Science.gov

Sample records for 3d interactive visualizations

  1. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  2. Techniques for interactive 3-D scientific visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Glinert, E.P. . Dept. of Computer Science); Blattner, M.M. Hospital and Tumor Inst., Houston, TX . Dept. of Biomathematics California Univ., Davis, CA . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Becker, B.G. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National La

    1990-09-24

    Interest in interactive 3-D graphics has exploded of late, fueled by (a) the allure of using scientific visualization to go where no-one has gone before'' and (b) by the development of new input devices which overcome some of the limitations imposed in the past by technology, yet which may be ill-suited to the kinds of interaction required by researchers active in scientific visualization. To resolve this tension, we propose a flat 5-D'' environment in which 2-D graphics are augmented by exploiting multiple human sensory modalities using cheap, conventional hardware readily available with personal computers and workstations. We discuss how interactions basic to 3-D scientific visualization, like searching a solution space and comparing two such spaces, are effectively carried out in our environment. Finally, we describe 3DMOVE, an experimental microworld we have implemented to test out some of our ideas. 40 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Glnemo2: Interactive Visualization 3D Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Jean-Charles

    2011-10-01

    Glnemo2 is an interactive 3D visualization program developed in C++ using the OpenGL library and Nokia QT 4.X API. It displays in 3D the particles positions of the different components of an nbody snapshot. It quickly gives a lot of information about the data (shape, density area, formation of structures such as spirals, bars, or peanuts). It allows for in/out zooms, rotations, changes of scale, translations, selection of different groups of particles and plots in different blending colors. It can color particles according to their density or temperature, play with the density threshold, trace orbits, display different time steps, take automatic screenshots to make movies, select particles using the mouse, and fly over a simulation using a given camera path. All these features are accessible from a very intuitive graphic user interface. Glnemo2 supports a wide range of input file formats (Nemo, Gadget 1 and 2, phiGrape, Ramses, list of files, realtime gyrfalcON simulation) which are automatically detected at loading time without user intervention. Glnemo2 uses a plugin mechanism to load the data, so that it is easy to add a new file reader. It's powered by a 3D engine which uses the latest OpenGL technology, such as shaders (glsl), vertex buffer object, frame buffer object, and takes in account the power of the graphic card used in order to accelerate the rendering. With a fast GPU, millions of particles can be rendered in real time. Glnemo2 runs on Linux, Windows (using minGW compiler), and MaxOSX, thanks to the QT4API.

  4. Interactive 3D visualization speeds well, reservoir planning

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1997-11-24

    Texaco Exploration and Production has begun making expeditious analyses and drilling decisions that result from interactive, large screen visualization of seismic and other three dimensional data. A pumpkin shaped room or pod inside a 3,500 sq ft, state-of-the-art facility in Southwest Houston houses a supercomputer and projection equipment Texaco said will help its people sharply reduce 3D seismic project cycle time, boost production from existing fields, and find more reserves. Oil and gas related applications of the visualization center include reservoir engineering, plant walkthrough simulation for facilities/piping design, and new field exploration. The center houses a Silicon Graphics Onyx2 infinite reality supercomputer configured with 8 processors, 3 graphics pipelines, and 6 gigabytes of main memory.

  5. Met.3D - a new open-source tool for interactive 3D visualization of ensemble weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, Marc; Kern, Michael; Schäfler, Andreas; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2015-04-01

    We introduce Met.3D, a new open-source tool for the interactive 3D visualization of numerical ensemble weather predictions. The tool has been developed to support weather forecasting during aircraft-based atmospheric field campaigns, however, is applicable to further forecasting, research and teaching activities. Our work approaches challenging topics related to the visual analysis of numerical atmospheric model output -- 3D visualisation, ensemble visualization, and how both can be used in a meaningful way suited to weather forecasting. Met.3D builds a bridge from proven 2D visualization methods commonly used in meteorology to 3D visualization by combining both visualization types in a 3D context. It implements methods that address the issue of spatial perception in the 3D view as well as approaches to using the ensemble in order to assess forecast uncertainty. Interactivity is key to the Met.3D approach. The tool uses modern graphics hardware technology to achieve interactive visualization of present-day numerical weather prediction datasets on standard consumer hardware. Met.3D supports forecast data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts and operates directly on ECMWF hybrid sigma-pressure level grids. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the software --illustrated with short video examples--, and give information on its availability.

  6. NASA VERVE: Interactive 3D Visualization Within Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Tamar; Allan, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    At NASA, we develop myriad Eclipse RCP applications to provide situational awareness for remote systems. The Intelligent Robotics Group at NASA Ames Research Center has developed VERVE - a high-performance, robot user interface that provides scientists, robot operators, and mission planners with powerful, interactive 3D displays of remote environments.VERVE includes a 3D Eclipse view with an embedded Java Ardor3D scenario, including SWT and mouse controls which interact with the Ardor3D camera and objects in the scene. VERVE also includes Eclipse views for exploring and editing objects in the Ardor3D scene graph, and a HUD (Heads Up Display) framework allows Growl-style notifications and other textual information to be overlayed onto the 3D scene. We use VERVE to listen to telemetry from robots and display the robots and associated scientific data along the terrain they are exploring; VERVE can be used for any interactive 3D display of data.VERVE is now open source. VERVE derives from the prior Viz system, which was developed for Mars Polar Lander (2001) and used for the Mars Exploration Rover (2003) and the Phoenix Lander (2008). It has been used for ongoing research with IRG's K10 and KRex rovers in various locations. VERVE was used on the International Space Station during two experiments in 2013 - Surface Telerobotics, in which astronauts controlled robots on Earth from the ISS, and SPHERES, where astronauts control a free flying robot on board the ISS.We will show in detail how to code with VERVE, how to interact between SWT controls to the Ardor3D scenario, and share example code.

  7. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  8. Hardware-accelerated autostereogram rendering for interactive 3D visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petz, Christoph; Goldluecke, Bastian; Magnor, Marcus

    2003-05-01

    Single Image Random Dot Stereograms (SIRDS) are an attractive way of depicting three-dimensional objects using conventional display technology. Once trained in decoupling the eyes' convergence and focusing, autostereograms of this kind are able to convey the three-dimensional impression of a scene. We present in this work an algorithm that generates SIRDS at interactive frame rates on a conventional PC. The presented system allows rotating a 3D geometry model and observing the object from arbitrary positions in real-time. Subjective tests show that the perception of a moving or rotating 3D scene presents no problem: The gaze remains focused onto the object. In contrast to conventional SIRDS algorithms, we render multiple pixels in a single step using a texture-based approach, exploiting the parallel-processing architecture of modern graphics hardware. A vertex program determines the parallax for each vertex of the geometry model, and the graphics hardware's texture unit is used to render the dot pattern. No data has to be transferred between main memory and the graphics card for generating the autostereograms, leaving CPU capacity available for other tasks. Frame rates of 25 fps are attained at a resolution of 1024x512 pixels on a standard PC using a consumer-grade nVidia GeForce4 graphics card, demonstrating the real-time capability of the system.

  9. Visualizing the process of interaction in a 3D environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Vivek; Suryanarayanan, Srikanth; Krishnan, Kajoli; Mullick, Rakesh

    2007-03-01

    As the imaging modalities used in medicine transition to increasingly three-dimensional data the question of how best to interact with and analyze this data becomes ever more pressing. Immersive virtual reality systems seem to hold promise in tackling this, but how individuals learn and interact in these environments is not fully understood. Here we will attempt to show some methods in which user interaction in a virtual reality environment can be visualized and how this can allow us to gain greater insight into the process of interaction/learning in these systems. Also explored is the possibility of using this method to improve understanding and management of ergonomic issues within an interface.

  10. The role of 3-D interactive visualization in blind surveys of H I in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punzo, D.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Roerdink, J. B. T. M.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Ramatsoku, M.; Verheijen, M. A. W.

    2015-09-01

    Upcoming H I surveys will deliver large datasets, and automated processing using the full 3-D information (two positional dimensions and one spectral dimension) to find and characterize H I objects is imperative. In this context, visualization is an essential tool for enabling qualitative and quantitative human control on an automated source finding and analysis pipeline. We discuss how Visual Analytics, the combination of automated data processing and human reasoning, creativity and intuition, supported by interactive visualization, enables flexible and fast interaction with the 3-D data, helping the astronomer to deal with the analysis of complex sources. 3-D visualization, coupled to modeling, provides additional capabilities helping the discovery and analysis of subtle structures in the 3-D domain. The requirements for a fully interactive visualization tool are: coupled 1-D/2-D/3-D visualization, quantitative and comparative capabilities, combined with supervised semi-automated analysis. Moreover, the source code must have the following characteristics for enabling collaborative work: open, modular, well documented, and well maintained. We review four state of-the-art, 3-D visualization packages assessing their capabilities and feasibility for use in the case of 3-D astronomical data.

  11. Development of 3D interactive visual objects using the Scripps Institution of Oceanography's Visualization Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilb, D.; Reif, C.; Peach, C.; Keen, C. S.; Smith, B.; Mellors, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    Within the last year scientists and educators at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), the Birch Aquarium at Scripps and San Diego State University have collaborated with education specialists to develop 3D interactive graphic teaching modules for use in the classroom and in teacher workshops at the SIO Visualization center (http://siovizcenter.ucsd.edu). The unique aspect of the SIO Visualization center is that the center is designed around a 120 degree curved Panoram floor-to-ceiling screen (8'6" by 28'4") that immerses viewers in a virtual environment. The center is powered by an SGI 3400 Onyx computer that is more powerful, by an order of magnitude in both speed and memory, than typical base systems currently used for education and outreach presentations. This technology allows us to display multiple 3D data layers (e.g., seismicity, high resolution topography, seismic reflectivity, draped interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images, etc.) simultaneously, render them in 3D stereo, and take a virtual flight through the data as dictated on the spot by the user. This system can also render snapshots, images and movies that are too big for other systems, and then export smaller size end-products to more commonly used computer systems. Since early 2002, we have explored various ways to provide informal education and outreach focusing on current research presented directly by the researchers doing the work. The Center currently provides a centerpiece for instruction on southern California seismology for K-12 students and teachers for various Scripps education endeavors. Future plans are in place to use the Visualization Center at Scripps for extended K-12 and college educational programs. In particular, we will be identifying K-12 curriculum needs, assisting with teacher education, developing assessments of our programs and products, producing web-accessible teaching modules and facilitating the development of appropriate teaching tools to be

  12. The Impact of Interactivity on Comprehending 2D and 3D Visualizations of Movement Data.

    PubMed

    Amini, Fereshteh; Rufiange, Sebastien; Hossain, Zahid; Ventura, Quentin; Irani, Pourang; McGuffin, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    GPS, RFID, and other technologies have made it increasingly common to track the positions of people and objects over time as they move through two-dimensional spaces. Visualizing such spatio-temporal movement data is challenging because each person or object involves three variables (two spatial variables as a function of the time variable), and simply plotting the data on a 2D geographic map can result in overplotting and occlusion that hides details. This also makes it difficult to understand correlations between space and time. Software such as GeoTime can display such data with a three-dimensional visualization, where the 3rd dimension is used for time. This allows for the disambiguation of spatially overlapping trajectories, and in theory, should make the data clearer. However, previous experimental comparisons of 2D and 3D visualizations have so far found little advantage in 3D visualizations, possibly due to the increased complexity of navigating and understanding a 3D view. We present a new controlled experimental comparison of 2D and 3D visualizations, involving commonly performed tasks that have not been tested before, and find advantages in 3D visualizations for more complex tasks. In particular, we tease out the effects of various basic interactions and find that the 2D view relies significantly on "scrubbing" the timeline, whereas the 3D view relies mainly on 3D camera navigation. Our work helps to improve understanding of 2D and 3D visualizations of spatio-temporal data, particularly with respect to interactivity.

  13. A lightweight tangible 3D interface for interactive visualization of thin fiber structures.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Bret; Lau, Tung Yuen; Schroeder, David; Toussaint, Kimani C; Keefe, Daniel F

    2013-12-01

    We present a prop-based, tangible interface for 3D interactive visualization of thin fiber structures. These data are commonly found in current bioimaging datasets, for example second-harmonic generation microscopy of collagen fibers in tissue. Our approach uses commodity visualization technologies such as a depth sensing camera and low-cost 3D display. Unlike most current uses of these emerging technologies in the games and graphics communities, we employ the depth sensing camera to create a fish-tank stereoscopic virtual reality system at the scientist's desk that supports tracking of small-scale gestures with objects already found in the work space. We apply the new interface to the problem of interactive exploratory visualization of three-dimensional thin fiber data. A critical task for the visual analysis of these data is understanding patterns in fiber orientation throughout a volume.The interface enables a new, fluid style of data exploration and fiber orientation analysis by using props to provide needed passive-haptic feedback, making 3D interactions with these fiber structures more controlled. We also contribute a low-level algorithm for extracting fiber centerlines from volumetric imaging. The system was designed and evaluated with two biophotonic experts who currently use it in their lab. As compared to typical practice within their field, the new visualization system provides a more effective way to examine and understand the 3D bioimaging datasets they collect.

  14. Role of Interaction in Enhancing the Epistemic Utility of 3D Mathematical Visualizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Hai-Ning; Sedig, Kamran

    2010-01-01

    Many epistemic activities, such as spatial reasoning, sense-making, problem solving, and learning, are information-based. In the context of epistemic activities involving mathematical information, learners often use interactive 3D mathematical visualizations (MVs). However, performing such activities is not always easy. Although it is generally…

  15. Web Based Interactive Anaglyph Stereo Visualization of 3D Model of Geoscience Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, J.

    2014-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to create interactive online tool for generating and viewing the anaglyph 3D stereo image on a Web browser via Internet. To achieve this, we designed and developed the prototype system. Three-dimensional visualization is well known and becoming popular in recent years to understand the target object and the related physical phenomena. Geoscience data have the complex data model, which combines large extents with rich small scale visual details. So, the real-time visualization of 3D geoscience data model on the Internet is a challenging work. In this paper, we show the result of creating which can be viewed in 3D anaglyph of geoscience data in any web browser which supports WebGL. We developed an anaglyph image viewing prototype system, and some representative results are displayed by anaglyph 3D stereo image generated in red-cyan colour from pairs of air-photo/digital elevation model and geological map/digital elevation model respectively. The best viewing is achieved by using suitable 3D red-cyan glasses, although alternatively red-blue or red-green spectacles can be also used. The middle mouse wheel can be used to zoom in/out the anaglyph image on a Web browser. Application of anaglyph 3D stereo image is a very important and easy way to understand the underground geologic system and active tectonic geomorphology. The integrated strata with fine three-dimensional topography and geologic map data can help to characterise the mineral potential area and the active tectonic abnormal characteristics. To conclude, it can be stated that anaglyph 3D stereo image provides a simple and feasible method to improve the relief effect of geoscience data such as geomorphology and geology. We believe that with further development, the anaglyph 3D stereo imaging system could as a complement to 3D geologic modeling, constitute a useful tool for better understanding of the underground geology and the active tectonic

  16. Employing WebGL to develop interactive stereoscopic 3D content for use in biomedical visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Semay; Renambot, Luc; Sauter, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Web Graphics Library (WebGL), the forthcoming web standard for rendering native 3D graphics in a browser, represents an important addition to the biomedical visualization toolset. It is projected to become a mainstream method of delivering 3D online content due to shrinking support for third-party plug-ins. Additionally, it provides a virtual reality (VR) experience to web users accommodated by the growing availability of stereoscopic displays (3D TV, desktop, and mobile). WebGL's value in biomedical visualization has been demonstrated by applications for interactive anatomical models, chemical and molecular visualization, and web-based volume rendering. However, a lack of instructional literature specific to the field prevents many from utilizing this technology. This project defines a WebGL design methodology for a target audience of biomedical artists with a basic understanding of web languages and 3D graphics. The methodology was informed by the development of an interactive web application depicting the anatomy and various pathologies of the human eye. The application supports several modes of stereoscopic displays for a better understanding of 3D anatomical structures.

  17. MEVA - An Interactive Visualization Application for Validation of Multifaceted Meteorological Data with Multiple 3D Devices

    PubMed Central

    Helbig, Carolin; Bilke, Lars; Bauer, Hans-Stefan; Böttinger, Michael; Kolditz, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Background To achieve more realistic simulations, meteorologists develop and use models with increasing spatial and temporal resolution. The analyzing, comparing, and visualizing of resulting simulations becomes more and more challenging due to the growing amounts and multifaceted character of the data. Various data sources, numerous variables and multiple simulations lead to a complex database. Although a variety of software exists suited for the visualization of meteorological data, none of them fulfills all of the typical domain-specific requirements: support for quasi-standard data formats and different grid types, standard visualization techniques for scalar and vector data, visualization of the context (e.g., topography) and other static data, support for multiple presentation devices used in modern sciences (e.g., virtual reality), a user-friendly interface, and suitability for cooperative work. Methods and Results Instead of attempting to develop yet another new visualization system to fulfill all possible needs in this application domain, our approach is to provide a flexible workflow that combines different existing state-of-the-art visualization software components in order to hide the complexity of 3D data visualization tools from the end user. To complete the workflow and to enable the domain scientists to interactively visualize their data without advanced skills in 3D visualization systems, we developed a lightweight custom visualization application (MEVA - multifaceted environmental data visualization application) that supports the most relevant visualization and interaction techniques and can be easily deployed. Specifically, our workflow combines a variety of different data abstraction methods provided by a state-of-the-art 3D visualization application with the interaction and presentation features of a computer-games engine. Our customized application includes solutions for the analysis of multirun data, specifically with respect to data

  18. Self-Discovery of Structural Geology Concepts using Interactive 3D Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billen, M. I.; Saunders, J.

    2010-12-01

    Mastering structural geology concepts that depend on understanding three-dimensional (3D) geometries and imagining relationships among unseen subsurface structures are fundamental skills for geologists. Traditionally these skills are developed first, through use of 2D drawings of 3D structures that can be difficult to decipher or 3D physical block models that show only a limited set of relationships on the surfaces of the blocks, followed by application and testing of concepts in field settings. We hypothesize that this learning process can be improved by providing repeated opportunities to evaluate and explore synthetic 3D structures using interactive 3D visualization software. We present laboratory modules designed for undergraduate structural geology curriculum using a self-discovery approach to teach concepts such as: the Rule of V’s, structure separation versus fault slip, and the more general dependence of structural exposure on surface topography. The laboratory modules are structured to allow students to discover and articulate each concept from observations of synthetic data both on traditional maps and using the volume visualization software 3DVisualizer. Modules lead students through exploration of data (e.g., a dipping layered structure exposed in ridge-valley topography or obliquely offset across a fault) by allowing them to interactively view (rotate, pan, zoom) the exposure of structures on topographic surfaces and to toggle on/off the full 3D structure as a transparent colored volume. This tool allows student to easily visually understand the relationships between, for example a dipping structure and its exposure on valley walls, as well as how the structure extends beneath the surface. Using this method gives students more opportunities to build a mental library of previously-seen relationships from which to draw-on when applying concepts in the field setting. These laboratory modules, the data and software are freely available from KeckCAVES.

  19. Comparison of User Performance with Interactive and Static 3d Visualization - Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, L.; Stachoň, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Interactive 3D visualizations of spatial data are currently available and popular through various applications such as Google Earth, ArcScene, etc. Several scientific studies have focused on user performance with 3D visualization, but static perspective views are used as stimuli in most of the studies. The main objective of this paper is to try to identify potential differences in user performance with static perspective views and interactive visualizations. This research is an exploratory study. An experiment was designed as a between-subject study and a customized testing tool based on open web technologies was used for the experiment. The testing set consists of an initial questionnaire, a training task and four experimental tasks. Selection of the highest point and determination of visibility from the top of a mountain were used as the experimental tasks. Speed and accuracy of each task performance of participants were recorded. The movement and actions in the virtual environment were also recorded within the interactive variant. The results show that participants deal with the tasks faster when using static visualization. The average error rate was also higher in the static variant. The findings from this pilot study will be used for further testing, especially for formulating of hypotheses and designing of subsequent experiments.

  20. Interactive Visualization of 3-D Mantle Convection Extended Through AJAX Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLane, J. C.; Czech, W.; Yuen, D.; Greensky, J.; Knox, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    We have designed a new software system for real-time interactive visualization of results taken directly from large-scale simulations of 3-D mantle convection and other large-scale simulations. This approach allows for intense visualization sessions for a couple of hours as opposed to storing massive amounts of data in a storage system. Our data sets consist of 3-D data for volume rendering with over 10 million unknowns at each timestep. Large scale visualization on a display wall holding around 13 million pixels has already been accomplished with extension to hand-held devices, such as the OQO and Nokia N800 and recently the iPHONE. We are developing web-based software in Java to extend the use of this system across long distances. The software is aimed at creating an interactive and functional application capable of running on multiple browsers by taking advantage of two AJAX-enabled web frameworks: Echo2 and Google Web Toolkit. The software runs in two modes allowing for a user to control an interactive session or observe a session controlled by another user. Modular build of the system allows for components to be swapped out for new components so that other forms of visualization could be accommodated such as Molecular Dynamics in mineral physics or 2-D data sets from lithospheric regional models.

  1. Touch Interaction with 3D Geographical Visualization on Web: Selected Technological and User Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, L.; Stachoň, Z.; Stuchlík, R.; Hladík, J.; Kubíček, P.

    2016-10-01

    The use of both 3D visualization and devices with touch displays is increasing. In this paper, we focused on the Web technologies for 3D visualization of spatial data and its interaction via touch screen gestures. At the first stage, we compared the support of touch interaction in selected JavaScript libraries on different hardware (desktop PCs with touch screens, tablets, and smartphones) and software platforms. Afterward, we realized simple empiric test (within-subject design, 6 participants, 2 simple tasks, LCD touch monitor Acer and digital terrain models as stimuli) focusing on the ability of users to solve simple spatial tasks via touch screens. An in-house testing web tool was developed and used based on JavaScript, PHP, and X3DOM languages and Hammer.js libraries. The correctness of answers, speed of users' performances, used gestures, and a simple gesture metric was recorded and analysed. Preliminary results revealed that the pan gesture is most frequently used by test participants and it is also supported by the majority of 3D libraries. Possible gesture metrics and future developments including the interpersonal differences are discussed in the conclusion.

  2. Interactive 3D Visualization of Humboldt Bay Bridge Earthquake Simulation With High Definition Stereo Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, P. B.; Nayak, A.; Yan, J.; Elgamal, A.

    2006-12-01

    This visualization project involves the study of the Humboldt Bay Middle Channel Bridge, a Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research (PEER) testbed site, subjected to an earthquake simulated by the Department of Structural Engineering, UCSD. The numerical simulation and data generation was carried out using the OpenSees finite element analysis platform, and GiD was employed for the mesh generation in preprocessing. In collaboration with the Scripps Visualization Center, the data was transformed into a virtual 3D world that a viewer could rotate around, zoom into, pan about, step through each timestep or examine in true stereo. The data consists of the static mesh of the bridge-foundation-ground elements, material indices for each type of element, the displacement amount of each element nodes over time, and the shear stress levels for each ground element over time. The Coin3D C++ Open Inventor API was used to parse the data and to render the bridge system in full 3D at 1130 individual time steps to show how the bridge structure and the surrounding soil elements interact during the full course of an earthquake. The results can be viewed interactively while using the program, saved as images and processed into animated movies, in resolutions as high as High Definition (1920x1080), or in stereo modes such as red-blue anaglyph.

  3. Open source 3D visualization and interaction dedicated to hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Julien; Giangola-Murzyn, Agathe; Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Climate change and surface urbanization strongly modify the hydrological cycle in urban areas, increasing the consequences of extreme events such as floods or draughts. These issues lead to the development of the Multi-Hydro model at the Ecole des Ponts ParisTech (A. Giangola-Murzyn et al., 2012). This fully distributed model allows to compute the hydrological response of urban and peri-urban areas. Unfortunately such models are seldom user friendly. Indeed generating the inputs before launching a new simulation is usually a tricky tasks, and understanding and interpreting the outputs remains specialist tasks not accessible to the wider public. The MH-AssimTool was developed to overcome these issues. To enable an easier and improved understanding of the model outputs, we decided to convert the raw output data (grids file in ascii format) to a 3D display. Some commercial paying models provide a 3D visualization. Because of the cost of their licenses, this kind of tools may not be accessible to the most concerned stakeholders. So, we are developing a new tool based on C++ for the computation, Qt for the graphic user interface, QGIS for the geographical side and OpenGL for the 3D display. All these languages and libraries are open source and multi-platform. We will discuss some preprocessing issues for the data conversion from 2.5D to 3D. Indeed, the GIS data, is considered as a 2.5D (e.i. 2D polygon + one height) and the its transform to 3D display implies a lot of algorithms. For example,to visualize in 3D one building, it is needed to have for each point the coordinates and the elevation according to the topography. Furthermore one have to create new points to represent the walls. Finally the interactions between the model and stakeholders through this new interface and how this helps converting a research tool into a an efficient operational decision tool will be discussed. This ongoing research on the improvement of the visualization methods is supported by the

  4. Virtual reality hardware for use in interactive 3D data fusion and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Christopher S.; Abidi, Mongi A.

    1997-09-01

    Virtual reality has become a tool for use in many areas of research. We have designed and built a VR system for use in range data fusion and visualization. One major VR tool is the CAVE. This is the ultimate visualization tool, but comes with a large price tag. Our design uses a unique CAVE whose graphics are powered by a desktop computer instead of a larger rack machine making it much less costly. The system consists of a screen eight feet tall by twenty-seven feet wide giving a variable field-of-view currently set at 160 degrees. A silicon graphics Indigo2 MaxImpact with the impact channel option is used for display. This gives the capability to drive three projectors at a resolution of 640 by 480 for use in displaying the virtual environment and one 640 by 480 display for a user control interface. This machine is also the first desktop package which has built-in hardware texture mapping. This feature allows us to quickly fuse the range and intensity data and other multi-sensory data. The final goal is a complete 3D texture mapped model of the environment. A dataglove, magnetic tracker, and spaceball are to be used for manipulation of the data and navigation through the virtual environment. This system gives several users the ability to interactively create 3D models from multiple range images.

  5. Towards a gestural 3D interaction for tangible and three-dimensional GIS visualizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partsinevelos, Panagiotis; Agadakos, Ioannis; Pattakos, Nikolas; Maragakis, Michail

    2014-05-01

    The last decade has been characterized by a significant increase of spatially dependent applications that require storage, visualization, analysis and exploration of geographic information. GIS analysis of spatiotemporal geographic data is operated by highly trained personnel under an abundance of software and tools, lacking interoperability and friendly user interaction. Towards this end, new forms of querying and interaction are emerging, including gestural interfaces. Three-dimensional GIS representations refer to either tangible surfaces or projected representations. Making a 3D tangible geographic representation touch-sensitive may be a convenient solution, but such an approach raises the cost significantly and complicates the hardware and processing required to combine touch-sensitive material (for pinpointing points) with deformable material (for displaying elevations). In this study, a novel interaction scheme upon a three dimensional visualization of GIS data is proposed. While gesture user interfaces are not yet fully acceptable due to inconsistencies and complexity, a non-tangible GIS system where 3D visualizations are projected, calls for interactions that are based on three-dimensional, non-contact and gestural procedures. Towards these objectives, we use the Microsoft Kinect II system which includes a time of flight camera, allowing for a robust and real time depth map generation, along with the capturing and translation of a variety of predefined gestures from different simultaneous users. By incorporating these features into our system architecture, we attempt to create a natural way for users to operate on GIS data. Apart from the conventional pan and zoom features, the key functions addressed for the 3-D user interface is the ability to pinpoint particular points, lines and areas of interest, such as destinations, waypoints, landmarks, closed areas, etc. The first results shown, concern a projected GIS representation where the user selects points

  6. Earthscape, a Multi-Purpose Interactive 3d Globe Viewer for Hybrid Data Visualization and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarthou, A.; Mas, S.; Jacquin, M.; Moreno, N.; Salamon, A.

    2015-08-01

    The hybrid visualization and interaction tool EarthScape is presented here. The software is able to display simultaneously LiDAR point clouds, draped videos with moving footprint, volume scientific data (using volume rendering, isosurface and slice plane), raster data such as still satellite images, vector data and 3D models such as buildings or vehicles. The application runs on touch screen devices such as tablets. The software is based on open source libraries, such as OpenSceneGraph, osgEarth and OpenCV, and shader programming is used to implement volume rendering of scientific data. The next goal of EarthScape is to perform data analysis using ENVI Services Engine, a cloud data analysis solution. EarthScape is also designed to be a client of Jagwire which provides multisource geo-referenced video fluxes. When all these components will be included, EarthScape will be a multi-purpose platform that will provide at the same time data analysis, hybrid visualization and complex interactions. The software is available on demand for free at france@exelisvis.com.

  7. Art-Science-Technology collaboration through immersive, interactive 3D visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, L. H.

    2014-12-01

    At the W. M. Keck Center for Active Visualization in Earth Sciences (KeckCAVES), a group of geoscientists and computer scientists collaborate to develop and use of interactive, immersive, 3D visualization technology to view, manipulate, and interpret data for scientific research. The visual impact of immersion in a CAVE environment can be extremely compelling, and from the outset KeckCAVES scientists have collaborated with artists to bring this technology to creative works, including theater and dance performance, installations, and gamification. The first full-fledged collaboration designed and produced a performance called "Collapse: Suddenly falling down", choreographed by Della Davidson, which investigated the human and cultural response to natural and man-made disasters. Scientific data (lidar scans of disaster sites, such as landslides and mine collapses) were fully integrated into the performance by the Sideshow Physical Theatre. This presentation will discuss both the technological and creative characteristics of, and lessons learned from the collaboration. Many parallels between the artistic and scientific process emerged. We observed that both artists and scientists set out to investigate a topic, solve a problem, or answer a question. Refining that question or problem is an essential part of both the creative and scientific workflow. Both artists and scientists seek understanding (in this case understanding of natural disasters). Differences also emerged; the group noted that the scientists sought clarity (including but not limited to quantitative measurements) as a means to understanding, while the artists embraced ambiguity, also as a means to understanding. Subsequent art-science-technology collaborations have responded to evolving technology for visualization and include gamification as a means to explore data, and use of augmented reality for informal learning in museum settings.

  8. 3D imaging of microbial biofilms: integration of synchrotron imaging and an interactive visualization interface.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mathew; Marshall, Matthew J; Miller, Erin A; Kuprat, Andrew P; Kleese-van Dam, Kerstin; Carson, James P

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the structure of microbial biofilms and other complex microbial communities is now possible through x-ray microtomography imaging. Feature detection and image processing for this type of data focuses on efficiently identifying and segmenting biofilm biomass in the datasets. These datasets are very large and segmentation often requires manual interventions due to low contrast between objects and high noise levels. New software is required for the effectual interpretation and analysis of such data. This work specifies the evolution and ability to analyze and visualize high resolution x-ray microtomography datasets. Major functionalities include read/write with multiple popular file formats, down-sampling large datasets to generate quick-views on low-power computers, image processing, and generating high quality output images and videos. These capabilities have been wrapped into a new interactive software toolkit, BiofilmViewer. A major focus of our work is to facilitate data transfer and to utilize the capabilities of existing powerful visualization and analytical tools including MATLAB, ImageJ, Paraview, Chimera, Vaa3D, Cell Profiler, Icy, BioImageXD, and Drishti.

  9. Interactive 3D Visualization: An Important Element in Dealing with Increasing Data Volumes and Decreasing Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, L.; Reed, B.; Mayer, L.

    2002-12-01

    Recent years have seen remarkable advances in sonar technology, positioning capabilities, and computer processing power that have revolutionized the way we image the seafloor. The US Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) has updated its survey vessels and launches to the latest generation of technology and now possesses a tremendous ocean observing and mapping capability. However, the systems produce massive amounts of data that must be validated prior to inclusion in various bathymetry, hydrography, and imagery products. The key to meeting the challenge of the massive data volumes was to change the approach that required every data point be viewed. This was achieved with the replacement of the traditional line-by-line editing approach with an automated cleaning module, and an area-based editor. The approach includes a unique data structure that enables the direct access to the full resolution data from the area based view, including a direct interface to target files and imagery snippets from mosaic and full resolution imagery. The increased data volumes to be processed also offered tremendous opportunities in terms of visualization and analysis, and interactive 3D presentation of the complex multi-attribute data provided a natural complement to the area based processing. If properly geo-referenced and treated, the complex data sets can be presented in a natural and intuitive manner that allows the integration of multiple components each at their inherent level of resolution and without compromising the quantitative nature of the data. Artificial sun-illumination, shading, and 3-D rendering are used with digital bathymetric data to form natural looking and easily interpretable, yet quantitative, landscapes that allow the user to rapidly identify the data requiring further processing or analysis. Color can be used to represent depth or other parameters (like backscatter, quality factors or sediment properties), which can be draped over the DTM, or high resolution

  10. Web-Based Interactive 3D Visualization as a Tool for Improved Anatomy Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersson, Helge; Sinkvist, David; Wang, Chunliang; Smedby, Orjan

    2009-01-01

    Despite a long tradition, conventional anatomy education based on dissection is declining. This study tested a new virtual reality (VR) technique for anatomy learning based on virtual contrast injection. The aim was to assess whether students value this new three-dimensional (3D) visualization method as a learning tool and what value they gain…

  11. TRAIL protein localization in human primary T cells by 3D microscopy using 3D interactive surface plot: a new method to visualize plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Gras, Christophe; Smith, Nikaïa; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Gandini, Mariana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-31

    The apoptotic ligand TNF-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL) is expressed on the membrane of immune cells during HIV infection. The intracellular stockade of TRAIL in human primary CD4(+) T cells is not known. Here we investigated whether primary CD4(+) T cells expressed TRAIL in their intracellular compartment and whether TRAIL is relocalized on the plasma membrane under HIV activation. We found that TRAIL protein was stocked in intracellular compartment in non activated CD4(+) T cells and that the total level of TRAIL protein was not increased under HIV-1 stimulation. However, TRAIL was massively relocalized on plasma membrane when cells were cultured with HIV. Using three dimensional (3D) microscopy we localized TRAIL protein in human T cells and developed a new method to visualize plasma membrane without the need of a membrane marker. This method used the 3D interactive surface plot and bright light acquired images. PMID:23085529

  12. TRAIL protein localization in human primary T cells by 3D microscopy using 3D interactive surface plot: a new method to visualize plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Gras, Christophe; Smith, Nikaïa; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Gandini, Mariana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-31

    The apoptotic ligand TNF-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL) is expressed on the membrane of immune cells during HIV infection. The intracellular stockade of TRAIL in human primary CD4(+) T cells is not known. Here we investigated whether primary CD4(+) T cells expressed TRAIL in their intracellular compartment and whether TRAIL is relocalized on the plasma membrane under HIV activation. We found that TRAIL protein was stocked in intracellular compartment in non activated CD4(+) T cells and that the total level of TRAIL protein was not increased under HIV-1 stimulation. However, TRAIL was massively relocalized on plasma membrane when cells were cultured with HIV. Using three dimensional (3D) microscopy we localized TRAIL protein in human T cells and developed a new method to visualize plasma membrane without the need of a membrane marker. This method used the 3D interactive surface plot and bright light acquired images.

  13. Interactive 3D Visualization of the Great Lakes of the World (GLOW) as a Tool to Facilitate Informal Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yikilmaz, M.; Harwood, C. L.; Hsi, S.; Kellogg, L. H.; Kreylos, O.; McDermott, J.; Pellett, B.; Schladow, G.; Segale, H. M.; Yalowitz, S.

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) visualization is a powerful research tool that has been used to investigate complex scientific problems in various fields. It allows researchers to explore and understand processes and features that are not directly observable and help with building of new models. It has been shown that 3D visualization creates a more engaging environment for public audiences. Interactive 3D visualization can allow individuals to explore scientific concepts on their own. We present an NSF funded project developed in collaboration with UC Davis KeckCAVES, UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center, ECHO Lake Aquarium & Science Center, and Lawrence Hall of Science. The Great Lakes of the World (GLOW) project aims to build interactive 3D visualization of some of the major lakes and reservoirs of the world to enhance public awareness and increase understanding and stewardship of freshwater lake ecosystems, habitats, and earth science processes. The project includes a collection of publicly available satellite imagery and digital elevation models at various resolutions for the 20 major lakes of the world as well as the bathymetry data for the 12 lakes. It also includes the vector based 'Global Lakes and Wetlands Database (GLWD)' by the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF) and the Center for Environmental System Research University of Kassel, Germany and the CIA World DataBank II data sets to show wetlands and water reservoirs at global scale. We use a custom virtual globe (Crusta) developed at the UC Davis KeckCAVES. Crusta is designed to specifically allow for visualization and mapping of features in very high spatial resolution (< 1m) and large extent (1000's of km2) raster imagery and topographic data. In addition to imagery, a set of pins, labels and billboards are used to provide textual information about these lakes. Users can interactively learn about the lake and watershed processes as well as geologic processes (e.g. faulting, landslide, glacial, volcanic

  14. An interactive 3D visualization and manipulation tool for effective assessment of angiogenesis and arteriogenesis using computed tomographic angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Li; Gao, Ling; Zhuang, Zhenwu; DeMuinck, Ebo; Huang, Heng; Makedon, Fillia; Pearlman, Justin

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents IVM, an Interactive Vessel Manipulation tool that can help make effective and efficient assessment of angiogenesis and arteriogenesis in computed tomographic angiography (CTA) studies. IVM consists of three fundamental components: (1) a visualization component, (2) a tracing component, and (3) a measurement component. Given a user-specified threshold, IVM can create a 3D surface visualization based on it. Since vessels are thin and tubular structures, using standard isosurface extraction techniques usually cannot yield satisfactory reconstructions. Instead, IVM directly renders the surface of a derived binary 3D image. The image volumes collected in CTA studies often have a relatively high resolution. Thus, compared with more complicated vessel extraction and visualization techniques, rendering the binary image surface has the advantages of being effective, simple and fast. IVM employs a semi-automatic approach to determine the threshold: a user can adjust the threshold by checking the corresponding 3D surface reconstruction and make the choice. Typical tracing software often defines ROIs on 3D image volumes using three orthogonal views. The tracing component in IVM takes one step further: it can perform tracing not only on image slices but also in a 3D view. We observe that directly operating on a 3D view can help a tracer identify ROIs more easily. After setting a threshold and tracing an ROI, a user can use IVM's measurement component to estimate the volume and other parameters of vessels in the ROI. The effectiveness of the IVM tool is demonstrated on rat vessel/bone images collected in a previous CTA study.

  15. 3D Imaging of Microbial Biofilms: Integration of Synchrotron Imaging and an Interactive Visualization Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Mathew; Marshall, Matthew J.; Miller, Erin A.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Carson, James P.

    2014-08-26

    Understanding the interactions of structured communities known as “biofilms” and other complex matrixes is possible through the X-ray micro tomography imaging of the biofilms. Feature detection and image processing for this type of data focuses on efficiently identifying and segmenting biofilms and bacteria in the datasets. The datasets are very large and often require manual interventions due to low contrast between objects and high noise levels. Thus new software is required for the effectual interpretation and analysis of the data. This work specifies the evolution and application of the ability to analyze and visualize high resolution X-ray micro tomography datasets.

  16. 3D Visualization Development of SIUE Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellutla, Shravya

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has progressed from the traditional map-making to the modern technology where the information can be created, edited, managed and analyzed. Like any other models, maps are simplified representations of real world. Hence visualization plays an essential role in the applications of GIS. The use of sophisticated visualization tools and methods, especially three dimensional (3D) modeling, has been rising considerably due to the advancement of technology. There are currently many off-the-shelf technologies available in the market to build 3D GIS models. One of the objectives of this research was to examine the available ArcGIS and its extensions for 3D modeling and visualization and use them to depict a real world scenario. Furthermore, with the advent of the web, a platform for accessing and sharing spatial information on the Internet, it is possible to generate interactive online maps. Integrating Internet capacity with GIS functionality redefines the process of sharing and processing the spatial information. Enabling a 3D map online requires off-the-shelf GIS software, 3D model builders, web server, web applications and client server technologies. Such environments are either complicated or expensive because of the amount of hardware and software involved. Therefore, the second objective of this research was to investigate and develop simpler yet cost-effective 3D modeling approach that uses available ArcGIS suite products and the free 3D computer graphics software for designing 3D world scenes. Both ArcGIS Explorer and ArcGIS Online will be used to demonstrate the way of sharing and distributing 3D geographic information on the Internet. A case study of the development of 3D campus for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is demonstrated.

  17. A Comprehensive Software System for Interactive, Real-time, Visual 3D Deterministic and Stochastic Groundwater Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.

    2002-05-01

    Taking advantage of the recent developments in groundwater modeling research and computer, image and graphics processing, and objected oriented programming technologies, Dr. Li and his research group have recently developed a comprehensive software system for unified deterministic and stochastic groundwater modeling. Characterized by a new real-time modeling paradigm and improved computational algorithms, the software simulates 3D unsteady flow and reactive transport in general groundwater formations subject to both systematic and "randomly" varying stresses and geological and chemical heterogeneity. The software system has following distinct features and capabilities: Interactive simulation and real time visualization and animation of flow in response to deterministic as well as stochastic stresses. Interactive, visual, and real time particle tracking, random walk, and reactive plume modeling in both systematically and randomly fluctuating flow. Interactive statistical inference, scattered data interpolation, regression, and ordinary and universal Kriging, conditional and unconditional simulation. Real-time, visual and parallel conditional flow and transport simulations. Interactive water and contaminant mass balance analysis and visual and real-time flux update. Interactive, visual, and real time monitoring of head and flux hydrographs and concentration breakthroughs. Real-time modeling and visualization of aquifer transition from confined to unconfined to partially de-saturated or completely dry and rewetting Simultaneous and embedded subscale models, automatic and real-time regional to local data extraction; Multiple subscale flow and transport models Real-time modeling of steady and transient vertical flow patterns on multiple arbitrarily-shaped cross-sections and simultaneous visualization of aquifer stratigraphy, properties, hydrological features (rivers, lakes, wetlands, wells, drains, surface seeps), and dynamically adjusted surface flooding area

  18. Glnemo2: An Interactive 3D Visualization Program for N-body Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, J. C.

    2012-09-01

    Glnemo2 aims at giving a new user experience to visualize the results of N-body simulations and a new approach in the analysis process. It is particularly timely, because astrophysicists have now access to a lot of computing power to run N-body simulations from single multi-processor machines up to small clusters.

  19. An Interactive Training Game Using 3D Sound for Visually Impaired People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hsiao Ping; Huang, Yen-Hsuan; Sheu, Tzu-Fang

    2013-01-01

    The number of visually impaired people is increasing year by year. Although attention has been given to the needs of people with disabilities, most of the discussion has focused on social welfare, while talk about assistive technology for people with disabilities is rare. The blind need training courses for reconstruction and rehabilitation.…

  20. A Real-Time Magnetoencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Using Interactive 3D Visualization and the Hadoop Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    McClay, Wilbert A; Yadav, Nancy; Ozbek, Yusuf; Haas, Andy; Attias, Hagaii T; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2015-09-30

    Ecumenically, the fastest growing segment of Big Data is human biology-related data and the annual data creation is on the order of zetabytes. The implications are global across industries, of which the treatment of brain related illnesses and trauma could see the most significant and immediate effects. The next generation of health care IT and sensory devices are acquiring and storing massive amounts of patient related data. An innovative Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) for interactive 3D visualization is presented utilizing the Hadoop Ecosystem for data analysis and storage. The BCI is an implementation of Bayesian factor analysis algorithms that can distinguish distinct thought actions using magneto encephalographic (MEG) brain signals. We have collected data on five subjects yielding 90% positive performance in MEG mid- and post-movement activity. We describe a driver that substitutes the actions of the BCI as mouse button presses for real-time use in visual simulations. This process has been added into a flight visualization demonstration. By thinking left or right, the user experiences the aircraft turning in the chosen direction. The driver components of the BCI can be compiled into any software and substitute a user's intent for specific keyboard strikes or mouse button presses. The BCI's data analytics OPEN ACCESS Brain. Sci. 2015, 5 420 of a subject's MEG brainwaves and flight visualization performance are stored and analyzed using the Hadoop Ecosystem as a quick retrieval data warehouse.

  1. A Real-Time Magnetoencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Using Interactive 3D Visualization and the Hadoop Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    McClay, Wilbert A; Yadav, Nancy; Ozbek, Yusuf; Haas, Andy; Attias, Hagaii T; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2015-01-01

    Ecumenically, the fastest growing segment of Big Data is human biology-related data and the annual data creation is on the order of zetabytes. The implications are global across industries, of which the treatment of brain related illnesses and trauma could see the most significant and immediate effects. The next generation of health care IT and sensory devices are acquiring and storing massive amounts of patient related data. An innovative Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) for interactive 3D visualization is presented utilizing the Hadoop Ecosystem for data analysis and storage. The BCI is an implementation of Bayesian factor analysis algorithms that can distinguish distinct thought actions using magneto encephalographic (MEG) brain signals. We have collected data on five subjects yielding 90% positive performance in MEG mid- and post-movement activity. We describe a driver that substitutes the actions of the BCI as mouse button presses for real-time use in visual simulations. This process has been added into a flight visualization demonstration. By thinking left or right, the user experiences the aircraft turning in the chosen direction. The driver components of the BCI can be compiled into any software and substitute a user's intent for specific keyboard strikes or mouse button presses. The BCI's data analytics OPEN ACCESS Brain. Sci. 2015, 5 420 of a subject's MEG brainwaves and flight visualization performance are stored and analyzed using the Hadoop Ecosystem as a quick retrieval data warehouse. PMID:26437432

  2. A Real-Time Magnetoencephalography Brain-Computer Interface Using Interactive 3D Visualization and the Hadoop Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Wilbert A.; Yadav, Nancy; Ozbek, Yusuf; Haas, Andy; Attias, Hagaii T.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2015-01-01

    Ecumenically, the fastest growing segment of Big Data is human biology-related data and the annual data creation is on the order of zetabytes. The implications are global across industries, of which the treatment of brain related illnesses and trauma could see the most significant and immediate effects. The next generation of health care IT and sensory devices are acquiring and storing massive amounts of patient related data. An innovative Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) for interactive 3D visualization is presented utilizing the Hadoop Ecosystem for data analysis and storage. The BCI is an implementation of Bayesian factor analysis algorithms that can distinguish distinct thought actions using magneto encephalographic (MEG) brain signals. We have collected data on five subjects yielding 90% positive performance in MEG mid- and post-movement activity. We describe a driver that substitutes the actions of the BCI as mouse button presses for real-time use in visual simulations. This process has been added into a flight visualization demonstration. By thinking left or right, the user experiences the aircraft turning in the chosen direction. The driver components of the BCI can be compiled into any software and substitute a user’s intent for specific keyboard strikes or mouse button presses. The BCI’s data analytics of a subject’s MEG brainwaves and flight visualization performance are stored and analyzed using the Hadoop Ecosystem as a quick retrieval data warehouse. PMID:26437432

  3. Teaching Geography with 3-D Visualization Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthamatten, Peter; Ziegler, Susy S.

    2006-01-01

    Technology that helps students view images in three dimensions (3-D) can support a broad range of learning styles. "Geo-Wall systems" are visualization tools that allow scientists, teachers, and students to project stereographic images and view them in 3-D. We developed and presented 3-D visualization exercises in several undergraduate courses.…

  4. Interactive 3D visualization tools for stereotactic atlas-based functional neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Jean, Philippe; Kasrai, Reza; Clonda, Diego; Sadikot, Abbas F.; Evans, Alan C.; Peters, Terence M.

    1998-06-01

    Many of the critical basal ganglia structures are not distinguishable on anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, even though they differ in functionality. In order to provide the neurosurgeon with this missing information, a deformable volumetric atlas of the basal ganglia has been created from the Shaltenbrand and Wahren atlas of cryogenic slices. The volumetric atlas can be non-linearly deformed to an individual patient's MRI. To facilitate the clinical use of the atlas, a visualization platform has been developed for pre- and intra-operative use which permits manipulation of the merged atlas and MRI data sets in two- and three-dimensional views. The platform includes graphical tools which allow the visualization of projections of the leukotome and other surgical tools with respect to the atlas data, as well as pre- registered images from any other imaging modality. In addition, a graphical interface has been designed to create custom virtual lesions using computer models of neurosurgical tools for intra-operative planning. To date 17 clinical cases have been successfully performed using the described system.

  5. An overview of 3D software visualization.

    PubMed

    Teyseyre, Alfredo R; Campo, Marcelo R

    2009-01-01

    Software visualization studies techniques and methods for graphically representing different aspects of software. Its main goal is to enhance, simplify and clarify the mental representation a software engineer has of a computer system. During many years, visualization in 2D space has been actively studied, but in the last decade, researchers have begun to explore new 3D representations for visualizing software. In this article, we present an overview of current research in the area, describing several major aspects like: visual representations, interaction issues, evaluation methods and development tools. We also perform a survey of some representative tools to support different tasks, i.e., software maintenance and comprehension, requirements validation and algorithm animation for educational purposes, among others. Finally, we conclude identifying future research directions. PMID:19008558

  6. 3-D visualization of ensemble weather forecasts - Part 1: The visualization tool Met.3D (version 1.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, M.; Kern, M.; Schäfler, A.; Westermann, R.

    2015-02-01

    We present Met.3D, a new open-source tool for the interactive 3-D visualization of numerical ensemble weather predictions. The tool has been developed to support weather forecasting during aircraft-based atmospheric field campaigns, however, is applicable to further forecasting, research and teaching activities. Our work approaches challenging topics related to the visual analysis of numerical atmospheric model output - 3-D visualization, ensemble visualization, and how both can be used in a meaningful way suited to weather forecasting. Met.3D builds a bridge from proven 2-D visualization methods commonly used in meteorology to 3-D visualization by combining both visualization types in a 3-D context. We address the issue of spatial perception in the 3-D view and present approaches to using the ensemble to allow the user to assess forecast uncertainty. Interactivity is key to our approach. Met.3D uses modern graphics technology to achieve interactive visualization on standard consumer hardware. The tool supports forecast data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts and can operate directly on ECMWF hybrid sigma-pressure level grids. We describe the employed visualization algorithms, and analyse the impact of the ECMWF grid topology on computing 3-D ensemble statistical quantitites. Our techniques are demonstrated with examples from the T-NAWDEX-Falcon 2012 campaign.

  7. 3-D Flyover Visualization of Veil Nebula

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D visualization flies across a small portion of the Veil Nebula as photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope. This region is a small part of a huge expanding remnant from a star that explod...

  8. [3D interactive clipping technology in medical image processing].

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaoping; Yang, Kaitai; Li, Bin; Li, Yuanjun; Liang, Jing

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the methods of 3D visualization and the 3D interactive clipping of CT/MRI image sequence in arbitrary orientation based on the Visualization Toolkit (VTK). A new method for 3D CT/MRI reconstructed image clipping is presented, which can clip 3D object and 3D space of medical image sequence to observe the inner structure using 3D widget for manipulating an infinite plane. Experiment results show that the proposed method can implement 3D interactive clipping of medical image effectively and get satisfied results with good quality in short time.

  9. Spatial Visualization by Realistic 3D Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yue, Jianping

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the popular Purdue Spatial Visualization Test-Visualization by Rotations (PSVT-R) in isometric drawings was recreated with CAD software that allows 3D solid modeling and rendering to provide more realistic pictorial views. Both the original and the modified PSVT-R tests were given to students and their scores on the two tests were…

  10. The 3D widgets for exploratory scientific visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, Kenneth P.; Meyer, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques are used to simulate flows of fluids like air or water around such objects as airplanes and automobiles. These techniques usually generate very large amounts of numerical data which are difficult to understand without using graphical scientific visualization techniques. There are a number of commercial scientific visualization applications available today which allow scientists to control visualization tools via textual and/or 2D user interfaces. However, these user interfaces are often difficult to use. We believe that 3D direct-manipulation techniques for interactively controlling visualization tools will provide opportunities for powerful and useful interfaces with which scientists can more effectively explore their datasets. A few systems have been developed which use these techniques. In this paper, we will present a variety of 3D interaction techniques for manipulating parameters of visualization tools used to explore CFD datasets, and discuss in detail various techniques for positioning tools in a 3D scene.

  11. The GPlates Portal: Cloud-Based Interactive 3D Visualization of Global Geophysical and Geological Data in a Web Browser.

    PubMed

    Müller, R Dietmar; Qin, Xiaodong; Sandwell, David T; Dutkiewicz, Adriana; Williams, Simon E; Flament, Nicolas; Maus, Stefan; Seton, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The pace of scientific discovery is being transformed by the availability of 'big data' and open access, open source software tools. These innovations open up new avenues for how scientists communicate and share data and ideas with each other and with the general public. Here, we describe our efforts to bring to life our studies of the Earth system, both at present day and through deep geological time. The GPlates Portal (portal.gplates.org) is a gateway to a series of virtual globes based on the Cesium Javascript library. The portal allows fast interactive visualization of global geophysical and geological data sets, draped over digital terrain models. The globes use WebGL for hardware-accelerated graphics and are cross-platform and cross-browser compatible with complete camera control. The globes include a visualization of a high-resolution global digital elevation model and the vertical gradient of the global gravity field, highlighting small-scale seafloor fabric such as abyssal hills, fracture zones and seamounts in unprecedented detail. The portal also features globes portraying seafloor geology and a global data set of marine magnetic anomaly identifications. The portal is specifically designed to visualize models of the Earth through geological time. These space-time globes include tectonic reconstructions of the Earth's gravity and magnetic fields, and several models of long-wavelength surface dynamic topography through time, including the interactive plotting of vertical motion histories at selected locations. The globes put the on-the-fly visualization of massive data sets at the fingertips of end-users to stimulate teaching and learning and novel avenues of inquiry.

  12. The GPlates Portal: Cloud-Based Interactive 3D Visualization of Global Geophysical and Geological Data in a Web Browser.

    PubMed

    Müller, R Dietmar; Qin, Xiaodong; Sandwell, David T; Dutkiewicz, Adriana; Williams, Simon E; Flament, Nicolas; Maus, Stefan; Seton, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The pace of scientific discovery is being transformed by the availability of 'big data' and open access, open source software tools. These innovations open up new avenues for how scientists communicate and share data and ideas with each other and with the general public. Here, we describe our efforts to bring to life our studies of the Earth system, both at present day and through deep geological time. The GPlates Portal (portal.gplates.org) is a gateway to a series of virtual globes based on the Cesium Javascript library. The portal allows fast interactive visualization of global geophysical and geological data sets, draped over digital terrain models. The globes use WebGL for hardware-accelerated graphics and are cross-platform and cross-browser compatible with complete camera control. The globes include a visualization of a high-resolution global digital elevation model and the vertical gradient of the global gravity field, highlighting small-scale seafloor fabric such as abyssal hills, fracture zones and seamounts in unprecedented detail. The portal also features globes portraying seafloor geology and a global data set of marine magnetic anomaly identifications. The portal is specifically designed to visualize models of the Earth through geological time. These space-time globes include tectonic reconstructions of the Earth's gravity and magnetic fields, and several models of long-wavelength surface dynamic topography through time, including the interactive plotting of vertical motion histories at selected locations. The globes put the on-the-fly visualization of massive data sets at the fingertips of end-users to stimulate teaching and learning and novel avenues of inquiry. PMID:26960151

  13. The GPlates Portal: Cloud-Based Interactive 3D Visualization of Global Geophysical and Geological Data in a Web Browser

    PubMed Central

    Müller, R. Dietmar; Qin, Xiaodong; Sandwell, David T.; Dutkiewicz, Adriana; Williams, Simon E.; Flament, Nicolas; Maus, Stefan; Seton, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The pace of scientific discovery is being transformed by the availability of ‘big data’ and open access, open source software tools. These innovations open up new avenues for how scientists communicate and share data and ideas with each other and with the general public. Here, we describe our efforts to bring to life our studies of the Earth system, both at present day and through deep geological time. The GPlates Portal (portal.gplates.org) is a gateway to a series of virtual globes based on the Cesium Javascript library. The portal allows fast interactive visualization of global geophysical and geological data sets, draped over digital terrain models. The globes use WebGL for hardware-accelerated graphics and are cross-platform and cross-browser compatible with complete camera control. The globes include a visualization of a high-resolution global digital elevation model and the vertical gradient of the global gravity field, highlighting small-scale seafloor fabric such as abyssal hills, fracture zones and seamounts in unprecedented detail. The portal also features globes portraying seafloor geology and a global data set of marine magnetic anomaly identifications. The portal is specifically designed to visualize models of the Earth through geological time. These space-time globes include tectonic reconstructions of the Earth’s gravity and magnetic fields, and several models of long-wavelength surface dynamic topography through time, including the interactive plotting of vertical motion histories at selected locations. The globes put the on-the-fly visualization of massive data sets at the fingertips of end-users to stimulate teaching and learning and novel avenues of inquiry. PMID:26960151

  14. Restoring Fort Frontenac in 3D: Effective Usage of 3D Technology for Heritage Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, M.; Goins, E.; Jackson, C.; Halbstein, D.; Foster, S.; Bazely, S.

    2015-02-01

    This paper is composed of three elements: 3D modeling, web design, and heritage visualization. The aim is to use computer graphics design to inform and create an interest in historical visualization by rebuilding Fort Frontenac using 3D modeling and interactive design. The final model will be integr ated into an interactive website to learn more about the fort's historic imp ortance. It is apparent that using computer graphics can save time and money when it comes to historical visualization. Visitors do not have to travel to the actual archaeological buildings. They can simply use the Web in their own home to learn about this information virtually. Meticulously following historical records to create a sophisticated restoration of archaeological buildings will draw viewers into visualizations, such as the historical world of Fort Frontenac. As a result, it allows the viewers to effectively understand the fort's social sy stem, habits, and historical events.

  15. 3D Visualization of Global Ocean Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, V. G.; Sharma, R.; Zhang, E.; Schmittner, A.; Jenny, B.

    2015-12-01

    Advanced 3D visualization techniques are seldom used to explore the dynamic behavior of ocean circulation. Streamlines are an effective method for visualization of flow, and they can be designed to clearly show the dynamic behavior of a fluidic system. We employ vector field editing and extraction software to examine the topology of velocity vector fields generated by a 3D global circulation model coupled to a one-layer atmosphere model simulating preindustrial and last glacial maximum (LGM) conditions. This results in a streamline-based visualization along multiple density isosurfaces on which we visualize points of vertical exchange and the distribution of properties such as temperature and biogeochemical tracers. Previous work involving this model examined the change in the energetics driving overturning circulation and mixing between simulations of LGM and preindustrial conditions. This visualization elucidates the relationship between locations of vertical exchange and mixing, as well as demonstrates the effects of circulation and mixing on the distribution of tracers such as carbon isotopes.

  16. 3D visualization of polymer nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H

    2009-01-01

    Soft materials and structured polymers are extremely useful nanotechnology building blocks. Block copolymers, in particular, have served as 2D masks for nanolithography and 3D scaffolds for photonic crystals, nanoparticle fabrication, and solar cells. F or many of these applications, the precise 3 dimensional structure and the number and type of defects in the polymer is important for ultimate function. However, directly visualizing the 3D structure of a soft material from the nanometer to millimeter length scales is a significant technical challenge. Here, we propose to develop the instrumentation needed for direct 3D structure determination at near nanometer resolution throughout a nearly millimeter-cubed volume of a soft, potentially heterogeneous, material. This new capability will be a valuable research tool for LANL missions in chemistry, materials science, and nanoscience. Our approach to soft materials visualization builds upon exciting developments in super-resolution optical microscopy that have occurred over the past two years. To date, these new, truly revolutionary, imaging methods have been developed and almost exclusively used for biological applications. However, in addition to biological cells, these super-resolution imaging techniques hold extreme promise for direct visualization of many important nanostructured polymers and other heterogeneous chemical systems. Los Alamos has a unique opportunity to lead the development of these super-resolution imaging methods for problems of chemical rather than biological significance. While these optical methods are limited to systems transparent to visible wavelengths, we stress that many important functional chemicals such as polymers, glasses, sol-gels, aerogels, or colloidal assemblies meet this requirement, with specific examples including materials designed for optical communication, manipulation, or light-harvesting Our Research Goals are: (1) Develop the instrumentation necessary for imaging materials

  17. Volumetric visualization of 3D data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Gregory; Miles, Richard

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a rapid growth in the ability to obtain detailed data on large complex structures in three dimensions. This development occurred first in the medical field, with CAT (computer aided tomography) scans and now magnetic resonance imaging, and in seismological exploration. With the advances in supercomputing and computational fluid dynamics, and in experimental techniques in fluid dynamics, there is now the ability to produce similar large data fields representing 3D structures and phenomena in these disciplines. These developments have produced a situation in which currently there is access to data which is too complex to be understood using the tools available for data reduction and presentation. Researchers in these areas are becoming limited by their ability to visualize and comprehend the 3D systems they are measuring and simulating.

  18. Advanced Data Visualization in Astrophysics: The X3D Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Owen, Chris I.; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta

    2016-02-01

    Most modern astrophysical data sets are multi-dimensional; a characteristic that can nowadays generally be conserved and exploited scientifically during the data reduction/simulation and analysis cascades. However, the same multi-dimensional data sets are systematically cropped, sliced, and/or projected to printable two-dimensional diagrams at the publication stage. In this article, we introduce the concept of the “X3D pathway” as a mean of simplifying and easing the access to data visualization and publication via three-dimensional (3D) diagrams. The X3D pathway exploits the facts that (1) the X3D 3D file format lies at the center of a product tree that includes interactive HTML documents, 3D printing, and high-end animations, and (2) all high-impact-factor and peer-reviewed journals in astrophysics are now published (some exclusively) online. We argue that the X3D standard is an ideal vector for sharing multi-dimensional data sets because it provides direct access to a range of different data visualization techniques, is fully open source, and is a well-defined standard from the International Organization for Standardization. Unlike other earlier propositions to publish multi-dimensional data sets via 3D diagrams, the X3D pathway is not tied to specific software (prone to rapid and unexpected evolution), but instead is compatible with a range of open-source software already in use by our community. The interactive HTML branch of the X3D pathway is also actively supported by leading peer-reviewed journals in the field of astrophysics. Finally, this article provides interested readers with a detailed set of practical astrophysical examples designed to act as a stepping stone toward the implementation of the X3D pathway for any other data set.

  19. 3D visual presentation of shoulder joint motion.

    PubMed

    Totterman, S; Tamez-Pena, J; Kwok, E; Strang, J; Smith, J; Rubens, D; Parker, K

    1998-01-01

    The 3D visual presentation of biodynamic events of human joints is a challenging task. Although the 3D reconstruction of high contrast structures from CT data has been widely explored, then there is much less experience in reconstructing the small low contrast soft tissue structures from inhomogeneous and sometimes noisy MR data. Further, there are no algorithms for tracking the motion of moving anatomic structures through MR data. We represent a comprehensive approach to 3D musculoskeletal imagery that addresses these challenges. Specific imaging protocols, segmentation algorithms and rendering techniques are developed and applied to render complex 3D musculoskeletal systems for their 4D visual presentation. Applications of our approach include analysis of rotational motion of the shoulder, the knee flexion, and other complex musculoskeletal motions, and the development of interactive virtual human joints.

  20. Visualization of 3-D tensor fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesselink, L.

    1996-01-01

    Second-order tensor fields have applications in many different areas of physics, such as general relativity and fluid mechanics. The wealth of multivariate information in tensor fields makes them more complex and abstract than scalar and vector fields. Visualization is a good technique for scientists to gain new insights from them. Visualizing a 3-D continuous tensor field is equivalent to simultaneously visualizing its three eigenvector fields. In the past, research has been conducted in the area of two-dimensional tensor fields. It was shown that degenerate points, defined as points where eigenvalues are equal to each other, are the basic singularities underlying the topology of tensor fields. Moreover, it was shown that eigenvectors never cross each other except at degenerate points. Since we live in a three-dimensional world, it is important for us to understand the underlying physics of this world. In this report, we describe a new method for locating degenerate points along with the conditions for classifying them in three-dimensional space. Finally, we discuss some topological features of three-dimensional tensor fields, and interpret topological patterns in terms of physical properties.

  1. Immersive 3D Visualization of Astronomical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaff, A.; Berthier, J.; Da Rocha, J.; Deparis, N.; Derriere, S.; Gaultier, P.; Houpin, R.; Normand, J.; Ocvirk, P.

    2015-09-01

    The immersive-3D visualization, or Virtual Reality in our study, was previously dedicated to specific uses (research, flight simulators, etc.) The investment in infrastructure and its cost was reserved to large laboratories or companies. Lately we saw the development of immersive-3D masks intended for wide distribution, for example the Oculus Rift and the Sony Morpheus projects. The usual reaction is to say that these tools are primarily intended for games since it is easy to imagine a player in a virtual environment and the added value to conventional 2D screens. Yet it is likely that there are many applications in the professional field if these tools are becoming common. Introducing this technology into existing applications or new developments makes sense only if interest is properly evaluated. The use in Astronomy is clear for education, it is easy to imagine mobile and light planetariums or to reproduce poorly accessible environments (e.g., large instruments). In contrast, in the field of professional astronomy the use is probably less obvious and it requires to conduct studies to determine the most appropriate ones and to assess the contributions compared to the other display modes.

  2. Real-Time 3D Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Butler Hine, former director of the Intelligent Mechanism Group (IMG) at Ames Research Center, and five others partnered to start Fourth Planet, Inc., a visualization company that specializes in the intuitive visual representation of dynamic, real-time data over the Internet and Intranet. Over a five-year period, the then NASA researchers performed ten robotic field missions in harsh climes to mimic the end- to-end operations of automated vehicles trekking across another world under control from Earth. The core software technology for these missions was the Virtual Environment Vehicle Interface (VEVI). Fourth Planet has released VEVI4, the fourth generation of the VEVI software, and NetVision. VEVI4 is a cutting-edge computer graphics simulation and remote control applications tool. The NetVision package allows large companies to view and analyze in virtual 3D space such things as the health or performance of their computer network or locate a trouble spot on an electric power grid. Other products are forthcoming. Fourth Planet is currently part of the NASA/Ames Technology Commercialization Center, a business incubator for start-up companies.

  3. 3D volume visualization in remote radiation treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, David Y.; Garcia, Hong-Mei C.; Mun, Seong K.; Rogers, James E.; Tohme, Walid G.; Carlson, Wayne E.; May, Stephen; Yagel, Roni

    1996-03-01

    This paper reports a novel applications of 3D visualization in an ARPA-funded remote radiation treatment planning (RTP) experiment, utilizing supercomputer 3D volumetric modeling power and NASA ACTS (Advanced Communication Technology Satellite) communication bandwidths at the Ka-band range. The objective of radiation treatment is to deliver a tumorcidal dose of radiation to a tumor volume while minimizing doses to surrounding normal tissues. High performance graphics computers are required to allow physicians to view a 3D anatomy, specify proposed radiation beams, and evaluate the dose distribution around the tumor. Supercomputing power is needed to compute and even optimize dose distribution according to pre-specified requirements. High speed communications offer possibilities for sharing scarce and expensive computing resources (e.g., hardware, software, personnel, etc.) as well as medical expertise for 3D treatment planning among hospitals. This paper provides initial technical insights into the feasibility of such resource sharing. The overall deployment of the RTP experiment, visualization procedures, and parallel volume rendering in support of remote interactive 3D volume visualization will be described.

  4. EarthSLOT (an Earth Science, Logistics, and Outreach Terrainbase): Or, How You Can Create 3D, Interactive Visualizations of the Earth with Little or No Funds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokein, P.; Nolan, M.

    2004-12-01

    In spring of 2004 we received a Small Grant for Exploratory Research (SGER) from the NSF's Office of Polar Program's Arctic Logistics and Research Support program to create an internet-based, interactive, 3D terrain and data visualization system of the Arctic. A preliminary version of this application, called EarthSLOT, can now be found on-line at www.earthslot.org. EarthSLOT allows users to visualize the earth, whether as a spinning globe from space or from the sea-floor looking up at a mid-ocean ridge or anywhere in between. Flight controls range from completely interactive to following pre-planned routes, and the visualizations can be done real-time over the internet or saved as screen shots or MPG movies. The purpose of this project is to put easy-to-use 3D terrain and visualization tools into the hands of many users at little or no cost to them, by taking care of the complicated and expensive work ourselves. Therefore EarthSLOT may be an ideal tool for scientists with low outreach budgets to share their research with other scientists or the public. Those on a very low budget can use EarthSLOT for free, as can any ordinary user, without modifying it or adding their own data. Example uses would be analyzing the terrain surrounding a field site, adding a 3D visualization of a study area to a presentation, or exploring the vector data added by others to their study areas. Those with about \\$1200 to spend on the necessary commercial software can add their own content to the existing application. For example, an ecologist can add or create shapefiles that outlines their study plots and then link those outlines to web pages containing data or further information. Or a glaciologist can superimpose the locations of mass balance stakes and weather stations on the surface of a glacier, then create an mpg movie that starts in space and zooms down to the stake level to visualize how weather systems on a planetary scale relate to the local measurements. Or scientists

  5. Distributed 3D Information Visualization - Towards Integration of the Dynamic 3D Graphics and Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucinic, Dean; Deen, Danny; Oanta, Emil; Batarilo, Zvonimir; Lacor, Chris

    This paper focuses on visualization and manipulation of graphical content in distributed network environments. The developed graphical middleware and 3D desktop prototypes were specialized for situational awareness. This research was done in the LArge Scale COllaborative decision support Technology (LASCOT) project, which explored and combined software technologies to support human-centred decision support system for crisis management (earthquake, tsunami, flooding, airplane or oil-tanker incidents, chemical, radio-active or other pollutants spreading, etc.). The performed state-of-the-art review did not identify any publicly available large scale distributed application of this kind. Existing proprietary solutions rely on the conventional technologies and 2D representations. Our challenge was to apply the "latest" available technologies, such Java3D, X3D and SOAP, compatible with average computer graphics hardware. The selected technologies are integrated and we demonstrate: the flow of data, which originates from heterogeneous data sources; interoperability across different operating systems and 3D visual representations to enhance the end-users interactions.

  6. How 3D immersive visualization is changing medical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koning, Anton H. J.

    2011-03-01

    Originally the only way to look inside the human body without opening it up was by means of two dimensional (2D) images obtained using X-ray equipment. The fact that human anatomy is inherently three dimensional leads to ambiguities in interpretation and problems of occlusion. Three dimensional (3D) imaging modalities such as CT, MRI and 3D ultrasound remove these drawbacks and are now part of routine medical care. While most hospitals 'have gone digital', meaning that the images are no longer printed on film, they are still being viewed on 2D screens. However, this way valuable depth information is lost, and some interactions become unnecessarily complex or even unfeasible. Using a virtual reality (VR) system to present volumetric data means that depth information is presented to the viewer and 3D interaction is made possible. At the Erasmus MC we have developed V-Scope, an immersive volume visualization system for visualizing a variety of (bio-)medical volumetric datasets, ranging from 3D ultrasound, via CT and MRI, to confocal microscopy, OPT and 3D electron-microscopy data. In this talk we will address the advantages of such a system for both medical diagnostics as well as for (bio)medical research.

  7. Advanced 3D Sensing and Visualization System for Unattended Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.J.; Little, C.Q.; Nelson, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to create a reliable, 3D sensing and visualization system for unattended monitoring. The system provides benefits for several of Sandia's initiatives including nonproliferation, treaty verification, national security and critical infrastructure surety. The robust qualities of the system make it suitable for both interior and exterior monitoring applications. The 3D sensing system combines two existing sensor technologies in a new way to continuously maintain accurate 3D models of both static and dynamic components of monitored areas (e.g., portions of buildings, roads, and secured perimeters in addition to real-time estimates of the shape, location, and motion of humans and moving objects). A key strength of this system is the ability to monitor simultaneous activities on a continuous basis, such as several humans working independently within a controlled workspace, while also detecting unauthorized entry into the workspace. Data from the sensing system is used to identi~ activities or conditions that can signi~ potential surety (safety, security, and reliability) threats. The system could alert a security operator of potential threats or could be used to cue other detection, inspection or warning systems. An interactive, Web-based, 3D visualization capability was also developed using the Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML). The intex%ace allows remote, interactive inspection of a monitored area (via the Internet or Satellite Links) using a 3D computer model of the area that is rendered from actual sensor data.

  8. NIHmagic: 3D visualization, registration, and segmentation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidlin, Raisa Z.; Ohazama, Chikai J.; Arai, Andrew E.; McGarry, Delia P.; Panza, Julio A.; Trus, Benes L.

    2000-05-01

    Interactive visualization of multi-dimensional biological images has revolutionized diagnostic and therapy planning. Extracting complementary anatomical and functional information from different imaging modalities provides a synergistic analysis capability for quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the objects under examination. We have been developing NIHmagic, a visualization tool for research and clinical use, on the SGI OnyxII Infinite Reality platform. Images are reconstructed into a 3D volume by volume rendering, a display technique that employs 3D texture mapping to provide a translucent appearance to the object. A stack of slices is rendered into a volume by an opacity mapping function, where the opacity is determined by the intensity of the voxel and its distance from the viewer. NIHmagic incorporates 3D visualization of time-sequenced images, manual registration of 2D slices, segmentation of anatomical structures, and color-coded re-mapping of intensities. Visualization of MIR, PET, CT, Ultrasound, and 3D reconstructed electron microscopy images has been accomplished using NIHmagic.

  9. Mayavi2: 3D Scientific Data Visualization and Plotting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Prabhu; Varoquaux, Gaël

    2012-05-01

    Mayavi is an open-source, general-purpose, 3D scientific visualization package. It seeks to provide easy and interactive tools for data visualization that fit with the scientific user's workflow. Mayavi provides several entry points: a full-blown interactive application; a Python library with both a MATLAB-like interface focused on easy scripting and a feature-rich object hierarchy; widgets associated with these objects for assembling in a domain-specific application, and plugins that work with a general purpose application-building framework.

  10. 3D Visualization of Machine Learning Algorithms with Astronomical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    We present innovative machine learning (ML) methods using unsupervised clustering with minimum spanning trees (MSTs) to study 3D astronomical catalogs. Utilizing Python code to build trees based on galaxy catalogs, we can render the results with the visualization suite Blender to produce interactive 360 degree panoramic videos. The catalogs and their ML results can be explored in a 3D space using mobile devices, tablets or desktop browsers. We compare the statistics of the MST results to a number of machine learning methods relating to optimization and efficiency.

  11. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  12. Exploring interaction with 3D volumetric displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Tovi; Wigdor, Daniel; Balakrishnan, Ravin

    2005-03-01

    Volumetric displays generate true volumetric 3D images by actually illuminating points in 3D space. As a result, viewing their contents is similar to viewing physical objects in the real world. These displays provide a 360 degree field of view, and do not require the user to wear hardware such as shutter glasses or head-trackers. These properties make them a promising alternative to traditional display systems for viewing imagery in 3D. Because these displays have only recently been made available commercially (e.g., www.actuality-systems.com), their current use tends to be limited to non-interactive output-only display devices. To take full advantage of the unique features of these displays, however, it would be desirable if the 3D data being displayed could be directly interacted with and manipulated. We investigate interaction techniques for volumetric display interfaces, through the development of an interactive 3D geometric model building application. While this application area itself presents many interesting challenges, our focus is on the interaction techniques that are likely generalizable to interactive applications for other domains. We explore a very direct style of interaction where the user interacts with the virtual data using direct finger manipulations on and around the enclosure surrounding the displayed 3D volumetric image.

  13. 3D Visualization for Phoenix Mars Lander Science Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Laurence; Keely, Leslie; Lees, David; Stoker, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Planetary surface exploration missions present considerable operational challenges in the form of substantial communication delays, limited communication windows, and limited communication bandwidth. A 3D visualization software was developed and delivered to the 2008 Phoenix Mars Lander (PML) mission. The components of the system include an interactive 3D visualization environment called Mercator, terrain reconstruction software called the Ames Stereo Pipeline, and a server providing distributed access to terrain models. The software was successfully utilized during the mission for science analysis, site understanding, and science operations activity planning. A terrain server was implemented that provided distribution of terrain models from a central repository to clients running the Mercator software. The Ames Stereo Pipeline generates accurate, high-resolution, texture-mapped, 3D terrain models from stereo image pairs. These terrain models can then be visualized within the Mercator environment. The central cross-cutting goal for these tools is to provide an easy-to-use, high-quality, full-featured visualization environment that enhances the mission science team s ability to develop low-risk productive science activity plans. In addition, for the Mercator and Viz visualization environments, extensibility and adaptability to different missions and application areas are key design goals.

  14. Diffractive optical element for creating visual 3D images.

    PubMed

    Goncharsky, Alexander; Goncharsky, Anton; Durlevich, Svyatoslav

    2016-05-01

    A method is proposed to compute and synthesize the microrelief of a diffractive optical element to produce a new visual security feature - the vertical 3D/3D switch effect. The security feature consists in the alternation of two 3D color images when the diffractive element is tilted up/down. Optical security elements that produce the new security feature are synthesized using electron-beam technology. Sample optical security elements are manufactured that produce 3D to 3D visual switch effect when illuminated by white light. Photos and video records of the vertical 3D/3D switch effect of real optical elements are presented. The optical elements developed can be replicated using standard equipment employed for manufacturing security holograms. The new optical security feature is easy to control visually, safely protected against counterfeit, and designed to protect banknotes, documents, ID cards, etc. PMID:27137530

  15. EarthServer - 3D Visualization on the Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Sebastian; Herzig, Pasquale; Bockholt, Ulrich; Jung, Yvonne; Behr, Johannes

    2013-04-01

    EarthServer (www.earthserver.eu), funded by the European Commission under its Seventh Framework Program, is a project to enable the management, access and exploration of massive, multi-dimensional datasets using Open GeoSpatial Consortium (OGC) query and processing language standards like WCS 2.0 and WCPS. To this end, a server/client architecture designed to handle Petabyte/Exabyte volumes of multi-dimensional data is being developed and deployed. As an important part of the EarthServer project, six Lighthouse Applications, major scientific data exploitation initiatives, are being established to make cross-domain, Earth Sciences related data repositories available in an open and unified manner, as service endpoints based on solutions and infrastructure developed within the project. Clients technology developed and deployed in EarthServer ranges from mobile and web clients to immersive virtual reality systems, all designed to interact with a physically and logically distributed server infrastructure using exclusively OGC standards. In this contribution, we would like to present our work on a web-based 3D visualization and interaction client for Earth Sciences data using only technology found in standard web browsers without requiring the user to install plugins or addons. Additionally, we are able to run the earth data visualization client on a wide range of different platforms with very different soft- and hardware requirements such as smart phones (e.g. iOS, Android), different desktop systems etc. High-quality, hardware-accelerated visualization of 3D and 4D content in standard web browsers can be realized now and we believe it will become more and more common to use this fast, lightweight and ubiquitous platform to provide insights into big datasets without requiring the user to set up a specialized client first. With that in mind, we will also point out some of the limitations we encountered using current web technologies. Underlying the EarthServer web client

  16. 3D visualization of port simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Horsthemke, W. H.; Macal, C. M.; Nevins, M. R.

    1999-06-14

    Affordable and realistic three dimensional visualization technology can be applied to large scale constructive simulations such as the port simulation model, PORTSIM. These visualization tools enhance the experienced planner's ability to form mental models of how seaport operations will unfold when the simulation model is implemented and executed. They also offer unique opportunities to train new planners not only in the use of the simulation model but on the layout and design of seaports. Simulation visualization capabilities are enhanced by borrowing from work on interface design, camera control, and data presentation. Using selective fidelity, the designers of these visualization systems can reduce their time and efforts by concentrating on those features which yield the most value for their simulation. Offering the user various observational tools allows the freedom to simply watch or engage in the simulation without getting lost. Identifying the underlying infrastructure or cargo items with labels can provide useful information at the risk of some visual clutter. The PortVis visualization expands the PORTSIM user base which can benefit from the results provided by this capability, especially in strategic planning, mission rehearsal, and training. Strategic planners will immediately reap the benefits of seeing the impact of increased throughput visually without keeping track of statistical data. Mission rehearsal and training users will have an effective training tool to supplement their operational training exercises which are limited in number because of their high costs. Having another effective training modality in this visualization system allows more training to take place and more personnel to gain an understanding of seaport operations. This simulation and visualization training can be accomplished at lower cost than would be possible for the operational training exercises alone. The application of PORTSIM and PortVis will lead to more efficient

  17. Visualizer: 3D Gridded Data Visualization Software for Geoscience Education and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwood, C.; Billen, M. I.; Kreylos, O.; Jadamec, M.; Sumner, D. Y.; Kellogg, L. H.; Hamann, B.

    2008-12-01

    In both research and education learning is an interactive and iterative process of exploring and analyzing data or model results. However, visualization software often presents challenges on the path to learning because it assumes the user already knows the locations and types of features of interest, instead of enabling flexible and intuitive examination of results. We present examples of research and teaching using the software, Visualizer, specifically designed to create an effective and intuitive environment for interactive, scientific analysis of 3D gridded data. Visualizer runs in a range of 3D virtual reality environments (e.g., GeoWall, ImmersaDesk, or CAVE), but also provides a similar level of real-time interactivity on a desktop computer. When using Visualizer in a 3D-enabled environment, the software allows the user to interact with the data images as real objects, grabbing, rotating or walking around the data to gain insight and perspective. On the desktop, simple features, such as a set of cross-bars marking the plane of the screen, provide extra 3D spatial cues that allow the user to more quickly understand geometric relationships within the data. This platform portability allows the user to more easily integrate research results into classroom demonstrations and exercises, while the interactivity provides an engaging environment for self-directed and inquiry-based learning by students. Visualizer software is freely available for download (www.keckcaves.org) and runs on Mac OSX and Linux platforms.

  18. 3D visualization for medical volume segmentation validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldeib, Ayman M.

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a 3-D visualization tool that manipulates and/or enhances by user input the segmented targets and other organs. A 3-D visualization tool is developed to create a precise and realistic 3-D model from CT/MR data set for manipulation in 3-D and permitting physician or planner to look through, around, and inside the various structures. The 3-D visualization tool is designed to assist and to evaluate the segmentation process. It can control the transparency of each 3-D object. It displays in one view a 2-D slice (axial, coronal, and/or sagittal)within a 3-D model of the segmented tumor or structures. This helps the radiotherapist or the operator to evaluate the adequacy of the generated target compared to the original 2-D slices. The graphical interface enables the operator to easily select a specific 2-D slice of the 3-D volume data set. The operator is enabled to manually override and adjust the automated segmentation results. After correction, the operator can see the 3-D model again and go back and forth till satisfactory segmentation is obtained. The novelty of this research work is in using state-of-the-art of image processing and 3-D visualization techniques to facilitate a process of a medical volume segmentation validation and assure the accuracy of the volume measurement of the structure of interest.

  19. 3D Immersive Visualization: An Educational Tool in Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Campos, N.; Cárdenas-Soto, M.; Juárez-Casas, M.; Castrejón-Pineda, R.

    2007-05-01

    3D immersive visualization is an innovative tool currently used in various disciplines, such as medicine, architecture, engineering, video games, etc. Recently, the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) mounted a visualization theater (Ixtli) with leading edge technology, for academic and research purposes that require immersive 3D tools for a better understanding of the concepts involved. The Division of Engineering in Earth Sciences of the School of Engineering, UNAM, is running a project focused on visualization of geoscience data. Its objective is to incoporate educational material in geoscience courses in order to support and to improve the teaching-learning process, especially in well-known difficult topics for students. As part of the project, proffessors and students are trained in visualization techniques, then their data are adapted and visualized in Ixtli as part of a class or a seminar, where all the attendants can interact, not only among each other but also with the object under study. As part of our results, we present specific examples used in basic geophysics courses, such as interpreted seismic cubes, seismic-wave propagation models, and structural models from bathymetric, gravimetric and seismological data; as well as examples from ongoing applied projects, such as a modeled SH upward wave, the occurrence of an earthquake cluster in 1999 in the Popocatepetl volcano, and a risk atlas from Delegación Alvaro Obregón in Mexico City. All these examples, plus those to come, constitute a library for students and professors willing to explore another dimension of the teaching-learning process. Furthermore, this experience can be enhaced by rich discussions and interactions by videoconferences with other universities and researchers.

  20. Comparative visual analysis of 3D urban wind simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röber, Niklas; Salim, Mohamed; Grawe, David; Leitl, Bernd; Böttinger, Michael; Schlünzen, Heinke

    2016-04-01

    Climate simulations are conducted in large quantity for a variety of different applications. Many of these simulations focus on global developments and study the Earth's climate system using a coupled atmosphere ocean model. Other simulations are performed on much smaller regional scales, to study very small fine grained climatic effects. These microscale climate simulations pose similar, yet also different, challenges for the visualization and the analysis of the simulation data. Modern interactive visualization and data analysis techniques are very powerful tools to assist the researcher in answering and communicating complex research questions. This presentation discusses comparative visualization for several different wind simulations, which were created using the microscale climate model MITRAS. The simulations differ in wind direction and speed, but are all centered on the same simulation domain: An area of Hamburg-Wilhelmsburg that hosted the IGA/IBA exhibition in 2013. The experiments contain a scenario case to analyze the effects of single buildings, as well as examine the impact of the Coriolis force within the simulation. The scenario case is additionally compared with real measurements from a wind tunnel experiment to ascertain the accuracy of the simulation and the model itself. We also compare different approaches for tree modeling and evaluate the stability of the model. In this presentation, we describe not only our workflow to efficiently and effectively visualize microscale climate simulation data using common 3D visualization and data analysis techniques, but also discuss how to compare variations of a simulation and how to highlight the subtle differences in between them. For the visualizations we use a range of different 3D tools that feature techniques for statistical data analysis, data selection, as well as linking and brushing.

  1. Three-dimensional visualization of ensemble weather forecasts - Part 1: The visualization tool Met.3D (version 1.0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, M.; Kern, M.; Schäfler, A.; Westermann, R.

    2015-07-01

    We present "Met.3D", a new open-source tool for the interactive three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of numerical ensemble weather predictions. The tool has been developed to support weather forecasting during aircraft-based atmospheric field campaigns; however, it is applicable to further forecasting, research and teaching activities. Our work approaches challenging topics related to the visual analysis of numerical atmospheric model output - 3-D visualization, ensemble visualization and how both can be used in a meaningful way suited to weather forecasting. Met.3D builds a bridge from proven 2-D visualization methods commonly used in meteorology to 3-D visualization by combining both visualization types in a 3-D context. We address the issue of spatial perception in the 3-D view and present approaches to using the ensemble to allow the user to assess forecast uncertainty. Interactivity is key to our approach. Met.3D uses modern graphics technology to achieve interactive visualization on standard consumer hardware. The tool supports forecast data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and can operate directly on ECMWF hybrid sigma-pressure level grids. We describe the employed visualization algorithms, and analyse the impact of the ECMWF grid topology on computing 3-D ensemble statistical quantities. Our techniques are demonstrated with examples from the T-NAWDEX-Falcon 2012 (THORPEX - North Atlantic Waveguide and Downstream Impact Experiment) campaign.

  2. Integrating 3D Visualization and GIS in Planning Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Li

    2010-01-01

    Most GIS-related planning practices and education are currently limited to two-dimensional mapping and analysis although 3D GIS is a powerful tool to study the complex urban environment in its full spatial extent. This paper reviews current GIS and 3D visualization uses and development in planning practice and education. Current literature…

  3. DspaceOgre 3D Graphics Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan; Myin, Steven; Pomerantz, Marc I.

    2011-01-01

    This general-purpose 3D graphics visualization C++ tool is designed for visualization of simulation and analysis data for articulated mechanisms. Examples of such systems are vehicles, robotic arms, biomechanics models, and biomolecular structures. DspaceOgre builds upon the open-source Ogre3D graphics visualization library. It provides additional classes to support the management of complex scenes involving multiple viewpoints and different scene groups, and can be used as a remote graphics server. This software provides improved support for adding programs at the graphics processing unit (GPU) level for improved performance. It also improves upon the messaging interface it exposes for use as a visualization server.

  4. A Volume Rendering Framework for Visualizing 3D Flow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Hsien-Hsi; Li, Liya; Shen, Han-Wei; Tai, Wen-Kai

    In this paper, we present a volume rendering framework for visualizing 3D flow fields. We introduce the concept of coherence field which evaluates the representativeness of a given streamline set for the underlying 3D vector field. Visualization of the coherence field can provide effective visual feedback to the user for incremental insertion of more streamline seeds. Given an initial set of streamlines, a coherence volume is constructed from a distance field to measure the similarity between the existing streamlines and those in their nearby regions based on the difference between the approximate and the actual vector directions. With the visual feedback obtained from rendering the coherence volume, new streamline seeds can be selected by the user or by a heuristic seed selection algorithm to adaptively improve the coherence volume. An improved volume rendering technique that can render user-defined appearance textures is proposed to facilitate macro-visualization of 3D vector fields.

  5. Visual search is influenced by 3D spatial layout.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, Nonie J; Grove, Philip M

    2015-10-01

    Many activities necessitate the deployment of attention to specific distances and directions in our three-dimensional (3D) environment. However, most research on how attention is deployed is conducted with two dimensional (2D) computer displays, leaving a large gap in our understanding about the deployment of attention in 3D space. We report how each of four parameters of 3D visual space influence visual search: 3D display volume, distance in depth, number of depth planes, and relative target position in depth. Using a search task, we find that visual search performance depends on 3D volume, relative target position in depth, and number of depth planes. Our results demonstrate an asymmetrical preference for targets in the front of a display unique to 3D search and show that arranging items into more depth planes reduces search efficiency. Consistent with research using 2D displays, we found slower response times to find targets in displays with larger 3D volumes compared with smaller 3D volumes. Finally, in contrast to the importance of target depth relative to other distractors, target depth relative to the fixation point did not affect response times or search efficiency.

  6. Real-time auto-stereoscopic visualization of 3D medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portoni, Luisa; Patak, Alexandre; Noirard, Pierre; Grossetie, Jean-Claude; van Berkel, Cees

    2000-04-01

    The work here described regards multi-viewer auto- stereoscopic visualization of 3D models of anatomical structures and organs of the human body. High-quality 3D models of more than 1600 anatomical structures have been reconstructed using the Visualization Toolkit, a freely available C++ class library for 3D graphics and visualization. 2D images used for 3D reconstruction comes from the Visible Human Data Set. Auto-stereoscopic 3D image visualization is obtained using a prototype monitor developed at Philips Research Labs, UK. This special multiview 3D-LCD screen has been connected directly to a SGI workstation, where 3D reconstruction and medical imaging applications are executed. Dedicated software has been developed to implement multiview capability. A number of static or animated contemporary views of the same object can simultaneously be seen on the 3D-LCD screen by several observers, having a real 3D perception of the visualized scene without the use of extra media as dedicated glasses or head-mounted displays. Developed software applications allow real-time interaction with visualized 3D models, didactical animations and movies have been realized as well.

  7. Examination of 3D visual attention in stereoscopic video content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh-Thu, Quan; Schiatti, Luca

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in video technology and digital cinema have made it possible to produce entertaining 3D stereoscopic content that can be viewed for an extended duration without necessarily causing extreme fatigue, visual strain and discomfort. Viewers focus naturally their attention on specific areas of interest in their visual field. Visual attention is an important aspect of perception and its understanding is therefore an important aspect for the creation of 3D stereoscopic content. Most of the studies on visual attention have focused on the case of still images or 2D video. Only a very few studies have investigated eye movement patterns in 3D stereoscopic moving sequences, and how these may differ from viewing 2D video content. In this paper, we present and discuss the results of a subjective experiment that we conducted using an eye-tracking apparatus to record observers' gaze patterns. Participants were asked to watch the same set of video clips in a free-viewing task. Each clip was shown in a 3D stereoscopic version and 2D version. Our results indicate that the extent of areas of interests is not necessarily wider in 3D. We found a very strong content dependency in the difference of density and locations of fixations between 2D and 3D stereoscopic content. However, we found that saccades were overall faster and that fixation durations were overall lower when observers viewed the 3D stereoscopic version.

  8. 3D visualization of middle ear structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Uwe; Schmitt, Thomas

    1998-06-01

    application of a micro- tomographic imaging device. Therefore an X-ray beam focused down to few microns passes the object in a tomographic arrangement. Subsequently the slices become reconstructed. Generally spatial resolution down to 10 micrometer may be obtained by using this procedure. But there exist few devices only, it is not available as standard equipment. The best results concerning spatial resolution should be achieved by applying conventional histologic sectioning techniques. Of course the target will become destroyed during the procedure. It is cut into sections (e.g., 10 micrometer thick), every layer is stained, and the image acquired and stored by a digital still-camera with appropriate resolution (e.g., 2024 X 3036). Three-dimensional reconstruction is done with the computer. The staining allows visual selection of bones and soft tissues, resolutions down to 10 micrometer are possible without target segmentation. But there arise some practical problems. Mainly the geometric context of the layers is affected by the cutting procedure, especially if cutting bone. Another problem performs the adjustment of the -- possibly distorted -- slices to each other. Artificial markers are necessary, which could allow automatic adjustment too. But the introduction and imaging of the markers is difficult inside the temporal bone specimen, that is interspersed by several cavities. Of course the internal target structures must not be destroyed by the marker introduction. Furthermore the embedding compound could disturb the image acquisition, e.g., by optical scattering of paraffin. A related alternative is given by layered ablation/grinding and imaging of the top layer. This saves the geometric consistency, but requires very tricky and time-consuming embedding procedures. Both approaches require considerable expenditures. The possible approaches are evaluated in detail and first results are compared. So far none of the above-mentioned procedures has been established as a

  9. 3d visualization of atomistic simulations on every desktop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peled, Dan; Silverman, Amihai; Adler, Joan

    2013-08-01

    Once upon a time, after making simulations, one had to go to a visualization center with fancy SGI machines to run a GL visualization and make a movie. More recently, OpenGL and its mesa clone have let us create 3D on simple desktops (or laptops), whether or not a Z-buffer card is present. Today, 3D a la Avatar is a commodity technique, presented in cinemas and sold for home TV. However, only a few special research centers have systems large enough for entire classes to view 3D, or special immersive facilities like visualization CAVEs or walls, and not everyone finds 3D immersion easy to view. For maximum physics with minimum effort a 3D system must come to each researcher and student. So how do we create 3D visualization cheaply on every desktop for atomistic simulations? After several months of attempts to select commodity equipment for a whole room system, we selected an approach that goes back a long time, even predating GL. The old concept of anaglyphic stereo relies on two images, slightly displaced, and viewed through colored glasses, or two squares of cellophane from a regular screen/projector or poster. We have added this capability to our AViz atomistic visualization code in its new, 6.1 version, which is RedHat, CentOS and Ubuntu compatible. Examples using data from our own research and that of other groups will be given.

  10. Visualizing Terrestrial and Aquatic Systems in 3-D

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental modeling community has a long-standing need for affordable, easy-to-use tools that support 3-D visualization of complex spatial and temporal model output. The Visualization of Terrestrial and Aquatic Systems project (VISTAS) aims to help scientists produce effe...

  11. Faster, higher quality volume visualization for 3D medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvin, Alan D.; Laine, Andrew F.; Song, Ting

    2008-03-01

    The two major volume visualization methods used in biomedical applications are Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) and Volume Rendering (VR), both of which involve the process of creating sets of 2D projections from 3D images. We have developed a new method for very fast, high-quality volume visualization of 3D biomedical images, based on the fact that the inverse of this process (transforming 2D projections into a 3D image) is essentially equivalent to tomographic image reconstruction. This new method uses the 2D projections acquired by the scanner, thereby obviating the need for the two computationally expensive steps currently required in the complete process of biomedical visualization, that is, (i) reconstructing the 3D image from 2D projection data, and (ii) computing the set of 2D projections from the reconstructed 3D image As well as improvements in computation speed, this method also results in improvements in visualization quality, and in the case of x-ray CT we can exploit this quality improvement to reduce radiation dosage. In this paper, demonstrate the benefits of developing biomedical visualization techniques by directly processing the sensor data acquired by body scanners, rather than by processing the image data reconstructed from the sensor data. We show results of using this approach for volume visualization for tomographic modalities, like x-ray CT, and as well as for MRI.

  12. An annotation system for 3D fluid flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughlin, Maria M.; Hughes, John F.

    1995-01-01

    Annotation is a key activity of data analysis. However, current systems for data analysis focus almost exclusively on visualization. We propose a system which integrates annotations into a visualization system. Annotations are embedded in 3D data space, using the Post-it metaphor. This embedding allows contextual-based information storage and retrieval, and facilitates information sharing in collaborative environments. We provide a traditional database filter and a Magic Lens filter to create specialized views of the data. The system has been customized for fluid flow applications, with features which allow users to store parameters of visualization tools and sketch 3D volumes.

  13. 3D Visualization of Astronomical Data with Blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, B. R.

    2015-09-01

    We present the innovative use of Blender, a 3D graphics package, for astronomical visualization. With a Python API and feature rich interface, Blender lends itself well to many 3D data visualization scenarios including data cube rendering, N-body simulations, catalog displays, and surface maps. We focus on the aspects of the software most useful to astronomers such as visual data exploration, applying data to Blender object constructs, and using graphics processing units (GPUs) for rendering. We share examples from both observational data and theoretical models to illustrate how the software can fit into an astronomer's toolkit.

  14. Visualizing 3D velocity fields near contour surfaces. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Grant, C.

    1994-08-08

    Vector field rendering is difficult in 3D because the vector icons overlap and hide each other. We propose four different techniques for visualizing vector fields only near surfaces. The first uses motion blurred particles in a thickened region around the surface. The second uses a voxel grid to contain integral curves of the vector field. The third uses many antialiased lines through the surface, and the fourth uses hairs sprouting from the surface and then bending in the direction of the vector field. All the methods use the graphics pipeline, allowing real time rotation and interaction, and the first two methods can animate the texture to move in the flow determined by the velocity field.

  15. Visualizing 3D velocity fields near contour surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Grant, C.

    1994-03-01

    Vector field rendering is difficult in 3D because the vector icons overlap and hide each other. We propose four different techniques for visualizing vector fields only near surfaces. The first uses motion blurred particles in a thickened region around the surface. The second uses a voxel grid to contain integral curves of the vector field. The third uses many antialiased lines through the surface, and the fourth uses hairs sprouting from the surface and then bending in the direction of the vector field. All the methods use the graphite pipeline, allowing real time rotation and interaction, and the first two methods can animate the texture to move in the flow determined by the velocity field.

  16. Creating 3D visualizations of MRI data: A brief guide

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data is itself 3D, it is often difficult to adequately present the results papers and slides in 3D. As a result, findings of MRI studies are often presented in 2D instead. A solution is to create figures that include perspective and can convey 3D information; such figures can sometimes be produced by standard functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis packages and related specialty programs. However, many options cannot provide functionality such as visualizing activation clusters that are both cortical and subcortical (i.e., a 3D glass brain), the production of several statistical maps with an identical perspective in the 3D rendering, or animated renderings. Here I detail an approach for creating 3D visualizations of MRI data that satisfies all of these criteria. Though a 3D ‘glass brain’ rendering can sometimes be difficult to interpret, they are useful in showing a more overall representation of the results, whereas the traditional slices show a more local view. Combined, presenting both 2D and 3D representations of MR images can provide a more comprehensive view of the study’s findings. PMID:26594340

  17. Development of visual 3D virtual environment for control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirose, Michitaka; Myoi, Takeshi; Amari, Haruo; Inamura, Kohei; Stark, Lawrence

    1991-01-01

    Virtual environments for software visualization may enable complex programs to be created and maintained. A typical application might be for control of regional electric power systems. As these encompass broader computer networks than ever, construction of such systems becomes very difficult. Conventional text-oriented environments are useful in programming individual processors. However, they are obviously insufficient to program a large and complicated system, that includes large numbers of computers connected to each other; such programming is called 'programming in the large.' As a solution for this problem, the authors are developing a graphic programming environment wherein one can visualize complicated software in virtual 3D world. One of the major features of the environment is the 3D representation of concurrent process. 3D representation is used to supply both network-wide interprocess programming capability (capability for 'programming in the large') and real-time programming capability. The authors' idea is to fuse both the block diagram (which is useful to check relationship among large number of processes or processors) and the time chart (which is useful to check precise timing for synchronization) into a single 3D space. The 3D representation gives us a capability for direct and intuitive planning or understanding of complicated relationship among many concurrent processes. To realize the 3D representation, a technology to enable easy handling of virtual 3D object is a definite necessity. Using a stereo display system and a gesture input device (VPL DataGlove), our prototype of the virtual workstation has been implemented. The workstation can supply the 'sensation' of the virtual 3D space to a programmer. Software for the 3D programming environment is implemented on the workstation. According to preliminary assessments, a 50 percent reduction of programming effort is achieved by using the virtual 3D environment. The authors expect that the 3D

  18. DspaceOgreTerrain 3D Terrain Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myint, Steven; Jain, Abhinandan; Pomerantz, Marc I.

    2012-01-01

    DspaceOgreTerrain is an extension to the DspaceOgre 3D visualization tool that supports real-time visualization of various terrain types, including digital elevation maps, planets, and meshes. DspaceOgreTerrain supports creating 3D representations of terrains and placing them in a scene graph. The 3D representations allow for a continuous level of detail, GPU-based rendering, and overlaying graphics like wheel tracks and shadows. It supports reading data from the SimScape terrain- modeling library. DspaceOgreTerrain solves the problem of displaying the results of simulations that involve very large terrains. In the past, it has been used to visualize simulations of vehicle traverses on Lunar and Martian terrains. These terrains were made up of billions of vertices and would not have been renderable in real-time without using a continuous level of detail rendering technique.

  19. Real-time depth map manipulation for 3D visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ideses, Ianir; Fishbain, Barak; Yaroslavsky, Leonid

    2009-02-01

    One of the key aspects of 3D visualization is computation of depth maps. Depth maps enables synthesis of 3D video from 2D video and use of multi-view displays. Depth maps can be acquired in several ways. One method is to measure the real 3D properties of the scene objects. Other methods rely on using two cameras and computing the correspondence for each pixel. Once a depth map is acquired for every frame, it can be used to construct its artificial stereo pair. There are many known methods for computing the optical flow between adjacent video frames. The drawback of these methods is that they require extensive computation power and are not very well suited to high quality real-time 3D rendering. One efficient method for computing depth maps is extraction of motion vector information from standard video encoders. In this paper we present methods to improve the 3D visualization quality acquired from compression CODECS by spatial/temporal and logical operations and manipulations. We show how an efficient real time implementation of spatial-temporal local order statistics such as median and local adaptive filtering in 3D-DCT domain can substantially improve the quality of depth maps and consequently 3D video while retaining real-time rendering. Real-time performance is achived by utilizing multi-core technology using standard parallelization algorithms and libraries (OpenMP, IPP).

  20. Measuring visual discomfort associated with 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambooij, M.; Fortuin, M.; Ijsselsteijn, W. A.; Heynderickx, I.

    2009-02-01

    Some people report visual discomfort when watching 3D displays. For both the objective measurement of visual fatigue and the subjective measurement of visual discomfort, we would like to arrive at general indicators that are easy to apply in perception experiments. Previous research yielded contradictory results concerning such indicators. We hypothesize two potential causes for this: 1) not all clinical tests are equally appropriate to evaluate the effect of stereoscopic viewing on visual fatigue, and 2) there is a natural variation in susceptibility to visual fatigue amongst people with normal vision. To verify these hypotheses, we designed an experiment, consisting of two parts. Firstly, an optometric screening was used to differentiate participants in susceptibility to visual fatigue. Secondly, in a 2×2 within-subjects design (2D vs 3D and two-view vs nine-view display), a questionnaire and eight optometric tests (i.e. binocular acuity, fixation disparity with and without fusion lock, heterophoria, convergent and divergent fusion, vergence facility and accommodation response) were administered before and immediately after a reading task. Results revealed that participants found to be more susceptible to visual fatigue during screening showed a clinically meaningful increase in fusion amplitude after having viewed 3D stimuli. Two questionnaire items (i.e., pain and irritation) were significantly affected by the participants' susceptibility, while two other items (i.e., double vision and sharpness) were scored differently between 2D and 3D for all participants. Our results suggest that a combination of fusion range measurements and self-report is appropriate for evaluating visual fatigue related to 3D displays.

  1. Dynamic 3D Visualization of Vocal Tract Shaping During Speech

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yinghua; Kim, Yoon-Chul; Proctor, Michael I.; Narayanan, Shrikanth S.; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is widely used in speech research as a means to investigate the shaping and dynamics of the vocal tract during speech production. 3D dynamic MRI would be a major advance, as it would provide 3D dynamic visualization of the entire vocal tract. We present a novel method for the creation of 3D dynamic movies of vocal tract shaping based on the acquisition of 2D dynamic data from parallel slices and temporal alignment of the image sequences using audio information. Multiple sagittal 2D real-time movies with synchronized audio recordings are acquired for English vowel-consonant-vowel stimuli /ala/, /aɹa/, /asa/ and /aʃa/. Audio data are aligned using mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC) extracted from windowed intervals of the speech signal. Sagittal image sequences acquired from all slices are then aligned using dynamic time warping (DTW). The aligned image sequences enable dynamic 3D visualization by creating synthesized movies of the moving airway in the coronal planes, visualizing desired tissue surfaces and tube-shaped vocal tract airway after manual segmentation of targeted articulators and smoothing. The resulting volumes allow for dynamic 3D visualization of salient aspects of lingual articulation, including the formation of tongue grooves and sublingual cavities, with a temporal resolution of 78 ms. PMID:23204279

  2. Visualization of 3D ensemble weather forecasts to predict uncertain warm conveyor belt situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, Marc; Grams, Christian M.; Schäfler, Andreas; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2015-04-01

    We present the application of interactive 3D visualization of ensemble weather predictions to forecasting warm conveyor belt (WCB) situations during aircraft-based atmospheric research campaigns under consideration of uncertainty in the forecast. Based on requirements of the 2012 T-NAWDEX-Falcon campaign, a method based on ensemble Lagrangian particle trajectories has been developed to predict 3D probabilities of the spatial occurrence of WCBs. The method has been integrated into the new open-source 3D ensemble visualization tool Met.3D. The integration facilitates interactive visual exploration of predicted WCB features and derived probabilities in the context of ensemble forecasts from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts. To judge forecast uncertainty, Met.3D's interactivity enables the user to compute and visualize ensemble statistical quantities on-demand and to navigate the ensemble members. A new visual analysis method to quantitatively analyse the contribution of ensemble members to a probability region assists the forecaster in interpreting the obtained probabilities. In this presentation, we focus on a case study that illustrates how we envision the use of 3D ensemble visualization for weather forecasting. The case study revisits a forecast case from T-NAWDEX-Falcon and demonstrates the practical application of the proposed uncertainty visualization methods.

  3. A workflow for the 3D visualization of meteorological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbig, Carolin; Rink, Karsten

    2014-05-01

    In the future, climate change will strongly influence our environment and living conditions. To predict possible changes, climate models that include basic and process conditions have been developed and big data sets are produced as a result of simulations. The combination of various variables of climate models with spatial data from different sources helps to identify correlations and to study key processes. For our case study we use results of the weather research and forecasting (WRF) model of two regions at different scales that include various landscapes in Northern Central Europe and Baden-Württemberg. We visualize these simulation results in combination with observation data and geographic data, such as river networks, to evaluate processes and analyze if the model represents the atmospheric system sufficiently. For this purpose, a continuous workflow that leads from the integration of heterogeneous raw data to visualization using open source software (e.g. OpenGeoSys Data Explorer, ParaView) is developed. These visualizations can be displayed on a desktop computer or in an interactive virtual reality environment. We established a concept that includes recommended 3D representations and a color scheme for the variables of the data based on existing guidelines and established traditions in the specific domain. To examine changes over time in observation and simulation data, we added the temporal dimension to the visualization. In a first step of the analysis, the visualizations are used to get an overview of the data and detect areas of interest such as regions of convection or wind turbulences. Then, subsets of data sets are extracted and the included variables can be examined in detail. An evaluation by experts from the domains of visualization and atmospheric sciences establish if they are self-explanatory and clearly arranged. These easy-to-understand visualizations of complex data sets are the basis for scientific communication. In addition, they have

  4. 3D Stereoscopic Visualization of Fenestrated Stent Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Zhonghua; Squelch, Andrew; Bartlett, Andrew; Cunningham, Kylie; Lawrence-Brown, Michael

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to present a technique of stereoscopic visualization in the evaluation of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm treated with fenestrated stent grafts compared with conventional 2D visualizations. Two patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm undergoing fenestrated stent grafting were selected for inclusion in the study. Conventional 2D views including axial, multiplanar reformation, maximum-intensity projection, and volume rendering and 3D stereoscopic visualizations were assessed by two experienced reviewers independently with regard to the treatment outcomes of fenestrated repair. Interobserver agreement was assessed with Kendall's W statistic. Multiplanar reformation and maximum-intensity projection visualizations were scored the highest in the evaluation of parameters related to the fenestrated stent grafting, while 3D stereoscopic visualization was scored as valuable in the evaluation of appearance (any distortions) of the fenestrated stent. Volume rendering was found to play a limited role in the follow-up of fenestrated stent grafting. 3D stereoscopic visualization adds additional information that assists endovascular specialists to identify any distortions of the fenestrated stents when compared with 2D visualizations.

  5. 3D visualization techniques for the STEREO-mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegelmann, T.; Podlipnik, B.; Inhester, B.; Feng, L.; Ruan, P.

    The forthcoming STEREO-mission will observe the Sun from two different viewpoints We expect about 2GB data per day which ask for suitable data presentation techniques A key feature of STEREO is that it will provide for the first time a 3D-view of the Sun and the solar corona In our normal environment we see objects three dimensional because the light from real 3D objects needs different travel times to our left and right eye As a consequence we see slightly different images with our eyes which gives us information about the depth of objects and a corresponding 3D impression Techniques for the 3D-visualization of scientific and other data on paper TV computer screen cinema etc are well known e g two colour anaglyph technique shutter glasses polarization filters and head-mounted displays We discuss advantages and disadvantages of these techniques and how they can be applied to STEREO-data The 3D-visualization techniques are not limited to visual images but can be also used to show the reconstructed coronal magnetic field and energy and helicity distribution In the advent of STEREO we test the method with data from SOHO which provides us different viewpoints by the solar rotation This restricts the analysis to structures which remain stationary for several days Real STEREO-data will not be affected by these limitations however

  6. Gesture Interaction Browser-Based 3D Molecular Viewer.

    PubMed

    Virag, Ioan; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara; Crişan-Vida, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents an open source system that allows the user to interact with a 3D molecular viewer using associated hand gestures for rotating, scaling and panning the rendered model. The novelty of this approach is that the entire application is browser-based and doesn't require installation of third party plug-ins or additional software components in order to visualize the supported chemical file formats. This kind of solution is suitable for instruction of users in less IT oriented environments, like medicine or chemistry. For rendering various molecular geometries our team used GLmol (a molecular viewer written in JavaScript). The interaction with the 3D models is made with Leap Motion controller that allows real-time tracking of the user's hand gestures. The first results confirmed that the resulting application leads to a better way of understanding various types of translational bioinformatics related problems in both biomedical research and education. PMID:27350455

  7. Gesture Interaction Browser-Based 3D Molecular Viewer.

    PubMed

    Virag, Ioan; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara; Crişan-Vida, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents an open source system that allows the user to interact with a 3D molecular viewer using associated hand gestures for rotating, scaling and panning the rendered model. The novelty of this approach is that the entire application is browser-based and doesn't require installation of third party plug-ins or additional software components in order to visualize the supported chemical file formats. This kind of solution is suitable for instruction of users in less IT oriented environments, like medicine or chemistry. For rendering various molecular geometries our team used GLmol (a molecular viewer written in JavaScript). The interaction with the 3D models is made with Leap Motion controller that allows real-time tracking of the user's hand gestures. The first results confirmed that the resulting application leads to a better way of understanding various types of translational bioinformatics related problems in both biomedical research and education.

  8. Recent Advances in Visualizing 3D Flow with LIC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria; Grosch, Chester

    1998-01-01

    Line Integral Convolution (LIC), introduced by Cabral and Leedom in 1993, is an elegant and versatile technique for representing directional information via patterns of correlation in a texture. Although most commonly used to depict 2D flow, or flow over a surface in 3D, LIC methods can equivalently be used to portray 3D flow through a volume. However, the popularity of LIC as a device for illustrating 3D flow has historically been limited both by the computational expense of generating and rendering such a 3D texture and by the difficulties inherent in clearly and effectively conveying the directional information embodied in the volumetric output textures that are produced. In an earlier paper, we briefly discussed some of the factors that may underlie the perceptual difficulties that we can encounter with dense 3D displays and outlined several strategies for more effectively visualizing 3D flow with volume LIC. In this article, we review in more detail techniques for selectively emphasizing critical regions of interest in a flow and for facilitating the accurate perception of the 3D depth and orientation of overlapping streamlines, and we demonstrate new methods for efficiently incorporating an indication of orientation into a flow representation and for conveying additional information about related scalar quantities such as temperature or vorticity over a flow via subtle, continuous line width and color variations.

  9. Point Cloud Visualization in AN Open Source 3d Globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Calle, M.; Gómez-Deck, D.; Koehler, O.; Pulido, F.

    2011-09-01

    During the last years the usage of 3D applications in GIS is becoming more popular. Since the appearance of Google Earth, users are familiarized with 3D environments. On the other hand, nowadays computers with 3D acceleration are common, broadband access is widespread and the public information that can be used in GIS clients that are able to use data from the Internet is constantly increasing. There are currently several libraries suitable for this kind of applications. Based on these facts, and using libraries that are already developed and connected to our own developments, we are working on the implementation of a real 3D GIS with analysis capabilities. Since a 3D GIS such as this can be very interesting for tasks like LiDAR or Laser Scanner point clouds rendering and analysis, special attention is given to get an optimal handling of very large data sets. Glob3 will be a multidimensional GIS in which 3D point clouds could be explored and analysed, even if they are consist of several million points.The latest addition to our visualization libraries is the development of a points cloud server that works regardless of the cloud's size. The server receives and processes petitions from a 3d client (for example glob3, but could be any other, such as one based on WebGL) and delivers the data in the form of pre-processed tiles, depending on the required level of detail.

  10. 3D Orbit Visualization for Earth-Observing Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Joseph C.; Plesea, Lucian; Chafin, Brian G.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2011-01-01

    This software visualizes orbit paths for the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), but was designed to be general and applicable to any Earth-observing mission. The software uses the Google Earth user interface to provide a visual mechanism to explore spacecraft orbit paths, ground footprint locations, and local cloud cover conditions. In addition, a drill-down capability allows for users to point and click on a particular observation frame to pop up ancillary information such as data product filenames and directory paths, latitude, longitude, time stamp, column-average dry air mole fraction of carbon dioxide, and solar zenith angle. This software can be integrated with the ground data system for any Earth-observing mission to automatically generate daily orbit path data products in Google Earth KML format. These KML data products can be directly loaded into the Google Earth application for interactive 3D visualization of the orbit paths for each mission day. Each time the application runs, the daily orbit paths are encapsulated in a KML file for each mission day since the last time the application ran. Alternatively, the daily KML for a specified mission day may be generated. The application automatically extracts the spacecraft position and ground footprint geometry as a function of time from a daily Level 1B data product created and archived by the mission s ground data system software. In addition, ancillary data, such as the column-averaged dry air mole fraction of carbon dioxide and solar zenith angle, are automatically extracted from a Level 2 mission data product. Zoom, pan, and rotate capability are provided through the standard Google Earth interface. Cloud cover is indicated with an image layer from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) aboard the Aqua satellite, which is automatically retrieved from JPL s OnEarth Web service.

  11. 3D Models of Stellar Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, S.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Booth, R.; Maercker, M.; Ramstedt, S.; Vlemmings, W.; Harries, T.; Mackey, J.; Langer, N.; Corradi, R.

    2014-04-01

    Symbiotic binaries consist of a cool, evolved mass-losing giant and an accreting compact companion. As symbiotic nebulae show similar morphologies to those in planetary nebulae (so much so that it is often difficult to distinguish between the two), they are ideal laboratories for understanding the role a binary companion plays in shaping the circumstellar envelopes in these evolved systems. We will present 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) models of interacting binaries, e.g. R Aquarii and Mira, and discuss the formation of spiral outflows, arcs, shells and equatorial density enhancements.We will also discuss the implications of the former for planetary nebulae, e.g. the Egg Nebula and Cat's Eye, and the latter for the formation of bipolar geometries, e.g. M2-9. We also investigate accretion and angular momentum evolution in symbiotic binaries which may be important to understand the formation of jets and more episodic mass-loss features we see in circumstellar envelopes and the orbital characteristics of binary central stars of planetary nebulae.

  12. Large Terrain Continuous Level of Detail 3D Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myint, Steven; Jain, Abhinandan

    2012-01-01

    This software solved the problem of displaying terrains that are usually too large to be displayed on standard workstations in real time. The software can visualize terrain data sets composed of billions of vertices, and can display these data sets at greater than 30 frames per second. The Large Terrain Continuous Level of Detail 3D Visualization Tool allows large terrains, which can be composed of billions of vertices, to be visualized in real time. It utilizes a continuous level of detail technique called clipmapping to support this. It offloads much of the work involved in breaking up the terrain into levels of details onto the GPU (graphics processing unit) for faster processing.

  13. Virtual environment interaction through 3D audio by blind children.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, J; Lumbreras, M

    1999-01-01

    Interactive software is actively used for learning, cognition, and entertainment purposes. Educational entertainment software is not very popular among blind children because most computer games and electronic toys have interfaces that are only accessible through visual cues. This work applies the concept of interactive hyperstories to blind children. Hyperstories are implemented in a 3D acoustic virtual world. In past studies we have conceptualized a model to design hyperstories. This study illustrates the feasibility of the model. It also provides an introduction to researchers to the field of entertainment software for blind children. As a result, we have designed and field tested AudioDoom, a virtual environment interacted through 3D Audio by blind children. AudioDoom is also a software that enables testing nontrivial interfaces and cognitive tasks with blind children. We explored the construction of cognitive spatial structures in the minds of blind children through audio-based entertainment and spatial sound navigable experiences. Children playing AudioDoom were exposed to first person experiences by exploring highly interactive virtual worlds through the use of 3D aural representations of the space. This experience was structured in several cognitive tasks where they had to build concrete models of their spatial representations constructed through the interaction with AudioDoom by using Legotrade mark blocks. We analyze our preliminary results after testing AudioDoom with Chilean children from a school for blind children. We discuss issues such as interactivity in software without visual cues, the representation of spatial sound navigable experiences, and entertainment software such as computer games for blind children. We also evaluate the feasibility to construct virtual environments through the design of dynamic learning materials with audio cues.

  14. Symbolic processing methods for 3D visual processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedder, Maurice; Hall, Ernest L.

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a theory that defines an open method for solving 3D visual data processing and artificial intelligence problems that is independent of hardware or software implementation. The goal of the theory is to generalize and abstract the process of 3D visual processing so that the method can be applied to a wide variety of 3D visual processing problems. Once the theory is described a heuristic derivation is given. Symbolic processing methods can be generalized into an abstract model composed of eight basic components. The symbolic processing model components are: input data; input data interface; symbolic data library; symbolic data environment space; relationship matrix; symbolic logic driver; output data interface and output data. An obstacle detection and avoidance experiment was constructed to demonstrate the symbolic processing method. The results of the robot obstacle avoidance experiment demonstrated that the mobile robot could successfully navigate the obstacle course using symbolic processing methods for the control software. The significance of the symbolic processing approach is that the method arrived at a solution by using a more formal quantifiable process. Some of the practical applications for this theory are: 3D object recognition, obstacle avoidance, and intelligent robot control.

  15. Virtual reality and 3D animation in forensic visualization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Minhua; Zheng, Huiru; Lallie, Harjinder

    2010-09-01

    Computer-generated three-dimensional (3D) animation is an ideal media to accurately visualize crime or accident scenes to the viewers and in the courtrooms. Based upon factual data, forensic animations can reproduce the scene and demonstrate the activity at various points in time. The use of computer animation techniques to reconstruct crime scenes is beginning to replace the traditional illustrations, photographs, and verbal descriptions, and is becoming popular in today's forensics. This article integrates work in the areas of 3D graphics, computer vision, motion tracking, natural language processing, and forensic computing, to investigate the state-of-the-art in forensic visualization. It identifies and reviews areas where new applications of 3D digital technologies and artificial intelligence could be used to enhance particular phases of forensic visualization to create 3D models and animations automatically and quickly. Having discussed the relationships between major crime types and level-of-detail in corresponding forensic animations, we recognized that high level-of-detail animation involving human characters, which is appropriate for many major crime types but has had limited use in courtrooms, could be useful for crime investigation.

  16. Virtual reality and 3D animation in forensic visualization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Minhua; Zheng, Huiru; Lallie, Harjinder

    2010-09-01

    Computer-generated three-dimensional (3D) animation is an ideal media to accurately visualize crime or accident scenes to the viewers and in the courtrooms. Based upon factual data, forensic animations can reproduce the scene and demonstrate the activity at various points in time. The use of computer animation techniques to reconstruct crime scenes is beginning to replace the traditional illustrations, photographs, and verbal descriptions, and is becoming popular in today's forensics. This article integrates work in the areas of 3D graphics, computer vision, motion tracking, natural language processing, and forensic computing, to investigate the state-of-the-art in forensic visualization. It identifies and reviews areas where new applications of 3D digital technologies and artificial intelligence could be used to enhance particular phases of forensic visualization to create 3D models and animations automatically and quickly. Having discussed the relationships between major crime types and level-of-detail in corresponding forensic animations, we recognized that high level-of-detail animation involving human characters, which is appropriate for many major crime types but has had limited use in courtrooms, could be useful for crime investigation. PMID:20533989

  17. Improvements in the Visualization of Stereoscopic 3D Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrieri, Luis E.

    2015-09-01

    A pleasant visualization of stereoscopic imagery must take into account factors that may produce eye strain and fatigue. Fortunately, our binocular vision system has embedded mechanisms to perceive depth for extended periods of time without producing eye fatigue; however, stereoscopic imagery may still induce visual discomfort in certain displaying scenarios. An important source of eye fatigue originates in the conflict between vergence eye movement and focusing mechanisms. Today's eye-tracking technology makes possible to know the viewers' gaze direction; hence, 3D imagery can be dynamically corrected based on this information. In this paper, I introduce a method to improve the visualization of stereoscopic imagery on planar displays based on emulating vergence and accommodation mechanisms of binocular human vision. Unlike other methods to improve the visual comfort that introduce depth distortions, in the stereoscopic visual media, this technique aims to produce a gentler and more natural binocular viewing experience without distorting the original depth of the scene.

  18. Visualization of 2-D and 3-D Tensor Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesselink, Lambertus

    1997-01-01

    In previous work we have developed a novel approach to visualizing second order symmetric 2-D tensor fields based on degenerate point analysis. At degenerate points the eigenvalues are either zero or equal to each other, and the hyper-streamlines about these points give rise to tri-sector or wedge points. These singularities and their connecting hyper-streamlines determine the topology of the tensor field. In this study we are developing new methods for analyzing and displaying 3-D tensor fields. This problem is considerably more difficult than the 2-D one, as the richness of the data set is much larger. Here we report on our progress and a novel method to find , analyze and display 3-D degenerate points. First we discuss the theory, then an application involving a 3-D tensor field, the Boussinesq problem with two forces.

  19. Visualization of 2-D and 3-D Tensor Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesselink, Lambertus

    1995-01-01

    In previous work we have developed a novel approach to visualizing second order symmetric 2-D tensor fields based on degenerate point analysis. At degenerate points the eigenvalues are either zero or equal to each other, and the hyperstreamlines about these points give rise to trisector or wedge points. These singularities and their connecting hyperstreamlines determine the topology of the tensor field. In this study we are developing new methods for analyzing and displaying 3-D tensor fields. This problem is considerably more difficult than the 2-D one, as the richness of the data set is much larger. Here we report on our progress and a novel method to find, analyze and display 3-D degenerate points. First we discuss the theory, then an application involving a 3-D tensor field, the Boussinesq problem with two forces.

  20. Ideal Positions: 3D Sonography, Medical Visuality, Popular Culture.

    PubMed

    Seiber, Tim

    2016-03-01

    As digital technologies are integrated into medical environments, they continue to transform the experience of contemporary health care. Importantly, medicine is increasingly visual. In the history of sonography, visibility has played an important role in accessing fetal bodies for diagnostic and entertainment purposes. With the advent of three-dimensional (3D) rendering, sonography presents the fetus visually as already a child. The aesthetics of this process and the resulting imagery, made possible in digital networks, discloses important changes in the relationship between technology and biology, reproductive health and political debates, and biotechnology and culture.

  1. 3-D Flow Visualization of a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurow, Brian; Williams, Steven; Lynch, Kyle

    2009-11-01

    A recently developed 3-D flow visualization technique is used to visualize large-scale structures in a turbulent boundary layer. The technique is based on the scanning of a laser light sheet through the flow field similar to that of Delo and Smits (1997). High-speeds are possible using a recently developed MHz rate pulse burst laser system, an ultra-high-speed camera capable of 500,000 fps and a galvanometric scanning mirror yielding a total acquisition time of 136 microseconds for a 220 x 220 x 68 voxel image. In these experiments, smoke is seeded into the boundary layer formed on the wall of a low-speed wind tunnel. The boundary layer is approximately 1.5'' thick at the imaging location with a free stream velocity of 24 ft/s yielding a Reynolds number of 18,000 based on boundary layer thickness. The 3-D image volume is approximately 4'' x 4'' x 4''. Preliminary results using 3-D iso-surface visualizations show a collection of elongated large-scale structures inclined in the streamwise direction. The spanwise width of the structures, which are located in the outer region, is on the order of 25 -- 50% of the boundary layer thickness.

  2. Recovery and Visualization of 3D Structure of Chromosomes from Tomographic Reconstruction Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, Sabarish; Liao, Pao-Chuan; Shin, Min C.; Tsap, Leonid V.

    2006-12-01

    The objectives of this work include automatic recovery and visualization of a 3D chromosome structure from a sequence of 2D tomographic reconstruction images taken through the nucleus of a cell. Structure is very important for biologists as it affects chromosome functions, behavior of the cell, and its state. Analysis of chromosome structure is significant in the detection of diseases, identification of chromosomal abnormalities, study of DNA structural conformation, in-depth study of chromosomal surface morphology, observation of in vivo behavior of the chromosomes over time, and in monitoring environmental gene mutations. The methodology incorporates thresholding based on a histogram analysis with a polyline splitting algorithm, contour extraction via active contours, and detection of the 3D chromosome structure by establishing corresponding regions throughout the slices. Visualization using point cloud meshing generates a 3D surface. The 3D triangular mesh of the chromosomes provides surface detail and allows a user to interactively analyze chromosomes using visualization software.

  3. Recovery and Visualization of 3D Structure of Chromosomes from Tomographic Reconstruction Images

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, S; Liao, P; Shin, M C; Tsap, L V

    2004-04-28

    The objectives of this work include automatic recovery and visualization of a 3D chromosome structure from a sequence of 2D tomographic reconstruction images taken through the nucleus of a cell. Structure is very important for biologists as it affects chromosome functions, behavior of the cell and its state. Chromosome analysis is significant in the detection of deceases and in monitoring environmental gene mutations. The algorithm incorporates thresholding based on a histogram analysis with a polyline splitting algorithm, contour extraction via active contours, and detection of the 3D chromosome structure by establishing corresponding regions throughout the slices. Visualization using point cloud meshing generates a 3D surface. The 3D triangular mesh of the chromosomes provides surface detail and allows a user to interactively analyze chromosomes using visualization software.

  4. Breast tumour visualization using 3D quantitative ultrasound methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangeh, Mehrdad J.; Raheem, Abdul; Tadayyon, Hadi; Liu, Simon; Hadizad, Farnoosh; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancer types accounting for 29% of all cancer cases. Early detection and treatment has a crucial impact on improving the survival of affected patients. Ultrasound (US) is non-ionizing, portable, inexpensive, and real-time imaging modality for screening and quantifying breast cancer. Due to these attractive attributes, the last decade has witnessed many studies on using quantitative ultrasound (QUS) methods in tissue characterization. However, these studies have mainly been limited to 2-D QUS methods using hand-held US (HHUS) scanners. With the availability of automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) technology, this study is the first to develop 3-D QUS methods for the ABUS visualization of breast tumours. Using an ABUS system, unlike the manual 2-D HHUS device, the whole patient's breast was scanned in an automated manner. The acquired frames were subsequently examined and a region of interest (ROI) was selected in each frame where tumour was identified. Standard 2-D QUS methods were used to compute spectral and backscatter coefficient (BSC) parametric maps on the selected ROIs. Next, the computed 2-D parameters were mapped to a Cartesian 3-D space, interpolated, and rendered to provide a transparent color-coded visualization of the entire breast tumour. Such 3-D visualization can potentially be used for further analysis of the breast tumours in terms of their size and extension. Moreover, the 3-D volumetric scans can be used for tissue characterization and the categorization of breast tumours as benign or malignant by quantifying the computed parametric maps over the whole tumour volume.

  5. A geoscience perspective on immersive 3D gridded data visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billen, Magali I.; Kreylos, Oliver; Hamann, Bernd; Jadamec, Margarete A.; Kellogg, Louise H.; Staadt, Oliver; Sumner, Dawn Y.

    2008-09-01

    We describe visualization software, Visualizer, that was developed specifically for interactive, visual exploration in immersive virtual reality (VR) environments. Visualizer uses carefully optimized algorithms and data structures to support the high frame rates required for immersion and the real-time feedback required for interactivity. As an application developed for VR from the ground up, Visualizer realizes benefits that usually cannot be achieved by software initially developed for the desktop and later ported to VR. However, Visualizer can also be used on desktop systems (unix/linux-based operating systems including Mac OS X) with a similar level of real-time interactivity, bridging the "software gap" between desktop and VR that has been an obstacle for the adoption of VR methods in the Geosciences. While many of the capabilities of Visualizer are already available in other software packages used in a desktop environment, the features that distinguish Visualizer are: (1) Visualizer can be used in any VR environment including the desktop, GeoWall, or CAVE, (2) in non-desktop environments the user interacts with the data set directly using a wand or other input devices instead of working indirectly via dialog boxes or text input, (3) on the desktop, Visualizer provides real-time interaction with very large data sets that cannot easily be viewed or manipulated in other software packages. Three case studies are presented that illustrate the direct scientific benefits realized by analyzing data or simulation results with Visualizer in a VR environment. We also address some of the main obstacles to widespread use of VR environments in scientific research with a user study that shows Visualizer is easy to learn and to use in a VR environment and can be as effective on desktop systems as native desktop applications.

  6. 3D Visualization Types in Multimedia Applications for Science Learning: A Case Study for 8th Grade Students in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korakakis, G.; Pavlatou, E. A.; Palyvos, J. A.; Spyrellis, N.

    2009-01-01

    This research aims to determine whether the use of specific types of visualization (3D illustration, 3D animation, and interactive 3D animation) combined with narration and text, contributes to the learning process of 13- and 14- years-old students in science courses. The study was carried out with 212 8th grade students in Greece. This…

  7. 2D/3D Visual Tracker for Rover Mast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajracharya, Max; Madison, Richard W.; Nesnas, Issa A.; Bandari, Esfandiar; Kunz, Clayton; Deans, Matt; Bualat, Maria

    2006-01-01

    A visual-tracker computer program controls an articulated mast on a Mars rover to keep a designated feature (a target) in view while the rover drives toward the target, avoiding obstacles. Several prior visual-tracker programs have been tested on rover platforms; most require very small and well-estimated motion between consecutive image frames a requirement that is not realistic for a rover on rough terrain. The present visual-tracker program is designed to handle large image motions that lead to significant changes in feature geometry and photometry between frames. When a point is selected in one of the images acquired from stereoscopic cameras on the mast, a stereo triangulation algorithm computes a three-dimensional (3D) location for the target. As the rover moves, its body-mounted cameras feed images to a visual-odometry algorithm, which tracks two-dimensional (2D) corner features and computes their old and new 3D locations. The algorithm rejects points, the 3D motions of which are inconsistent with a rigid-world constraint, and then computes the apparent change in the rover pose (i.e., translation and rotation). The mast pan and tilt angles needed to keep the target centered in the field-of-view of the cameras (thereby minimizing the area over which the 2D-tracking algorithm must operate) are computed from the estimated change in the rover pose, the 3D position of the target feature, and a model of kinematics of the mast. If the motion between the consecutive frames is still large (i.e., 3D tracking was unsuccessful), an adaptive view-based matching technique is applied to the new image. This technique uses correlation-based template matching, in which a feature template is scaled by the ratio between the depth in the original template and the depth of pixels in the new image. This is repeated over the entire search window and the best correlation results indicate the appropriate match. The program could be a core for building application programs for systems

  8. 3D-printer visualization of neuron models

    PubMed Central

    McDougal, Robert A.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes. In a quest to understand this neuronal diversity, researchers have three-dimensionally traced tens of thousands of neurons; many of these tracings are freely available through online repositories like NeuroMorpho.Org and ModelDB. Tracings can be visualized on the computer screen, used for statistical analysis of the properties of different cell types, used to simulate neuronal behavior, and more. We introduce the use of 3D printing as a technique for visualizing traced morphologies. Our method for generating printable versions of a cell or group of cells is to expand dendrite and axon diameters and then to transform the tracing into a 3D object with a neuronal surface generating algorithm like Constructive Tessellated Neuronal Geometry (CTNG). We show that 3D printed cells can be readily examined, manipulated, and compared with other neurons to gain insight into both the biology and the reconstruction process. We share our printable models in a new database, 3DModelDB, and encourage others to do the same with cells that they generate using our code or other methods. To provide additional context, 3DModelDB provides a simulatable version of each cell, links to papers that use or describe it, and links to associated entries in other databases. PMID:26175684

  9. 3D-printer visualization of neuron models.

    PubMed

    McDougal, Robert A; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2015-01-01

    Neurons come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes. In a quest to understand this neuronal diversity, researchers have three-dimensionally traced tens of thousands of neurons; many of these tracings are freely available through online repositories like NeuroMorpho.Org and ModelDB. Tracings can be visualized on the computer screen, used for statistical analysis of the properties of different cell types, used to simulate neuronal behavior, and more. We introduce the use of 3D printing as a technique for visualizing traced morphologies. Our method for generating printable versions of a cell or group of cells is to expand dendrite and axon diameters and then to transform the tracing into a 3D object with a neuronal surface generating algorithm like Constructive Tessellated Neuronal Geometry (CTNG). We show that 3D printed cells can be readily examined, manipulated, and compared with other neurons to gain insight into both the biology and the reconstruction process. We share our printable models in a new database, 3DModelDB, and encourage others to do the same with cells that they generate using our code or other methods. To provide additional context, 3DModelDB provides a simulatable version of each cell, links to papers that use or describe it, and links to associated entries in other databases.

  10. Visualization and Analysis of 3D Gene Expression Data

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, E. Wes; Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Hamann, Bernd; Hagen, Hans

    2007-10-25

    Recent methods for extracting precise measurements ofspatial gene expression patterns from three-dimensional (3D) image dataopens the way for new analysis of the complex gene regulatory networkscontrolling animal development. To support analysis of this novel andhighly complex data we developed PointCloudXplore (PCX), an integratedvisualization framework that supports dedicated multi-modal, physical andinformation visualization views along with algorithms to aid in analyzingthe relationships between gene expression levels. Using PCX, we helpedour science stakeholders to address many questions in 3D gene expressionresearch, e.g., to objectively define spatial pattern boundaries andtemporal profiles of genes and to analyze how mRNA patterns arecontrolled by their regulatory transcription factors.

  11. Visual storytelling in 2D and stereoscopic 3D video: effect of blur on visual attention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh-Thu, Quan; Vienne, Cyril; Blondé, Laurent

    2013-03-01

    Visual attention is an inherent mechanism that plays an important role in the human visual perception. As our visual system has limited capacity and cannot efficiently process the information from the entire visual field, we focus our attention on specific areas of interest in the image for detailed analysis of these areas. In the context of media entertainment, the viewers' visual attention deployment is also influenced by the art of visual storytelling. To this date, visual editing and composition of scenes in stereoscopic 3D content creation still mostly follows those used in 2D. In particular, out-of-focus blur is often used in 2D motion pictures and photography to drive the viewer's attention towards a sharp area of the image. In this paper, we study specifically the impact of defocused foreground objects on visual attention deployment in stereoscopic 3D content. For that purpose, we conducted a subjective experiment using an eyetracker. Our results bring more insights on the deployment of visual attention in stereoscopic 3D content viewing, and provide further understanding on visual attention behavior differences between 2D and 3D. Our results show that a traditional 2D scene compositing approach such as the use of foreground blur does not necessarily produce the same effect on visual attention deployment in 2D and 3D. Implications for stereoscopic content creation and visual fatigue are discussed.

  12. Visualizing 3D Turbulence On Temporally Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, D. E.; Kadlec, B. J.; Yuen, D. A.; Erlebacher, G.

    2005-12-01

    Today there is an explosion in data from high-resolution computations of nonlinear phenomena in many fields, including the geo- and environmental sciences. The efficient storage and subsequent visualization of these large data sets is a trade off in storage costs versus data quality. New dynamically adaptive simulation methodologies promise significant computational cost savings and have the added benefit of producing results on adapted grids that significantly reduce storage and data manipulation costs. Yet, with these adaptive simulation methodologies come new challenges in the visualization of temporally adaptive data sets. In this work turbulence data sets from Stochastic Coherent Adaptive Large Eddy Simulations (SCALES) are visualized with the open source tool ParaView, as a challenging case study. SCALES simulations use a temporally adaptive collocation grid defined by wavelet threshold filtering to resolve the most energetic coherent structures in a turbulence field. A subgrid scale model is used to account for the effect of unresolved subgrid scale modes. The results from the SCALES simulations are saved on a thresholded dyadic wavelet collocation grid, which by its nature does not include cell information. Paraview is an open source visualization package developed by KitWare(tm) that is based on the widely used VTK graphics toolkit. The efficient generation of cell information, required with current ParaView data formats, is explored using custom algorithms and VTK toolkit routines. Adaptive 3d visualizations using isosurfaces and volume visualizations are compared with non-adaptive visualizations. To explore the localized multiscale structures in the turbulent data sets the wavelet coefficients are also visualized allowing visualization of energy contained in local physical regions as well as in local wave number space.

  13. FROMS3D: New Software for 3-D Visualization of Fracture Network System in Fractured Rock Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Y. H.; Um, J. G.; Choi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    A new software (FROMS3D) is presented to visualize fracture network system in 3-D. The software consists of several modules that play roles in management of borehole and field fracture data, fracture network modelling, visualization of fracture geometry in 3-D and calculation and visualization of intersections and equivalent pipes between fractures. Intel Parallel Studio XE 2013, Visual Studio.NET 2010 and the open source VTK library were utilized as development tools to efficiently implement the modules and the graphical user interface of the software. The results have suggested that the developed software is effective in visualizing 3-D fracture network system, and can provide useful information to tackle the engineering geological problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviors of the fractured rock masses.

  14. 3D reconstruction and visualization of plant leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiaomeng; Xu, Lihong; Li, Dawei; Zhang, Peng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional reconstruction method, which is based on point clouds and texture images, is used to realize the visualization of leaves of greenhouse crops. We take Epipremnum aureum as the object for study and focus on applying the triangular meshing method to organize and categorize scattered point cloud input data of leaves, and then construct a triangulated surface with interconnection topology to simulate the real surface of the object. At last we texture-map the leaf surface with real images to present a life-like 3D model which can be used to simulate the growth of greenhouse plants.

  15. Advanced Visualization of Experimental Data in Real Time Using LiveView3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Richard J.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2006-01-01

    LiveView3D is a software application that imports and displays a variety of wind tunnel derived data in an interactive virtual environment in real time. LiveView3D combines the use of streaming video fed into a three-dimensional virtual representation of the test configuration with networked communications to the test facility Data Acquisition System (DAS). This unified approach to real time data visualization provides a unique opportunity to comprehend very large sets of diverse forms of data in a real time situation, as well as in post-test analysis. This paper describes how LiveView3D has been implemented to visualize diverse forms of aerodynamic data gathered during wind tunnel experiments, most notably at the NASA Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). Planned future developments of the LiveView3D system are also addressed.

  16. LiveView3D: Real Time Data Visualization for the Aerospace Testing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Richard J.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses LiveView3D, a software package and associated data visualization system for use in the aerospace testing environment. The LiveView3D system allows researchers to graphically view data from numerous wind tunnel instruments in real time in an interactive virtual environment. The graphical nature of the LiveView3D display provides researchers with an intuitive view of the measurement data, making it easier to interpret the aerodynamic phenomenon under investigation. LiveView3D has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center and has been applied in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). This paper discusses the capabilities of the LiveView3D system, provides example results from its application in the UPWT, and outlines features planned for future implementation.

  17. Use of Colour and Interactive Animation in Learning 3D Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iskander, Wejdan; Curtis, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of two computer-implemented techniques (colour and interactive animation) on learning 3D vectors. The participants were 43 female Saudi Arabian high school students. They were pre-tested on 3D vectors using a paper questionnaire that consisted of calculation and visualization types of questions. The students…

  18. Image segmentation and 3D visualization for MRI mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lihua; Chu, Yong; Salem, Angela F.; Clark, Robert A.

    2002-05-01

    MRI mammography has a number of advantages, including the tomographic, and therefore three-dimensional (3-D) nature, of the images. It allows the application of MRI mammography to breasts with dense tissue, post operative scarring, and silicon implants. However, due to the vast quantity of images and subtlety of difference in MR sequence, there is a need for reliable computer diagnosis to reduce the radiologist's workload. The purpose of this work was to develop automatic breast/tissue segmentation and visualization algorithms to aid physicians in detecting and observing abnormalities in breast. Two segmentation algorithms were developed: one for breast segmentation, the other for glandular tissue segmentation. In breast segmentation, the MRI image is first segmented using an adaptive growing clustering method. Two tracing algorithms were then developed to refine the breast air and chest wall boundaries of breast. The glandular tissue segmentation was performed using an adaptive thresholding method, in which the threshold value was spatially adaptive using a sliding window. The 3D visualization of the segmented 2D slices of MRI mammography was implemented under IDL environment. The breast and glandular tissue rendering, slicing and animation were displayed.

  19. JHelioviewer: Visualizing the Sun and Heliosphere in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, D.; Spoerri, S.; Pagel, S.

    2012-12-01

    The next generation of heliophysics missions, Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, will focus on exploring the linkage between the Sun and the heliosphere. These new missions will collect unique data that will allow us to study, e.g., the coupling between macroscopic physical processes to those on kinetic scales, the generation of solar energetic particles and their propagation into the heliosphere and the origin and acceleration of solar wind plasma. Already today, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory returns 1.4 TB/day of high-resolution solar images, magnetograms and EUV irradiance data. Within a few years, the scientific community will thus have access to petabytes of multidimensional remote-sensinng and complex in-situ observations from different vantage points, complemented by petabytes of simulation data. Answering overarching science questions like "How do solar transients drive heliospheric variability and space weather?" will only be possible if the community has the necessary tools at hand. As of today, there is an obvious lack of capability to both visualize these data and assimilate them into sophisticated models to advance our knowledge. A key piece needed to bridge the gap between observables, derived quantities like vector fields and model output is a tool to routinely and intuitively visualize large heterogeneous, multidimensional, time-dependent data sets. While a few tools exist to visualize, e.g., 3D data sets for a small number of time steps, the space sciences community is lacking the equipment to do this (i) on a routine basis, (ii) for complex multidimensional data sets from various instruments and vantage points and (iii) in an extensible and modular way that is open for future improvements and interdisciplinary usage. In this contribution, we will present recent progress in visualizing the Sun and its magnetic field in 3D using the open-source JHelioviewer framework, which is part of the ESA/NASA Helioviewer Project. Among other features

  20. Research and implementation of visualization techniques for 3D explosion fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Jianguo; Xu, Xiangzhao; Ma, Tianbao; Yu, Wen

    2015-12-01

    The visualization of scalar data in 3D explosion fields was devised to solve the problems of the complex physical and the huge data in numerical simulation of explosion mechanics problems. For enhancing the explosion effects and reducing the impacts of image analysis, the adjustment coefficient was added into original Phong illumination model. A variety of accelerated volume rendering algorithm and multithread technique were used to realize the fast rendering and real-time interactive control of 3D explosion fields. Cutaway view was implemented, so arbitrary section of 3D explosion fields can be seen conveniently. Slice can be extracted along three axes of 3D explosion fields, and the value at an arbitrary point on the slice can be gained. The experiment results show that the volume rendering acceleration algorithm can generate high quality images and can increase the speed of image generating, while achieve interactive control quickly.

  1. Planetary subsurface investigation by 3D visualization model .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seu, R.; Catallo, C.; Tragni, M.; Abbattista, C.; Cinquepalmi, L.

    Subsurface data analysis and visualization represents one of the main aspect in Planetary Observation (i.e. search for water or geological characterization). The data are collected by subsurface sounding radars as instruments on-board of deep space missions. These data are generally represented as 2D radargrams in the perspective of space track and z axes (perpendicular to the subsurface) but without direct correlation to other data acquisition or knowledge on the planet . In many case there are plenty of data from other sensors of the same mission, or other ones, with high continuity in time and in space and specially around the scientific sites of interest (i.e. candidate landing areas or particular scientific interesting sites). The 2D perspective is good to analyse single acquisitions and to perform detailed analysis on the returned echo but are quite useless to compare very large dataset as now are available on many planets and moons of solar system. The best way is to approach the analysis on 3D visualization model generated from the entire stack of data. First of all this approach allows to navigate the subsurface in all directions and analyses different sections and slices or moreover navigate the iso-surfaces respect to a value (or interval). The last one allows to isolate one or more iso-surfaces and remove, in the visualization mode, other data not interesting for the analysis; finally it helps to individuate the underground 3D bodies. Other aspect is the needs to link the on-ground data, as imaging, to the underground one by geographical and context field of view.

  2. Interactive initialization of 2D/3D rigid registration

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Ren Hui; Güler, Özgür; Kürklüoglu, Mustafa; Lovejoy, John; Yaniv, Ziv

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Registration is one of the key technical components in an image-guided navigation system. A large number of 2D/3D registration algorithms have been previously proposed, but have not been able to transition into clinical practice. The authors identify the primary reason for the lack of adoption with the prerequisite for a sufficiently accurate initial transformation, mean target registration error of about 10 mm or less. In this paper, the authors present two interactive initialization approaches that provide the desired accuracy for x-ray/MR and x-ray/CT registration in the operating room setting. Methods: The authors have developed two interactive registration methods based on visual alignment of a preoperative image, MR, or CT to intraoperative x-rays. In the first approach, the operator uses a gesture based interface to align a volume rendering of the preoperative image to multiple x-rays. The second approach uses a tracked tool available as part of a navigation system. Preoperatively, a virtual replica of the tool is positioned next to the anatomical structures visible in the volumetric data. Intraoperatively, the physical tool is positioned in a similar manner and subsequently used to align a volume rendering to the x-ray images using an augmented reality (AR) approach. Both methods were assessed using three publicly available reference data sets for 2D/3D registration evaluation. Results: In the authors' experiments, the authors show that for x-ray/MR registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mean target registration error (mTRE) of 9.3 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 146.3 ± 73.0 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 7.2 ± 3.2 mm with interaction times of 44 ± 32 s. For x-ray/CT registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mTRE of 7.4 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 132.1 ± 66.4 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 8.3 ± 5.0 mm with interaction times of 58 ± 52 s. Conclusions: Based on the

  3. Image-guided prostate sectioning supporting registration of graded cancerous foci from digital histopathology images to in vivo MRI: an interactive 3D visualization tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, E.; Fenster, A.; Crukley, C.; McKenzie, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Moussa, M.; Bauman, G.; Ward, A. D.

    2011-03-01

    Personalized treatment of prostate cancer would be enhanced by an assessment of cancer stage and grade from imaging, the validation of which requires the accurate co-registration of in vivo images with a gold standard for stage and grade established by histopathology. We present a visualization tool supporting an image-guided approach enabling the acquisition of histopathology images parallel to the in vivo imaging planes, simplifying this registration. This tool decreases imaging-to-specimen landmark alignment error by 62%, and decreases the time required to mark the slicing plane on the specimen by 47%. Preliminary results from our method demonstrate the alignment of regions suspicious for cancer on T2w MRI with confirmed cancer foci on histopathology, and we calculate a sub-millimeter in-plane target registration error.

  4. A new multimodal interactive way of subjective scoring of 3D video quality of experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewan; Lee, Kwanghyun; Lee, Sanghoon; Bovik, Alan C.

    2014-03-01

    People that watch today's 3D visual programs, such as 3D cinema, 3D TV and 3D games, experience wide and dynamically varying ranges of 3D visual immersion and 3D quality of experience (QoE). It is necessary to be able to deploy reliable methodologies that measure each viewers subjective experience. We propose a new methodology that we call Multimodal Interactive Continuous Scoring of Quality (MICSQ). MICSQ is composed of a device interaction process between the 3D display and a separate device (PC, tablet, etc.) used as an assessment tool, and a human interaction process between the subject(s) and the device. The scoring process is multimodal, using aural and tactile cues to help engage and focus the subject(s) on their tasks. Moreover, the wireless device interaction process makes it possible for multiple subjects to assess 3D QoE simultaneously in a large space such as a movie theater, and at di®erent visual angles and distances.

  5. Visualization package for 3D laser-scanned geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Paul F.; Sadler, Lewis L.

    1993-06-01

    A computer software package named LEGO was designed and implemented to enable medical personnel to explore and manipulate laser scanned 3D geometry obtained from a Cyberware 4020PS scanner. This type of scanner reconstructs a real world object into a mathematical computer model by collecting thousands of depth measurement using a low powered laser. LEGO consists of a collection of tools that can be interactively combined to accomplish complex tasks. Tools fall into five major categories: viewing, simple, quantitative, manipulative, and miscellaneous. This paper is based on a masters thesis obtained from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

  6. Visualizing 3D fracture morphology in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbe, Marie-Julie; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media plays a fundamental role in many natural and engineered subsurface processes. The interplay between fluid flow, medium deformation and fracture is essential in geoscience problems as disparate as fracking for unconventional hydrocarbon production, conduit formation and methane venting from lake and ocean sediments, and desiccation cracks in soil. Recent work has pointed to the importance of capillary forces in some relevant regimes of fracturing of granular materials (Sandnes et al., Nat. Comm. 2011), leading to the term hydro-capillary fracturing (Holtzman et al., PRL 2012). Most of these experimental and computational investigations have focused, however, on 2D or quasi-2D systems. Here, we develop an experimental set-up that allows us to observe two-phase flow in a 3D granular bed, and control the level of confining stress. We use an index matching technique to directly visualize the injection of a liquid in a granular media saturated with another, immiscible liquid. We determine the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system, and elucidate different regimes of the invasion pattern. We present result for the 3D morphology of the invasion, with particular emphasis on the fracturing regime.

  7. Visualizing 3D Fracture Morphology in Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbe, M. J.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media plays a fundamental role in many natural and engineered subsurface processes. The interplay between fluid flow, medium deformation and fracture is essential in geoscience problems as disparate as fracking for unconventional hydrocarbon production, conduit formation and methane venting from lake and ocean sediments, and desiccation cracks in soil. Recent work has pointed to the importance of capillary forces in some relevant regimes of fracturing of granular materials (Sandnes et al., Nat. Comm. 2011), leading to the term hydro-capillary fracturing (Holtzman et al., PRL 2012). Most of these experimental and computational investigations have focused, however, on 2D or quasi-2D systems. Here, we develop an experimental set-up that allows us to observe two-phase flow in a 3D granular bed, and control the level of confining stress. We use an index matching technique to directly visualize the injection of a liquid in a granular media saturated with another, immiscible liquid. We determine the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system, and elucidate different regimes of the invasion pattern. We present result for the 3D morphology of the invasion, with particular emphasis on the fracturing regime.

  8. An object oriented fully 3D tomography visual toolkit.

    PubMed

    Agostinelli, S; Paoli, G

    2001-04-01

    In this paper we present a modern object oriented component object model (COMM) C + + toolkit dedicated to fully 3D cone-beam tomography. The toolkit allows the display and visual manipulation of analytical phantoms, projection sets and volumetric data through a standard Windows graphical user interface. Data input/output is performed using proprietary file formats but import/export of industry standard file formats, including raw binary, Windows bitmap and AVI, ACR/NEMA DICOMM 3 and NCSA HDF is available. At the time of writing built-in implemented data manipulators include a basic phantom ray-tracer and a Matrox Genesis frame grabbing facility. A COMM plug-in interface is provided for user-defined custom backprojector algorithms: a simple Feldkamp ActiveX control, including source code, is provided as an example; our fast Feldkamp plug-in is also available.

  9. A 3D Vector/Scalar Visualization and Particle Tracking Package

    1999-08-19

    BOILERMAKER is an interactive visualization system consisting of three components: a visualization component, a particle tracking component, and a communication layer. The software, to date, has been used primarily in the visualization of vector and scalar fields associated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of flue gas flows in industrial boilers and incinerators. Users can interactively request and toggle static vector fields, dynamic streamlines, and flowing vector fields. In addition, the user can interactively placemore » injector nozzles on boiler walls and visualize massed, evaporating sprays emanating from them. Some characteristics of the spray can be adjusted from within the visualization environment including spray shape and particle size. Also included with this release is software that supports 3D menu capabilities, scrollbars, communication and navigation.« less

  10. A 3D Vector/Scalar Visualization and Particle Tracking Package

    SciTech Connect

    Freitag, Lori; Disz, Terry; Papka, Mike; Heath, Daniel; Diachin, Darin; Herzog, Jim; Ryan, and Bob

    1999-08-19

    BOILERMAKER is an interactive visualization system consisting of three components: a visualization component, a particle tracking component, and a communication layer. The software, to date, has been used primarily in the visualization of vector and scalar fields associated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of flue gas flows in industrial boilers and incinerators. Users can interactively request and toggle static vector fields, dynamic streamlines, and flowing vector fields. In addition, the user can interactively place injector nozzles on boiler walls and visualize massed, evaporating sprays emanating from them. Some characteristics of the spray can be adjusted from within the visualization environment including spray shape and particle size. Also included with this release is software that supports 3D menu capabilities, scrollbars, communication and navigation.

  11. A web-based solution for 3D medical image visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiaoshuai; Sun, Jianyong; Zhang, Jianguo

    2015-03-01

    In this presentation, we present a web-based 3D medical image visualization solution which enables interactive large medical image data processing and visualization over the web platform. To improve the efficiency of our solution, we adopt GPU accelerated techniques to process images on the server side while rapidly transferring images to the HTML5 supported web browser on the client side. Compared to traditional local visualization solution, our solution doesn't require the users to install extra software or download the whole volume dataset from PACS server. By designing this web-based solution, it is feasible for users to access the 3D medical image visualization service wherever the internet is available.

  12. Demonstration of three gorges archaeological relics based on 3D-visualization technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenli

    2015-12-01

    This paper mainly focuses on the digital demonstration of three gorges archeological relics to exhibit the achievements of the protective measures. A novel and effective method based on 3D-visualization technology, which includes large-scaled landscape reconstruction, virtual studio, and virtual panoramic roaming, etc, is proposed to create a digitized interactive demonstration system. The method contains three stages: pre-processing, 3D modeling and integration. Firstly, abundant archaeological information is classified according to its history and geographical information. Secondly, build up a 3D-model library with the technology of digital images processing and 3D modeling. Thirdly, use virtual reality technology to display the archaeological scenes and cultural relics vividly and realistically. The present work promotes the application of virtual reality to digital projects and enriches the content of digital archaeology.

  13. Trans3D: a free tool for dynamical visualization of EEG activity transmission in the brain.

    PubMed

    Blinowski, Grzegorz; Kamiński, Maciej; Wawer, Dariusz

    2014-08-01

    The problem of functional connectivity in the brain is in the focus of attention nowadays, since it is crucial for understanding information processing in the brain. A large repertoire of measures of connectivity have been devised, some of them being capable of estimating time-varying directed connectivity. Hence, there is a need for a dedicated software tool for visualizing the propagation of electrical activity in the brain. To this aim, the Trans3D application was developed. It is an open access tool based on widely available libraries and supporting both Windows XP/Vista/7(™), Linux and Mac environments. Trans3D can create animations of activity propagation between electrodes/sensors, which can be placed by the user on the scalp/cortex of a 3D model of the head. Various interactive graphic functions for manipulating and visualizing components of the 3D model and input data are available. An application of the Trans3D tool has helped to elucidate the dynamics of the phenomena of information processing in motor and cognitive tasks, which otherwise would have been very difficult to observe. Trans3D is available at: http://www.eeg.pl/.

  14. Tools for 3D scientific visualization in computational aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gordon; Plessel, Todd; Merritt, Fergus; Watson, Val

    1989-01-01

    The purpose is to describe the tools and techniques in use at the NASA Ames Research Center for performing visualization of computational aerodynamics, for example visualization of flow fields from computer simulations of fluid dynamics about vehicles such as the Space Shuttle. The hardware used for visualization is a high-performance graphics workstation connected to a super computer with a high speed channel. At present, the workstation is a Silicon Graphics IRIS 3130, the supercomputer is a CRAY2, and the high speed channel is a hyperchannel. The three techniques used for visualization are post-processing, tracking, and steering. Post-processing analysis is done after the simulation. Tracking analysis is done during a simulation but is not interactive, whereas steering analysis involves modifying the simulation interactively during the simulation. Using post-processing methods, a flow simulation is executed on a supercomputer and, after the simulation is complete, the results of the simulation are processed for viewing. The software in use and under development at NASA Ames Research Center for performing these types of tasks in computational aerodynamics is described. Workstation performance issues, benchmarking, and high-performance networks for this purpose are also discussed as well as descriptions of other hardware for digital video and film recording.

  15. Exploratory Climate Data Visualization and Analysis Using DV3D and UVCDAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Earth system scientists are being inundated by an explosion of data generated by ever-increasing resolution in both global models and remote sensors. Advanced tools for accessing, analyzing, and visualizing very large and complex climate data are required to maintain rapid progress in Earth system research. To meet this need, NASA, in collaboration with the Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UVCOAT) consortium, is developing exploratory climate data analysis and visualization tools which provide data analysis capabilities for the Earth System Grid (ESG). This paper describes DV3D, a UV-COAT package that enables exploratory analysis of climate simulation and observation datasets. OV3D provides user-friendly interfaces for visualization and analysis of climate data at a level appropriate for scientists. It features workflow inte rfaces, interactive 40 data exploration, hyperwall and stereo visualization, automated provenance generation, and parallel task execution. DV30's integration with CDAT's climate data management system (COMS) and other climate data analysis tools provides a wide range of high performance climate data analysis operations. DV3D expands the scientists' toolbox by incorporating a suite of rich new exploratory visualization and analysis methods for addressing the complexity of climate datasets.

  16. Designing stereoscopic information visualization for 3D-TV: What can we can learn from S3D gaming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    This paper explores graphical design and spatial alignment of visual information and graphical elements into stereoscopically filmed content, e.g. captions, subtitles, and especially more complex elements in 3D-TV productions. The method used is a descriptive analysis of existing computer- and video games that have been adapted for stereoscopic display using semi-automatic rendering techniques (e.g. Nvidia 3D Vision) or games which have been specifically designed for stereoscopic vision. Digital games often feature compelling visual interfaces that combine high usability with creative visual design. We explore selected examples of game interfaces in stereoscopic vision regarding their stereoscopic characteristics, how they draw attention, how we judge effect and comfort and where the interfaces fail. As a result, we propose a list of five aspects which should be considered when designing stereoscopic visual information: explicit information, implicit information, spatial reference, drawing attention, and vertical alignment. We discuss possible consequences, opportunities and challenges for integrating visual information elements into 3D-TV content. This work shall further help to improve current editing systems and identifies a need for future editing systems for 3DTV, e.g., live editing and real-time alignment of visual information into 3D footage.

  17. [A positioning error measurement method in radiotherapy based on 3D visualization].

    PubMed

    An, Ji-Ye; Li, Yue-Xi; Lu, Xu-Dong; Duan, Hui-Long

    2007-09-01

    The positioning error in radiotherapy is one of the most important factors that influence the location precision of the tumor. Based on the CT-on-rails technology, this paper describes the research on measuring the positioning error in radiotherapy by comparing the planning CT images with the treatment CT images using 3-dimension (3D) methods. It can help doctors to measure positioning errors more accurately than 2D methods. It also supports the powerful 3D interaction such as drag-dropping, rotating and picking-up the object, so that doctors can visualize and measure the positioning errors intuitively.

  18. Influence of Gsd for 3d City Modeling and Visualization from Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrajhi, Muhamad; Alam, Zafare; Afroz Khan, Mohammad; Alobeid, Abdalla

    2016-06-01

    Ministry of Municipal and Rural Affairs (MOMRA), aims to establish solid infrastructure required for 3D city modelling, for decision making to set a mark in urban development. MOMRA is responsible for the large scale mapping 1:1,000; 1:2,500; 1:10,000 and 1:20,000 scales for 10cm, 20cm and 40 GSD with Aerial Triangulation data. As 3D city models are increasingly used for the presentation exploration, and evaluation of urban and architectural designs. Visualization capabilities and animations support of upcoming 3D geo-information technologies empower architects, urban planners, and authorities to visualize and analyze urban and architectural designs in the context of the existing situation. To make use of this possibility, first of all 3D city model has to be created for which MOMRA uses the Aerial Triangulation data and aerial imagery. The main concise for 3D city modelling in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia exists due to uneven surface and undulations. Thus real time 3D visualization and interactive exploration support planning processes by providing multiple stakeholders such as decision maker, architects, urban planners, authorities, citizens or investors with a three - dimensional model. Apart from advanced visualization, these 3D city models can be helpful for dealing with natural hazards and provide various possibilities to deal with exotic conditions by better and advanced viewing technological infrastructure. Riyadh on one side is 5700m above sea level and on the other hand Abha city is 2300m, this uneven terrain represents a drastic change of surface in the Kingdom, for which 3D city models provide valuable solutions with all possible opportunities. In this research paper: influence of different GSD (Ground Sample Distance) aerial imagery with Aerial Triangulation is used for 3D visualization in different region of the Kingdom, to check which scale is more sophisticated for obtaining better results and is cost manageable, with GSD (7.5cm, 10cm, 20cm and 40cm

  19. Constructing 3D interaction maps from 1D epigenomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yun; Chen, Zhao; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Mengchi; Medovoy, David; Whitaker, John W.; Ding, Bo; Li, Nan; Zheng, Lina; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The human genome is tightly packaged into chromatin whose functional output depends on both one-dimensional (1D) local chromatin states and three-dimensional (3D) genome organization. Currently, chromatin modifications and 3D genome organization are measured by distinct assays. An emerging question is whether it is possible to deduce 3D interactions by integrative analysis of 1D epigenomic data and associate 3D contacts to functionality of the interacting loci. Here we present EpiTensor, an algorithm to identify 3D spatial associations within topologically associating domains (TADs) from 1D maps of histone modifications, chromatin accessibility and RNA-seq. We demonstrate that active promoter–promoter, promoter–enhancer and enhancer–enhancer associations identified by EpiTensor are highly concordant with those detected by Hi-C, ChIA-PET and eQTL analyses at 200 bp resolution. Moreover, EpiTensor has identified a set of interaction hotspots, characterized by higher chromatin and transcriptional activity as well as enriched TF and ncRNA binding across diverse cell types, which may be critical for stabilizing the local 3D interactions. PMID:26960733

  20. Constructing 3D interaction maps from 1D epigenomes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Chen, Zhao; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Mengchi; Medovoy, David; Whitaker, John W; Ding, Bo; Li, Nan; Zheng, Lina; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The human genome is tightly packaged into chromatin whose functional output depends on both one-dimensional (1D) local chromatin states and three-dimensional (3D) genome organization. Currently, chromatin modifications and 3D genome organization are measured by distinct assays. An emerging question is whether it is possible to deduce 3D interactions by integrative analysis of 1D epigenomic data and associate 3D contacts to functionality of the interacting loci. Here we present EpiTensor, an algorithm to identify 3D spatial associations within topologically associating domains (TADs) from 1D maps of histone modifications, chromatin accessibility and RNA-seq. We demonstrate that active promoter-promoter, promoter-enhancer and enhancer-enhancer associations identified by EpiTensor are highly concordant with those detected by Hi-C, ChIA-PET and eQTL analyses at 200 bp resolution. Moreover, EpiTensor has identified a set of interaction hotspots, characterized by higher chromatin and transcriptional activity as well as enriched TF and ncRNA binding across diverse cell types, which may be critical for stabilizing the local 3D interactions. PMID:26960733

  1. Analysis and dynamic 3D visualization of cerebral blood flow combining 3D and 4D MR image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkert, Nils Daniel; Säring, Dennis; Fiehler, Jens; Illies, Till; Möller, Dietmar; Handels, Heinz

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we present a method for the dynamic visualization of cerebral blood flow. Spatio-temporal 4D magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) image datasets and 3D MRA datasets with high spatial resolution were acquired for the analysis of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). One of the main tasks is the combination of the information of the 3D and 4D MRA image sequences. Initially, in the 3D MRA dataset the vessel system is segmented and a 3D surface model is generated. Then, temporal intensity curves are analyzed voxelwise in the 4D MRA image sequences. A curve fitting of the temporal intensity curves to a patient individual reference curve is used to extract the bolus arrival times in the 4D MRA sequences. After non-linear registration of both MRA datasets the extracted hemodynamic information is transferred to the surface model where the time points of inflow can be visualized color coded dynamically over time. The dynamic visualizations computed using the curve fitting method for the estimation of the bolus arrival times were rated superior compared to those computed using conventional approaches for bolus arrival time estimation. In summary the procedure suggested allows a dynamic visualization of the individual hemodynamic situation and better understanding during the visual evaluation of cerebral vascular diseases.

  2. S3D: An interactive surface grid generation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luh, Raymond Ching-Chung; Pierce, Lawrence E.; Yip, David

    1992-01-01

    S3D, an interactive software tool for surface grid generation, is described. S3D provides the means with which a geometry definition based either on a discretized curve set or a rectangular set can be quickly processed towards the generation of a surface grid for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications. This is made possible as a result of implementing commonly encountered surface gridding tasks in an environment with a highly efficient and user friendly graphical interface. Some of the more advanced features of S3D include surface-surface intersections, optimized surface domain decomposition and recomposition, and automated propagation of edge distributions to surrounding grids.

  3. How spatial abilities and dynamic visualizations interplay when learning functional anatomy with 3D anatomical models.

    PubMed

    Berney, Sandra; Bétrancourt, Mireille; Molinari, Gaëlle; Hoyek, Nady

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of dynamic visualizations of three-dimensional (3D) models in anatomy curricula may be an adequate solution for spatial difficulties encountered with traditional static learning, as they provide direct visualization of change throughout the viewpoints. However, little research has explored the interplay between learning material presentation formats, spatial abilities, and anatomical tasks. First, to understand the cognitive challenges a novice learner would be faced with when first exposed to 3D anatomical content, a six-step cognitive task analysis was developed. Following this, an experimental study was conducted to explore how presentation formats (dynamic vs. static visualizations) support learning of functional anatomy, and affect subsequent anatomical tasks derived from the cognitive task analysis. A second aim was to investigate the interplay between spatial abilities (spatial visualization and spatial relation) and presentation formats when the functional anatomy of a 3D scapula and the associated shoulder flexion movement are learned. Findings showed no main effect of the presentation formats on performances, but revealed the predictive influence of spatial visualization and spatial relation abilities on performance. However, an interesting interaction between presentation formats and spatial relation ability for a specific anatomical task was found. This result highlighted the influence of presentation formats when spatial abilities are involved as well as the differentiated influence of spatial abilities on anatomical tasks.

  4. Advanced in Visualization of 3D Time-Dependent CFD Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, David A.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulations of complex 3D time-dependent (unsteady) flows are becoming increasingly feasible because of the progress in computing systems. Unfortunately, many existing flow visualization systems were developed for time-independent (steady) solutions and do not adequately depict solutions from unsteady flow simulations. Furthermore, most systems only handle one time step of the solutions individually and do not consider the time-dependent nature of the solutions. For example, instantaneous streamlines are computed by tracking the particles using one time step of the solution. However, for streaklines and timelines, particles need to be tracked through all time steps. Streaklines can reveal quite different information about the flow than those revealed by instantaneous streamlines. Comparisons of instantaneous streamlines with dynamic streaklines are shown. For a complex 3D flow simulation, it is common to generate a grid system with several millions of grid points and to have tens of thousands of time steps. The disk requirement for storing the flow data can easily be tens of gigabytes. Visualizing solutions of this magnitude is a challenging problem with today's computer hardware technology. Even interactive visualization of one time step of the flow data can be a problem for some existing flow visualization systems because of the size of the grid. Current approaches for visualizing complex 3D time-dependent CFD solutions are described. The flow visualization system developed at NASA Ames Research Center to compute time-dependent particle traces from unsteady CFD solutions is described. The system computes particle traces (streaklines) by integrating through the time steps. This system has been used by several NASA scientists to visualize their CFD time-dependent solutions. The flow visualization capabilities of this system are described, and visualization results are shown.

  5. The OpenEarth Framework (OEF) for the 3D Visualization of Integrated Earth Science Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, David; Moreland, John; Baru, Chaitan; Crosby, Chris

    2010-05-01

    Data integration is increasingly important as we strive to combine data from disparate sources and assemble better models of the complex processes operating at the Earth's surface and within its interior. These data are often large, multi-dimensional, and subject to differing conventions for data structures, file formats, coordinate spaces, and units of measure. When visualized, these data require differing, and sometimes conflicting, conventions for visual representations, dimensionality, symbology, and interaction. All of this makes the visualization of integrated Earth science data particularly difficult. The OpenEarth Framework (OEF) is an open-source data integration and visualization suite of applications and libraries being developed by the GEON project at the University of California, San Diego, USA. Funded by the NSF, the project is leveraging virtual globe technology from NASA's WorldWind to create interactive 3D visualization tools that combine and layer data from a wide variety of sources to create a holistic view of features at, above, and beneath the Earth's surface. The OEF architecture is open, cross-platform, modular, and based upon Java. The OEF's modular approach to software architecture yields an array of mix-and-match software components for assembling custom applications. Available modules support file format handling, web service communications, data management, user interaction, and 3D visualization. File parsers handle a variety of formal and de facto standard file formats used in the field. Each one imports data into a general-purpose common data model supporting multidimensional regular and irregular grids, topography, feature geometry, and more. Data within these data models may be manipulated, combined, reprojected, and visualized. The OEF's visualization features support a variety of conventional and new visualization techniques for looking at topography, tomography, point clouds, imagery, maps, and feature geometry. 3D data such as

  6. Sub aquatic 3D visualization and temporal analysis utilizing ArcGIS online and 3D applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used 3D Visualization tools to illustrate some complex water quality data we’ve been collecting in the Great Lakes. These data include continuous tow data collected from our research vessel the Lake Explorer II, and continuous water quality data collected from an autono...

  7. Defect modelling in an interactive 3-D CAD environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, D.; Potts, A.; McNab, A.; Toft, M.; Chapman, R. K.

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes enhancement of the NDT Workbench, as presented at QNDE '98, to include theoretical models for the ultrasonic inspection of smooth planar defects, developed by British Energy and BNFL-Magnox Generation. The Workbench is a PC-based software package for the reconstruction, visualization and analysis of 3-D ultrasonic NDT data in an interactive CAD environment. This extension of the Workbeach now provides the user with a well established modelling approach, coupled with a graphical user interface for: a) configuring the model for flaw size, shape, orientation and location; b) flexible specification of probe parameters; c) selection of scanning surface and scan pattern on the CAD component model; d) presentation of the output as a simulated ultrasound image within the component, or as graphical or tabular displays. The defect modelling facilities of the Workbench can be used for inspection procedure assessment and confirmation of data interpretation, by comparison of overlay images generated from real and simulated data. The modelling technique currently implemented is based on the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction, for simulation of strip-like, circular or elliptical crack responses in the time harmonic or time dependent cases. Eventually, the Workbench will also allow modelling using elastodynamic Kirchhoff theory.

  8. A topological framework for interactive queries on 3D models in the Web.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Mauro; Rodrigues, José I; Silvestre, Ivo; Veiga-Pires, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Several technologies exist to create 3D content for the web. With X3D, WebGL, and X3DOM, it is possible to visualize and interact with 3D models in a web browser. Frequently, three-dimensional objects are stored using the X3D file format for the web. However, there is no explicit topological information, which makes it difficult to design fast algorithms for applications that require adjacency and incidence data. This paper presents a new open source toolkit TopTri (Topological model for Triangle meshes) for Web3D servers that builds the topological model for triangular meshes of manifold or nonmanifold models. Web3D client applications using this toolkit make queries to the web server to get adjacent and incidence information of vertices, edges, and faces. This paper shows the application of the topological information to get minimal local points and iso-lines in a 3D mesh in a web browser. As an application, we present also the interactive identification of stalactites in a cave chamber in a 3D web browser. Several tests show that even for large triangular meshes with millions of triangles, the adjacency and incidence information is returned in real time making the presented toolkit appropriate for interactive Web3D applications.

  9. A Topological Framework for Interactive Queries on 3D Models in the Web

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Mauro; Rodrigues, José I.; Silvestre, Ivo; Veiga-Pires, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Several technologies exist to create 3D content for the web. With X3D, WebGL, and X3DOM, it is possible to visualize and interact with 3D models in a web browser. Frequently, three-dimensional objects are stored using the X3D file format for the web. However, there is no explicit topological information, which makes it difficult to design fast algorithms for applications that require adjacency and incidence data. This paper presents a new open source toolkit TopTri (Topological model for Triangle meshes) for Web3D servers that builds the topological model for triangular meshes of manifold or nonmanifold models. Web3D client applications using this toolkit make queries to the web server to get adjacent and incidence information of vertices, edges, and faces. This paper shows the application of the topological information to get minimal local points and iso-lines in a 3D mesh in a web browser. As an application, we present also the interactive identification of stalactites in a cave chamber in a 3D web browser. Several tests show that even for large triangular meshes with millions of triangles, the adjacency and incidence information is returned in real time making the presented toolkit appropriate for interactive Web3D applications. PMID:24977236

  10. A 3D Immersive Fault Visualizer and Editor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yikilmaz, M. B.; van Aalsburg, J.; Kreylos, O.; Kellogg, L. H.; Rundle, J. B.

    2007-12-01

    Digital fault models are an important resource for the study of earthquake dynamics, fault-earthquake interactions and seismicity. Once digitized these fault models can be used in Finite Element Model (FEM) programs or earthquake simulations such as Virtual California (VC). However, these models are often difficult to create, requiring a substantial amount of time to generate the fault topology and compute the properties of the individual segments. To aid in the construction of such models we have developed an immersive virtual reality (VR) application to visualize and edit fault models. Our program is designed to run in a CAVE (walk-in VR environment), but also works in a wide range of other environments, including desktop systems and GeoWalls. It is being developed at the UC Davis W.M. Keck Center for Active Visualization in the Earth Sciences (KeckCAVES, http://www.keckcaves.org). Immersive VR environments are ideal for visualizing and manipulating three- dimensional data sets. Our program allows users to create new models or modify existing ones; for example by repositioning individual fault-segments, by changing the dip angle, or by modifying (or assigning) the value of a property associated with a particular fault segment (i.e. slip rate). With the addition of high resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEM) the user can accurately add new segments to an existing model or create a fault model entirely from scratch. Interactively created or modified models can be written to XML files at any time; from there the data may easily be converted into various formats required by the analysis software or simulation. We believe that the ease of interaction provided by VR technology is ideally suited to the problem of creating and editing digital fault models. Our software provides the user with an intuitive environment for visualizing and editing fault model data. This translates not only into less time spent creating fault models, but also enables the researcher to

  11. Educational Visualizations in 3D Collaborative Virtual Environments: A Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fominykh, Mikhail; Prasolova-Forland, Ekaterina

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Collaborative virtual environments (CVEs) have become increasingly popular in educational settings and the role of 3D content is becoming more and more important. Still, there are many challenges in this area, such as lack of empirical studies that provide design for educational activities in 3D CVEs and lack of norms of how to support…

  12. Visualizing Terrestrial and Aquatic Systems in 3D

    EPA Science Inventory

    The need for better visualization tools for environmental science is well documented, and the Visualization for Terrestrial and Aquatic Systems project (VISTAS) aims to both help scientists produce effective environmental science visualizations and to determine which visualizatio...

  13. Automated objective characterization of visual field defects in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Wolfgang (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method and apparatus for electronically performing a visual field test for a patient. A visual field test pattern is displayed to the patient on an electronic display device and the patient's responses to the visual field test pattern are recorded. A visual field representation is generated from the patient's responses. The visual field representation is then used as an input into a variety of automated diagnostic processes. In one process, the visual field representation is used to generate a statistical description of the rapidity of change of a patient's visual field at the boundary of a visual field defect. In another process, the area of a visual field defect is calculated using the visual field representation. In another process, the visual field representation is used to generate a statistical description of the volume of a patient's visual field defect.

  14. Translation, Enhancement, Filtering, and Visualization of Large 3D Triangle Mesh

    1997-04-21

    The runthru system consists of five programs: workcell filter, just do it, transl8g, decim8, and runthru. The workcell filter program is useful if the source of your 3D triangle mesh model is IGRIP. It will traverse a directory structure of Deneb IGRIP files and filter out any IGRIP part files that are not referenced by an accompanying IGRIP work cell file. The just do it program automates translating and/or filtering of large numbers of partsmore » that are organized in hierarchical directory structures. The transl8g program facilitates the interchange, topology generation, error checking, and enhancement of large 3D triangle meshes. Such data is frequently used to represent conceptual designs, scientific visualization volume modeling, or discrete sample data. Interchange is provided between several popular commercial and defacto standard geometry formats. Error checking is included to identify duplicate and zero area triangles. Model engancement features include common vertex joining, consistent triangle vertex ordering, vertex noemal vector averaging, and triangle strip generation. Many of the traditional O(n2) algorithms required to provide the above features have been recast and are o(nlog(n)) which support large mesh sizes. The decim8 program is based on a data filter algorithm that significantly reduces the number of triangles required to represent 3D models of geometry, scientific visualization results, and discretely sampled data. It eliminates local patches of triangles whose geometries are not appreciably different and replaces them with fewer, larger triangles. The algorithm has been used to reduce triangles in large conceptual design models to facilitate virtual walk throughs and to enable interactive viewing of large 3D iso-surface volume visualizations. The runthru program provides high performance interactive display and manipulation of 3D triangle mesh models.« less

  15. RUNTHRU6.0. Translation, Enhancement, Filtering, and Visualization of Large 3D Triangle Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Janucik, F.X.; Ross, D.M.; Sischo, K.F.

    1997-01-01

    The runthru system consists of five programs: workcell filter, just do it, transl8g, decim8, and runthru. The workcell filter program is useful if the source of your 3D triangle mesh model is IGRIP. It will traverse a directory structure of Deneb IGRIP files and filter out any IGRIP part files that are not referenced by an accompanying IGRIP work cell file. The just do it program automates translating and/or filtering of large numbers of parts that are organized in hierarchical directory structures. The transl8g program facilitates the interchange, topology generation, error checking, and enhancement of large 3D triangle meshes. Such data is frequently used to represent conceptual designs, scientific visualization volume modeling, or discrete sample data. Interchange is provided between several popular commercial and defacto standard geometry formats. Error checking is included to identify duplicate and zero area triangles. Model engancement features include common vertex joining, consistent triangle vertex ordering, vertex noemal vector averaging, and triangle strip generation. Many of the traditional O(n2) algorithms required to provide the above features have been recast and are o(nlog(n)) which support large mesh sizes. The decim8 program is based on a data filter algorithm that significantly reduces the number of triangles required to represent 3D models of geometry, scientific visualization results, and discretely sampled data. It eliminates local patches of triangles whose geometries are not appreciably different and replaces them with fewer, larger triangles. The algorithm has been used to reduce triangles in large conceptual design models to facilitate virtual walk throughs and to enable interactive viewing of large 3D iso-surface volume visualizations. The runthru program provides high performance interactive display and manipulation of 3D triangle mesh models.

  16. Translation, Enhancement, Filtering, and Visualization of Large 3D Triangle Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-21

    The runthru system consists of five programs: workcell filter, just do it, transl8g, decim8, and runthru. The workcell filter program is useful if the source of your 3D triangle mesh model is IGRIP. It will traverse a directory structure of Deneb IGRIP files and filter out any IGRIP part files that are not referenced by an accompanying IGRIP work cell file. The just do it program automates translating and/or filtering of large numbers of parts that are organized in hierarchical directory structures. The transl8g program facilitates the interchange, topology generation, error checking, and enhancement of large 3D triangle meshes. Such data is frequently used to represent conceptual designs, scientific visualization volume modeling, or discrete sample data. Interchange is provided between several popular commercial and defacto standard geometry formats. Error checking is included to identify duplicate and zero area triangles. Model engancement features include common vertex joining, consistent triangle vertex ordering, vertex noemal vector averaging, and triangle strip generation. Many of the traditional O(n2) algorithms required to provide the above features have been recast and are o(nlog(n)) which support large mesh sizes. The decim8 program is based on a data filter algorithm that significantly reduces the number of triangles required to represent 3D models of geometry, scientific visualization results, and discretely sampled data. It eliminates local patches of triangles whose geometries are not appreciably different and replaces them with fewer, larger triangles. The algorithm has been used to reduce triangles in large conceptual design models to facilitate virtual walk throughs and to enable interactive viewing of large 3D iso-surface volume visualizations. The runthru program provides high performance interactive display and manipulation of 3D triangle mesh models.

  17. Visual Short-Term Memory Benefit for Objects on Different 3-D Surfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Yaoda; Nakayama, Ken

    2007-01-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) plays an important role in visual cognition. Although objects are located on different 3-dimensional (3-D) surfaces in the real world, how VSTM capacity may be influenced by the presence of multiple 3-D surfaces has never been examined. By manipulating binocular disparities of visual displays, the authors found that…

  18. Research on steady-state visual evoked potentials in 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Yu-Yi; Lee, Chia-Ying; Lin, Fang-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Pai; Ko, Li-Wei; Shieh, Han-Ping D.

    2015-05-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are intuitive systems for users to communicate with outer electronic devices. Steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) is one of the common inputs for BCI systems due to its easy detection and high information transfer rates. An advanced interactive platform integrated with liquid crystal displays is leading a trend to provide an alternative option not only for the handicapped but also for the public to make our lives more convenient. Many SSVEP-based BCI systems have been studied in a 2D environment; however there is only little literature about SSVEP-based BCI systems using 3D stimuli. 3D displays have potentials in SSVEP-based BCI systems because they can offer vivid images, good quality in presentation, various stimuli and more entertainment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of two important 3D factors (disparity and crosstalk) on SSVEPs. Twelve participants participated in the experiment with a patterned retarder 3D display. The results show that there is a significant difference (p-value<0.05) between large and small disparity angle, and the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of small disparity angles is higher than those of large disparity angles. The 3D stimuli with smaller disparity and lower crosstalk are more suitable for applications based on the results of 3D perception and SSVEP responses (SNR). Furthermore, we can infer the 3D perception of users by SSVEP responses, and modify the proper disparity of 3D images automatically in the future.

  19. Interactive 3D visualisation of ECMWF ensemble weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, Marc; Grams, Christian M.; Schäfler, Andreas; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the feasibility of interactive 3D visualisation of ensemble weather predictions in a way suited for weather forecasting during aircraft-based atmospheric field campaigns. The study builds upon our previous work on web-based, 2D visualisation of numerical weather prediction data for the purpose of research flight planning (Rautenhaus et al., Geosci. Model Dev., 5, 55-71, 2012). Now we explore how interactive 3D visualisation of ensemble forecasts can be used to quickly identify atmospheric features relevant to a flight and to assess their uncertainty. We use data from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Ensemble Prediction System (EPS) and present techniques to interactively visualise the forecasts on a commodity desktop PC with a state-of-the-art graphics card. Major objectives of this study are: (1) help the user transition from the ``familiar'' 2D views (horizontal maps and vertical cross-sections) to 3D visualisation by putting interactive 2D views into a 3D context and enriching them with 3D elements, at the same time (2) maintain a high degree of quantitativeness in the visualisation to facilitate easy interpretation; (3) exploitation of the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) for maximum interactivity; (4) investigation of how visualisation can be performed directly from datasets on ECMWF hybrid model levels; (5) development of a basic forecasting tool that provides synchronized navigation through forecast base and lead times, as well as through the ensemble dimension and (6) interactive computation and visualisation of ensemble-based quantities. A prototype of our tool was used for weather forecasting during the aircraft-based T-NAWDEX-Falcon field campaign, which took place in October 2012 at the German Aerospace Centre's (DLR) Oberpfaffenhofen base. We reconstruct the forecast of a warm conveyor belt situation that occurred during the campaign and discuss challenges and opportunities posed by employing three

  20. Peptide Directed 3D Assembly of Nanoparticles through Biomolecular Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Prerna

    The current challenge of the 'bottom up' process is the programmed self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks into complex and larger-scale superstructures with unique properties that can be integrated as components in solar cells, microelectronics, meta materials, catalysis, and sensors. Recent trends in the complexity of device design demand the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) superstructures from multi-nanomaterial components in precise configurations. Bio mimetic assembly is an emerging technique for building hybrid materials because living organisms are efficient, inexpensive, and environmentally benign material generators, allowing low temperature fabrication. Using this approach, a novel peptide-directed nanomaterial assembly technology based on bio molecular interaction of streptavidin and biotin is presented for assembling nanomaterials with peptides for the construction of 3D peptide-inorganic superlattices with defined 3D shape. We took advantage of robust natural collagen triple-helix peptides and used them as nanowire building blocks for 3D peptide-gold nanoparticles superlattice generation. The type of 3D peptide superlattice assembly with hybrid NP building blocks described herein shows potential for the fabrication of complex functional device which demands precise long-range arrangement and periodicity of NPs.

  1. Tensor3D: A computer graphics program to simulate 3D real-time deformation and visualization of geometric bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallozzi Lavorante, Luca; Dirk Ebert, Hans

    2008-07-01

    Tensor3D is a geometric modeling program with the capacity to simulate and visualize in real-time the deformation, specified through a tensor matrix and applied to triangulated models representing geological bodies. 3D visualization allows the study of deformational processes that are traditionally conducted in 2D, such as simple and pure shears. Besides geometric objects that are immediately available in the program window, the program can read other models from disk, thus being able to import objects created with different open-source or proprietary programs. A strain ellipsoid and a bounding box are simultaneously shown and instantly deformed with the main object. The principal axes of strain are visualized as well to provide graphical information about the orientation of the tensor's normal components. The deformed models can also be saved, retrieved later and deformed again, in order to study different steps of progressive strain, or to make this data available to other programs. The shape of stress ellipsoids and the corresponding Mohr circles defined by any stress tensor can also be represented. The application was written using the Visualization ToolKit, a powerful scientific visualization library in the public domain. This development choice, allied to the use of the Tcl/Tk programming language, which is independent on the host computational platform, makes the program a useful tool for the study of geometric deformations directly in three dimensions in teaching as well as research activities.

  2. Efficient Structure-Aware Selection Techniques for 3D Point Cloud Visualizations with 2DOF Input.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingyun; Efstathiou, K; Isenberg, P; Isenberg, T

    2012-12-01

    Data selection is a fundamental task in visualization because it serves as a pre-requisite to many follow-up interactions. Efficient spatial selection in 3D point cloud datasets consisting of thousands or millions of particles can be particularly challenging. We present two new techniques, TeddySelection and CloudLasso, that support the selection of subsets in large particle 3D datasets in an interactive and visually intuitive manner. Specifically, we describe how to spatially select a subset of a 3D particle cloud by simply encircling the target particles on screen using either the mouse or direct-touch input. Based on the drawn lasso, our techniques automatically determine a bounding selection surface around the encircled particles based on their density. This kind of selection technique can be applied to particle datasets in several application domains. TeddySelection and CloudLasso reduce, and in some cases even eliminate, the need for complex multi-step selection processes involving Boolean operations. This was confirmed in a formal, controlled user study in which we compared the more flexible CloudLasso technique to the standard cylinder-based selection technique. This study showed that the former is consistently more efficient than the latter - in several cases the CloudLasso selection time was half that of the corresponding cylinder-based selection.

  3. An interactive program to conceptualize the anatomy of the internal brainstem in 3D.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Kelly; Wilson, Timothy D; De Ribaupierre, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    Neuroanatomy is a complex sub-discipline of anatomy requiring abstract visualization and strong spatial reasoning. Traditional methods of learning neuroanatomy include investigation using dissection, light microscopy and histology. Often, this pedagogical approach requires students to formulate three-dimensional (3D) mental images from sequential two-dimensional (2D) cross-sections, which can be difficult for many students to conceptualize. The goal of this study is to develop an interactive 3D learning tool of the internal brainstem anatomy and assess its efficacy on student learning against the classical methods of learning neuroanatomy. Results reveal that students the amount of learning was equal between both experimental groups. Qualitative results show that students enjoyed interactive learning and warmly welcomed the 3D program. Future neuroanatomy laboratories may include a 3D component to aid in student conceptualization of internal brainstem anatomy.

  4. MuPIT interactive: webserver for mapping variant positions to annotated, interactive 3D structures.

    PubMed

    Niknafs, Noushin; Kim, Dewey; Kim, Ryangguk; Diekhans, Mark; Ryan, Michael; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Karchin, Rachel

    2013-11-01

    Mutation position imaging toolbox (MuPIT) interactive is a browser-based application for single-nucleotide variants (SNVs), which automatically maps the genomic coordinates of SNVs onto the coordinates of available three-dimensional (3D) protein structures. The application is designed for interactive browser-based visualization of the putative functional relevance of SNVs by biologists who are not necessarily experts either in bioinformatics or protein structure. Users may submit batches of several thousand SNVs and review all protein structures that cover the SNVs, including available functional annotations such as binding sites, mutagenesis experiments, and common polymorphisms. Multiple SNVs may be mapped onto each structure, enabling 3D visualization of SNV clusters and their relationship to functionally annotated positions. We illustrate the utility of MuPIT interactive in rationalizing the impact of selected polymorphisms in the PharmGKB database, somatic mutations identified in the Cancer Genome Atlas study of invasive breast carcinomas, and rare variants identified in the exome sequencing project. MuPIT interactive is freely available for non-profit use at http://mupit.icm.jhu.edu .

  5. 3D thermal medical image visualization tool: Integration between MRI and thermographic images.

    PubMed

    Abreu de Souza, Mauren; Chagas Paz, André Augusto; Sanches, Ionildo Jóse; Nohama, Percy; Gamba, Humberto Remigio

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional medical image reconstruction using different images modalities require registration techniques that are, in general, based on the stacking of 2D MRI/CT images slices. In this way, the integration of two different imaging modalities: anatomical (MRI/CT) and physiological information (infrared image), to generate a 3D thermal model, is a new methodology still under development. This paper presents a 3D THERMO interface that provides flexibility for the 3D visualization: it incorporates the DICOM parameters; different color scale palettes at the final 3D model; 3D visualization at different planes of sections; and a filtering option that provides better image visualization. To summarize, the 3D thermographc medical image visualization provides a realistic and precise medical tool. The merging of two different imaging modalities allows better quality and more fidelity, especially for medical applications in which the temperature changes are clinically significant.

  6. Scalable nanohelices for predictive studies and enhanced 3D visualization.

    PubMed

    Meagher, Kwyn A; Doblack, Benjamin N; Ramirez, Mercedes; Davila, Lilian P

    2014-11-12

    Spring-like materials are ubiquitous in nature and of interest in nanotechnology for energy harvesting, hydrogen storage, and biological sensing applications. For predictive simulations, it has become increasingly important to be able to model the structure of nanohelices accurately. To study the effect of local structure on the properties of these complex geometries one must develop realistic models. To date, software packages are rather limited in creating atomistic helical models. This work focuses on producing atomistic models of silica glass (SiO₂) nanoribbons and nanosprings for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Using an MD model of "bulk" silica glass, two computational procedures to precisely create the shape of nanoribbons and nanosprings are presented. The first method employs the AWK programming language and open-source software to effectively carve various shapes of silica nanoribbons from the initial bulk model, using desired dimensions and parametric equations to define a helix. With this method, accurate atomistic silica nanoribbons can be generated for a range of pitch values and dimensions. The second method involves a more robust code which allows flexibility in modeling nanohelical structures. This approach utilizes a C++ code particularly written to implement pre-screening methods as well as the mathematical equations for a helix, resulting in greater precision and efficiency when creating nanospring models. Using these codes, well-defined and scalable nanoribbons and nanosprings suited for atomistic simulations can be effectively created. An added value in both open-source codes is that they can be adapted to reproduce different helical structures, independent of material. In addition, a MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI) is used to enhance learning through visualization and interaction for a general user with the atomistic helical structures. One application of these methods is the recent study of nanohelices via MD simulations for

  7. Scalable nanohelices for predictive studies and enhanced 3D visualization.

    PubMed

    Meagher, Kwyn A; Doblack, Benjamin N; Ramirez, Mercedes; Davila, Lilian P

    2014-01-01

    Spring-like materials are ubiquitous in nature and of interest in nanotechnology for energy harvesting, hydrogen storage, and biological sensing applications. For predictive simulations, it has become increasingly important to be able to model the structure of nanohelices accurately. To study the effect of local structure on the properties of these complex geometries one must develop realistic models. To date, software packages are rather limited in creating atomistic helical models. This work focuses on producing atomistic models of silica glass (SiO₂) nanoribbons and nanosprings for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Using an MD model of "bulk" silica glass, two computational procedures to precisely create the shape of nanoribbons and nanosprings are presented. The first method employs the AWK programming language and open-source software to effectively carve various shapes of silica nanoribbons from the initial bulk model, using desired dimensions and parametric equations to define a helix. With this method, accurate atomistic silica nanoribbons can be generated for a range of pitch values and dimensions. The second method involves a more robust code which allows flexibility in modeling nanohelical structures. This approach utilizes a C++ code particularly written to implement pre-screening methods as well as the mathematical equations for a helix, resulting in greater precision and efficiency when creating nanospring models. Using these codes, well-defined and scalable nanoribbons and nanosprings suited for atomistic simulations can be effectively created. An added value in both open-source codes is that they can be adapted to reproduce different helical structures, independent of material. In addition, a MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI) is used to enhance learning through visualization and interaction for a general user with the atomistic helical structures. One application of these methods is the recent study of nanohelices via MD simulations for

  8. 3D model of the Bernese Part of the Swiss Molasse Basin: visualization of uncertainties in a 3D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mock, Samuel; Allenbach, Robin; Reynolds, Lance; Wehrens, Philip; Kurmann-Matzenauer, Eva; Kuhn, Pascal; Michael, Salomè; Di Tommaso, Gennaro; Herwegh, Marco

    2016-04-01

    The Swiss Molasse Basin comprises the western and central part of the North Alpine Foreland Basin. In recent years it has come under closer scrutiny due to its promising geopotentials such as geothermal energy and CO2 sequestration. In order to adress these topics good knowledge of the subsurface is a key prerequisite. For that matter, geological 3D models serve as valuable tools. In collaboration with the Swiss Geological Survey (swisstopo) and as part of the project GeoMol CH, a geological 3D model of the Swiss Molasse Basin in the Canton of Bern has been built. The model covers an area of 1810 km2and reaches depth of up to 6.7 km. It comprises 10 major Cenozoic and Mesozoic units and numerous faults. The 3D model is mainly based on 2D seismic data complemented by information from few deep wells. Additionally, data from geological maps and profiles were used for refinement at shallow depths. In total, 1163 km of reflection seismic data, along 77 seismic lines, have been interpreted by different authors with respect to stratigraphy and structures. Both, horizons and faults, have been interpreted in 2D and modelled in 3D using IHS's Kingdom Suite and Midland Valley's MOVE software packages, respectively. Given the variable degree of subsurface information available, each 3D model is subject of uncertainty. With the primary input data coming from interpretation of reflection seismic data, a variety of uncertainties comes into play. Some of them are difficult to address (e.g. author's style of interpretation) while others can be quantified (e.g. mis-tie correction, well-tie). An important source of uncertainties is the quality of seismic data; this affects the traceability and lateral continuation of seismic reflectors. By defining quality classes we can semi-quantify this source of uncertainty. In order to visualize the quality and density of the input data in a meaningful way, we introduce quality-weighted data density maps. In combination with the geological 3D

  9. The Visual Representation of 3D Object Orientation in Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Noah J.; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2013-01-01

    An accurate representation of three-dimensional (3D) object orientation is essential for interacting with the environment. Where and how the brain visually encodes 3D object orientation remains unknown, but prior studies suggest the caudal intraparietal area (CIP) may be involved. Here, we develop rigorous analytical methods for quantifying 3D orientation tuning curves, and use these tools to the study the neural coding of surface orientation. Specifically, we show that single neurons in area CIP of the rhesus macaque jointly encode the slant and tilt of a planar surface, and that across the population, the distribution of preferred slant-tilts is not statistically different from uniform. This suggests that all slant-tilt combinations are equally represented in area CIP. Furthermore, some CIP neurons are found to also represent the third rotational degree of freedom that determines the orientation of the image pattern on the planar surface. Together, the present results suggest that CIP is a critical neural locus for the encoding of all three rotational degrees of freedom specifying an object's 3D spatial orientation. PMID:24305830

  10. DataViewer3D: An Open-Source, Cross-Platform Multi-Modal Neuroimaging Data Visualization Tool.

    PubMed

    Gouws, André; Woods, Will; Millman, Rebecca; Morland, Antony; Green, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Integration and display of results from multiple neuroimaging modalities [e.g. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetoencephalography, EEG] relies on display of a diverse range of data within a common, defined coordinate frame. DataViewer3D (DV3D) is a multi-modal imaging data visualization tool offering a cross-platform, open-source solution to simultaneous data overlay visualization requirements of imaging studies. While DV3D is primarily a visualization tool, the package allows an analysis approach where results from one imaging modality can guide comparative analysis of another modality in a single coordinate space. DV3D is built on Python, a dynamic object-oriented programming language with support for integration of modular toolkits, and development of cross-platform software for neuroimaging. DV3D harnesses the power of the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) for two-dimensional (2D) and 3D rendering, calling VTK's low level C++ functions from Python. Users interact with data via an intuitive interface that uses Python to bind wxWidgets, which in turn calls the user's operating system dialogs and graphical user interface tools. DV3D currently supports NIfTI-1, ANALYZE and DICOM formats for MRI data display (including statistical data overlay). Formats for other data types are supported. The modularity of DV3D and ease of use of Python allows rapid integration of additional format support and user development. DV3D has been tested on Mac OSX, RedHat Linux and Microsoft Windows XP. DV3D is offered for free download with an extensive set of tutorial resources and example data. PMID:19352444

  11. Optimizing visual comfort for stereoscopic 3D display based on color-plus-depth signals.

    PubMed

    Shao, Feng; Jiang, Qiuping; Fu, Randi; Yu, Mei; Jiang, Gangyi

    2016-05-30

    Visual comfort is a long-facing problem in stereoscopic 3D (S3D) display. In this paper, targeting to produce S3D content based on color-plus-depth signals, a general framework for depth mapping to optimize visual comfort for S3D display is proposed. The main motivation of this work is to remap the depth range of color-plus-depth signals to a new depth range that is suitable to comfortable S3D display. Towards this end, we first remap the depth range globally based on the adjusted zero disparity plane, and then present a two-stage global and local depth optimization solution to solve the visual comfort problem. The remapped depth map is used to generate the S3D output. We demonstrate the power of our approach on perceptually uncomfortable and comfortable stereoscopic images. PMID:27410090

  12. Interactive and Stereoscopic Hybrid 3D Viewer of Radar Data with Gesture Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goenetxea, Jon; Moreno, Aitor; Unzueta, Luis; Galdós, Andoni; Segura, Álvaro

    This work presents an interactive and stereoscopic 3D viewer of weather information coming from a Doppler radar. The hybrid system shows a GIS model of the regional zone where the radar is located and the corresponding reconstructed 3D volume weather data. To enhance the immersiveness of the navigation, stereoscopic visualization has been added to the viewer, using a polarized glasses based system. The user can interact with the 3D virtual world using a Nintendo Wiimote for navigating through it and a Nintendo Wii Nunchuk for giving commands by means of hand gestures. We also present a dynamic gesture recognition procedure that measures the temporal advance of the performed gesture postures. Experimental results show how dynamic gestures are effectively recognized so that a more natural interaction and immersive navigation in the virtual world is achieved.

  13. KENO3D Visualization Tool for KENO V.a and KENO-VI Geometry Models

    SciTech Connect

    Horwedel, J.E.; Bowman, S.M.

    2000-06-01

    Criticality safety analyses often require detailed modeling of complex geometries. Effective visualization tools can enhance checking the accuracy of these models. This report describes the KENO3D visualization tool developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide visualization of KENO V.a and KENO-VI criticality safety models. The development of KENO3D is part of the current efforts to enhance the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluations) computer software system.

  14. 3D visualization for the MARS14 Code

    SciTech Connect

    Rzepecki, Jaroslaw P.; Kostin, Mikhail A; Mokhov, Nikolai V.

    2003-01-23

    A new three-dimensional visualization engine has been developed for the MARS14 code system. It is based on the OPENINVENTOR graphics library and integrated with the MARS built-in two-dimensional Graphical-User Interface, MARS-GUI-SLICE. The integrated package allows thorough checking of complex geometry systems and their fragments, materials, magnetic fields, particle tracks along with a visualization of calculated 2-D histograms. The algorithms and their optimization are described for two geometry classes along with examples in accelerator and detector applications.

  15. Combined 3-D auditory-visual cueing for a visual target acquisition task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westergren, Rachael L.; Havig, Paul R.; Heft, Eric L.

    2007-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that helmet-mounted displays (HMDs) are advantageous in maintaining situation awareness and increasing the amount of time pilots spend looking off-boresight (Geiselman & Osgood, 1994; Geiselman & Osgood, 1995). However, space is also limited on a HMD and any symbology that is presented takes up valuable space and can occlude a pilot's vision. There has been much research in the area of visual cueing and visual search as they relate to seeking out visual targets in the sky. However, the idea of localized auditory cueing, as it could apply in the realm of air-to-air targeting, is an area less studied. One question is how can we present information such that a pilot's attention will be directed to the object of interest the most quickly? Some different types of target location cueing symbology have been studied to find such aspects of symbology that will aid a pilot most in acquiring a target. The purpose of this study is to determine the best method of cueing a person to visual targets in the shortest amount of time possible using auditory and visual cues in combination. Specifically, participants were presented with different combinations of reflected line cues, standard line cues, and localized auditory cues for primary and secondary targets. The cues were presented using an HMD and 3-D auditory headphones, with a magnetic head tracker used to determine when the participant had visually acquired the targets. The possible benefits of these cues based on the times to acquire are discussed.

  16. A 3D-Video-Based Computerized Analysis of Social and Sexual Interactions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Jumpei; Urakawa, Susumu; Takamura, Yusaku; Malcher-Lopes, Renato; Hori, Etsuro; Tomaz, Carlos; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    A large number of studies have analyzed social and sexual interactions between rodents in relation to neural activity. Computerized video analysis has been successfully used to detect numerous behaviors quickly and objectively; however, to date only 2D video recording has been used, which cannot determine the 3D locations of animals and encounters difficulties in tracking animals when they are overlapping, e.g., when mounting. To overcome these limitations, we developed a novel 3D video analysis system for examining social and sexual interactions in rats. A 3D image was reconstructed by integrating images captured by multiple depth cameras at different viewpoints. The 3D positions of body parts of the rats were then estimated by fitting skeleton models of the rats to the 3D images using a physics-based fitting algorithm, and various behaviors were recognized based on the spatio-temporal patterns of the 3D movements of the body parts. Comparisons between the data collected by the 3D system and those by visual inspection indicated that this system could precisely estimate the 3D positions of body parts for 2 rats during social and sexual interactions with few manual interventions, and could compute the traces of the 2 animals even during mounting. We then analyzed the effects of AM-251 (a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist) on male rat sexual behavior, and found that AM-251 decreased movements and trunk height before sexual behavior, but increased the duration of head-head contact during sexual behavior. These results demonstrate that the use of this 3D system in behavioral studies could open the door to new approaches for investigating the neuroscience of social and sexual behavior. PMID:24205238

  17. A 3D-video-based computerized analysis of social and sexual interactions in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Jumpei; Urakawa, Susumu; Takamura, Yusaku; Malcher-Lopes, Renato; Hori, Etsuro; Tomaz, Carlos; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    A large number of studies have analyzed social and sexual interactions between rodents in relation to neural activity. Computerized video analysis has been successfully used to detect numerous behaviors quickly and objectively; however, to date only 2D video recording has been used, which cannot determine the 3D locations of animals and encounters difficulties in tracking animals when they are overlapping, e.g., when mounting. To overcome these limitations, we developed a novel 3D video analysis system for examining social and sexual interactions in rats. A 3D image was reconstructed by integrating images captured by multiple depth cameras at different viewpoints. The 3D positions of body parts of the rats were then estimated by fitting skeleton models of the rats to the 3D images using a physics-based fitting algorithm, and various behaviors were recognized based on the spatio-temporal patterns of the 3D movements of the body parts. Comparisons between the data collected by the 3D system and those by visual inspection indicated that this system could precisely estimate the 3D positions of body parts for 2 rats during social and sexual interactions with few manual interventions, and could compute the traces of the 2 animals even during mounting. We then analyzed the effects of AM-251 (a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist) on male rat sexual behavior, and found that AM-251 decreased movements and trunk height before sexual behavior, but increased the duration of head-head contact during sexual behavior. These results demonstrate that the use of this 3D system in behavioral studies could open the door to new approaches for investigating the neuroscience of social and sexual behavior. PMID:24205238

  18. New software for visualizing 3D geological data in coal mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungjae; Choi, Yosoon

    2015-04-01

    This study developed new software to visualize 3D geological data in coal mines. The Visualization Tool Kit (VTK) library and Visual Basic.NET 2010 were used to implement the software. The software consists of several modules providing functionalities: (1) importing and editing borehole data; (2) modelling of coal seams in 3D; (3) modelling of coal properties using 3D ordinary Kriging method; (4) calculating economical values of 3D blocks; (5) pit boundary optimization for identifying economical coal reserves based on the Lerchs-Grosmann algorithm; and (6) visualizing 3D geological, geometrical and economical data. The software has been applied to a small-scale open-pit coal mine in Indonesia revealed that it can provide useful information supporting the planning and design of open-pit coal mines.

  19. 3D visualization of unsteady 2D airplane wake vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Kwan-Liu; Zheng, Z. C.

    1994-01-01

    Air flowing around the wing tips of an airplane forms horizontal tornado-like vortices that can be dangerous to following aircraft. The dynamics of such vortices, including ground and atmospheric effects, can be predicted by numerical simulation, allowing the safety and capacity of airports to be improved. In this paper, we introduce three-dimensional techniques for visualizing time-dependent, two-dimensional wake vortex computations, and the hazard strength of such vortices near the ground. We describe a vortex core tracing algorithm and a local tiling method to visualize the vortex evolution. The tiling method converts time-dependent, two-dimensional vortex cores into three-dimensional vortex tubes. Finally, a novel approach calculates the induced rolling moment on the following airplane at each grid point within a region near the vortex tubes and thus allows three-dimensional visualization of the hazard strength of the vortices. We also suggest ways of combining multiple visualization methods to present more information simultaneously.

  20. Visualization of a newborn's hip joint using 3D ultrasound and automatic image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overhoff, Heinrich M.; Lazovic, Djordje; von Jan, Ute

    1999-05-01

    Graf's method is a successful procedure for the diagnostic screening of developmental dysplasia of the hip. In a defined 2-D ultrasound (US) scan, which virtually cuts the hip joint, landmarks are interactively identified to derive congruence indicators. As the indicators do not reflect the spatial joint structure, and the femoral head is not clearly visible in the US scan, here 3-D US is used to gain insight to the hip joint in its spatial form. Hip joints of newborns were free-hand scanned using a conventional ultrasound transducer and a localizer system fixed on the scanhead. To overcome examiner- dependent findings the landmarks were detected by automatic segmentation of the image volume. The landmark image volumes and an automatically determined virtual sphere approximating the femoral head were visualized color-coded on a computer screen. The visualization was found to be intuitive and to simplify the diagnostic substantially. By the visualization of the 3-D relations between acetabulum and femoral head the reliability of diagnostics is improved by finding the entire joint geometry.

  1. Assessment of 3D Viewers for the Display of Interactive Documents in the Learning of Graphic Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbero, Basilio Ramos; Pedrosa, Carlos Melgosa; Mate, Esteban Garcia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine which 3D viewers should be used for the display of interactive graphic engineering documents, so that the visualization and manipulation of 3D models provide useful support to students of industrial engineering (mechanical, organizational, electronic engineering, etc). The technical features of 26 3D…

  2. ProteinVista: a fast molecular visualization system using Microsoft Direct3D.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan-Yong; Park, Sung-Hee; Park, Soo-Jun; Park, Sun-Hee; Hwang, Chi-Jung

    2008-09-01

    Many tools have been developed to visualize protein and molecular structures. Most high quality protein visualization tools use the OpenGL graphics library as a 3D graphics system. Currently, the performance of recent 3D graphics hardware has rapidly improved. Recent high-performance 3D graphics hardware support Microsoft Direct3D graphics library more than OpenGL and have become very popular in personal computers (PCs). In this paper, a molecular visualization system termed ProteinVista is proposed. ProteinVista is well-designed visualization system using the Microsoft Direct3D graphics library. It provides various visualization styles such as the wireframe, stick, ball and stick, space fill, ribbon, and surface model styles, in addition to display options for 3D visualization. As ProteinVista is optimized for recent 3D graphics hardware platforms and because it uses a geometry instancing technique, its rendering speed is 2.7 times faster compared to other visualization tools.

  3. New techniques in 3D scalar and vector field visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Becker, B.

    1993-05-05

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we have recently developed several techniques for volume visualization of scalar and vector fields, all of which use back-to-front compositing. The first renders volume density clouds by compositing polyhedral volume cells or their faces. The second is a ``splatting`` scheme which composites textures used to reconstruct the scalar or vector fields. One version calculates the necessary texture values in software, and another takes advantage of hardware texture mapping. The next technique renders contour surface polygons using semi-transparent textures, which adjust appropriately when the surfaces deform in a flow, or change topology. The final one renders the ``flow volume`` of smoke or dye tracer swept out by a fluid flowing through a small generating polygon. All of these techniques are applied to a climate model data set, to visualize cloud density and wind velocity.

  4. PhotoCloud: Interactive remote exploration of joint 2D and 3D datasets.

    PubMed

    Brivio, Paolo; Benedetti, Luca; Tarini, Marco; Ponchio, Federico; Cignoni, Paolo; Scopigno, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    PhotoCloud is a real-time client-server system for interactive visualization and exploration of large datasets comprising thousands of calibrated 2D photographs of a scene and a complex 3D description of the scene. The system isn't tailored to any specific data acquisition process; it aims at generality and flexibility. PhotoCloud achieves scalability through a multiresolution dynamic hierarchical representation of the data, which is remotely stored and accessed by the client through an efficient cache system. The system includes a compact image browser and a multiresolution model renderer. PhotoCloud employs iconic visualization of the images in the 3D space and projects images onto the 3D scene on the fly. Users can navigate the 2D and 3D spaces with smooth, integrated, seamless transitions between them. A study with differently skilled users confirms PhotoCloud's effectiveness and communication power. The Web extras at http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLHJB2bhmgB7cmYD0ST9CEDMRv1JlX4xPH are videos demonstrating PhotoCloud, a real-time client-server system for interactive exploration of large datasets comprising 2D photos and 3D models.

  5. A 3D visualization system for molecular structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Terry J.

    1989-01-01

    The properties of molecules derive in part from their structures. Because of the importance of understanding molecular structures various methodologies, ranging from first principles to empirical technique, were developed for computing the structure of molecules. For large molecules such as polymer model compounds, the structural information is difficult to comprehend by examining tabulated data. Therefore, a molecular graphics display system, called MOLDS, was developed to help interpret the data. MOLDS is a menu-driven program developed to run on the LADC SNS computer systems. This program can read a data file generated by the modeling programs or data can be entered using the keyboard. MOLDS has the following capabilities: draws the 3-D representation of a molecule using stick, ball and ball, or space filled model from Cartesian coordinates, draws different perspective views of the molecule; rotates the molecule on the X, Y, Z axis or about some arbitrary line in space, zooms in on a small area of the molecule in order to obtain a better view of a specific region; and makes hard copy representation of molecules on a graphic printer. In addition, MOLDS can be easily updated and readily adapted to run on most computer systems.

  6. A package for 3-D unstructured grid generation, finite-element flow solution and flow field visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Loehner, Rainald

    1990-01-01

    A set of computer programs for 3-D unstructured grid generation, fluid flow calculations, and flow field visualization was developed. The grid generation program, called VGRID3D, generates grids over complex configurations using the advancing front method. In this method, the point and element generation is accomplished simultaneously, VPLOT3D is an interactive, menudriven pre- and post-processor graphics program for interpolation and display of unstructured grid data. The flow solver, VFLOW3D, is an Euler equation solver based on an explicit, two-step, Taylor-Galerkin algorithm which uses the Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) concept for a wriggle-free solution. Using these programs, increasingly complex 3-D configurations of interest to aerospace community were gridded including a complete Space Transportation System comprised of the space-shuttle orbitor, the solid-rocket boosters, and the external tank. Flow solutions were obtained on various configurations in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow regimes.

  7. Impacts of a CAREER Award on Advancing 3D Visualization in Geology Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billen, M. I.

    2011-12-01

    CAREER awards provide a unique opportunity to develop educational activities as an integrated part of one's research activities. This CAREER award focused on developing interactive 3D visualization tools to aid geology students in improving their 3D visualization skills. Not only is this a key skill for field geologists who need to visualize unseen subsurface structures, but it is also an important aspect of geodynamic research into the processes, such as faulting and viscous flow, that occur during subduction. Working with an undergraduate student researcher and using the KeckCAVES developed volume visualization code 3DVisualizer, we have developed interactive visualization laboratory exercises (e.g., Discovering the Rule of Vs) and a suite of mini-exercises using illustrative 3D geologic structures (e.g., syncline, thrust fault) that students can explore (e.g., rotate, slice, cut-away) to understand how exposure of these structures at the surface can provide insight into the subsurface structure. These exercises have been integrated into the structural geology curriculum and made available on the web through the KeckCAVES Education website as both data-and-code downloads and pre-made movies. One of the main challenges of implementing research and education activities through the award is that progress must be made on both throughout the award period. Therefore, while our original intent was to use subduction model output as the structures in the educational models, delays in the research results required that we develop these models using other simpler input data sets. These delays occurred because one of the other goals of the CAREER grant is to allow the faculty to take their research in a new direction, which may certainly lead to transformative science, but can also lead to more false-starts as the challenges of doing the new science are overcome. However, having created the infrastructure for the educational components, use of the model results in future

  8. Exploring Direct 3D Interaction for Full Horizontal Parallax Light Field Displays Using Leap Motion Controller

    PubMed Central

    Adhikarla, Vamsi Kiran; Sodnik, Jaka; Szolgay, Peter; Jakus, Grega

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the design and evaluation of direct 3D gesture interaction with a full horizontal parallax light field display. A light field display defines a visual scene using directional light beams emitted from multiple light sources as if they are emitted from scene points. Each scene point is rendered individually resulting in more realistic and accurate 3D visualization compared to other 3D displaying technologies. We propose an interaction setup combining the visualization of objects within the Field Of View (FOV) of a light field display and their selection through freehand gesture tracked by the Leap Motion Controller. The accuracy and usefulness of the proposed interaction setup was also evaluated in a user study with test subjects. The results of the study revealed high user preference for free hand interaction with light field display as well as relatively low cognitive demand of this technique. Further, our results also revealed some limitations and adjustments of the proposed setup to be addressed in future work. PMID:25875189

  9. Interactive 2D to 3D stereoscopic image synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Mark H.; Lipton, Lenny

    2005-03-01

    Advances in stereoscopic display technologies, graphic card devices, and digital imaging algorithms have opened up new possibilities in synthesizing stereoscopic images. The power of today"s DirectX/OpenGL optimized graphics cards together with adapting new and creative imaging tools found in software products such as Adobe Photoshop, provide a powerful environment for converting planar drawings and photographs into stereoscopic images. The basis for such a creative process is the focus of this paper. This article presents a novel technique, which uses advanced imaging features and custom Windows-based software that utilizes the Direct X 9 API to provide the user with an interactive stereo image synthesizer. By creating an accurate and interactive world scene with moveable and flexible depth map altered textured surfaces, perspective stereoscopic cameras with both visible frustums and zero parallax planes, a user can precisely model a virtual three-dimensional representation of a real-world scene. Current versions of Adobe Photoshop provide a creative user with a rich assortment of tools needed to highlight elements of a 2D image, simulate hidden areas, and creatively shape them for a 3D scene representation. The technique described has been implemented as a Photoshop plug-in and thus allows for a seamless transition of these 2D image elements into 3D surfaces, which are subsequently rendered to create stereoscopic views.

  10. Introduction of 3D Printing Technology in the Classroom for Visually Impaired Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jo, Wonjin; I, Jang Hee; Harianto, Rachel Ananda; So, Ji Hyun; Lee, Hyebin; Lee, Heon Ju; Moon, Myoung-Woon

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigate how 3D printing technology could be utilized for instructional materials that allow visually impaired students to have full access to high-quality instruction in history class. Researchers from the 3D Printing Group of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) provided the Seoul National School for the Blind with…

  11. Evaluation of passive polarized stereoscopic 3D display for visual & mental fatigues.

    PubMed

    Amin, Hafeez Ullah; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Mumtaz, Wajid; Badruddin, Nasreen; Kamel, Nidal

    2015-01-01

    Visual and mental fatigues induced by active shutter stereoscopic 3D (S3D) display have been reported using event-related brain potentials (ERP). An important question, that is whether such effects (visual & mental fatigues) can be found in passive polarized S3D display, is answered here. Sixty-eight healthy participants are divided into 2D and S3D groups and subjected to an oddball paradigm after being exposed to S3D videos with passive polarized display or 2D display. The age and fluid intelligence ability of the participants are controlled between the groups. ERP results do not show any significant differences between S3D and 2D groups to find the aftereffects of S3D in terms of visual and mental fatigues. Hence, we conclude that passive polarized S3D display technology may not induce visual and/or mental fatigue which may increase the cognitive load and suppress the ERP components. PMID:26738049

  12. i3Drive, a 3D interactive driving simulator.

    PubMed

    Ambroz, Miha; Prebil, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    i3Drive, a wheeled-vehicle simulator, can accurately simulate vehicles of various configurations with up to eight wheels in real time on a desktop PC. It presents the vehicle dynamics as an interactive animation in a virtual 3D environment. The application is fully GUI-controlled, giving users an easy overview of the simulation parameters and letting them adjust those parameters interactively. It models all relevant vehicle systems, including the mechanical models of the suspension, power train, and braking and steering systems. The simulation results generally correspond well with actual measurements, making the system useful for studying vehicle performance in various driving scenarios. i3Drive is thus a worthy complement to other, more complex tools for vehicle-dynamics simulation and analysis.

  13. MuPIT Interactive: Webserver for mapping variant positions to annotated, interactive 3D structures

    PubMed Central

    Niknafs, Noushin; Kim, Dewey; Kim, Ryang Guk; Diekhans, Mark; Ryan, Michael; Stenson, Peter D.; Cooper, David N.; Karchin, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Mutation Position Imaging Toolbox (MuPIT) Interactive is a browser-based application for single nucleotide variants (SNVs), which automatically maps the genomic coordinates of SNVs onto the coordinates of available three-dimensional protein structures. The application is designed for interactive browser-based visualization of the putative functional relevance of SNVs by biologists who are not necessarily experts either in bioinformatics or protein structure. Users may submit batches of several thousand SNVs and review all protein structures that cover the SNVs, including available functional annotations such as binding sites, mutagenesis experiments, and common polymorphisms. Multiple SNVs may be mapped onto each structure, enabling 3D visualization of SNV clusters and their relationship to functionally annotated positions. We illustrate the utility of MuPIT Interactive in rationalizing the impact of selected polymorphisms in the PharmGKB database, somatic mutations identified in the Cancer Genome Atlas study of invasive breast carcinomas, and rare variants identified in the Exome Sequencing Project. MuPIT Interactive is freely available for non-profit use at http://mupit.icm.jhu.edu. PMID:23793516

  14. Registration and 3D visualization of large microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosaliganti, Kishore; Pan, Tony; Sharp, Richard; Ridgway, Randall; Iyengar, Srivathsan; Gulacy, Alexandra; Wenzel, Pamela; de Bruin, Alain; Machiraju, Raghu; Huang, Kun; Leone, Gustavo; Saltz, Joel

    2006-03-01

    Inactivation of the retinoblastoma gene in mouse embryos causes tissue infiltrations into critical sections of the placenta, which has been shown to affect fetal survivability. Our collaborators in cancer genetics are extremely interested in examining the three dimensional nature of these infiltrations given a stack of two dimensional light microscopy images. Three sets of wildtype and mutant placentas was sectioned serially and digitized using a commercial light microscopy scanner. Each individual placenta dataset consisted of approximately 1000 images totaling 700 GB in size, which were registered into a volumetric dataset using National Library of Medicine's (NIH/NLM) Insight Segmentation and Registration Toolkit (ITK). This paper describes our method for image registration to aid in volume visualization of tissue level intermixing for both wildtype and Rb - specimens. The registration process faces many challenges arising from the large image sizes, damages during sectioning, staining gradients both within and across sections, and background noise. These issues limit the direct application of standard registration techniques due to frequent convergence to local solutions. In this work, we develop a mixture of automated and semi-automated enhancements with ground-truth validation for the mutual information-based registration algorithm. Our final volume renderings clearly show tissue intermixing differences between both wildtype and Rb - specimens which are not obvious prior to registration.

  15. Sector mapping method for 3D detached retina visualization.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yi-Ran; Zhao, Yong; Zhong, Jie; Li, Ke; Lu, Cui-Xin; Zhang, Bing

    2016-10-01

    A new sphere-mapping algorithm called sector mapping is introduced to map sector images to the sphere of an eyeball. The proposed sector-mapping algorithm is evaluated and compared with the plane-mapping algorithm adopted in previous work. A simulation that maps an image of concentric circles to the sphere of the eyeball and an analysis of the difference in distance between neighboring points in a plane and sector were used to compare the two mapping algorithms. A three-dimensional model of a whole retina with clear retinal detachment was generated using the Visualization Toolkit software. A comparison of the mapping results shows that the central part of the retina near the optic disc is stretched and its edges are compressed when the plane-mapping algorithm is used. A better mapping result is obtained by the sector-mapping algorithm than by the plane-mapping algorithm in both the simulation results and real clinical retinal detachment three-dimensional reconstruction. PMID:27480739

  16. McIDAS-V: Advanced Visualization for 3D Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rink, T.; Achtor, T. H.

    2010-12-01

    McIDAS-V is a Java-based, open-source, freely available software package for analysis and visualization of geophysical data. Its advanced capabilities provide very interactive 4-D displays, including 3D volumetric rendering and fast sub-manifold slicing, linked to an abstract mathematical data model with built-in metadata for units, coordinate system transforms and sampling topology. A Jython interface provides user defined analysis and computation in terms of the internal data model. These powerful capabilities to integrate data, analysis and visualization are being applied to hyper-spectral sounding retrievals, eg. AIRS and IASI, of moisture and cloud density to interrogate and analyze their 3D structure, as well as, validate with instruments such as CALIPSO, CloudSat and MODIS. The object oriented framework design allows for specialized extensions for novel displays and new sources of data. Community defined CF-conventions for gridded data are understood by the software, and can be immediately imported into the application. This presentation will show examples how McIDAS-V is used in 3-dimensional data analysis, display and evaluation.

  17. Using a wireless motion controller for 3D medical image catheter interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanovski, Dime; Hahn, Dieter; Daum, Volker; Hornegger, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    State-of-the-art morphological imaging techniques usually provide high resolution 3D images with a huge number of slices. In clinical practice, however, 2D slice-based examinations are still the method of choice even for these large amounts of data. Providing intuitive interaction methods for specific 3D medical visualization applications is therefore a critical feature for clinical imaging applications. For the domain of catheter navigation and surgery planning, it is crucial to assist the physician with appropriate visualization techniques, such as 3D segmentation maps, fly-through cameras or virtual interaction approaches. There has been an ongoing development and improvement for controllers that help to interact with 3D environments in the domain of computer games. These controllers are based on both motion and infrared sensors and are typically used to detect 3D position and orientation. We have investigated how a state-of-the-art wireless motion sensor controller (Wiimote), developed by Nintendo, can be used for catheter navigation and planning purposes. By default the Wiimote controller only measure rough acceleration over a range of +/- 3g with 10% sensitivity and orientation. Therefore, a pose estimation algorithm was developed for computing accurate position and orientation in 3D space regarding 4 Infrared LEDs. Current results show that for the translation it is possible to obtain a mean error of (0.38cm, 0.41cm, 4.94cm) and for the rotation (0.16, 0.28) respectively. Within this paper we introduce a clinical prototype that allows steering of a virtual fly-through camera attached to the catheter tip by the Wii controller on basis of a segmented vessel tree.

  18. GPU-Based Visualization of 3D Fluid Interfaces using Level Set Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadlec, B. J.

    2009-12-01

    We model a simple 3D fluid-interface problem using the level set method and visualize the interface as a dynamic surface. Level set methods allow implicit handling of complex topologies deformed by evolutions where sharp changes and cusps are present without destroying the representation. We present a highly optimized visualization and computation algorithm that is implemented in CUDA to run on the NVIDIA GeForce 295 GTX. CUDA is a general purpose parallel computing architecture that allows the NVIDIA GPU to be treated like a data parallel supercomputer in order to solve many computational problems in a fraction of the time required on a CPU. CUDA is compared to the new OpenCL™ (Open Computing Language), which is designed to run on heterogeneous computing environments but does not take advantage of low-level features in NVIDIA hardware that provide significant speedups. Therefore, our technique is implemented using CUDA and results are compared to a single CPU implementation to show the benefits of using the GPU and CUDA for visualizing fluid-interface problems. We solve a 1024^3 problem and experience significant speedup using the NVIDIA GeForce 295 GTX. Implementation details for mapping the problem to the GPU architecture are described as well as discussion on porting the technique to heterogeneous devices (AMD, Intel, IBM) using OpenCL. The results present a new interactive system for computing and visualizing the evolution of fluid interface problems on the GPU.

  19. 3D Inhabited Virtual Worlds: Interactivity and Interaction between Avatars, Autonomous Agents, and Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jens F.

    This paper addresses some of the central questions currently related to 3-Dimensional Inhabited Virtual Worlds (3D-IVWs), their virtual interactions, and communication, drawing from the theory and methodology of sociology, interaction analysis, interpersonal communication, semiotics, cultural studies, and media studies. First, 3D-IVWs--seen as a…

  20. Design and implementation of a 3D ocean virtual reality and visualization engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ge; Li, Bo; Tian, Fenglin; Ji, Pengbo; Li, Wenqing

    2012-12-01

    In this study, a 3D virtual reality and visualization engine for rendering the ocean, named VV-Ocean, is designed for marine applications. The design goals of VV-Ocean aim at high fidelity simulation of ocean environment, visualization of massive and multidimensional marine data, and imitation of marine lives. VV-Ocean is composed of five modules, i.e. memory management module, resources management module, scene management module, rendering process management module and interaction management module. There are three core functions in VV-Ocean: reconstructing vivid virtual ocean scenes, visualizing real data dynamically in real time, imitating and simulating marine lives intuitively. Based on VV-Ocean, we establish a sea-land integration platform which can reproduce drifting and diffusion processes of oil spilling from sea bottom to surface. Environment factors such as ocean current and wind field have been considered in this simulation. On this platform oil spilling process can be abstracted as movements of abundant oil particles. The result shows that oil particles blend with water well and the platform meets the requirement for real-time and interactive rendering. VV-Ocean can be widely used in ocean applications such as demonstrating marine operations, facilitating maritime communications, developing ocean games, reducing marine hazards, forecasting the weather over oceans, serving marine tourism, and so on. Finally, further technological improvements of VV-Ocean are discussed.

  1. Visualizing Earthquakes in '3D' using the IRIS Earthquake Browser (IEB) Website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welti, R.; McQuillan, P. J.; Weertman, B. R.

    2012-12-01

    The distribution of earthquakes is often easier to interpret in 3D, but most 3D visualization tools require the installation of specialized software and some practice in their use. To reduce this barrier for students and the general public, a pseudo-3D seismicity viewer has been developed which runs in a web browser as part of the IRIS Earthquake Browser (IEB). IEB is an interactive map for viewing earthquake epicenters all over the world, and is composed of a Google map, HTML, JavaScript and a fast earthquake hypocenter web service. The web service accesses seismic data at IRIS from the early 1960s until present. Users can change the region, the number of events, and the depth and magnitude ranges to display. Earthquakes may also be viewed as a table, or exported to various formats. Predefined regions can be selected and zoomed to, and bookmarks generally preserve whatever region and settings are in effect when bookmarked, allowing the easy sharing of particular "scenarios" with other users. Plate boundaries can be added to the display. The 3DV viewer displays events for the currently-selected IEB region in a separate window. They can be rotated and zoomed, with a fast response for plots of up to several thousand events. Rotation can be done manually by dragging or automatically at a set rate, and tectonic plate boundaries turned on or off. 3DV uses a geographical projection algorithm provided by Gary Pavils and collaborators. It is written in HTML5, and is based on CanvasMol by Branislav Ulicny.; A region SE of Fiji, selected in IRIS Earthquake Browser. ; The same region as viewed in 3D Viewer.

  2. A segmentation method for 3D visualization of neurons imaged with a confocal laser scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jeffrey R.; Barrett, Steven F.; Wilcox, Michael J.

    2005-04-01

    Our understanding of the world around us is based primarily on three-dimensional information because of the environment in which we live and interact. Medical or biological image information is often collected in the form of two-dimensional, serial section images. As such, it is difficult for the observer to mentally reconstruct the three dimensional features of each object. Although many image rendering software packages allow for 3D views of the serial sections, they lack the ability to segment, or isolate different objects in the data set. Segmentation is the key to creating 3D renderings of distinct objects from serial slice images, like separate pieces to a puzzle. This paper describes a segmentation method for objects recorded with serial section images. The user defines threshold levels and object labels on a single image of the data set that are subsequently used to automatically segment each object in the remaining images of the same data set, while maintaining boundaries between contacting objects. The performance of the algorithm is verified using mathematically defined shapes. It is then applied to the visual neurons of the housefly, Musca domestica. Knowledge of the fly"s visual system may lead to improved machine visions systems. This effort has provided the impetus to develop this segmentation algorithm. The described segmentation method can be applied to any high contrast serial slice data set that is well aligned and registered. The medical field alone has many applications for rapid generation of 3D segmented models from MRI and other medical imaging modalities.

  3. User-Appropriate Viewer for High Resolution Interactive Engagement with 3d Digital Cultural Artefacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, D.; La Pensée, A.; Cooper, M.

    2013-07-01

    Three dimensional (3D) laser scanning is an important documentation technique for cultural heritage. This technology has been adopted from the engineering and aeronautical industry and is an invaluable tool for the documentation of objects within museum collections (La Pensée, 2008). The datasets created via close range laser scanning are extremely accurate and the created 3D dataset allows for a more detailed analysis in comparison to other documentation technologies such as photography. The dataset can be used for a range of different applications including: documentation; archiving; surface monitoring; replication; gallery interactives; educational sessions; conservation and visualization. However, the novel nature of a 3D dataset is presenting a rather unique challenge with respect to its sharing and dissemination. This is in part due to the need for specialised 3D software and a supported graphics card to display high resolution 3D models. This can be detrimental to one of the main goals of cultural institutions, which is to share knowledge and enable activities such as research, education and entertainment. This has limited the presentation of 3D models of cultural heritage objects to mainly either images or videos. Yet with recent developments in computer graphics, increased internet speed and emerging technologies such as Adobe's Stage 3D (Adobe, 2013) and WebGL (Khronos, 2013), it is now possible to share a dataset directly within a webpage. This allows website visitors to interact with the 3D dataset allowing them to explore every angle of the object, gaining an insight into its shape and nature. This can be very important considering that it is difficult to offer the same level of understanding of the object through the use of traditional mediums such as photographs and videos. Yet this presents a range of problems: this is a very novel experience and very few people have engaged with 3D objects outside of 3D software packages or games. This paper

  4. 3D Vision on Mars: Stereo processing and visualizations for NASA and ESA rover missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Ben

    2016-07-01

    Three dimensional (3D) vision processing is an essential component of planetary rover mission planning and scientific data analysis. Standard ground vision processing products are digital terrain maps, panoramas, and virtual views of the environment. Such processing is currently developed for the PanCam instrument of ESA's ExoMars Rover mission by the PanCam 3D Vision Team under JOANNEUM RESEARCH coordination. Camera calibration, quality estimation of the expected results and the interfaces to other mission elements such as operations planning, rover navigation system and global Mars mapping are a specific focus of the current work. The main goals of the 3D Vision team in this context are: instrument design support & calibration processing: Development of 3D vision functionality Visualization: development of a 3D visualization tool for scientific data analysis. 3D reconstructions from stereo image data during the mission Support for 3D scientific exploitation to characterize the overall landscape geomorphology, processes, and the nature of the geologic record using the reconstructed 3D models. The developed processing framework PRoViP establishes an extensible framework for 3D vision processing in planetary robotic missions. Examples of processing products and capabilities are: Digital Terrain Models, Ortho images, 3D meshes, occlusion, solar illumination-, slope-, roughness-, and hazard-maps. Another important processing capability is the fusion of rover and orbiter based images with the support of multiple missions and sensors (e.g. MSL Mastcam stereo processing). For 3D visualization a tool called PRo3D has been developed to analyze and directly interpret digital outcrop models. Stereo image products derived from Mars rover data can be rendered in PRo3D, enabling the user to zoom, rotate and translate the generated 3D outcrop models. Interpretations can be digitized directly onto the 3D surface, and simple measurements of the outcrop and sedimentary features

  5. TRACE3D. Interactive Beam-Dynamics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, L.; Yao, C.Y.

    1993-12-01

    TRACE3D is an interactive program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined system. The transport system may consist of the following elements: drift, thin lens, quadrupole, permanent magnet quadrupole, solenoid, doublet, triplet, bending magnet, edge angle (for bend), RF gap, radio-frequency-quadrupole cell, RF cavity, coupled-cavity tank, user-desired element, coordinate rotation, and identical element. The beam is represented by a 6X6 matrix defining a hyper-ellipsoid in six-dimensional phase space. The projection of this hyperellipsoid on any two-dimensional plane is an ellipse that defines the boundary of the beam in that plane.

  6. TRACE3D. Interactive Beam-Dynamics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.; Rusthoi, D.P.

    1991-06-01

    TRACE3D is an interactive program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined system. The transport system may consist of the following elements: drift, thin lens, quadrupole, permanent magnet quadrupole, solenoid, doublet, triplet, bending magnet, edge angle (for bend), RF gap, radio-frequency-quadrupole cell, RF cavity, coupled-cavity tank, user-desired element, coordinate rotation, and identical element. The beam is represented by a 6X6 matrix defining a hyper-ellipsoid in six-dimensional phase space. The projection of this hyperellipsoid on any two-dimensional plane is an ellipse that defines the boundary of the beam in that plane.

  7. Remote web-based 3D visualization of hydrological forecasting datasets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Meersbergen, Maarten; Drost, Niels; Blower, Jon; Griffiths, Guy; Hut, Rolf; van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-04-01

    As the possibilities for larger and more detailed simulations of geoscientific data expand, the need for smart solutions in data visualization grow as well. Large volumes of data should be quickly accessible from anywhere in the world without the need for transferring the simulation results. We aim to provide tools for both processing and the handling of these large datasets. As an example, the eWaterCycle project (www.ewatercycle.org) aims to provide a running 14-day ensemble forecast to predict water related stress around the globe. The large volumes of simulation results with uncertainty data that are generated through ensemble hydrological predictions provide a challenge for existing visualization solutions. One possible solution for this challenge lies in the use of web-enabled technology for visualization and analysis of these datasets. Web-based visualization provides an additional benefit in that it eliminates the need for any software installation and configuration and allows for the easy communication of research results between collaborating research parties. Providing interactive tools for the exploration of these datasets will not only help in the analysis of the data by researchers, it can also aid in the dissemination of the research results to the general public. In Vienna, we will present a working open source solution for remote visualization of large volumes of global geospatial data based on the proven open-source 3D web visualization software package Cesium (cesiumjs.org), the ncWMS software package provided by the Reading e-Science Centre and the WebGL and NetCDF standards.

  8. Extending a teleradiology system by tools for 3D-visualization and volumetric analysis through a plug-in mechanism.

    PubMed

    Evers, H; Mayer, A; Engelmann, U; Schröter, A; Baur, U; Wolsiffer, K; Meinzer, H P

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes ongoing research concerning interactive volume visualization coupled with tools for volumetric analysis. To establish an easy to use application, the 3D-visualization has been embedded in a state of the art teleradiology system, where additional functionality is often desired beyond basic image transfer and management. Major clinical requirements for deriving spatial measures are covered by the tools, in order to realize extended diagnosis support and therapy planning. Introducing the general plug-in mechanism this work exemplarily describes the useful extension of an approved application. Interactive visualization was achieved by a hybrid approach taking advantage of both the precise volume visualization based on the Heidelberg Raytracing Model and the graphics acceleration of modern workstations. Several tools for volumetric analysis extend the 3D-viewing. They offer 3D-pointing devices to select locations in the data volume, measure anatomical structures or control segmentation processes. A haptic interface provides a realistic perception while navigating within the 3D-reconstruction. The work is closely related to research work in the field of heart, liver and head surgery. In cooperation with our medical partners the development of tools as presented proceed the integration of image analysis into clinical routine. PMID:10384617

  9. How Spatial Abilities and Dynamic Visualizations Interplay When Learning Functional Anatomy with 3D Anatomical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, Sandra; Bétrancourt, Mireille; Molinari, Gaëlle; Hoyek, Nady

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of dynamic visualizations of three-dimensional (3D) models in anatomy curricula may be an adequate solution for spatial difficulties encountered with traditional static learning, as they provide direct visualization of change throughout the viewpoints. However, little research has explored the interplay between learning material…

  10. A GUI visualization system for airborne lidar image data to reconstruct 3D city model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Yoshiyuki; Koizumi, Kohei

    2015-10-01

    A visualization toolbox system with graphical user interfaces (GUIs) was developed for the analysis of LiDAR point cloud data, as a compound object oriented widget application in IDL (Interractive Data Language). The main features in our system include file input and output abilities, data conversion capability from ascii formatted LiDAR point cloud data to LiDAR image data whose pixel value corresponds the altitude measured by LiDAR, visualization of 2D/3D images in various processing steps and automatic reconstruction ability of 3D city model. The performance and advantages of our graphical user interface (GUI) visualization system for LiDAR data are demonstrated.

  11. 3D Shape Perception in Posterior Cortical Atrophy: A Visual Neuroscience Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gillebert, Céline R.; Schaeverbeke, Jolien; Bastin, Christine; Neyens, Veerle; Bruffaerts, Rose; De Weer, An-Sofie; Seghers, Alexandra; Sunaert, Stefan; Van Laere, Koen; Versijpt, Jan; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Salmon, Eric; Todd, James T.; Orban, Guy A.

    2015-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a rare focal neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by progressive visuoperceptual and visuospatial deficits, most often due to atypical Alzheimer's disease (AD). We applied insights from basic visual neuroscience to analyze 3D shape perception in humans affected by PCA. Thirteen PCA patients and 30 matched healthy controls participated, together with two patient control groups with diffuse Lewy body dementia (DLBD) and an amnestic-dominant phenotype of AD, respectively. The hierarchical study design consisted of 3D shape processing for 4 cues (shading, motion, texture, and binocular disparity) with corresponding 2D and elementary feature extraction control conditions. PCA and DLBD exhibited severe 3D shape-processing deficits and AD to a lesser degree. In PCA, deficient 3D shape-from-shading was associated with volume loss in the right posterior inferior temporal cortex. This region coincided with a region of functional activation during 3D shape-from-shading in healthy controls. In PCA patients who performed the same fMRI paradigm, response amplitude during 3D shape-from-shading was reduced in this region. Gray matter volume in this region also correlated with 3D shape-from-shading in AD. 3D shape-from-disparity in PCA was associated with volume loss slightly more anteriorly in posterior inferior temporal cortex as well as in ventral premotor cortex. The findings in right posterior inferior temporal cortex and right premotor cortex are consistent with neurophysiologically based models of the functional anatomy of 3D shape processing. However, in DLBD, 3D shape deficits rely on mechanisms distinct from inferior temporal structural integrity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by progressive visuoperceptual dysfunction and most often an atypical presentation of Alzheimer's disease (AD) affecting the ventral and dorsal visual streams rather than the medial

  12. [3D Super-resolution Reconstruction and Visualization of Pulmonary Nodules from CT Image].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Fan, Xing; Yang, Ying; Tian, Xuedong; Gu, Lixu

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to propose an algorithm for three-dimensional projection onto convex sets (3D POCS) to achieve super resolution reconstruction of 3D lung computer tomography (CT) images, and to introduce multi-resolution mixed display mode to make 3D visualization of pulmonary nodules. Firstly, we built the low resolution 3D images which have spatial displacement in sub pixel level between each other and generate the reference image. Then, we mapped the low resolution images into the high resolution reference image using 3D motion estimation and revised the reference image based on the consistency constraint convex sets to reconstruct the 3D high resolution images iteratively. Finally, we displayed the different resolution images simultaneously. We then estimated the performance of provided method on 5 image sets and compared them with those of 3 interpolation reconstruction methods. The experiments showed that the performance of 3D POCS algorithm was better than that of 3 interpolation reconstruction methods in two aspects, i.e., subjective and objective aspects, and mixed display mode is suitable to the 3D visualization of high resolution of pulmonary nodules.

  13. Three-Dimensional Phylogeny Explorer: Distinguishing paralogs, lateral transfer, and violation of "molecular clock" assumption with 3D visualization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Namshin; Lee, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Background Construction and interpretation of phylogenetic trees has been a major research topic for understanding the evolution of genes. Increases in sequence data and complexity are creating a need for more powerful and insightful tree visualization tools. Results We have developed 3D Phylogeny Explorer (3DPE), a novel phylogeny tree viewer that maps trees onto three spatial axes (species on the X-axis; paralogs on Z; evolutionary distance on Y), enabling one to distinguish at a glance evolutionary features such as speciation; gene duplication and paralog evolution; lateral gene transfer; and violation of the "molecular clock" assumption. Users can input any tree on the online 3DPE, then rotate, scroll, rescale, and explore it interactively as "live" 3D views. All objects in 3DPE are clickable to display subtrees, connectivity path highlighting, sequence alignments, and gene summary views, and etc. To illustrate the value of this visualization approach for microbial genomes, we also generated 3D phylogeny analyses for all clusters from the public COG database. We constructed tree views using well-established methods and graph algorithms. We used Scientific Python to generate VRML2 3D views viewable in any web browser. Conclusion 3DPE provides a novel phylogenetic tree projection method into 3D space and its web-based implementation with live 3D features for reconstruction of phylogenetic trees of COG database. PMID:17584922

  14. vPresent: A cloud based 3D virtual presentation environment for interactive product customization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Xiaoming; Guo, Fei; He, Yifeng; Guan, Ling

    2013-09-01

    In modern society, many companies offer product customization services to their customers. There are two major issues in providing customized products. First, product manufacturers need to effectively present their products to the customers who may be located in any geographical area. Second, customers need to be able to provide their feedbacks on the product in real-time. However, the traditional presentation approaches cannot effectively convey sufficient information for the product or efficiently adjust product design according to customers' real-time feedbacks. In order to address these issues, we propose vPresent , a cloud based 3D virtual presentation environment, in this paper. In vPresent, the product expert can show the 3D virtual product to the remote customers and dynamically customize the product based on customers' feedbacks, while customers can provide their opinions in real time when they are viewing a vivid 3D visualization of the product. Since the proposed vPresent is a cloud based system, the customers are able to access the customized virtual products from anywhere at any time, via desktop, laptop, or even smart phone. The proposed vPresent is expected to effectively deliver 3D visual information to customers and provide an interactive design platform for the development of customized products.

  15. Comparing and visualizing titanium implant integration in rat bone using 2D and 3D techniques.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Anna; Sarve, Hamid; Johansson, Carina B

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to compare the osseointegration of grit-blasted implants with and without a hydrogen fluoride treatment in rat tibia and femur, and to visualize bone formation using state-of-the-art 3D visualization techniques. Grit-blasted implants were inserted in femur and tibia of 10 Sprague-Dawley rats (4 implants/rat). Four weeks after insertion, bone implant samples were retrieved. Selected samples were imaged in 3D using Synchrotron Radiation-based μCT (SRμCT). The 3D data was quantified and visualized using two novel visualization techniques, thread fly-through and 2D unfolding. All samples were processed to cut and ground sections and 2D histomorphometrical comparisons of bone implant contact (BIC), bone area (BA), and mirror image area (MI) were performed. BA values were statistically significantly higher for test implants than controls (p < 0.05), but BIC and MI data did not differ significantly. Thus, the results partly indicate improved bone formation at blasted and hydrogen fluoride treated implants, compared to blasted implants. The 3D analysis was a valuable complement to 2D analysis, facilitating improved visualization. However, further studies are required to evaluate aspects of 3D quantitative techniques, with relation to light microscopy that traditionally is used for osseointegration studies.

  16. Comparing and visualizing titanium implant integration in rat bone using 2D and 3D techniques.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Anna; Sarve, Hamid; Johansson, Carina B

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to compare the osseointegration of grit-blasted implants with and without a hydrogen fluoride treatment in rat tibia and femur, and to visualize bone formation using state-of-the-art 3D visualization techniques. Grit-blasted implants were inserted in femur and tibia of 10 Sprague-Dawley rats (4 implants/rat). Four weeks after insertion, bone implant samples were retrieved. Selected samples were imaged in 3D using Synchrotron Radiation-based μCT (SRμCT). The 3D data was quantified and visualized using two novel visualization techniques, thread fly-through and 2D unfolding. All samples were processed to cut and ground sections and 2D histomorphometrical comparisons of bone implant contact (BIC), bone area (BA), and mirror image area (MI) were performed. BA values were statistically significantly higher for test implants than controls (p < 0.05), but BIC and MI data did not differ significantly. Thus, the results partly indicate improved bone formation at blasted and hydrogen fluoride treated implants, compared to blasted implants. The 3D analysis was a valuable complement to 2D analysis, facilitating improved visualization. However, further studies are required to evaluate aspects of 3D quantitative techniques, with relation to light microscopy that traditionally is used for osseointegration studies. PMID:24711247

  17. An Interactive 3D Virtual Anatomy Puzzle for Learning and Simulation - Initial Demonstration and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Messier, Erik; Wilcox, Jascha; Dawson-Elli, Alexander; Diaz, Gabriel; Linte, Cristian A

    2016-01-01

    To inspire young students (grades 6-12) to become medical practitioners and biomedical engineers, it is necessary to expose them to key concepts of the field in a way that is both exciting and informative. Recent advances in medical image acquisition, manipulation, processing, visualization, and display have revolutionized the approach in which the human body and internal anatomy can be seen and studied. It is now possible to collect 3D, 4D, and 5D medical images of patient specific data, and display that data to the end user using consumer level 3D stereoscopic display technology. Despite such advancements, traditional 2D modes of content presentation such as textbooks and slides are still the standard didactic equipment used to teach young students anatomy. More sophisticated methods of display can help to elucidate the complex 3D relationships between structures that are so often missed when viewing only 2D media, and can instill in students an appreciation for the interconnection between medicine and technology. Here we describe the design, implementation, and preliminary evaluation of a 3D virtual anatomy puzzle dedicated to helping users learn the anatomy of various organs and systems by manipulating 3D virtual data. The puzzle currently comprises several components of the human anatomy and can be easily extended to include additional organs and systems. The 3D virtual anatomy puzzle game was implemented and piloted using three display paradigms - a traditional 2D monitor, a 3D TV with active shutter glass, and the DK2 version Oculus Rift, as well as two different user interaction devices - a space mouse and traditional keyboard controls. PMID:27046584

  18. Characteristics of visual fatigue under the effect of 3D animation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Shuo; Hsueh, Ya-Hsin; Tung, Kwong-Chung; Jhou, Fong-Yi; Lin, David Pei-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Visual fatigue is commonly encountered in modern life. Clinical visual fatigue characteristics caused by 2-D and 3-D animations may be different, but have not been characterized in detail. This study tried to distinguish the differential effects on visual fatigue caused by 2-D and 3-D animations. A total of 23 volunteers were subjected to accommodation and vergence assessments, followed by a 40-min video game program designed to aggravate their asthenopic symptoms. The volunteers were then assessed for accommodation and vergence parameters again and directed to watch a 5-min 3-D video program, and then assessed again for the parameters. The results support that the 3-D animations caused similar characteristics in vision fatigue parameters in some specific aspects as compared to that caused by 2-D animations. Furthermore, 3-D animations may lead to more exhaustion in both ciliary and extra-ocular muscles, and such differential effects were more evident in the high demand of near vision work. The current results indicated that an arbitrary set of indexes may be promoted in the design of 3-D display or equipments.

  19. A novel 3D wavelet based filter for visualizing features in noisy biological data

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, W C; Haase, S; Lyle, J M; Agard, D A; Sedat, J W

    2005-01-05

    We have developed a 3D wavelet-based filter for visualizing structural features in volumetric data. The only variable parameter is a characteristic linear size of the feature of interest. The filtered output contains only those regions that are correlated with the characteristic size, thus denoising the image. We demonstrate the use of the filter by applying it to 3D data from a variety of electron microscopy samples including low contrast vitreous ice cryogenic preparations, as well as 3D optical microscopy specimens.

  20. Interactive Retro-Deformation of Terrain for Reconstructing 3D Fault Displacements.

    PubMed

    Westerteiger, R; Compton, T; Bernadin, T; Cowgill, E; Gwinner, K; Hamann, B; Gerndt, A; Hagen, H

    2012-12-01

    Planetary topography is the result of complex interactions between geological processes, of which faulting is a prominent component. Surface-rupturing earthquakes cut and move landforms which develop across active faults, producing characteristic surface displacements across the fault. Geometric models of faults and their associated surface displacements are commonly applied to reconstruct these offsets to enable interpretation of the observed topography. However, current 2D techniques are limited in their capability to convey both the three-dimensional kinematics of faulting and the incremental sequence of events required by a given reconstruction. Here we present a real-time system for interactive retro-deformation of faulted topography to enable reconstruction of fault displacement within a high-resolution (sub 1m/pixel) 3D terrain visualization. We employ geometry shaders on the GPU to intersect the surface mesh with fault-segments interactively specified by the user and transform the resulting surface blocks in realtime according to a kinematic model of fault motion. Our method facilitates a human-in-the-loop approach to reconstruction of fault displacements by providing instant visual feedback while exploring the parameter space. Thus, scientists can evaluate the validity of traditional point-to-point reconstructions by visually examining a smooth interpolation of the displacement in 3D. We show the efficacy of our approach by using it to reconstruct segments of the San Andreas fault, California as well as a graben structure in the Noctis Labyrinthus region on Mars.

  1. Interactive Retro-Deformation of Terrain for Reconstructing 3D Fault Displacements.

    PubMed

    Westerteiger, R; Compton, T; Bernadin, T; Cowgill, E; Gwinner, K; Hamann, B; Gerndt, A; Hagen, H

    2012-12-01

    Planetary topography is the result of complex interactions between geological processes, of which faulting is a prominent component. Surface-rupturing earthquakes cut and move landforms which develop across active faults, producing characteristic surface displacements across the fault. Geometric models of faults and their associated surface displacements are commonly applied to reconstruct these offsets to enable interpretation of the observed topography. However, current 2D techniques are limited in their capability to convey both the three-dimensional kinematics of faulting and the incremental sequence of events required by a given reconstruction. Here we present a real-time system for interactive retro-deformation of faulted topography to enable reconstruction of fault displacement within a high-resolution (sub 1m/pixel) 3D terrain visualization. We employ geometry shaders on the GPU to intersect the surface mesh with fault-segments interactively specified by the user and transform the resulting surface blocks in realtime according to a kinematic model of fault motion. Our method facilitates a human-in-the-loop approach to reconstruction of fault displacements by providing instant visual feedback while exploring the parameter space. Thus, scientists can evaluate the validity of traditional point-to-point reconstructions by visually examining a smooth interpolation of the displacement in 3D. We show the efficacy of our approach by using it to reconstruct segments of the San Andreas fault, California as well as a graben structure in the Noctis Labyrinthus region on Mars. PMID:26357128

  2. An Interactive, 3D Fault Editor for VR Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Aalsburg, J.; Yikilmaz, M. B.; Kreylos, O.; Kellogg, L. H.; Rundle, J. B.

    2008-12-01

    Digitial Fault Models (DFM) play a vital role in the study of earthquake dynamics, fault-earthquake interactions, and seismicity. DFMs serve as input for finite-element method (FEM) or other earthquake simulations such as Virtual California. Generally, digital fault models are generated by importing a digitized and georeferenced (2D) fault map and/or a hillshade image of the study area into a geographical information system (GIS) application, where individual fault lines are traced by the user. Data assimilation and creation of a DFM, or updating an existing DFM based on new observations, is a tedious and time-consuming process. In order to facilitate the creation process, we are developing an immersive virtual reality (VR) application to visualize and edit fault models. This program is designed to run in immersive environments such as a CAVE (walk-in VR environment), but also works in a wide range of other environments, including desktop systems and GeoWalls. It is being developed at the UC Davis W.M. Keck Center for Active Visualization in the Earth Sciences (KeckCAVES, http://www.keckcaves.org). Our program allows users to create new models or modify existing ones; for instance by repositioning individual fault-segments, by changing the dip angle, or by modifying (or assigning) the value of a property associated with a particular fault segment (i.e. slip rate). With the addition of high resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEM) , georeferenced active tectonic fault maps and earthquake hypocenters, the user can accurately add new segments to an existing model or create a fault model entirely from scratch. Interactively created or modified models can be written to XML files at any time; from there the data may easily be converted into various formats required by the analysis software or simulation. We believe that the ease of interaction provided by VR technology is ideally suited to the problem of creating and editing digital fault models. Our software provides

  3. Discovering new methods of data fusion, visualization, and analysis in 3D immersive environments for hyperspectral and laser altimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. A.; Gertman, V.; Olsoy, P.; Mitchell, J.; Glenn, N. F.; Joshi, A.; Norpchen, D.; Shrestha, R.; Pernice, M.; Spaete, L.; Grover, S.; Whiting, E.; Lee, R.

    2011-12-01

    Immersive virtual reality environments such as the IQ-Station or CAVE° (Cave Automated Virtual Environment) offer new and exciting ways to visualize and explore scientific data and are powerful research and educational tools. Combining remote sensing data from a range of sensor platforms in immersive 3D environments can enhance the spectral, textural, spatial, and temporal attributes of the data, which enables scientists to interact and analyze the data in ways never before possible. Visualization and analysis of large remote sensing datasets in immersive environments requires software customization for integrating LiDAR point cloud data with hyperspectral raster imagery, the generation of quantitative tools for multidimensional analysis, and the development of methods to capture 3D visualizations for stereographic playback. This study uses hyperspectral and LiDAR data acquired over the China Hat geologic study area near Soda Springs, Idaho, USA. The data are fused into a 3D image cube for interactive data exploration and several methods of recording and playback are investigated that include: 1) creating and implementing a Virtual Reality User Interface (VRUI) patch configuration file to enable recording and playback of VRUI interactive sessions within the CAVE and 2) using the LiDAR and hyperspectral remote sensing data and GIS data to create an ArcScene 3D animated flyover, where left- and right-eye visuals are captured from two independent monitors for playback in a stereoscopic player. These visualizations can be used as outreach tools to demonstrate how integrated data and geotechnology techniques can help scientists see, explore, and more adequately comprehend scientific phenomena, both real and abstract.

  4. V3D enables real-time 3D visualization and quantitative analysis of large-scale biological image data sets.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hanchuan; Ruan, Zongcai; Long, Fuhui; Simpson, Julie H; Myers, Eugene W

    2010-04-01

    The V3D system provides three-dimensional (3D) visualization of gigabyte-sized microscopy image stacks in real time on current laptops and desktops. V3D streamlines the online analysis, measurement and proofreading of complicated image patterns by combining ergonomic functions for selecting a location in an image directly in 3D space and for displaying biological measurements, such as from fluorescent probes, using the overlaid surface objects. V3D runs on all major computer platforms and can be enhanced by software plug-ins to address specific biological problems. To demonstrate this extensibility, we built a V3D-based application, V3D-Neuron, to reconstruct complex 3D neuronal structures from high-resolution brain images. V3D-Neuron can precisely digitize the morphology of a single neuron in a fruitfly brain in minutes, with about a 17-fold improvement in reliability and tenfold savings in time compared with other neuron reconstruction tools. Using V3D-Neuron, we demonstrate the feasibility of building a 3D digital atlas of neurite tracts in the fruitfly brain. PMID:20231818

  5. Discovering hidden relationships between renal diseases and regulated genes through 3D network visualizations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In a recent study, two-dimensional (2D) network layouts were used to visualize and quantitatively analyze the relationship between chronic renal diseases and regulated genes. The results revealed complex relationships between disease type, gene specificity, and gene regulation type, which led to important insights about the underlying biological pathways. Here we describe an attempt to extend our understanding of these complex relationships by reanalyzing the data using three-dimensional (3D) network layouts, displayed through 2D and 3D viewing methods. Findings The 3D network layout (displayed through the 3D viewing method) revealed that genes implicated in many diseases (non-specific genes) tended to be predominantly down-regulated, whereas genes regulated in a few diseases (disease-specific genes) tended to be up-regulated. This new global relationship was quantitatively validated through comparison to 1000 random permutations of networks of the same size and distribution. Our new finding appeared to be the result of using specific features of the 3D viewing method to analyze the 3D renal network. Conclusions The global relationship between gene regulation and gene specificity is the first clue from human studies that there exist common mechanisms across several renal diseases, which suggest hypotheses for the underlying mechanisms. Furthermore, the study suggests hypotheses for why the 3D visualization helped to make salient a new regularity that was difficult to detect in 2D. Future research that tests these hypotheses should enable a more systematic understanding of when and how to use 3D network visualizations to reveal complex regularities in biological networks. PMID:21070623

  6. The performance & flow visualization studies of three-dimensional (3-D) wind turbine blade models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutrisno, Prajitno, Purnomo, W., Setyawan B.

    2016-06-01

    Recently, studies on the design of 3-D wind turbine blades have a less attention even though 3-D blade products are widely sold. In contrary, advanced studies in 3-D helicopter blade tip have been studied rigorously. Studies in wind turbine blade modeling are mostly assumed that blade spanwise sections behave as independent two-dimensional airfoils, implying that there is no exchange of momentum in the spanwise direction. Moreover, flow visualization experiments are infrequently conducted. Therefore, a modeling study of wind turbine blade with visualization experiment is needed to be improved to obtain a better understanding. The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of 3-D wind turbine blade models with backward-forward swept and verify the flow patterns using flow visualization. In this research, the blade models are constructed based on the twist and chord distributions following Schmitz's formula. Forward and backward swept are added to the rotating blades. Based on this, the additional swept would enhance or diminish outward flow disturbance or stall development propagation on the spanwise blade surfaces to give better blade design. Some combinations, i. e., b lades with backward swept, provide a better 3-D favorable rotational force of the rotor system. The performance of the 3-D wind turbine system model is measured by a torque meter, employing Prony's braking system. Furthermore, the 3-D flow patterns around the rotating blade models are investigated by applying "tuft-visualization technique", to study the appearance of laminar, separated, and boundary layer flow patterns surrounding the 3-dimentional blade system.

  7. In situ visualization of magma deformation at high temperature using time-lapse 3D tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinho, jose; Lee, Peter; Lavallee, Yan; Kendrick, Jackie; Von-Aulock, Felix

    2016-04-01

    We use synchrotron based x-ray computed micro-tomography (sCT) to visualize, in situ, the microstructural evolution of magma samples 3 mm diameter with a resolution of 3 μm during heating and uniaxial compression at temperatures up to 1040 °C. The interaction between crystals, melt and gas bubbles is analysed in 4D (3D + time) during sample deformation. The ability to observe the changes of the microstructure as a function of time allow us to: a) study the effect of temperature in the ability of magma to fracture or deform; b) quantify bubble nucleation and growth rates during heating; c) study the relation between crystal displacement and volatile exsolution. We will show unique beautiful videos of how bubbles grow and coalescence, how samples and crystals within the sample fracture, heal and deform. Our study establishes in situ sCT as a powerful tool to quantify and visualize with micro-scale resolution fast processes taking place in magma that are essential to understand ascent in a volcanic conduit and validate existing models for determining the explosivity of volcanic eruptions. Tracking simultaneously the time and spatial changes of magma microstructures is shown to be primordial to study disequilibrium processes between crystals, melt and gas phases.

  8. 3D Printing Meets Astrophysics: A New Way to Visualize and Communicate Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas Ignatius; Steffen, Wolfgang; Clementel, Nicola; Gull, Theodore R.

    2015-08-01

    3D printing has the potential to improve the astronomy community’s ability to visualize, understand, interpret, and communicate important scientific results. I summarize recent efforts to use 3D printing to understand in detail the 3D structure of a complex astrophysical system, the supermassive binary star Eta Carinae and its surrounding bipolar ‘Homunculus’ nebula. Using mapping observations of molecular hydrogen line emission obtained with the ESO Very Large Telescope, we obtained a full 3D model of the Homunculus, allowing us to 3D print, for the first time, a detailed replica of a nebula (Steffen et al. 2014, MNRAS, 442, 3316). I also present 3D prints of output from supercomputer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in the highly eccentric binary located near the center of the Homunculus (Madura et al. 2015, arXiv:1503.00716). These 3D prints, the first of their kind, reveal previously unknown ‘finger-like’ structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (when the two stars are closest to each other) that protrude outward from the spiral wind-wind collision region. The results of both efforts have received significant media attention in recent months, including two NASA press releases (http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/astronomers-bring-the-third-dimension-to-a-doomed-stars-outburst/ and http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/nasa-observatories-take-an-unprecedented-look-into-superstar-eta-carinae/), demonstrating the potential of using 3D printing for astronomy outreach and education. Perhaps more importantly, 3D printing makes it possible to bring the wonders of astronomy to new, often neglected, audiences, i.e. the blind and visually impaired.

  9. Services Oriented Smart City Platform Based On 3d City Model Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prandi, F.; Soave, M.; Devigili, F.; Andreolli, M.; De Amicis, R.

    2014-04-01

    The rapid technological evolution, which is characterizing all the disciplines involved within the wide concept of smart cities, is becoming a key factor to trigger true user-driven innovation. However to fully develop the Smart City concept to a wide geographical target, it is required an infrastructure that allows the integration of heterogeneous geographical information and sensor networks into a common technological ground. In this context 3D city models will play an increasingly important role in our daily lives and become an essential part of the modern city information infrastructure (Spatial Data Infrastructure). The work presented in this paper describes an innovative Services Oriented Architecture software platform aimed at providing smartcities services on top of 3D urban models. 3D city models are the basis of many applications and can became the platform for integrating city information within the Smart-Cites context. In particular the paper will investigate how the efficient visualisation of 3D city models using different levels of detail (LODs) is one of the pivotal technological challenge to support Smart-Cities applications. The goal is to provide to the final user realistic and abstract 3D representations of the urban environment and the possibility to interact with a massive amounts of semantic information contained into the geospatial 3D city model. The proposed solution, using OCG standards and a custom service to provide 3D city models, lets the users to consume the services and interact with the 3D model via Web in a more effective way.

  10. Memory and visual search in naturalistic 2D and 3D environments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chia-Ling; Aivar, M. Pilar; Kit, Dmitry M.; Tong, Matthew H.; Hayhoe, Mary M.

    2016-01-01

    The role of memory in guiding attention allocation in daily behaviors is not well understood. In experiments with two-dimensional (2D) images, there is mixed evidence about the importance of memory. Because the stimulus context in laboratory experiments and daily behaviors differs extensively, we investigated the role of memory in visual search, in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) environments. A 3D immersive virtual apartment composed of two rooms was created, and a parallel 2D visual search experiment composed of snapshots from the 3D environment was developed. Eye movements were tracked in both experiments. Repeated searches for geometric objects were performed to assess the role of spatial memory. Subsequently, subjects searched for realistic context objects to test for incidental learning. Our results show that subjects learned the room-target associations in 3D but less so in 2D. Gaze was increasingly restricted to relevant regions of the room with experience in both settings. Search for local contextual objects, however, was not facilitated by early experience. Incidental fixations to context objects do not necessarily benefit search performance. Together, these results demonstrate that memory for global aspects of the environment guides search by restricting allocation of attention to likely regions, whereas task relevance determines what is learned from the active search experience. Behaviors in 2D and 3D environments are comparable, although there is greater use of memory in 3D. PMID:27299769

  11. Localization and visualization of excess chemical potential in statistical mechanical integral equation theory 3D-HNC-RISM.

    PubMed

    Du, Qi-Shi; Liu, Peng-Jun; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2008-02-01

    In this study the excess chemical potential of the integral equation theory, 3D-RISM-HNC [Q. Du, Q. Wei, J. Phys. Chem. B 107 (2003) 13463-13470], is visualized in three-dimensional form and localized at interaction sites of solute molecule. Taking the advantage of reference interaction site model (RISM), the calculation equations of chemical excess potential are reformulized according to the solute interaction sites s in molecular space. Consequently the solvation free energy is localized at every interaction site of solute molecule. For visualization of the 3D-RISM-HNC calculation results, the excess chemical potentials are described using radial and three-dimensional diagrams. It is found that the radial diagrams of the excess chemical potentials are more sensitive to the bridge functions than the radial diagrams of solvent site density distributions. The diagrams of average excess chemical potential provide useful information of solute-solvent electrostatic and van der Waals interactions. The local description of solvation free energy at active sites of solute in 3D-RISM-HNC may broaden the application scope of statistical mechanical integral equation theory in solution chemistry and life science.

  12. Procession: using intelligent 3D information visualization to support client understanding during construction projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, Steve

    2000-02-01

    The latest results in the development of the software tool 'Procession' is presented. The research underlying Procession delivers a conceptual 3D framework for the interpretation of non-physical construction industry processes. Procession is the implementation of the proposed 3D framework, as an information visualization software tool. The conceptual transformation of construction clients' informational needs into 3D visual structures is documented. Also discussed is the development of an 'intelligent' software process to calculate the relevance of individual project elements. This is used to determine the representation of project elements within a 3D surface. Construction is not short of technologies for visualizing physical building models. However, it would seem that little or no consideration has been given to improving the intelligibility of non-physical construction processes. This type of information is usually known as Project Planning data and is concerned with the individual tasks that make up construction projects. While, there are software applications that allow access to this data for the professional members of the project team, clients are currently without a suitable tool. Procession's data surface is an abstract representation of three selected project dimensions. Its 3D progress reports provide construction clients with an 'at-a-glance' indication of project 'health'.

  13. Incremental learning of 3D-DCT compact representations for robust visual tracking.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi; Dick, Anthony; Shen, Chunhua; van den Hengel, Anton; Wang, Hanzi

    2013-04-01

    Visual tracking usually requires an object appearance model that is robust to changing illumination, pose, and other factors encountered in video. Many recent trackers utilize appearance samples in previous frames to form the bases upon which the object appearance model is built. This approach has the following limitations: 1) The bases are data driven, so they can be easily corrupted, and 2) it is difficult to robustly update the bases in challenging situations. In this paper, we construct an appearance model using the 3D discrete cosine transform (3D-DCT). The 3D-DCT is based on a set of cosine basis functions which are determined by the dimensions of the 3D signal and thus independent of the input video data. In addition, the 3D-DCT can generate a compact energy spectrum whose high-frequency coefficients are sparse if the appearance samples are similar. By discarding these high-frequency coefficients, we simultaneously obtain a compact 3D-DCT-based object representation and a signal reconstruction-based similarity measure (reflecting the information loss from signal reconstruction). To efficiently update the object representation, we propose an incremental 3D-DCT algorithm which decomposes the 3D-DCT into successive operations of the 2D discrete cosine transform (2D-DCT) and 1D discrete cosine transform (1D-DCT) on the input video data. As a result, the incremental 3D-DCT algorithm only needs to compute the 2D-DCT for newly added frames as well as the 1D-DCT along the third dimension, which significantly reduces the computational complexity. Based on this incremental 3D-DCT algorithm, we design a discriminative criterion to evaluate the likelihood of a test sample belonging to the foreground object. We then embed the discriminative criterion into a particle filtering framework for object state inference over time. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed tracker.

  14. Strategies for Effectively Visualizing a 3D Flow Using Volume Line Integral Convolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, Victoria; Grosch, Chester

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses strategies for effectively portraying 3D flow using volume line integral convolution. Issues include defining an appropriate input texture, clarifying the distinct identities and relative depths of the advected texture elements, and selectively highlighting regions of interest in both the input and output volumes. Apart from offering insights into the greater potential of 3D LIC as a method for effectively representing flow in a volume, a principal contribution of this work is the suggestion of a technique for generating and rendering 3D visibility-impeding 'halos' that can help to intuitively indicate the presence of depth discontinuities between contiguous elements in a projection and thereby clarify the 3D spatial organization of elements in the flow. The proposed techniques are applied to the visualization of a hot, supersonic, laminar jet exiting into a colder, subsonic coflow.

  15. Photographing Internal Fractures of the Archaeological Statues with 3D Visualization of Ground Penetrating Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadioglu, S.; Kadioglu, Y. K.

    2009-04-01

    travertine had maximum positive reflection coefficient. Therefore, after processing, a simplified amplitude-colour range was assigned for maximum positive and negative polarities and the rest. The colour limitation made small scale fractures visible on the radargrams. However, solid 3D block data with linear opacity could not image the fractures and cavities exactly. A new opacity function was constructed, which dominates maximum positive amplitudes and eliminates other irrelevant amplitudes. Therefore, transparent 3D image of the GPR data were obtained for the fractures. Interactive visualization of the fractures with their depth and direction was done by using sub-blocks of the transparent 3D volume. Vesicular textures within travertine were supported by the GPR results. Mapping fractures and cavities in the statues could indicate the stability case of them and showed the best way to minimize restore cost.

  16. 3D interactive model of lumbar spinal structures of anesthetic interest.

    PubMed

    Prats-Galino, Alberto; Reina, Miguel A; Mavar Haramija, Marija; Puigdellivol-Sánchez, Anna; Juanes Méndez, Juan A; De Andrés, José A

    2015-03-01

    A 3D model of lumbar structures of anesthetic interest was reconstructed from human magnetic resonance (MR) images and embedded in a Portable Document Format (PDF) file, which can be opened by freely available software and used offline. The MR images were analyzed using a specific 3D software platform for biomedical data. Models generated from manually delimited volumes of interest and selected MR images were exported to Virtual Reality Modeling Language format and were presented in a PDF document containing JavaScript-based functions. The 3D file and the corresponding instructions and license files can be downloaded freely at http://diposit.ub.edu/dspace/handle/2445/44844?locale=en. The 3D PDF interactive file includes reconstructions of the L3-L5 vertebrae, intervertebral disks, ligaments, epidural and foraminal fat, dural sac and nerve root cuffs, sensory and motor nerve roots of the cauda equina, and anesthetic approaches (epidural medial, spinal paramedial, and selective nerve root paths); it also includes a predefined sequential educational presentation. Zoom, 360° rotation, selective visualization, and transparency graduation of each structure and clipping functions are available. Familiarization requires no specialized informatics knowledge. The ease with which the document can be used could make it valuable for anatomical and anesthetic teaching and demonstration of patient information. PMID:25352014

  17. Interactive 3-D graphics workstations in stereotaxy: clinical requirements, algorithms, and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehricke, Hans-Heino; Daiber, Gerhard; Sonntag, Ralf; Strasser, Wolfgang; Lochner, Mathias; Rudi, Lothar S.; Lorenz, Walter J.

    1992-09-01

    In stereotactic treatment planning the spatial relationships between a variety of objects has to be taken into account in order to avoid destruction of vital brain structures and rupture of vasculature. The visualization of these highly complex relations may be supported by 3-D computer graphics methods. In this context the three-dimensional display of the intracranial vascular tree and additional objects, such as neuroanatomy, pathology, stereotactic devices, or isodose surfaces, is of high clinical value. We report an advanced rendering method for a depth-enhanced maximum intensity projection from magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and a walk-through approach to the analysis of MRA volume data. Furthermore, various methods for a multiple-object 3-D rendering in stereotaxy are discussed. The development of advanced applications in medical imaging can hardly be successful if image acquisition problems are disregarded. We put particular emphasis on the use of conventional MRI and MRA for stereotactic guidance. The problem of MR distortion is discussed and a novel three- dimensional approach to the quantification and correction of the distortion patterns is presented. Our results suggest that the sole use of MR for stereotactic guidance is highly practical. The true three-dimensionality of the acquired datasets opens up new perspectives to stereotactic treatment planning. For the first time it is possible now to integrate all the necessary information into 3-D scenes, thus enabling an interactive 3-D planning.

  18. Proteopedia: 3D Visualization and Annotation of Transcription Factor-DNA Readout Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dantas Machado, Ana Carolina; Saleebyan, Skyler B.; Holmes, Bailey T.; Karelina, Maria; Tam, Julia; Kim, Sharon Y.; Kim, Keziah H.; Dror, Iris; Hodis, Eran; Martz, Eric; Compeau, Patricia A.; Rohs, Remo

    2012-01-01

    3D visualization assists in identifying diverse mechanisms of protein-DNA recognition that can be observed for transcription factors and other DNA binding proteins. We used Proteopedia to illustrate transcription factor-DNA readout modes with a focus on DNA shape, which can be a function of either nucleotide sequence (Hox proteins) or base pairing…

  19. 2D but not 3D: pictorial-depth deficits in a case of visual agnosia.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Oliver H; Driver, Jon; McCarthy, Rosaleen A

    2004-01-01

    Patients with visual agnosia exhibit acquired impairments in visual object recognition, that may or may not involve deficits in low-level perceptual abilities. Here we report a case (patient DM) who after head injury presented with object-recognition deficits. He still appears able to extract 2D information from the visual world in a relatively intact manner; but his ability to extract pictorial information about 3D object-structure is greatly compromised. His copying of line drawings is relatively good, and he is accurate and shows apparently normal mental rotation when matching or judging objects tilted in the picture-plane. But he performs poorly on a variety of tasks requiring 3D representations to be derived from 2D stimuli, including: performing mental rotation in depth, rather than in the picture-plane; judging the relative depth of two regions depicted in line-drawings of objects; and deciding whether a line-drawing represents an object that is 'impossible' in 3D. Interestingly, DM failed to show several visual illusions experienced by normals (Muller-Lyer and Ponzo), that some authors have attributed to pictorial depth cues. Taken together, these findings indicate a deficit in achieving 3D intepretations of objects from 2D pictorial cues, that may contribute to object-recognition problems in agnosia.

  20. Real-time 3D visualization of volumetric video motion sensor data

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.; Stansfield, S.; Shawver, D.; Flachs, G.M.; Jordan, J.B.; Bao, Z.

    1996-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of improving detection, assessment, and response capabilities of security systems. Our approach combines two state-of-the-art technologies: volumetric video motion detection (VVMD) and virtual reality (VR). This work capitalizes on the ability of VVMD technology to provide three-dimensional (3D) information about the position, shape, and size of intruders within a protected volume. The 3D information is obtained by fusing motion detection data from multiple video sensors. The second component involves the application of VR technology to display information relating to the sensors and the sensor environment. VR technology enables an operator, or security guard, to be immersed in a 3D graphical representation of the remote site. VVMD data is transmitted from the remote site via ordinary telephone lines. There are several benefits to displaying VVMD information in this way. Because the VVMD system provides 3D information and because the sensor environment is a physical 3D space, it seems natural to display this information in 3D. Also, the 3D graphical representation depicts essential details within and around the protected volume in a natural way for human perception. Sensor information can also be more easily interpreted when the operator can `move` through the virtual environment and explore the relationships between the sensor data, objects and other visual cues present in the virtual environment. By exploiting the powerful ability of humans to understand and interpret 3D information, we expect to improve the means for visualizing and interpreting sensor information, allow a human operator to assess a potential threat more quickly and accurately, and enable a more effective response. This paper will detail both the VVMD and VR technologies and will discuss a prototype system based upon their integration.

  1. 3D surface reconstruction and visualization of the Drosophila wing imaginal disc at cellular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Linge; Widmann, Thomas; Jülicher, Frank; Dahmann, Christian; Breen, David

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying and visualizing the shape of developing biological tissues provide information about the morphogenetic processes in multicellular organisms. The size and shape of biological tissues depend on the number, size, shape, and arrangement of the constituting cells. To better understand the mechanisms that guide tissues into their final shape, it is important to investigate the cellular arrangement within tissues. Here we present a data processing pipeline to generate 3D volumetric surface models of epithelial tissues, as well as geometric descriptions of the tissues' apical cell cross-sections. The data processing pipeline includes image acquisition, editing, processing and analysis, 2D cell mesh generation, 3D contourbased surface reconstruction, cell mesh projection, followed by geometric calculations and color-based visualization of morphological parameters. In their first utilization we have applied these procedures to construct a 3D volumetric surface model at cellular resolution of the wing imaginal disc of Drosophila melanogaster. The ultimate goal of the reported effort is to produce tools for the creation of detailed 3D geometric models of the individual cells in epithelial tissues. To date, 3D volumetric surface models of the whole wing imaginal disc have been created, and the apicolateral cell boundaries have been identified, allowing for the calculation and visualization of cell parameters, e.g. apical cross-sectional area of cells. The calculation and visualization of morphological parameters show position-dependent patterns of cell shape in the wing imaginal disc. Our procedures should offer a general data processing pipeline for the construction of 3D volumetric surface models of a wide variety of epithelial tissues.

  2. Openwebglobe 2: Visualization of Complex 3D-GEODATA in the (mobile) Webbrowser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christen, M.

    2016-06-01

    Providing worldwide high resolution data for virtual globes consists of compute and storage intense tasks for processing data. Furthermore, rendering complex 3D-Geodata, such as 3D-City models with an extremely high polygon count and a vast amount of textures at interactive framerates is still a very challenging task, especially on mobile devices. This paper presents an approach for processing, caching and serving massive geospatial data in a cloud-based environment for large scale, out-of-core, highly scalable 3D scene rendering on a web based virtual globe. Cloud computing is used for processing large amounts of geospatial data and also for providing 2D and 3D map data to a large amount of (mobile) web clients. In this paper the approach for processing, rendering and caching very large datasets in the currently developed virtual globe "OpenWebGlobe 2" is shown, which displays 3D-Geodata on nearly every device.

  3. Texture-based visualization of unsteady 3D flow by real-time advection and volumetric illumination.

    PubMed

    Weiskopf, Daniel; Schafhitzel, Tobias; Ertl, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an interactive technique for the dense texture-based visualization of unsteady 3D flow, taking into account issues of computational efficiency and visual perception. High efficiency is achieved by a 3D graphics processing unit (GPU)-based texture advection mechanism that implements logical 3D grid structures by physical memory in the form of 2D textures. This approach results in fast read and write access to physical memory, independent of GPU architecture. Slice-based direct volume rendering is used for the final display. We investigate two alternative methods for the volumetric illumination of the result of texture advection: First, gradient-based illumination that employs a real-time computation of gradients, and, second, line-based lighting based on illumination in codimension 2. In addition to the Phong model, perception-guided rendering methods are considered, such as cool/warm shading, halo rendering, or color-based depth cueing. The problems of clutter and occlusion are addressed by supporting a volumetric importance function that enhances features of the flow and reduces visual complexity in less interesting regions. GPU implementation aspects, performance measurements, and a discussion of results are included to demonstrate our visualization approach.

  4. Remote Visualization and Navigation of 3d Models of Archeological Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callieri, M.; Dellepiane, M.; Scopigno, R.

    2015-02-01

    The remote visualization and navigation of 3D data directly inside the web browser is becoming a viable option, due to the recent efforts in standardizing the components for 3D rendering on the web platform. Nevertheless, handling complex models may be a challenge, especially when a more generic solution is needed to handle different cases. In particular, archeological and architectural models are usually hard to handle, since their navigation can be managed in several ways, and a completely free navigation may be misleading and not realistic. In this paper we present a solution for the remote navigation of these dataset in a WebGL component. The navigation has two possible modes: the "bird's eye" mode, where the user is able to see the model from above, and the "first person" mode, where the user can move inside the structure. The two modalities are linked by a point of interest, that helps the user to control the navigation in an intuitive fashion. Since the terrain may not be flat, and the architecture may be complex, it's necessary to handle these issues, possibly without implementing complex mesh-based collision mechanisms. Hence, a complete navigation is obtained by storing the height and collision information in an image, which provides a very simple source of data. Moreover, the same image-based approach can be used to store additional information that could enhance the navigation experience. The method has been tested in two complex test cases, showing that a simple yet powerful interaction can be obtained with limited pre-processing of data.

  5. Integrating Data Clustering and Visualization for the Analysis of 3D Gene Expression Data

    SciTech Connect

    Data Analysis and Visualization and the Department of Computer Science, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis CA 95616, USA,; nternational Research Training Group ``Visualization of Large and Unstructured Data Sets,'' University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Genomics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley CA 94720, USA; Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley CA 94720, USA,; Computer Science Division,University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA,; Computer Science Department, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA,; All authors are with the Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,; Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Huang, Min-Yu; Bethel, E. Wes; Biggin, Mark D.; Fowlkes, Charless C.; Hendriks, Cris L. Luengo; Keranen, Soile V. E.; Eisen, Michael B.; Knowles, David W.; Malik, Jitendra; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd

    2008-05-12

    The recent development of methods for extracting precise measurements of spatial gene expression patterns from three-dimensional (3D) image data opens the way for new analyses of the complex gene regulatory networks controlling animal development. We present an integrated visualization and analysis framework that supports user-guided data clustering to aid exploration of these new complex datasets. The interplay of data visualization and clustering-based data classification leads to improved visualization and enables a more detailed analysis than previously possible. We discuss (i) integration of data clustering and visualization into one framework; (ii) application of data clustering to 3D gene expression data; (iii) evaluation of the number of clusters k in the context of 3D gene expression clustering; and (iv) improvement of overall analysis quality via dedicated post-processing of clustering results based on visualization. We discuss the use of this framework to objectively define spatial pattern boundaries and temporal profiles of genes and to analyze how mRNA patterns are controlled by their regulatory transcription factors.

  6. 3D Data Mapping and Real-Time Experiment Control and Visualization in Brain Slices.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Marco A; Hibbard, Jaime V K; Miller, Michael E; Nivin, Tyler W; Milescu, Lorin S

    2015-10-20

    Here, we propose two basic concepts that can streamline electrophysiology and imaging experiments in brain slices and enhance data collection and analysis. The first idea is to interface the experiment with a software environment that provides a 3D scene viewer in which the experimental rig, the brain slice, and the recorded data are represented to scale. Within the 3D scene viewer, the user can visualize a live image of the sample and 3D renderings of the recording electrodes with real-time position feedback. Furthermore, the user can control the instruments and visualize their status in real time. The second idea is to integrate multiple types of experimental data into a spatial and temporal map of the brain slice. These data may include low-magnification maps of the entire brain slice, for spatial context, or any other type of high-resolution structural and functional image, together with time-resolved electrical and optical signals. The entire data collection can be visualized within the 3D scene viewer. These concepts can be applied to any other type of experiment in which high-resolution data are recorded within a larger sample at different spatial and temporal coordinates.

  7. Optical clearing based cellular-level 3D visualization of intact lymph node cortex

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eunjoo; Seo, Howon; Choe, Kibaek; Hwang, Yoonha; Ahn, Jinhyo; Ahn, Soyeon; Kim, Pilhan

    2015-01-01

    Lymph node (LN) is an important immune organ that controls adaptive immune responses against foreign pathogens and abnormal cells. To facilitate efficient immune function, LN has highly organized 3D cellular structures, vascular and lymphatic system. Unfortunately, conventional histological analysis relying on thin-sliced tissue has limitations in 3D cellular analysis due to structural disruption and tissue loss in the processes of fixation and tissue slicing. Optical sectioning confocal microscopy has been utilized to analyze 3D structure of intact LN tissue without physical tissue slicing. However, light scattering within biological tissues limits the imaging depth only to superficial portion of LN cortex. Recently, optical clearing techniques have shown enhancement of imaging depth in various biological tissues, but their efficacy for LN are remained to be investigated. In this work, we established optical clearing procedure for LN and achieved 3D volumetric visualization of the whole cortex of LN. More than 4 times improvement in imaging depth was confirmed by using LN obtained from H2B-GFP/actin-DsRed double reporter transgenic mouse. With adoptive transfer of GFP expressing B cells and DsRed expressing T cells and fluorescent vascular labeling by anti-CD31 and anti-LYVE-1 antibody conjugates, we successfully visualized major cellular-level structures such as T-cell zone, B-cell follicle and germinal center. Further, we visualized the GFP expressing metastatic melanoma cell colony, vasculature and lymphatic vessels in the LN cortex. PMID:26504662

  8. 3D Data Mapping and Real-Time Experiment Control and Visualization in Brain Slices.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Marco A; Hibbard, Jaime V K; Miller, Michael E; Nivin, Tyler W; Milescu, Lorin S

    2015-10-20

    Here, we propose two basic concepts that can streamline electrophysiology and imaging experiments in brain slices and enhance data collection and analysis. The first idea is to interface the experiment with a software environment that provides a 3D scene viewer in which the experimental rig, the brain slice, and the recorded data are represented to scale. Within the 3D scene viewer, the user can visualize a live image of the sample and 3D renderings of the recording electrodes with real-time position feedback. Furthermore, the user can control the instruments and visualize their status in real time. The second idea is to integrate multiple types of experimental data into a spatial and temporal map of the brain slice. These data may include low-magnification maps of the entire brain slice, for spatial context, or any other type of high-resolution structural and functional image, together with time-resolved electrical and optical signals. The entire data collection can be visualized within the 3D scene viewer. These concepts can be applied to any other type of experiment in which high-resolution data are recorded within a larger sample at different spatial and temporal coordinates. PMID:26488641

  9. 3D visualization of movements can amplify motor cortex activation during subsequent motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Sollfrank, Teresa; Hart, Daniel; Goodsell, Rachel; Foster, Jonathan; Tan, Tele

    2015-01-01

    A repetitive movement practice by motor imagery (MI) can influence motor cortical excitability in the electroencephalogram (EEG). This study investigated if a realistic visualization in 3D of upper and lower limb movements can amplify motor related potentials during subsequent MI. We hypothesized that a richer sensory visualization might be more effective during instrumental conditioning, resulting in a more pronounced event related desynchronization (ERD) of the upper alpha band (10-12 Hz) over the sensorimotor cortices thereby potentially improving MI based brain-computer interface (BCI) protocols for motor rehabilitation. The results show a strong increase of the characteristic patterns of ERD of the upper alpha band components for left and right limb MI present over the sensorimotor areas in both visualization conditions. Overall, significant differences were observed as a function of visualization modality (VM; 2D vs. 3D). The largest upper alpha band power decrease was obtained during MI after a 3-dimensional visualization. In total in 12 out of 20 tasks the end-user of the 3D visualization group showed an enhanced upper alpha ERD relative to 2D VM group, with statistical significance in nine tasks.With a realistic visualization of the limb movements, we tried to increase motor cortex activation during subsequent MI. The feedback and the feedback environment should be inherently motivating and relevant for the learner and should have an appeal of novelty, real-world relevance or aesthetic value (Ryan and Deci, 2000; Merrill, 2007). Realistic visual feedback, consistent with the participant's MI, might be helpful for accomplishing successful MI and the use of such feedback may assist in making BCI a more natural interface for MI based BCI rehabilitation.

  10. 3D visualization of movements can amplify motor cortex activation during subsequent motor imagery

    PubMed Central

    Sollfrank, Teresa; Hart, Daniel; Goodsell, Rachel; Foster, Jonathan; Tan, Tele

    2015-01-01

    A repetitive movement practice by motor imagery (MI) can influence motor cortical excitability in the electroencephalogram (EEG). This study investigated if a realistic visualization in 3D of upper and lower limb movements can amplify motor related potentials during subsequent MI. We hypothesized that a richer sensory visualization might be more effective during instrumental conditioning, resulting in a more pronounced event related desynchronization (ERD) of the upper alpha band (10–12 Hz) over the sensorimotor cortices thereby potentially improving MI based brain-computer interface (BCI) protocols for motor rehabilitation. The results show a strong increase of the characteristic patterns of ERD of the upper alpha band components for left and right limb MI present over the sensorimotor areas in both visualization conditions. Overall, significant differences were observed as a function of visualization modality (VM; 2D vs. 3D). The largest upper alpha band power decrease was obtained during MI after a 3-dimensional visualization. In total in 12 out of 20 tasks the end-user of the 3D visualization group showed an enhanced upper alpha ERD relative to 2D VM group, with statistical significance in nine tasks.With a realistic visualization of the limb movements, we tried to increase motor cortex activation during subsequent MI. The feedback and the feedback environment should be inherently motivating and relevant for the learner and should have an appeal of novelty, real-world relevance or aesthetic value (Ryan and Deci, 2000; Merrill, 2007). Realistic visual feedback, consistent with the participant’s MI, might be helpful for accomplishing successful MI and the use of such feedback may assist in making BCI a more natural interface for MI based BCI rehabilitation. PMID:26347642

  11. Unified framework for generation of 3D web visualization for mechatronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severa, O.; Goubej, M.; Konigsmarkova, J.

    2015-11-01

    The paper deals with development of a unified framework for generation of 3D visualizations of complex mechatronic systems. It provides a high-fidelity representation of executed motion by allowing direct employment of a machine geometry model acquired from a CAD system. Open-architecture multi-platform solution based on latest web standards is achieved by utilizing a web browser as a final 3D renderer. The results are applicable both for simulations and development of real-time human machine interfaces. Case study of autonomous underwater vehicle control is provided to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach.

  12. Real-time visualization of 3-D dynamic microscopic objects using optical diffraction tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Kyung Sang; Park, Hyunjoo; Ye, Jong Chul; Park, Yongkeun

    2013-12-30

    3-D refractive index (RI) distribution is an intrinsic bio-marker for the chemical and structural information about biological cells. Here we develop an optical diffraction tomography technique for the real-time reconstruction of 3-D RI distribution, employing sparse angle illumination and a graphic processing unit (GPU) implementation. The execution time for the tomographic reconstruction is 0.21 s for 96(3) voxels, which is 17 times faster than that of a conventional approach. We demonstrated the real-time visualization capability with imaging the dynamics of Brownian motion of an anisotropic colloidal dimer and the dynamic shape change in a red blood cell upon shear flow.

  13. Distributed haptic interactions with physically based 3D deformable models over lossy networks.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ziying; Yang, Yin; Guo, Xiaohu; Prabhakaran, Balakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have faced great challenges when simulating complicated 3D volumetric deformable models in haptics-enabled collaborative/cooperative virtual environments (HCVEs) due to the expensive simulation cost, heavy communication load, and unstable network conditions. When general network services are applied to HCVEs, network problems such as packet loss, delay, and jitter can cause severe visual distortion, haptic instability, and system inconsistency. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to support haptic interactions with physically based 3D deformable models in a distributed virtual environment. Our objective is to achieve real-time sharing of deformable and force simulations over general networks. Combining linear modal analysis and corotational methods, we can effectively simulate physical behaviors of 3D objects, even for large rotational deformations. We analyze different factors that influence HCVEs' performance and focus on exploring solutions for streaming over lossy networks. In our system, 3D deformation can be described by a fairly small amount of data (several KB) using accelerations in the spectral domain, so that we can achieve low communication load and effective streaming. We develop a loss compensation and prediction algorithm to correct the errors/distortions caused by network problem, and a force prediction method to simulate force at users' side to ensure the haptic stability, and the visual and haptic consistency. Our system works well under both the client-server and the peer-to-peer distribution structures, and can be easily extended to other topologies. In addition to theoretical analysis, we have tested the proposed system and algorithms under various network conditions. The experimental results are remarkably good, confirming the effectiveness, robustness, and validity of our approach. PMID:24808394

  14. Pancreaticoduodenectomy assisted by 3-D visualization reconstruction and portal vein arterialization

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhao-jie; Li, Wen-gang; Huang, Jun-li; Xiao, Lin-feng; Chen, Fu-zhen; Wang, Bo-liang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Three-dimensional visualization reconstruction, the 3-D visualization model reconstructed by software using 2-D CT images, has been widely applied in medicine; but it has rarely been applied in pancreaticoduodenectomy. Although the hepatic artery is very important for the liver, it has to be removed when tumor invades it. Therefore, portal vein arterialization has been used in clinic as a remedial measure, but there still is professional debate on portal vein arterialization. Methods: Here, we report 1 case that was diagnosed with poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the duodenum. The tumor had large size and invaded surrounding organs and vessels. Results: Preliminary diagnoses were poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the duodenum and viral hepatitis B. Pancreaticoduodenectomy assisted by 3-D visualization reconstruction and portal vein arterialization were performed in this case. The tumor was removed. Liver function returned to normal limits 1 week after operation. Digital subtraction arteriography showed compensatory artery branches within the liver 1 month after operation. Conclusion: 3-D visualization reconstruction can provide a reliable assistance for the accurate assessment and surgical design before pancreatoduodenectomy, and it is certainly worth adopting portal vein arterialization when retention of hepatic artery is impossible or conventional arterial anastomosis is required during pancreatoduodenectomy. PMID:27603365

  15. Visualization of 3D geometric models of the breast created from contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken, III; Wang, Xiao Hui; Chang, Yuan-Hsiang; Chapman, Brian E.

    2002-05-01

    Contrast enhanced breast MRI is currently used as an adjuvant modality to x-ray mammography because of its ability to resolve ambiguities and determine the extent of malignancy. This study described techniques to create and visualize 3D geometric models of abnormal breast tissue. MRIs were performed on a General Electric 1.5 Tesla scanner using dual phased array breast coils. Image processing tasks included: 1) correction of image inhomogeneity caused by the coils, 2) segmentation of normal and abnormal tissue, and 3) modeling and visualization of the segmented tissue. The models were visualized using object-based surface rendering which revealed characteristics critical to differentiating benign from malignant tissue. Surface rendering illustrated the enhancement distribution and enhancement patterns. The modeling process condensed the multi-slice MRI data information and standardized its interpretation. Visualizing the 3D models should improve the radiologist's and/or surgeon's impression of the 3D shape, extent, and accessibility of the malignancy compared to viewing breast MRI data slice by slice.

  16. Post-processing methods of rendering and visualizing 3-D reconstructed tomographic images

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.T.C.

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the computer processing techniques of tomographic images, after they have been generated by imaging scanners, for volume visualization. Volume visualization is concerned with the representation, manipulation, and rendering of volumetric data. Since the first digital images were produced from computed tomography (CT) scanners in the mid 1970s, applications of visualization in medicine have expanded dramatically. Today, three-dimensional (3D) medical visualization has expanded from using CT data, the first inherently digital source of 3D medical data, to using data from various medical imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance scanners, positron emission scanners, digital ultrasound, electronic and confocal microscopy, and other medical imaging modalities. We have advanced from rendering anatomy to aid diagnosis and visualize complex anatomic structures to planning and assisting surgery and radiation treatment. New, more accurate and cost-effective procedures for clinical services and biomedical research have become possible by integrating computer graphics technology with medical images. This trend is particularly noticeable in current market-driven health care environment. For example, interventional imaging, image-guided surgery, and stereotactic and visualization techniques are now stemming into surgical practice. In this presentation, we discuss only computer-display-based approaches of volumetric medical visualization. That is, we assume that the display device available is two-dimensional (2D) in nature and all analysis of multidimensional image data is to be carried out via the 2D screen of the device. There are technologies such as holography and virtual reality that do provide a {open_quotes}true 3D screen{close_quotes}. To confine the scope, this presentation will not discuss such approaches.

  17. A 3-D visualization method for image-guided brain surgery.

    PubMed

    Bourbakis, N G; Awad, M

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with a 3D methodology for brain tumor image-guided surgery. The methodology is based on development of a visualization process that mimics the human surgeon behavior and decision-making. In particular, it originally constructs a 3D representation of a tumor by using the segmented version of the 2D MRI images. Then it develops an optimal path for the tumor extraction based on minimizing the surgical effort and penetration area. A cost function, incorporated in this process, minimizes the damage surrounding healthy tissues taking into consideration the constraints of a new snake-like surgical tool proposed here. The tumor extraction method presented in this paper is compared with the ordinary method used on brain surgery, which is based on a straight-line based surgical tool. Illustrative examples based on real simulations present the advantages of the 3D methodology proposed here.

  18. Experimenter's Laboratory for Visualized Interactive Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Elaine R.; Rodier, Daniel R.; Klemp, Marjorie K.

    1994-01-01

    ELVIS (Experimenter's Laboratory for Visualized Interactive Science) is an interactive visualization environment that enables scientists, students, and educators to visualize and analyze large, complex, and diverse sets of scientific data. It accomplishes this by presenting the data sets as 2-D, 3-D, color, stereo, and graphic images with movable and multiple light sources combined with displays of solid-surface, contours, wire-frame, and transparency. By simultaneously rendering diverse data sets acquired from multiple sources, formats, and resolutions and by interacting with the data through an intuitive, direct-manipulation interface, ELVIS provides an interactive and responsive environment for exploratory data analysis.

  19. Transparent 3D Visualization of Archaeological Remains in Roman Site in Ankara-Turkey with Ground Penetrating Radar Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadioglu, S.

    2009-04-01

    remains. Interactive interpretation was done by using sub-blocks of the transparent 3D volume. The opacity function coefficients were increased while deep sub-blocks were visualized. Therefore amplitudes of electromagnetic wave field were controlled by changing opacity coefficients with depth. The transparent 3D visualization provided to identify the archaeological remains on native locations with depth in a 3D volume. According to the visualization results, in the governorship agora, the broken Roman Street was identified under the remnants of Ottoman, Seljuk's and Byzantine periods respectively at 4m depths and a colonnaded portico was determined in the governorship garden. Diggings encouraged the 3D image results. In the Augustus temple, very complex remnant structures including cubbies were determined in front of the east wall of the temple. The remnant walls very near to the surface were continued so deep in the 3D image. The transparent 3D visualization results overlapped with the digging results of the Augustus temple.

  20. Visualization of 3D osteon morphology by synchrotron radiation micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, D M L; Erickson, B; Peele, A G; Hannah, K; Thomas, C D L; Clement, J G

    2011-01-01

    Cortical bone histology has been the subject of scientific inquiry since the advent of the earliest microscopes. Histology – literally the study of tissue – is a field nearly synonymous with 2D thin sections. That said, progressive developments in high-resolution X-ray imaging are enabling 3D visualization to reach ever smaller structures. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), employing conventional X-ray sources, has become the gold standard for 3D analysis of trabecular bone and is capable of detecting the structure of vascular (osteonal) porosity in cortical bone. To date, however, direct 3D visualization of secondary osteons has eluded micro-CT based upon absorption-derived contrast. Synchrotron radiation micro-CT, through greater image quality, resolution and alternative contrast mechanisms (e.g. phase contrast), holds great potential for non-destructive 3D visualization of secondary osteons. Our objective was to demonstrate this potential and to discuss areas of bone research that can be advanced through the application of this approach. We imaged human mid-femoral cortical bone specimens derived from a 20-year-old male (Melbourne Femur Collection) at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron (Chicago, IL, USA) using the 2BM beam line. A 60-mm distance between the target and the detector was employed to enhance visualization of internal structures through propagation phase contrast. Scan times were 1 h and images were acquired with 1.4-μm nominal isotropic resolution. Computer-aided manual segmentation and volumetric 3D rendering were employed to visualize secondary osteons and porous structures, respectively. Osteonal borders were evident via two contrast mechanisms. First, relatively new (hypomineralized) osteons were evident due to differences in X-ray attenuation relative to the surrounding bone. Second, osteon boundaries (cement lines) were delineated by phase contrast. Phase contrast also enabled the detection of soft tissue remnants within the

  1. 3D visualization of the scoliotic spine: longitudinal studies, data acquisition, and radiation dosage constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvin, Alan D.; Adler, Roy L.; Margulies, Joseph Y.; Tresser, Charles P.; Wu, Chai W.

    1999-05-01

    Decision making in the treatment of scoliosis is typically based on longitudinal studies that involve the imaging and visualization the progressive degeneration of a patient's spine over a period of years. Some patients will need surgery if their spinal deformation exceeds a certain degree of severity. Currently, surgeons rely on 2D measurements, obtained from x-rays, to quantify spinal deformation. Clearly working only with 2D measurements seriously limits the surgeon's ability to infer 3D spinal pathology. Standard CT scanning is not a practical solution for obtaining 3D spinal measurements of scoliotic patients. Because it would expose the patient to a prohibitively high dose of radiation. We have developed 2 new CT-based methods of 3D spinal visualization that produce 3D models of the spine by integrating a very small number of axial CT slices with data obtained from CT scout data. In the first method the scout data are converted to sinogram data, and then processed by a tomographic image reconstruction algorithm. In the second method, the vertebral boundaries are detected in the scout data, and these edges are then used as linear constraints to determine 2D convex hulls of the vertebrae.

  2. Visualization of hepatic arteries with 3D ultrasound during intra-arterial therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gérard, Maxime; Tang, An; Badoual, Anaïs.; Michaud, François; Bigot, Alexandre; Soulez, Gilles; Kadoury, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    Liver cancer represents the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The prognosis is poor with an overall mortality of 95%. Moreover, most hepatic tumors are unresectable due to their advanced stage at discovery or poor underlying liver function. Tumor embolization by intra-arterial approaches is the current standard of care for advanced cases of hepatocellular carcinoma. These therapies rely on the fact that the blood supply of primary hepatic tumors is predominantly arterial. Feedback on blood flow velocities in the hepatic arteries is crucial to ensure maximal treatment efficacy on the targeted masses. Based on these velocities, the intra-arterial injection rate is modulated for optimal infusion of the chemotherapeutic drugs into the tumorous tissue. While Doppler ultrasound is a well-documented technique for the assessment of blood flow, 3D visualization of vascular anatomy with ultrasound remains challenging. In this paper we present an image-guidance pipeline that enables the localization of the hepatic arterial branches within a 3D ultrasound image of the liver. A diagnostic Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is first processed to automatically segment the hepatic arteries. A non-rigid registration method is then applied on the portal phase of the MRA volume with a 3D ultrasound to enable the visualization of the 3D mesh of the hepatic arteries in the Doppler images. To evaluate the performance of the proposed workflow, we present initial results from porcine models and patient images.

  3. On the comparison of visual discomfort generated by S3D and 2D content based on eye-tracking features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatsun, Iana; Larabi, Mohamed-Chaker; Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine

    2014-03-01

    The changing of TV systems from 2D to 3D mode is the next expected step in the telecommunication world. Some works have already been done to perform this progress technically, but interaction of the third dimension with humans is not yet clear. Previously, it was found that any increased load of visual system can create visual fatigue, like prolonged TV watching, computer work or video gaming. But watching S3D can cause another nature of visual fatigue, since all S3D technologies creates illusion of the third dimension based on characteristics of binocular vision. In this work we propose to evaluate and compare the visual fatigue from watching 2D and S3D content. This work shows the difference in accumulation of visual fatigue and its assessment for two types of content. In order to perform this comparison eye-tracking experiments using six commercially available movies were conducted. Healthy naive participants took part into the test and gave their answers feeling the subjective evaluation. It was found that watching stereo 3D content induce stronger feeling of visual fatigue than conventional 2D, and the nature of video has an important effect on its increase. Visual characteristics obtained by using eye-tracking were investigated regarding their relation with visual fatigue.

  4. Suitability of online 3D visualization technique in oil palm plantation management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat, Ruzinoor Che; Nordin, Norani; Zulkifli, Abdul Nasir; Yusof, Shahrul Azmi Mohd

    2016-08-01

    Oil palm industry has been the backbone for the growth of Malaysia economy. The exports of this commodity increasing almost every year. Therefore, there are many studies focusing on how to help this industry increased its productivity. In order to increase the productivity, the management of oil palm plantation need to be improved and strengthen. One of the solution in helping the oil palm manager is by implementing online 3D visualization technique for oil palm plantation using game engine technology. The potential of this application is that it can helps in fertilizer and irrigation management. For this reason, the aim of this paper is to investigate the issues in managing oil palm plantation from the view of oil palm manager by interview. The results from this interview will helps in identifying the suitable issues could be highlight in implementing online 3D visualization technique for oil palm plantation management.

  5. 3D visualization environment for analysis of telehealth indicators in public health.

    PubMed

    Filho, Amadeu S Campos; Novaes, Magdala A; Gomes, Alex S

    2013-01-01

    With the growth of telehealth applications and the need for public health managers to have tools that facilitate visualization of indicators produced by telehealth services arose the need to have simple systems to better planning the interventions. Furthermore, Health systems are considers difficult in order to visualize the right information by many health professionals [1] because of the complexity of its Graphical User Interface (GUI) and the high cognitive load needed to handle it. To overcome this problem, we have proposed a 3D environment for the analysis of telehealth indicators in public health by managers of public health sites. Users who will use the environment are part of public health manager of family health sites that participate of Network of Telehealth Centers of Pernambuco (RedeNUTES) [2] that is part of Brazil telehealth program. This paper aims to present a 3D environment for analysis of telehealth indicators by public health manager.

  6. Image processing and 3D visualization in the interpretation of patterned injury of the skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, William R.; Altschuler, Bruce R.

    1995-09-01

    The use of image processing is becoming increasingly important in the evaluation of violent crime. While much work has been done in the use of these techniques for forensic purposes outside of forensic pathology, its use in the pathologic examination of wounding has been limited. We are investigating the use of image processing in the analysis of patterned injuries and tissue damage. Our interests are currently concentrated on 1) the use of image processing techniques to aid the investigator in observing and evaluating patterned injuries in photographs, 2) measurement of the 3D shape characteristics of surface lesions, and 3) correlation of patterned injuries with deep tissue injury as a problem in 3D visualization. We are beginning investigations in data-acquisition problems for performing 3D scene reconstructions from the pathology perspective of correlating tissue injury to scene features and trace evidence localization. Our primary tool for correlation of surface injuries with deep tissue injuries has been the comparison of processed surface injury photographs with 3D reconstructions from antemortem CT and MRI data. We have developed a prototype robot for the acquisition of 3D wound and scene data.

  7. Optimization of site characterization and remediation methods using 3-D geoscience modeling and visualization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hedegaard, R.F.; Ho, J.; Eisert, J.

    1996-12-31

    Three-dimensional (3-D) geoscience volume modeling can be used to improve the efficiency of the environmental investigation and remediation process. At several unsaturated zone spill sites at two Superfund (CERCLA) sites (Military Installations) in California, all aspects of subsurface contamination have been characterized using an integrated computerized approach. With the aide of software such as LYNX GMS{trademark}, Wavefront`s Data Visualizer{trademark} and Gstools (public domain), the authors have created a central platform from which to map a contaminant plume, visualize the same plume three-dimensionally, and calculate volumes of contaminated soil or groundwater above important health risk thresholds. The developed methodology allows rapid data inspection for decisions such that the characterization process and remedial action design are optimized. By using the 3-D geoscience modeling and visualization techniques, the technical staff are able to evaluate the completeness and spatial variability of the data and conduct 3-D geostatistical predictions of contaminant and lithologic distributions. The geometry of each plume is estimated using 3-D variography on raw analyte values and indicator thresholds for the kriged model. Three-dimensional lithologic interpretation is based on either {open_quote}linked{close_quote} parallel cross sections or on kriged grid estimations derived from borehole data coded with permeability indicator thresholds. Investigative borings, as well as soil vapor extraction/injection wells, are sighted and excavation costs are estimated using these results. The principal advantages of the technique are the efficiency and rapidity with which meaningful results are obtained and the enhanced visualization capability which is a desirable medium to communicate with both the technical staff as well as nontechnical audiences.

  8. Real-Time Modeling and 3D Visualization of Source Dynamics and Connectivity Using Wearable EEG

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Tim; Kothe, Christian; Chi, Yu Mike; Ojeda, Alejandro; Kerth, Trevor; Makeig, Scott; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes our recent efforts to deliver real-time data extraction, preprocessing, artifact rejection, source reconstruction, multivariate dynamical system analysis (including spectral Granger causality) and 3D visualization as well as classification within the open-source SIFT and BCILAB toolboxes. We report the application of such a pipeline to simulated data and real EEG data obtained from a novel wearable high-density (64-channel) dry EEG system. PMID:24110155

  9. Correlation between a perspective distortion in a S3D content and the visual discomfort perceived

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyen, D.; Sacré, J.-J.; Blondé, L.

    2012-03-01

    Perspective distortion will occur in stereoscopic 3D (S3D) when the relative disparity between elements generates a depth not in accordance with the relative size of the presented objects. Subjective tests have been conducted using test sequences where shooting parameters are perfectly known and where vergence/accommodation conflict is not predominant. Perspective distortions will occur with some of the sequences, depending on viewing conditions. People were asked to qualify sequences in term of naturalness and visual comfort. Results of test revealed a clear correlation between perspective conflict and visual discomfort perceived. Whatever the shooting condition, parallel or toed-in cameras, results are similar. A factor between depth and perspective can be calculated for each shooting configuration and viewing condition. This factor seems a relevant indicator to evaluate the comfort of S3D content perception. Subjective tests allowed to better understand the link between perspective conflicts and visual comfort. Next, studies will be conducted to extend these tests to cinema conditions were the range of viewing conditions is larger.

  10. SAFAS: Unifying Form and Structure through Interactive 3D Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polys, Nicholas F.; Bacim, Felipe; Setareh, Mehdi; Jones, Brett D.

    2015-01-01

    There has been a significant gap between the tools used for the design of a building's architectural form and those that evaluate the structural physics of that form. Seeking to bring the perspectives of visual design and structural engineering closer together, we developed and evaluated a design tool for students and practitioners to explore the…

  11. UCVM: An Open Source Software Package for Querying and Visualizing 3D Velocity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, D.; Small, P.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Chen, P.; Lee, E. J.; Taborda, R.; Olsen, K. B.; Callaghan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic velocity models provide foundational data for ground motion simulations that calculate the propagation of earthquake waves through the Earth. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) package for both Linux and OS X. This unique framework provides a cohesive way for querying and visualizing 3D models. UCVM v14.3.0, supports many Southern California velocity models including CVM-S4, CVM-H 11.9.1, and CVM-S4.26. The last model was derived from 26 full-3D tomographic iterations on CVM-S4. Recently, UCVM has been used to deliver a prototype of a new 3D model of central California (CCA) also based on full-3D tomographic inversions. UCVM was used to provide initial plots of this model and will be used to deliver CCA to users when the model is publicly released. Visualizing models is also possible with UCVM. Integrated within the platform are plotting utilities that can generate 2D cross-sections, horizontal slices, and basin depth maps. UCVM can also export models in NetCDF format for easy import into IDV and ParaView. UCVM has also been prototyped to export models that are compatible with IRIS' new Earth Model Collaboration (EMC) visualization utility. This capability allows for user-specified horizontal slices and cross-sections to be plotted in the same 3D Earth space. UCVM was designed to help a wide variety of researchers. It is currently being use to generate velocity meshes for many SCEC wave propagation codes, including AWP-ODC-SGT and Hercules. It is also used to provide the initial input to SCEC's CyberShake platform. For those interested in specific data points, the software framework makes it easy to extract P and S wave propagation speeds and other material properties from 3D velocity models by providing a common interface through which researchers can query earth models for a given location and depth. Also included in the last release was the ability to add small

  12. Multimodal 3-D reconstruction of human anatomical structures using SurLens Visualization System.

    PubMed

    Adeshina, A M; Hashim, R; Khalid, N E A; Abidin, S Z Z

    2013-03-01

    In the medical diagnosis and treatment planning, radiologists and surgeons rely heavily on the slices produced by medical imaging devices. Unfortunately, these image scanners could only present the 3-D human anatomical structure in 2-D. Traditionally, this requires medical professional concerned to study and analyze the 2-D images based on their expert experience. This is tedious, time consuming and prone to error; expecially when certain features are occluding the desired region of interest. Reconstruction procedures was earlier proposed to handle such situation. However, 3-D reconstruction system requires high performance computation and longer processing time. Integrating efficient reconstruction system into clinical procedures involves high resulting cost. Previously, brain's blood vessels reconstruction with MRA was achieved using SurLens Visualization System. However, adapting such system to other image modalities, applicable to the entire human anatomical structures, would be a meaningful contribution towards achieving a resourceful system for medical diagnosis and disease therapy. This paper attempts to adapt SurLens to possible visualisation of abnormalities in human anatomical structures using CT and MR images. The study was evaluated with brain MR images from the department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, United States and CT abdominal pelvic, from the Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing. The MR images contain around 109 datasets each of T1-FLASH, T2-Weighted, DTI and T1-MPRAGE. Significantly, visualization of human anatomical structure was achieved without prior segmentation. SurLens was adapted to visualize and display abnormalities, such as an indication of walderstrom's macroglobulinemia, stroke and penetrating brain injury in the human brain using Magentic Resonance (MR) images. Moreover, possible abnormalities in abdominal pelvic was also visualized using Computed Tomography (CT) slices. The study shows SurLens' functionality as

  13. 3D Visualization of Cultural Heritage Artefacts with Virtual Reality devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonizzi Barsanti, S.; Caruso, G.; Micoli, L. L.; Covarrubias Rodriguez, M.; Guidi, G.

    2015-08-01

    Although 3D models are useful to preserve the information about historical artefacts, the potential of these digital contents are not fully accomplished until they are not used to interactively communicate their significance to non-specialists. Starting from this consideration, a new way to provide museum visitors with more information was investigated. The research is aimed at valorising and making more accessible the Egyptian funeral objects exhibited in the Sforza Castle in Milan. The results of the research will be used for the renewal of the current exhibition, at the Archaeological Museum in Milan, by making it more attractive. A 3D virtual interactive scenario regarding the "path of the dead", an important ritual in ancient Egypt, was realized to augment the experience and the comprehension of the public through interactivity. Four important artefacts were considered for this scope: two ushabty, a wooden sarcophagus and a heart scarab. The scenario was realized by integrating low-cost Virtual Reality technologies, as the Oculus Rift DK2 and the Leap Motion controller, and implementing a specific software by using Unity. The 3D models were implemented by adding responsive points of interest in relation to important symbols or features of the artefact. This allows highlighting single parts of the artefact in order to better identify the hieroglyphs and provide their translation. The paper describes the process for optimizing the 3D models, the implementation of the interactive scenario and the results of some test that have been carried out in the lab.

  14. 2D and 3D MALDI-imaging: conceptual strategies for visualization and data mining.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Herbert; Heldmann, Stefan; Trede, Dennis; Strehlow, Jan; Wirtz, Stefan; Dreher, Wolfgang; Berger, Judith; Oetjen, Janina; Kobarg, Jan Hendrik; Fischer, Bernd; Maass, Peter

    2014-01-01

    3D imaging has a significant impact on many challenges in life sciences, because biology is a 3-dimensional phenomenon. Current 3D imaging-technologies (various types MRI, PET, SPECT) are labeled, i.e. they trace the localization of a specific compound in the body. In contrast, 3D MALDI mass spectrometry-imaging (MALDI-MSI) is a label-free method imaging the spatial distribution of molecular compounds. It complements 3D imaging labeled methods, immunohistochemistry, and genetics-based methods. However, 3D MALDI-MSI cannot tap its full potential due to the lack of statistical methods for analysis and interpretation of large and complex 3D datasets. To overcome this, we established a complete and robust 3D MALDI-MSI pipeline combined with efficient computational data analysis methods for 3D edge preserving image denoising, 3D spatial segmentation as well as finding colocalized m/z values, which will be reviewed here in detail. Furthermore, we explain, why the integration and correlation of the MALDI imaging data with other imaging modalities allows to enhance the interpretation of the molecular data and provides visualization of molecular patterns that may otherwise not be apparent. Therefore, a 3D data acquisition workflow is described generating a set of 3 different dimensional images representing the same anatomies. First, an in-vitro MRI measurement is performed which results in a three-dimensional image modality representing the 3D structure of the measured object. After sectioning the 3D object into N consecutive slices, all N slices are scanned using an optical digital scanner, enabling for performing the MS measurements. Scanning the individual sections results into low-resolution images, which define the base coordinate system for the whole pipeline. The scanned images conclude the information from the spatial (MRI) and the mass spectrometric (MALDI-MSI) dimension and are used for the spatial three-dimensional reconstruction of the object performed by image

  15. Augmented depth perception visualization in 2D/3D image fusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Kreiser, Matthias; Wang, Lejing; Navab, Nassir; Fallavollita, Pascal

    2014-12-01

    2D/3D image fusion applications are widely used in endovascular interventions. Complaints from interventionists about existing state-of-art visualization software are usually related to the strong compromise between 2D and 3D visibility or the lack of depth perception. In this paper, we investigate several concepts enabling improvement of current image fusion visualization found in the operating room. First, a contour enhanced visualization is used to circumvent hidden information in the X-ray image. Second, an occlusion and depth color-coding scheme is considered to improve depth perception. To validate our visualization technique both phantom and clinical data are considered. An evaluation is performed in the form of a questionnaire which included 24 participants: ten clinicians and fourteen non-clinicians. Results indicate that the occlusion correction method provides 100% correctness when determining the true position of an aneurysm in X-ray. Further, when integrating an RGB or RB color-depth encoding in the image fusion both perception and intuitiveness are improved.

  16. Visualizing Dispersion Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottschalk, Elinor; Venkataraman, Bhawani

    2014-01-01

    An animation and accompanying activity has been developed to help students visualize how dispersion interactions arise. The animation uses the gecko's ability to walk on vertical surfaces to illustrate how dispersion interactions play a role in macroscale outcomes. Assessment of student learning reveals that students were able to develop…

  17. Localizing Protein in 3D Neural Stem Cell Culture: a Hybrid Visualization Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Fai, Stephen; Bennett, Steffany A.L.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of 3-dimensional (3D) topography in influencing neural stem and progenitor cell (NPC) phenotype is widely acknowledged yet challenging to study. When dissociated from embryonic or post-natal brain, single NPCs will proliferate in suspension to form neurospheres. Daughter cells within these cultures spontaneously adopt distinct developmental lineages (neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes) over the course of expansion despite being exposed to the same extracellular milieu. This progression recapitulates many of the stages observed over the course of neurogenesis and gliogenesis in post-natal brain and is often used to study basic NPC biology within a controlled environment. Assessing the full impact of 3D topography and cellular positioning within these cultures on NPC fate is, however, difficult. To localize target proteins and identify NPC lineages by immunocytochemistry, free-floating neurospheres must be plated on a substrate or serially sectioned. This processing is required to ensure equivalent cell permeabilization and antibody access throughout the sphere. As a result, 2D epifluorescent images of cryosections or confocal reconstructions of 3D Z-stacks can only provide spatial information about cell position within discrete physical or digital 3D slices and do not visualize cellular position in the intact sphere. Here, to reiterate the topography of the neurosphere culture and permit spatial analysis of protein expression throughout the entire culture, we present a protocol for isolation, expansion, and serial sectioning of post-natal hippocampal neurospheres suitable for epifluorescent or confocal immunodetection of target proteins. Connexin29 (Cx29) is analyzed as an example. Next, using a hybrid of graphic editing and 3D modelling softwares rigorously applied to maintain biological detail, we describe how to re-assemble the 3D structural positioning of these images and digitally map labelled cells within the complete neurosphere. This

  18. Whole versus Part Presentations of the Interactive 3D Graphics Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azmy, Nabil Gad; Ismaeel, Dina Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present an analysis of how the structure and design of the Interactive 3D Graphics Learning Objects can be effective and efficient in terms of Performance, Time on task, and Learning Efficiency. The study explored two treatments, namely whole versus Part Presentations of the Interactive 3D Graphics Learning Objects,…

  19. Visualization of anthropometric measures of workers in computer 3D modeling of work place.

    PubMed

    Mijović, B; Ujević, D; Baksa, S

    2001-12-01

    In this work, 3D visualization of a work place by means of a computer-made 3D-machine model and computer animation of a worker have been performed. By visualization of 3D characters in inverse kinematic and dynamic relation with the operating part of a machine, the biomechanic characteristics of worker's body have been determined. The dimensions of a machine have been determined by an inspection of technical documentation as well as by direct measurements and recordings of the machine by camera. On the basis of measured body height of workers all relevant anthropometric measures have been determined by a computer program developed by the authors. By knowing the anthropometric measures, the vision fields and the scope zones while forming work places, exact postures of workers while performing technological procedures were determined. The minimal and maximal rotation angles and the translation of upper and lower arm which are basis for the analysis of worker burdening were analyzed. The dimensions of the seized space of a body are obtained by computer anthropometric analysis of movement, e.g. range of arms, position of legs, head, back. The influence of forming of a work place on correct postures of workers during work has been reconsidered and thus the consumption of energy and fatigue can be reduced to a minimum. PMID:11811295

  20. Hand/eye calibration of a robot arm with a 3D visual sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min-Young; Cho, Hyungsuck; Kim, Jae H.

    2001-10-01

    Hand/eye calibration is useful in many industrial applications, for instance, grasping objects or reconstructing 3D scenes. The calibration of robot systems with a visual sensor is essentially the calibration of a robot, a sensor, and hand-to-eye relation. This paper describes a new technique for computing 3D position and orientation of a 3D visual sensor system relative to the end effector of a robot manipulator in an eye-on-hand robot configuration. When the position of feature points on a calibration target in sensor coordinates viewed at each robot movement, and the position of these points in world coordinates and the relative robot movement between two robot motions are known, a homogeneous equation of the form AX equals XB can be derived. To obtain the unique solution of X, it is necessary to make two relative robot arm movements and to form a system of two equations of the form: A1X equals XB1 and A2X equals XB2. In this paper, a closed-form solution of this calibration system is derived, and the constraints for existence of a unique solution are described in detail. Test results obtained through a series of simulation show that this technique is a simple, efficient, and accurate method for hand/eye calibration.

  1. XML-based 3D model visualization and simulation framework for dynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Fishwick, Paul A.

    2002-07-01

    Relatively recent advances in computer technology enable us to create three-dimensional (3D) dynamic models and simulate them within a 3D web environment. The use of such models is especially valuable when teaching simulation, and the concepts behind dynamic models, since the models are made more accessible to the students. Students tend to enjoy a construction process in which they are able to employ their own cultural and aesthetic forms. The challenge is to create a language that allows for a grammar for modeling, while simultaneously permitting arbitrary presentation styles. For further flexibility, we need an effective way to represent and simulate dynamic models that can be shared by modelers over the Internet. We present an Extensible Markup Language (XML)-based framework that will guide a modeler in creating personalized 3D models, visualizing its dynamic behaviors, and simulating the created models. A model author will use XML files to represent geometries and topology of a dynamic model. Model Fusion Engine, written in Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformation (XSLT), expedites the modeling process by automating the creation of dynamic models with the user-defined XML files. Modelers can also link simulation programs with a created model to analyze the characteristics of the model. The advantages of this system lie in the education of modeling and simulating dynamic models, and in the exploitation of visualizing the dynamic model behaviors.

  2. Towards robust 3D visual tracking for motion compensation in beating heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Richa, Rogério; Bó, Antônio P L; Poignet, Philippe

    2011-06-01

    In the context of minimally invasive cardiac surgery, active vision-based motion compensation schemes have been proposed for mitigating problems related to physiological motion. However, robust and accurate visual tracking remains a difficult task. The purpose of this paper is to present a robust visual tracking method that estimates the 3D temporal and spatial deformation of the heart surface using stereo endoscopic images. The novelty is the combination of a visual tracking method based on a Thin-Plate Spline (TPS) model for representing the heart surface deformations with a temporal heart motion model based on a time-varying dual Fourier series for overcoming tracking disturbances or failures. The considerable improvements in tracking robustness facing specular reflections and occlusions are demonstrated through experiments using images of in vivo porcine and human beating hearts.

  3. Tools for 3D scientific visualization in computational aerodynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gordon; Plessel, Todd; Merritt, Fergus; Watson, Val

    1989-01-01

    Hardware, software, and techniques used by the Fluid Dynamics Division (NASA) for performing visualization of computational aerodynamics, which can be applied to the visualization of flow fields from computer simulations of fluid dynamics about the Space Shuttle, are discussed. Three visualization techniques applied, post-processing, tracking, and steering, are described, as well as the post-processing software packages used, PLOT3D, SURF (Surface Modeller), GAS (Graphical Animation System), and FAST (Flow Analysis software Toolkit). Using post-processing methods a flow simulation was executed on a supercomputer and, after the simulation was complete, the results were processed for viewing. It is shown that the high-resolution, high-performance three-dimensional workstation combined with specially developed display and animation software provides a good tool for analyzing flow field solutions obtained from supercomputers.

  4. Towards robust 3D visual tracking for motion compensation in beating heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Richa, Rogério; Bó, Antônio P L; Poignet, Philippe

    2011-06-01

    In the context of minimally invasive cardiac surgery, active vision-based motion compensation schemes have been proposed for mitigating problems related to physiological motion. However, robust and accurate visual tracking remains a difficult task. The purpose of this paper is to present a robust visual tracking method that estimates the 3D temporal and spatial deformation of the heart surface using stereo endoscopic images. The novelty is the combination of a visual tracking method based on a Thin-Plate Spline (TPS) model for representing the heart surface deformations with a temporal heart motion model based on a time-varying dual Fourier series for overcoming tracking disturbances or failures. The considerable improvements in tracking robustness facing specular reflections and occlusions are demonstrated through experiments using images of in vivo porcine and human beating hearts. PMID:21277821

  5. Education System Using Interactive 3D Computer Graphics (3D-CG) Animation and Scenario Language for Teaching Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Shindo, Yoshiaki

    2006-01-01

    The 3D computer graphics (3D-CG) animation using a virtual actor's speaking is very effective as an educational medium. But it takes a long time to produce a 3D-CG animation. To reduce the cost of producing 3D-CG educational contents and improve the capability of the education system, we have developed a new education system using Virtual Actor.…

  6. 3D Geo-Structures Visualization Education Project (3dgeostructuresvis.ucdavis.edu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billen, M. I.

    2014-12-01

    Students of field-based geology must master a suite of challenging skills from recognizing rocks, to measuring orientations of features in the field, to finding oneself (and the outcrop) on a map and placing structural information on maps. Students must then synthesize this information to derive meaning from the observations and ultimately to determine the three-dimensional (3D) shape of the deformed structures and their kinematic history. Synthesizing this kind of information requires sophisticated visualizations skills in order to extrapolate observations into the subsurface or missing (eroded) material. The good news is that students can learn 3D visualization skills through practice, and virtual tools can help provide some of that practice. Here I present a suite of learning modules focused at developing students' ability to imagine (visualize) complex 3D structures and their exposure through digital topographic surfaces. Using the software 3DVisualizer, developed by KeckCAVES (keckcaves.org) we have developed visualizations of common geologic structures (e.g., syncline, dipping fold) in which the rock is represented by originally flat-lying layers of sediment, each with a different color, which have been subsequently deformed. The exercises build up in complexity, first focusing on understanding the structure in 3D (penetrative understanding), and then moving to the exposure of the structure at a topographic surface. Individual layers can be rendered as a transparent feature to explore how the layer extends above and below the topographic surface (e.g., to follow an eroded fold limb across a valley). The exercises are provided using either movies of the visualization (which can also be used for examples during lectures), or the data and software can be downloaded to allow for more self-driven exploration and learning. These virtual field models and exercises can be used as "practice runs" before going into the field, as make-up assignments, as a field

  7. Extracting, Tracking, and Visualizing Magnetic Flux Vortices in 3D Complex-Valued Superconductor Simulation Data.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hanqi; Phillips, Carolyn L; Peterka, Tom; Karpeyev, Dmitry; Glatz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for the vortex extraction and tracking of superconducting magnetic flux vortices for both structured and unstructured mesh data. In the Ginzburg-Landau theory, magnetic flux vortices are well-defined features in a complex-valued order parameter field, and their dynamics determine electromagnetic properties in type-II superconductors. Our method represents each vortex line (a 1D curve embedded in 3D space) as a connected graph extracted from the discretized field in both space and time. For a time-varying discrete dataset, our vortex extraction and tracking method is as accurate as the data discretization. We then apply 3D visualization and 2D event diagrams to the extraction and tracking results to help scientists understand vortex dynamics and macroscale superconductor behavior in greater detail than previously possible.

  8. Multimodal visualization of 3D enhanced MRI and CT of acoustic schwannoma and related structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharski, Tomasz; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Niemczyk, Kazimierz; Marchel, Andrzej

    2005-09-01

    According to the necessity of supporting vestibular schwannoma surgery, there is a demand to develop a convenient method of medical data visualization. The process of making choice of optimal operating access way has been uncomfortable for a surgeon so far, because there has been a necessity of analyzing two independent 3D images series (CT -bone tissues visible, MRI - soft tissues visible) in the region of ponto-cerebellar angle tumors. The authors propose a solution that will improve this process. The system used is equipped with stereoscopic helmet mounted display. It allows merged CT and MRI data representing tissues in the region of of ponto-cerebellar angle to be visualized in stereoscopic way. The process of data preparation for visualization includes: -automated segmentation algorithms, -different types of 3D images (CT, MRI) fusion. The authors focused on the development of novel algorithms for segmentation of vestibular schwannoma. It is important and difficult task due to different types of tumors and their inhomogeneous character dependent on growth models. The authors propose algorithms based on histogram spectrum and multimodal character of MRI imaging (T1 and T2 modes). However due to a variety of objects the library of algorithms with specific modifications matching to selected types of images is proposed. The applicability and functionality of the algorithms and library was proved on the series of data delivered by Warsaw Central Medical University Hospital.

  9. PointCloudXplore: a visualization tool for 3D gene expressiondata

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Fowlkes,Charles C.; Luengo Hendriks, Cristian L.; Simirenko, Lisa; Shah, NameetaY.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggn, Mark D.; Hagen, Hans; Sudar, Damir J.; Malik, Jitendra; Knowles, David W.; Hamann, Bernd

    2006-10-01

    The Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project (BDTNP) has developed a suite of methods that support quantitative, computational analysis of three-dimensional (3D) gene expression patterns with cellular resolution in early Drosophila embryos, aiming at a more in-depth understanding of gene regulatory networks. We describe a new tool, called PointCloudXplore (PCX), that supports effective 3D gene expression data exploration. PCX is a visualization tool that uses the established visualization techniques of multiple views, brushing, and linking to support the analysis of high-dimensional datasets that describe many genes' expression. Each of the views in PointCloudXplore shows a different gene expression data property. Brushing is used to select and emphasize data associated with defined subsets of embryo cells within a view. Linking is used to show in additional views the expression data for a group of cells that have first been highlighted as a brush in a single view, allowing further data subset properties to be determined. In PCX, physical views of the data are linked to abstract data displays such as parallel coordinates. Physical views show the spatial relationships between different genes' expression patterns within an embryo. Abstract gene expression data displays on the other hand allow for an analysis of relationships between different genes directly in the gene expression space. We discuss on parallel coordinates as one example abstract data view currently available in PCX. We have developed several extensions to standard parallel coordinates to facilitate brushing and the visualization of 3D gene expression data.

  10. TractRender: a new generalized 3D medical image visualization and output platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Darryl H.; Tsao, Sinchai; Gajawelli, Niharika; Law, Meng; Lepore, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion MRI allows us not only voxelized diffusion characteristics but also the potential to delineate neuronal fiber path through tractography. There is a dearth of flexible open source tractography software programs for visualizing these complicated 3D structures. Moreover, rendering these structures using various shading, lighting, and representations will result in vastly different graphical feel. In addition, the ability to output these objects in various formats increases the utility of this platform. We have created TractRender that leverages openGL features through Matlab, allowing for maximum ease of use but still maintain the flexibility of custom scene rendering.

  11. Arena3D: visualizing time-driven phenotypic differences in biological systems

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Elucidating the genotype-phenotype connection is one of the big challenges of modern molecular biology. To fully understand this connection, it is necessary to consider the underlying networks and the time factor. In this context of data deluge and heterogeneous information, visualization plays an essential role in interpreting complex and dynamic topologies. Thus, software that is able to bring the network, phenotypic and temporal information together is needed. Arena3D has been previously introduced as a tool that facilitates link discovery between processes. It uses a layered display to separate different levels of information while emphasizing the connections between them. We present novel developments of the tool for the visualization and analysis of dynamic genotype-phenotype landscapes. Results Version 2.0 introduces novel features that allow handling time course data in a phenotypic context. Gene expression levels or other measures can be loaded and visualized at different time points and phenotypic comparison is facilitated through clustering and correlation display or highlighting of impacting changes through time. Similarity scoring allows the identification of global patterns in dynamic heterogeneous data. In this paper we demonstrate the utility of the tool on two distinct biological problems of different scales. First, we analyze a medium scale dataset that looks at perturbation effects of the pluripotency regulator Nanog in murine embryonic stem cells. Dynamic cluster analysis suggests alternative indirect links between Nanog and other proteins in the core stem cell network. Moreover, recurrent correlations from the epigenetic to the translational level are identified. Second, we investigate a large scale dataset consisting of genome-wide knockdown screens for human genes essential in the mitotic process. Here, a potential new role for the gene lsm14a in cytokinesis is suggested. We also show how phenotypic patterning allows for extensive

  12. Presenting Cultural Heritage Landscapes - from GIS via 3d Models to Interactive Presentation Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prechtel, N.; Münster, S.; Kröber, C.; Schubert, C.; Schietzold, S.

    2013-07-01

    Two current projects of the authors try to approach cultural heritage landscapes from both cultural sciences and geography through a combination of customised geo-information (GIS) and visualisation/presentation technology. In excess of a mere academic use, easyto- handle virtual 3D web presentations may contribute to knowledge, esteem, commemoration and preservation. The examples relate to pre-historic Scythian burial sites in the South-Siberian Altay Mountains ("Uch Enmek") as well as to a "virtual memorial" of contemporary history ("GEPAM"), a chapter of Jewish prosecution in the "Third Reich", which historically connects the town of Dresden with the Czech Terezin (Theresienstadt). It is common knowledge that a profound understanding of (pre-)historic artefacts and places may reflect a larger environment as well as an individual geographic setting. Coming from this background, the presented projects try to find technical solutions. They start from GIS models and aim at customised interactive presentations of 3D models. In using the latter a widely-spanned public is invited to a land- or townscape of specific cultural importance. The geographic space is thought to work as a door to a repository of educational exhibits under the umbrella of a web application. Within this concept a landscape/townscape also accounts for the time dimension in different scales (time of construction/operation versus actual state, and in sense of a season and time of the day as a principal modulator of visual perception of space).

  13. Fast 3D visualization of endogenous brain signals with high-sensitivity laser scanning photothermal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Jun; Iida, Tadatsune; Tanaka, Shinji; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Kasai, Haruo; Okabe, Shigeo; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    A fast, high-sensitivity photothermal microscope was developed by implementing a spatially segmented balanced detection scheme into a laser scanning microscope. We confirmed a 4.9 times improvement in signal-to-noise ratio in the spatially segmented balanced detection compared with that of conventional detection. The system demonstrated simultaneous bi-modal photothermal and confocal fluorescence imaging of transgenic mouse brain tissue with a pixel dwell time of 20 μs. The fluorescence image visualized neurons expressing yellow fluorescence proteins, while the photothermal signal detected endogenous chromophores in the mouse brain, allowing 3D visualization of the distribution of various features such as blood cells and fine structures probably due to lipids. This imaging modality was constructed using compact and cost-effective laser diodes, and will thus be widely useful in the life and medical sciences. PMID:27231615

  14. Sensor Spatial Distortion, Visual Latency, and Update Rate Effects on 3D Tracking in Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S. R.; Adelstein, B. D.; Baumeler, S.; Jense, G. J.; Jacoby, R. H.; Trejo, Leonard (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Several common defects that we have sought to minimize in immersing virtual environments are: static sensor spatial distortion, visual latency, and low update rates. Human performance within our environments during large amplitude 3D tracking was assessed by objective and subjective methods in the presence and absence of these defects. Results show that 1) removal of our relatively small spatial sensor distortion had minor effects on the tracking activity, 2) an Adapted Cooper-Harper controllability scale proved the most sensitive subjective indicator of the degradation of dynamic fidelity caused by increasing latency and decreasing frame rates, and 3) performance, as measured by normalized RMS tracking error or subjective impressions, was more markedly influenced by changing visual latency than by update rate.

  15. 3D radiation hydrodynamics: Interacting photo-evaporating clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, A. J.; Mellema, G.

    2003-07-01

    We present the results of a new radiation hydrodynamics code called Maartje. This code describes the evolution of a flow in three spatial dimensions using an adaptive mesh, and contains a combination of a ray tracer and an atomic physics module to describe the effects of ionizing radiation. The code is parallelized using a custom threadpool library. We present an application in which we follow the ionization of two dense spherical clumps which are exposed to an ionizing radiation field from a 50 000 K black body. We study various configurations in which one of the clumps shields the other from the ionizing photons. We find that relatively long-lived filamentary structures with narrow tails are formed. This raises the possibility that cometary knots (such as are found in the Helix Nebula) may be the result of the interaction of an ionizing radiation field with an ensemble of clumps, as opposed to the identification of a single knot with a single clump. Movies are available at http://www.edpsciences.org

  16. Interactive browsing of 3D environment over the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cha; Li, Jin

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a system for wandering in a realistic environment over the Internet. The environment is captured by the concentric mosaic, compressed via the reference block coder (RBC), and accessed and delivered over the Internet through the virtual media (Vmedia) access protocol. Capturing the environment through the concentric mosaic is easy. We mount a camera at the end of a level beam, and shoot images as the beam rotates. The huge dataset of the concentric mosaic is then compressed through the RBC, which is specifically designed for both high compression efficiency and just-in-time (JIT) rendering. Through the JIT rendering function, only a portion of the RBC bitstream is accessed, decoded and rendered for each virtual view. A multimedia communication protocol -- the Vmedia protocol, is then proposed to deliver the compressed concentric mosaic data over the Internet. Only the bitstream segments corresponding to the current view are streamed over the Internet. Moreover, the delivered bitstream segments are managed by a local Vmedia cache so that frequently used bitstream segments need not be streamed over the Internet repeatedly, and the Vmedia is able to handle a RBC bitstream larger than its memory capacity. A Vmedia concentric mosaic interactive browser is developed where the user can freely wander in a realistic environment, e.g., rotate around, walk forward/backward and sidestep, even under a tight bandwidth of 33.6 kbps.

  17. Active and interactive floating image display using holographic 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morii, Tsutomu; Sakamoto, Kunio

    2006-08-01

    We developed a prototype tabletop holographic display system. This system consists of the object recognition system and the spatial imaging system. In this paper, we describe the recognition system using an RFID tag and the 3D display system using a holographic technology. A 3D display system is useful technology for virtual reality, mixed reality and augmented reality. We have researched spatial imaging and interaction system. We have ever proposed 3D displays using the slit as a parallax barrier, the lenticular screen and the holographic optical elements(HOEs) for displaying active image 1,2,3. The purpose of this paper is to propose the interactive system using these 3D imaging technologies. In this paper, the authors describe the interactive tabletop 3D display system. The observer can view virtual images when the user puts the special object on the display table. The key technologies of this system are the object recognition system and the spatial imaging display.

  18. In vivo 3D visualization of peripheral circulatory system using linear optoacoustic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermilov, Sergey A.; Brecht, Hans-Peter; Fronheiser, Matthew P.; Nadvoretsky, Vyacheslav; Su, Richard; Conjusteau, Andre; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2010-02-01

    In this work we modified light illumination of the laser optoacoustic (OA) imaging system to improve the 3D visualization of human forearm vasculature. The computer modeling demonstrated that the new illumination design that features laser beams converging on the surface of the skin in the imaging plane of the probe provides superior OA images in comparison to the images generated by the illumination with parallel laser beams. We also developed the procedure for vein/artery differentiation based on OA imaging with 690 nm and 1080 nm laser wavelengths. The procedure includes statistical analysis of the intensities of OA images of the neighboring blood vessels. Analysis of the OA images generated by computer simulation of a human forearm illuminated at 690 nm and 1080 nm resulted in successful differentiation of veins and arteries. In vivo scanning of a human forearm provided high contrast 3D OA image of a forearm skin and a superficial blood vessel. The blood vessel image contrast was further enhanced after it was automatically traced using the developed software. The software also allowed evaluation of the effective blood vessel diameter at each step of the scan. We propose that the developed 3D OA imaging system can be used during preoperative mapping of forearm vessels that is essential for hemodialysis treatment.

  19. 3D colour visualization of label images using volume rendering techniques.

    PubMed

    Vandenhouten, R; Kottenhoff, R; Grebe, R

    1995-01-01

    Volume rendering methods for the visualization of 3D image data sets have been developed and collected in a C library. The core algorithm consists of a perspective ray casting technique for a natural and realistic view of the 3D scene. New edge operator shading methods are employed for a fast and information preserving representation of surfaces. Control parameters of the algorithm can be tuned to have either smoothed surfaces or a very detailed rendering of the geometrical structure. Different objects can be distinguished by different colours. Shadow ray tracing has been implemented to improve the realistic impression of the 3D image. For a simultaneous representation of objects in different depths, hiding each other, two types of transparency mode are used (wireframe and glass transparency). Single objects or groups of objects can be excluded from the rendering (peeling). Three orthogonal cutting planes or one arbitrarily placed cutting plane can be applied to the rendered objects in order to get additional information about inner structures, contours, and relative positions.

  20. Magnetic and Lattice Interaction in 3d Transition Metal Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassim, Ishmaeel Khalil

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The importance and nature of magnetic and lattice degrees of freedom and their interaction in transition metal magnets has been investigated. As an example of localised behaviour, Heusler alloys in which the magnetic moment was confined to Mn atoms were chosen, e.g. Pd_2MnIn. The manganese atoms are separated by more than 4.6A. By systematically changing Pd for either Ag or Au the electron concentration can be varied in a continuous manner. Dependent upon the electron concentration several different antiferromagnetic structures consistent with an fcc lattice are observed at low temperatures. The type of magnetic order gives rise to distinct lattice distortion characteristic of the magnetic symmetry. A wide range of bulk measurements was carried out to characterise the materials, e.g. X-ray, neutron diffraction, magnetic susceptibility and specific heat (using both pulse and continuous heating techniques). The magnetic structures were, in some instances, frustrated as may be expected for antiferromagnetism on an fcc lattice. As an example of itinerant behaviour the Fe-Ni system was chosen. rm Fe_{1 -x}Ni_ x alloy systems have long been of considerable interest since rm Fe_ {65}Ni_{35} shows an anomalously small thermal expansion below T_ {rm c}. Numerous experiments have been carried out to understand this phenomenon, the Invar effect. The effect is most pronounced close to the composition defining the phase boundary between the bcc and fcc structures. The interplay between the magnetic and lattice degrees of freedom were investigated on an atomic scale using inelastic polarised neutron scattering. The polarisation dependence of the magneto vibrational scattering of the one phonon cross-sections has been investigated as a continuous function of q throughout the Brillouin zone in the Invar alloy rm Fe_{65 }Ni_{35}, and in two other FeNi samples out side the Invar region. The magneto vibrational scattering is

  1. A low-latency, big database system and browser for storage, querying and visualization of 3D genomic data.

    PubMed

    Butyaev, Alexander; Mavlyutov, Ruslan; Blanchette, Mathieu; Cudré-Mauroux, Philippe; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2015-09-18

    Recent releases of genome three-dimensional (3D) structures have the potential to transform our understanding of genomes. Nonetheless, the storage technology and visualization tools need to evolve to offer to the scientific community fast and convenient access to these data. We introduce simultaneously a database system to store and query 3D genomic data (3DBG), and a 3D genome browser to visualize and explore 3D genome structures (3DGB). We benchmark 3DBG against state-of-the-art systems and demonstrate that it is faster than previous solutions, and importantly gracefully scales with the size of data. We also illustrate the usefulness of our 3D genome Web browser to explore human genome structures. The 3D genome browser is available at http://3dgb.cs.mcgill.ca/.

  2. A low-latency, big database system and browser for storage, querying and visualization of 3D genomic data.

    PubMed

    Butyaev, Alexander; Mavlyutov, Ruslan; Blanchette, Mathieu; Cudré-Mauroux, Philippe; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2015-09-18

    Recent releases of genome three-dimensional (3D) structures have the potential to transform our understanding of genomes. Nonetheless, the storage technology and visualization tools need to evolve to offer to the scientific community fast and convenient access to these data. We introduce simultaneously a database system to store and query 3D genomic data (3DBG), and a 3D genome browser to visualize and explore 3D genome structures (3DGB). We benchmark 3DBG against state-of-the-art systems and demonstrate that it is faster than previous solutions, and importantly gracefully scales with the size of data. We also illustrate the usefulness of our 3D genome Web browser to explore human genome structures. The 3D genome browser is available at http://3dgb.cs.mcgill.ca/. PMID:25990738

  3. A low-latency, big database system and browser for storage, querying and visualization of 3D genomic data

    PubMed Central

    Butyaev, Alexander; Mavlyutov, Ruslan; Blanchette, Mathieu; Cudré-Mauroux, Philippe; Waldispühl, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Recent releases of genome three-dimensional (3D) structures have the potential to transform our understanding of genomes. Nonetheless, the storage technology and visualization tools need to evolve to offer to the scientific community fast and convenient access to these data. We introduce simultaneously a database system to store and query 3D genomic data (3DBG), and a 3D genome browser to visualize and explore 3D genome structures (3DGB). We benchmark 3DBG against state-of-the-art systems and demonstrate that it is faster than previous solutions, and importantly gracefully scales with the size of data. We also illustrate the usefulness of our 3D genome Web browser to explore human genome structures. The 3D genome browser is available at http://3dgb.cs.mcgill.ca/. PMID:25990738

  4. 3D histogram visualization in different color spaces with application in color clustering classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Gabriel G.; Abe, Satoshi

    1995-04-01

    The paper presents a dynamically visualization procedure for 3D histogram of color images. The procedure runs for RGB, YMC, HSV, HSL device dependent color spaces and for Lab, Luv device independent color spaces and it is easily extendable to other color spaces if the analytical form of color transformations is available. Each histogram value is represented in the color space as a colored ball, in a position corresponding to the place of color in the color space. The paper presents the procedures for nonlinear ball normalization, ordering of drawing, space edges drawing, translation, scaling and rotation of the histogram. The 3D histogram visualization procedure can be used in different applications described in the second part of the paper. It enables to get a clear representation of the range of colors of one image, to derive and compare the efficiency of different clusterization procedures for color classification, to display comparatively the gamut of different color devices, to select the color space for an optimal mapping procedure of the outside gamut colors for minimizing the hue error, to detect bad-alignment in RGB planes for a sequential process.

  5. A novel and stable approach to anatomical structure morphing for enhanced intraoperative 3D visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamani, Kumar T.; Gonzalez Ballester, Miguel A.; Nolte, Lutz-Peter; Styner, Martin

    2005-04-01

    The use of three dimensional models in planning and navigating computer assisted surgeries is now well established. These models provide intuitive visualization to the surgeons contributing to significantly better surgical outcomes. Models obtained from specifically acquired CT scans have the disadvantage that they induce high radiation dose to the patient. In this paper we propose a novel and stable method to construct a patient-specific model that provides an appropriate intra-operative 3D visualization without the need for a pre or intra-operative imaging. Patient specific data consists of digitized landmarks and surface points that are obtained intra-operatively. The 3D model is reconstructed by fitting a statistical deformable model to the minimal sparse digitized data. The statistical model is constructed using Principal Component Analysis from training objects. Our morphing scheme efficiently and accurately computes a Mahalanobis distance weighted least square fit of the deformable model to the 3D data model by solving a linear equation system. Relaxing the Mahalanobis distance term as additional points are incorporated enables our method to handle small and large sets of digitized points efficiently. Our novel incorporation of M-estimator based weighting of the digitized points enables us to effectively reject outliers and compute stable models. Normalization of the input model data and the digitized points makes our method size invariant and hence applicable directly to any anatomical shape. The method also allows incorporation of non-spatial data such as patient height and weight. The predominant applications are hip and knee surgeries.

  6. Visualization and 3D Reconstruction of Flame Cells of Taenia solium (Cestoda)

    PubMed Central

    Valverde-Islas, Laura E.; Arrangoiz, Esteban; Vega, Elio; Robert, Lilia; Villanueva, Rafael; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Willms, Kaethe; Zepeda-Rodríguez, Armando; Fortoul, Teresa I.; Ambrosio, Javier R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Flame cells are the terminal cells of protonephridial systems, which are part of the excretory systems of invertebrates. Although the knowledge of their biological role is incomplete, there is a consensus that these cells perform excretion/secretion activities. It has been suggested that the flame cells participate in the maintenance of the osmotic environment that the cestodes require to live inside their hosts. In live Platyhelminthes, by light microscopy, the cells appear beating their flames rapidly and, at the ultrastructural, the cells have a large body enclosing a tuft of cilia. Few studies have been performed to define the localization of the cytoskeletal proteins of these cells, and it is unclear how these proteins are involved in cell function. Methodology/Principal Findings Parasites of two different developmental stages of T. solium were used: cysticerci recovered from naturally infected pigs and intestinal adults obtained from immunosuppressed and experimentally infected golden hamsters. Hamsters were fed viable cysticerci to recover adult parasites after one month of infection. In the present studies focusing on flame cells of cysticerci tissues was performed. Using several methods such as video, confocal and electron microscopy, in addition to computational analysis for reconstruction and modeling, we have provided a 3D visual rendition of the cytoskeletal architecture of Taenia solium flame cells. Conclusions/Significance We consider that visual representations of cells open a new way for understanding the role of these cells in the excretory systems of Platyhelminths. After reconstruction, the observation of high resolution 3D images allowed for virtual observation of the interior composition of cells. A combination of microscopic images, computational reconstructions and 3D modeling of cells appears to be useful for inferring the cellular dynamics of the flame cell cytoskeleton. PMID:21412407

  7. Effect of space balance 3D training using visual feedback on balance and mobility in acute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Ko, YoungJun; Ha, HyunGeun; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Lee, WanHee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of balance training with Space Balance 3D, which is a computerized measurement and visual feedback balance assessment system, on balance and mobility in acute stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] This was a randomized controlled trial in which 52 subjects were assigned randomly into either an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group, which contained 26 subjects, received balance training with a Space Balance 3D exercise program and conventional physical therapy interventions 5 times per week during 3 weeks. Outcome measures were examined before and after the 3-week interventions using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (PASS). The data were analyzed by a two-way repeated measures ANOVA using SPSS 19.0. [Results] The results revealed a nonsignificant interaction effect between group and time period for both groups before and after the interventions in the BBS score, TUG score, and PASS score. In addition, the experimental group showed more improvement than the control group in the BBS, TUG and PASS scores, but the differences were not significant. In the comparisons within the groups by time, both groups showed significant improvement in BBS, TUG, and PASS scores. [Conclusion] The Space Balance 3D training with conventional physical therapy intervention is recommended for improvement of balance and mobility in acute stroke patients. PMID:26157270

  8. Effect of space balance 3D training using visual feedback on balance and mobility in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Ko, YoungJun; Ha, HyunGeun; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Lee, WanHee

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of balance training with Space Balance 3D, which is a computerized measurement and visual feedback balance assessment system, on balance and mobility in acute stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] This was a randomized controlled trial in which 52 subjects were assigned randomly into either an experimental group or a control group. The experimental group, which contained 26 subjects, received balance training with a Space Balance 3D exercise program and conventional physical therapy interventions 5 times per week during 3 weeks. Outcome measures were examined before and after the 3-week interventions using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (PASS). The data were analyzed by a two-way repeated measures ANOVA using SPSS 19.0. [Results] The results revealed a nonsignificant interaction effect between group and time period for both groups before and after the interventions in the BBS score, TUG score, and PASS score. In addition, the experimental group showed more improvement than the control group in the BBS, TUG and PASS scores, but the differences were not significant. In the comparisons within the groups by time, both groups showed significant improvement in BBS, TUG, and PASS scores. [Conclusion] The Space Balance 3D training with conventional physical therapy intervention is recommended for improvement of balance and mobility in acute stroke patients.

  9. 3D visualization of ultra-fine ICON climate simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röber, Niklas; Spickermann, Dela; Böttinger, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Advances in high performance computing and model development allow the simulation of finer and more detailed climate experiments. The new ICON model is based on an unstructured triangular grid and can be used for a wide range of applications, ranging from global coupled climate simulations down to very detailed and high resolution regional experiments. It consists of an atmospheric and an oceanic component and scales very well for high numbers of cores. This allows us to conduct very detailed climate experiments with ultra-fine resolutions. ICON is jointly developed in partnership with DKRZ by the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology and the German Weather Service. This presentation discusses our current workflow for analyzing and visualizing this high resolution data. The ICON model has been used for eddy resolving (<10km) ocean simulations, as well as for ultra-fine cloud resolving (120m) atmospheric simulations. This results in very large 3D time dependent multi-variate data that need to be displayed and analyzed. We have developed specific plugins for the free available visualization software ParaView and Vapor, which allows us to read and handle that much data. Within ParaView, we can additionally compare prognostic variables with performance data side by side to investigate the performance and scalability of the model. With the simulation running in parallel on several hundred nodes, an equal load balance is imperative. In our presentation we show visualizations of high-resolution ICON oceanographic and HDCP2 atmospheric simulations that were created using ParaView and Vapor. Furthermore we discuss our current efforts to improve our visualization capabilities, thereby exploring the potential of regular in-situ visualization, as well as of in-situ compression / post visualization.

  10. Developing a 3D Game Design Authoring Package to Assist Students' Visualization Process in Design Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Ming-Shiou; Chuang, Tsung-Yen

    2013-01-01

    The teaching of 3D digital game design requires the development of students' meta-skills, from story creativity to 3D model construction, and even the visualization process in design thinking. The characteristics a good game designer should possess have been identified as including redesign things, creativity thinking and the ability to…

  11. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  12. A 3D interactive model and atlas of the jaw musculature of Alligator mississippiensis.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Casey M; Tsai, Henry P; Skiljan, Rebecca J; George, Ian D; Pathan, Sami

    2013-01-01

    Modern imaging and dissemination methods enable morphologists to share complex, three-dimensional (3D) data in ways not previously possible. Here we present a 3D interactive model of the jaw musculature of the American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis). Alligator and crocodylian jaw musculature is notoriously challenging to inspect and interpret because of the derived nature of the feeding apparatus. Using Iodine-contrast enhanced microCT imaging, a segmented model of jaw muscles, trigeminal nerve, brain and skull are presented as a cross-sectional atlas and 3D, interactive pdf of the rendered model. Modern 3D dissemination methods like this 3D Alligator hold great potential for morphologists to share anatomical information to scientists, educators, and the public in an easily downloadable format. PMID:23762228

  13. Interaction Design and Usability of Learning Spaces in 3D Multi-user Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minocha, Shailey; Reeves, Ahmad John

    Three-dimensional virtual worlds are multimedia, simulated environments, often managed over the Web, which users can 'inhabit' and interact via their own graphical, self-representations known as 'avatars'. 3D virtual worlds are being used in many applications: education/training, gaming, social networking, marketing and commerce. Second Life is the most widely used 3D virtual world in education. However, problems associated with usability, navigation and way finding in 3D virtual worlds may impact on student learning and engagement. Based on empirical investigations of learning spaces in Second Life, this paper presents design guidelines to improve the usability and ease of navigation in 3D spaces. Methods of data collection include semi-structured interviews with Second Life students, educators and designers. The findings have revealed that design principles from the fields of urban planning, Human- Computer Interaction, Web usability, geography and psychology can influence the design of spaces in 3D multi-user virtual environments.

  14. GIS-based 3D visualization of the Mw 7.7, 2007, Tocopilla aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, S.; Sobiesiak, M.; Altenbrunn, K.

    2009-12-01

    The November 14, 2007 Mw 7.7 earthquake nucleated on the west coast of northern Chile about 40 km east of the city of Tocopilla. It took place in the southern part of a large seismic gap, the Iquique subduction zone segment which is supposed to be at the end of its seismic cycle. The Tocopilla fault plane appears to be the northern continuation of the Mw 8.0, 1995 Antofagasta earthquake. We present a complex 3D model of the rupture area including first hypocenter localizations of aftershocks following the event. The data was recorded during a mission of the German Task Force for Earthquakes after the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake. The seismic stations were recording the aftershocks from November 2007 until May 2008. In general, subduction zones have a complex structure where most of the volumes examined are characterized by strong variations in physical and material parameters. Therefore, 3D representation of the geophysical and geological conditions to be found are of great importance to understand such a subduction environment. We start with a two-dimensional visualization of the geological and geophysical setting. In a second step, we use GIS as a three-dimensional modeling tool which gives us the possibility to visualize the complex geophysical processes. One can easily add and delete data and focus on the information one needs. This allows us to investigate the aftershock distribution along the subducting slab and identify clear structures and clusters within the data set. Furthermore we combine the 2007 Tocopilla data set with the 1995 Antofagasta aftershocks which provides a new, three-dimensional insight into the segment boundary of these two events. Analyzing the aftershock sequence with a GIS-based model will not only help to visualize the setting but also be the base for various calculations and further explorations of the complex structures. Aftershocks following the 1995 Antofagasta earthquake and the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake

  15. On the Usability and Usefulness of 3d (geo)visualizations - a Focus on Virtual Reality Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çöltekin, A.; Lokka, I.; Zahner, M.

    2016-06-01

    Whether and when should we show data in 3D is an on-going debate in communities conducting visualization research. A strong opposition exists in the information visualization (Infovis) community, and seemingly unnecessary/unwarranted use of 3D, e.g., in plots, bar or pie charts, is heavily criticized. The scientific visualization (Scivis) community, on the other hand, is more supportive of the use of 3D as it allows `seeing' invisible phenomena, or designing and printing things that are used in e.g., surgeries, educational settings etc. Geographic visualization (Geovis) stands between the Infovis and Scivis communities. In geographic information science, most visuo-spatial analyses have been sufficiently conducted in 2D or 2.5D, including analyses related to terrain and much of the urban phenomena. On the other hand, there has always been a strong interest in 3D, with similar motivations as in Scivis community. Among many types of 3D visualizations, a popular one that is exploited both for visual analysis and visualization is the highly realistic (geo)virtual environments. Such environments may be engaging and memorable for the viewers because they offer highly immersive experiences. However, it is not yet well-established if we should opt to show the data in 3D; and if yes, a) what type of 3D we should use, b) for what task types, and c) for whom. In this paper, we identify some of the central arguments for and against the use of 3D visualizations around these three considerations in a concise interdisciplinary literature review.

  16. 3D Visualization of Hydrological Model Outputs For a Better Understanding of Multi-Scale Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, J.; Schertzer, D. J. M.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.

    2014-12-01

    During the last decades, many hydrological models has been created to simulate extreme events or scenarios on catchments. The classical outputs of these models are 2D maps, time series or graphs, which are easily understood by scientists, but not so much by many stakeholders, e.g. mayors or local authorities, and the general public. One goal of the Blue Green Dream project is to create outputs that are adequate for them. To reach this goal, we decided to convert most of the model outputs into a unique 3D visualization interface that combines all of them. This conversion has to be performed with an hydrological thinking to keep the information consistent with the context and the raw outputs.We focus our work on the conversion of the outputs of the Multi-Hydro (MH) model, which is physically based, fully distributed and with a GIS data interface. MH splits the urban water cycle into 4 components: the rainfall, the surface runoff, the infiltration and the drainage. To each of them, corresponds a modeling module with specific inputs and outputs. The superimposition of all this information will highlight the model outputs and help to verify the quality of the raw input data. For example, the spatial and the time variability of the rain generated by the rainfall module will be directly visible in 4D (3D + time) before running a full simulation. It is the same with the runoff module: because the result quality depends of the resolution of the rasterized land use, it will confirm or not the choice of the cell size.As most of the inputs and outputs are GIS files, two main conversions will be applied to display the results into 3D. First, a conversion from vector files to 3D objects. For example, buildings are defined in 2D inside a GIS vector file. Each polygon can be extruded with an height to create volumes. The principle is the same for the roads but an intrusion, instead of an extrusion, is done inside the topography file. The second main conversion is the raster

  17. A MATLAB function for 3-D and 4-D topographical visualization in geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zekollari, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Combining topographical information and spatially varying variables in visualizations is often crucial and inherent to geoscientific problems. Despite this, it is often an impossible or a very time-consuming and difficult task to create such figures by using classic software packages. This is also the case in the widely used numerical computing environment MATLAB. Here a MATLAB function is introduced for plotting a variety of natural environments with a pronounced topography, such as for instance glaciers, volcanoes and lakes in mountainous regions. Landscapes can be visualized in 3-D, with a single colour defining a featured surface type (e.g. ice, snow, water, lava), or with a colour scale defining the magnitude of a variable (e.g. ice thickness, snow depth, water depth, surface velocity, gradient, elevation). As an input only the elevation of the subsurface (typically the bedrock) and the surface are needed, which can be complemented by various input parameters in order to adapt the figure to specific needs. The figures are particularly suited to make time-evolving animations of natural processes, such as for instance a glacier retreat or a lake drainage event. Several visualization examples will be provided alongside with animations. The function, which is freely available for download, only requires the basic package of MATLAB and can be run on any standard stationary or portable personal computer.

  18. The effects of task difficulty on visual search strategy in virtual 3D displays.

    PubMed

    Pomplun, Marc; Garaas, Tyler W; Carrasco, Marisa

    2013-01-01

    Analyzing the factors that determine our choice of visual search strategy may shed light on visual behavior in everyday situations. Previous results suggest that increasing task difficulty leads to more systematic search paths. Here we analyze observers' eye movements in an "easy" conjunction search task and a "difficult" shape search task to study visual search strategies in stereoscopic search displays with virtual depth induced by binocular disparity. Standard eye-movement variables, such as fixation duration and initial saccade latency, as well as new measures proposed here, such as saccadic step size, relative saccadic selectivity, and x-y target distance, revealed systematic effects on search dynamics in the horizontal-vertical plane throughout the search process. We found that in the "easy" task, observers start with the processing of display items in the display center immediately after stimulus onset and subsequently move their gaze outwards, guided by extrafoveally perceived stimulus color. In contrast, the "difficult" task induced an initial gaze shift to the upper-left display corner, followed by a systematic left-right and top-down search process. The only consistent depth effect was a trend of initial saccades in the easy task with smallest displays to the items closest to the observer. The results demonstrate the utility of eye-movement analysis for understanding search strategies and provide a first step toward studying search strategies in actual 3D scenarios. PMID:23986539

  19. Adaptive enhancement and visualization techniques for 3D THz images of breast cancer tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yuhao; Bowman, Tyler; Gauch, John; El-Shenawee, Magda

    2016-03-01

    This paper evaluates image enhancement and visualization techniques for pulsed terahertz (THz) images of tissue samples. Specifically, our research objective is to effectively differentiate between heterogeneous regions of breast tissues that contain tumors diagnosed as triple negative infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC). Tissue slices and blocks of varying thicknesses were prepared and scanned using our lab's THz pulsed imaging system. One of the challenges we have encountered in visualizing the obtained images and differentiating between healthy and cancerous regions of the tissues is that most THz images have a low level of details and narrow contrast, making it difficult to accurately identify and visualize the margins around the IDC. To overcome this problem, we have applied and evaluated a number of image processing techniques to the scanned 3D THz images. In particular, we employed various spatial filtering and intensity transformation techniques to emphasize the small details in the images and adjust the image contrast. For each of these methods, we investigated how varying filter sizes and parameters affect the amount of enhancement applied to the images. Our experimentation shows that several image processing techniques are effective in producing THz images of breast tissue samples that contain distinguishable details, making further segmentation of the different image regions promising.

  20. The effects of task difficulty on visual search strategy in virtual 3D displays.

    PubMed

    Pomplun, Marc; Garaas, Tyler W; Carrasco, Marisa

    2013-08-28

    Analyzing the factors that determine our choice of visual search strategy may shed light on visual behavior in everyday situations. Previous results suggest that increasing task difficulty leads to more systematic search paths. Here we analyze observers' eye movements in an "easy" conjunction search task and a "difficult" shape search task to study visual search strategies in stereoscopic search displays with virtual depth induced by binocular disparity. Standard eye-movement variables, such as fixation duration and initial saccade latency, as well as new measures proposed here, such as saccadic step size, relative saccadic selectivity, and x-y target distance, revealed systematic effects on search dynamics in the horizontal-vertical plane throughout the search process. We found that in the "easy" task, observers start with the processing of display items in the display center immediately after stimulus onset and subsequently move their gaze outwards, guided by extrafoveally perceived stimulus color. In contrast, the "difficult" task induced an initial gaze shift to the upper-left display corner, followed by a systematic left-right and top-down search process. The only consistent depth effect was a trend of initial saccades in the easy task with smallest displays to the items closest to the observer. The results demonstrate the utility of eye-movement analysis for understanding search strategies and provide a first step toward studying search strategies in actual 3D scenarios.

  1. Intraoperative 3D stereo visualization for image-guided cardiac ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizian, Mahdi; Patel, Rajni

    2011-03-01

    There are commercial products which provide 3D rendered volumes, reconstructed from electro-anatomical mapping and/or pre-operative CT/MR images of a patient's heart with tools for highlighting target locations for cardiac ablation applications. However, it is not possible to update the three-dimensional (3D) volume intraoperatively to provide the interventional cardiologist with more up-to-date feedback at each instant of time. In this paper, we describe the system we have developed for real-time three-dimensional stereo visualization for cardiac ablation. A 4D ultrasound probe is used to acquire and update a 3D image volume. A magnetic tracking device is used to track the distal part of the ablation catheter in real time and a master-slave robot-assisted system is developed for actuation of a steerable catheter. Three-dimensional ultrasound image volumes go through some processing to make the heart tissue and the catheter more visible. The rendered volume is shown in a virtual environment. The catheter can also be added as a virtual tool to this environment to achieve a higher update rate on the catheter's position. The ultrasound probe is also equipped with an EM tracker which is used for online registration of the ultrasound images and the catheter tracking data. The whole augmented reality scene can be shown stereoscopically to enhance depth perception for the user. We have used transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) instead of the conventional transoesophageal (TEE) or intracardiac (ICE) echocardiogram. A beating heart model has been used to perform the experiments. This method can be used both for diagnostic and therapeutic applications as well as training interventional cardiologists.

  2. Are There Side Effects to Watching 3D Movies? A Prospective Crossover Observational Study on Visually Induced Motion Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Solimini, Angelo G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing popularity of commercial movies showing three dimensional (3D) images has raised concern about possible adverse side effects on viewers. Methods and Findings A prospective carryover observational study was designed to assess the effect of exposure (3D vs. 2D movie views) on self reported symptoms of visually induced motion sickness. The standardized Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) was self administered on a convenience sample of 497 healthy adult volunteers before and after the vision of 2D and 3D movies. Viewers reporting some sickness (SSQ total score>15) were 54.8% of the total sample after the 3D movie compared to 14.1% of total sample after the 2D movie. Symptom intensity was 8.8 times higher than baseline after exposure to 3D movie (compared to the increase of 2 times the baseline after the 2D movie). Multivariate modeling of visually induced motion sickness as response variables pointed out the significant effects of exposure to 3D movie, history of car sickness and headache, after adjusting for gender, age, self reported anxiety level, attention to the movie and show time. Conclusions Seeing 3D movies can increase rating of symptoms of nausea, oculomotor and disorientation, especially in women with susceptible visual-vestibular system. Confirmatory studies which include examination of clinical signs on viewers are needed to pursue a conclusive evidence on the 3D vision effects on spectators. PMID:23418530

  3. Reconstruction and Visualization of Coordinated 3D Cell Migration Based on Optical Flow.

    PubMed

    Kappe, Christopher P; Schütz, Lucas; Gunther, Stefan; Hufnagel, Lars; Lemke, Steffen; Leitte, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Animal development is marked by the repeated reorganization of cells and cell populations, which ultimately determine form and shape of the growing organism. One of the central questions in developmental biology is to understand precisely how cells reorganize, as well as how and to what extent this reorganization is coordinated. While modern microscopes can record video data for every cell during animal development in 3D+t, analyzing these videos remains a major challenge: reconstruction of comprehensive cell tracks turned out to be very demanding especially with decreasing data quality and increasing cell densities. In this paper, we present an analysis pipeline for coordinated cellular motions in developing embryos based on the optical flow of a series of 3D images. We use numerical integration to reconstruct cellular long-term motions in the optical flow of the video, we take care of data validation, and we derive a LIC-based, dense flow visualization for the resulting pathlines. This approach allows us to handle low video quality such as noisy data or poorly separated cells, and it allows the biologists to get a comprehensive understanding of their data by capturing dynamic growth processes in stills. We validate our methods using three videos of growing fruit fly embryos.

  4. PointCloudExplore 2: Visual exploration of 3D gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    International Research Training Group Visualization of Large and Unstructured Data Sets, University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Institute for Data Analysis and Visualization, University of California, Davis, CA; Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory , Berkeley, CA; Genomics Division, LBNL; Computer Science Department, University of California, Irvine, CA; Computer Science Division,University of California, Berkeley, CA; Life Sciences Division, LBNL; Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology and the Center for Integrative Genomics, University of California, Berkeley, CA; Ruebel, Oliver; Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Huang, Min-Yu; Bethel, E. Wes; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Fowlkes, Charless C.; Hendriks, Cris L. Luengo; DePace, Angela H.; Simirenko, L.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hagen, Hand; Malik, Jitendra; Knowles, David W.; Hamann, Bernd

    2008-03-31

    To better understand how developmental regulatory networks are defined inthe genome sequence, the Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project (BDNTP)has developed a suite of methods to describe 3D gene expression data, i.e.,the output of the network at cellular resolution for multiple time points. To allow researchersto explore these novel data sets we have developed PointCloudXplore (PCX).In PCX we have linked physical and information visualization views via the concept ofbrushing (cell selection). For each view dedicated operations for performing selectionof cells are available. In PCX, all cell selections are stored in a central managementsystem. Cells selected in one view can in this way be highlighted in any view allowingfurther cell subset properties to be determined. Complex cell queries can be definedby combining different cell selections using logical operations such as AND, OR, andNOT. Here we are going to provide an overview of PointCloudXplore 2 (PCX2), thelatest publicly available version of PCX. PCX2 has shown to be an effective tool forvisual exploration of 3D gene expression data. We discuss (i) all views available inPCX2, (ii) different strategies to perform cell selection, (iii) the basic architecture ofPCX2., and (iv) illustrate the usefulness of PCX2 using selected examples.

  5. CheS-Mapper - Chemical Space Mapping and Visualization in 3D

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Analyzing chemical datasets is a challenging task for scientific researchers in the field of chemoinformatics. It is important, yet difficult to understand the relationship between the structure of chemical compounds, their physico-chemical properties, and biological or toxic effects. To that respect, visualization tools can help to better comprehend the underlying correlations. Our recently developed 3D molecular viewer CheS-Mapper (Chemical Space Mapper) divides large datasets into clusters of similar compounds and consequently arranges them in 3D space, such that their spatial proximity reflects their similarity. The user can indirectly determine similarity, by selecting which features to employ in the process. The tool can use and calculate different kind of features, like structural fragments as well as quantitative chemical descriptors. These features can be highlighted within CheS-Mapper, which aids the chemist to better understand patterns and regularities and relate the observations to established scientific knowledge. As a final function, the tool can also be used to select and export specific subsets of a given dataset for further analysis. PMID:22424447

  6. Evaluation of neuroanatomical training using a 3D visual reality model.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Danielle N; Wilson, Timothy D; Eagleson, Roy; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    As one of the more difficult components of any curricula, neuroanatomy poses many challenges to students - not only because of the numerous discrete structures, but also due to the complicated spatial relations between them, which must be learned. Traditional anatomical education uses 2D images with a focus on dissection. This approach tends to underestimate the cognitive leaps required between textbook, lecture, and dissection cases. With reduced anatomical teaching time available, and varying student spatial abilities, new techniques are needed for training. The goal of this study is to assess the improvement of trainee understanding of 3D brain anatomy, orientation, visualization, and navigation through the use of digital training regimes in comparison with current methods. Two subsets of health science and medical students were tested individually after being given a group lecture and either a pre- or post-dissection digital lab. Results suggest that exposure to a 3D digital lab may improve knowledge acquisition and understanding by the students, particularly for first time learners. PMID:22356963

  7. Thoracic Cavity Definition for 3D PET/CT Analysis and Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Bascom, Rebecca; Allen, Thomas W.; Higgins, William E.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) serve as the standard imaging modalities for lung-cancer management. CT gives anatomical detail on diagnostic regions of interest (ROIs), while PET gives highly specific functional information. During the lung-cancer management process, a patient receives a co-registered whole-body PET/CT scan pair and a dedicated high-resolution chest CT scan. With these data, multimodal PET/CT ROI information can be gleaned to facilitate disease management. Effective image segmentation of the thoracic cavity, however, is needed to focus attention on the central chest. We present an automatic method for thoracic cavity segmentation from 3D CT scans. We then demonstrate how the method facilitates 3D ROI localization and visualization in patient multimodal imaging studies. Our segmentation method draws upon digital topological and morphological operations, active-contour analysis, and key organ landmarks. Using a large patient database, the method showed high agreement to ground-truth regions, with a mean coverage = 99.2% and leakage = 0.52%. Furthermore, it enabled extremely fast computation. For PET/CT lesion analysis, the segmentation method reduced ROI search space by 97.7% for a whole-body scan, or nearly 3 times greater than that achieved by a lung mask. Despite this reduction, we achieved 100% true-positive ROI detection, while also reducing the false-positive (FP) detection rate by >5 times over that achieved with a lung mask. Finally, the method greatly improved PET/CT visualization by eliminating false PET-avid obscurations arising from the heart, bones, and liver. In particular, PET MIP views and fused PET/CT renderings depicted unprecedented clarity of the lesions and neighboring anatomical structures truly relevant to lung-cancer assessment. PMID:25957746

  8. Toward virtual anatomy: a stereoscopic 3-D interactive multimedia computer program for cranial osteology.

    PubMed

    Trelease, R B

    1996-01-01

    Advances in computer visualization and user interface technologies have enabled development of "virtual reality" programs that allow users to perceive and to interact with objects in artificial three-dimensional environments. Such technologies were used to create an image database and program for studying the human skull, a specimen that has become increasingly expensive and scarce. Stereoscopic image pairs of a museum-quality skull were digitized from multiple views. For each view, the stereo pairs were interlaced into a single, field-sequential stereoscopic picture using an image processing program. The resulting interlaced image files are organized in an interactive multimedia program. At run-time, gray-scale 3-D images are displayed on a large-screen computer monitor and observed through liquid-crystal shutter goggles. Users can then control the program and change views with a mouse and cursor to point-and-click on screen-level control words ("buttons"). For each view of the skull, an ID control button can be used to overlay pointers and captions for important structures. Pointing and clicking on "hidden buttons" overlying certain structures triggers digitized audio spoken word descriptions or mini lectures.

  9. Using Computer-Aided Design Software and 3D Printers to Improve Spatial Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsio-Loudis, Petros; Jones, Millie

    2015-01-01

    Many articles have been published on the use of 3D printing technology. From prefabricated homes and outdoor structures to human organs, 3D printing technology has found a niche in many fields, but especially education. With the introduction of AutoCAD technical drawing programs and now 3D printing, learners can use 3D printed models to develop…

  10. Earth Science Research Discovery, Integration, 3D Visualization and Analysis using NASA World Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alameh, N.; Hogan, P.

    2008-12-01

    NASA plays a leadership role in the world of Advanced Information Technologies. Part of our mission is to leverage those technologies to increase the usability of the growing amount of earth observation produced by the science community. NASA World Wind open source technology provides a complete 3D visualization platform that is being continually advanced by NASA, its partners and the open source community. The technology makes scientific data and observations more accessible to Earth scientists and offers them a standards-based extensible platform to manipulate and analyze that data. The API-centric architecture of World Wind's SDK allows others to readily extend or embed this technology (including in web pages). Such multiple approaches to using the technology accelerate opportunities for the research community to provide "advances in fundamental understanding of the Earth system and increased application of this understanding to serve the nation and the people of the world" (NRC Decadal Survey). The opportunities to advance this NASA Open Source Agreement (NOSA) technology by leveraging advances in web services, interoperability, data discovery mechanisms, and Sensor Web are unencumbered by proprietary constraints and therefore provide the basis for an evolving platform that can reliably service the needs of the Earth Science, Sensor Web and GEOSS communities. The ability for these communities to not only use this technology in an unrestricted manner but to also participate in advancing it leads to accelerated innovation and maximum exchange of information. 3 characteristics enable World Wind to push the frontier in Advanced Information Systems: 1- World Wind provides a unifying information browser to enable a variety of 3D geospatial applications. World Wind consists of a coherent suite of modular components to be used selectively or in concert with any number of programs. 2- World Wind technology can be embedded as part of any application and hence makes it

  11. Dynamic 3D-visualization of merged geophysical and geological data sets from the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsson, M. E.

    2002-12-01

    Bringing together geophysical and geological data sets in a dynamic 3D-environment can greatly enhance our ability to comprehend earth processes. The relationship between, for example, seafloor topography and measured gravity anomalies can easily be visualized as well as the distribution of magnetic anomalies in oceanic crust and their varying offset due to seafloor spreading. In this presentation the gravity derived from ERS-1 satellite altimetry by Laxon and McAdoo (1994) and the magnetic compilation by Verhoef et al. (1996) of the Arctic Ocean is co-registered with the International Bathymetric Chart of the Arctic Ocean (IBCAO) bathymetry and brought into a dynamic 3D-environment for visualization and analysis. This exercise provides information of great value when we address the geologic origin of the Arctic Ocean physiographic provinces. Furthermore, since the ERS-1 gravity and IBCAO bathymetry are two entirely unrelated datasets the gravity may also be used for validating seafloor features seen in the IBCAO compilation that are based on sparse data. For instance, at the eastern most end of the Gakkel Ridge Axial Valley the IBCAO bathymetry is based on digitized contour information from a Russian bathymetric map published in 1999 by the Russian Federation's Head Department of Navigation and Oceanography (HDNO) with no available trackline sources. In the bathymetry, the Axial Valley is clearly seen to continue towards the continental slope of the Laptev Sea and this continuation is supported by the ERS-1 gravity. Another example of bringing together geological and geophysical data sets is from northern Russia, where huge ice lakes were dammed by the Early Weichselian ice sheet at about 90 000 years ago (Mangerud et al., 2001). The damming resulted from blocking the Russian north flowing rivers, supplying most of the fresh water to the Arctic Ocean, by the Ice Sheet margin. These proglacial lakes are reconstructed in our dynamic 3D-environment based on field

  12. 3D Visualization of Sheath Folds in Roman Marble from Ephesus, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Sebastian; Passchier, Cornelis W.; de Kemp, Eric A.; Ilhan, Sinan

    2013-04-01

    Excavation of a palatial 2nd century AD house (Terrace House Two) in the ancient city of Ephesus, Turkey in the 1970s produced 10.313 pieces of colored, folded marble which belonged to 54 marble plates of 1.6 cm thickness that originally covered the walls of the banquet hall of the house. The marble plates were completely reassembled and restored by a team of workers over the last 6 years. The plates were recognized as having been sawn from two separate large blocks of "Cipollino verde", a green mylonitized marble from Karystos on the Island of Euboea, Greece. After restoration, it became clear that all slabs had been placed on the wall in approximately the sequence in which they had been cut off by a Roman stone saw. As a result, the marble plates give a full 3D insight in the folded internal structure of 1m3 block of mylonite. The restoration of the slabs was recognized as a first, unique opportunity for detailed reconstruction of the 3D geometry of m-scale folds in mylonitized marble. Photographs were taken of each slab and used to reconstruct their exact arrangement within the originally quarried blocks. Outlines of layers were digitized and a full 3D reconstruction of the internal structure of the block was created using ArcMap and GOCAD. Fold structures in the block include curtain folds and multilayered sheath folds. Several different layers showing these structures were digitized on the photographs of the slab surfaces and virtually mounted back together within the model of the marble block. Due to the serial sectioning into slabs, with cm-scale spacing, the visualization of the 3D geometry of sheath folds was accomplished with a resolution better than 4 cm. Final assembled 3D images reveal how sheath folds emerge from continuous layers and show their overall consistency as well as a constant hinge line orientation of the fold structures. Observations suggest that a single deformation phase was responsible for the evolution of "Cipollino verde" structures

  13. Cluster Analysis and Web-Based 3-D Visualization of Large-scale Geophysical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadlec, B. J.; Yuen, D. A.; Bollig, E. F.; Dzwinel, W.; da Silva, C. R.

    2004-05-01

    We present a problem-solving environment WEB-IS (Web-based Data Interrogative System), which we have developed for remote analysis and visualization of geophysical data [Garbow et. al., 2003]. WEB-IS employs agglomerative clustering methods intended for feature extraction and studying the predictions of large magnitude earthquake events. Data-mining is accomplished using a mutual nearest meighbor (MNN) algorithm for extracting event clusters of different density and shapes based on a hierarchical proximity measure. Clustering schemes used in molecular dynamics [Da Silva et. al., 2002] are also considered for increasing computational efficiency using a linked cell algorithm for creating a Verlet neighbor list (VNL) and extracting different cluster structures by applying a canonical backtracking search on the VNL. Space and time correlations between the events are visualized dynamically in 3-D through a filter by showing clusters at different timescales according to defined units of time ranging from days to years. This WEB-IS functionality was tested both on synthetic [Eneva and Ben-Zion, 1997] and actual earthquake catalogs of Japanese earthquakes and can be applied to the soft-computing data mining methods used in hydrology and geoinformatics. Da Silva, C.R.S., Justo, J.F., Fazzio, A., Phys Rev B, vol., 65, 2002. Eneva, M., Ben-Zion, Y.,J. Geophys. Res., 102, 17785-17795, 1997. Garbow, Z.A., Yuen, D.A., Erlebacher, G., Bollig, E.F., Kadlec, B.J., Vis. Geosci., 2003.

  14. Interactive Collaborative Visualization in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollig, E. F.; Kadlec, B. J.; Erlebacher, G.; Yuen, D. A.; Palchuk, Y. M.

    2004-12-01

    Datasets in the earth sciences continue growing in size due to higher experimental resolving power, and numerical simulations at higher resolutions. Over the last several years, an increasing number of scientists have turned to visualization to represent their vast datasets in a meaningful fashion. In most cases, datasets are downloaded and then visualized on a local workstation with 2D or 3D software packages. However, it becomes inconvenient to download datasets of several gigabytes unless network bandwidth is sufficiently high (10 Gbits/sec). We are investigating the use of Virtual Network Computing (VNC) to provide interactive three-dimensional visualization services to the user community. Specialized software [1,2] enables OpenGL-based visualization software to capitalize on the hardware capabilities of modern graphics cards and transfer session information to clients through the VNC protocol. The virtue of this software is that it does not require any changes to visualization software. Session information is displayed within java applets, enabling the use of a wide variety of clients, including hand-held devices. The VNC protocol makes collaboration and interaction between multiple users possible. We demonstrate the collaborative VNC system with the commercial 3D visualization system Amira (http://www.tgs.com) and the open source VTK (http://www.vtk.org) over a 100 Mbit network. We also present ongoing work for integrating VNC within the Naradabrokering Grid environment. [1] Stegmaier, S. and Magallon, M. and T. Ertl, "A Generic Solution for Hardware-Accelerated Remote Visualization," Joint Eurographics -- IEEE TCVG Symposium on Visualization, 2002. [2] VirtualGL--3D without boundaries http://virtualgl.sourceforge.net/installation.htm

  15. 3D Slicer as a Tool for Interactive Brain Tumor Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Kikinis, Ron; Pieper, Steve

    2014-01-01

    User interaction is required for reliable segmentation of brain tumors in clinical practice and in clinical research. By incorporating current research tools, 3D Slicer provides a set of easy to use interactive tools that can be efficiently used for this purpose. PMID:22255945

  16. Novel 3D Approach to Flare Modeling via Interactive IDL Widget Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, G. M.; Fleishman, G. D.; Gary, D. E.; Kuznetsov, A.; Kontar, E. P.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, and soon-to-be, available sophisticated 3D models of particle acceleration and transport in solar flares require a new level of user-friendly visualization and analysis tools allowing quick and easy adjustment of the model parameters and computation of realistic radiation patterns (images, spectra, polarization, etc). We report the current state of the art of these tools in development, already proved to be highly efficient for the direct flare modeling. We present an interactive IDL widget application intended to provide a flexible tool that allows the user to generate spatially resolved radio and X-ray spectra. The object-based architecture of this application provides full interaction with imported 3D magnetic field models (e.g., from an extrapolation) that may be embedded in a global coronal model. Various tools provided allow users to explore the magnetic connectivity of the model by generating magnetic field lines originating in user-specified volume positions. Such lines may serve as reference lines for creating magnetic flux tubes, which are further populated with user-defined analytical thermal/non thermal particle distribution models. By default, the application integrates IDL callable DLL and Shared libraries containing fast GS emission codes developed in FORTRAN and C++ and soft and hard X-ray codes developed in IDL. However, the interactive interface allows interchanging these default libraries with any user-defined IDL or external callable codes designed to solve the radiation transfer equation in the same or other wavelength ranges of interest. To illustrate the tool capacity and generality, we present a step-by-step real-time computation of microwave and X-ray images from realistic magnetic structures obtained from a magnetic field extrapolation preceding a real event, and compare them with the actual imaging data obtained by NORH and RHESSI instruments. We discuss further anticipated developments of the tools needed to accommodate

  17. Visualization methods for high-resolution, transient, 3-D, finite element situations

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.

    1995-01-10

    Scientific visualization is the process whereby numerical data is transformed into a visual form to augment the process of discovery and understanding. Visualizing the data generated by large-scale, transient, three-dimensional finite element simulations poses many challenges due to geometric complexity, the presence of multiple materials and multiple element types, and the inherent unstructured nature of the meshes. In this paper, the direct use of finite element data structures, nodal assembly procedures, and element interpolants for volumetric adaptive surface extraction, surface rendering, vector grids and particle tracing is discussed. A brief description of a {open_quotes}direct-to-disk{close_quotes} animation system is presented, and case studies which demonstrate the use of isosurfaces, vector plots, cutting planes, reference surfaces and particle tracing are then discussed in the context of several case studies for transient incompressible viscous flow, and acoustic fluid-structure interaction simulations. An overview of the implications of massively parallel computers on visualization is presented to highlight the issues in parallel visualization methodology, algorithms. data locality and the ultimate requirements for temporary and archival data storage and network bandwidth.

  18. Infrared tomographic PIV and 3D motion tracking system applied to aquatic predator-prey interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Deepak; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2013-02-01

    Infrared tomographic PIV and 3D motion tracking are combined to measure evolving volumetric velocity fields and organism trajectories during aquatic predator-prey interactions. The technique was used to study zebrafish foraging on both non-evasive and evasive prey species. Measurement volumes of 22.5 mm × 10.5 mm × 12 mm were reconstructed from images captured on a set of four high-speed cameras. To obtain accurate fluid velocity vectors within each volume, fish were first masked out using an automated visual hull method. Fish and prey locations were identified independently from the same image sets and tracked separately within the measurement volume. Experiments demonstrated that fish were not influenced by the infrared laser illumination or the tracer particles. Results showed that the zebrafish used different strategies, suction and ram feeding, for successful capture of non-evasive and evasive prey, respectively. The two strategies yielded different variations in fluid velocity between the fish mouth and the prey. In general, the results suggest that the local flow field, the direction of prey locomotion with respect to the predator and the relative accelerations and speeds of the predator and prey may all be significant in determining predation success.

  19. Interactive Terascale Particle Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, David; Green, Bryan; Moran, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the methods used to produce an interactive visualization of a 2 TB computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data set using particle tracing (streaklines). We use the method introduced by Bruckschen et al. [2001] that pre-computes a large number of particles, stores them on disk using a space-filling curve ordering that minimizes seeks, and then retrieves and displays the particles according to the user's command. We describe how the particle computation can be performed using a PC cluster, how the algorithm can be adapted to work with a multi-block curvilinear mesh, and how the out-of-core visualization can be scaled to 296 billion particles while still achieving interactive performance on PG hardware. Compared to the earlier work, our data set size and total number of particles are an order of magnitude larger. We also describe a new compression technique that allows the lossless compression of the particles by 41% and speeds the particle retrieval by about 30%.

  20. 3-D visualization and non-linear tissue classification of breast tumors using ultrasound elastography in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Ahmed; Layne, Ginger; Abraham, Jame; Mukdadi, Osama M

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the study described here was to introduce new methods for the classification and visualization of human breast tumors using 3-D ultrasound elastography. A tumor's type, shape and size are key features that can help the physician to decide the sort and extent of necessary treatment. In this work, tumor type, being either benign or malignant, was classified non-invasively for nine volunteer patients. The classification was based on estimating four parameters that reflect the tumor's non-linear biomechanical behavior, under multi-compression levels. Tumor prognosis using non-linear elastography was confirmed with biopsy as a gold standard. Three tissue classification parameters were found to be statistically significant with a p-value < 0.05, whereas the fourth non-linear parameter was highly significant, having a p-value < 0.001. Furthermore, each breast tumor's shape and size were estimated in vivo using 3-D elastography, and were enhanced using interactive segmentation. Segmentation with level sets was used to isolate the stiff tumor from the surrounding soft tissue. Segmentation also provided a reliable means to estimate tumors volumes. Four volumetric strains were investigated: the traditional normal axial strain, the first principal strain, von Mises strain and maximum shear strain. It was noted that these strains can provide varying degrees of boundary enhancement to the stiff tumor in the constructed elastograms. The enhanced boundary improved the performance of the segmentation process. In summary, the proposed methods can be employed as a 3-D non-invasive tool for characterization of breast tumors, and may provide early prognosis with minimal pain, as well as diminish the risk of late-stage breast cancer.

  1. CMAS 3D, a new program to visualize and project major elements compositions in the CMAS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, L.; Ouillon, N.; Chazot, G.; Kornprobst, J.; Boivin, P.

    2009-06-01

    CMAS 3D, developed in MATLAB ®, is a program to support visualization of major element chemical data in three dimensions. Such projections are used to discuss correlations, metamorphic reactions and the chemical evolution of rocks, melts or minerals. It can also project data into 2D plots. The CMAS 3D interface makes it easy to use, and does not require any knowledge of Matlab ® programming. CMAS 3D uses data compiled in a Microsoft Excel™ spreadsheet. Although useful for scientific research, the program is also a powerful tool for teaching.

  2. A new approach of building 3D visualization framework for multimodal medical images display and computed assisted diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenwei; Sun, Jianyong; Zhang, Jianguo

    2012-02-01

    As more and more CT/MR studies are scanning with larger volume of data sets, more and more radiologists and clinician would like using PACS WS to display and manipulate these larger data sets of images with 3D rendering features. In this paper, we proposed a design method and implantation strategy to develop 3D image display component not only with normal 3D display functions but also with multi-modal medical image fusion as well as compute-assisted diagnosis of coronary heart diseases. The 3D component has been integrated into the PACS display workstation of Shanghai Huadong Hospital, and the clinical practice showed that it is easy for radiologists and physicians to use these 3D functions such as multi-modalities' (e.g. CT, MRI, PET, SPECT) visualization, registration and fusion, and the lesion quantitative measurements. The users were satisfying with the rendering speeds and quality of 3D reconstruction. The advantages of the component include low requirements for computer hardware, easy integration, reliable performance and comfortable application experience. With this system, the radiologists and the clinicians can manipulate with 3D images easily, and use the advanced visualization tools to facilitate their work with a PACS display workstation at any time.

  3. Representing 3D virtual objects: interaction between visuo-spatial ability and type of exploration.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Frank; van den Broek, Egon L

    2010-03-17

    We investigated individual differences in interactively exploring 3D virtual objects. 36 participants explored 24 simple and 24 difficult objects (composed of respectively three and five Biederman geons) actively, passively, or not at all. Both their 3D mental representation of the objects and visuo-spatial ability was assessed. Results show that, regardless of the object's complexity, people with a low VSA benefit from active exploration of objects, where people with a middle or high VSA do not. These findings extend and refine earlier research on interactively learning visuo-spatial information and underline the importance to take individual differences into account. PMID:20116394

  4. Representing 3D virtual objects: interaction between visuo-spatial ability and type of exploration.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Frank; van den Broek, Egon L

    2010-03-17

    We investigated individual differences in interactively exploring 3D virtual objects. 36 participants explored 24 simple and 24 difficult objects (composed of respectively three and five Biederman geons) actively, passively, or not at all. Both their 3D mental representation of the objects and visuo-spatial ability was assessed. Results show that, regardless of the object's complexity, people with a low VSA benefit from active exploration of objects, where people with a middle or high VSA do not. These findings extend and refine earlier research on interactively learning visuo-spatial information and underline the importance to take individual differences into account.

  5. Interactive Cosmetic Makeup of a 3D Point-Based Face Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Sik; Choi, Soo-Mi

    We present an interactive system for cosmetic makeup of a point-based face model acquired by 3D scanners. We first enhance the texture of a face model in 3D space using low-pass Gaussian filtering, median filtering, and histogram equalization. The user is provided with a stereoscopic display and haptic feedback, and can perform simulated makeup tasks including the application of foundation, color makeup, and lip gloss. Fast rendering is achieved by processing surfels using the GPU, and we use a BSP tree data structure and a dynamic local refinement of the facial surface to provide interactive haptics. We have implemented a prototype system and evaluated its performance.

  6. Human Lumbar Ligamentum Flavum Anatomy for Epidural Anesthesia: Reviewing a 3D MR-Based Interactive Model and Postmortem Samples.

    PubMed

    Reina, Miguel A; Lirk, Philipp; Puigdellívol-Sánchez, Anna; Mavar, Marija; Prats-Galino, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    The ligamentum flavum (LF) forms the anatomic basis for the loss-of-resistance technique essential to the performance of epidural anesthesia. However, the LF presents considerable interindividual variability, including the possibility of midline gaps, which may influence the performance of epidural anesthesia. We devise a method to reconstruct the anatomy of the digitally LF based on magnetic resonance images to clarify the exact limits and edges of LF and its different thickness, depending on the area examined, while avoiding destructive methods, as well as the dissection processes. Anatomic cadaveric cross sections enabled us to visually check the definition of the edges along the entire LF and compare them using 3D image reconstruction methods. Reconstruction was performed in images obtained from 7 patients. Images from 1 patient were used as a basis for the 3D spinal anatomy tool. In parallel, axial cuts, 2 to 3 cm thick, were performed in lumbar spines of 4 frozen cadavers. This technique allowed us to identify the entire ligament and its exact limits, while avoiding alterations resulting from cutting processes or from preparation methods. The LF extended between the laminas of adjacent vertebrae at all vertebral levels of the patients examined, but midline gaps are regularly encountered. These anatomical variants were reproduced in a 3D portable document format. The major anatomical features of the LF were reproduced in the 3D model. Details of its structure and variations of thickness in successive sagittal and axial slides could be visualized. Gaps within LF previously studied in cadavers have been identified in our interactive 3D model, which may help to understand their nature, as well as possible implications for epidural techniques.

  7. Human Lumbar Ligamentum Flavum Anatomy for Epidural Anesthesia: Reviewing a 3D MR-Based Interactive Model and Postmortem Samples.

    PubMed

    Reina, Miguel A; Lirk, Philipp; Puigdellívol-Sánchez, Anna; Mavar, Marija; Prats-Galino, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    The ligamentum flavum (LF) forms the anatomic basis for the loss-of-resistance technique essential to the performance of epidural anesthesia. However, the LF presents considerable interindividual variability, including the possibility of midline gaps, which may influence the performance of epidural anesthesia. We devise a method to reconstruct the anatomy of the digitally LF based on magnetic resonance images to clarify the exact limits and edges of LF and its different thickness, depending on the area examined, while avoiding destructive methods, as well as the dissection processes. Anatomic cadaveric cross sections enabled us to visually check the definition of the edges along the entire LF and compare them using 3D image reconstruction methods. Reconstruction was performed in images obtained from 7 patients. Images from 1 patient were used as a basis for the 3D spinal anatomy tool. In parallel, axial cuts, 2 to 3 cm thick, were performed in lumbar spines of 4 frozen cadavers. This technique allowed us to identify the entire ligament and its exact limits, while avoiding alterations resulting from cutting processes or from preparation methods. The LF extended between the laminas of adjacent vertebrae at all vertebral levels of the patients examined, but midline gaps are regularly encountered. These anatomical variants were reproduced in a 3D portable document format. The major anatomical features of the LF were reproduced in the 3D model. Details of its structure and variations of thickness in successive sagittal and axial slides could be visualized. Gaps within LF previously studied in cadavers have been identified in our interactive 3D model, which may help to understand their nature, as well as possible implications for epidural techniques. PMID:26891398

  8. Use and Evaluation of 3D GeoWall Visualizations in Undergraduate Space Science Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, N. E.; Hamed, K. M.; Lopez, R. E.; Mitchell, E. J.; Gray, C. L.; Corralez, D. S.; Robinson, C. A.; Soderlund, K. M.

    2005-12-01

    One persistent difficulty many astronomy students face is the lack of 3- dimensional mental model of the systems being studied, in particular the Sun-Earth-Moon system. Students without such a mental model can have a very hard time conceptualizing the geometric relationships that cause, for example, the cycle of lunar phases or the pattern of seasons. The GeoWall is a recently developed and affordable projection mechanism for three-dimensional stereo visualization which is becoming a popular tool in classrooms and research labs for use in geology classes, but as yet very little work has been done involving the GeoWall for astronomy classes. We present results from a large study involving over 1000 students of varied backgrounds: some students were tested at the University of Texas at El Paso, a large public university on the US-Mexico border and other students were from the Florida Institute of Technology, a small, private, technical school in Melbourne Florida. We wrote a lecture tutorial-style lab to go along with a GeoWall 3D visual of the Earth-Moon system and tested the students before and after with several diagnostics. Students were given pre and post tests using the Lunar Phase Concept Inventory (LPCI) as well as a separate evaluation written specifically for this project. We found the lab useful for both populations of students, but not equally effective for all. We discuss reactions from the students and their improvement, as well as whether the students are able to correctly assess the usefullness of the project for their own learning.

  9. A 3D Earth orbit model; visualization and analysis of Milankovitch cycles and insolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilb, R. D.; Kostadinov, T. S.

    2012-12-01

    An astronomically precise and accurate Earth orbit graphical model, Earth orbit v2.0, is presented. The model offers 3D visualizations of Earth's orbital geometry, Milankovitch parameters and the ensuing insolation forcings. Prevalent paleoclimatic theories invoke Milankovitch cycles as a major forcing mechanism capable of shifting Earth's climate regimes on time scales of tens to hundreds of thousands of years. Variability of eccentricity (ellipticity of orbit), precession (longitude of perihelion) and obliquity (Earth's axial tilt) changes parameters such as amplitude of seasonal insolation, timing of seasons with respect to perihelion, and total annual insolation. Hays et al. (1976) demonstrated a strong link between Milankovitch cycles and paleoclimatological records, which has been confirmed and expanded many times since (e.g. Berger et al., 1994; Berger et al., 2010). The complex interplay of several orbital parameters on various time scales makes assessment and visualization of Earth's orbit and spatio-temporal insolation variability challenging. It is difficult to appreciate the pivotal importance of Kepler's laws of planetary motion in controlling the effects of Milankovitch cycles on insolation patterns on various spatio-temporal scales. These factors also make Milankovitch theory difficult to teach effectively. The model allows substantial user control in a robust, yet intuitive and user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) developed in Matlab. We present the user with a choice between Berger et al. (1978) and Laskar et al. (2004) astronomical solutions for eccentricity, obliquity and precession. Berger solutions span from -1 Myr to +1 Myr, while Laskar provides solutions from -101 Myr to +21 Myr since J2000. Users can also choose a "demo" mode which allows the three Milankovitch parameters to be varied independently of each other, so the user can isolate the effects of each on orbital geometry and insolation. For example, extreme eccentricity can be

  10. A 3D Visualization Method for Bladder Filling Examination Based on EIT

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Ran, Peng; Xu, Zheng; Li, Bing; Li, Song-nong

    2012-01-01

    As the researches of electric impedance tomography (EIT) applications in medical examinations deepen, we attempt to produce the visualization of 3D images of human bladder. In this paper, a planar electrode array system will be introduced as the measuring platform and a series of feasible methods are proposed to evaluate the simulated volume of bladder to avoid overfilling. The combined regularization algorithm enhances the spatial resolution and presents distinguishable sketch of disturbances from the background, which provides us with reliable data from inverse problem to carry on to the three-dimensional reconstruction. By detecting the edge elements and tracking down the lost information, we extract quantitative morphological features of the object from the noises and background. Preliminary measurements were conducted and the results showed that the proposed algorithm overcomes the defects of holes, protrusions, and debris in reconstruction. In addition, the targets' location in space and roughly volume could be calculated according to the grid of finite element of the model, and this feature was never achievable for the previous 2D imaging. PMID:23365617

  11. Reconstructing the Curve-Skeletons of 3D Shapes Using the Visual Hull.

    PubMed

    Livesu, Marco; Guggeri, Fabio; Scateni, Riccardo

    2012-11-01

    Curve-skeletons are the most important descriptors for shapes, capable of capturing in a synthetic manner the most relevant features. They are useful for many different applications: from shape matching and retrieval, to medical imaging, to animation. This has led, over the years, to the development of several different techniques for extraction, each trying to comply with specific goals. We propose a novel technique which stems from the intuition of reproducing what a human being does to deduce the shape of an object holding it in his or her hand and rotating. To accomplish this, we use the formal definitions of epipolar geometry and visual hull. We show how it is possible to infer the curve-skeleton of a broad class of 3D shapes, along with an estimation of the radii of the maximal inscribed balls, by gathering information about the medial axes of their projections on the image planes of the stereographic vision. It is definitely worth to point out that our method works indifferently on (even unoriented) polygonal meshes, voxel models, and point clouds. Moreover, it is insensitive to noise, pose-invariant, resolution-invariant, and robust when applied to incomplete data sets.

  12. Ergodic theory and experimental visualization of chaos in 3D flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Mezic, Igor

    2000-11-01

    In his motivation for the ergodic hypothesis Gibbs invoked an analogy with fluid mixing: “…Yet no fact is more familiar to us than that stirring tends to bring a liquid to a state of uniform mixture, or uniform densities of its components…”. Although proof of the ergodic hypothesis is possible only for the simplest of systems using methods from ergodic theory, the use of the hypothesis has led to many accurate predictions in statistical mechanics. The problem of fluid mixing, however, turned out to be considerably more complicated than Gibbs envisioned. Chaotic advection can indeed lead to efficient mixing even in non-turbulent flows, but many non-mixed islands are known to persist within well-mixed regions. In numerical studies, Poincaré maps can be used to reveal the structure of such islands but their visualization in the laboratory requires laborious experimental procedures and is possible only for certain types of flows. Here we propose the first non-intrusive, simple to implement, and generally applicable technique for constructing experimental Poincaré maps and apply it to a steady, 3D, vortex breakdown bubble. We employ standard laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and construct Poincaré maps by time averaging a sufficiently long sequence of instantaneous LIF images. We also show that ergodic theory methods provide a rigorous theoretical justification for this approach whose main objective is to reveal the non-ergodic regions of the flow.

  13. 3D Visualization of Monte-Carlo Simulation's of HZE Track Structure and Initial Chemical Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Heavy ions biophysics is important for space radiation risk assessment [1] and hadron-therapy [2]. The characteristic of heavy ions tracks include a very high energy deposition region close to the track (<20 nm) denoted as the track core, and an outer penumbra region consisting of individual secondary electrons (6-rays). A still open question is the radiobiological effects of 6- rays relative to the track core. Of importance is the induction of double-strand breaks (DSB) [3] and oxidative damage to the biomolecules and the tissue matrix, considered the most important lesions for acute and long term effects of radiation. In this work, we have simulated a 56Fe26+ ion track of 1 GeV/amu with our Monte-Carlo code RITRACKS [4]. The simulation results have been used to calculate the energy depiction and initial chemical species in a "voxelized" space, which is then visualized in 3D. Several voxels with dose >1000 Gy are found in the penumbra, some located 0.1 mm from the track core. In computational models, the DSB induction probability is calculated with radial dose [6], which may not take into account the higher RBE of electron track ends for DSB induction. Therefore, these simulations should help improve models of DSB induction and our understanding of heavy ions biophysics.

  14. 3D visualization of sheath folds in Ancient Roman marble wall coverings from Ephesos, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Sebastian; Passchier, Cees W.; de Kemp, Eric A.; İlhan, Sinan

    2014-10-01

    Archaeological excavations and restoration of a palatial Roman housing complex in Ephesos, Turkey yielded 40 wall-decorating plates of folded mylonitic marble (Cipollino verde), derived from the internal Hellenides near Karystos, Greece. Cipollino verde was commonly used for decoration purposes in Roman buildings. The plates were serial-sectioned from a single quarried block of 1,25 m3 and provided a research opportunity for detailed reconstruction of the 3D geometry of meterscale folds in mylonitized marble. A GOCAD model is used to visualize the internal fold structures of the marble, comprising curtain folds and multilayered sheath folds. The sheath folds are unusual in that they have their intermediate axis normal to the parent layering. This agrees with regional tectonic studies, which suggest that Cipollino verde structures formed by local constrictional non-coaxial flow. Sheath fold cross-section geometry, exposed on the surface of a plate or outcrop, is found to be independent of the intersection angle of the fold structure with the studied plane. Consequently, a single surface cannot be used as an indicator of the three-dimensional geometry of transected sheath folds.

  15. Optoacoustic 3D visualization of changes in physiological properties of mouse tissues from live to postmortem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Richard; Ermiliov, Sergey A.; Liopo, Anton V.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2012-02-01

    Using the method of 3D optoacoustic tomography, we studied changes in tissues of the whole body of nude mice as the changes manifested themselves from live to postmortem. The studies provided the necessary baseline for optoacoustic imaging of necrotizing tissue, acute and chronic hypoxia, and reperfusion. They also establish a new optoacoustic model of early postmortem conditions of the whole mouse body. Animals were scanned in a 37°C water bath using a three-dimensional optoacoustic tomography system previously shown to provide high contrast maps of vasculature and organs based on changes in the optical absorbance. The scans were performed right before, 5 minutes after, 2 hours and 1 day after a lethal injection of KCl. The near-infrared laser wavelength of 765 nm was used to evaluate physiological features of postmortem changes. Our data showed that optoacoustic imaging is well suited for visualization of both live and postmortem tissues. The images revealed changes of optical properties in mouse organs and tissues. Specifically, we observed improvements in contrast of the vascular network and organs after the death of the animal. We associated these with reduced optical scattering, loss of motion artifacts, and blood coagulation.

  16. 3D Visual Data-Driven Spatiotemporal Deformations for Non-Rigid Object Grasping Using Robot Hands.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Carlos M; Gil, Pablo; Torres, Fernando

    2016-05-05

    Sensing techniques are important for solving problems of uncertainty inherent to intelligent grasping tasks. The main goal here is to present a visual sensing system based on range imaging technology for robot manipulation of non-rigid objects. Our proposal provides a suitable visual perception system of complex grasping tasks to support a robot controller when other sensor systems, such as tactile and force, are not able to obtain useful data relevant to the grasping manipulation task. In particular, a new visual approach based on RGBD data was implemented to help a robot controller carry out intelligent manipulation tasks with flexible objects. The proposed method supervises the interaction between the grasped object and the robot hand in order to avoid poor contact between the fingertips and an object when there is neither force nor pressure data. This new approach is also used to measure changes to the shape of an object's surfaces and so allows us to find deformations caused by inappropriate pressure being applied by the hand's fingers. Test was carried out for grasping tasks involving several flexible household objects with a multi-fingered robot hand working in real time. Our approach generates pulses from the deformation detection method and sends an event message to the robot controller when surface deformation is detected. In comparison with other methods, the obtained results reveal that our visual pipeline does not use deformations models of objects and materials, as well as the approach works well both planar and 3D household objects in real time. In addition, our method does not depend on the pose of the robot hand because the location of the reference system is computed from a recognition process of a pattern located place at the robot forearm. The presented experiments demonstrate that the proposed method accomplishes a good monitoring of grasping task with several objects and different grasping configurations in indoor environments.

  17. 3D Visual Data-Driven Spatiotemporal Deformations for Non-Rigid Object Grasping Using Robot Hands

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, Carlos M.; Gil, Pablo; Torres, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Sensing techniques are important for solving problems of uncertainty inherent to intelligent grasping tasks. The main goal here is to present a visual sensing system based on range imaging technology for robot manipulation of non-rigid objects. Our proposal provides a suitable visual perception system of complex grasping tasks to support a robot controller when other sensor systems, such as tactile and force, are not able to obtain useful data relevant to the grasping manipulation task. In particular, a new visual approach based on RGBD data was implemented to help a robot controller carry out intelligent manipulation tasks with flexible objects. The proposed method supervises the interaction between the grasped object and the robot hand in order to avoid poor contact between the fingertips and an object when there is neither force nor pressure data. This new approach is also used to measure changes to the shape of an object’s surfaces and so allows us to find deformations caused by inappropriate pressure being applied by the hand’s fingers. Test was carried out for grasping tasks involving several flexible household objects with a multi-fingered robot hand working in real time. Our approach generates pulses from the deformation detection method and sends an event message to the robot controller when surface deformation is detected. In comparison with other methods, the obtained results reveal that our visual pipeline does not use deformations models of objects and materials, as well as the approach works well both planar and 3D household objects in real time. In addition, our method does not depend on the pose of the robot hand because the location of the reference system is computed from a recognition process of a pattern located place at the robot forearm. The presented experiments demonstrate that the proposed method accomplishes a good monitoring of grasping task with several objects and different grasping configurations in indoor environments. PMID

  18. 3D Visualization of Solar Data: Preparing for Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, D.; Felix, S.; Meier, S.; Csillaghy, A.; Nicula, B.; Verstringe, F.; Bourgoignie, B.; Berghmans, D.; Jiggens, P.

    2014-12-01

    The next generation of ESA/NASA heliophysics missions, Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus, will focus on exploring the linkage between the Sun and the heliosphere. These new missions will collect unique data that will allow us to study, e.g., the coupling between macroscopic physical processes to those on kinetic scales, the generation of solar energetic particles and their propagation into the heliosphere and the origin and acceleration of solar wind plasma. Since 2010, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory returns 1.4 TB/day of high-resolution solar images, magnetograms and EUV irradiance data. Within a few years, the scientific community will thus have access to petabytes of multi­dimensional remote­sensing and complex in-situ observations from different vantage points, complemented by petabytes of simulation data. Answering overarching science questions like "How do solar transients drive heliospheric variability and space weather?" will only be possible if the community has the necessary tools at hand. As of today, there is an obvious lack of capability to both visualize these data and assimilate them into sophisticated models to advance our knowledge. A key piece needed to bridge the gap between observables, derived quantities like magnetic field extrapolations and model output is a tool to routinely and intuitively visualize large heterogeneous, multidimensional, time­dependent data sets. As of today, the space science community is lacking the means to do this (i) on a routine basis, (ii) for complex multi­dimensional data sets from various instruments and vantage points and (iii) in an extensible and modular way that is open for future improvements and interdisciplinary usage. In this contribution, we will present recent progress in visualizing the Sun and its magnetic field in 3D using the open-source JHelioviewer framework, which is part of the ESA/NASA Helioviewer Project. Among other features, JHelioviewer offers efficient region-of-interest-based data

  19. A 3D Visualization and Analysis Model of the Earth Orbit, Milankovitch Cycles and Insolation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinov, Tihomir; Gilb, Roy

    2013-04-01

    Milankovitch theory postulates that periodic variability of Earth's orbital elements is a major climate forcing mechanism. Although controversies remain, ample geologic evidence supports the major role of the Milankovitch cycles in climate, e.g. glacial-interglacial cycles. There are three Milankovitch orbital parameters: orbital eccentricity (main periodicities of ~100,000 and ~400,000 years), precession (quantified as the longitude of perihelion, main periodicities 19,000-24,000 years) and obliquity of the ecliptic (Earth's axial tilt, main periodicity 41,000 years). The combination of these parameters controls the spatio-temporal patterns of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the timing of the seasons with respect to perihelion, as well as season duration. The complex interplay of the Milankovitch orbital parameters on various time scales makes assessment and visualization of Earth's orbit and insolation variability challenging. It is difficult to appreciate the pivotal importance of Kepler's laws of planetary motion in controlling the effects of Milankovitch cycles on insolation patterns. These factors also make Earth-Sun geometry and Milankovitch theory difficult to teach effectively. Here, an astronomically precise and accurate Earth orbit visualization model is presented. The model offers 3D visualizations of Earth's orbital geometry, Milankovitch parameters and the ensuing insolation forcings. Both research and educational uses are envisioned for the model, which is developed in Matlab® as a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI). We present the user with a choice between the Berger et al. (1978) and Laskar et al. (2004) astronomical solutions for eccentricity, obliquity and precession. A "demo" mode is also available, which allows the three Milankovitch parameters to be varied independently of each other (and over much larger ranges than the naturally occurring ones), so the user can isolate the effects of each parameter on orbital geometry

  20. Improved Visualization of Intracranial Vessels with Intraoperative Coregistration of Rotational Digital Subtraction Angiography and Intraoperative 3D Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Podlesek, Dino; Meyer, Tobias; Morgenstern, Ute; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound can visualize and update the vessel status in real time during cerebral vascular surgery. We studied the depiction of parent vessels and aneurysms with a high-resolution 3D intraoperative ultrasound imaging system during aneurysm clipping using rotational digital subtraction angiography as a reference. Methods We analyzed 3D intraoperative ultrasound in 39 patients with cerebral aneurysms to visualize the aneurysm intraoperatively and the nearby vascular tree before and after clipping. Simultaneous coregistration of preoperative subtraction angiography data with 3D intraoperative ultrasound was performed to verify the anatomical assignment. Results Intraoperative ultrasound detected 35 of 43 aneurysms (81%) in 39 patients. Thirty-nine intraoperative ultrasound measurements were matched with rotational digital subtraction angiography and were successfully reconstructed during the procedure. In 7 patients, the aneurysm was partially visualized by 3D-ioUS or was not in field of view. Post-clipping intraoperative ultrasound was obtained in 26 and successfully reconstructed in 18 patients (69%) despite clip related artefacts. The overlap between 3D-ioUS aneurysm volume and preoperative rDSA aneurysm volume resulted in a mean accuracy of 0.71 (Dice coefficient). Conclusions Intraoperative coregistration of 3D intraoperative ultrasound data with preoperative rotational digital subtraction angiography is possible with high accuracy. It allows the immediate visualization of vessels beyond the microscopic field, as well as parallel assessment of blood velocity, aneurysm and vascular tree configuration. Although spatial resolution is lower than for standard angiography, the method provides an excellent vascular overview, advantageous interpretation of 3D-ioUS and immediate intraoperative feedback of the vascular status. A prerequisite for understanding vascular intraoperative ultrasound is image quality and a successful match with preoperative

  1. Do you see what I hear: experiments in multi-channel sound and 3D visualization for network monitoring?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballora, Mark; Hall, David L.

    2010-04-01

    Detection of intrusions is a continuing problem in network security. Due to the large volumes of data recorded in Web server logs, analysis is typically forensic, taking place only after a problem has occurred. This paper describes a novel method of representing Web log information through multi-channel sound, while simultaneously visualizing network activity using a 3-D immersive environment. We are exploring the detection of intrusion signatures and patterns, utilizing human aural and visual pattern recognition ability to detect intrusions as they occur. IP addresses and return codes are mapped to an informative and unobtrusive listening environment to act as a situational sound track of Web traffic. Web log data is parsed and formatted using Python, then read as a data array by the synthesis language SuperCollider [1], which renders it as a sonification. This can be done either for the study of pre-existing data sets or in monitoring Web traffic in real time. Components rendered aurally include IP address, geographical information, and server Return Codes. Users can interact with the data, speeding or slowing the speed of representation (for pre-existing data sets) or "mixing" sound components to optimize intelligibility for tracking suspicious activity.

  2. Evolution, Interaction, and Intrinsic Properties of Dislocations in Intermetallics: Anisotropic 3D Dislocation Dynamics Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qian

    2008-01-01

    The generation, motion, and interaction of dislocations play key roles during the plastic deformation process of crystalline solids. 3D Dislocation Dynamics has been employed as a mesoscale simulation algorithm to investigate the collective and cooperative behavior of dislocations. Most current research on 3D Dislocation Dynamics is based on the solutions available in the framework of classical isotropic elasticity. However, due to some degree of elastic anisotropy in almost all crystalline solids, it is very necessary to extend 3D Dislocation Dynamics into anisotropic elasticity. In this study, first, the details of efficient and accurate incorporation of the fully anisotropic elasticity into 3D discrete Dislocation Dynamics by numerically evaluating the derivatives of Green's functions are described. Then the intrinsic properties of perfect dislocations, including their stability, their core properties and disassociation characteristics, in newly discovered rare earth-based intermetallics and in conventional intermetallics are investigated, within the framework of fully anisotropic elasticity supplemented with the atomistic information obtained from the ab initio calculations. Moreover, the evolution and interaction of dislocations in these intermetallics as well as the role of solute segregation are presented by utilizing fully anisotropic 3D dislocation dynamics. The results from this work clearly indicate the role and the importance of elastic anisotropy on the evolution of dislocation microstructures, the overall ductility and the hardening behavior in these systems.

  3. 3D Visualization of near real-time remote-sensing observation for hurricanes field campaign using Google Earth API

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Turk, J.; Vu, Q.; Knosp, B.; Hristova-Veleva, S. M.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Poulsen, W. L.; Licata, S.

    2009-12-01

    NASA is planning a new field experiment, the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP), in the summer of 2010 to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. The DC-8 aircraft and the Global Hawk Unmanned Airborne System (UAS) will be deployed loaded with instruments for measurements including lightning, temperature, 3D wind, precipitation, liquid and ice water contents, aerosol and cloud profiles. During the field campaign, both the spaceborne and the airborne observations will be collected in real-time and integrated with the hurricane forecast models. This observation-model integration will help the campaign achieve its science goals by allowing team members to effectively plan the mission with current forecasts. To support the GRIP experiment, JPL developed a website for interactive visualization of all related remote-sensing observations in the GRIP’s geographical domain using the new Google Earth API. All the observations are collected in near real-time (NRT) with 2 to 5 hour latency. The observations include a 1KM blended Sea Surface Temperature (SST) map from GHRSST L2P products; 6-hour composite images of GOES IR; stability indices, temperature and vapor profiles from AIRS and AMSU-B; microwave brightness temperature and rain index maps from AMSR-E, SSMI and TRMM-TMI; ocean surface wind vectors, vorticity and divergence of the wind from QuikSCAT; the 3D precipitation structure from TRMM-PR and vertical profiles of cloud and precipitation from CloudSAT. All the NRT observations are collected from the data centers and science facilities at NASA and NOAA, subsetted, re-projected, and composited into hourly or daily data products depending on the frequency of the observation. The data products are then displayed on the 3D Google Earth plug-in at the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) website. The data products offered by the TCIS in the Google Earth display include image overlays, wind vectors, clickable

  4. 3D Sound Interactive Environments for Blind Children Problem Solving Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Jaime; Saenz, Mauricio

    2006-01-01

    Audio-based virtual environments have been increasingly used to foster cognitive and learning skills. A number of studies have also highlighted that the use of technology can help learners to develop effective skills such as motivation and self-esteem. This study presents the design and usability of 3D interactive environments for children with…

  5. 3D nitrogen-doped graphene/β-cyclodextrin: host-guest interactions for electrochemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jilun; Leng, Xuanye; Xiao, Yao; Hu, Chengguo; Fu, Lei

    2015-07-01

    Host-guest interactions, especially those between cyclodextrins (CDs, including α-, β- and γ-CD) and various guest molecules, exhibit a very high supramolecular recognition ability. Thus, they have received considerable attention in different fields. These specific interactions between host and guest molecules are promising for biosensing and clinical detection. However, there is a lack of an ideal electrode substrate for CDs to increase their performance in electrochemical sensing. Herein, we propose a new 3D nitrogen-doped graphene (3D-NG) based electrochemical sensor, taking advantage of the superior sensitivity of host-guest interactions. Our 3D-NG was fabricated by a template-directed chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method, and it showed a large specific surface area, a high capacity for biomolecules and a high electron transfer efficiency. Thus, for the first time, we took 3D-NG as an electrode substrate for β-CD to establish a new type of biosensor. Using dopamine (DA) and acetaminophen (APAP) as representative guest molecules, our 3D-NG/β-CD biosensor shows extremely high sensitivities (5468.6 μA mM-1 cm-2 and 2419.2 μA mM-1 cm-2, respectively), which are significantly higher than those reported in most previous studies. The stable adsorption of β-CD on 3D-NG indicates potential applications in clinical detection and medical testing.Host-guest interactions, especially those between cyclodextrins (CDs, including α-, β- and γ-CD) and various guest molecules, exhibit a very high supramolecular recognition ability. Thus, they have received considerable attention in different fields. These specific interactions between host and guest molecules are promising for biosensing and clinical detection. However, there is a lack of an ideal electrode substrate for CDs to increase their performance in electrochemical sensing. Herein, we propose a new 3D nitrogen-doped graphene (3D-NG) based electrochemical sensor, taking advantage of the superior sensitivity

  6. Enhanced sensory re-learning after nerve repair using 3D audio-visual signals and kinaesthesia--preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Schmidhammer, R; Hausner, T; Kröpfl, A; Huber, W; Hopf, R; Leixnering, M; Herz, H; Redl, H

    2007-01-01

    Sensory re-learning methods and basics on cortical reorganization after peripheral nerve lesion are well documented. The aim of enhanced sensory re-learning using 3D audio-visual signals and kinaesthetic training is the augmentation of cognitive memory (visual and acoustic sensory memory) and cognitive function for the improvement of cerebral plasticity processes and starts as soon as possible after nerve repair. Preliminary results are shown.

  7. Holographic particle velocimetry - A 3D measurement technique for vortex interactions, coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle

    1991-10-01

    To understand the topology and dynamics of coherent structures (CS), the interactions of CS with fine-scale turbulence, and the effects of CS on entrainment, mixing and combustion, experimental tools are needed that can measure velocity (preferably vorticity) vector fields in both 3D space and time. While traditional measurement techniques are not able to serve this purpose, holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) appears to be promising. In a demonstration experiment, the instantaneous 3D velocity vector fields in some simple vortical flows have been obtained using the HPV technique. In this preliminary report, the principles of the HPV technique are illustrated and the key issues in its implementation are discussed.

  8. 3D Visualization of "Frozen" Dynamic Magma Chambers in the Duluth Complex, Northeastern Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, D. M.; Hauck, S. A.

    2005-12-01

    The Mesoproterozoic Duluth Complex and associated intrusions of the Midcontinent Rift in northeastern Minnesota constitute one of the largest, semi-continuous, mafic intrusive complexes in the world, second only to the Bushveld Complex of South Africa. These rocks cover an arcuate area of over 5,000 square kilometers and give rise to two strong gravity anomalies (+50 & +70 mgal) that imply intrusive roots to more than 13 km depth. The geometry of three large mafic intrusions within the Duluth Complex have been modeled by the integration of field mapping and drill hole data with maps of gravity and magnetic anomalies. The igneous bodies include the South Kawishiwi, Partridge River, and Bald Eagle intrusions that collectively outcrop over an area of > 800 square kilometers. The South Kawishiwi and Partridge River intrusions host several billion tons of low-grade Cu-Ni-PGE mineralization near their base, while the geophysical expressions of the Bald Eagle intrusion have the same shape and dimensions as the "bulls eye" pattern of low velocity seismic reflection anomalies along the East Pacific Rise. These anomalies are interpreted to define regions of melt concentrations, i.e., active magma chambers. This suggests that the funnel-shaped Bald Eagle intrusion could be an example of a "frozen" dynamic magma chamber. In support of this analogy we note that the magmatic systems of intracontinental rifts, mid-ocean ridges, extensional regimes in back-arc environments, and ophiolites have a common characteristic: the emplacement of magma in extensional environments, and the common products in all four are varieties of layered intrusions, dikes and sills, and overlying volcanic rocks. 3D visualization of these intrusions is integral to the understanding of the Duluth Complex magmatic system and associated mineralization, and can be used as a proxy for study of similar systems, such as the Antarctic Ferrar dolerites, worldwide.

  9. Distortion-free wide-angle 3D imaging and visualization using off-axially distributed image sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Piao, Yongri; Kim, Nam-Woo; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2014-07-15

    We propose a new off-axially distributed image sensing (ODIS) using a wide-angle lens for reconstructing distortion-free wide-angle slice images computationally. In the proposed system, the wide-angle image sensor captures a wide-angle 3D scene, and thus the collected information of the 3D objects is severely distorted. To correct this distortion, we introduce a new correction process involving a wide-angle lens to the computational reconstruction in ODIS. This enables us to reconstruct distortion-free, wide-angle slice images for visualization of 3D objects. Experimental results are carried out to verify the proposed method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the use of a wide-angle lens in a multiple-perspective 3D imaging system is described.

  10. Movement-Based Estimation and Visualization of Space Use in 3D for Wildlife Ecology and Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Tracey, Jeff A.; Sheppard, James; Zhu, Jun; Wei, Fuwen; Swaisgood, Ronald R.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in digital biotelemetry technologies are enabling the collection of bigger and more accurate data on the movements of free-ranging wildlife in space and time. Although many biotelemetry devices record 3D location data with x, y, and z coordinates from tracked animals, the third z coordinate is typically not integrated into studies of animal spatial use. Disregarding the vertical component may seriously limit understanding of animal habitat use and niche separation. We present novel movement-based kernel density estimators and computer visualization tools for generating and exploring 3D home ranges based on location data. We use case studies of three wildlife species – giant panda, dugong, and California condor – to demonstrate the ecological insights and conservation management benefits provided by 3D home range estimation and visualization for terrestrial, aquatic, and avian wildlife research. PMID:24988114

  11. Movement-based estimation and visualization of space use in 3D for wildlife ecology and conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tracey, Jeff A.; Sheppard, James; Zhu, Jun; Wei, Fu-Wen; Swaisgood, Ronald R.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in digital biotelemetry technologies are enabling the collection of bigger and more accurate data on the movements of free-ranging wildlife in space and time. Although many biotelemetry devices record 3D location data with x, y, and z coordinates from tracked animals, the third z coordinate is typically not integrated into studies of animal spatial use. Disregarding the vertical component may seriously limit understanding of animal habitat use and niche separation. We present novel movement-based kernel density estimators and computer visualization tools for generating and exploring 3D home ranges based on location data. We use case studies of three wildlife species – giant panda, dugong, and California condor – to demonstrate the ecological insights and conservation management benefits provided by 3D home range estimation and visualization for terrestrial, aquatic, and avian wildlife research.

  12. Movement-based estimation and visualization of space use in 3D for wildlife ecology and conservation.

    PubMed

    Tracey, Jeff A; Sheppard, James; Zhu, Jun; Wei, Fuwen; Swaisgood, Ronald R; Fisher, Robert N

    2014-01-01

    Advances in digital biotelemetry technologies are enabling the collection of bigger and more accurate data on the movements of free-ranging wildlife in space and time. Although many biotelemetry devices record 3D location data with x, y, and z coordinates from tracked animals, the third z coordinate is typically not integrated into studies of animal spatial use. Disregarding the vertical component may seriously limit understanding of animal habitat use and niche separation. We present novel movement-based kernel density estimators and computer visualization tools for generating and exploring 3D home ranges based on location data. We use case studies of three wildlife species--giant panda, dugong, and California condor--to demonstrate the ecological insights and conservation management benefits provided by 3D home range estimation and visualization for terrestrial, aquatic, and avian wildlife research. PMID:24988114

  13. GIST: an interactive, GPU-based level set segmentation tool for 3D medical images.

    PubMed

    Cates, Joshua E; Lefohn, Aaron E; Whitaker, Ross T

    2004-09-01

    While level sets have demonstrated a great potential for 3D medical image segmentation, their usefulness has been limited by two problems. First, 3D level sets are relatively slow to compute. Second, their formulation usually entails several free parameters which can be very difficult to correctly tune for specific applications. The second problem is compounded by the first. This paper describes a new tool for 3D segmentation that addresses these problems by computing level-set surface models at interactive rates. This tool employs two important, novel technologies. First is the mapping of a 3D level-set solver onto a commodity graphics card (GPU). This mapping relies on a novel mechanism for GPU memory management. The interactive rates level-set PDE solver give the user immediate feedback on the parameter settings, and thus users can tune free parameters and control the shape of the model in real time. The second technology is the use of intensity-based speed functions, which allow a user to quickly and intuitively specify the behavior of the deformable model. We have found that the combination of these interactive tools enables users to produce good, reliable segmentations. To support this observation, this paper presents qualitative results from several different datasets as well as a quantitative evaluation from a study of brain tumor segmentations. PMID:15450217

  14. Visualizing 3D Objects from 2D Cross Sectional Images Displayed "In-Situ" versus "Ex-Situ"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Bing; Klatzky, Roberta L.; Stetten, George

    2010-01-01

    The present research investigates how mental visualization of a 3D object from 2D cross sectional images is influenced by displacing the images from the source object, as is customary in medical imaging. Three experiments were conducted to assess people's ability to integrate spatial information over a series of cross sectional images in order to…

  15. 3-D Surface Visualization of pH Titration "Topos": Equivalence Point Cliffs, Dilution Ramps, and Buffer Plateaus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Garon C.; Hossain, Md Mainul; MacCarthy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    3-D topographic surfaces ("topos") can be generated to visualize how pH behaves during titration and dilution procedures. The surfaces are constructed by plotting computed pH values above a composition grid with volume of base added in one direction and overall system dilution on the other. What emerge are surface features that…

  16. 3D flow visualization and tomographic particle image velocimetry for vortex breakdown over a non-slender delta wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, ChengYue; Gao, Qi; Wei, RunJie; Li, Tian; Wang, JinJun

    2016-06-01

    Volumetric measurement for the leading-edge vortex (LEV) breakdown of a delta wing has been conducted by three-dimensional (3D) flow visualization and tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV). The 3D flow visualization is employed to show the vortex structures, which was recorded by four cameras with high resolution. 3D dye streaklines of the visualization are reconstructed using a similar way of particle reconstruction in TPIV. Tomographic PIV is carried out at the same time using same cameras with the dye visualization. Q criterion is employed to identify the LEV. Results of tomographic PIV agree well with the reconstructed 3D dye streaklines, which proves the validity of the measurements. The time-averaged flow field based on TPIV is shown and described by sections of velocity and streamwise vorticity. Combining the two measurement methods sheds light on the complex structures of both bubble type and spiral type of breakdown. The breakdown position is recognized by investigating both the streaklines and TPIV velocity fields. Proper orthogonal decomposition is applied to extract a pair of conjugated helical instability modes from TPIV data. Therefore, the dominant frequency of the instability modes is obtained from the corresponding POD coefficients of the modes based on wavelet transform analysis.

  17. 3D Simulation Technology as an Effective Instructional Tool for Enhancing Spatial Visualization Skills in Apparel Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Juyeon; Kim, Dong-Eun; Sohn, MyungHee

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the effectiveness of 3D simulation technology for enhancing spatial visualization skills in apparel design education and further to suggest an innovative teaching approach using the technology. Apparel design majors in an introductory patternmaking course, at a large Midwestern University in the United…

  18. From digital mapping to GIS-based 3D visualization of geological maps: example from the Western Alps geological units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestro, Gianni; Cassulo, Roberto; Festa, Andrea; Fioraso, Gianfranco; Nicolò, Gabriele; Perotti, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    Collection of field geological data and sharing of geological maps are nowadays greatly enhanced by using digital tools and IT (Information Technology) applications. Portable hardware allows accurate GPS localization of data and homogeneous storing of information in field databases, whereas GIS (Geographic Information Systems) applications enable generalization of field data and realization of geological map databases. A further step in the digital processing of geological map information consists of building virtual visualization by means of GIS-based 3D viewers, that allow projection and draping of significant geological features over photo-realistic terrain models. Digital fieldwork activities carried out by the Authors in the Western Alps, together with building of geological map databases and related 3D visualizations, are an example of application of the above described digital technologies. Digital geological mapping was performed by means of a GIS mobile software loaded on a rugged handheld device, and lithological, structural and geomorphological features with their attributes were stored in different layers that form the field database. The latter was then generalized through usual map processing steps such as outcrops interpolation, characterization of geological boundaries and selection of meaningful punctual observations. This map databases was used for building virtual visualizations through a GIS-based 3D-viewer that loaded detailed DTM (resolution of 5 meters) and aerial images. 3D visualizations were focused on projection and draping of significant stratigraphic contacts (e.g. contacts that separate different Quaternary deposits) and tectonic contacts (i.e. exhumation-related contacts that dismembered original ophiolite sequences). In our experience digital geological mapping and related databases ensured homogeneous data storing and effective sharing of information, and allowed subsequent building of 3D GIS-based visualizations. The latters gave

  19. Visualizing Terrestrial and Aquatic Systems in 3D - in IEEE VisWeek 2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    The need for better visualization tools for environmental science is well documented, and the Visualization for Terrestrial and Aquatic Systems project (VISTAS) aims to both help scientists produce effective environmental science visualizations and to determine which visualizatio...

  20. 3D visualization of strain in abdominal aortic aneurysms based on navigated ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekken, Reidar; Kaspersen, Jon Harald; Tangen, Geir Arne; Dahl, Torbjørn; Hernes, Toril A. N.; Myhre, Hans Olav

    2007-03-01

    The criterion for recommending treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm is that the diameter exceeds 50-55 mm or shows a rapid increase. Our hypothesis is that a more accurate prediction of aneurysm rupture is obtained by estimating arterial wall strain from patient specific measurements. Measuring strain in specific parts of the aneurysm reveals differences in load or tissue properties. We have previously presented a method for in vivo estimation of circumferential strain by ultrasound. In the present work, a position sensor attached to the ultrasound probe was used for combining several 2D ultrasound sectors into a 3D model. The ultrasound was registered to a computed-tomography scan (CT), and the strain values were mapped onto a model segmented from these CT data. This gave an intuitive coupling between anatomy and strain, which may benefit both data acquisition and the interpretation of strain. In addition to potentially provide information relevant for assessing the rupture risk of the aneurysm in itself, this model could be used for validating simulations of fluid-structure interactions. Further, the measurements could be integrated with the simulations in order to increase the amount of patient specific information, thus producing a more reliable and accurate model of the biomechanics of the individual aneurysm. This approach makes it possible to extract several parameters potentially relevant for predicting rupture risk, and may therefore extend the basis for clinical decision making.

  1. CFL3D Contribution to the AIAA Supersonic Shock Boundary Layer Interaction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper documents the CFL3D contribution to the AIAA Supersonic Shock Boundary Layer Interaction Workshop, held in Orlando, Florida in January 2010. CFL3D is a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code. Four shock boundary layer interaction cases are computed using a one-equation turbulence model widely used for other aerodynamic problems of interest. Two of the cases have experimental data available at the workshop, and two of the cases do not. The effect of grid, flux scheme, and thin-layer approximation are investigated. Comparisons are made to the available experimental data. All four cases exhibit strong three-dimensional behavior in and near the interaction regions, resulting from influences of the tunnel side-walls.

  2. Earth Orbit v2.1: a 3-D visualization and analysis model of Earth's orbit, Milankovitch cycles and insolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinov, T. S.; Gilb, R.

    2014-06-01

    Milankovitch theory postulates that periodic variability of Earth's orbital elements is a major climate forcing mechanism, causing, for example, the contemporary glacial-interglacial cycles. There are three Milankovitch orbital parameters: orbital eccentricity, precession and obliquity. The interaction of the amplitudes, periods and phases of these parameters controls the spatio-temporal patterns of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the timing and duration of the seasons. This complexity makes Earth-Sun geometry and Milankovitch theory difficult to teach effectively. Here, we present "Earth Orbit v2.1": an astronomically precise and accurate model that offers 3-D visualizations of Earth's orbital geometry, Milankovitch parameters and the ensuing insolation forcing. The model is developed in MATLAB® as a user-friendly graphical user interface. Users are presented with a choice between the Berger (1978a) and Laskar et al. (2004) astronomical solutions for eccentricity, obliquity and precession. A "demo" mode is also available, which allows the Milankovitch parameters to be varied independently of each other, so that users can isolate the effects of each parameter on orbital geometry, the seasons, and insolation. A 3-D orbital configuration plot, as well as various surface and line plots of insolation and insolation anomalies on various time and space scales are produced. Insolation computations use the model's own orbital geometry with no additional a priori input other than the Milankovitch parameter solutions. Insolation output and the underlying solar declination computation are successfully validated against the results of Laskar et al. (2004) and Meeus (1998), respectively. The model outputs some ancillary parameters as well, e.g., Earth's radius-vector length, solar declination and day length for the chosen date and latitude. Time-series plots of the Milankovitch parameters and several relevant paleoclimatological data sets can be produced. Both

  3. Earth Orbit v2.1: a 3-D visualization and analysis model of Earth's orbit, Milankovitch cycles and insolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinov, T. S.; Gilb, R.

    2013-11-01

    Milankovitch theory postulates that periodic variability of Earth's orbital elements is a major climate forcing mechanism, causing, for example, the contemporary glacial-interglacial cycles. There are three Milankovitch orbital parameters: orbital eccentricity, precession and obliquity. The interaction of the amplitudes, periods and phases of these parameters controls the spatio-temporal patterns of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the timing of the seasons with respect to perihelion. This complexity makes Earth-Sun geometry and Milankovitch theory difficult to teach effectively. Here, we present "Earth Orbit v2.1": an astronomically precise and accurate model that offers 3-D visualizations of Earth's orbital geometry, Milankovitch parameters and the ensuing insolation forcing. The model is developed in MATLAB® as a user-friendly graphical user interface. Users are presented with a choice between the Berger (1978a) and Laskar et al. (2004) astronomical solutions for eccentricity, obliquity and precession. A "demo" mode is also available, which allows the Milankovitch parameters to be varied independently of each other, so that users can isolate the effects of each parameter on orbital geometry, the seasons, and insolation. A 3-D orbital configuration plot, as well as various surface and line plots of insolation and insolation anomalies on various time and space scales are produced. Insolation computations use the model's own orbital geometry with no additional a priori input other than the Milankovitch parameter solutions. Insolation output and the underlying solar declination computation are successfully validated against the results of Laskar et al. (2004) and Meeus (1998), respectively. The model outputs some ancillary parameters as well, e.g. Earth's radius-vector length, solar declination and day length for the chosen date and latitude. Time-series plots of the Milankovitch parameters and EPICA ice core CO2 and temperature data can be produced. Both

  4. Towards Perceptual Interface for Visualization Navigation of Large Data Sets Using Gesture Recognition with Bezier Curves and Registered 3-D Data

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, M C; Tsap, L V; Goldgof, D B

    2003-03-20

    This paper presents a gesture recognition system for visualization navigation. Scientists are interested in developing interactive settings for exploring large data sets in an intuitive environment. The input consists of registered 3-D data. A geometric method using Bezier curves is used for the trajectory analysis and classification of gestures. The hand gesture speed is incorporated into the algorithm to enable correct recognition from trajectories with variations in hand speed. The method is robust and reliable: correct hand identification rate is 99.9% (from 1641 frames), modes of hand movements are correct 95.6% of the time, recognition rate (given the right mode) is 97.9%. An application to gesture-controlled visualization of 3D bioinformatics data is also presented.

  5. Functional metabolic interactions of human neuron-astrocyte 3D in vitro networks

    PubMed Central

    Simão, Daniel; Terrasso, Ana P.; Teixeira, Ana P.; Brito, Catarina; Sonnewald, Ursula; Alves, Paula M.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of human neural tissue-like 3D structures holds great promise for disease modeling, drug discovery and regenerative medicine strategies. Promoting the establishment of complex cell-cell interactions, 3D culture systems enable the development of human cell-based models with increased physiological relevance, over monolayer cultures. Here, we demonstrate the establishment of neuronal and astrocytic metabolic signatures and shuttles in a human 3D neural cell model, namely the glutamine-glutamate-GABA shuttle. This was indicated by labeling of neuronal GABA following incubation with the glia-specific substrate [2-13C]acetate, which decreased by methionine sulfoximine-induced inhibition of the glial enzyme glutamine synthetase. Cell metabolic specialization was further demonstrated by higher pyruvate carboxylase-derived labeling in glutamine than in glutamate, indicating its activity in astrocytes and not in neurons. Exposure to the neurotoxin acrylamide resulted in intracellular accumulation of glutamate and decreased GABA synthesis. These results suggest an acrylamide-induced impairment of neuronal synaptic vesicle trafficking and imbalanced glutamine-glutamate-GABA cycle, due to loss of cell-cell contacts at synaptic sites. This work demonstrates, for the first time to our knowledge, that neural differentiation of human cells in a 3D setting recapitulates neuronal-astrocytic metabolic interactions, highlighting the relevance of these models for toxicology and better understanding the crosstalk between human neural cells. PMID:27619889

  6. Functional metabolic interactions of human neuron-astrocyte 3D in vitro networks.

    PubMed

    Simão, Daniel; Terrasso, Ana P; Teixeira, Ana P; Brito, Catarina; Sonnewald, Ursula; Alves, Paula M

    2016-01-01

    The generation of human neural tissue-like 3D structures holds great promise for disease modeling, drug discovery and regenerative medicine strategies. Promoting the establishment of complex cell-cell interactions, 3D culture systems enable the development of human cell-based models with increased physiological relevance, over monolayer cultures. Here, we demonstrate the establishment of neuronal and astrocytic metabolic signatures and shuttles in a human 3D neural cell model, namely the glutamine-glutamate-GABA shuttle. This was indicated by labeling of neuronal GABA following incubation with the glia-specific substrate [2-(13)C]acetate, which decreased by methionine sulfoximine-induced inhibition of the glial enzyme glutamine synthetase. Cell metabolic specialization was further demonstrated by higher pyruvate carboxylase-derived labeling in glutamine than in glutamate, indicating its activity in astrocytes and not in neurons. Exposure to the neurotoxin acrylamide resulted in intracellular accumulation of glutamate and decreased GABA synthesis. These results suggest an acrylamide-induced impairment of neuronal synaptic vesicle trafficking and imbalanced glutamine-glutamate-GABA cycle, due to loss of cell-cell contacts at synaptic sites. This work demonstrates, for the first time to our knowledge, that neural differentiation of human cells in a 3D setting recapitulates neuronal-astrocytic metabolic interactions, highlighting the relevance of these models for toxicology and better understanding the crosstalk between human neural cells. PMID:27619889

  7. Functional metabolic interactions of human neuron-astrocyte 3D in vitro networks.

    PubMed

    Simão, Daniel; Terrasso, Ana P; Teixeira, Ana P; Brito, Catarina; Sonnewald, Ursula; Alves, Paula M

    2016-01-01

    The generation of human neural tissue-like 3D structures holds great promise for disease modeling, drug discovery and regenerative medicine strategies. Promoting the establishment of complex cell-cell interactions, 3D culture systems enable the development of human cell-based models with increased physiological relevance, over monolayer cultures. Here, we demonstrate the establishment of neuronal and astrocytic metabolic signatures and shuttles in a human 3D neural cell model, namely the glutamine-glutamate-GABA shuttle. This was indicated by labeling of neuronal GABA following incubation with the glia-specific substrate [2-(13)C]acetate, which decreased by methionine sulfoximine-induced inhibition of the glial enzyme glutamine synthetase. Cell metabolic specialization was further demonstrated by higher pyruvate carboxylase-derived labeling in glutamine than in glutamate, indicating its activity in astrocytes and not in neurons. Exposure to the neurotoxin acrylamide resulted in intracellular accumulation of glutamate and decreased GABA synthesis. These results suggest an acrylamide-induced impairment of neuronal synaptic vesicle trafficking and imbalanced glutamine-glutamate-GABA cycle, due to loss of cell-cell contacts at synaptic sites. This work demonstrates, for the first time to our knowledge, that neural differentiation of human cells in a 3D setting recapitulates neuronal-astrocytic metabolic interactions, highlighting the relevance of these models for toxicology and better understanding the crosstalk between human neural cells.

  8. GeoBuilder: a geometric algorithm visualization and debugging system for 2D and 3D geometric computing.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jyh-Da; Tsai, Ming-Hung; Lee, Gen-Cher; Huang, Jeng-Hung; Lee, Der-Tsai

    2009-01-01

    Algorithm visualization is a unique research topic that integrates engineering skills such as computer graphics, system programming, database management, computer networks, etc., to facilitate algorithmic researchers in testing their ideas, demonstrating new findings, and teaching algorithm design in the classroom. Within the broad applications of algorithm visualization, there still remain performance issues that deserve further research, e.g., system portability, collaboration capability, and animation effect in 3D environments. Using modern technologies of Java programming, we develop an algorithm visualization and debugging system, dubbed GeoBuilder, for geometric computing. The GeoBuilder system features Java's promising portability, engagement of collaboration in algorithm development, and automatic camera positioning for tracking 3D geometric objects. In this paper, we describe the design of the GeoBuilder system and demonstrate its applications. PMID:19147888

  9. Three-dimensional (3D) visualization of reflow porosity and modeling of deformation in Pb-free solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, M.A.; Hunter, L.; Kranz, S.; Williams, J.J.; Lau, S.H.; Chawla, N.

    2010-04-15

    The volume, size, and dispersion of porosity in solder joints are known to affect mechanical performance and reliability. Most of the techniques used to characterize the three-dimensional (3D) nature of these defects are destructive. With the enhancements in high resolution computed tomography (CT), the detection limits of intrinsic microstructures have been significantly improved. Furthermore, the 3D microstructure of the material can be used in finite element models to understand their effect on microscopic deformation. In this paper we describe a technique utilizing high resolution (< 1 {mu}m) X-ray tomography for the three-dimensional (3D) visualization of pores in Sn-3.9Ag-0.7Cu/Cu joints. The characteristics of reflow porosity, including volume fraction and distribution, were investigated for two reflow profiles. The size and distribution of porosity size were visualized in 3D for four different solder joints. In addition, the 3D virtual microstructure was incorporated into a finite element model to quantify the effect of voids on the lap shear behavior of a solder joint. The presence, size, and location of voids significantly increased the severity of strain localization at the solder/copper interface.

  10. Spatial Reasoning with External Visualizations: What Matters Is What You See, Not whether You Interact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keehner, Madeleine; Hegarty, Mary; Cohen, Cheryl; Khooshabeh, Peter; Montello, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Three experiments examined the effects of interactive visualizations and spatial abilities on a task requiring participants to infer and draw cross sections of a three-dimensional (3D) object. The experiments manipulated whether participants could interactively control a virtual 3D visualization of the object while performing the task, and…

  11. High-Resolution Multibeam Sonar Survey and Interactive 3-D Exploration of the D-Day Wrecks off Normandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, L. A.; Calder, B.; Schmidt, J. S.

    2003-12-01

    Historically, archaeological investigations use sidescan sonar and marine magnetometers as initial search tools. Targets are then examined through direct observation by divers, video, or photographs. Magnetometers can demonstrate the presence, absence, and relative susceptibility of ferrous objects but provide little indication of the nature of the target. Sidescan sonar can present a clear image of the overall nature of a target and its surrounding environment, but the sidescan image is often distorted and contains little information about the true 3-D shape of the object. Optical techniques allow precise identification of objects but suffer from very limited range, even in the best of situations. Modern high-resolution multibeam sonar offers an opportunity to cover a relatively large area from a safe distance above the target, while resolving the true three-dimensional (3-D) shape of the object with centimeter-level resolution. The combination of 3-D mapping and interactive 3-D visualization techniques provides a powerful new means to explore underwater artifacts. A clear demonstration of the applicability of high-resolution multibeam sonar to wreck and artifact investigations occurred when the Naval Historical Center (NHC), the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (CCOM) at the University of New Hampshire, and Reson Inc., collaborated to explore the state of preservation and impact on the surrounding environment of a series of wrecks located off the coast of Normandy, France, adjacent to the American landing sectors The survey augmented previously collected magnetometer and high-resolution sidescan sonar data using a Reson 8125 high-resolution focused multibeam sonar with 240, 0.5° (at nadir) beams distributed over a 120° swath. The team investigated 21 areas in water depths ranging from about three -to 30 meters (m); some areas contained individual targets such as landing craft, barges, a destroyer, troop carrier, etc., while others contained multiple smaller

  12. The 3D Visualization of Slope Terrain in Sun Moon Lake.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, F.; Gwo-shyn, S.; Pei-Kun, L.

    2015-12-01

    side-slope using the multi-beam sounder below the water surface. Finally, the image of the side-scan sonar is taken and merges with contour lines produced from underwater topographic DTM data. Combining those data, our purpose is by creating different 3D images to have good visualization checking the data of side-slope DTM surveys if they are in well qualified controlled.

  13. Analysis and Visualization of 3D Motion Data for UPDRS Rating of Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Piro, Neltje E; Piro, Lennart K; Kassubek, Jan; Blechschmidt-Trapp, Ronald A

    2016-01-01

    Remote monitoring of Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients with inertia sensors is a relevant method for a better assessment of symptoms. We present a new approach for symptom quantification based on motion data: the automatic Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) classification in combination with an animated 3D avatar giving the neurologist the impression of having the patient live in front of him. In this study we compared the UPDRS ratings of the pronation-supination task derived from: (a) an examination based on video recordings as a clinical reference; (b) an automatically classified UPDRS; and (c) a UPDRS rating from the assessment of the animated 3D avatar. Data were recorded using Magnetic, Angular Rate, Gravity (MARG) sensors with 15 subjects performing a pronation-supination movement of the hand. After preprocessing, the data were classified with a J48 classifier and animated as a 3D avatar. Video recording of the movements, as well as the 3D avatar, were examined by movement disorder specialists and rated by UPDRS. The mean agreement between the ratings based on video and (b) the automatically classified UPDRS is 0.48 and with (c) the 3D avatar it is 0.47. The 3D avatar is similarly suitable for assessing the UPDRS as video recordings for the examined task and will be further developed by the research team. PMID:27338400

  14. Identifying Key Structural Features and Spatial Relationships in Archean Microbialites Using 2D and 3D Visualization Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, E. W.; Sumner, D. Y.

    2009-12-01

    Microbialites in the 2521 ± 3 Ma Gamohaan Formation, South Africa, have several different end-member morphologies which show distinct growth structures and spatial relationships. We characterized several growth structures and spatial relationships in two samples (DK20 and 2_06) using a combination of 2D and 3D analytical techniques. There are two main goals in studying complicated microbialites with a combination of 2D and 3D methods. First, one can better understand microbialite growth by identifying important structures and structural relationships. Once structures are identified, the order in which the structures formed and how they are related can be inferred from observations of crosscutting relationships. Second, it is important to use both 2D and 3D methods to correlate 3D observations with those in 2D that are more common in the field. Combining analysis provides significantly more insight into the 3D morphology of microbial structures. In our studies, 2D analysis consisted of describing polished slabs and serial sections created by grinding down the rock 100 microns at a time. 3D analysis was performed on serial sections visualized in 3D using Vrui and 3DVisualizer software developed at KeckCAVES, UCD (http://keckcaves.org). Data were visualized on a laptop and in an immersive cave system. Both samples contain microbial laminae and more vertically orients microbial "walls" called supports. The relationships between these features created voids now filled with herringbone and blocky calcite crystals. DK20, a classic plumose structure, contains two types of support structures. Both are 1st order structures (1st order structures with organic inclusions and 1st without organic inclusions) interpreted as planar features based on 2D analysis. In the 2D analysis the 1st order structures show v branching relationships as well as single cuspate relationships (two 1st order structures with inclusions merging upward), and single tented relationships (three supports

  15. LATIS3D: The Gold Standard for Laser-Tissue-Interaction Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Makarewicz, A.M.; Kim, B.M.; Gentile, N.A.; Yang, Y.B.; Brlik, M.; Vincent, L.

    2000-02-29

    The goal of this LDRD project has been to create LATIS3D--the world's premier computer program for laser-tissue interaction modeling. The development was based on recent experience with the 2D LATIS code and the ASCI code, KULL. With LATIS3D, important applications in laser medical therapy were researched including dynamical calculations of tissue emulsification and ablation, photothermal therapy, and photon transport for photodynamic therapy. This project also enhanced LLNL's core competency in laser-matter interactions and high-energy-density physics by pushing simulation codes into new parameter regimes and by attracting external expertise. This will benefit both existing LLNL programs such as ICF and SBSS and emerging programs in medical technology and other laser applications.

  16. The 3-D Navier-Stokes analysis of crossing, glancing shocks/turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    Three dimensional viscous flow analysis is performed for a configuration where two crossing and glancing shocks interact with a turbulent boundary layer. A time marching 3-D full Navier-Stokes code, called PARC3D, is used to compute the flow field, and the solution is compared to the experimental data obtained at the NASA Lewis Research Center's 1 x 1 ft supersonic wind tunnel facility. The study is carried out as part of the continuing code assessment program in support of the generic hypersonic research at NASA Lewis. Detailed comparisons of static pressure fields and oil flow patterns are made with the corresponding solution on the wall containing the shock/boundary layer interaction in an effort to validate the code for hypersonic inlet applications.

  17. 3-D Navier-Stokes analysis of crossing, glancing shocks/turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    Three dimensional viscous flow analysis is performed for a configuration where two crossing and glancing shocks interact with a turbulent boundary layer. A time marching 3-D full Navier-Stokes code, called PARC3D, is used to compute the flow field, and the solution is compared to the experimental data obtained at the NASA Lewis Research Center's 1 x 1 ft supersonic wind tunnel facility. The study is carried out as part of the continuing code assessment program in support of the generic hypersonic research at NASA Lewis. Detailed comparisons of static pressure fields and oil flow patterns are made with the corresponding solution on the wall containing the shock/boundary layer interaction in an effort to validate the code for hypersonic inlet applications.

  18. 3D interactive augmented reality-enhanced digital learning systems for mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Kai-Ten; Tseng, Po-Hsuan; Chiu, Pei-Shuan; Yang, Jia-Lin; Chiu, Chun-Jie

    2013-03-01

    With enhanced processing capability of mobile platforms, augmented reality (AR) has been considered a promising technology for achieving enhanced user experiences (UX). Augmented reality is to impose virtual information, e.g., videos and images, onto a live-view digital display. UX on real-world environment via the display can be e ectively enhanced with the adoption of interactive AR technology. Enhancement on UX can be bene cial for digital learning systems. There are existing research works based on AR targeting for the design of e-learning systems. However, none of these work focuses on providing three-dimensional (3-D) object modeling for en- hanced UX based on interactive AR techniques. In this paper, the 3-D interactive augmented reality-enhanced learning (IARL) systems will be proposed to provide enhanced UX for digital learning. The proposed IARL systems consist of two major components, including the markerless pattern recognition (MPR) for 3-D models and velocity-based object tracking (VOT) algorithms. Realistic implementation of proposed IARL system is conducted on Android-based mobile platforms. UX on digital learning can be greatly improved with the adoption of proposed IARL systems.

  19. WWW creates new interactive 3D graphics and collaborative environments for medical research and education.

    PubMed

    Samothrakis, S; Arvanitis, T N; Plataniotis, A; McNeill, M D; Lister, P F

    1997-11-01

    Virtual Reality Modelling Language (VRML) is the start of a new era for medicine and the World Wide Web (WWW). Scientists can use VRML across the Internet to explore new three-dimensional (3D) worlds, share concepts and collaborate together in a virtual environment. VRML enables the generation of virtual environments through the use of geometric, spatial and colour data structures to represent 3D objects and scenes. In medicine, researchers often want to interact with scientific data, which in several instances may also be dynamic (e.g. MRI data). This data is often very large and is difficult to visualise. A 3D graphical representation can make the information contained in such large data sets more understandable and easier to interpret. Fast networks and satellites can reliably transfer large data sets from computer to computer. This has led to the adoption of remote tale-working in many applications including medical applications. Radiology experts, for example, can view and inspect in near real-time a 3D data set acquired from a patient who is in another part of the world. Such technology is destined to improve the quality of life for many people. This paper introduces VRML (including some technical details) and discusses the advantages of VRML in application developing. PMID:9506396

  20. 3D modeling of ultrasonic wave interaction with disbonds and weak bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, C.; Hinders, M.

    2012-05-01

    Ultrasonic techniques, such as the use of guided waves, can be ideal for finding damage in the plate and pipe-like structures used in aerospace applications. However, the interaction of waves with real flaw types and geometries can lead to experimental signals that are difficult to interpret. 3-dimensional (3D) elastic wave simulations can be a powerful tool in understanding the complicated wave scattering involved in flaw detection and for optimizing experimental techniques. We have developed and implemented parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (3D EFIT) code to investigate Lamb wave scattering from realistic flaws. This paper discusses simulation results for an aluminum-aluminum diffusion disbond and an aluminum-epoxy disbond and compares results from the disbond case to the common artificial flaw type of a flat-bottom hole. The paper also discusses the potential for extending the 3D EFIT equations to incorporate physics-based weak bond models for simulating wave scattering from weak adhesive bonds.

  1. 3D Modeling of Ultrasonic Wave Interaction with Disbonds and Weak Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, C.; Hinders, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic techniques, such as the use of guided waves, can be ideal for finding damage in the plate and pipe-like structures used in aerospace applications. However, the interaction of waves with real flaw types and geometries can lead to experimental signals that are difficult to interpret. 3-dimensional (3D) elastic wave simulations can be a powerful tool in understanding the complicated wave scattering involved in flaw detection and for optimizing experimental techniques. We have developed and implemented parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (3D EFIT) code to investigate Lamb wave scattering from realistic flaws. This paper discusses simulation results for an aluminum-aluminum diffusion disbond and an aluminum-epoxy disbond and compares results from the disbond case to the common artificial flaw type of a flat-bottom hole. The paper also discusses the potential for extending the 3D EFIT equations to incorporate physics-based weak bond models for simulating wave scattering from weak adhesive bonds.

  2. Load Assembly of the Ignitor Machine with 3D Interactive Virtual Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliori, S.; Pierattini, S.

    2003-10-01

    The main purpose of this work is to assist the Ignitor team in every phase of the project using the new Virtual Reality Technology (VR). Through the VR it is possible to see, plan and test the machine assembly sequence and the total layout. We are also planning to simulate in VR the remote handling systems. The complexity of the system requires a large and powerful graphical device. The ENEA?s "Advanced Visualization Technology" team has implemented a repository file data structure integrated with the CATIA drawing cams from the designer of Ignitor. The 3D virtual mockup software is used to view and analyze all objects that compose the mockup and also to analyze the correct assembly sequences. The ENEA?s 3D immersive system and software are fully integrated in the ENEA?s supercomputing GRID infrastructure. At any time all members of the Ignitor Project can view the status of the mockup in 3D (draft and/or final objects) through the net. During the conference examples of the assembly sequence and load assembly structure will be presented.

  3. 3-D visualization and identification of biological microorganisms using partially temporal incoherent light in-line computational holographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Moon, Inkyu; Javidi, Bahram

    2008-12-01

    We present a new method for three-dimensional (3-D) visualization and identification of biological microorganisms using partially temporal incoherent light in-line (PTILI) computational holographic imaging and multivariate statistical methods. For 3-D data acquisition of biological microorganisms, the band-pass filtered white light is used to illuminate a biological sample. The transversely and longitudinally diffracted pattern of the biological sample is magnified by microscope objective (MO) and is optically recorded with an image sensor array interfaced with a computer. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the biological sample from the diffraction pattern is accomplished by using computational Fresnel propagation method. Principal components analysis and nonparametric inference algorithms are applied to the 3-D complex amplitude biological sample for identification purposes. Experiments indicate that the proposed system can be useful for identifying biological microorganisms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on using PTILI computational holographic microscopy for identification of biological microorganisms.

  4. Controlled implant/soft tissue interaction by nanoscale surface modifications of 3D porous titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Elisabeth; Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Salou, Laetitia; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Helene; Layrolle, Pierre; Debry, Christian; Lavalle, Philippe; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2015-06-01

    Porous titanium implants are widely employed in the orthopaedics field to ensure good bone fixation. Recently, the use of porous titanium implants has also been investigated in artificial larynx development in a clinical setting. Such uses necessitate a better understanding of the interaction of soft tissues with porous titanium structures. Moreover, surface treatments of titanium have been generally evaluated in planar structures, while the porous titanium implants have complex 3 dimensional (3D) architectures. In this study, the determining factors for soft tissue integration of 3D porous titanium implants were investigated as a function of surface treatments via quantification of the interaction of serum proteins and cells with single titanium microbeads (300-500 μm in diameter). Samples were either acid etched or nanostructured by anodization. When the samples are used in 3D configuration (porous titanium discs of 2 mm thickness) in vivo (in subcutis of rats for 2 weeks), a better integration was observed for both anodized and acid etched samples compared to the non-treated implants. If the implants were also pre-treated with rat serum before implantation, the integration was further facilitated. In order to understand the underlying reasons for this effect, human fibroblast cell culture tests under several conditions (directly on beads, beads in suspension, beads encapsulated in gelatin hydrogels) were conducted to mimic the different interactions of cells with Ti implants in vivo. Physical characterization showed that surface treatments increased hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and roughness. Surface treatments also resulted in improved adsorption of serum albumin which in turn facilitated the adsorption of other proteins such as apolipoprotein as quantified by protein sequencing. The cellular response to the beads showed considerable difference with respect to the cell culture configuration. When the titanium microbeads were entrapped in cell

  5. Mutational analysis of the complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21)-C3d interaction reveals a putative charged SCR1 binding site for C3d.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Jonathan P; Young, Kendra A; Guthridge, Joel M; Asokan, Rengasamy; Szakonyi, Gerda; Chen, Xiaojiang S; Holers, V Michael

    2005-02-25

    We have characterized the interaction between the first two short consensus repeats (SCR1-2) of complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) and C3d in solution, by utilising the available crystal structures of free and C3d-bound forms of CR2 to create a series of informative mutations targeting specific areas of the CR2-C3d complex. Wild-type and mutant forms of CR2 were expressed on the surface of K562 erythroleukemia cells and their binding ability assessed using C3dg-biotin tetramers complexed to fluorochrome conjugated streptavidin and measured by flow cytometry. Mutations directed at the SCR2-C3d interface (R83A, R83E, G84Y) were found to strongly disrupt C3dg binding, supporting the conclusion that the SCR2 interface reflected in the crystal structure is correct. Previous epitope and peptide mapping studies have also indicated that the PILN11GR13IS sequence of the first inter-cysteine region of SCR1 is essential for the binding of iC3b. Mutations targeting residues within or in close spatial proximity to this area (N11A, N11E, R13A, R13E, Y16A, S32A, S32E), and a number of other positively charged residues located primarily on a contiguous face of SCR1 (R28A, R28E, R36A, R36E, K41A, K41E, K50A, K50E, K57A, K57E, K67A, K67E), have allowed us to reassess those regions on SCR1 that are essential for CR2-C3d binding. The nature of this interaction and the possibility of a direct SCR1-C3d association are discussed extensively. Finally, a D52N mutant was constructed introducing an N-glycosylation sequence at an area central to the CR2 dimer interface. This mutation was designed to disrupt the CR2-C3d interaction, either directly through steric inhibition, or indirectly through disruption of a physiological dimer. However, no difference in C3dg binding relative to wild-type CR2 could be observed for this mutant, suggesting that the dimer may only be found in the crystal form of CR2.

  6. Mutational analysis of the complement receptor type 2 (CR2/CD21)-C3d interaction reveals a putative charged SCR1 binding site for C3d.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Jonathan P; Young, Kendra A; Guthridge, Joel M; Asokan, Rengasamy; Szakonyi, Gerda; Chen, Xiaojiang S; Holers, V Michael

    2005-02-25

    We have characterized the interaction between the first two short consensus repeats (SCR1-2) of complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) and C3d in solution, by utilising the available crystal structures of free and C3d-bound forms of CR2 to create a series of informative mutations targeting specific areas of the CR2-C3d complex. Wild-type and mutant forms of CR2 were expressed on the surface of K562 erythroleukemia cells and their binding ability assessed using C3dg-biotin tetramers complexed to fluorochrome conjugated streptavidin and measured by flow cytometry. Mutations directed at the SCR2-C3d interface (R83A, R83E, G84Y) were found to strongly disrupt C3dg binding, supporting the conclusion that the SCR2 interface reflected in the crystal structure is correct. Previous epitope and peptide mapping studies have also indicated that the PILN11GR13IS sequence of the first inter-cysteine region of SCR1 is essential for the binding of iC3b. Mutations targeting residues within or in close spatial proximity to this area (N11A, N11E, R13A, R13E, Y16A, S32A, S32E), and a number of other positively charged residues located primarily on a contiguous face of SCR1 (R28A, R28E, R36A, R36E, K41A, K41E, K50A, K50E, K57A, K57E, K67A, K67E), have allowed us to reassess those regions on SCR1 that are essential for CR2-C3d binding. The nature of this interaction and the possibility of a direct SCR1-C3d association are discussed extensively. Finally, a D52N mutant was constructed introducing an N-glycosylation sequence at an area central to the CR2 dimer interface. This mutation was designed to disrupt the CR2-C3d interaction, either directly through steric inhibition, or indirectly through disruption of a physiological dimer. However, no difference in C3dg binding relative to wild-type CR2 could be observed for this mutant, suggesting that the dimer may only be found in the crystal form of CR2. PMID:15713467

  7. Fusion of CTA and XA data using 3D centerline registration for plaque visualization during coronary intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaila, Gaurav; Kitslaar, Pieter; Tu, Shengxian; Penicka, Martin; Dijkstra, Jouke; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn

    2016-03-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) results in the buildup of plaque below the intima layer inside the vessel wall of the coronary arteries causing narrowing of the vessel and obstructing blood flow. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is usually done to enlarge the vessel lumen and regain back normal flow of blood to the heart. During PCI, X-ray imaging is done to assist guide wire movement through the vessels to the area of stenosis. While X-ray imaging allows for good lumen visualization, information on plaque type is unavailable. Also due to the projection nature of the X-ray imaging, additional drawbacks such as foreshortening and overlap of vessels limit the efficacy of the cardiac intervention. Reconstruction of 3D vessel geometry from biplane X-ray acquisitions helps to overcome some of these projection drawbacks. However, the plaque type information remains an issue. In contrast, imaging using computed tomography angiography (CTA) can provide us with information on both lumen and plaque type and allows us to generate a complete 3D coronary vessel tree unaffected by the foreshortening and overlap problems of the X-ray imaging. In this paper, we combine x-ray biplane images with CT angiography to visualize three plaque types (dense calcium, fibrous fatty and necrotic core) on x-ray images. 3D registration using three different registration methods is done between coronary centerlines available from x-ray images and from the CTA volume along with 3D plaque information available from CTA. We compare the different registration methods and evaluate their performance based on 3D root mean squared errors. Two methods are used to project this 3D information onto 2D plane of the x-ray biplane images. Validation of our approach is performed using artificial biplane x-ray datasets.

  8. Isoparametric 3-D Finite Element Mesh Generation Using Interactive Computer Graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayrak, C.; Ozsoy, T.

    1985-01-01

    An isoparametric 3-D finite element mesh generator was developed with direct interface to an interactive geometric modeler program called POLYGON. POLYGON defines the model geometry in terms of boundaries and mesh regions for the mesh generator. The mesh generator controls the mesh flow through the 2-dimensional spans of regions by using the topological data and defines the connectivity between regions. The program is menu driven and the user has a control of element density and biasing through the spans and can also apply boundary conditions, loads interactively.

  9. BRAGI: linking and visualization of database information in a 3D viewer and modeling tool.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Joachim; Dieterich, Guido; Kvesic, Marsel; Schomburg, Dietmar; Heinz, Dirk W

    2005-04-01

    BRAGI is a well-established package for viewing and modeling of three-dimensional (3D) structures of biological macromolecules. A new version of BRAGI has been developed that is supported on Windows, Linux and SGI. The user interface has been rewritten to give the standard 'look and feel' of the chosen operating system and to provide a more intuitive, easier usage. A large number of new features have been added. Information from public databases such as SWISS-PROT, InterPro, DALI and OMIM can be displayed in the 3D viewer. Structures can be searched for homologous sequences using the NCBI BLAST server.

  10. Studying Host-Pathogen Interactions In 3-D: Organotypic Models For Infectious Disease And Drug Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Richter, Emily G.; Ott, C. Mark

    2006-01-01

    Representative, reproducible and high-throughput models of human cells and tissues are critical for a meaningful evaluation of host-pathogen interactions and are an essential component of the research developmental pipeline. The most informative infection models - animals, organ explants and human trials - are not suited for extensive evaluation of pathogenesis mechanisms and screening of candidate drugs. At the other extreme, more cost effective and accessible infection models such as conventional cell culture and static co-culture may not capture physiological and three-dimensional aspects of tissue biology that are important in assessing pathogenesis, and effectiveness and cytotoxicity of therapeutics. Our lab has used innovative bioengineering technology to establish biologically meaningful 3-D models of human tissues that recapitulate many aspects of the differentiated structure and function of the parental tissue in vivo, and we have applied these models to study infectious disease. We have established a variety of different 3-D models that are currently being used in infection studies - including small intestine, colon, lung, placenta, bladder, periodontal ligament, and neuronal models. Published work from our lab has shown that our 3-D models respond to infection with bacterial and viral pathogens in ways that reflect the infection process in vivo. By virtue of their physiological relevance, 3-D cell cultures may also hold significant potential as models to provide insight into the neuropathogenesis of HIV infection. Furthermore, the experimental flexibility, reproducibility, cost-efficiency, and high throughput platform afforded by these 3-D models may have important implications for the design and development of drugs with which to effectively treat neurological complications of HIV infection.

  11. Application of 3D WebGIS and real-time technique in earthquake information publishing and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Boren; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Mao; Huang, Jing

    2015-06-01

    In hazard management, earthquake researchers have utilized GIS to ease the process of managing disasters. Researchers use WebGIS to assess hazards and seismic risk. Although they can provide a visual analysis platform based on GIS technology, they lack a general description in the extensibility of WebGIS for processing dynamic data, especially real-time data. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for real-time 3D visual earthquake information publishing model based on WebGIS and digital globe to improve the ability of processing real-time data in systems based on WebGIS. On the basis of the model, we implement a real-time 3D earthquake information publishing system—EqMap3D. The system can not only publish real-time earthquake information but also display these data and their background geoscience information in a 3D scene. It provides a powerful tool for display, analysis, and decision-making for researchers and administrators. It also facilitates better communication between researchers engaged in geosciences and the interested public.

  12. Techniques for Assessing 3-D Cell-Matrix Mechanical Interactions In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Miron-Mendoza, Miguel; Koppaka, Vindhya; Zhou, Chengxin; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Cellular interactions with extracellular matrices (ECM) through the application of mechanical forces mediate numerous biological processes including developmental morphogenesis, wound healing and cancer metastasis. They also play a key role in the cellular repopulation and/or remodeling of engineered tissues and organs. While 2-D studies can provide important insights into many aspects of cellular mechanobiology, cells reside within 3-D ECMs in vivo, and matrix structure and dimensionality have been shown to impact cell morphology, protein organization and mechanical behavior. Global measurements of cell-induced compaction of 3-D collagen matrices can provide important insights into the regulation of overall cell contractility by various cytokines and signaling pathways. However, to understand how the mechanics of cell spreading, migration, contraction and matrix remodeling are regulated at the molecular level, these processes must also be studied in individual cells. Here we review the evolution and application of techniques for imaging and assessing local cell-matrix mechanical interactions in 3-D culture models, tissue explants and living animals. PMID:23819988

  13. Development of a Top-View Numeric Coding Teaching-Learning Trajectory within an Elementary Grades 3-D Visualization Design Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sack, Jacqueline J.

    2013-01-01

    This article explicates the development of top-view numeric coding of 3-D cube structures within a design research project focused on 3-D visualization skills for elementary grades children. It describes children's conceptual development of 3-D cube structures using concrete models, conventional 2-D pictures and abstract top-view numeric…

  14. PROTEOME-3D: an interactive bioinformatics tool for large-scale data exploration and knowledge discovery.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Deborah H; Eng, Jimmy; Wright, Michael E; Han, David K

    2003-11-01

    Comprehensive understanding of biological systems requires efficient and systematic assimilation of high-throughput datasets in the context of the existing knowledge base. A major limitation in the field of proteomics is the lack of an appropriate software platform that can synthesize a large number of experimental datasets in the context of the existing knowledge base. Here, we describe a software platform, termed PROTEOME-3D, that utilizes three essential features for systematic analysis of proteomics data: creation of a scalable, queryable, customized database for identified proteins from published literature; graphical tools for displaying proteome landscapes and trends from multiple large-scale experiments; and interactive data analysis that facilitates identification of crucial networks and pathways. Thus, PROTEOME-3D offers a standardized platform to analyze high-throughput experimental datasets for the identification of crucial players in co-regulated pathways and cellular processes. PMID:12960178

  15. PROTEOME-3D: An Interactive Bioinformatics Tool for Large-Scale Data Exploration and Knowledge Discovery*

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Deborah H.; Eng, Jimmy; Wright, Michael E.; Han, David K.

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of biological systems requires efficient and systematic assimilation of high-throughput datasets in the context of the existing knowledge base. A major limitation in the field of proteomics is the lack of an appropriate software platform that can synthesize a large number of experimental datasets in the context of the existing knowledge base. Here, we describe a software platform, termed PROTEOME-3D, that utilizes three essential features for systematic analysis of proteomics data: creation of a scalable, queryable, customized database for identified proteins from published literature; graphical tools for displaying proteome landscapes and trends from multiple large-scale experiments; and interactive data analysis that facilitates identification of crucial networks and pathways. Thus, PROTEOME-3D offers a standardized platform to analyze high-throughput experimental datasets for the identification of crucial players in co-regulated pathways and cellular processes. PMID:12960178

  16. Interaction and behaviour imaging: a novel method to measure mother-infant interaction using video 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Leclère, C; Avril, M; Viaux-Savelon, S; Bodeau, N; Achard, C; Missonnier, S; Keren, M; Feldman, R; Chetouani, M; Cohen, D

    2016-05-24

    Studying early interaction is essential for understanding development and psychopathology. Automatic computational methods offer the possibility to analyse social signals and behaviours of several partners simultaneously and dynamically. Here, 20 dyads of mothers and their 13-36-month-old infants were videotaped during mother-infant interaction including 10 extremely high-risk and 10 low-risk dyads using two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) sensors. From 2D+3D data and 3D space reconstruction, we extracted individual parameters (quantity of movement and motion activity ratio for each partner) and dyadic parameters related to the dynamics of partners heads distance (contribution to heads distance), to the focus of mutual engagement (percentage of time spent face to face or oriented to the task) and to the dynamics of motion activity (synchrony ratio, overlap ratio, pause ratio). Features are compared with blind global rating of the interaction using the coding interactive behavior (CIB). We found that individual and dyadic parameters of 2D+3D motion features perfectly correlates with rated CIB maternal and dyadic composite scores. Support Vector Machine classification using all 2D-3D motion features classified 100% of the dyads in their group meaning that motion behaviours are sufficient to distinguish high-risk from low-risk dyads. The proposed method may present a promising, low-cost methodology that can uniquely use artificial technology to detect meaningful features of human interactions and may have several implications for studying dyadic behaviours in psychiatry. Combining both global rating scales and computerized methods may enable a continuum of time scale from a summary of entire interactions to second-by-second dynamics.

  17. Interaction and behaviour imaging: a novel method to measure mother–infant interaction using video 3D reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Leclère, C; Avril, M; Viaux-Savelon, S; Bodeau, N; Achard, C; Missonnier, S; Keren, M; Feldman, R; Chetouani, M; Cohen, D

    2016-01-01

    Studying early interaction is essential for understanding development and psychopathology. Automatic computational methods offer the possibility to analyse social signals and behaviours of several partners simultaneously and dynamically. Here, 20 dyads of mothers and their 13–36-month-old infants were videotaped during mother–infant interaction including 10 extremely high-risk and 10 low-risk dyads using two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) sensors. From 2D+3D data and 3D space reconstruction, we extracted individual parameters (quantity of movement and motion activity ratio for each partner) and dyadic parameters related to the dynamics of partners heads distance (contribution to heads distance), to the focus of mutual engagement (percentage of time spent face to face or oriented to the task) and to the dynamics of motion activity (synchrony ratio, overlap ratio, pause ratio). Features are compared with blind global rating of the interaction using the coding interactive behavior (CIB). We found that individual and dyadic parameters of 2D+3D motion features perfectly correlates with rated CIB maternal and dyadic composite scores. Support Vector Machine classification using all 2D–3D motion features classified 100% of the dyads in their group meaning that motion behaviours are sufficient to distinguish high-risk from low-risk dyads. The proposed method may present a promising, low-cost methodology that can uniquely use artificial technology to detect meaningful features of human interactions and may have several implications for studying dyadic behaviours in psychiatry. Combining both global rating scales and computerized methods may enable a continuum of time scale from a summary of entire interactions to second-by-second dynamics. PMID:27219342

  18. Controlled implant/soft tissue interaction by nanoscale surface modifications of 3D porous titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Elisabeth; Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Salou, Laetitia; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Helene; Layrolle, Pierre; Debry, Christian; Lavalle, Philippe; Engin Vrana, Nihal

    2015-05-01

    Porous titanium implants are widely employed in the orthopaedics field to ensure good bone fixation. Recently, the use of porous titanium implants has also been investigated in artificial larynx development in a clinical setting. Such uses necessitate a better understanding of the interaction of soft tissues with porous titanium structures. Moreover, surface treatments of titanium have been generally evaluated in planar structures, while the porous titanium implants have complex 3 dimensional (3D) architectures. In this study, the determining factors for soft tissue integration of 3D porous titanium implants were investigated as a function of surface treatments via quantification of the interaction of serum proteins and cells with single titanium microbeads (300-500 μm in diameter). Samples were either acid etched or nanostructured by anodization. When the samples are used in 3D configuration (porous titanium discs of 2 mm thickness) in vivo (in subcutis of rats for 2 weeks), a better integration was observed for both anodized and acid etched samples compared to the non-treated implants. If the implants were also pre-treated with rat serum before implantation, the integration was further facilitated. In order to understand the underlying reasons for this effect, human fibroblast cell culture tests under several conditions (directly on beads, beads in suspension, beads encapsulated in gelatin hydrogels) were conducted to mimic the different interactions of cells with Ti implants in vivo. Physical characterization showed that surface treatments increased hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and roughness. Surface treatments also resulted in improved adsorption of serum albumin which in turn facilitated the adsorption of other proteins such as apolipoprotein as quantified by protein sequencing. The cellular response to the beads showed considerable difference with respect to the cell culture configuration. When the titanium microbeads were entrapped in cell

  19. Design and application of real-time visual attention model for the exploration of 3D virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Hillaire, Sébastien; Lécuyer, Anatole; Regia-Corte, Tony; Cozot, Rémi; Royan, Jérôme; Breton, Gaspard

    2012-03-01

    This paper studies the design and application of a novel visual attention model designed to compute user's gaze position automatically, i.e., without using a gaze-tracking system. The model we propose is specifically designed for real-time first-person exploration of 3D virtual environments. It is the first model adapted to this context which can compute in real time a continuous gaze point position instead of a set of 3D objects potentially observed by the user. To do so, contrary to previous models which use a mesh-based representation of visual objects, we introduce a representation based on surface-elements. Our model also simulates visual reflexes and the cognitive processes which take place in the brain such as the gaze behavior associated to first-person navigation in the virtual environment. Our visual attention model combines both bottom-up and top-down components to compute a continuous gaze point position on screen that hopefully matches the user's one. We conducted an experiment to study and compare the performance of our method with a state-of-the-art approach. Our results are found significantly better with sometimes more than 100 percent of accuracy gained. This suggests that computing a gaze point in a 3D virtual environment in real time is possible and is a valid approach, compared to object-based approaches. Finally, we expose different applications of our model when exploring virtual environments. We present different algorithms which can improve or adapt the visual feedback of virtual environments based on gaze information. We first propose a level-of-detail approach that heavily relies on multiple-texture sampling. We show that it is possible to use the gaze information of our visual attention model to increase visual quality where the user is looking, while maintaining a high-refresh rate. Second, we introduce the use of the visual attention model in three visual effects inspired by the human visual system namely: depth-of-field blur, camera

  20. Design and application of real-time visual attention model for the exploration of 3D virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Hillaire, Sébastien; Lécuyer, Anatole; Regia-Corte, Tony; Cozot, Rémi; Royan, Jérôme; Breton, Gaspard

    2012-03-01

    This paper studies the design and application of a novel visual attention model designed to compute user's gaze position automatically, i.e., without using a gaze-tracking system. The model we propose is specifically designed for real-time first-person exploration of 3D virtual environments. It is the first model adapted to this context which can compute in real time a continuous gaze point position instead of a set of 3D objects potentially observed by the user. To do so, contrary to previous models which use a mesh-based representation of visual objects, we introduce a representation based on surface-elements. Our model also simulates visual reflexes and the cognitive processes which take place in the brain such as the gaze behavior associated to first-person navigation in the virtual environment. Our visual attention model combines both bottom-up and top-down components to compute a continuous gaze point position on screen that hopefully matches the user's one. We conducted an experiment to study and compare the performance of our method with a state-of-the-art approach. Our results are found significantly better with sometimes more than 100 percent of accuracy gained. This suggests that computing a gaze point in a 3D virtual environment in real time is possible and is a valid approach, compared to object-based approaches. Finally, we expose different applications of our model when exploring virtual environments. We present different algorithms which can improve or adapt the visual feedback of virtual environments based on gaze information. We first propose a level-of-detail approach that heavily relies on multiple-texture sampling. We show that it is possible to use the gaze information of our visual attention model to increase visual quality where the user is looking, while maintaining a high-refresh rate. Second, we introduce the use of the visual attention model in three visual effects inspired by the human visual system namely: depth-of-field blur, camera

  1. Triplet superconductivity in 3D Dirac semi-metal due to exchange interaction.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Baruch; Shapiro, B Ya; Li, Dingping; Shapiro, I

    2015-01-21

    Conventional phonon-electron interaction induces either triplet or one of two (degenerate) singlet pairing states in time reversal and inversion invariant 3D Dirac semi-metal. Investigation of the order parameters and energies of these states at zero temperature in a wide range of values of chemical potential μ, the effective electron-electron coupling constant λ and Debye energy TD demonstrates that when the exchange interaction is neglected the singlet always prevails, however, in significant portions of the (μ, λ, TD) parameter space the energy difference is very small. This means that interactions that are small, but discriminate between the spin singlet and the spin triplet, are important in order to determine the nature of the superconducting order there. The best candidate for such an interaction in the materials under consideration is the exchange (the Stoner term) characterized by constant λex. We show that at values of λex, much smaller than ones creating Stoner instability to ferromagnetism λex ∼ 1, the triplet pairing becomes energetically favored over the singlet ones. The 3D quantum critical point at μ = 0 is considered in detail. This can be realized experimentally in optically trapped cold atom systems. PMID:25501668

  2. Triplet superconductivity in 3D Dirac semi-metal due to exchange interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenstein, Baruch; Shapiro, B. Ya; Li, Dingping; Shapiro, I.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional phonon-electron interaction induces either triplet or one of two (degenerate) singlet pairing states in time reversal and inversion invariant 3D Dirac semi-metal. Investigation of the order parameters and energies of these states at zero temperature in a wide range of values of chemical potential μ, the effective electron-electron coupling constant λ and Debye energy TD demonstrates that when the exchange interaction is neglected the singlet always prevails, however, in significant portions of the (μ, λ, TD) parameter space the energy difference is very small. This means that interactions that are small, but discriminate between the spin singlet and the spin triplet, are important in order to determine the nature of the superconducting order there. The best candidate for such an interaction in the materials under consideration is the exchange (the Stoner term) characterized by constant λex. We show that at values of λex, much smaller than ones creating Stoner instability to ferromagnetism λex ˜ 1, the triplet pairing becomes energetically favored over the singlet ones. The 3D quantum critical point at μ = 0 is considered in detail. This can be realized experimentally in optically trapped cold atom systems.

  3. Time-lapse 3D electrical resistivity tomography to monitor soil-plant interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, Jacopo; Rossi, Matteo; Cassiani, Giorgio; Putti, Mario

    2013-04-01

    In this work we present the application of time-lapse non-invasive 3D micro- electrical tomography (ERT) to monitor soil-plant interactions in the root zone in the framework of the FP7 Project CLIMB (Climate Induced Changes on the Hydrology of Mediterranean Basins). The goal of the study is to gain a better understanding of the soil-vegetation interactions by the use of non-invasive techniques. We designed, built and installed a 3D electrical tomography apparatus for the monitoring of the root zone of a single apple tree in an orchard located in the Trentino region, Northern Italy. The micro-ERT apparatus consists of 48 buried electrodes on 4 instrumented micro boreholes plus 24 mini-electrodes on the surface spaced 0.1 m on a square grid. We collected repeated ERT and TDR soil moisture measurements for one year and performed two different controlled irrigation tests: one during a very dry Summer and one during a very wet and highly dynamic plant growing Spring period. We also ran laboratory analyses on soil specimens, in order to evaluate the electrical response at different saturation steps. The results demonstrate that 3D micro-ERT is capable of characterizing subsoil conditions and monitoring root zone activities, especially in terms of root zone suction regions. In particular, we note that in very dry conditions, 3D micro ERT can image water plumes in the shallow subsoil produced by a drip irrigation system. In the very dynamic growing season, under abundant irrigation, micro 3D ERT can detect the main suction zones caused by the tree root activity. Even though the quantitative use of this technique for moisture content balance suffers from well-known inversion difficulties, even the pure imaging of the active root zone is a valuable contribution. However the integration of the measurements in a fully coupled hydrogeophysical inversion is the way forward for a better understanding of subsoil interactions between biomass, hydrosphere and atmosphere.

  4. Novel Scientific Visualization Interfaces for Interactive Information Visualization and Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, I.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2012-12-01

    rainfall conditions are available in the IFIS. 2D and 3D interactive visualizations in the IFIS make the data more understandable to general public. Users are able to filter data sources for their communities and selected rivers. The data and information on IFIS is also accessible through web services and mobile applications. The IFIS is optimized for various browsers and screen sizes to provide access through multiple platforms including tablets and mobile devices. Multiple view modes in the IFIS accommodate different user types from general public to researchers and decision makers by providing different level of tools and details. River view mode allows users to visualize data from multiple IFC bridge sensors and USGS stream gauges to follow flooding condition along a river. The IFIS will help communities make better-informed decisions on the occurrence of floods, and will alert communities in advance to help minimize damage of floods.

  5. Managing Construction Operations Visually: 3-D Techniques for Complex Topography and Restricted Visibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Walter; Opdenbosh, Augusto; Santamaria, Juan Carlos

    2006-01-01

    Visual information is vital in planning and managing construction operations, particularly, where there is complex terrain topography and salvage operations with limited accessibility and visibility. From visually-assessing site operations and preventing equipment collisions to simulating material handling activities to supervising remotes sites…

  6. Interplay between 3d-3d and 3d-4f interactions at the origin of the magnetic ordering in the Ba2LnFeO5 oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Asish K.; Hardy, Vincent; Caignaert, Vincent; Raveau, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    A new family of oxides in which 3d-3d and 3d-4f interactions are of comparable strength has been synthesized and characterized both from structural and physical viewpoints. These compounds of formulation Ba2LnFeO5 (Ln  =  Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) are isotypic to the perovskite derivative Ba2YFeO5. They exhibit an original structure consisting of isolated FeO4 tetrahedra linked via LnO6 (or YO6) octahedra. Magnetic and calorimetric measurements show that all these compounds exhibit a unique, antiferromagnetic transition involving both the 3d and 4f ions. The antiferromagnetic properties of the Ln  =  Y phase (non-magnetic Y3+) and of the Ln  =  Eu (non-magnetic ground state multiplet of Eu3+) are ascribed to super-super exchange Fe-O-O-Fe interactions, leading to the lowest T N (5.5 K for Y and 4.6 K for Eu). The introduction of a magnetic lanthanide, i.e. Ln  =  Sm, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, in the octahedral sites, leads to larger T N values (up to 9.8 K for Ln  =  Yb). It is found that several mechanisms must be taken into account to explain the complex evolution of the magnetic properties along the Ba2LnFeO5 series. In particular, the super-exchange Ln-O-Fe, as well as the on-site Ln3+ magnetocrystalline anisotropy, are suggested to play crucial roles. This Ba2LnFeO5 series offers a rare opportunity to investigate experimentally a situation where the 3d-3d and 3d-4f interactions co-operate on an equal footing to trigger a unique long-range magnetic ordering in insulating oxides.

  7. Using 3D visual tools with LiDAR for environmental outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, N. F.; Mannel, S.; Ehinger, S.; Moore, C.

    2009-12-01

    The project objective is to develop visualizations using light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and other data sources to increase community understanding of remote sensing data for earth science. These data are visualized using Google Earth and other visualization methods. Final products are delivered to K-12, state, and federal agencies to share with their students and community constituents. Once our partner agencies were identified, we utilized a survey method to better understand their technological abilities and use of visualization products. The final multimedia products include a visualization of LiDAR and well data for water quality mapping in a southeastern Idaho watershed; a tour of hydrologic points of interest in southeastern Idaho visited by thousands of people each year, and post-earthquake features near Borah Peak, Idaho. In addition to the customized multimedia materials, we developed tutorials to encourage our partners to utilize these tools with their own LiDAR and other scientific data.

  8. Visual-vestibular interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Laurence R.; Merfeld, D.

    1994-01-01

    Significant progress was achieved during the period of this grant on a number of different fronts. A list of publications, abstracts, and theses supported by this grant is provided at the end of this document. The completed studies focused on three general areas: eye movements induced by dynamic linear acceleration, eye movements and vection reports induced by visual roll stimulation, and the separation of gravito-inertial force into central estimates of gravity and linear acceleration.

  9. 3D interferometric microscope: color visualization of engineered surfaces for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, Joanna; Novak, Matt; Bui, Son

    2015-09-01

    3D microscopes based on white light interference (WLI) provide precise measurement for the topography of engineering surfaces. However, the display of an object in its true colors as observed under white illumination is often desired; this traditionally has presented a challenge for WLI-based microscopes. Such 3D color display is appealing to the eye and great for presentations, and also provides fast evaluation of certain characteristics like defects, delamination, or deposition of different materials. Determination of color as observed by interferometric objectives is not straightforward; we will present how color imaging capabilities similar to an ordinary microscope can be obtained in interference microscopes based on WLI and we will give measurement and imaging examples of a few industrial samples.

  10. Formalizing the potential of stereoscopic 3D user experience in interactive entertainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Masuch, Maic

    2015-03-01

    The use of stereoscopic 3D vision affects how interactive entertainment has to be developed as well as how it is experienced by the audience. The large amount of possibly impacting factors and variety as well as a certain subtlety of measured effects on user experience make it difficult to grasp the overall potential of using S3D vision. In a comprehensive approach, we (a) present a development framework which summarizes possible variables in display technology, content creation and human factors, and (b) list a scheme of S3D user experience effects concerning initial fascination, emotions, performance, and behavior as well as negative feelings of discomfort and complexity. As a major contribution we propose a qualitative formalization which derives dependencies between development factors and user effects. The argumentation is based on several previously published user studies. We further show how to apply this formula to identify possible opportunities and threats in content creation as well as how to pursue future steps for a possible quantification.

  11. RNA Bricks--a database of RNA 3D motifs and their interactions.

    PubMed

    Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Walen, Tomasz; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2014-01-01

    The RNA Bricks database (http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/rnabricks), stores information about recurrent RNA 3D motifs and their interactions, found in experimentally determined RNA structures and in RNA-protein complexes. In contrast to other similar tools (RNA 3D Motif Atlas, RNA Frabase, Rloom) RNA motifs, i.e. 'RNA bricks' are presented in the molecular environment, in which they were determined, including RNA, protein, metal ions, water molecules and ligands. All nucleotide residues in RNA bricks are annotated with structural quality scores that describe real-space correlation coefficients with the electron density data (if available), backbone geometry and possible steric conflicts, which can be used to identify poorly modeled residues. The database is also equipped with an algorithm for 3D motif search and comparison. The algorithm compares spatial positions of backbone atoms of the user-provided query structure and of stored RNA motifs, without relying on sequence or secondary structure information. This enables the identification of local structural similarities among evolutionarily related and unrelated RNA molecules. Besides, the search utility enables searching 'RNA bricks' according to sequence similarity, and makes it possible to identify motifs with modified ribonucleotide residues at specific positions.

  12. FlySanDiego: a web-aware 3D interactive regional information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukas, David S.; Bailey, Michael J.

    2002-03-01

    Communication of regional geographic information to the population as a whole should be a municipal priority, but sadly it is not. From traffic patterns to weather information to emergency information to proposed highways, a city or county has, in electronic form, all of this useful information and more. With the ubiquity of web browsers and the arrival of online 3D graphics technologies such as VRML and Java 3D,this information could and should be made available. By using Java andJava3D, the rendering power of an OpenGL-type application can be combined with multithreading, allowing a program to invisibly access data sets from Internet sites with dedicated threads while processing user interaction with another. Any type of relevant data can be transformed into a three-dimensional interpretation and mapped over the terrain that the user is analyzing. This prototype is designed to be extremely extensible and expandable in order to accommodate future revisions and/or portability. This paper discusses the issues surrounding the creation of such a model, along with challenges, problems, and solutions.

  13. Web GIS in practice V: 3-D interactive and real-time mapping in Second Life

    PubMed Central

    Boulos, Maged N Kamel; Burden, David

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes technologies from Daden Limited for geographically mapping and accessing live news stories/feeds, as well as other real-time, real-world data feeds (e.g., Google Earth KML feeds and GeoRSS feeds) in the 3-D virtual world of Second Life, by plotting and updating the corresponding Earth location points on a globe or some other suitable form (in-world), and further linking those points to relevant information and resources. This approach enables users to visualise, interact with, and even walk or fly through, the plotted data in 3-D. Users can also do the reverse: put pins on a map in the virtual world, and then view the data points on the Web in Google Maps or Google Earth. The technologies presented thus serve as a bridge between mirror worlds like Google Earth and virtual worlds like Second Life. We explore the geo-data display potential of virtual worlds and their likely convergence with mirror worlds in the context of the future 3-D Internet or Metaverse, and reflect on the potential of such technologies and their future possibilities, e.g. their use to develop emergency/public health virtual situation rooms to effectively manage emergencies and disasters in real time. The paper also covers some of the issues associated with these technologies, namely user interface accessibility and individual privacy. PMID:18042275

  14. Web GIS in practice V: 3-D interactive and real-time mapping in Second Life.

    PubMed

    Boulos, Maged N Kamel; Burden, David

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes technologies from Daden Limited for geographically mapping and accessing live news stories/feeds, as well as other real-time, real-world data feeds (e.g., Google Earth KML feeds and GeoRSS feeds) in the 3-D virtual world of Second Life, by plotting and updating the corresponding Earth location points on a globe or some other suitable form (in-world), and further linking those points to relevant information and resources. This approach enables users to visualise, interact with, and even walk or fly through, the plotted data in 3-D. Users can also do the reverse: put pins on a map in the virtual world, and then view the data points on the Web in Google Maps or Google Earth. The technologies presented thus serve as a bridge between mirror worlds like Google Earth and virtual worlds like Second Life. We explore the geo-data display potential of virtual worlds and their likely convergence with mirror worlds in the context of the future 3-D Internet or Metaverse, and reflect on the potential of such technologies and their future possibilities, e.g. their use to develop emergency/public health virtual situation rooms to effectively manage emergencies and disasters in real time. The paper also covers some of the issues associated with these technologies, namely user interface accessibility and individual privacy. PMID:18042275

  15. A 3D printed nano bone matrix for characterization of breast cancer cell and osteoblast interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Castro, Nathan J.; Cui, Haitao; Zhou, Xuan; Boualam, Benchaa; McGrane, Robert; Glazer, Robert I.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-08-01

    Bone metastasis is one of the most prevalent complications of late-stage breast cancer, in which the native bone matrix components, including osteoblasts, are intimately involved in tumor progression. The development of a successful in vitro model would greatly facilitate understanding the underlying mechanism of breast cancer bone invasion as well as provide a tool for effective discovery of novel therapeutic strategies. In the current study, we fabricated a series of in vitro bone matrices composed of a polyethylene glycol hydrogel and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite of varying concentrations to mimic the native bone microenvironment for the investigation of breast cancer bone metastasis. A stereolithography-based three-dimensional (3D) printer was used to fabricate the bone matrices with precisely controlled architecture. The interaction between breast cancer cells and osteoblasts was investigated in the optimized bone matrix. Using a Transwell® system to separate the two cell lines, breast cancer cells inhibited osteoblast proliferation, while osteoblasts stimulated breast cancer cell growth, whereas, both cell lines increased IL-8 secretion. Breast cancer cells co-cultured with osteoblasts within the 3D bone matrix formed multi-cellular spheroids in comparison to two-dimensional monolayers. These findings validate the use of our 3D printed bone matrices as an in vitro metastasis model, and highlights their potential for investigating breast cancer bone metastasis.

  16. Intermolecular interactions and 3D structure in cellulose-NaOH-urea aqueous system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhiwei; Fang, Yan; Xiang, Junfeng; Ma, Yanping; Lu, Ang; Kang, Hongliang; Huang, Yong; Guo, Hongxia; Liu, Ruigang; Zhang, Lina

    2014-08-28

    The dissolution of cellulose in NaOH/urea aqueous solution at low temperature is a key finding in cellulose science and technology. In this paper, (15)N and (23)Na NMR experiments were carried out to clarify the intermolecular interactions in cellulose/NaOH/urea aqueous solution. It was found that there are direct interactions between OH(-) anions and amino groups of urea through hydrogen bonds and no direct interaction between urea and cellulose. Moreover, Na(+) ions can interact with both cellulose and urea in an aqueous system. These interactions lead to the formation of cellulose-NaOH-urea-H2O inclusion complexes (ICs). (23)Na relaxation results confirmed that the formation of urea-OH(-) clusters can effectively enhance the stability of Na(+) ions that attracted to cellulose chains. Low temperature can enhance the hydrogen bonding interaction between OH(-) ions and urea and improve the binding ability of the NaOH/urea/H2O clusters that attached to cellulose chains. Cryo-TEM observation confirmed the formation of cellulose-NaOH-urea-H2O ICs, which is in extended conformation with mean diameter of about 3.6 nm and mean length of about 300 nm. Possible 3D structure of the ICs was proposed by the M06-2X/6-31+G(d) theoretical calculation, revealing the O3H···O5 intramolecular hydrogen bonds could remain in the ICs. This work clarified the interactions in cellulose/NaOH/urea aqueous solution and the 3D structure of the cellulose chain in dilute cellulose/NaOH/urea aqueous solution.

  17. Visual Object Recognition with 3D-Aware Features in KITTI Urban Scenes

    PubMed Central

    Yebes, J. Javier; Bergasa, Luis M.; García-Garrido, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Driver assistance systems and autonomous robotics rely on the deployment of several sensors for environment perception. Compared to LiDAR systems, the inexpensive vision sensors can capture the 3D scene as perceived by a driver in terms of appearance and depth cues. Indeed, providing 3D image understanding capabilities to vehicles is an essential target in order to infer scene semantics in urban environments. One of the challenges that arises from the navigation task in naturalistic urban scenarios is the detection of road participants (e.g., cyclists, pedestrians and vehicles). In this regard, this paper tackles the detection and orientation estimation of cars, pedestrians and cyclists, employing the challenging and naturalistic KITTI images. This work proposes 3D-aware features computed from stereo color images in order to capture the appearance and depth peculiarities of the objects in road scenes. The successful part-based object detector, known as DPM, is extended to learn richer models from the 2.5D data (color and disparity), while also carrying out a detailed analysis of the training pipeline. A large set of experiments evaluate the proposals, and the best performing approach is ranked on the KITTI website. Indeed, this is the first work that reports results with stereo data for the KITTI object challenge, achieving increased detection ratios for the classes car and cyclist compared to a baseline DPM. PMID:25903553

  18. Visual Object Recognition with 3D-Aware Features in KITTI Urban Scenes.

    PubMed

    Yebes, J Javier; Bergasa, Luis M; García-Garrido, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Driver assistance systems and autonomous robotics rely on the deployment of several sensors for environment perception. Compared to LiDAR systems, the inexpensive vision sensors can capture the 3D scene as perceived by a driver in terms of appearance and depth cues. Indeed, providing 3D image understanding capabilities to vehicles is an essential target in order to infer scene semantics in urban environments. One of the challenges that arises from the navigation task in naturalistic urban scenarios is the detection of road participants (e.g., cyclists, pedestrians and vehicles). In this regard, this paper tackles the detection and orientation estimation of cars, pedestrians and cyclists, employing the challenging and naturalistic KITTI images. This work proposes 3D-aware features computed from stereo color images in order to capture the appearance and depth peculiarities of the objects in road scenes. The successful part-based object detector, known as DPM, is extended to learn richer models from the 2.5D data (color and disparity), while also carrying out a detailed analysis of the training pipeline. A large set of experiments evaluate the proposals, and the best performing approach is ranked on the KITTI website. Indeed, this is the first work that reports results with stereo data for the KITTI object challenge, achieving increased detection ratios for the classes car and cyclist compared to a baseline DPM. PMID:25903553

  19. Visual Object Recognition with 3D-Aware Features in KITTI Urban Scenes.

    PubMed

    Yebes, J Javier; Bergasa, Luis M; García-Garrido, Miguel Ángel

    2015-04-20

    Driver assistance systems and autonomous robotics rely on the deployment of several sensors for environment perception. Compared to LiDAR systems, the inexpensive vision sensors can capture the 3D scene as perceived by a driver in terms of appearance and depth cues. Indeed, providing 3D image understanding capabilities to vehicles is an essential target in order to infer scene semantics in urban environments. One of the challenges that arises from the navigation task in naturalistic urban scenarios is the detection of road participants (e.g., cyclists, pedestrians and vehicles). In this regard, this paper tackles the detection and orientation estimation of cars, pedestrians and cyclists, employing the challenging and naturalistic KITTI images. This work proposes