Science.gov

Sample records for 3d ion trap

  1. Track and trap in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Rodrigo, Peter J.; Nielsen, Ivan P.; Alonzo, Carlo A.

    2007-04-01

    Three-dimensional light structures can be created by modulating the spatial phase and polarization properties of an an expanded laser beam. A particularly promising technique is the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method invented and patented at Risø National Laboratory. Based on the combination of programmable spatial light modulator devices and an advanced graphical user-interface the GPC method enables real-time, interactive and arbitrary control over the dynamics and geometry of synthesized light patterns. Recent experiments have shown that GPC-driven micro-manipulation provides a unique technology platform for fully user-guided assembly of a plurality of particles in a plane, control of particle stacking along the beam axis, manipulation of multiple hollow beads, and the organization of living cells into three-dimensional colloidal structures. Here we present GPC-based optical micromanipulation in a microfluidic system where trapping experiments are computer-automated and thereby capable of running with only limited supervision. The system is able to dynamically detect living yeast cells using a computer-interfaced CCD camera, and respond to this by instantly creating traps at positions of the spotted cells streaming at flow velocities that would be difficult for a human operator to handle.

  2. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  3. Trapping radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.

    2004-12-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  4. Constructing 3D microtubule networks using holographic optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, J.; Osunbayo, O.; Vershinin, M.

    2015-01-01

    Developing abilities to assemble nanoscale structures is a major scientific and engineering challenge. We report a technique which allows precise positioning and manipulation of individual rigid filaments, enabling construction of custom-designed 3D filament networks. This approach uses holographic optical trapping (HOT) for nano-positioning and microtubules (MTs) as network building blocks. MTs are desirable engineering components due to their high aspect ratio, rigidity, and their ability to serve as substrate for directed nano-transport, reflecting their roles in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. The 3D architecture of MT cytoskeleton is a significant component of its function, however experimental tools to study the roles of this geometric complexity in a controlled environment have been lacking. We demonstrate the broad capabilities of our system by building a self-supporting 3D MT-based nanostructure and by conducting a MT-based transport experiment on a dynamically adjustable 3D MT intersection. Our methodology not only will advance studies of cytoskeletal networks (and associated processes such as MT-based transport) but will also likely find use in engineering nanostructures and devices. PMID:26657337

  5. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  6. Rydberg Excitation of a Single Trapped Ion.

    PubMed

    Feldker, T; Bachor, P; Stappel, M; Kolbe, D; Gerritsma, R; Walz, J; Schmidt-Kaler, F

    2015-10-23

    We demonstrate excitation of a single trapped cold (40)Ca(+) ion to Rydberg levels by laser radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet at a wavelength of 122 nm. Observed resonances are identified as 3d(2)D(3/2) to 51F, 52F and 3d(2)D(5/2) to 64F. We model the line shape and our results imply a large state-dependent coupling to the trapping potential. Rydberg ions are of great interest for future applications in quantum computing and simulation, in which large dipolar interactions are combined with the superb experimental control offered by Paul traps. PMID:26551109

  7. Ion trap device

    DOEpatents

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-26

    An ion trap device is disclosed. The device includes a series of electrodes that define an ion flow path. A radio frequency (RF) field is applied to the series of electrodes such that each electrode is phase shifted approximately 180 degrees from an adjacent electrode. A DC voltage is superimposed with the RF field to create a DC gradient to drive ions in the direction of the gradient. A second RF field or DC voltage is applied to selectively trap and release the ions from the device. Further, the device may be gridless and utilized at high pressure.

  8. Nonlinear integrable ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Danilov, V.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2011-10-01

    Quadrupole ion traps can be transformed into nonlinear traps with integrable motion by adding special electrostatic potentials. This can be done with both stationary potentials (electrostatic plus a uniform magnetic field) and with time-dependent electric potentials. These potentials are chosen such that the single particle Hamilton-Jacobi equations of motion are separable in some coordinate systems. The electrostatic potentials have several free adjustable parameters allowing for a quadrupole trap to be transformed into, for example, a double-well or a toroidal-well system. The particle motion remains regular, non-chaotic, integrable in quadratures, and stable for a wide range of parameters. We present two examples of how to realize such a system in case of a time-independent (the Penning trap) as well as a time-dependent (the Paul trap) configuration.

  9. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Alexander, Michael L.; Follansbee, James C.

    1997-01-01

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  10. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, S.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Follansbee, J.C.

    1997-12-02

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode is disclosed. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity. 4 figs.

  11. Experiments with Single Trapped Ytterbium Ions at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs of experiments performed with single trapped Ytterbium ions. The topics include: 1) Ytterbium ion level scheme; 2) Paul-Straubel rf trap and single ion image; 3) D5/2 state lifetime measurement; 4) D3/2 state lifetime measurement; 5) Trapped individual ions in an optical cavity; 6) Initial exploratory system: experimental goals; and 7) Future systems: trap-cavity integration II.

  12. Towards a 3-D Magneto-Optical Trap for Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collopy, Alejandra; Hummon, Matthew; Yeo, Mark; Stuhl, Benjamin; Hemmerling, Boerge; Drayna, Garrett; Chae, Eunmi; Ravi, Aakash; Lu, Hsin-I.; Doyle, John; Ye, Jun

    2013-05-01

    As the magneto-optical trap revolutionized atomic physics, we anticipate the molecular counterpart to open doors to unexplored molecular physics, including ultra-cold chemistry. While molecules possess more complex structure than atoms, quasi-cycling cooling transitions are still attainable in a variety of species, including the polar molecule YO. In order to remix dark states, we RF modulate the polarization of the light in our trap. In order to maintain a restoring force, we modulate the orientation of our magnetic fields in phase with the light using LC resonant in-vacuum magnetic coils. We demonstrate magneto-optical trapping in two dimensions for YO, and present progress towards a three dimensional implementation of a MOT loaded from a two-stage buffer gas cell source. We acknowledge support from the AFOSR (MURI), DOE, NIST and the NSF.

  13. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  14. Halo ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Austin, Daniel E; Wang, Miao; Tolley, Samuel E; Maas, Jeffrey D; Hawkins, Aaron R; Rockwood, Alan L; Tolley, H Dennis; Lee, Edgar D; Lee, Milton L

    2007-04-01

    We describe a novel radio frequency ion trap mass analyzer based on toroidal trapping geometry and microfabrication technology. The device, called the halo ion trap, consists of two parallel ceramic plates, the facing surfaces of which are imprinted with sets of concentric ring electrodes. Radii of the imprinted rings range from 5 to 12 mm, and the spacing between the plates is 4 mm. Unlike conventional ion traps, in which hyperbolic metal electrodes establish equipotential boundary conditions, electric fields in the halo ion trap are established by applying different radio frequency potentials to each ring. The potential on each ring can be independently optimized to provide the best trapping field. The halo ion trap features an open structure, allowing easy access for in situ ionization. The toroidal geometry provides a large trapping and analyzing volume, increasing the number of ions that can be stored and reducing the effects of space-charge on mass analysis. Preliminary mass spectra show resolution (m/Deltam) of 60-75 when the trap is operated at 1.9 MHz and 500 Vp-p. PMID:17335180

  15. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  16. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  17. Space charge induced nonlinear effects in quadrupole ion traps.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dan; Wang, Yuzhuo; Xiong, Xingchuang; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Tao; Fang, Xiang; Xu, Wei

    2014-03-01

    A theoretical method was proposed in this work to study space charge effects in quadrupole ion traps, including ion trapping, ion motion frequency shift, and nonlinear effects on ion trajectories. The spatial distributions of ion clouds within quadrupole ion traps were first modeled for both 3D and linear ion traps. It is found that the electric field generated by space charge can be expressed as a summation of even-order fields, such as quadrupole field, octopole field, etc. Ion trajectories were then solved using the harmonic balance method. Similar to high-order field effects, space charge will result in an "ocean wave" shape nonlinear resonance curve for an ion under a dipolar excitation. However, the nonlinear resonance curve will be totally shifted to lower frequencies and bend towards ion secular frequency as ion motion amplitude increases, which is just the opposite effect of any even-order field. Based on theoretical derivations, methods to reduce space charge effects were proposed.

  18. Ion funnel ion trap and process

    DOEpatents

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Clowers, Biran H [West Richland, WA; Prior, David C [Hermiston, OR; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-02-15

    An ion funnel trap is described that includes a inlet portion, a trapping portion, and a outlet portion that couples, in normal operation, with an ion funnel. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of .about.1 Torr and provides for: 1) removal of low mass-to-charge (m/z) ion species, 2) ion accumulation efficiency of up to 80%, 3) charge capacity of .about.10,000,000 elementary charges, 4) ion ejection time of 40 to 200 .mu.s, and 5) optimized variable ion accumulation times. Ion accumulation with low concentration peptide mixtures has shown an increase in analyte signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of a factor of 30, and a greater than 10-fold improvement in SNR for multiply charged analytes.

  19. Precision measurement of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime in a single trapped +40Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Guan, H.; Qian, Y.; Gao, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present a high-precision measurement of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime in a single trapped +40Ca. The measurement was performed using a high-efficiency quantum-state detection technique to monitor quantum jumps and a high-precision and highly synchronous measurement sequence for laser control. A feature in our measurement is the pumping rate of the 729-nm laser that was corrected in a real-time way. The 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime was obtained through the measurement of the spontaneous decay rate after incoherent shelving of the ion to the 3 d 3/2 2D state with a wait time. Systematic errors, such as collisions with background gases, heating effects, impurity components, the shelving and pumping rates, and state detection, were carefully analyzed and estimated. We determined an improved value of the 3 d 3/2 2D-state lifetime to be τ3 /2=1.195 (8 ) s. Furthermore, the 3 d 3/2 2D →4 s 1/2 2S quadrupole transition matrix element was measured to be Sk i=7.936 (26 ) e a02 , and the ratio between the lifetimes of 3 d 2D3 /2 and 3 d 2D5 /2 was determined to be 1.018(11). Our method can be universally applied to lifetime measurements of other single ions and atoms with a similar structure.

  20. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1993-04-27

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  1. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Goeringer, Douglas E.; Glish, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  2. Effect of Single-Electron Interface Trapping in Decanano MOSFETs: A 3D Atomistic Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asenov, Asen; Balasubramaniam, R.; Brown, A. R.; Davies, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    We study the effect of trapping/detrapping of a single-electron in interface states in the channel of n-type MOSFETs with decanano dimensions using 3D atomistic simulation techniques. In order to highlight the basic dependencies, the simulations are carried out initially assuming continuous doping charge, and discrete localized charge only for the trapped electron. The dependence of the random telegraph signal (RTS) amplitudes on the device dimensions and on the position of the trapped charge in the channel are studied in detail. Later, in full-scale, atomistic simulations assuming discrete charge for both randomly placed dopants and the trapped electron, we highlight the importance of current percolation and of traps with strategic position where the trapped electron blocks a dominant current path.

  3. Kinematic MHD Models of Collapsing Magnetic Traps: Extension to 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, Keith J.; Neukirch, Thomas

    2009-02-16

    We show how fully 3D kinematic MHD models of collapsing magnetic traps (CMTs) can be constructed, thus extending previous work on 2D trap models. CMTs are thought to form in the relaxing magnetic field lines in solar flares and it has been proposed that they play an important role in the acceleration of high-energy particles. This work is a first step to understanding the physics of CMTs better.

  4. Ion trapping in Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2004-06-28

    Transverse instabilities have been observed in the antiproton beam stored in the Fermilab Recycler Ring, resulting in a sudden increase in the transverse emittances and a small beam loss. The instabilities appear to occur a few hours after a change in the ramping pattern of the Main Injector which shares the same tunnel. The phenomena have been studied by inducing similar instabilities. However, the mechanism is still unknown. A possible explanation is that the ions trapped in the beam reach such an intensity that collective coupled transverse oscillation occurs. However, there is no direct evidence of the trapped ions at this moment.

  5. Experimental investigation of planar ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, C. E.; Leibrandt, D. R.; Bakr, W. S.; Mallard, W. J.; Brown, K. R.; Chuang, I. L.

    2006-03-15

    Chiaverini et al. [Quantum Inf. Comput. 5, 419 (2005)] recently suggested a linear Paul trap geometry for ion-trap quantum computation that places all of the electrodes in a plane. Such planar ion traps are compatible with modern semiconductor fabrication techniques and can be scaled to make compact, many-zone traps. In this paper we present an experimental realization of planar ion traps using electrodes on a printed circuit board to trap linear chains of tens of charged particles of 0.44 {mu}m diameter in a vacuum of 15 Pa (10{sup -1} torr). With these traps we address concerns about the low trap depth of planar ion traps and develop control electrode layouts for moving ions between trap zones without facing some of the technical difficulties involved in an atomic ion-trap experiment. Specifically, we use a trap with 36 zones (77 electrodes) arranged in a cross to demonstrate loading from a traditional four-rod linear Paul trap, linear ion movement, splitting and joining of ion chains, and movement of ions through intersections. We further propose an additional dc-biased electrode above the trap which increases the trap depth dramatically, and a planar ion-trap geometry that generates a two-dimensional lattice of point Paul traps.

  6. Ion sponge: a 3-dimentional array of quadrupole ion traps for trapping and mass-selectively processing ions in gas phase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Li, Linfan; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Ouyang, Zheng

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the concept of ion sponge has been explored for developing 3D arrays of large numbers of ion traps but with simple configurations. An ion sponge device with 484 trapping units in a volume of 10 × 10 × 3.2 cm has been constructed by simply stacking 9 meshes together. A single rf was used for trapping ions and mass-selective ion processing. The ion sponge provides a large trapping capacity and is highly transparent for transfer of ions, neutrals, and photons for gas phase ion processing. Multiple layers of quadrupole ion traps, with 121 trapping units in each layer, can operate as a single device for MS or MS/MS analysis, or as a series of mass-selective trapping devices with interlayer ion transfers facilitated by AC and DC voltages. Automatic sorting of ions to different trapping layers based on their mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios was achieved with traps of different sizes. Tandem-in-space MS/MS has also been demonstrated with precursor ions and fragment ions trapped in separate locations.

  7. Ion Sponge: A 3-Dimentional Array of Quadrupole Ion Traps for Trapping and Mass-Selectively Processing Ions in Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the concept of ion sponge has been explored for developing 3D arrays of large numbers of ion traps but with simple configurations. An ion sponge device with 484 trapping units in a volume of 10 × 10 × 3.2 cm has been constructed by simply stacking 9 meshes together. A single rf was used for trapping ions and mass-selective ion processing. The ion sponge provides a large trapping capacity and is highly transparent for transfer of ions, neutrals, and photons for gas phase ion processing. Multiple layers of quadrupole ion traps, with 121 trapping units in each layer, can operate as a single device for MS or MS/MS analysis, or as a series of mass-selective trapping devices with interlayer ion transfers facilitated by AC and DC voltages. Automatic sorting of ions to different trapping layers based on their mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios was achieved with traps of different sizes. Tandem-in-space MS/MS has also been demonstrated with precursor ions and fragment ions trapped in separate locations. PMID:24758328

  8. Microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Mangan, Michael A.; Blain, Matthew G.; Tigges, Chris P.; Linker, Kevin L.

    2011-04-19

    An array of microfabricated linear Paul-Straubel ion traps can be used for mass spectrometric applications. Each ion trap comprises two parallel inner RF electrodes and two parallel outer DC control electrodes symmetric about a central trap axis and suspended over an opening in a substrate. Neighboring ion traps in the array can share a common outer DC control electrode. The ions confined transversely by an RF quadrupole electric field potential well on the ion trap axis. The array can trap a wide array of ions.

  9. Microscale ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, J. Michael; Witten, William B.; Kornienko, Oleg

    2002-01-01

    An ion trap for mass spectrometric chemical analysis of ions is delineated. The ion trap includes a central electrode having an aperture; a pair of insulators, each having an aperture; a pair of end cap electrodes, each having an aperture; a first electronic signal source coupled to the central electrode; a second electronic signal source coupled to the end cap electrodes. The central electrode, insulators, and end cap electrodes are united in a sandwich construction where their respective apertures are coaxially aligned and symmetric about an axis to form a partially enclosed cavity having an effective radius r.sub.0 and an effective length 2z.sub.0, wherein r.sub.0 and/or z.sub.0 are less than 1.0 mm, and a ratio z.sub.0 /r.sub.0 is greater than 0.83.

  10. Cryogenic ion trapping systems with surface-electrode traps.

    PubMed

    Antohi, P B; Schuster, D; Akselrod, G M; Labaziewicz, J; Ge, Y; Lin, Z; Bakr, W S; Chuang, I L

    2009-01-01

    We present two simple cryogenic rf ion trap systems in which cryogenic temperatures and ultra high vacuum pressures can be reached in as little as 12 h. The ion traps are operated either in a liquid helium bath cryostat or in a low vibration closed cycle cryostat. The fast turn around time and availability of buffer gas cooling made the systems ideal for testing surface-electrode ion traps. The vibration amplitude of the closed cycled cryostat was found to be below 106 nm. We evaluated the systems by loading surface-electrode ion traps with (88)Sr(+) ions using laser ablation, which is compatible with the cryogenic environment. Using Doppler cooling we observed small ion crystals in which optically resolved ions have a trapped lifetime over 2500 min.

  11. Role of interfaces on the trapping of He in 2D and 3D Cu-Nb nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lach, Timothy G.; Ekiz, Elvan H.; Averback, Robert S.; Mara, Nathan A.; Bellon, Pascal

    2015-11-01

    The role of interface structure on the trapping of He in Cu-Nb nanocomposites was investigated by comparing He bubble formation in nano-multilayers grown by PVD, nanolaminates fabricated by accumulative roll bonding (ARB), and 3D nanocomposites obtained by high pressure torsion (HPT). All samples were implanted with 1 MeV He ions at room temperature and characterized by cross section transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The critical He concentration leading to bubble formation was determined by correlating the He bubble depth distribution detected by TEM with the implanted He depth profile obtained by SRIM. The critical He dose per unit interfacial area for bubble formation was largest for the PVD multilayers, lower by a factor of ∼1.4 in the HPT nanocomposites annealed at 500 °C, and lower by a factor of ∼4.6 in the ARB nanolaminates relative to the PVD multilayers. The results indicate that the (111)FCC||(110)BCC Kurdjumov-Sachs (KS) interfaces predominant in PVD and annealed HPT samples provide more effective traps than the (112)KS interfaces predominant in ARB nanolaminates; however, the good trapping efficiency and high interface area of 3D HPT structures make them most attractive for applications.

  12. Fast parallel interferometric 3D tracking of numerous optically trapped particles and their hydrodynamic interaction.

    PubMed

    Ruh, Dominic; Tränkle, Benjamin; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2011-10-24

    Multi-dimensional, correlated particle tracking is a key technology to reveal dynamic processes in living and synthetic soft matter systems. In this paper we present a new method for tracking micron-sized beads in parallel and in all three dimensions - faster and more precise than existing techniques. Using an acousto-optic deflector and two quadrant-photo-diodes, we can track numerous optically trapped beads at up to tens of kHz with a precision of a few nanometers by back-focal plane interferometry. By time-multiplexing the laser focus, we can calibrate individually all traps and all tracking signals in a few seconds and in 3D. We show 3D histograms and calibration constants for nine beads in a quadratic arrangement, although trapping and tracking is easily possible for more beads also in arbitrary 2D arrangements. As an application, we investigate the hydrodynamic coupling and diffusion anomalies of spheres trapped in a 3 × 3 arrangement. PMID:22109012

  13. Scalable Designs for Planar Ion Trap Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusher, R. E.

    2007-03-01

    Recent progress in quantum operations with trapped ion qubits has been spectacular for qubit counts up to approximately ten ions. Two qubit quantum gates, quantum error correction, simple quantum algorithms and entanglement of up to 8 qubits have been demonstrated by groups including those at NIST, University of Michigan, University of Innsbruck and Oxford. Interesting problems in quantum information processing including quantum simulations of condensed matter systems and quantum repeaters for long distance quantum communication systems require hundreds or thousands of qubits. Initial designs for an ion trap ``Quantum CCD'' using spatially multiplexed planar ion traps as well as initial experiments using planar ion traps are promising routes to scaling up the number of trapped ions to more interesting levels. We describe designs for planar ion traps fabricated using silicon VLSI techniques. This approach allows the control voltages required for the moving and positioning the ions in the array to be connected vertically through the silicon substrate to underlying CMOS electronics. We have developed techniques that allow the ion trap structures to be fabricated monolithically on top of the CMOS electronics. The planar traps have much weaker trapping depths than the more conventional multi-level traps. However, the trap depths are still adequate for trapping hot ions from many ion sources. The planar traps also involve more complex configurations for laser cooling and micromotion control. Initial solutions to these problems will be presented. Laser access to the ions can be provided by laser beams grazing the trap surface or by using vertical slots through the trap chip. We will also discuss limits imposed by power dissipation and ion transport through trap junctions (e.g. crosses and Ys). We have fabricated these VLSI based traps in a number of configurations. Initial fabrication and packaging challenges will be discussed. D. Kielpinski, C. Monroe, and D.J. Wineland

  14. Improved Linear-Ion-Trap Frequency Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.

    1995-01-01

    Improved design concept for linear-ion-trap (LIT) frequency-standard apparatus proposed. Apparatus contains lengthened linear ion trap, and ions processed alternately in two regions: ions prepared in upper region of trap, then transported to lower region for exposure to microwave radiation, then returned to upper region for optical interrogation. Improved design intended to increase long-term frequency stability of apparatus while reducing size, mass, and cost.

  15. Ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kosuga, Y.; Itoh, S.-I.; Diamond, P. H.; Itoh, K.; Lesur, M.

    2014-10-15

    A theory to describe basic characterization of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance is presented. The role of trapped ion granulations, clusters of trapped ions correlated by precession resonance, is the focus. Microscopically, the presence of trapped ion granulations leads to a sharp (logarithmic) divergence of two point phase space density correlation at small scales. Macroscopically, trapped ion granulations excite potential fluctuations that do not satisfy dispersion relation and so broaden frequency spectrum. The line width from emission due only to trapped ion granulations is calculated. The result shows that the line width depends on ion free energy and electron dissipation, which implies that non-adiabatic electrons are essential to recover non-trivial dynamics of trapped ion granulations. Relevant testable predictions are summarized.

  16. Optically Trapped Surface-Enhanced Raman Probes Prepared by Silver Photoreduction to 3D Microstructures.

    PubMed

    Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton; Lestyán, Tamás; Joniova, Jaroslava; Aekbote, Badri L; Strejčková, Alena; Ormos, Pál; Miskovsky, Pavol; Kelemen, Lóránd; Bánó, Gregor

    2015-09-15

    3D microstructures partially covered by silver nanoparticles have been developed and tested for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) in combination with optical tweezers. The microstructures made by two-photon polymerization of SU-8 photoresist were manipulated in a dual beam optical trap. The active area of the structures was covered by a SERS-active silver layer using chemically assisted photoreduction from silver nitrate solutions. Silver layers of different grain size distributions were created by changing the photoreduction parameters and characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The structures were tested by measuring the SERS spectra of emodin and hypericin.

  17. Atomic Clock Based On Linear Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John

    1992-01-01

    Highly stable atomic clock based on excitation and measurement of hyperfine transition in 199Hg+ ions confined in linear quadrupole trap by radio-frequency and static electric fields. Configuration increases stability of clock by enabling use of enough ions to obtain adequate signal while reducing non-thermal component of motion of ions in trapping field, reducing second-order Doppler shift of hyperfine transition. Features described in NPO-17758 "Linear Ion Trap for Atomic Clock." Frequency standard based on hyperfine transition described in NPO-17456, "Trapped-Mercury-Ion Frequency Standard."

  18. Trapped-Mercury-Ion Frequency Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1991-01-01

    Report describes principle of operation, design, and results of initial measurements on trapped-mercury-ion frequency-standard apparatus at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. New frequency standard being developed. Based on linear ion trap described in (NPO-17758). Expected to show much better short-term frequency stability because of increased ion-storage capacity.

  19. New ion trap for frequency standard applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A novel linear ion trap was designed, which permits storage of a large number of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. This new trap should store about 20 times the number of ions as a conventional RF trap with no corresponding increase in second-order Doppler shift from the confining field. In addition, the sensitivity of this shift to trapping parameters, i.e., RF voltage, RF frequency, and trap size, is greatly reduced.

  20. Detection of ancient morphology and potential hydrocarbon traps using 3-D seismic data and attribute analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Heggland, R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the use of seismic attributes on 3D data to reveal Tertiary and Cretaceous geological features in Norwegian block 9/2. Some of the features would hardly be possible to map using only 2D seismic data. The method which involves a precise interpretation of horizons, attribute analysis and manipulation of colour displays, may be useful when studying morphology, faults and hydrocarbon traps. The interval of interest in this study was from 0 to 1.5 s TWT. Horizontal displays (timeslices and attribute maps), seemed to highlight very nicely geological features such as shallow channels, fractures, karst topography and faults. The attributes used for mapping these features were amplitude, total reflection energy (a volume or time interval attribute), dip and azimuth. The choice of colour scale and manipulation of colour displays were also critical for the results. The data examples clearly demonstrate how it is possible to achieve a very detailed mapping of geological features using 3D seismic data and attribute analysis. The results of this study were useful for the understanding of hydrocarbon migration paths and hydrocarbon traps.

  1. Non-destructive ion trap mass spectrometer and method

    DOEpatents

    Frankevich, Vladimir E.; Soni, Manish H.; Nappi, Mario; Santini, Robert E.; Amy, Jonathan W.; Cooks, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates to an ion trap mass spectrometer of the type having an ion trapping volume defined by spaced end caps and a ring electrode. The ion trap includes a small sensing electrode which senses characteristic motion of ions trapped in said trapping volume and provides an image current. Ions are excited into characteristic motion by application of an excitation pulse to the trapped ions. The invention also relates to a method of operating such an ion trap.

  2. Three-Rod Linear Ion Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, Gary R.; Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1993-01-01

    Three-parallel-rod electrode structures proposed for use in linear ion traps and possibly for electrostatic levitation of macroscopic particles. Provides wider viewing angle because they confine ions in regions outside rod-electrode structures.

  3. Trapped Ion Optical Clocks at NPL

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, H. S.; Barwood, G. P.; Hosaka, K.; Klein, H. A.; Lea, S. N.; Walton, B. R.; Webster, S. A.; Gill, P.; Huang, G.; Stannard, A.

    2006-11-07

    Forbidden transitions in single laser-cooled trapped ions provide highly stable and accurate references for optical frequency standards. This paper describes recent progress on strontium and ytterbium ion optical frequency standards under development at NPL.

  4. Quantum Information Processing with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Christian

    Trapped ions constitute a well-isolated small quantum system that offers low decoherence rates and excellent opportunities for quantum control and measurement by laser-induced manipulation of the ions. These properties make trapped ions an attractive system for experimental investigations of quantum information processing. In the following, the basics of storing, manipulating and measuring quantum information encoded in a string of trapped ions will be discussed. Based on these techniques, entanglement can be created and simple quantum protocols like quantum teleportation be realized. This chapter concludes with a discussion of the use of entangling laser-ion interactions for quantum simulations and quantum logic spectroscopy.

  5. Atomic ion clock with two ion traps, and method to transfer ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D. (Inventor); Chung, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An atomic ion clock with a first ion trap and a second ion trap, where the second ion trap is of higher order than the first ion trap. In one embodiment, ions may be shuttled back and forth from one ion trap to the other by application of voltage ramps to the electrodes in the ion traps, where microwave interrogation takes place when the ions are in the second ion trap, and fluorescence is induced and measured when the ions are in the first ion trap. In one embodiment, the RF voltages applied to the second ion trap to contain the ions are at a higher frequency than that applied to the first ion trap. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  6. Ion traps fabricated in a CMOS foundry

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, K. K.; Ram, R. J.; Eltony, A. M.; Chuang, I. L.; Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M. Chiaverini, J.

    2014-07-28

    We demonstrate trapping in a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) foundry process utilizing the top metal layer of the process for the trap electrodes. The process includes doped active regions and metal interconnect layers, allowing for co-fabrication of standard CMOS circuitry as well as devices for optical control and measurement. With one of the interconnect layers defining a ground plane between the trap electrode layer and the p-type doped silicon substrate, ion loading is robust and trapping is stable. We measure a motional heating rate comparable to those seen in surface-electrode traps of similar size. This demonstration of scalable quantum computing hardware utilizing a commercial CMOS process opens the door to integration and co-fabrication of electronics and photonics for large-scale quantum processing in trapped-ion arrays.

  7. Cryptography, quantum computation and trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Richard J.

    1998-03-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  8. Ion trap in a semiconductor chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stick, D.; Hensinger, W. K.; Olmschenk, S.; Madsen, M. J.; Schwab, K.; Monroe, C.

    2006-01-01

    The electromagnetic manipulation of isolated atoms has led to many advances in physics, from laser cooling and Bose-Einstein condensation of cold gases to the precise quantum control of individual atomic ions. Work on miniaturizing electromagnetic traps to the micrometre scale promises even higher levels of control and reliability. Compared with `chip traps' for confining neutral atoms, ion traps with similar dimensions and power dissipation offer much higher confinement forces and allow unparalleled control at the single-atom level. Moreover, ion microtraps are of great interest in the development of miniature mass-spectrometer arrays, compact atomic clocks and, most notably, large-scale quantum information processors. Here we report the operation of a micrometre-scale ion trap, fabricated on a monolithic chip using semiconductor micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. We confine, laser cool and measure heating of a single 111Cd+ ion in an integrated radiofrequency trap etched from a doped gallium-arsenide heterostructure.

  9. MODEL SIMULATIONS OF CONTINUOUS ION INTERJECTION INTO EBIS TRAP WITH SLANTED ELECTROSTATIC MIRROR.

    SciTech Connect

    PIKIN,A.; KPONOU, A.; ALESSI, J.G.; BEEBE, E.N.; PRELEC, K.; RAPARIA, D.

    2007-08-26

    The efficiency of trapping ions in an EBIS is of primary importance for many applications requiring operations with externally produced ions: RIA breeders, ion sources, traps. At the present time, the most popular method of ion injection is pulsed injection, when short bunches of ions get trapped in a longitudinal trap while traversing the trap region. Continuous trapping is a challenge for EBIS devices because mechanisms which reduce the longitudinal ion energy per charge in a trap (cooling with residual gas, energy exchange with other ions, ionization) are not very effective, and accumulation of ions is slow. A possible approach to increase trapping efficiency is to slant the mirror at the end of the trap which is opposite to the injection end. A slanted mirror will convert longitudinal motion of ions into transverse motion, and, by reducing their longitudinal velocity, prevent these ions from escaping the trap on their way out. The trade off for the increased trapping efficiency this way is an increase in the initial transverse energy of the accumulated ions. The slanted mirror can be realized if the ends of two adjacent electrodes- drift tubes - which act as an electrostatic mirror, are machined to produce a slanted gap, rather than an upright one. Applying different voltages to these electrodes will produce a slanted mirror. The results are presented of 2D and 3D computer simulations of ion injection into a simplified model of EBIS with slanted mirror.

  10. Modeling and Optimizing RF Multipole Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanghaenel, Sven; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Radio frequency (rf) ion traps are very well suited for spectroscopy experiments thanks to the long time storage of the species of interest in a well defined volume. The electrical potential of the ion trap is determined by the geometry of its electrodes and the applied voltages. In order to understand the behavior of trapped ions in realistic multipole traps it is necessary to characterize these trapping potentials. Commercial programs like SIMION or COMSOL, employing the finite difference and/or finite element method, are often used to model the electrical fields of the trap in order to design traps for various purposes, e.g. introducing light from a laser into the trap volume. For a controlled trapping of ions, e.g. for low temperature trapping, the time dependent electrical fields need to be known to high accuracy especially at the minimum of the effective (mechanical) potential. The commercial programs are not optimized for these applications and suffer from a number of limitations. Therefore, in our approach the boundary element method (BEM) has been employed in home-built programs to generate numerical solutions of real trap geometries, e.g. from CAD drawings. In addition the resulting fields are described by appropriate multipole expansions. As a consequence, the quality of a trap can be characterized by a small set of multipole parameters which are used to optimize the trap design. In this presentation a few example calculations will be discussed. In particular the accuracy of the method and the benefits of describing the trapping potentials via multipole expansions will be illustrated. As one important application heating effects of cold ions arising from non-ideal multipole fields can now be understood as a consequence of imperfect field configurations.

  11. Characteristics of junctionless charge trap flash memory for 3D stacked NAND flash.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jinho; Na, Heedo; Park, Sunghoon; Sohn, Hyunchul

    2013-09-01

    The electrical characteristics of tunnel barrier engineered-charge trap flash (TBE-CTF) memory devices with junctionless (JL) source and drain (S/D) were investigated. The JL structure is composed of an n(+)-poly-Si based ultra-thin channel and S/D with identical doping concentrations. The band engineered Hf-silicate/Al2O3 tunnel barrier stack was applied to a JL-TBE-CTF memory device in order to enhance the field sensitivity. The Hf-silicate/Al2O3 tunnel barrier, HfO2 trap layer, and Al2O3 blocking layer were deposited by atomic layer deposition. The fabricated device exhibited a large memory window of 9.43 V, as well as high programming and erasing speeds. Moreover, it also showed adequate retention times and endurance properties. Hence, the JL-TBE-CTF memory (which has a low process complexity) is expected to be an appropriate structure for 3D stacked ultra-high density memory applications. PMID:24205672

  12. A Modular System of 3D Printed Emergence Traps for Studying the Biology of Shot Hole Borers and Other Scolytinae.

    PubMed

    Berry, Daniel; Selby, Roger D; Horvath, Joan C; Cameron, Rich H; Porqueras, Diego; Stouthamer, Richard

    2016-04-01

    A modular system for studying the biology of Scolytinae using 3D printed emergence traps is presented. This system consists of traps that can be used for the introduction of beetles into trees as well as for the determination of the number of offspring emerging from trees and branches, and their production of frass and sawdust. Open-source files used for printing these traps have been deposited as supplementary material and can be downloaded for trap production by students of Scolytinae with access to a 3D printer. The cost in material for the production of a single emergence trap on the printer used here is approximately $1.30, with a print time of less than 90 min. PMID:26838346

  13. Spectroscopy with trapped highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-01-23

    We give an overview of atomic spectroscopy performed on electron beam ion traps at various locations throughout the world. Spectroscopy at these facilities contributes to various areas of science and engineering, including but not limited to basic atomic physics, astrophysics, extreme ultraviolet lithography, and the development of density and temperature diagnostics of fusion plasmas. These contributions are accomplished by generating, for example, spectral surveys, making precise radiative lifetime measurements, accounting for radiative power emitted in a given wavelength band, illucidating isotopic effects, and testing collisional-radiative models. While spectroscopy with electron beam ion traps had originally focused on the x-ray emission from highly charged ions interacting with the electron beam, the operating modes of such devices have expanded to study radiation in almost all wavelength bands from the visible to the hard x-ray region; and at several facilities the ions can be studied even in the absence of an electron beam. Photon emission after charge exchange or laser excitation has been observed, and the work is no longer restricted to highly charged ions. Much of the experimental capabilities are unique to electron beam ion traps, and the work performed with these devices cannot be undertaken elsewhere. However, in other areas the work on electron beam ion traps rivals the spectroscopy performed with conventional ion traps or heavy-ion storage rings. The examples we present highlight many of the capabilities of the existing electron beam ion traps and their contributions to physics.

  14. Size based sorting and patterning of microbeads by evaporation driven flow in a 3D micro-traps array.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chee Chung; Liu, Yuxin; Wang, Karen Yanping; Rahman, Abdur Rub Abdur

    2013-09-21

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) micro-traps array for size selective sorting and patterning of microbeads via evaporation-driven capillary flow. The interconnected micro-traps array was manufactured by silicon micromachining. Microliters of aqueous solution containing particle mixtures of different sized (0.2 to 20 μm diameter) beads were dispensed onto the micro-traps substrate. The smaller particles spontaneously wicked towards the periphery of the chip, while the larger beads were orderly docked within the micro-traps array.

  15. Nonlinear spectroscopy of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlawin, Frank; Gessner, Manuel; Mukamel, Shaul; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Nonlinear spectroscopy employs a series of laser pulses to interrogate dynamics in large interacting many-body systems, and it has become a highly successful method for experiments in chemical physics. Current quantum optical experiments approach system sizes and levels of complexity that require the development of efficient techniques to assess spectral and dynamical features with scalable experimental overhead. However, established methods from optical spectroscopy of macroscopic ensembles cannot be applied straightforwardly to few-atom systems. Based on the ideas proposed in M. Gessner et al., (arXiv:1312.3365), we develop a diagrammatic approach to construct nonlinear measurement protocols for controlled quantum systems, and we discuss experimental implementations with trapped ion technology in detail. These methods, in combination with distinct features of ultracold-matter systems, allow us to monitor and analyze excitation dynamics in both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. They are independent of system size, and they can therefore reliably probe systems in which, e.g., quantum state tomography becomes prohibitively expensive. We propose signals that can probe steady-state currents, detect the influence of anharmonicities on phonon transport, and identify signatures of chaotic dynamics near a quantum phase transition in an Ising-type spin chain.

  16. Entanglement of Multiple Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sackett, C. A.

    2000-06-01

    Quantum mechanics allows for many-particle wave functions which cannot be factorized into a product of single-particle wave functions, even when the constituent particles are entirely distinct. Such entangled states explicitly demonstrate the nonclassical correlations of quantum theory,(See for instance J. Bell, Speakable and Unspeakable in Quantum Mechanics). (Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, 1987); J.-W. Pan, D. Bouwmeester, M. Daniell, H. Weinfurter, and A. Zeilinger, Nature 403, 515 (2000). have been suggested for use in high-precision spectroscopy,( J. Bollinger, W.M. Itano, D. Wineland, and D. Heinzen, Phys. Rev. A) 54, R4649 (1996). and are a fundamental element of schemes for quantum communication, cryptography, and computation.(See for instance H.-K Lo, S. Popescu, and T. Spiller, editors, Introduction to Quantum Computation and Information). (World Scientific, Singapore, 1997). In general, the more particles which can be entangled, the more useful the states are for quantum applications. In pursuit of these goals, we have demonstrated an entanglement technique which is applicable to any number of trapped ions.(K. Mølmer and A. Sørensen, Phys. Rev. Lett.) 82, 1835 (1999). We have used this technique to generate entangled states of two, and for the first time, four atoms.

  17. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1990-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potential and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  18. Simple analytic potentials for linear ion traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janik, G. R.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A simple analytical model was developed for the electric and ponderomotive (trapping) potentials in linear ion traps. This model was used to calculate the required voltage drive to a mercury trap, and the result compares well with experiments. The model gives a detailed picture of the geometric shape of the trapping potenital and allows an accurate calculation of the well depth. The simplicity of the model allowed an investigation of related, more exotic trap designs which may have advantages in light-collection efficiency.

  19. Interchange mode excited by trapped energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2015-07-15

    The kinetic energy principle describing the interaction between ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes with trapped energetic ions is revised. A model is proposed on the basis of the reduced ideal MHD equations for background plasmas and the bounce-averaged drift-kinetic equation for trapped energetic ions. The model is applicable to large-aspect-ratio toroidal devices. Specifically, the effect of trapped energetic ions on the interchange mode in helical systems is analyzed. Results show that the interchange mode is excited by trapped energetic ions, even if the equilibrium states are stable to the ideal interchange mode. The energetic-ion-induced branch of the interchange mode might be associated with the fishbone mode in helical systems.

  20. Trapping solids at the inner edge of the dead zone: 3-D global MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyurkevich, N.; Flock, M.; Turner, N. J.; Klahr, H.; Henning, Th.

    2010-06-01

    Context. The poorly-ionized interior of the protoplanetary disk or “dead zone” is the location where dust coagulation processes may be most efficient. However even here, planetesimal formation may be limited by the loss of solid material through radial drift, and by collisional fragmentation of the particles. Both depend on the turbulent properties of the gas. Aims: Our aim here is to investigate the possibility that solid particles are trapped at local pressure maxima in the dynamically evolving disk. We perform the first 3-D global non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) calculations of a section of the disk treating the turbulence driven by the magneto-rotational instability (MRI). Methods: We use the ZeusMP code with a fixed Ohmic resistivity distribution. The domain contains an inner MRI-active region near the young star and an outer midplane dead zone, with the transition between the two modeled by a sharp increase in the magnetic diffusivity. Results: The azimuthal magnetic fields generated in the active zone oscillate over time, changing sign about every 150 years. We thus observe the radial structure of the “butterfly pattern” seen previously in local shearing-box simulations. The mean magnetic field diffuses from the active zone into the dead zone, where the Reynolds stress nevertheless dominates, giving a residual α between 10-4 and 10-3. The greater total accretion stress in the active zone leads to a net reduction in the surface density, so that after 800 years an approximate steady state is reached in which a local radial maximum in the midplane pressure lies near the transition radius. We also observe the formation of density ridges within the active zone. Conclusions: The dead zone in our models possesses a mean magnetic field, significant Reynolds stresses and a steady local pressure maximum at the inner edge, where the outward migration of planetary embryos and the efficient trapping of solid material are possible.

  1. Model simulations of continuous ion injection into electron-beam ion source trap with slanted electrostatic mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, A.; Kponou, A.; Alessi, J. G.; Beebe, E. N.; Prelec, K.; Raparia, D.

    2008-02-15

    The efficiency of trapping ions in an electron-beam ion source (EBIS) is of primary importance for many applications requiring operations with externally produced ions: RIA breeders, ion sources, and traps. At the present time, the most popular method of ion injection is pulsed injection, when short bunches of ions get trapped in a longitudinal trap while traversing the trap region. Continuous trapping is a challenge for EBIS devices because mechanisms which reduce the longitudinal ion energy per charge in a trap (cooling with residual gas, energy exchange with other ions, and ionization) are not very effective, and accumulation of ions is slow. A possible approach to increase trapping efficiency is to slant the mirror at the end of the trap which is opposite to the injection end. A slanted mirror will convert longitudinal motion of ions into transverse motion, and, by reducing their longitudinal velocity, prevent these ions from escaping the trap on their way out. The trade-off for the increased trapping efficiency this way is an increase in the initial transverse energy of the accumulated ions. The slanted mirror can be realized if the ends of two adjacent electrodes, drift tubes, which act as an electrostatic mirror, are machined to produce a slanted gap, rather than an upright one. Applying different voltages to these electrodes will produce a slanted mirror. The results of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) computer simulations of the ion injection into an EBIS are presented using simplified models of an EBIS with conical (2D simulations) and slanted (3D simulations) mirror electrodes.

  2. Trapping low-energy antiprotons in an ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Xiang.

    1990-01-01

    A fraction of antiprotons from the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) of CERN are slowed from 5.9 MeV to below 3 keV as they pass through thin foils. Transmitted particle energy distribution and low energy antiproton yield are measured by a time-of-flight technique. The difference in the range of protons and antiprotons (known as the Barkas effect) is observed. While still in flight, up to 1.3 {times} 10{sup 5} antiprotons with energies between 0 eV to 3 keV are stored in an ion trap from a single pulse of 5.9 MeV antiprotons leaving LEAR, thus a trapping efficiency exceeding of 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} is established. Trapped antiprotons maintain their initial energy distribution unless allowed to collide with a cloud of trapped electrons, whereupon they slow and cool below 1 meV in 10 s, and fall into a harmonic potential well suited for precision mass measurements. The slowing, trapping and cooling of antiprotons are the main focus of this thesis. The stored antiprotons are in thermal equilibrium at 4.2 K. In this ion trap, the antiproton cyclotron frequency is measured and compared with the proton (or electron) cyclotron frequency. The new measured ratio of the antiproton and proton inertial masses, with its 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} uncertainty, is more than three orders of magnitude more accurate than previous measurements using exotic atoms. This is a most precise test of CPT invariance with baryons. The antiproton lifetime in an ion trap was measured to be more than 103 days by trapping a cloud of antiprotons for 59 days. The indicates the number density of atoms is less than 100/cm{sup 3} which corresponds to the pressure in the vacuum chamber being less than 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}17} Torr at 4.2 K if we apply the ideal gas law.

  3. Scaling the ion trap quantum processor.

    PubMed

    Monroe, C; Kim, J

    2013-03-01

    Trapped atomic ions are standards for quantum information processing, serving as quantum memories, hosts of quantum gates in quantum computers and simulators, and nodes of quantum communication networks. Quantum bits based on trapped ions enjoy a rare combination of attributes: They have exquisite coherence properties, they can be prepared and measured with nearly 100% efficiency, and they are readily entangled with each other through the Coulomb interaction or remote photonic interconnects. The outstanding challenge is the scaling of trapped ions to hundreds or thousands of qubits and beyond, at which scale quantum processors can outperform their classical counterparts in certain applications. We review the latest progress and prospects in that effort, with the promise of advanced architectures and new technologies, such as microfabricated ion traps and integrated photonics.

  4. A 3D feature point tracking method for ion radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouwenberg, Jasper J. M.; Ulrich, Leonie; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    A robust and computationally efficient algorithm for automated tracking of high densities of particles travelling in (semi-) straight lines is presented. It extends the implementation of (Sbalzarini and Koumoutsakos 2005) and is intended for use in the analysis of single ion track detectors. By including information of existing tracks in the exclusion criteria and a recursive cost minimization function, the algorithm is robust to variations on the measured particle tracks. A trajectory relinking algorithm was included to resolve the crossing of tracks in high particle density images. Validation of the algorithm was performed using fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTD) irradiated with high- and low (heavy) ion fluences and showed less than 1% faulty trajectories in the latter.

  5. Cavity QED in a molecular ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, D. I.; Bishop, Lev S.; Chuang, I. L.; DeMille, D.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2011-01-15

    We propose a class of experiments using rotational states of dipolar molecular ions trapped near an on-chip superconducting microwave cavity. Molecular ions have several advantages over neutral molecules for such cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. In particular, ions can be loaded easily into deep rf traps and are held independent of their internal state. An analysis of the detection efficiency for, and coherence properties of, the molecular ions is presented. We discuss approaches for manipulating quantum information and performing high-resolution rotational spectroscopy using this system.

  6. Improving IRMPD in a quadrupole ion trap.

    PubMed

    Newsome, G Asher; Glish, Gary L

    2009-06-01

    A focused laser is used to make infrared multiphoton photodissociation (IRMPD) more efficient in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Efficient (up to 100%) dissociation at the standard operating pressure of 1 x 10(-3) Torr can be achieved without any supplemental ion activation and with shorter irradiation times. The axial amplitudes of trapped ion clouds are measured using laser tomography. Laser flux on the ion cloud is increased six times by focusing the laser so that the beam waist approximates the ion cloud size. Unmodified peptide ions from 200 Da to 3 kDa are completely dissociated in 2.5-10 ms at a bath gas pressure of 3.3 x 10(-4) Torr and in 3-25 ms at 1.0 x 10(-3) Torr. Sequential dissociation of product ions is increased by focusing the laser and by operating at an increased bath gas pressure to minimize the size of the ion cloud.

  7. Accelerated simulation study of space charge effects in quadrupole ion traps using GPU techniques.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xingchuang; Xu, Wei; Fang, Xiang; Deng, Yulin; Ouyang, Zheng

    2012-10-01

    Space charge effects play important roles in the performance of various types of mass analyzers. Simulation of space charge effects is often limited by the computation capability. In this study, we evaluate the method of using graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate ion trajectory simulation. Simulation using GPU has been compared with multi-core central processing unit (CPU), and an acceleration of about 390 times have been obtained using a single computer for simulation of up to 10(5) ions in quadrupole ion traps. Characteristics of trapped ions can be investigated at detailed levels within a reasonable simulation time. Space charge effects on the trapping capacities of linear and 3D ion traps, ion cloud shapes, ion motion frequency shift, mass spectrum peak coalescence effects between two ion clouds of close m/z are studied with the ion trajectory simulation using GPU.

  8. Addressing single trapped ions for Rydberg quantum logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachor, P.; Feldker, T.; Walz, J.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the excitation of ions to the Rydberg state 22F by vacuum ultraviolet radiation at a wavelength of 123 nm combined with the coherent manipulation of the optical qubit transition in {}40{{Ca}}+. With a tightly focused beam at 729 nm wavelength we coherently excite a single ion from a linear string into the metastable 3{D}5/2 state before a VUV pulse excites it to the Rydberg state. In combination with ion shuttling in the trap, we extend this approach to the addressed excitation of multiple ions. The coherent initialization as well as the addressed Rydberg excitation are key prerequisites for more complex applications of Rydberg ions in quantum simulation or quantum information processing.

  9. 3D modelling of negative ion extraction from a negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Lifschitz, A. F.; Minea, T.

    2010-10-01

    The development of a suitable negative ion source constitutes a crucial step in the construction of the neutral beam injector of ITER. To fulfil the ITER requirements in terms of heating and current drive, the negative ion source should deliver 40 A of D-. The achievement of such a source constitutes a technical and scientific challenge, and it requires a deeper understanding of the underlying physics of the source. The present knowledge of the ion extraction mechanism from the negative ion source is limited. It constitutes a complex problem that involves understanding the behaviour of magnetized plasma sheaths when negative ions and electrons are pulled out from the plasma. Moreover, due to the asymmetry induced by the crossed magnetic configuration used to filter the electrons, any realistic study of this problem must consider the three spatial dimensions. To address this problem in a realistic way, a 3D particles-in-cell electrostatic code specifically designed for this system was developed. The code uses a Cartesian coordinate system and it can deal with complex boundary geometry as it is the case of the extraction apertures (Hemsworth et al 2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 045006). The complex magnetic field that is applied to deflect electrons is also taken into account. This code, called ONIX, was used to investigate the plasma properties and the transport of negative ions and electrons close to a source extraction aperture. Results in the collisionless approach on the formation of the plasma meniscus and the screening of the extraction field by the plasma are presented here, as well as negative ions trajectories. Negative ion extraction efficiency from volume and surfaces is discussed.

  10. A trapped mercury 199 ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, L. S.; Giffard, R. P.; Mcguire, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    Mercury 199 ions confined in an RF quadrupole trap and optically pumped by mercury 202 ion resonance light are investigated as the basis for a high performance frequency standard with commercial possibilities. Results achieved and estimates of the potential performance of such a standard are given.

  11. Ion parking during ion/ion reactions in electrodynamic ion traps.

    PubMed

    McLuckey, Scott A; Reid, Gavin E; Wells, J Mitchell

    2002-01-15

    Under appropriate ion density conditions, it is possible to selectively inhibit rates of ion/ion reactions in a quadrupole ion trap via the application of oscillatory voltages to one or more electrodes of the ion trap. The phenomenon is demonstrated using dipolar resonance excitation applied to the end-cap electrodes of a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap. The application of a resonance excitation voltage tuned to inhibit the ion/ion reaction rate of a specific range of ion mass-to-charge ratios is referred to as "ion parking". The bases for rate inhibition are (i) an increase in the relative velocity of the ion/ion reaction pair, which reduces the cross section for ion/ion capture and, at least in some cases, (ii) reduction in the time of physical overlap of positively charged and negatively charged ion clouds. The efficiency and specificity of the ion parking experiment is highly dependent upon ion densities, trapping conditions, ion charge states, and resonance excitation conditions. The ion parking experiment is illustrated herein along with applications to the concentration of ions originally present over a range of charge states into a selected charge state and in the selection of a particular ion from a set of ions derived from a simple protein mixture.

  12. Trapped ion scaling with pulsed fast gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, C. D. B.; Carvalho, A. R. R.; Hope, J. J.

    2015-10-01

    Fast entangling gates for trapped ion pairs offer vastly improved gate operation times relative to implemented gates, as well as approaches to trap scaling. Gates on a neighbouring ion pair only involve local ions when performed sufficiently fast, and we find that even a fast gate between a pair of distant ions with few degrees of freedom restores all the motional modes given more stringent gate speed conditions. We compare pulsed fast gate schemes, defined by a timescale faster than the trap period, and find that our proposed scheme has less stringent requirements on laser repetition rate for achieving arbitrary gate time targets and infidelities well below 10-4. By extending gate schemes to ion crystals, we explore the effect of ion number on gate fidelity for coupling two neighbouring ions in large crystals. Inter-ion distance determines the gate time, and a factor of five increase in repetition rate, or correspondingly the laser power, reduces the infidelity by almost two orders of magnitude. We also apply our fast gate scheme to entangle the first and last ions in a crystal. As the number of ions in the crystal increases, significant increases in the laser power are required to provide the short gate times corresponding to fidelity above 0.99.

  13. Fundamental studies of ion injection and trapping of electrosprayed ions on a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarmby, Scott Thomas

    The quadrupole ion trap is a highly versatile and sensitive analytical mass spectrometer. Because of the advantages offered by the ion trap, there has been intense interest in coupling it to ionization techniques such as electrospray which form ions externally to the ion trap. In this work, experiments and computer simulations were employed to study the injection of electrosprayed ions into the ion trap of a Finnigan MAT LCQ LC/MS n mass spectrometer. The kinetic energy distribution of the ion beam was characterized and found to be relatively wide, a result of the high pressures from the atmospheric pressure source. One of the most important experimental parameters which affects ion injection efficiency is the RF voltage applied to the ring electrode. A theoretical model was fit to experimental data allowing the optimum RF voltage for trapping a given m/z ion to be predicted. Computer simulations of ion motion were performed to study the effect of various instrumental parameters on trapping efficiency. A commercially available ion optics program, SIMION v6.0, was chosen because it allowed the actual ion trap electrode geometry including endcap holes to be simulated. In contrast to previous computer simulations, SIMION provided the ability to start ions outside the ion trap and to simulate more accurately the injection of externally formed ions. The endcap holes were found to allow the RF field to penetrate out of the ion trap and affect ions as they approached the ion trap. From these simulations, a model for the process by which injected ions are trapped was developed. Using these computer simulations, techniques of improving trapping efficiency were investigated. Most previous techniques perturb ions which are already in the ion trap and therefore cannot be used to accumulate ions; the ability to accumulate ions is a necessity with ionization sources such as electrospray which form ions continuously. One such novel technique for improving trapping efficiency

  14. Models Ion Trajectories in 2D and 3D Electrostatic and Magnetic Fields

    2000-02-21

    SIMION3D7.0REV is a C based ion optics simulation program that can model complex problems using Laplace equation solutions for potential fields. The program uses an ion optics workbench that can hold up to 200 2D and/or 3D electrostatic/magnetic potential arrays. Arrays can have up to 50,000,000 points. SIMION3D7.0''s 32 bit virtual Graphics User Interface provides a highly interactive advanced user environment. All potential arrays are visualized as 3D objects that the user can cut awaymore » to inspect ion trajectories and potential energy surfaces. User programs allow the user to customize the program for specific simulations. A geometry file option supports the definition of highly complex array geometry. Algorithm modifications have improved this version''s computational speed and accuracy.« less

  15. Extended linear ion trap frequency standard apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A linear ion trap for frequency standard applications is provided with a plurality of trapping rods equally spaced and applied quadruple rf voltages for radial confinement of atomic ions and biased level pins at each end for axial confinement of the ions. The trapping rods are divided into two linear ion trap regions by a gap in each rod in a common radial plane to provide dc discontinuity, thus dc isolating one region from the other. A first region for ion-loading and preparation fluorescence is biased with a dc voltage to transport ions into a second region for resonance frequency comparison with a local oscillator derived frequency while the second region is held at zero voltage. The dc bias voltage of the regions is reversed for transporting the ions back into the first region for fluorescence measurement. The dual mode cycle is repeated continuously for comparison and feedback control of the local oscillator derived frequency. Only the second region requires magnetic shielding for the resonance function which is sensitive to any ambient magnetic fields.

  16. Ion cloud model for a linear quadrupole ion trap.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Don J; Konenkov, Nikolai V

    2012-01-01

    If large numbers of ions are stored in a linear quadrupole ion trap, space charge causes the oscillation frequencies of ions to decrease. Ions then appear at higher apparent masses when resonantly ejected for mass analysis. In principle, to calculate mass shifts requires calculating the positions of all ions, interacting with each other, at all times, with a self-consistent space charge field. Here, we propose a simpler model for the ion cloud in the case where mass shifts and frequency shifts are relatively small (ca 0.2% and 0.4%, respectively), the trapping field is much stronger (ca × 10(2)) than the space charge field and space charge only causes small perturbations to the ion motion. The self-consistent field problem need not be considered. As test ions move with times long compared to a cycle of the trapping field, the motion of individual ions can be ignored. Static positions of the ions in the cloud are used. To generate an ion cloud, trajectories of N (ca 10,000) ions are calculated for random times between 10 and 100 cycles of the trapping radio frequency field. The ions are then distributed axially randomly in a trap four times the field radius, r(0) in length. The potential and electric field from the ion cloud are calculated from the ion positions. Near the trap center (distances r< 1r(0)), the potential and electric fields from space charge are not cylindrically symmetric, but are quite symmetric for greater values of r. Trajectories of test ions, oscillation frequencies and mass shifts can then be calculated in the trapping field, including the space charge field. Mass shifts are in good agreement with experiments for reasonable values of the initial positions and speeds of the ions. Agreement with earlier analytical models for the ion cloud, based on a uniform occupation of phase space, or a thermal (Boltzmann) distribution of ions trapped in the effective potential [D. Douglas and N.V. Konenkov, Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 26, 2105 (2012)] is

  17. Ion trapping and separation using potential wells

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.A.

    2000-01-04

    A new mode of operation for an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) has been demonstrated that uses potential wells to trap and separate ions by their mobility. This mode of operation has been made feasible by the improvements in personal computers that now allow real-time control of the potentials on ring electrodes in the IMS drift tube. This mode of operation does not require a shutter grid and allows the accumulation of ions in the potential well to enhance the ion signal. Loss of ions from the potential well is controlled by the radial electric fields required by Gauss's law.

  18. Cryogenically cooled octupole ion trap for spectroscopy of biomolecular ions.

    PubMed

    Boyarkin, Oleg V; Kopysov, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    We present here the design of a linear octupole ion trap, suitable for collisional cryogenic cooling and spectroscopy of large ions. The performance of this trap has been assessed using ultraviolet (UV) photofragmentation spectroscopy of protonated dipeptides. At the trap temperature of 6.1 K, the vibrational temperature of the ions reaches 9.1 K, although their estimated translational temperature is ~150 K. This observation suggests that, despite the significant translational heating by radio-frequency electrical field, vibrational cooling of heavy ions in the octupole is at least as efficient as in the 22-pole ion traps previously used in our laboratory. In contrast to the 22-pole traps, excellent radial confinement of ions in the octupole makes it convenient for laser spectroscopy and boosts the dissociation yield of the stored ions to 30%. Overlap of the entire ion cloud by the laser beam in the octupole also allows for efficient UV depletion spectroscopy of ion-He clusters. The measured electronic spectra of the dipeptides and the clusters differ drastically, complicating a use of UV tagging spectroscopy for structural determination of large species.

  19. Cryogenically cooled octupole ion trap for spectroscopy of biomolecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarkin, Oleg V.; Kopysov, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    We present here the design of a linear octupole ion trap, suitable for collisional cryogenic cooling and spectroscopy of large ions. The performance of this trap has been assessed using ultraviolet (UV) photofragmentation spectroscopy of protonated dipeptides. At the trap temperature of 6.1 K, the vibrational temperature of the ions reaches 9.1 K, although their estimated translational temperature is ˜150 K. This observation suggests that, despite the significant translational heating by radio-frequency electrical field, vibrational cooling of heavy ions in the octupole is at least as efficient as in the 22-pole ion traps previously used in our laboratory. In contrast to the 22-pole traps, excellent radial confinement of ions in the octupole makes it convenient for laser spectroscopy and boosts the dissociation yield of the stored ions to 30%. Overlap of the entire ion cloud by the laser beam in the octupole also allows for efficient UV depletion spectroscopy of ion-He clusters. The measured electronic spectra of the dipeptides and the clusters differ drastically, complicating a use of UV tagging spectroscopy for structural determination of large species.

  20. Motional-mode analysis of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalis, Henning; Hakelberg, Frederick; Wittemer, Matthias; Mielenz, Manuel; Warring, Ulrich; Schaetz, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    We present two methods for characterization of motional-mode configurations that are generally applicable to the weak- and strong-binding limit of single or multiple trapped atomic ions. Our methods are essential to realize control of the individual as well as the common motional degrees of freedom. In particular, when implementing scalable radio-frequency trap architectures with decreasing ion-electrode distances, local curvatures of electric potentials need to be measured and adjusted precisely, e.g., to tune phonon tunneling and control effective spin-spin interaction. We demonstrate both methods using single 25Mg+ ions that are individually confined 40 μ m above a surface-electrode trap array and prepared close to the ground state of motion in three dimensions.

  1. Product ion scanning using a Q-q-Q linear ion trap (Q TRAP) mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hager, James W; Yves Le Blanc, J C

    2003-01-01

    The use of a Q-q-Q(linear ion trap) instrument to obtain product ion spectra is described. The instrument is based on the ion path of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with Q3 operable as either a conventional RF/DC quadrupole mass filter or a linear ion trap mass spectrometer with axial ion ejection. This unique ion optical arrangement allows de-coupling of precursor ion isolation and fragmentation from the ion trap itself. The result is a high sensitivity tandem mass spectrometer with triple quadrupole fragmentation patterns and no inherent low mass cut-off. The use of the entrance RF-only section of the instrument as accumulation ion trap while the linear ion trap mass spectrometer is scanning enhances duty cycles and results in increased sensitivities by as much as a factor of 20. The instrument is also capable of all of the triple quadrupole scans including multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) as well as precursor and constant neutral loss scanning. The high product ion scanning sensitivity allows the recording of useful product ion spectra near the MRM limit of quantitation.

  2. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Reinard; Kester, Oliver

    2010-02-15

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not ''sorcery'' but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  3. Quantum computation with ions in microscopic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šašura, Marek; Steane, Andrew M.

    2002-12-01

    We discuss a possible experimental realization of fast quantum gates with high fidelity with ions confined in microscopic traps. The original proposal of this physical system for quantum computation comes from Cirac and Zoller (Nature 404, 579 (2000)). In this paper we analyse a sensitivity of the ion-trap quantum gate on various experimental parameters which was omitted in the original proposal. We address imprecision of laser pulses, impact of photon scattering, nonzero temperature effects and influence of laser intensity fluctuations on the total fidelity of the two-qubit phase gate.

  4. Creation of quantum-degenerate gases of ytterbium in a compact 2D-/3D-magneto-optical trap setup

    SciTech Connect

    Doerscher, Soeren; Thobe, Alexander; Hundt, Bastian; Kochanke, Andre; Le Targat, Rodolphe; Windpassinger, Patrick; Becker, Christoph; Sengstock, Klaus

    2013-04-15

    We report on the first experimental setup based on a 2D-/3D-magneto-optical trap (MOT) scheme to create both Bose-Einstein condensates and degenerate Fermi gases of several ytterbium isotopes. Our setup does not require a Zeeman slower and offers the flexibility to simultaneously produce ultracold samples of other atomic species. Furthermore, the extraordinary optical access favors future experiments in optical lattices. A 2D-MOT on the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition captures ytterbium directly from a dispenser of atoms and loads a 3D-MOT on the narrow {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}P{sub 1} intercombination transition. Subsequently, atoms are transferred to a crossed optical dipole trap and cooled evaporatively to quantum degeneracy.

  5. 3D imaging of sea quarks and gluons at an electron-ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey

    2011-11-01

    We outline key objectives and capabilities of an Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) — a high-energy and high-luminosity electron-proton/nucleus collider with polarized electron and proton beams. One of goals of a future EIC is to map the 3D (in configuration and momentum spaces) structure of sea quarks and gluons in the nucleon and nuclei. We briefly present and discuss key observables and measurements pertaining to the program of 3D imaging at an EIC.

  6. Graphene Oxide-Based Electrode Inks for 3D-Printed Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kun; Wang, Yibo; Yan, Chaoyi; Yao, Yonggang; Chen, Yanan; Dai, Jiaqi; Lacey, Steven; Wang, Yanbin; Wan, Jiayu; Li, Tian; Wang, Zhengyang; Xu, Yue; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-04-01

    All-component 3D-printed lithium-ion batteries are fabricated by printing graphene-oxide-based composite inks and solid-state gel polymer electrolyte. An entirely 3D-printed full cell features a high electrode mass loading of 18 mg cm(-2) , which is normalized to the overall area of the battery. This all-component printing can be extended to the fabrication of multidimensional/multiscale complex-structures of more energy-storage devices. PMID:26833897

  7. Graphene Oxide-Based Electrode Inks for 3D-Printed Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kun; Wang, Yibo; Yan, Chaoyi; Yao, Yonggang; Chen, Yanan; Dai, Jiaqi; Lacey, Steven; Wang, Yanbin; Wan, Jiayu; Li, Tian; Wang, Zhengyang; Xu, Yue; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-04-01

    All-component 3D-printed lithium-ion batteries are fabricated by printing graphene-oxide-based composite inks and solid-state gel polymer electrolyte. An entirely 3D-printed full cell features a high electrode mass loading of 18 mg cm(-2) , which is normalized to the overall area of the battery. This all-component printing can be extended to the fabrication of multidimensional/multiscale complex-structures of more energy-storage devices.

  8. Trapped Atomic Ions and Quantum Information Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Wineland, D. J.; Leibfried, D.; Bergquist, J. C.; Blakestad, R. B.; Bollinger, J. J.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Epstein, R. J.; Hume, D. B.; Itano, W. M.; Jost, J. D.; Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Langer, C.; Ozeri, R.; Reichle, R.; Rosenband, T.; Schaetz, T.; Schmidt, P. O.; Seidelin, S.; Shiga, N.

    2006-11-07

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a large-scale information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high-fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. This is still well in the future. NIST and other groups are addressing part of the scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly-parallel and scalable processing. In the near term, some simple quantum processing protocols are being used to aid in quantum metrology, such as in atomic clocks. As the number of qubits increases, Schroedinger's cat paradox and the measurement problem in quantum mechanics become more apparent; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on these fundamental issues.

  9. Measurement of 3D-forces on a Micro Particle in Acoustofluidic Devices Using an Optical Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, Andreas; Lakämper, Stefan; Schaap, Iwan A. T.; Dual, Jurg

    Here, we use a calibrated high gradient laser trap to directly measure the total time-averaged 3D force on a dielectric silica parti- cle in the regime of an ultrasonic standing wave. Acoustic radiation and acoustic streaming apply forces on an optically trapped particle within an acoustofluidic device. From measuring the induced displacements from the laser trap center in three dimen- sions the acoustic forces (0.2-50pN) can be calculated in dependence of the particle position and excitation frequency. Thus, the real pressure distributions within acoustofluidic devices can be mapped out. The three dimensional direct measurement, as pre- sented here, opens up the possibility to quantify so far inaccessible small scale phenomena such as the effects of: a.) local and global acoustic streaming, and b.) boundaries or close-by objects.

  10. Extending the Dynamic Range of the Ion Trap by Differential Mobility Filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adam B.; Coy, Stephen L.; Kafle, Amol; Glick, James; Nazarov, Erkinjon; Vouros, Paul

    2013-09-01

    A miniature, planar, differential ion mobility spectrometer (DMS) was interfaced to an LCQ classic ion trap to conduct selective ion filtration prior to mass analysis in order to extend the dynamic range of the trap. Space charge effects are known to limit the functional ion storage capacity of ion trap mass analyzers and this, in turn, can affect the quality of the mass spectral data generated. This problem is further exacerbated in the analysis of mixtures where the indiscriminate introduction of matrix ions results in premature trap saturation with non-targeted species, thereby reducing the number of parent ions that may be used to conduct MS/MS experiments for quantitation or other diagnostic studies. We show that conducting differential mobility-based separations prior to mass analysis allows the isolation of targeted analytes from electrosprayed mixtures preventing the indiscriminate introduction of matrix ions and premature trap saturation with analytically unrelated species. Coupling these two analytical techniques is shown to enhance the detection of a targeted drug metabolite from a biological matrix. In its capacity as a selective ion filter, the DMS can improve the analytical performance of analyzers such as quadrupole (3D or linear) and ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) ion traps that depend on ion accumulation.

  11. Extending the Dynamic Range of the Ion Trap by Differential Mobility Filtration

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Adam B.; Coy, Stephen L.; Kafle, Amol; Glick, James; Nazarov, Erkinjon

    2013-01-01

    A miniature, planar, differential ion mobility spectrometer (DMS) was interfaced to an LCQ classic ion trap to conduct selective ion filtration prior to mass analysis in order to extend the dynamic range of the trap. Space charge effects are known to limit the functional ion storage capacity of ion trap mass analyzers and this, in turn, can affect the quality of the mass spectral data generated. This problem is further exacerbated in the analysis of mixtures where the indiscriminate introduction of matrix ions results in premature trap saturation with non-targeted species, thereby reducing the number of parent ions that may be used to conduct MS/MS experiments for quantitation or other diagnostic studies. We show that conducting differential mobility-based separations prior to mass analysis allows the isolation of targeted analytes from electrosprayed mixtures preventing the indiscriminate introduction of matrix ions and premature trap saturation with analytically unrelated species. Coupling these two analytical techniques is shown to enhance the detection of a targeted drug metabolite from a biological matrix. In its capacity as a selective ion filter, the DMS can improve the analytical performance of analyzers such as quadrupole (3-D or linear) and ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) ion traps that depend on ion accumulation. PMID:23797861

  12. Ion Behavior in an Electrically Compensated Ion Cyclotron Resonance Trap

    PubMed Central

    Brustkern, Adam M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    We recently described a new electrically compensated trap in FT ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and developed a means of tuning traps of this general design. Here, we describe a continuation of that research by comparing the ion transient lifetimes and the resulting mass resolving powers and signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios that are achievable in the compensated vs. uncompensated modes of this trap. Transient lifetimes are ten times longer under the same conditions of pressure, providing improved mass resolving power and S/N ratios. The mass resolving power as a function of m/z is linear (log-log plot) and nearly equal to the theoretical maximum. Importantly, the ion cyclotron frequency as a function of ion number decreases linearly in accord with theory, unlike its behavior in the uncompensated mode. This linearity should lead to better control in mass calibration and increased mass accuracy than achievable in the uncompensated mode. PMID:21499521

  13. Quantum simulations with cold trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatt, Rainer

    2016-05-01

    The quantum toolbox of the Innsbruck ion-trap quantum computer is applied to simulate the dynamics and to investigate the propagation of entanglement in a quantum many-body system represented by long chains of trapped-ion qubits. Quantum dynamics can be described by particle-like carriers of information that emerge in the collective behavior of the underlying system, the so-called quasiparticles. These elementary excitations are predicted to distribute quantum information in a fashion determined by the system's interactions. First, we observe the entanglement distributed by quasiparticles as they trace out light-cone-like wavefronts. Second, using the ability to tune the interaction range in our system, we observe information propagation in an experimental regime where the effective-lightcone picture does not apply. Moreover, a spectroscopic technique is presented to study artificial quantum matter and use it for characterizing quasiparticles in a many-body system of trapped atomic ions. Our approach is to excite combinations of the system's fundamental quasiparticle eigenmodes, given by delocalized spin waves. By observing the dynamical response to superpositions of such eigenmodes, we extract the system dispersion relation, magnetic order, and even detect signatures of quasiparticle interactions. In the second part of the talk, it will be shown how strings of trapped ions can be used for quantum simulations of a lattice gauge field theory. As an example, we map the real-time evolution of the Schwinger mechanism to a string of trapped ions in a few-qubit quantum computer, simulating the spontaneous creation of electron-positron pairs.

  14. Trapped Ion Magnetic Resonance: Concepts and Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizarro, Pedro Jose

    A novel spectroscopy of trapped ions is proposed which will bring single-ion detection sensitivity to the observation of magnetic resonance spectra and resolve the apparent incompatibility in existing techniques between high information content and high sensitivity. Methods for studying both electron spin resonance (ESR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are designed. They assume established techniques for trapping ions in high magnetic field and observing electrically the trapping frequencies with high resolution (<1 Hz) and sensitivity (single -ion). A magnetic bottle field gradient couples the spin and spatial motions together and leads to the small spin -dependent force on the ion exploited by Dehmelt to observe directly the perturbation of the ground-state electron's axial frequency by its spin magnetic moment. A series of fundamental innovations is described to extend magnetic resonance to molecular ions ( cong 100 amu) and nuclear magnetic moments. It is demonstrated how time-domain trapping frequency observations before and after magnetic resonance can be used to make cooling of the particle to its ground state unnecessary. Adiabatic cycling of the magnetic bottle off between detection periods is shown to be practical and to allow high-resolution magnetic resonance to be encoded pointwise as the presence or absence of trapping frequency shifts. Methods of inducing spin -dependent work on the ion orbits with magnetic field gradients and Larmor frequency irradiation are proposed which greatly amplify the attainable shifts in trapping frequency. The first proposal presented builds on Dehmelt's experiment to reveal ESR spectra. A more powerful technique for ESR is then designed where axially synchronized spin transitions perform spin-dependent work in the presence of a magnetic bottle, which also converts axial amplitude changes into cyclotron frequency shifts. The most general approach presented is a continuous Stern-Gerlach effect in which a magnetic field

  15. Linear ion trap based atomic frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, Lute

    1991-01-01

    In order to develop a trapped ion-based fieldable frequency standard with stability 1 x 10 to the -13th/sq rt tau for averaging times tau greater than 10,000 s, a hybrid RF/DC linear ion trap was developed which permits storage of large numbers of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. The authors have confined Hg-199(+) ions in this trap and have measured very high Q transitions with good SNRs. In preliminary measurements they obtained stabilities of 1.6 x 10 to the -13th/sq rt tau (tau between 50 and 800 s) with a 160-mHz wide atomic resonance linewidth and a signal-to-noise ratio of 40 for each measurement cycle. Atomic resonance lines as narrow as 30 mHz on the 40.5-GHz clock transition have been measured with no appreciable reduction in the ion signal. A stability of 7 x 10 to the -14th/sq rt tau is made possible by the signal-to-noise and line Q of this measured transition. Analysis of fundamental sources of frequency instability indicates that a long-term stability of 2 x 10 to the -16th is feasible for this device with existing technology for tau = 10 to the 6th s or more.

  16. Miniaturized Linear Wire Ion Trap Mass Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinghao; Li, Ailin; Tian, Yuan; Zare, Richard N; Austin, Daniel E

    2016-08-01

    We report a linear ion trap (LIT) in which the electric field is formed by fine wires held under tension and accurately positioned using holes drilled in two end plates made of plastic. The coordinates of the hole positions were optimized in simulation. The stability diagram and mass spectra using boundary ejection were compared between simulation and experiment and good agreement was found. The mass spectra from experiments show peak widths (fwhm) in units of mass-to-charge of around 0.38 Th using a scan rate of 3830 Th/s. The limits of detection are 137 ppbv and 401 ppbv for benzene and toluene, respectively. Different sizes of the wire ion trap can be easily fabricated by drilling holes in scaled positions. Other distinguishing features, such as high ion and photon transmission, low capacitance, high tolerance to mechanical and assembly error, and low weight, are discussed. PMID:27373557

  17. The trapped mercury ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    Singly ionized mercury atoms have a structure similar to neutral alkali atoms. They can be maintained as ions for very long times in an RF quadrupole ion trap. Thus, their ground state hyperfine structure can be used to make a frequency standard using optical pumping techniques similar to the well-known rubidium standard. The mass 199 isotope of mercury has an ionic hyperfine structure of 40.5 GHz. In a trap system a linewidth of 10 Hz has been measured. An expression is presented for the short-term stability of a proposed mercury standard as set by the achieved signal to noise ratio. There is prospect of further improvement. Long-term stability is affected by second order doppler effect, and by pressure, light, and Stark shifts. However, these appear either sufficiently small or sufficiently controlable that the proposed mercury ion standard would be competitive with existing standards.

  18. Development of a Kingdon ion trap system for trapping externally injected highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Numadate, Naoki; Okada, Kunihiro; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Tanuma, Hajime

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a Kingdon ion trap system for the purpose of the laboratory observation of the x-ray forbidden transitions of highly charged ions (HCIs). Externally injected Ar{sup q+} (q = 5–7) with kinetic energies of 6q keV were successfully trapped in the ion trap. The energy distribution of trapped ions is discussed in detail on the basis of numerical simulations. The combination of the Kingdon ion trap and the time-of-flight mass spectrometer enabled us to measure precise trapping lifetimes of HCIs. As a performance test of the instrument, we measured trapping lifetimes of Ar{sup q+} (q = 5–7) under a constant number density of H₂ and determined the charge-transfer cross sections of Ar{sup q+}(q = 5, 6)-H₂ collision systems at binary collision energies of a few eV. It was confirmed that the present cross section data are consistent with previous data and the values estimated by some scaling formula.

  19. Ion Beam Etching: Replication of Micro Nano-structured 3D Stencil Masks

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Patrick; Guibert, Edouard; Mikhailov, Serguei; Bruegger, Juergen; Villanueva, Guillermo

    2009-03-10

    Ion beam LIGA allows the etching of 3D nano-structures by direct writing with a nano-sized beam. However, this is a relatively time consuming process. We propose here another approach for etching structures on large surfaces and faster, compared to the direct writing process. This approach consists of replicating 3D structured masks, by scanning an unfocused ion beam. A polymer substrate is placed behind the mask, as in UV photolithography. But the main advantage is that the 3D structure of the mask can be replicated into the polymer. For that purpose, the masks (developped at LMIS1, EPFL) are made of a silicon nitride membrane 100 nm thick, on which 3D gold structures up to 200 nm thick, are deposited. The 3D Au structures are made with the nanostencil method, based on successive gold deposition. The IMA institute, from HE-Arc, owns a High Voltage Engineering 1.7 MV Tandetron with both solid and gaseous negative ion sources, able to generate ions from almost every chemical element in a broad range of energies comprised between 400 keV and 6.8 MeV. The beam composition and energy are chosen in such a way, that ions lose a significant fraction of their energy when passing through the thickest regions of the mask. Ions passing through thinner regions of the mask loose a smaller fraction of their energy and etch the polymer with larger thicknesses, allowing a replication of the mask into the polymer. For our trials, we have used a carbon beam with an energy of 500 keV. The beam was focussed to a diameter of 5 mm with solid slits, in order to avoid border effects and thus ensure a homogeneous dose distribution on the beam diameter. The feasibility of this technique has been demonstrated, allowing industrial applications for micro-mould fabrication, micro-fluidics and micro-optics.

  20. Industrial challenges in ion beam processing and metrology in the 3D era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, J.; Möller, W.

    2015-12-01

    Ion beam mechanisms present in plasma doping have been investigated by comparing SIMS measurements of Ge implants into deposited layers of As on Si wafers to planar dynamic ion beam models of the implants and SIMS analyses. Industrial devices are overcoming the limitations of lateral scaling by using the vertical direction. The same modelling approach would be valuable for interpreting 1.5D SIMS analyses of plasma doping of 3D-NAND test structures but 3D dynamic codes do not yet have all the capabilities to allow this. The required features are being developed within a static 3D code, TRI3DSTP, which has been used to qualitatively explain the good uniformity of a P plasma doping process and indicate where more quantitative explanations will be possible once the full dynamic capabilities are available.

  1. Ion track reconstruction in 3D using alumina-based fluorescent nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Niklas, M; Bartz, J A; Akselrod, M S; Abollahi, A; Jäkel, O; Greilich, S

    2013-09-21

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3: C, Mg single crystal combined with confocal microscopy provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution only limited by light diffraction. FNTDs are also ideal substrates to be coated with cells to engineer cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors (Cell-Fit-HD). This radiobiological tool enables a novel platform linking cell responses to physical dose deposition on a sub-cellular level in proton and heavy ion therapies. To achieve spatial correlation between single ion hits in the cell coating and its biological response the ion traversals have to be reconstructed in 3D using the depth information gained by the FNTD read-out. FNTDs were coated with a confluent human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial (A549) cell layer. Carbon ion irradiation of the hybrid detector was performed perpendicular and angular to the detector surface. In situ imaging of the fluorescently labeled cell layer and the FNTD was performed in a sequential read-out. Making use of the trajectory information provided by the FNTD the accuracy of 3D track reconstruction of single particles traversing the hybrid detector was studied. The accuracy is strongly influenced by the irradiation angle and therefore by complexity of the FNTD signal. Perpendicular irradiation results in highest accuracy with error of smaller than 0.10°. The ability of FNTD technology to provide accurate 3D ion track reconstruction makes it a powerful tool for radiobiological investigations in clinical ion beams, either being used as a substrate to be coated with living tissue or being implanted in vivo. PMID:23965401

  2. Ion track reconstruction in 3D using alumina-based fluorescent nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklas, M.; Bartz, J. A.; Akselrod, M. S.; Abollahi, A.; Jäkel, O.; Greilich, S.

    2013-09-01

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3: C, Mg single crystal combined with confocal microscopy provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution only limited by light diffraction. FNTDs are also ideal substrates to be coated with cells to engineer cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors (Cell-Fit-HD). This radiobiological tool enables a novel platform linking cell responses to physical dose deposition on a sub-cellular level in proton and heavy ion therapies. To achieve spatial correlation between single ion hits in the cell coating and its biological response the ion traversals have to be reconstructed in 3D using the depth information gained by the FNTD read-out. FNTDs were coated with a confluent human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial (A549) cell layer. Carbon ion irradiation of the hybrid detector was performed perpendicular and angular to the detector surface. In situ imaging of the fluorescently labeled cell layer and the FNTD was performed in a sequential read-out. Making use of the trajectory information provided by the FNTD the accuracy of 3D track reconstruction of single particles traversing the hybrid detector was studied. The accuracy is strongly influenced by the irradiation angle and therefore by complexity of the FNTD signal. Perpendicular irradiation results in highest accuracy with error of smaller than 0.10°. The ability of FNTD technology to provide accurate 3D ion track reconstruction makes it a powerful tool for radiobiological investigations in clinical ion beams, either being used as a substrate to be coated with living tissue or being implanted in vivo.

  3. EDITORIAL: Modern applications of trapped ions Modern applications of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoop, Martina; Hilico, Laurent; Eschner, Jürgen

    2009-08-01

    Ion traps are fantastic tools to explore the world of electrons, atomic and molecular ions, or charged clusters, in the classical as well as in the quantum regime. Extremely long storage times allow probing even of single particles with very high precision. The mass selectivity of the trapping devices is exploited in many experiments, in particular for mass metrology. An overwhelming part of the experiments and ideas rely on the very high level of parameter control which is offered by the ion trap. Manipulation of individual ions and engineering of well defined quantum states are the fundamental techniques to take the experiments beyond existing frontiers and to unprecedented precision. This special issue presents state-of-the-art theory and experiments in a variety of tutorials, reviews and research papers. More than half of these contributions form a follow-up to the first workshop on Modern Applications of Trapped Ions held in Les Houches, France, in May 2008. A great number of topics is covered in atomic and molecular physics, with ion traps as a common tool. The variety of approaches is meant to make this digest a helpful resource to the whole ion trapping community. Among the contributions, four major - while still overlapping - domains can be identified. Novel ion trap design is the motor of future developments and applications. Spectacular progress has been made in the domain of quantum information processing, such as the realization of planar traps, which opens the way to large-scale quantum computation. In this issue, this enthralling subject is introduced by a tutorial and two review articles, completed by contributions on different experimental realizations. Precision measurements belong to a more traditional domain which nevertheless evolves at the forefront of research: metrology of frequencies and fundamental constants, measurements of g-factors or high-precision mass measurements are the foundations of atomic and molecular physics. The creation and

  4. The JPL trapped mercury ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1988-01-01

    In order to provide frequency standards for the Deep Space Network (DSN) which are more stable than present-day hydrogen masers, a research task was established under the Advanced Systems Program of the TDA to develop a Hg-199(+) trapped ion frequency standard. The first closed-loop operation of this kind is described. Mercury-199 ions are confined in an RF trap and are state-selected through the use of optical pumping with 194 nm UV light from a Hg-202 discharge lamp. Absorption of microwave radiation at the hyperfine frequency (40.5 GHz) is signaled by atomic fluorescence of the UV light. The frequency of a 40.5 GHz oscillator is locked to a 1.6 Hz wide atomic absorption line of the trapped ions. The measured Allan variance of this locked oscillator is currently gamma sub y (pi) = 4.4 x 10 to the minus 12th/square root of pi for 20 is less than pi is less than 320 seconds, which is better stability than the best commercial cesium standards by almost a factor of 2. This initial result was achieved without magnetic shielding and without regulation of ion number.

  5. Ion counting from explicit-solvent simulations and 3D-RISM.

    PubMed

    Giambaşu, George M; Luchko, Tyler; Herschlag, Daniel; York, Darrin M; Case, David A

    2014-02-18

    The ionic atmosphere around nucleic acids remains only partially understood at atomic-level detail. Ion counting (IC) experiments provide a quantitative measure of the ionic atmosphere around nucleic acids and, as such, are a natural route for testing quantitative theoretical approaches. In this article, we replicate IC experiments involving duplex DNA in NaCl(aq) using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM), and nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann (NLPB) calculations and test against recent buffer-equilibration atomic emission spectroscopy measurements. Further, we outline the statistical mechanical basis for interpreting IC experiments and clarify the use of specific concentration scales. Near physiological concentrations, MD simulation and 3D-RISM estimates are close to experimental results, but at higher concentrations (>0.7 M), both methods underestimate the number of condensed cations and overestimate the number of excluded anions. The effect of DNA charge on ion and water atmosphere extends 20-25 Å from its surface, yielding layered density profiles. Overall, ion distributions from 3D-RISMs are relatively close to those from corresponding MD simulations, but with less Na(+) binding in grooves and tighter binding to phosphates. NLPB calculations, on the other hand, systematically underestimate the number of condensed cations at almost all concentrations and yield nearly structureless ion distributions that are qualitatively distinct from those generated by both MD simulation and 3D-RISM. These results suggest that MD simulation and 3D-RISM may be further developed to provide quantitative insight into the characterization of the ion atmosphere around nucleic acids and their effect on structure and stability.

  6. Ion Counting from Explicit-Solvent Simulations and 3D-RISM

    PubMed Central

    Giambaşu, George M.; Luchko, Tyler; Herschlag, Daniel; York, Darrin M.; Case, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The ionic atmosphere around nucleic acids remains only partially understood at atomic-level detail. Ion counting (IC) experiments provide a quantitative measure of the ionic atmosphere around nucleic acids and, as such, are a natural route for testing quantitative theoretical approaches. In this article, we replicate IC experiments involving duplex DNA in NaCl(aq) using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM), and nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann (NLPB) calculations and test against recent buffer-equilibration atomic emission spectroscopy measurements. Further, we outline the statistical mechanical basis for interpreting IC experiments and clarify the use of specific concentration scales. Near physiological concentrations, MD simulation and 3D-RISM estimates are close to experimental results, but at higher concentrations (>0.7 M), both methods underestimate the number of condensed cations and overestimate the number of excluded anions. The effect of DNA charge on ion and water atmosphere extends 20–25 Å from its surface, yielding layered density profiles. Overall, ion distributions from 3D-RISMs are relatively close to those from corresponding MD simulations, but with less Na+ binding in grooves and tighter binding to phosphates. NLPB calculations, on the other hand, systematically underestimate the number of condensed cations at almost all concentrations and yield nearly structureless ion distributions that are qualitatively distinct from those generated by both MD simulation and 3D-RISM. These results suggest that MD simulation and 3D-RISM may be further developed to provide quantitative insight into the characterization of the ion atmosphere around nucleic acids and their effect on structure and stability. PMID:24559991

  7. Microscopic spin Hamiltonian approaches for 3d8 and 3d2 ions in a trigonal crystal field - perturbation theory methods versus complete diagonalization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudowicz, Czeslaw; Yeung, Yau-yuen; Yang, Zi-Yuan; Qin, Jian

    2002-06-01

    In this paper, we critically review the existing microscopic spin Hamiltonian (MSH) approaches, namely the complete diagonalization method (CDM) and the perturbation theory method (PTM), for 3d8(3d2) ions in a trigonal (C3v, D3, D3d) symmetry crystal field (CF). A new CDM is presented and a CFA/MSH computer package based on our crystal-field analysis (CFA) package for 3dN ions is developed for numerical calculations. Our method takes into account the contribution to the SH parameters (D, g∥ and g⊥) from all 45 CF states for 3d8(3d2) ions and is based on the complete diagonalization of the Hamiltonian including the electrostatic interactions, the CF terms (in the intermediate CF scheme) and the spin-orbit coupling. The CFA/MSH package enables us to study not only the CF energy levels and wavefunctions but also the SH parameters as functions of the CF parameters (B20, B40 and B43 or alternatively Dq, v and v') for 3d8(3d2) ions in trigonal symmetry. Extensive comparative studies of other MSH approaches are carried out using the CFA/MSH package. First, we check the accuracy of the approximate PTM based on the `quasi-fourth-order' perturbation formulae developed by Petrosyan and Mirzakhanyan (PM). The present investigations indicate that the PM formulae for the g-factors (g∥ and g⊥) indeed work well, especially for the cases of small v and v' and large Dq, whereas the PM formula for the zero-field splitting (ZFS) exhibits serious shortcomings. Earlier criticism of the PM approach by Zhou et al (Zhou K W, Zhao S B, Wu P F and Xie J K 1990 Phys. Status Solidi b 162 193) is then revisited. Second, we carry out an extensive comparison of the results of the present CFA/MSH package and those of other CDMs based on the strong- and weak-CF schemes. The CF energy levels and the SH parameters for 3d2 and 3d8 ions at C3v symmetry sites in several crystals are calculated and analysed. Our investigations reveal serious inconsistencies in the CDM results of Zhou et al and Li

  8. Quantum error correction with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Philipp

    Quantum computers promise exponential speed-up compared to their classical counterparts for certain problems. Unfortunately, the states required for quantum computation are fragile and lose their quantum properties with growing system size. In a milestone work, it has been shown that quantum error correction can overcome this problem and enable arbitrary long and arbitrary high quality quantum algorithms. However, current experiments are not able to fulfill the requirements to employ useful quantum error correction procedures. In this talk, I will first review past proof-of-principle experiments in trapped ion quantum information processors. Building on that, I will sketch a way towards a medium-sized trapped ion system that will be capable of running an error correction procedure that outperforms it constituents.

  9. Quantum Rabi Model with Trapped Ions.

    PubMed

    Pedernales, J S; Lizuain, I; Felicetti, S; Romero, G; Lamata, L; Solano, E

    2015-01-01

    We propose the quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi model in all parameter regimes by means of detuned bichromatic sideband excitations of a single trapped ion. We show that current setups can reproduce, in particular, the ultrastrong and deep strong coupling regimes of such a paradigmatic light-matter interaction. Furthermore, associated with these extreme dipolar regimes, we study the controlled generation and detection of their entangled ground states by means of adiabatic methods. Ion traps have arguably performed the first quantum simulation of the Jaynes-Cummings model, a restricted regime of the quantum Rabi model where the rotating-wave approximation holds. We show that one can go beyond and experimentally investigate the quantum simulation of coupling regimes of the quantum Rabi model that are difficult to achieve with natural dipolar interactions. PMID:26482660

  10. Ultrafast Interferometry and Gates with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kale; Wong-Campos, David; Neyenhuis, Brian; Mizrahi, Jonathan; Monroe, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    We sense the motion of a trapped atomic ion using a sequence of state-dependent ultrafast momentum kicks. We use this atom interferometer to characterize a nearly-pure quantum state with n = 1 phonon and accurately measure thermal states ranging from near the zero-point energy to n ~104 , with the possibility of extending at least 100 times higher in energy. The complete energy range of this method spans from the ground state to far outside of the Lamb-Dicke regime, where atomic motion is greater than the optical wavelength. Apart from thermometry, these interferometric techniques are useful for quantum information purposes, and we discuss the outlook for ultrafast entangling gates between multiple trapped ions. This work is supported by the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  11. Trapped Ion Quantum Computation by Adiabatic Passage

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xuni; Wu Chunfeng; Lai, C. H.; Oh, C. H.

    2008-11-07

    We propose a new universal quantum computation scheme for trapped ions in thermal motion via the technique of adiabatic passage, which incorporates the advantages of both the adiabatic passage and the model of trapped ions in thermal motion. Our scheme is immune from the decoherence due to spontaneous emission from excited states as the system in our scheme evolves along a dark state. In our scheme the vibrational degrees of freedom are not required to be cooled to their ground states because they are only virtually excited. It is shown that the fidelity of the resultant gate operation is still high even when the magnitude of the effective Rabi frequency moderately deviates from the desired value.

  12. Quantum Rabi Model with Trapped Ions

    PubMed Central

    Pedernales, J. S.; Lizuain, I.; Felicetti, S.; Romero, G.; Lamata, L.; Solano, E.

    2015-01-01

    We propose the quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi model in all parameter regimes by means of detuned bichromatic sideband excitations of a single trapped ion. We show that current setups can reproduce, in particular, the ultrastrong and deep strong coupling regimes of such a paradigmatic light-matter interaction. Furthermore, associated with these extreme dipolar regimes, we study the controlled generation and detection of their entangled ground states by means of adiabatic methods. Ion traps have arguably performed the first quantum simulation of the Jaynes-Cummings model, a restricted regime of the quantum Rabi model where the rotating-wave approximation holds. We show that one can go beyond and experimentally investigate the quantum simulation of coupling regimes of the quantum Rabi model that are difficult to achieve with natural dipolar interactions. PMID:26482660

  13. High transmission 3D printed flex-PCB-based ion funnel.

    PubMed

    Tridas, Eric Miguel; Allemang, Christopher; Mast, Fabian; Anthony, J Mark; Schlaf, Rudiger

    2015-07-01

    In this study a novel fabrication method for a radio frequency (RF) ion funnel is presented. RF ion funnels are important devices for focusing ion clouds at low vacuum conditions for mass spectrometry or deposition-related applications. Typically, ion funnels are constructed of stainless steel plate ring electrodes with a decreasing diameter where RF and direct current potentials are applied to the electrodes to focus the ion cloud. The presented novel design is based on a flexible circuit board that serves both as the signal distribution circuit and as the electrodes of the ion funnel. The flexible circuit board is rolled into a 3D printed scaffold to create a funnel shape with ring electrodes formed by the copper electrodes of the flexible circuit board. The design is characterized in direct comparison with a conventional steel-plate electrode design. The discussed results show that the new funnel has similar performance to the conventionally designed funnel despite much lower manufacturing costs.

  14. Experimental wavelengths for intrashell transitions in tungsten ions with partially filled 3p and 3d subshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartsson, Thomas; Clementson, Joel; Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Spectra and measured wavelengths of intrashell n=3 transitions in highly charged tungsten ions with partially filled 3p and 3d valence shells, Al-like W61+ through Fe-like W48+, are presented. The ions were created and excited at the electron-beam ion-trap facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and measured with a high-resolution grazing-incidence spectrometer. The spectral lines were studied in the 27-41 Å range and were analyzed by a comparison with synthetic spectra based on a collisional-radiative model. We determined that the emission includes not only electric-dipole-allowed transitions, but also several electric-quadrupole and magnetic-dipole transitions. Line-position uncertainties as low as 25 ppm were achieved. Thus, our measurements provide much-needed benchmarks for calculations of the atomic structure of highly charged ions with a partially filled subshell, since these ions are difficult to calculate due to electron-correlation effects.

  15. Integrated 3D macro-trapping and light-sheet imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhengyi; Piksarv, Peeter; Ferrier, David E. K.; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2015-08-01

    Biological research requires high-speed and low-damage imaging techniques for live specimens in areas such as development study in embryos. Light sheet microscopy provides fast imaging speed whilst keeps the photo-damage and photo-blenching to minimum. Conventional sample embedding methods in light sheet imaging involves using agent such as agarose which potentially affects the behavior and the develop pattern of the specimens. Here we demonstrate integrating dual-beam trapping method into light sheet imaging system to confine and translate the specimen whilst light sheet images are taken. Tobacco plant cells as well as Spirobranchus lamarcki larva were trapped solely with optical force and sectional images were acquired. This now approach has the potential to extend the applications of light sheet imaging significantly.

  16. Note: Ion source design for ion trap systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, J. R.; Quevedo, M.; Gnade, B.; Vasselli, J.

    2013-06-01

    A small plasma (glow discharge) based ion source and circuit are described in this work. The ion source works by producing a high voltage pulsed discharge between two electrodes in a pressure range of 50-100 mTorr. A third mesh electrode is used for ion extraction. The electrodes are small stainless steel screws mounted in a MACOR ionization chamber in a linear arrangement. The electrode arrangement is driven by a circuit, design for low power operation. This design is a proof of concept intended for applications on small cylindrical ion traps.

  17. An improved linear ion trap physics package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes an improvement in the architecture of the physics package used in the Linear Ion Trap (LIT)-based frequency standard recently developed at JPL. This new design is based on the observation that ions can be moved along the axis of an LIT by applied dc voltages. The state selection and interrogation region can be separated from the more critical microwave resonance region where the multiplied local oscillator signal is compared with the stable atomic transition. This separation relaxes many of the design constraints of the present units. Improvements include increased frequency stability and a substantial reduction in size, mass, and cost of the final frequency standard.

  18. Quantum computation with ``hot`` trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    James, D.F.V.; Schneider, S. |; Milburn, G.J.

    1998-12-31

    The authors describe two methods that have been proposed to circumvent the problem of heating by external electromagnetic fields in ion trap quantum computers. Firstly the higher order modes of ion oscillation (i.e., modes other than the center-of-mass mode) have much slower heating rates, and can therefore be employed as a reliable quantum information bus. Secondly they discuss a recently proposed method combining adiabatic passage and a number-state dependent phase shift which allows quantum gates to be performed using the center-of-mass mode as the information bus, regardless of its initial state.

  19. Fast ion transport during applied 3D magnetic perturbations on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Zeeland, M. A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Kramer, G. J.; Lasnier, C. J.; Pace, D. C.; Allen, S. L.; Chen, X.; Evans, T. E.; García-Muñoz, M.; Hanson, J. M.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lao, L. L.; Meyer, W. H.; Moyer, R. A.; Nazikian, R.; Orlov, D. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Wingen, A.

    2015-07-01

    Measurements show fast ion losses correlated with applied three-dimensional (3D) fields in a variety of plasmas ranging from L-mode to resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) edge localized mode (ELM) suppressed H-mode discharges. In DIII-D L-mode discharges with a slowly rotating n=2 magnetic perturbation, scintillator detector loss signals synchronized with the applied fields are observed to decay within one poloidal transit time after beam turn-off indicating they arise predominantly from prompt loss orbits. Full orbit following using M3D-C1 calculations of the perturbed fields and kinetic profiles reproduce many features of the measured losses and points to the importance of the applied 3D field phase with respect to the beam injection location in determining the overall impact on prompt beam ion loss. Modeling of these results includes a self-consistent calculation of the 3D perturbed beam ion birth profiles and scrape-off-layer ionization, a factor found to be essential to reproducing the experimental measurements. Extension of the simulations to full slowing down timescales, including fueling and the effects of drag and pitch angle scattering, show the applied n=3 RMPs in ELM suppressed H-mode plasmas can induce a significant loss of energetic particles from the core. With the applied n=3 fields, up to 8.4% of the injected beam power is predicted to be lost, compared to 2.7% with axisymmetric fields only. These fast ions, originating from minor radii ρ >0.7 , are predicted to be primarily passing particles lost to the divertor region, consistent with wide field-of-view infrared periscope measurements of wall heating in n=3 RMP ELM suppressed plasmas. Edge fast ion {{\\text{D}}α} (FIDA) measurements also confirm a large change in edge fast ion profile due to the n=3 fields, where the effect was isolated by using short 50 ms RMP-off periods during which ELM suppression was maintained yet the fast ion profile was allowed to recover. The role of resonances

  20. Spectroscopy of ions using fast beams and ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnington, E H; Trabert, E

    2004-10-01

    A knowledge of the spectra of ionized atoms is of importance in many fields. They can be studied in a wide variety of light sources. In recent years techniques coming under the broad heatings of fast beams and ion traps have been used extensively for such investigations. This article considers the advantages that various techniques have for particular applications.

  1. Comparison of different techniques in optical trap for generating picokelvin 3D atom cloud in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Hepeng; Luan, Tian; Li, Chen; Zhang, Yin; Ma, Zhaoyuan; Chen, Xuzong

    2016-01-01

    Pursuing ultralow temperature 3D atom gas under microgravity conditions is one of the popular topics in the field of ultracold research. Many groups around the world are using, or are planning to use, delta-kick cooling (DKC) in microgravity. Our group has also proposed a two-stage crossed beam cooling (TSCBC) method that also provides a path to picokelvin temperatures. In this paper, we compare the characteristics of TSCBC and DKC for producing a picokelvin system in microgravity. Using a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, we simulate the cooling process of 87Rb using the two different cooling techniques. Under the same initial conditions, 87Rb can reach 7 pK in 15 s using TSCBC and 75 pK in 5.1 s with DKC. The simulation results show that TSCBC can reach lower temperatures compared with DKC, but needs more time and a more stable laser.

  2. Periodic table of 3d-metal dimers and their ions.

    PubMed

    Gutsev, G L; Mochena, M D; Jena, P; Bauschlicher, C W; Partridge, H

    2004-10-01

    The ground states of the mixed 3d-metal dimers TiV, TiCr, TiMn, TiFe, TiCo, TiNi, TiCu, TiZn, VCr, VMn, VFe, VCo, VNi, VCu, VZn, CrMn, CrFe, CrCo, CrNi, CrCu, CrZn, MnFe, MnCo, MnNi, MnCu, MnZn, FeCo, FeNi, FeCu, FeZn, CoNi, CoCu, CoZn, NiCu, NiZn, and CuZn along with their singly negatively and positively charged ions are assigned based on the results of computations using density functional theory with generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation functional. Except for TiCo and CrMn, our assignment agrees with experiment. Computed spectroscopic constants (r(e),omega(e),D(o)) are in fair agreement with experiment. The ground-state spin multiplicities of all the ions are found to differ from the spin multiplicities of the corresponding neutral parents by +/-1. Except for TiV, MnFe, and MnCu, the number of unpaired electrons, N, in a neutral ground-state dimer is either N(1)+N(2) or mid R:N(1)-N(2)mid R:, where N(1) and N(2) are the numbers of unpaired 3d electrons in the 3d(n)4s(1) occupation of the constituent atoms. Combining the present and previous results obtained at the same level of theory for homonuclear 3d-metal and ScX (X=Ti-Zn) dimers allows one to construct "periodic" tables of all 3d-metal dimers along with their singly charged ions.

  3. Resonance of the Macromotion of Ions Trapped in a RF Trap by the Subharmonic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, Jun; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko

    1992-11-01

    Yb+ ions were trapped in an uncompensated rf trap with light buffer gas and then the storage time, as well as the total number of the trapped ions, was determined by the rf resonance method. When the ratio of the frequency of the trapping field to that of the macromotion of the trapped ions was an integer, the total number and the storage time were smaller and shorter, respectively, than those obtained when the ratio was a half-integer. A theoretical calculation shows that this effect, called the subharmonic oscillation, is caused by excitation of the macromotion of the trapped ions by the leaked trapping rf field, in the case in which the ion trap has an octupole besides a quadrupole potential.

  4. Impact of continuing scaling on the device performance of 3D cylindrical junction-less charge trapping memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xinkai, Li; Zongliang, Huo; Lei, Jin; Dandan, Jiang; Peizhen, Hong; Qiang, Xu; Zhaoyun, Tang; Chunlong, Li; Tianchun, Ye

    2015-09-01

    This work presents a comprehensive analysis of 3D cylindrical junction-less charge trapping memory device performance regarding continuous scaling of the structure dimensions. The key device performance, such as program/erase speed, vertical charge loss, and lateral charge migration under high temperature are intensively studied using the Sentaurus 3D device simulator. Although scaling of channel radius is beneficial for operation speed improvement, it leads to a retention challenge due to vertical leakage, especially enhanced charge loss through TPO. Scaling of gate length not only decreases the program/erase speed but also leads to worse lateral charge migration. Scaling of spacer length is critical for the interference of adjacent cells and should be carefully optimized according to specific cell operation conditions. The gate stack shape is also found to be an important factor affecting the lateral charge migration. Our results provide guidance for high density and high reliability 3D CTM integration. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61474137, 61176073, 61306107).

  5. Periodic table of 3d-metal dimers and their ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutsev, G. L.; Mochena, M. D.; Jena, P.; Bauschlicher, C. W.; Partridge, H.

    2004-10-01

    The ground states of the mixed 3d-metal dimers TiV, TiCr, TiMn, TiFe, TiCo, TiNi, TiCu, TiZn, VCr, VMn, VFe, VCo, VNi, VCu, VZn, CrMn, CrFe, CrCo, CrNi, CrCu, CrZn, MnFe, MnCo, MnNi, MnCu, MnZn, FeCo, FeNi, FeCu, FeZn, CoNi, CoCu, CoZn, NiCu, NiZn, and CuZn along with their singly negatively and positively charged ions are assigned based on the results of computations using density functional theory with generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation functional. Except for TiCo and CrMn, our assignment agrees with experiment. Computed spectroscopic constants (re,ωe,Do) are in fair agreement with experiment. The ground-state spin multiplicities of all the ions are found to differ from the spin multiplicities of the corresponding neutral parents by ±1. Except for TiV, MnFe, and MnCu, the number of unpaired electrons, N, in a neutral ground-state dimer is either N1+N2 or |N1-N2|, where N1 and N2 are the numbers of unpaired 3d electrons in the 3dn4s1 occupation of the constituent atoms. Combining the present and previous results obtained at the same level of theory for homonuclear [Gutsev and Bauschlicher, J. Phys. Chem. A 107, 4755 (2003)] 3d-metal and ScX (X=Ti-Zn) dimers [Gutsev, Bauschlicher, and Andrews, in Theoretical Prospects of Negative Ions, edited by J. Kalcher (Research Signpost, Trivandrum, 2002), pp. 43-60] allows one to construct "periodic" tables of all 3d-metal dimers along with their singly charged ions.

  6. Sisyphus cooling of Trapped Ions as a Route to Experiments in the Quantum Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haljan, Paul C.; Ejtemaee, Sara

    2016-05-01

    In a linear rf Paul trap, relaxing the transverse confinement can lead laser-cooled trapped ions to undergo a symmetry-breaking structural transition from a linear to a 2-D zigzag configuration. We are interested in exploring the dynamics near the linear-zigzag transition at ultralow temperatures, corresponding to a few quanta or less of thermal energy in the vibrations of the trapped ion crystal. In weaker traps, as in our case, the Lamb-Dicke limit is not strongly fulfilled through Doppler cooling, and Raman sideband cooling of the vibrational modes starting from Doppler temperatures becomes challenging. To resolve this, we have implemented 3-D Sisyphus cooling based on a polarization gradient field as an intermediate step to achieving near ground-state cooling of trapped Ytterbium ions. We have compared the performance of the polarization-gradient cooling of a single trapped ion to simulations, and have extended the technique to cool crystals of a few ions. We find Sisyphus cooling, which has so far not been widely used with trapped ions, to be a simple, robust technique that simultaneously cools all of the vibrational modes to well below the Doppler limit, and paves the way towards our experiments in the quantum regime.

  7. Simulation of 3-D Magnetic Reconnection by Gyrokinetic Electron and Fully Kinetic Ion Particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Lin, Y.; Chen, L.

    2015-12-01

    3-D collisionless magnetic reconnection is investigated using the gyrokinetic electron and fully-kinetic ion (GeFi) particle simulation model. The simulation is carried out for cases with various finite guide field BG in a current sheet as occurring in space and laboratory plasmas. Turbulence power spectrum of magenetic field is found in the reconnection current sheet, with a clear k-5/3 dependence. The wave properties are analyzed. The anomalous resistivity in the electron diffusion region is estimated. The Dependence of the reconnection physics on the ion-to-electron mass ratio mi/me, beta values, and the half-width of the current sheet are also investigated.

  8. Prospects for quantum computation with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.J.; James, D.F.V.

    1997-12-31

    Over the past decade information theory has been generalized to allow binary data to be represented by two-state quantum mechanical systems. (A single two-level system has come to be known as a qubit in this context.) The additional freedom introduced into information physics with quantum systems has opened up a variety of capabilities that go well beyond those of conventional information. For example, quantum cryptography allows two parties to generate a secret key even in the presence of eavesdropping. But perhaps the most remarkable capabilities have been predicted in the field of quantum computation. Here, a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, and an overview of the in trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos are presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are discussed.

  9. The 3D manipulation of a microsphere for nano-CMM probe using single fiber optical trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Sang In; Takaya, Yasuhiro; Miyoshi, Takashi; Hayashi, Terutake

    2006-08-01

    We suggest a novel 3-D probing technique for measuring micro parts which have high aspect ratio such as a groove or a deep-hole. This technique uses the optical force exerted on a dielectric microsphere at the tip of optical fiber so called the fiber optical trapping. A microsphere is trapped at the tip of an optical fiber which has micrometer size of the diameter and sub micrometer size of the tapered tip. The optical source is a Nd:YAG laser with the wavelength of 1064 nm. A fiber optical trapping system is quite similar to a conventional CMM. The roll of a microsphere is the same as the probe sphere of a conventional CMM and an optical fiber works as a stylus shaft. The micro optical fiber part is thinner than the diameter of the microsphere and longer than the depth of shapes such as deep holes and grooves, which enable to make an approach to a steep angle surface of a work piece with high aspect ratio.

  10. Study of negative hydrogen ion beam optics using the 3D3V PIC model

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, K.; Nishioka, S.; Goto, I.; Hatayama, A.; Hanada, M.; Kojima, A.

    2015-04-08

    The mechanism of negative ion extraction under real conditions with the complex magnetic field is studied by using the 3D PIC simulation code. The extraction region of the negative ion source for the negative ion based neutral beam injection system in fusion reactors is modelled. It is shown that the E x B drift of electrons is caused by the magnetic filter and the electron suppression magnetic field, and the resultant asymmetry of the plasma meniscus. Furthermore, it is indicated that that the asymmetry of the plasma meniscus results in the asymmetry of negative ion beam profile including the beam halo. It could be demonstrated theoretically that the E x B drift is not significantly weakened by the elastic collisions of the electrons with neutral particles.

  11. 3D hybrid simulations with gyrokinetic particle ions and fluid electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Belova, E.V.; Park, W.; Fu, G.Y.; Strauss, H.R.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    The previous hybrid MHD/particle model (MH3D-K code) represented energetic ions as gyrokinetic (or drift-kinetic) particles coupled to MHD equations using the pressure or current coupling scheme. A small energetic to bulk ion density ratio was assumed, n{sub h}/n{sub b} {much_lt} 1, allowing the neglect of the energetic ion perpendicular inertia in the momentum equation and the use of MHD Ohm`s law E = {minus}v{sub b} {times} B. A generalization of this model in which all ions are treated as gyrokinetic/drift-kinetic particles and fluid description is used for the electron dynamics is considered in this paper.

  12. Trapped Ion Quantum Computing with Microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Joe; Weidt, Sebastian; Standing, Eamon; Webster, Simon; Lake, Kim; Murgia, David; Navickas, Tomas; Lekitsch, Bjoern; Hughes, Marcus; Sterling, Robin; de Motte, Darren; Giri, Gouri; Rodriguez, Andrea; Webb, Anna; Rattanasonti, Hwanjit; Srinivasan, Prasanna; Kraft, Michael; Maclean, Jessica; Mellor, Chris; Hensinger, Winfried

    2015-03-01

    To this point, entanglement operations in trapped ion qubits have been predominantly performed with lasers. However, this becomes problematic when scaling to large numbers of qubits due to the challenging engineering required. The use of stable and easily controllable microwaves to drive entanglement gates can overcome this problem. We will present our work towards implementing multi-qubit entanglement gates using microwaves in an experimental setup that produces a static magnetic field gradient of 24 T/m over an ion string. We will first present a scheme for preparing and manipulating dressed-state qubits and qutrits that are highly robust to decoherence from magnetic field fluctuations. We will also present our work experimentally demonstrating motional sideband transitions and Schrödinger cat states using microwaves in conjunction with the magnetic field gradient, as well as sideband cooling to the ground state of motion using dressed-states. Furthermore, we will show our latest results in creating microfabricated ion trap chips towards large scale quantum computing and simulation.

  13. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guise, Nicholas D.; Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-01

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with 40Ca+ ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with 171Yb+ ions in a second BGA trap.

  14. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Guise, Nicholas D. Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-07

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with {sup 171}Yb{sup +} ions in a second BGA trap.

  15. Progress Towards Quantum Simulation Using Micro-fabricated Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, K.; Ji, G.; Rickerd, C.; Collins, K.; Monroe, C.

    2015-05-01

    We report on current experimental progress towards using a surface electrode trap for quantum simulation. We use a micro-fabricated trap developed collaboratively between the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) and Honeywell International known as the Ball Grid Array (BGA) trap. This trap features 96 electrodes for fine control of the DC potential as well as a small footprint allowing for tight focusing of interaction lasers. We discuss the experimental system which utilizes the BGA trap, loading of Yb171 ions in this trap, and deterministic loading of chains of five or more ions. We hope to take advantage of the features of this new trap architecture in order to perform a small scale Boson Sampling experiment. This work is performed in collaboration with the GTRI Ion Trap Group and supported by ARO with funding from the IARPA MQCO program, and the AFOSR STTR on Atom Trap Chips.

  16. 3D numerical simulations of negative hydrogen ion extraction using realistic plasma parameters, geometry of the extraction aperture and full 3D magnetic field map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Wünderlich, D.; Ruf, B.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.; Minea, T.

    2014-02-01

    Decreasing the co-extracted electron current while simultaneously keeping negative ion (NI) current sufficiently high is a crucial issue on the development plasma source system for ITER Neutral Beam Injector. To support finding the best extraction conditions the 3D Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collision electrostatic code ONIX (Orsay Negative Ion eXtraction) has been developed. Close collaboration with experiments and other numerical models allows performing realistic simulations with relevant input parameters: plasma properties, geometry of the extraction aperture, full 3D magnetic field map, etc. For the first time ONIX has been benchmarked with commercial positive ions tracing code KOBRA3D. A very good agreement in terms of the meniscus position and depth has been found. Simulation of NI extraction with different e/NI ratio in bulk plasma shows high relevance of the direct negative ion extraction from the surface produced NI in order to obtain extracted NI current as in the experimental results from BATMAN testbed.

  17. 3D imaging of the early embryonic chicken heart with focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rennie, Monique Y; Gahan, Curran G; López, Claudia S; Thornburg, Kent L; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2014-08-01

    Early embryonic heart development is a period of dynamic growth and remodeling, with rapid changes occurring at the tissue, cell, and subcellular levels. A detailed understanding of the events that establish the components of the heart wall has been hampered by a lack of methodologies for three-dimensional (3D), high-resolution imaging. Focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) is a novel technology for imaging 3D tissue volumes at the subcellular level. FIB-SEM alternates between imaging the block face with a scanning electron beam and milling away thin sections of tissue with a FIB, allowing for collection and analysis of 3D data. FIB-SEM was used to image the three layers of the day 4 chicken embryo heart: myocardium, cardiac jelly, and endocardium. Individual images obtained with FIB-SEM were comparable in quality and resolution to those obtained with transmission electron microscopy. Up to 1,100 serial images were obtained in 4 nm increments at 4.88 nm resolution, and image stacks were aligned to create volumes 800-1,500 μm3 in size. Segmentation of organelles revealed their organization and distinct volume fractions between cardiac wall layers. We conclude that FIB-SEM is a powerful modality for 3D subcellular imaging of the embryonic heart wall.

  18. Dynamics Of Ions In A Radio-Frequency Quadrupole Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Williams, Angelyn P.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1994-01-01

    Report describes computer-simulation study of motions of various numbers of ions in Paul trap. Study part of continuing effort to understand motions of trapped charged particles (atoms, ions, molecules, or dust particles). Motions characterized in terms of heating by radio-frequency fields, formation of crystallike structures in cold clouds of trapped particles, and other phenomena important in operation of radio-frequency traps in frequency standards.

  19. 3D Imaging of Diatoms with Ion-abrasion Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Mark; Kim, Sang; Shi, Dan; Scott, Keana; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2009-01-01

    Ion-abrasion scanning electron microscopy (IASEM) takes advantage of focused ion beams to abrade thin sections from the surface of bulk specimens, coupled with SEM to image the surface of each section, enabling 3D reconstructions of subcellular architecture at ~ 30 nm resolution. Here, we report the first application of IASEM for imaging a biomineralizing organism, the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Diatoms have highly patterned silica-based cell wall structures that are unique models for the study and application of directed nanomaterials synthesis by biological systems. Our study provides new insights into the architecture and assembly principles of both the “hard” (siliceous) and “soft” (organic) components of the cell. From 3D reconstructions of developmentally synchronized diatoms captured at different stages, we show that both micro- and nanoscale siliceous structures can be visualized at specific stages in their formation. We show that not only are structures visualized in a whole-cell context, but demonstrate that fragile, early-stage structures are visible, and that this can be combined with elemental mapping in the exposed slice. We demonstrate that the 3D architectures of silica structures, and the cellular components that mediate their creation and positioning can be visualized simultaneously, providing new opportunities to study and manipulate mineral nanostructures in a genetically tractable system. PMID:19269330

  20. Ion beam analysis of defect trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, M. L.; Howe, L. M.

    1983-12-01

    Channeling measurements using medium energy ions (e.g. 1 MeV He +) have been used to determine the positions of solute atoms which are displaced from lattice sites by the trapping of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms. In this way, some simple defect trapping configurations have been identified in fcc metals. One of these is the mixed dumbbell (created when a self-interstitial is trapped by a small solute atom), consisting of a host atom and solute atom stradding a normal lattice site. Another is the tetravacancy-solute atom complex, consisting of four nearest neighbour vacancies surrounding a solute atom displaced into the tetrahedral interstitial site. In addition, from detailed analyses of displacements into different crystallographic channels as a function of irradiation fluence and annealing temperature, the evolution of a variety of defect complexes containing self-interstitials or vacancies has been studied in Al, Cu, Ni, Fe, and Mg crystals. Information from channeling analyses will be compared with data obtained from measurements of electrical resistivity, Mössbauer effect, perturbed angular correlation, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, muon precession, positron annihilation and internal friction. The advantages of the different methods will be discussed.

  1. Towards Quantum Simulations Using a Chip Ion Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chenglin; Wright, Ken; Brennan, Daniel; Ji, Geoffrey; Monroe, Christopher

    2013-05-01

    We report our current experimental progress towards using chip ion traps for quantum simulation. Current progress is being made using a micro-fabricated symmetric trap from GTRI. This trap implements a novel two level design that combines the benefits of both surface traps and linear four-rod traps. The trap has 50 electrodes which allow for the fine control of the DC potential needed to create large anharmonic potentials, to join and split ion chains and to shuttle ions along the trapping axis similar to many surface traps. However this trap also has a much deeper trapping depth than conventional surface traps and improved optical access via an angled slot through the chip wide enough to accommodate higher power laser light which could cause surface charging or damage in a traditional chip trap. These advantages should allow trapping of long ion chains. We hope to use these features as the next step in increasing the size of current quantum simulations being done at Univ of Maryland, which are aimed at exploring quantum phenomena in spin systems in a regime inaccessible to classical simulation. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Army Research Office with funding from the DARPA OLE program, IARPA, and the MURI program; and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI. We acknowledge the GTRI team of J. Amini, K. Brown, A. Harter, F. Shaikh, R. Slusher, and C. Volin for the fabrication of the trap.

  2. Integrated Diffractive Optics for Surface Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streed, Erik; Ghadimi, Moji; Blums, Valdis; Norton, Benjamin; Connor, Paul; Amini, Jason; Volin, Curtis; Lobino, Mirko; Kielpinski, David

    2016-05-01

    Photonic interconnects are a bottleneck to achieving large-scale trapped ion quantum computing. We have modified a Georgia Tech Research Institute microwave chip trap by using e-beam lithography to write reflective diffractive collimating optics (80 μm x 127 μm, f=58.6 μm, λ=369.5nm) on the center electrode. The optics have an NA of 0.55 x 0.73, capturing 13.2% of the solid angle. To evaluate the optics 174Yb+ was loaded by isotope selective photo-ionization from a thermal oven and then shuttled to imaging sites. Near diffraction limited sub-wavelength ion images were obtained with an observed spot sized FWHM of 338 nm x 268 nm vs. a diffraction limit of 336 nm x 257 nm. The total photon collection efficiency was measured to be 5.2+/-1.2%. Coupling into a single mode fiber of up to 2.0+/-0.6% was observed, limited by mismatch in the coupling optics. Image mode quality indicates coupling up to 4% may be possible. Funding from Australian Research Council and IARPA.

  3. Trapped ion mode in toroidally rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Artun, M.; Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1995-04-01

    The influence of radially sheared toroidal flows on the Trapped Ion Mode (TIM) is investigated using a two-dimensional eigenmode code. These radially extended toroidal microinstabilities could significantly influence the interpretation of confinement scaling trends and associated fluctuation properties observed in recent tokamak experiments. In the present analysis, the electrostatic drift kinetic equation is obtained from the general nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in rotating plasmas. In the long perpendicular wavelength limit k{sub {tau}}{rho}{sub bi} {much_lt} 1, where {rho}{sub bi} is the average trapped-ion banana width, the resulting eigenmode equation becomes a coupled system of second order differential equations nmo for the poloidal harmonics. These equations are solved using finite element methods. Numerical results from the analysis of low and medium toroidal mode number instabilities are presented using representative TFTR L-mode input parameters. To illustrate the effects of mode coupling, a case is presented where the poloidal mode coupling is suppressed. The influence of toroidal rotation on a TFTR L-mode shot is also analyzed by including a beam species with considerable larger temperature. A discussion of the numerical results is presented.

  4. New ion trap for atomic frequency standard applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1989-01-01

    A novel linear ion trap that permits storage of a large number of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the radio frequency (RF) confining fields has been designed and built. This new trap should store about 20 times the number of ions a conventional RF trap stores with no corresponding increase in second-order Doppler shift from the confining field. In addition, the sensitivity of this shift to trapping parameters, i.e., RF voltage, RF frequency, and trap size, is greatly reduced.

  5. Reconstruction of 3D ion beam micro-tomography data for applications in Cell Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habchi, C.; Nguyen, D. T.; Barberet, Ph.; Incerti, S.; Moretto, Ph.; Sakellariou, A.; Seznec, H.

    2009-06-01

    The DISRA (Discrete Image Space Reconstruction Algorithm) reconstruction code, created by A. Sakellariou, was conceived for the ideal case of complete three-dimensional (3D) PIXET (Particle Induced X-ray Emission Tomography) data. This implies two major difficulties for biological samples: first, the long duration of such experiments and second, the subsequent damage that occurs on such fragile specimens. For this reason, the DISRA code was extended at CENBG in order to probe isolated PIXET slices, taking into account the sample structure and mass density provided by 3D STIMT (Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography) in the volume of interest. This modified version was tested on a phantom sample and first results on human cancer cells are also presented.

  6. Lifetimes of the hyperfine levels of 3d94s 3D3 in high-Z Ni-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Weijie; Andersson, Martin; Yao, Ke; Brage, Tomas; Hutton, Roger; Zou, Yaming

    2013-07-01

    Based on the multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method and using the GRASPVU package, a theoretical investigation was performed to study the lifetimes of hyperfine levels of the first excited level 3d94s 3D3 in Ni-like ions (Z = 72-79) for all stable isotopes with nuclear spin. Comparisons between hyperfine-induced electric quadrupole transition rates and the pure magnetic octupole transition rates show that the extra electric quadrupole transition channel caused by the nuclear magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine interaction is important for most hyperfine levels in each individual ion. Lifetimes of most hyperfine levels are sensitive to this extra decay channel. Extreme cases are found in 181Ta, 185Re and 187Re, where lifetimes of some hyperfine levels are shortened by more than an order of magnitude.

  7. Computer simulations of ions in radio-frequency traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, A.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.; Djomehri, J.; Harabetian, E.

    1990-01-01

    The motion of ions in a trapped-ion frequency standard affects the stability of the standard. In order to study the motion and structures of large ion clouds in a radio-frequency (RF) trap, a computer simulation of the system that incorporates the effect of thermal excitation of the ions was developed. Results are presented from the simulation for cloud sizes up to 512 ions, emphasizing cloud structures in the low-temperature regime.

  8. Trap door and underside of cap stone of pyramid ion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Trap door and underside of cap stone of pyramid ion - Washington Monument, High ground West of Fifteenth Street, Northwest, between Independence & Constitution Avenues, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. Ultra-stable Hg(+) trapped ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John; Maleki, Lute

    1990-01-01

    A fieldable trapped ion frequency standard based on Hg-199(+) ions confined in a hybrid rf/dc linear ion trap is developed. This trap permits storage of large numbers of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the rf confining fields. In preliminary measurements a stability of 2 to 3 x 10(exp -15) was obtained for 10000 second averaging times. These measurements were carried out with a 120 mHz wide atomic resonance line for the 40.5 GHz clock transition with a second order Doppler shift from the rf trapping field of 6 x 10(exp -13).

  10. Resolved sideband spectra of calcium ions in a Penning trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Joe; Stutter, Graham; Segal, Daniel; Thompson, Richard

    2013-03-01

    I report on recent work at Imperial College London, with laser cooled calcium-40 ion Coulomb crystals in Penning traps. Penning traps provide a number of advantages over the more common radiofrequency (RF) trap; namely the ability to trap 3-dimensional, micromotion-free ion Coulomb crystals, and the ability to produce deep traps while maintaining a large ion-electrode surface distance. While these factors should permit lower heating rates than in typical RF traps, very little research has been conducted into the behavior and control of small Coulomb crystals in Penning traps due to the experimental challenges involved. We have spent several years developing techniques to overcome these obstacles, and are now making rapid progress towards the sub-Doppler cooling and coherent control of small ion crystals. We have already observed high resolution optical spectra showing sidebands due to radial and axial motions, giving estimated temperatures close to the Doppler limit.

  11. Test of Lorentz symmetry with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruttivarasin, Thaned

    2016-05-01

    The outcome of an experiment should not depend on the orientation of the apparatus in space. This important cornerstone of physics is deeply engrained into the Standard Model of Physics by requiring that all fields must be Lorentz invariant. However, it is well-known that the Standard Model is incomplete. Some theories conjecture that at the Planck scale Lorentz symmetry might be broken and measurable at experimentally accessible energy scales. Therefore, a search for violation of Lorentz symmetry directly probes physics beyond the Standard model. We present a novel experiment utilizing trapped calcium ions as a direct probe of Lorentz-violation in the electron-photon sector. We monitor the energy between atomic states with different orientations of the electronic wave-functions as they rotate together with the motion of the Earth. This is analogous to the famous Michelson-Morley experiment. To remove magnetic field noise, we perform the experiment with the ions prepared in the decoherence-free states. Our result improves on the most stringent bounds on Lorentz symmetry for electrons by 100 times. The experimental scheme is readily applicable to many ion species, hence opening up paths toward much improved test of Lorentz symmetry in the future. (Ph. D. Advisor: Hartmut Haeffner, University of California, Berkeley).

  12. An Atomic Abacus: Trapped ion quantum computing experiments at NIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demarco, Brian

    2003-03-01

    Trapped atomic ions are an ideal system for exploring quantum information science because deterministic state preparation and efficient state detection are possible and coherent manipulation of atomic systems is relatively advanced. In our experiment, a few singly charged Be ions are confined by static and radio-frequency electric fields in a micro-machined linear Paul trap. The internal and motional states of the ions are coherently manipulated using applied laser light. Our current work focuses on demonstrating the necessary ingredients to produce a scalable quantum computing scheme and on simplifying and improving quantum logic gates. I will speak about a new set of experiments that was made possible by recent improvements in trap technology. A novel trap with multiple trapping regions was used to demonstrate the first steps towards a fully scalable quantum computing scheme. Single ions were ``shuttled" between trapping regions without disturbing the ion's motional and internal state, and two ions were separated from a single to two different trapping zones. Improvements in the trap manufacturing process has led to a reduction of nearly two orders of magnitude in the ion's motional heating rate, making possible two new improved logic gates. The first gate utilizes the wave-packet nature of the ions to tune the laser-atom interaction and achieve a controlled-NOT gate between a single ion's spin and motional states. The second, a two-ion phase gate, uses phase-space dynamics to produce a state-sensitive geometric phase. I will end with a quick look at experiments using a Mg ion to sympathetically cool a simultaneously trapped Be ion and a glimpse of the next generation of ions traps currently under construction.

  13. Virus enabled 3d nano-array electrodes for integrated Lithium/Sodium-ion microbatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yihang

    Multilayers of functional materials (carbon/electrode/nickel) were hierarchically architectured over tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) templates that were genetically modified to self-assemble in a vertical manner on current-collectors for battery applications. The spaces formed between individual rods effectively accommodated the volume expansion and contraction of electrodes during charge/discharge, while surface carbon coating engineered over these nanorods further enhance the electronic conductivity. The microbattery based on self aligned nanoforests with precise arrangement of various auxiliary material layers including a central nanometric metal core as direct electronic pathway to current collector, can deliver high energy density and stable cycling stability. C/LiFePO4/Ni/TMV nanoforest cathodes for Li-ion batteries and C/Sn/Ni/TMV nanoforest anodes for Na-ion batteries were assembled using physical sputtering deposition. Both 3D nanoforest electrodes show exceptional cycling stability and rate capability.

  14. Doppler Sideband Spectra for Ions in a Linear Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Tjoelker, R. L.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a spectroscopic measurement of the temperature and linear density of HG+ ions held in a linear ion trap (LIT). The inferred temperature and number result from analysis of sidebands on the 40.5 GHz resonance line.

  15. Ion-migration Polarity Change and 3D Shape Evaluation in the WDT Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chao; Mitobe, Kazutaka; Yoshimura, Noboru

    In this paper, protection resistance was measured as a parameter for the 3D shape of the dendrite, which was produced on the copper, printed wired board by the WDT method. The measurement was occurred using the 3D shape measurement system. We measured the 3D shape of a dendrite in a nonuniform electric field with a changing polarity. Moreover, the polar effect of ion-migration was examined by the 3D shape electric field analysis using ANSYS. Consequently, the height of the accumulation things at anode was higher than the negative pole side under round shaped cathode condition. Similarly, the quantity of the accumulation thing is also found larger at anode. On the other hand, the dispersal of the accumulation thing is observed between the anode and the negative pole under a round shaped anode conditions. And it turns out that there is also smaller accumulation thing at the tip part of a round shaped electrode. Moreover, for a same protection resistance, the amounts of generating of the accumulation objects per unit electric charge were larger for round shaped anode conditions comparing to the cathode. It is seen from 3d shape electric field analysis, that horizontal part of the electric field vector at anode is greater than the cathode. At the same time, the field intensity at anode is also larger than cathode. For a round shaped anode in 3D shape electric field analysis, the strongest electric field vector was found between a round shape electrode tip part and flat electrode. Although in the round shape cathode, the electric field vector had become the strongest between the flat electrode and the round shape electrode tip part. The electric field intensity of a nearby flat electrode was strong for a round shape electrode facing the field. Since the action states of the accumulation thing after a short circuit is different depending on the polarity of electrode for a nonuniform electric field conditions, it appears that it will not take much time to occur a failure

  16. Trapped ion simulation of molecular spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yangchao; Lu, Yao; Zhang, Kuan; Zhang, Shuaining; Huh, Joonsuk; Kim, Kihwan

    2016-05-01

    Boson sampling had been suggested as a classically intractable and quantum mechanically manageable problem via computational complexity theory arguments. Recently, Huh and co-workers proposed theoretically a modified version of boson sampling, which is designed to simulate a molecular problem, as a practical application. Here, we report the experimental implementation of the theoretical proposal with a trapped ion system. As a first demonstration, we perform the quantum simulation of molecular vibronic profile of SO2, which incorporates squeezing, rotation and coherent displacements operations, and the collective projection measurement on phonon modes. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China 11CBA00300, 2011CBA00301, National Natural Science Foundation of China 11374178, 11574002. Basic Science Research Program of Korea NRF-2015R1A6A3A04059773.

  17. JPL Ultrastable Trapped Ion Atomic Frequency Standards.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Yi, Lin; Tucker, Blake; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Recently, room temperature trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on three directions: 1) ultrastable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate stability performance and autonomous timekeeping; 2) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements; and 3) miniature clocks. In this paper, we concentrate on the first direction and present a design and the initial results from a new ultrastable clock referred to as L10 that achieves a short-term stability of 4.5 ×10(-14)/τ(1/2) and an initial measurement of no significant drift with an uncertainty of 2.4 ×10(-16) /day over a two-week period.

  18. Vibrational Spectroscopy on Trapped Cold Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2014-06-01

    We perform vibrational spectroscopy on the V0←10 overtone of a trapped and sympathetically cooled CaH+ molecular ion using a resonance enhanced two photon dissociation scheme. Our experiments are motivated by theoretical work that proposes comparing the vibrational overtones of CaH^+ with electronic transitions in atoms to detect possible time variation of in the mass ratio of the proton to electron. Due to the nonexistence of experimental data of the transition, we start the search with a broadband femtosecond Ti:Saph laser guided by theoretical calculations. Once the vibrational transition has been identified, we will move to CW lasers to perform rotationally resolved spectroscopy. M. Kajita and Y. Moriwaki, J. Phys. B. At. Mol. Opt.Phys., 42,154022(2009) Private communication

  19. JPL Ultrastable Trapped Ion Atomic Frequency Standards.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Yi, Lin; Tucker, Blake; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Recently, room temperature trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on three directions: 1) ultrastable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate stability performance and autonomous timekeeping; 2) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements; and 3) miniature clocks. In this paper, we concentrate on the first direction and present a design and the initial results from a new ultrastable clock referred to as L10 that achieves a short-term stability of 4.5 ×10(-14)/τ(1/2) and an initial measurement of no significant drift with an uncertainty of 2.4 ×10(-16) /day over a two-week period. PMID:27249827

  20. Holographic patterning of high-performance on-chip 3D lithium-ion microbatteries

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Hailong; Pikul, James H.; Zhang, Runyu; Li, Xuejiao; Xu, Sheng; Wang, Junjie; Rogers, John A.; King, William P.; Braun, Paul V.

    2015-01-01

    As sensors, wireless communication devices, personal health monitoring systems, and autonomous microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) become distributed and smaller, there is an increasing demand for miniaturized integrated power sources. Although thin-film batteries are well-suited for on-chip integration, their energy and power per unit area are limited. Three-dimensional electrode designs have potential to offer much greater power and energy per unit area; however, efforts to date to realize 3D microbatteries have led to prototypes with solid electrodes (and therefore low power) or mesostructured electrodes not compatible with manufacturing or on-chip integration. Here, we demonstrate an on-chip compatible method to fabricate high energy density (6.5 μWh cm−2⋅μm−1) 3D mesostructured Li-ion microbatteries based on LiMnO2 cathodes, and NiSn anodes that possess supercapacitor-like power (3,600 μW cm−2⋅μm−1 peak). The mesostructured electrodes are fabricated by combining 3D holographic lithography with conventional photolithography, enabling deterministic control of both the internal electrode mesostructure and the spatial distribution of the electrodes on the substrate. The resultant full cells exhibit impressive performances, for example a conventional light-emitting diode (LED) is driven with a 500-μA peak current (600-C discharge) from a 10-μm-thick microbattery with an area of 4 mm2 for 200 cycles with only 12% capacity fade. A combined experimental and modeling study where the structural parameters of the battery are modulated illustrates the unique design flexibility enabled by 3D holographic lithography and provides guidance for optimization for a given application. PMID:25964360

  1. Holographic patterning of high-performance on-chip 3D lithium-ion microbatteries.

    PubMed

    Ning, Hailong; Pikul, James H; Zhang, Runyu; Li, Xuejiao; Xu, Sheng; Wang, Junjie; Rogers, John A; King, William P; Braun, Paul V

    2015-05-26

    As sensors, wireless communication devices, personal health monitoring systems, and autonomous microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) become distributed and smaller, there is an increasing demand for miniaturized integrated power sources. Although thin-film batteries are well-suited for on-chip integration, their energy and power per unit area are limited. Three-dimensional electrode designs have potential to offer much greater power and energy per unit area; however, efforts to date to realize 3D microbatteries have led to prototypes with solid electrodes (and therefore low power) or mesostructured electrodes not compatible with manufacturing or on-chip integration. Here, we demonstrate an on-chip compatible method to fabricate high energy density (6.5 μWh cm(-2)⋅μm(-1)) 3D mesostructured Li-ion microbatteries based on LiMnO2 cathodes, and NiSn anodes that possess supercapacitor-like power (3,600 μW cm(-2)⋅μm(-1) peak). The mesostructured electrodes are fabricated by combining 3D holographic lithography with conventional photolithography, enabling deterministic control of both the internal electrode mesostructure and the spatial distribution of the electrodes on the substrate. The resultant full cells exhibit impressive performances, for example a conventional light-emitting diode (LED) is driven with a 500-μA peak current (600-C discharge) from a 10-μm-thick microbattery with an area of 4 mm(2) for 200 cycles with only 12% capacity fade. A combined experimental and modeling study where the structural parameters of the battery are modulated illustrates the unique design flexibility enabled by 3D holographic lithography and provides guidance for optimization for a given application. PMID:25964360

  2. Reactive Oxygen-Doped 3D Interdigital Carbonaceous Materials for Li and Na Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ling; Lu, Bingan

    2016-05-01

    Carbonaceous materials as anodes usually exhibit low capacity for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) and sodium ion batteries (SIBs). Oxygen-doped carbonaceous materials have the potential of high capacity and super rate performance. However, up to now, the reported oxygen-doped carbonaceous materials usually exhibit inferior electrochemical performance. To overcome this problem, a high reactive oxygen-doped 3D interdigital porous carbonaceous material is designed and synthesized through epitaxial growth method and used as anodes for LIBs and SIBs. It delivers high reversible capacity, super rate performance, and long cycling stability (473 mA h g(-1) after 500 cycles for LIBs and 223 mA h g(-1) after 1200 cycles for SIBs, respectively, at the current density of 1000 mA g(-1) ), with a capacity decay of 0.0214% per cycle for LIBs and 0.0155% per cycle for SIBs. The results demonstrate that constructing 3D interdigital porous structure with reactive oxygen functional groups can significantly enhance the electrochemical performance of oxygen-doped carbonaceous material.

  3. Microfabricated quadrupole ion trap for mass spectrometer applications.

    PubMed

    Pau, S; Pai, C S; Low, Y L; Moxom, J; Reilly, P T A; Whitten, W B; Ramsey, J M

    2006-03-31

    An array of miniaturized cylindrical quadrupole ion traps, with a radius of 20 microm, is fabricated using silicon micromachining using phosphorus doped polysilicon and silicon dioxide for the purpose of creating a mass spectrometer on a chip. We have operated the array for mass-selective ion ejection and mass analysis using Xe ions at a pressure of 10(-4). The scaling rules for the ion trap in relation to operating pressure, voltage, and frequency are examined. PMID:16605890

  4. Four-Sector Cylindrical Radio-Frequency Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melbourne, Ruthann K.; Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1992-01-01

    Proposed linear radio-frequency ion trap consists of closed metal cylinder partitioned into four equal cylindrical-sector electrodes and two circular end electrodes. Features include relatively large ion-storage capacity and shielding against external fields. Used in frequency-standard laboratories to confine 199Hg+ ions electrodynamically in isolation from external environment. Similar to device described in "Linear Ion Trap for Atomic Clock" (NPO-17758).

  5. Progress Report on the Improved Linear Ion Trap Physics Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the first operational results from the extended linear ion trap frequency standard now being developed at JPL. This new design separates the state selection/interrogation region from the more critical microwave resonance region where the multiplied local oscillator (LO) signal is compared to the stable atomic transition. Hg+ ions have been trapped, shuttled back and forth between the resonance and state selection traps. In addition, microwave transitions between the Hg+ clock levels have been driven in the resonance trap and detected in the state selection trap.

  6. An ion trap built with photonic crystal fibre technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenfelser, F. Keitch, B.; Kienzler, D.; Home, J. P.; Bykov, D.; Uebel, P.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2015-03-15

    We demonstrate a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated using techniques transferred from the manufacture of photonic-crystal fibres. This provides a relatively straightforward route for realizing traps with an electrode structure on the 100 micron scale with high optical access. We demonstrate the basic functionality of the trap by cooling a single ion to the quantum ground state, allowing us to measure a heating rate from the ground state of 787 ± 24 quanta/s. Variation of the fabrication procedure used here may provide access to traps in this geometry with trap scales between 100 μm and 10 μm.

  7. New light-trapping concept by means of several optical components applied to compact holographic 3D concentration solar module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamarín Villegas, Ayalid M.; Pérez López, Francisco J.; Calo López, Antonio; Rodríguez San Segundo, Hugo-José

    2014-05-01

    A new light-trapping concept is presented, which joins broad bandwidth volume phase reflection holograms (VPRH) working together with three other optical components: specifically designed three-dimensional (3D) cavities, Total Internal Reflection (TIR) within an optical medium, and specular reflection by means of a highly reflective surface. This concept is applied to the design and development of both low concentration photovoltaic (LCPV) and solar thermal modules reaching a concentration factor of up to 3X. Higher concentrations are feasible for use in concentrated solar power (CSP) devices. The whole system is entirely made of polymeric materials (except for the solar cells or fluid carrying pipes), thus reducing cost by up to 40%. The module concentrates solar light onto solar cells - or fluid carrying pipes - with no need for active tracking of the sun, covering the whole seasonal and daily incident angle spectrum while it also minimizes optical losses. In this work we analyze the first experimentally measured optical characteristics and performance of VPRH in dichromated gelatin film (DCG) in our concept. The VPRH can reach high diffraction efficiencies (˜98%, ignoring Fresnel reflection losses). Thanks to specifically designed raw material, coating and developing process specifications, also very broad selective spectral (higher than 300 nm) and angular bandwidths (˜+20º) per grating are achieved. The VPRH was optimized to use silicon solar cells, but designs for other semiconductor devices or for fluid heating are feasible. The 3D shape, the hologram's and reflective surface's optical quality, the TIR effect and the correct coupling of all the components are key to high performance of the concentration solar module.

  8. Potentiometric and spectroscopic study of the interaction of 3d transition metal ions with inositol hexakisphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga, Nicolás; Macho, Israel; Gómez, Kerman; González, Gabriel; Kremer, Carlos; Torres, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Among myo-inositol phosphates, the most abundant in nature is the myo-inositol hexakisphosphate, InsP6. Although it is known to be vital to cell functioning, the biochemical research into its metabolism needs chemical and structural analysis of all the protonation, complexation and precipitation processes that it undergoes in the biological media. In view of its high negative charge at physiological level, our group has been leading a thorough research into the InsP6 chemical and structural behavior in the presence of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions essential for life. The aim of this article is to extend these studies, dealing with the chemical and structural features of the InsP6 interaction with biologically relevant 3d transition metal ions (Fe(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)), in a non-interacting medium and under simulated physiological conditions. The metal-complex stability constants were determined by potentiometry, showing under ligand-excess conditions the formation of mononuclear species in different protonation states. Under metal ion excess, polymetallic species were detected for Fe(II), Fe(III), Zn(II) and Cu(II). Additionally, the 31P NMR and UV-vis spectroscopic studies provided interesting structural aspects of the strong metal ion-InsP6 interaction.

  9. Origin of extracted negative ions by 3D PIC-MCC modeling. Surface vs Volume comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Lifschitz, A. F.; Minea, T.

    2011-09-01

    The development of a high performance negative ion (NI) source constitutes a crucial step in the construction of Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) of the future fusion reactor ITER. NI source should deliver 40 A of H- (or D-), which is a technical and scientific challenge, and requires a deeper understanding of the underlying physics of the source and its magnetic filter. The present knowledge of the ion extraction mechanism from the negative ion source is limited and concerns magnetized plasma sheaths used to avoid electrons being co-extracted from the plasma together with the NI. Moreover, due to the asymmetry induced by the ITER crossed magnetic configuration used to filter the electrons, any realistic study of this problem must consider the three spatial dimensions. To address this problem, a 3D Particles-in-Cell electrostatic collisional code was developed, specifically designed for this system. Binary collisions between the particles are introduced using Monte Carlo Collision scheme. The complex orthogonal magnetic field that is applied to deflect electrons is also taken into account. This code, called ONIX (Orsay Negative Ion eXtraction), was used to investigate the plasma properties and the transport of the charged particles close to a typical extraction aperture [1]. This contribution focuses on the limits for the extracted NI current from both, plasma volume and aperture wall. Results of production, destruction, and transport of H- in the extraction region are presented. The extraction efficiency of H- from the volume is compared to the one of H- coming from the wall.

  10. Highly Charged Ions in Rare Earth Permanent Magnet Penning Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guise, Nicholas D.; Brewer, Samuel M.; Tan, Joseph N.

    A newly constructed apparatus at the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is designed for the isolation, manipulation, and study of highly charged ions. Highly charged ions are produced in the NIST electron-beam ion trap (EBIT), extracted through a beamline that selects a single mass/charge species, then captured in a compact Penning trap. The magnetic field of the trap is generated by cylindrical NdFeB permanent magnets integrated into its electrodes. In a room-temperature prototype trap with a single NdFeB magnet, species including Ne10+ and N7+ were confined with storage times of order 1 second, showing the potential of this setup for manipulation and spectroscopy of highly charged ions in a controlled environment. Ion capture has since been demonstrated with similar storage times in a more-elaborate Penning trap that integrates two coaxial NdFeB magnets for improved B-field homogeneity. Ongoing experiments utilize a second-generation apparatus that incorporates this two-magnet Penning trap along with a fast time-of-flight MCP detector capable of resolving the charge-state evolution of trapped ions. Holes in the two-magnet Penning trap ring electrode allow for optical and atomic beam access. Possible applications include spectroscopic studies of one-electron ions in Rydberg states, as well as highly charged ions of interest in atomic physics, metrology, astrophysics, and plasma diagnostics.

  11. Atomic physics measurements in an electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R.E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M.H.; Cowan, T.; Dietrich, D.; Henderson, J.R.; Knapp, D.A.; Osterheld, A.; Schneider, M.B.

    1989-03-01

    An electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged ions (q less than or equal to 70/+/) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of transition energies and electron excitation cross sections for x-ray line emission are summarized. 13 refs., 10 figs.

  12. How far can ion trap miniaturization go? Parameter scaling and space-charge limits for very small cylindrical ion traps.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Higgs, Jessica; Li, Ailin; Barney, Brandon; Austin, Daniel E

    2014-03-01

    A broad effort is underway to make radiofrequency (RF) ion trap mass spectrometers small enough for portable chemical analysis. A variety of trap geometries and fabrication approaches are under development from several research groups. A common issue is the reduced trapping capacity in smaller traps, with the associated reduction in sensitivity. This article explores the key variables that scale with trap size including RF voltage, frequency, electrical capacitance, power and pseudopotential well depth. High-field electric breakdown constrains the maximum RF voltages used in smaller ion traps. Simulations show the effects of space charge and the limits of trapping capacity as a function of trap dimensions for cylindrical ion traps down to the micrometer level. RF amplitudes that scale as the 1/3, 1/2 and 2/3 power of trap radius, r0, were studied. At a fixed level of performance, the number of analyzable ions scales as r0(n), with n ranging from 1.55 to 1.75 depending on the choice of voltage scaling. The implications for miniaturized ion trap mass spectrometry are discussed. PMID:24619549

  13. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR TRAPPING IONS IN A MAGNETIC FIELD

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1962-04-17

    A method and apparatus are described for trapping ions within an evacuated container and within a magnetic field utilizing dissociation and/or ionization of molecular ions to form atomic ions and energetic neutral particles. The atomic ions are magnetically trapped as a result of a change of charge-to- mass ratio. The molecular ions are injected into the container and into the path of an energetic carbon arc discharge which dissociates and/or ionizes a portion of the molecular ions into atomic ions and energetic neutrals. The resulting atomic ions are trapped by the magnetic field to form a circulating beam of atomic ions, and the energetic neutrals pass out of the system and may be utilized in a particle accelerator. (AEC)

  14. Controlling trapping potentials and stray electric fields in a microfabricated ion trap through design and compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doret, S. Charles; Amini, Jason M.; Wright, Kenneth; Volin, Curtis; Killian, Tyler; Ozakin, Arkadas; Denison, Douglas; Hayden, Harley; Pai, C.-S.; Slusher, Richart E.; Harter, Alexa W.

    2012-07-01

    Recent advances in quantum information processing with trapped ions have demonstrated the need for new ion trap architectures capable of holding and manipulating chains of many (>10) ions. Here we present the design and detailed characterization of a new linear trap, microfabricated with scalable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) techniques, that is well-suited to this challenge. Forty-four individually controlled dc electrodes provide the many degrees of freedom required to construct anharmonic potential wells, shuttle ions, merge and split ion chains, precisely tune secular mode frequencies, and adjust the orientation of trap axes. Microfabricated capacitors on dc electrodes suppress radio-frequency pickup and excess micromotion, while a top-level ground layer simplifies modeling of electric fields and protects trap structures underneath. A localized aperture in the substrate provides access to the trapping region from an oven below, permitting deterministic loading of particular isotopic/elemental sequences via species-selective photoionization. The shapes of the aperture and radio-frequency electrodes are optimized to minimize perturbation of the trapping pseudopotential. Laboratory experiments verify simulated potentials and characterize trapping lifetimes, stray electric fields, and ion heating rates, while measurement and cancellation of spatially-varying stray electric fields permits the formation of nearly-equally spaced ion chains.

  15. Ion collision crosssection measurements in quadrupole ion traps using a time-frequency analysis method.

    PubMed

    He, Muyi; Guo, Dan; Chen, Yu; Xiong, Xingchuang; Fang, Xiang; Xu, Wei

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a method for measuring ion collision crosssections (CCSs) was proposed through time-frequency analysis of ion trajectories in quadrupole ion traps. A linear ion trap with added high-order electric fields was designed and simulated. With the presence of high-order electric fields and ion-neutral collisions, ion secular motion frequency within the quadrupole ion trap will be a function of ion motion amplitude, thus a function of time and ion CCS. A direct relationship was then established between ion CCS and ion motion frequency with respect to time, which could be obtained through time-frequency analysis of ion trajectories (or ion motion induced image currents). To confirm the proposed theory, realistic ion trajectory simulations were performed, where the CCSs of bradykinin, angiotensin I and II, and ubiquitin ions were calculated from simulated ion trajectories. As an example, differentiation of isomeric ubiquitin ions was also demonstrated in the simulations. PMID:25319271

  16. Impact of 3D features on ion collisional transport in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustos, A.; Castejón, F.; Fernández, L. A.; García, J.; Martin-Mayor, V.; Reynolds, J. M.; Seki, R.; Velasco, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    The influence of magnetic ripple on ion collisional transport in ITER (Shimada et al 2007 Progress in the ITER Physics Basis: chapter 1. Overview and summary Nucl. Fusion 47 S1) is calculated using the Monte Carlo orbit code ISDEP (Castejón et al 2007 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 49 753). The ripple is introduced as a perturbation to the 2D equilibrium configuration of the device, given by the HELENA code (Huysmans 1991 CP90 Conf. on Computational Physics (Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 1990) (Singapore: World Scientific) p 371), obtaining a 3D configuration. Since the intensity of the ripple can change depending on the design of the test blanket modules that will be introduced in ITER, a scan of the ripple intensity has been performed to study the changes in confinement properties. The main result is that an increase in the perturbation leads to a degradation of the confinement due to an increase in the radial fluxes. The selective ion losses cause modifications in the ion distribution function. In this work most of the computing time has been provided by a new Citizen Supercomputer called Ibercivis.

  17. Interaction of 3d transition metal atoms with charged ion projectiles from Electron Nuclear Dynamics computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelberg, Frank

    2003-03-01

    Computational results on atomic scattering between charged projectiles and transition metal target atoms are presented. This work aims at obtaining detailed information about charge, spin and energy transfer processes that occur between the interacting particles. An in-depth understanding of these phenomena is expected to provide a theoretical basis for the interpretation of various types of ion beam experiments, ranging from gas phase chromatography to spectroscopic observations of fast ions in ferromagnetic media. This contribution focuses on the scattering of light projectiles ranging from He to O, that are prepared in various initial charge states, by 3d transition metal atoms. The presented computations are performed in the framework of Electron Nuclear Dynamics (END)^1 theory which incorporates the coupling between electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom without reliance on the computationally cumbersome and frequently intractable determination of potential energy surfaces. In the present application of END theory to ion - transition metal atom scattering, a supermolecule approach is utilized in conjunction with a spin-unrestricted single determinantal wave function describing the electronic system. Integral scattering, charge and spin exchange cross sections are discussed as functions of the elementary parameters of the problem, such as projectile and target atomic numbers as well as projectile charge and initial kinetic energy. ^1 E.Deumens, A.Diz, R.Longo, Y.Oehrn, Rev.Mod.Phys. 66, 917 (1994)

  18. Cast and 3D printed ion exchange membranes for monolithic microbial fuel cell fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philamore, Hemma; Rossiter, Jonathan; Walters, Peter; Winfield, Jonathan; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2015-09-01

    We present novel solutions to a key challenge in microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology; greater power density through increased relative surface area of the ion exchange membrane that separates the anode and cathode electrodes. The first use of a 3D printed polymer and a cast latex membrane are compared to a conventionally used cation exchange membrane. These new techniques significantly expand the geometric versatility available to ion exchange membranes in MFCs, which may be instrumental in answering challenges in the design of MFCs including miniaturisation, cost and ease of fabrication. Under electrical load conditions selected for optimal power transfer, peak power production (mean 10 batch feeds) was 11.39 μW (CEM), 10.51 μW (latex) and 0.92 μW (Tangoplus). Change in conductivity and pH of anolyte were correlated with MFC power production. Digital and environmental scanning electron microscopy show structural changes to and biological precipitation on membrane materials following long term use in an MFC. The cost of the novel membranes was lower than the conventional CEM. The efficacy of two novel membranes for ion exchange indicates that further characterisation of these materials and their fabrication techniques, shows great potential to significantly increase the range and type of MFCs that can be produced.

  19. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-12-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  20. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  1. [MOLECULAR EVOLUTION OF ION CHANNELS: AMINO ACID SEQUENCES AND 3D STRUCTURES].

    PubMed

    Korkosh, V S; Zhorov, B S; Tikhonov, D B

    2016-01-01

    An integral part of modern evolutionary biology is comparative analysis of structure and function of macromolecules such as proteins. The first and critical step to understand evolution of homologous proteins is their amino acid sequence alignment. However, standard algorithms fop not provide unambiguous sequence alignments for proteins of poor homology. More reliable results can be obtained by comparing experimental 3D structures obtained at atomic resolution, for instance, with the aid of X-ray structural analysis. If such structures are lacking, homology modeling is used, which may take into account indirect experimental data on functional roles of individual amino-acid residues. An important problem is that the sequence alignment, which reflects genetic modifications, does not necessarily correspond to the functional homology. The latter depends on three-dimensional structures which are critical for natural selection. Since alignment techniques relying only on the analysis of primary structures carry no information on the functional properties of proteins, including 3D structures into consideration is very important. Here we consider several examples involving ion channels and demonstrate that alignment of their three-dimensional structures can significantly improve sequence alignments obtained by traditional methods.

  2. Compact toroidal ion-trap design and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, M. J.; Gorman, C. H.

    2010-10-15

    We present the design of a type of compact toroidal, or 'halo', ion trap. Such traps may be useful for mass spectrometry, studying small Coulomb cluster rings, quantum-information applications, or other quantum simulations where a ring topology is of interest. We present results from a Monte Carlo optimization of the trap design parameters using finite-element analysis simulations that minimize higher-order anharmonic terms in the trapping pseudopotential, while maintaining complete control over ion placement at the pseudopotential node in three dimensions using static bias fields. These simulations are based on a practical electrode design using readily available parts, yet can be easily scaled to any size trap with similar electrode spacings. We also derive the conditions for a crystal structure transition for two ions in the compact halo trap, the first nontrivial transition for Coulomb crystals in this geometry.

  3. A Scalable Microfabricated Ion Trap for Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunz, Peter; Haltli, Raymond; Hollowell, Andrew; Lobser, Daniel; Mizrahi, Jonathan; Rembetski, John; Resnick, Paul; Sterk, Jonathan D.; Stick, Daniel L.; Blain, Matthew G.

    2016-05-01

    Trapped Ion Quantum Information Processing (QIP) relies on complex microfabricated trap structures to enable scaling of the number of quantum bits. Building on previous demonstrations of surface-electrode ion traps, we have designed and characterized the Sandia high-optical-access (HOA-2) microfabricated ion trap. This trap features high optical access, high trap frequencies, low heating rates, and negligible charging of dielectric trap components. We have observed trap lifetimes of more than 100h, measured trap heating rates for ytterbium of less than 40quanta/s, and demonstrated shuttling of ions from a slotted to an above surface region and through a Y-junction. Furthermore, we summarize demonstrations of high-fidelity single and two-qubit gates realized in this trap. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This work was supported by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

  4. Calculation of Dose Deposition in 3D Voxels by Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    The biological response to high-LET radiation is very different from low-LET radiation, and can be partly attributed to the energy deposition by the radiation. Several experiments, notably detection of gamma-H2AX foci by immunofluorescence, has revealed important differences in the nature and in the spatial distribution of double-strand breaks (DSB) induced by low- and high-LET radiations. Many calculations, most of which are based on amorphous track models with radial dose, have been combined with chromosome models to calculate the number and distribution of DSB within nuclei and chromosome aberrations. In this work, the Monte-Carlo track structure simulation code RITRACKS have been used to calculate directly the energy deposition in voxels (3D pixels). A cubic volume of 5 micrometers of side was irradiated by 1) 450 (1)H+ ions of 300 MeV (LET is approximately 0.3 keV/micrometer) and 2) by 1 (56)Fe26+ ion of 1 GeV/amu (LET is approximately 150 keV/micrometer). In both cases, the dose deposited in the volume is approximately 1 Gy. All energy deposition events are recorded and dose is calculated in voxels of 20 micrometers of side. The voxels are then visualized in 3D by using a color scale to represent the intensity of the dose in a voxel. This simple approach has revealed several important points which may help understand experimental observations. In both simulations, voxels which receive low dose are the most numerous, and those corresponding to electron track ends received a dose which is in the higher range. The dose voxels are distributed randomly and scattered uniformly within the volume irradiated by low-LET radiation. The distribution of the voxels shows major differences for the (56)Fe26+ ion. The track structure can still be seen, and voxels with much higher dose are found in the region corresponding to the track "core". These high-dose voxels are not found in the low-LET irradiation simulation and may be responsible for DSB that are more difficult to

  5. Measurement of the temperature of cold highly charged ions produced in an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Decaux, V.; Widmann, K.

    1994-09-14

    The temperature of highly charged titanium ions produced and trapped in an electron beam ion trap was determined by precisely measuring the broadening of the emission line profile caused by the thermal Doppler motion. The measured temperature ranges from about 700 eV for deeply trapped ions to about 70 eV for ions in a shallow trap. The latter value represents the lowest temperature at which the x-ray emission of collisonally excited heliumlike Ti{sup 20}+ ions has ever been recorded, and the measured transitions represent the narrowest x-ray lines observed from highly charged titanium ions.

  6. Ion trap array mass analyzer: structure and performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxu; Jiang, Gongyu; Luo, Chan; Xu, Fuxing; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2009-06-15

    An ion trap array (ITA) mass analyzer--a novel ion trap mass analyzer with multiple ion trapping and analyzing channels--was designed and constructed. Its property and performance were investigated and reported in this paper. The ITA was built with several planar electrodes including two parallel printed circuit board (PCB) plates. Each PCB plate was fabricated to several identical rectangular electric strips based on normal PCB fabrication technology and was placed symmetrically to those on the opposite plate. There is no electrode between any two adjacent strips. Every strip was supplied with an rf voltage while the polarity of the voltage applied to the adjacent two strips was opposite. So the electric potential at the central plane between two adjacent strips is zero. Multiple identical electric field regions that contain the dominant quadrupole plus some other high-order fields were produced between the two PCB plates. The multiple identical electric field regions will have the property of ion trapping, ion storage, and mass analysis functions. So an ITA could work as multiple ion trap mass analyzers. It could perform multiple sample ion storage, mass-selected ion isolation, ion ejection, and mass analysis simultaneously. The ITA was operated at both "digital ion trap mode" and "conventional rf mode" experimentally. A preliminary mass spectrum has been carried out in one of the ion trap channels, and it shows a mass resolution of over 1000. Additional functions such as mass-selected ion isolation and mass-selected ion ejection have also been tested. Furthermore, the ITA has a small size and very low cost. An ITA with four channels is less than 30 cm(3) in total volume, and it shows a great promise for the miniaturization of the whole mass spectrometer instrument and high-throughput mass analysis. PMID:19441854

  7. A system for trapping barium ions in a microfabricated surface trap

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R. D. Sakrejda, T.; Wright, J.; Zhou, Z.; Blinov, B. B.; Chen, S.-P.

    2014-05-15

    We have developed a vacuum chamber and control system for rapid testing of microfabricated surface ion traps. Our system is modular in design and is based on an in-vacuum printed circuit board with integrated filters. We have used this system to successfully trap and cool barium ions and have achieved ion ‘dark' lifetimes of 31.6 s ± 3.4 s with controlled shuttling of ions. We provide a detailed description of the ion trap system including the in-vacuum materials used, control electronics and neutral atom source. We discuss the challenges presented in achieving a system which can work reliably over two years of operations in which the trap under test was changed at least 10 times.

  8. Rydberg excitation of trapped strontium ions (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennrich, Markus; Higgins, Gerard; Pokorny, Fabian; Kress, Florian; Maier, Christine; Haag, Johannes; Colombe, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Trapped Rydberg ions are a novel approach for quantum information processing [1,2]. This idea joins the advanced quantum control of trapped ions with the strong dipolar interaction between Rydberg atoms. For trapped ions this method promises to speed up entangling interactions [3] and to enable such operations in larger ion crystals [4]. We report on the first experimental realization of trapped strontium Rydberg ions. A single ion was confined in a linear Paul trap and excited to Rydberg states (25S to 37S) using a two-photon excitation with 243nm and 308nm laser light. The transitions we observed are narrow and the excitation can be performed repeatedly which indicates that the Rydberg ions are stable in the ion trap. Similar results have been recently reported on a single photon Rydberg excitation of trapped calcium ions [5]. The tunability of the 304-309nm laser should enable us to excite our strontium ions to even higher Rydberg levels. Such highly excited levels are required to achieve a strong interaction between neighboring Rydberg ions in the trap as will be required for quantum gates using the Rydberg interaction. References [1] M. Müller, L. Liang, I. Lesanovsky, P. Zoller, New J. Phys. 10, 093009 (2008). [2] F. Schmidt-Kaler, et al., New J. Phys. 13, 075014 (2011). [3] W. Li, I. Lesanovsky, Appl. Phys. B 114, 37-44 (2014). [4] W. Li, A.W. Glaetzle, R. Nath, I. Lesanovsky, Phys. Rev. A 87, 052304 (2013). [5] T. Feldker, et al., arXiv:1506.05958

  9. 3D characterization of the forces in optical traps based on counter-propagating beams shaped by a spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Martin V.; Lindballe, Thue B.; Kylling, Anton P.; Palima, Darwin Z.; Glückstad, Jesper; Keiding, Soren R.; Stapelfeldt, Henrik

    2010-08-01

    An experimental characterization of the 3D forces, acting on a trapped polystyrene bead in a counter-propagating beam geometry, is reported. Using a single optical trap with a large working distance (in the BioPhotonics Workstation), we simultaneously measure the transverse and longitudinal trapping force constants. Two different methods were used: The Drag force method and the Equipartition method. We show that the counterpropagating beams traps are simple harmonic for small displacements. The force constants reveal a transverse asymmetry as κ- = 9.7 pN/μm and κ+ = 11.3 pN/μm (at a total laser power of 2x35 mW) for displacements in opposite directions. The Equipartition method is limited by mechanical noise and is shown to be applicable only when the total laser power in a single 10 μm counter-propagating trap is below 2x20 mW.

  10. Preparation of 3D nanoporous copper-supported cuprous oxide for high-performance lithium ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dequan; Yang, Zhibo; Wang, Peng; Li, Fei; Wang, Desheng; He, Deyan

    2013-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanoporous architectures can provide efficient and rapid pathways for Li-ion and electron transport as well as short solid-state diffusion lengths in lithium ion batteries (LIBs). In this work, 3D nanoporous copper-supported cuprous oxide was successfully fabricated by low-cost selective etching of an electron-beam melted Cu(50)Al(50) alloy and subsequent in situ thermal oxidation. The architecture was used as an anode in lithium ion batteries. In the first cycle, the sample delivered an extremely high lithium storage capacity of about 2.35 mA h cm(-2). A high reversible capacity of 1.45 mA h cm(-2) was achieved after 120 cycles. This work develops a promising approach to building reliable 3D nanostructured electrodes for high-performance lithium ion batteries.

  11. Nonlinear Evolution of 3D Drift-Ion-Sound Standing Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranov, Volodymyr

    2000-10-01

    Drift waves play an important role in transport processes in plasmas [1]. Detailed investigation of their stability must include an account of the coupling to ion-sound waves [2]. General properties of the model [2] were studied in [3], stability analysis was done in [4], but linear drift dispersion effects were neglected. Incorrectness of this neglect was emphasized in [5]. In the present work, evolution of spatially periodic 3D standing waves is studied. All physical effects contained in the model [2] are taken into account, namely additional vortex nonlinearity and dispersion effects due to the emission of coupled drift and ion-sound waves. For the waves of small but finite amplitude, perturbation theory based on multiple-time-scale formalism is built. Second and third order in amplitude effects are discussed. References [1] Horton W. 1999. Rev.Mod.Phys. 3. 735. [2] Meiss J.D. and W.Horton. 1983. Phys.Fluids 26. 990. [3] Nycander J. 1994. Chaos 4. 253. [4] Akerstedt H.O., J.Nycander and V.P.Pavlenko. 1996. Phys.Plasmas 3. 160. [5] Goloborod'ko V.Ya., V.B.Taranov. 1999. J. of Plasma and Fusion Res. SERIES 2. 335.

  12. Measurement of carbon ion microdosimetric distributions with ultrathin 3D silicon diodes.

    PubMed

    Gómez, F; Fleta, C; Esteban, S; Quirion, D; Pellegrini, G; Lozano, M; Prezado, Y; Dos Santos, M; Guardiola, C; Montarou, G; Prieto-Pena, J; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-06-01

    The commissioning of an ion beam for hadrontherapy requires the evaluation of the biologically weighted effective dose that results from the microdosimetric properties of the therapy beam. The spectra of the energy imparted at cellular and sub-cellular scales are fundamental to the determination of the biological effect of the beam. These magnitudes are related to the microdosimetric distributions of the ion beam at different points along the beam path. This work is dedicated to the measurement of microdosimetric spectra at several depths in the central axis of a (12)C beam with an energy of 94.98 AMeV using a novel 3D ultrathin silicon diode detector. Data is compared with Monte Carlo calculations providing an excellent agreement (deviations are less than 2% for the most probable lineal energy value) up to the Bragg peak. The results show the feasibility to determine with high precision the lineal energy transfer spectrum of a hadrontherapy beam with these silicon devices. PMID:27163881

  13. Effects of Na+ and He+ pickup ions on the lunar plasma environment: 3D hybrid modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Sarantos, M.

    2011-12-01

    The hybrid kinetic model used here supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the moon-solar wind-magnetosphere of the Earth system. There is a set of MHD,kinetic, hybrid, drift kinetic, electrostatic and full kinetic modeling of the lunar plasma environment [1]. However, observations show the existence of several species of the neutrals and pickup ions like Na, He, K, O etc., (see e.g., [2,3,4]). The solar wind parameters are chosen from the ARTEMIS observations [5]. The Na+, He+ lunar exosphere's parameters are chosen from [6,7]. The hybrid kinetic model allows us to take into account the finite gyroradius effects of pickup ions and to correctly estimate the ions velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field, and on the lunar surface. Modeling shows the formation of the asymmetric Mach cone, the structuring of the pickup ion tails, and presents another type of lunar-solar wind interaction. We will compare the results of our modeling with observed distributions. References [1] Lipatov, A.S., and Cooper, J.F., Hybrid kinetic modeling of the Lunar plasma environment: Past, present and future. In: Lunar Dust, Plasma and Atmosphere: The Next Steps, January 27-29, 2010, Boulder, Colorado, Abstracts/lpa2010.colorado.edu/. [2] Potter, A.E., and Morgan, T.H., Discovery of sodium and potassium vapor in the atmosphere of the Moon, Science, 241, 675-680, doi:10.1126/science.241.4866.675, 1988. [3] Tyler, A.L., et al., Observations of sodium in the tenuous lunar atmosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 15(10), 1141-1144, doi:10.1029/GL015i010p01141, 1988. [4] Tanaka, T., et al., First in situ observation of the Moon-originating ions in the Earth's Magnetosphere by MAP-PACE on SELENE (KAGUYA), Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L22106, doi:10.1029/2009GL040682, 2009. [5] Wiehle, S., et al., First Lunar Wake Passage of ARTEMIS: Discrimination of Wake Effects and Solar Wind Fluctuations by 3D Hybrid Simulations, Planet

  14. Visualizing nanoscale 3D compositional fluctuation of lithium in advanced lithium-ion battery cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Devaraj, Arun; Gu, Meng; Colby, Robert J.; Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Chong M.; Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie; Genc, Arda; Zhang, Jiguang; Belharouak, Ilias; Wang, Dapeng; Amine, Khalil; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2015-08-14

    The distribution and concentration of lithium in Li-ion battery cathodes at different stages of cycling is a pivotal factor in determining battery performance. Non-uniform distribution of the transition metal cations has been shown to affect cathode performance; however, the Li is notoriously challenging to characterize with typical high-spatial-resolution imaging techniques. Here, for the first time, laser–assisted atom probe tomography is applied to two advanced Li-ion battery oxide cathode materials—layered Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 and spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4—to unambiguously map the three dimensional (3D) distribution of Li at sub-nanometer spatial resolution and correlate it with the distribution of the transition metal cations (M) and the oxygen. The as-fabricated layered Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 is shown to have Li-rich Li2MO3 phase regions and Li-depleted Li(Ni0.5Mn0.5)O2 regions while in the cycled layered Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 an overall loss of Li and presence of Ni rich regions, Mn rich regions and Li rich regions are shown in addition to providing the first direct evidence for Li loss on cycling of layered LNMO cathodes. The spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode is shown to have a uniform distribution of all cations. These results were additionally validated by correlating with energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping of these nanoparticles in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Thus, we have opened the door for probing the nanoscale compositional fluctuations in crucial Li-ion battery cathode materials at an unprecedented spatial resolution of sub-nanometer scale in 3D which can provide critical information for understanding capacity decay mechanisms in these advanced cathode materials.

  15. Visualizing nanoscale 3D compositional fluctuation of lithium in advanced lithium-ion battery cathodes

    DOE PAGES

    Devaraj, Arun; Gu, Meng; Colby, Robert J.; Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Chong M.; Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie; Genc, Arda; Zhang, Jiguang; Belharouak, Ilias; et al

    2015-08-14

    The distribution and concentration of lithium in Li-ion battery cathodes at different stages of cycling is a pivotal factor in determining battery performance. Non-uniform distribution of the transition metal cations has been shown to affect cathode performance; however, the Li is notoriously challenging to characterize with typical high-spatial-resolution imaging techniques. Here, for the first time, laser–assisted atom probe tomography is applied to two advanced Li-ion battery oxide cathode materials—layered Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 and spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4—to unambiguously map the three dimensional (3D) distribution of Li at sub-nanometer spatial resolution and correlate it with the distribution of the transition metal cations (M) and themore » oxygen. The as-fabricated layered Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 is shown to have Li-rich Li2MO3 phase regions and Li-depleted Li(Ni0.5Mn0.5)O2 regions while in the cycled layered Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 an overall loss of Li and presence of Ni rich regions, Mn rich regions and Li rich regions are shown in addition to providing the first direct evidence for Li loss on cycling of layered LNMO cathodes. The spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode is shown to have a uniform distribution of all cations. These results were additionally validated by correlating with energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping of these nanoparticles in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Thus, we have opened the door for probing the nanoscale compositional fluctuations in crucial Li-ion battery cathode materials at an unprecedented spatial resolution of sub-nanometer scale in 3D which can provide critical information for understanding capacity decay mechanisms in these advanced cathode materials.« less

  16. Recent developments in ion detection techniques for Penning trap mass spectrometry at TRIGA-TRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketelaer, J.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Ferrer, R.; George, S.; Herfurth, F.; Ketter, J.; Nagy, Sz.; Repp, J.; Schweikhard, L.; Smorra, C.; Sturm, S.; Ulmer, S.

    2009-12-01

    The highest precision in the determination of nuclear and atomic masses can be achieved by Penning trap mass spectrometry. The mass value is obtained through a measurement of the cyclotron frequency of the stored charged particle. Two different approaches are used at the Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP for the mass determination: the destructive Time-Of-Flight Ion Cyclotron Resonance (TOF-ICR) technique and the non-destructive Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) method. New developments for both techniques are described, which will improve the detection efficiency and the suppression of contaminations in the case of TOF-ICR. The FT-ICR detection systems will allow for the investigation of an incoming ion bunch from a radioactive-beam facility on the one hand, and for the detection of a single singly charged ion in the Penning trap on the other hand.

  17. In-trap spectroscopy of charge-bred radioactive ions.

    PubMed

    Lennarz, A; Grossheim, A; Leach, K G; Alanssari, M; Brunner, T; Chaudhuri, A; Chowdhury, U; Crespo López-Urrutia, J R; Gallant, A T; Holl, M; Kwiatkowski, A A; Lassen, J; Macdonald, T D; Schultz, B E; Seeraji, S; Simon, M C; Andreoiu, C; Dilling, J; Frekers, D

    2014-08-22

    In this Letter, we introduce the concept of in-trap nuclear decay spectroscopy of highly charged radioactive ions and describe its successful application as a novel spectroscopic tool. This is demonstrated by a measurement of the decay properties of radioactive mass A=124 ions (here, ^{124}In and ^{124}Cs) in the electron-beam ion trap of the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. By subjecting the trapped ions to an intense electron beam, the ions are charge bred to high charge states (i.e., equivalent to the removal of N-shell electrons), and an increase of storage times to the level of minutes without significant ion losses is achieved. The present technique opens the venue for precision spectroscopy of low branching ratios and is being developed in the context of measuring electron-capture branching ratios needed for determining the nuclear ground-state properties of the intermediate odd-odd nuclei in double-beta (ββ) decay.

  18. Resonant structure of the 3d electron`s angular distribution in a free Mn{sup +}Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M.Y.; Dolmatov, V.K.

    1995-08-01

    The 3d-electron angular anisotropy parameter of the free Mn{sup +} ion is calculated using the {open_quotes}spin-polarized{close_quotes} random-phase approximation with exchange. Strong resonance structure is discovered, which is due to interference with the powerful 3p {yields} 3d discrete excitation. The effect of the 3p {yields} 4s transition is also noticeable. The ordering of these respective resonances with phonon energy increase proved to be opposite in angular anisotropy parameter to that in 3d-photoionization cross section. A paper describing these results was published.

  19. Reducing Space Charge Effects in a Linear Ion Trap by Rhombic Ion Excitation and Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Wang, Yuzhuo; Hu, Lili; Guo, Dan; Fang, Xiang; Zhou, Mingfei; Xu, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Space charge effects play important roles in ion trap operations, which typically limit the ion trapping capacity, dynamic range, mass accuracy, and resolving power of a quadrupole ion trap. In this study, a rhombic ion excitation and ejection method was proposed to minimize space charge effects in a linear ion trap. Instead of applying a single dipolar AC excitation signal, two dipolar AC excitation signals with the same frequency and amplitude but 90° phase difference were applied in the x- and y-directions of the linear ion trap, respectively. As a result, mass selective excited ions would circle around the ion cloud located at the center of the ion trap, rather than go through the ion cloud. In this work, excited ions were then axially ejected and detected, but this rhombic ion excitation method could also be applied to linear ion traps with ion radial ejection capabilities. Experiments show that space charge induced mass resolution degradation and mass shift could be alleviated with this method. For the experimental conditions in this work, space charge induced mass shift could be decreased by ~50%, and the mass resolving power could be improved by ~2 times at the same time.

  20. Instant gelation synthesis of 3D porous MoS2@C nanocomposites for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Fei, Ling; Xu, Yun; Wu, Xiaofei; Chen, Gen; Li, Yuling; Li, Binsong; Deng, Shuguang; Smirnov, Sergei; Fan, Hongyou; Luo, Hongmei

    2014-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) nanoporous architectures, possessing high surface area, massive pores, and excellent structural stability, are highly desirable for many applications including catalysts and electrode materials in lithium ion batteries. However, the preparation of such materials remains a major challenge. Here, we introduce a novel method, instant gelation, for the synthesis of such materials. The as-prepared porous 3D MoS2@C nanocomposites, with layered MoS2 clusters or strips ingrained in porous and conductive 3D carbon matrix, indeed showed excellent electrochemical performance when applied as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. Its interconnected carbon network ensures good conductivity and fast electron transport; the micro-, and mesoporous nature effectively shortens the lithium ion diffusion path and provides room necessary for volume expansion. The large specific surface area is beneficial for a better contact between electrode materials and electrolyte.

  1. Employing trapped cold ions to verify the quantum Jarzynski equality.

    PubMed

    Huber, Gerhard; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand; Deffner, Sebastian; Lutz, Eric

    2008-08-15

    We propose a scheme to investigate the nonequilibrium work distribution of a quantum particle under well controlled transformations of the external potential, exploiting the versatility of a single ion in a segmented linear Paul trap. We describe in detail how the motional quantum state of a single ion can be prepared, manipulated, and finally readout to fully determine the free energy difference in both harmonic and anharmonic potentials. Uniquely to our system, we show how an ion may be immersed in an engineered laser-field reservoir. Trapped ions therefore represent an ideal tool for investigating the Jarzynski equality in open and closed quantum systems.

  2. The impact of pore structure and surface roughness on capillary trapping for 2-D and 3-D porous media: Comparison with percolation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Ataei-Dadavi, Iman; Mohammadian, Sadjad; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2015-11-01

    We study the impact of pore structure and surface roughness on capillary trapping of nonwetting gas phase during imbibition with water for capillary numbers between 10-7 and 5 × 10-5, within glass beads, natural sands, glass beads monolayers, and 2-D micromodels. The materials exhibit different roughness of the pore-solid interface. We found that glass beads and natural sands, which exhibit nearly the same grain size distribution, pore size distribution, and connectivity, showed a significant difference of the trapped gas phase of about 15%. This difference can be explained by the microstructure of the pore-solid interface. Based on the visualization of the trapping dynamics within glass beads monolayers and 2-D micromodels, we could show that bypass trapping controls the trapping process in glass beads monolayers, while snap-off trapping controls the trapping process in 2-D micromodels. We conclude that these different trapping processes are the reason for the different trapping efficiency, when comparing glass beads packs with natural sand packs. Moreover, for small capillary numbers of 10-6, we found that the cluster size distribution of trapped gas clusters of all 2-D and 3-D porous media can be described by a universal power law behavior predicted from percolation theory. This cannot be expected a priori for 2-D porous media, because bicontinuity of the two bulk phases is violated. Obviously, bicontinuity holds for the thin-film water phase and the bulk gas phase. The snap-off trapping process leads to ordinary bond percolation in front of the advancing bulk water phase and is the reason for the observed universal power law behavior in 2-D micromodels with rough surfaces.

  3. Experimental demonstration of a surface-electrode multipole ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurice, Mark; Allen, Curtis; Green, Dylan; Farr, Andrew; Burke, Timothy; Hilleke, Russell; Clark, Robert

    2015-08-01

    We report on the design and experimental characterization of a surface-electrode multipole ion trap. Individual microscopic sugar particles are confined in the trap. The trajectories of driven particle motion are compared with a theoretical model, both to verify qualitative predictions of the model and to measure the charge-to-mass ratio of the confined particle. The generation of harmonics of the driving frequency is observed as a key signature of the nonlinear nature of the trap. We remark on possible applications of our traps, including to mass spectrometry.

  4. Temperature and heating rate of ion crystals in Penning traps

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Marie J.; Hasegawa, Taro; Bollinger, John J.

    2004-09-01

    We have determined the temperature and heating rate of laser-cooled ions in a Penning trap using Doppler laser spectroscopy. Between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} {sup 9}Be{sup +} ions are trapped in a Penning trap and Doppler laser cooled to temperatures of a few millikelvin, where they form ion crystals. This system is an example of a strongly coupled one-component plasma. The ion temperature was measured as a function of time after turning off the laser-cooling. In the solid phase, we measured a heating rate of {approx}65 mK/s. Information about possible heating mechanisms was obtained directly from temperature measurements, and also from measurements of the rate of radial expansion of the ion plasma. We determined that the observed heating is due to collisions with the {approx}4x10{sup -9} Pa residual gas of our vacuum system.

  5. Optical cavity integrated surface ion trap for enhanced light collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito, Francisco M.

    Ion trap systems allow the faithful storage and manipulation of qubits encoded in the energy levels of the ions, and can be interfaced with photonic qubits that can be transmitted to connect remote quantum systems. Single photons transmitted from two remote sites, each entangled with one quantum memory, can be used to entangle distant quantum memories by interfering on a beam splitter. Efficient remote entanglement generation relies upon efficient light collection from single ions into a single mode fiber. This can be realized by integrating an ion trap with an optical cavity and employing the Purcell effect for enhancing the light collection. Remote entanglement can be used as a resource for a quantum repeater for provably secure long-distance communication or as a method for communicating within a distributed quantum information processor. We present the integration of a 1 mm optical cavity with a micro-fabricated surface ion trap. The plano-concave cavity is oriented normal to the chip surface where the planar mirror is attached underneath the trap chip. The cavity is locked using a 780 nm laser which is stabilized to Rubidium and shifted to match the 369 nm Doppler transition in Ytterbium. The linear ion trap allows ions to be shuttled in and out of the cavity mode. The Purcell enhancement of spontaneous emission into the cavity mode would then allow efficient collection of the emitted photons, enabling faster remote entanglement generation.

  6. Towards Non-Equilibrium Dynamics with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbert, Ariel; Jubin, Sierra; Doret, Charlie

    2016-05-01

    Atomic systems are superbly suited to the study of non-equilibrium dynamics. These systems' exquisite isolation from environmental perturbations leads to long relaxation times that enable exploration of far-from-equilibrium phenomena. One example of particular relevance to experiments in trapped ion quantum information processing, metrology, and precision spectroscopy is the approach to thermal equilibrium of sympathetically cooled linear ion chains. Suitable manipulation of experimental parameters permits exploration of the quantum-to-classical crossover between ballistic transport and diffusive, Fourier's Law conduction, a topic of interest not only to the trapped ion community but also for the development of microelectronic devices and other nanoscale structures. We present progress towards trapping chains of multiple co-trapped calcium isotopes geared towards measuring thermal equilibration and discuss plans for future experiments in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. This work is supported by Cottrell College Science Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement and by Williams College.

  7. Heavy ion plasma confinement in an RF quadrupole trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schermann, J.; Major, F. G.

    1971-01-01

    The confinement of an electron free plasma in a pure quadrupole RF electric trap was considered. The ultimate goal was to produce a large density of mercury ions, in order to realize a trapped ion frequency standard using the hyperfine resonance of 199 Hg(+) at 40.7 GHz. An attempt was made to obtain an iodine plasma consisting of equal numbers of positive and negative ions of atomic iodine, the positive iodine ions, being susceptible to charge-exchange with mercury atoms, will produce the desired mercury ions. The experiment showed that the photoproduction of ions pairs in iodine using the necessary UV radiation occurs with a small cross-section, making it difficult to demonstrate the feasibility of space charge neutralization in a quadrupole trap. For this reason it was considered expedient to choose thallium iodide, which has a more favorable absorption spectrum (in the region of 2000 to 2100 A). The results indicate that, although the ionic recombination is a serious limiting factor, a considerable improvement can be obtained in practice for the density of trapped ions, with a considerable advantage in lifetimes for spectroscopic purposes. The ion pair formation by photoionization is briefly reviewed.

  8. Ion trap simulations of quantum fields in an expanding universe.

    PubMed

    Alsing, Paul M; Dowling, Jonathan P; Milburn, G J

    2005-06-10

    We propose an experiment in which the phonon excitation of ion(s) in a trap, with a trap frequency exponentially modulated at rate kappa, exhibits a thermal spectrum with an "Unruh" temperature given by k(B)T=Planck kappa. We discuss the similarities of this experiment to the response of detectors in a de Sitter universe and the usual Unruh effect for uniformly accelerated detectors. We demonstrate a new Unruh effect for detectors that respond to antinormally ordered moments using the ion's first blue sideband transition.

  9. Carbon Quantum Dots and Their Derivative 3D Porous Carbon Frameworks for Sodium-Ion Batteries with Ultralong Cycle Life.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hongshuai; Banks, Craig E; Jing, Mingjun; Zhang, Yan; Ji, Xiaobo

    2015-12-16

    A new methodology for the synthesis of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) for large production is proposed. The as-obtained CQDs can be transformed into 3D porous carbon frameworks exhibiting superb sodium storage properties with ultralong cycle life and ultrahigh rate capability, comparable to state-of-the-art carbon anode materials for sodium-ion batteries.

  10. A Linear RFQ Ion Trap for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Flatt, B.; Green, M.; Wodin, J.; DeVoe, R.; Fierlinger, P.; Gratta, G.; LePort, F.; Montero Diez, M.; Neilson, R.; O'Sullivan, K.; Pocar, A.; Baussan, E.; Breidenbach, M.; Conley, R.; Fairbank Jr., W.; Farine, J.; Hall, K.; Hallman, D.; Hargrove, C.; Hauger, M.; Hodgson, J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Neuchatel U. /SLAC /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /Alabama U.

    2008-01-14

    The design, construction, and performance of a linear radio-frequency ion trap (RFQ) intended for use in the Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) are described. EXO aims to detect the neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 136}Xe to {sup 136}Ba. To suppress possible backgrounds EXO will complement the measurement of decay energy and, to some extent, topology of candidate events in a Xe filled detector with the identification of the daughter nucleus ({sup 136}Ba). The ion trap described here is capable of accepting, cooling, and confining individual Ba ions extracted from the site of the candidate double-beta decay event. A single trapped ion can then be identified, with a large signal-to-noise ratio, via laser spectroscopy.

  11. Reducing Motional Decoherence in Ion Traps with Surface Science Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeffner, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Many trapped ions experiments ask for low motional heating rates while trapping the ions close to trapping electrodes. However, in practice small ion-electrode distances lead to unexpected high heating rates. While the mechanisms for the heating is still unclear, it is now evident that surface contamination of the metallic electrodes is at least partially responsible for the elevated heating rates. I will discuss heating rate measurements in a microfabricated surface trap complemented with basic surface science studies. We monitor the elemental surface composition of the Cu-Al alloy trap with an Auger spectrometer. After bake-out, we find a strong Carbon and Oxygen contamination and heating rates of 200 quanta/s at 1 MHz trap frequency. After removing most of the Carbon and Oxygen with Ar-Ion sputtering, the heating rates drop to 4 quanta/s. Interestingly, we still measure the decreased heating rate even after the surface oxidized from the background gas throughout a 40-day waiting time in UHV.

  12. Parallel Transport Quantum Logic Gates with Trapped Ions.

    PubMed

    de Clercq, Ludwig E; Lo, Hsiang-Yu; Marinelli, Matteo; Nadlinger, David; Oswald, Robin; Negnevitsky, Vlad; Kienzler, Daniel; Keitch, Ben; Home, Jonathan P

    2016-02-26

    We demonstrate single-qubit operations by transporting a beryllium ion with a controlled velocity through a stationary laser beam. We use these to perform coherent sequences of quantum operations, and to perform parallel quantum logic gates on two ions in different processing zones of a multiplexed ion trap chip using a single recycled laser beam. For the latter, we demonstrate individually addressed single-qubit gates by local control of the speed of each ion. The fidelities we observe are consistent with operations performed using standard methods involving static ions and pulsed laser fields. This work therefore provides a path to scalable ion trap quantum computing with reduced requirements on the optical control complexity. PMID:26967401

  13. Global gyrokinetic simulations of trapped-electron mode and trapped-ion mode microturbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouot, T.; Gravier, E.; Reveille, T.; Sarrat, M.; Collard, M.; Bertrand, P.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Ghendrih, P.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a reduced kinetic model, which describes simultaneously trapped-ion (TIM) and trapped-electron (TEM) driven modes. Interestingly, the model enables the study of a full f problem for ion and electron trapped particles at very low numerical cost. The linear growth rate obtained with the full f nonlinear code Trapped Element REduction in Semi Lagrangian Approach is successfully compared with analytical predictions. Moreover, nonlinear results show some basic properties of collisionless TEM and TIM turbulence in tokamaks. A competition between streamer-like structures and zonal flows is observed for TEM and TIM turbulence. Zonal flows are shown to play an important role in suppressing the nonlinear transport and strongly depend on the temperature ratio Te/Ti .

  14. Collisional activation with random noise in ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1992-07-01

    Random noise applied to the end caps of a quadrupole ion trap is shown to be an effective means for the collisional activation of trapped ions independent of mass/charge ratio and number of ions. This technique is compared and contrasted with conventional single-frequency collisional activation for the molecular ion of N,N-dimethylaniline, protonated cocaine, the molecular anion of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, and doubly protonated neuromedin U-8. Collisional activation with noise tends to produce more extensive fragmentation than the conventional approach due to the fact that product ions are also kinetically excited in the noise experiment. The efficiency of the noise experiment in producing detectable product ions relative to the conventional approach ranges from being equivalent to being a factor of 3 less efficient. Furthermore, discrimination against low mass/charge product ions is apparent in the data from multiply charged biomolecules. Nevertheless, collisional activation with random noise provides a very simple means for overcoming problems associated with the dependence of single-frequency collisional activation on mass/charge ratio and the number of ions in the ion trap. 45 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Linear Ion Traps in Space: The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) Instrument and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arevalo, Ricardo; Brinckerhoff, William; Mahaffy, Paul; van Amerom, Friso; Danell, Ryan; Pinnick, Veronica; Li, Xiang; Hovmand, Lars; Getty, Stephanie; Grubisic, Andrej; Goesmann, Fred; Cottin, Hervé

    2015-11-01

    Historically, quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) instruments have been used to explore a wide survey of planetary targets in our solar system, from Venus (Pioneer Venus) to Saturn (Cassini-Huygens). However, linear ion trap (LIT) mass spectrometers have found a niche as smaller, versatile alternatives to traditional quadrupole analyzers.The core astrobiological experiment of ESA’s ExoMars Program is the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) onboard the ExoMars 2018 rover. The MOMA instrument is centered on a linear (or 2-D) ion trap mass spectrometer. As opposed to 3-D traps, LIT-based instruments accommodate two symmetrical ion injection pathways, enabling two complementary ion sources to be used. In the case of MOMA, these two analytical approaches are laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) at Mars ambient pressures, and traditional gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). The LIT analyzer employed by MOMA also offers: higher ion capacity compared to a 3-D trap of the same volume; redundant detection subassemblies for extended lifetime; and, a link to heritage QMS designs and assembly logistics. The MOMA engineering test unit (ETU) has demonstrated the detection of organics in the presence of wt.%-levels of perchlorate, effective ion enhancement via stored waveform inverse Fourier transform (SWIFT), and derivation of structural information through tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS).A more progressive linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LITMS), funded by the NASA ROSES MatISSE Program, is being developed at NASA GSFC and promises to augment the capabilities of the MOMA instrument by way of: an expanded mass range (i.e., 20 - 2000 Da); detection of both positive and negative ions; spatially resolved (<1 mm) characterization of individual rock core layers; and, evolved gas analysis and GCMS with pyrolysis up to 1300° C (enabling breakdown of refractory phases). The Advanced Resolution Organic Molecule Analyzer (AROMA) instrument, being developed through NASA

  16. Analysis of the beam halo in negative ion sources by using 3D3V PIC code.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Nishioka, S; Goto, I; Hatayama, A; Hanada, M; Kojima, A; Hiratsuka, J

    2016-02-01

    The physical mechanism of the formation of the negative ion beam halo and the heat loads of the multi-stage acceleration grids are investigated with the 3D PIC (particle in cell) simulation. The following physical mechanism of the beam halo formation is verified: The beam core and the halo consist of the negative ions extracted from the center and the periphery of the meniscus, respectively. This difference of negative ion extraction location results in a geometrical aberration. Furthermore, it is shown that the heat loads on the first acceleration grid and the second acceleration grid are quantitatively improved compared with those for the 2D PIC simulation result.

  17. Analysis of the beam halo in negative ion sources by using 3D3V PIC code.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Nishioka, S; Goto, I; Hatayama, A; Hanada, M; Kojima, A; Hiratsuka, J

    2016-02-01

    The physical mechanism of the formation of the negative ion beam halo and the heat loads of the multi-stage acceleration grids are investigated with the 3D PIC (particle in cell) simulation. The following physical mechanism of the beam halo formation is verified: The beam core and the halo consist of the negative ions extracted from the center and the periphery of the meniscus, respectively. This difference of negative ion extraction location results in a geometrical aberration. Furthermore, it is shown that the heat loads on the first acceleration grid and the second acceleration grid are quantitatively improved compared with those for the 2D PIC simulation result. PMID:26932006

  18. Characteristics of Ion Activation and Collision Induced Dissociation Using Digital Ion Trap Technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuxing; Dang, Qiankun; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2016-08-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) is one of the most established techniques for tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The CID of mass selected ion could be realized by ion resonance excitation with a digital rectangular waveform. The method is simple, and highly efficient CID result could be obtained by optimizing the experimental parameters, such as digital waveform voltage, frequency, and q value. In this work, the relationship between ion trapping waveform voltage and frequency at preselected q value, the relationship between waveform frequency and the q value at certain ion trapping voltage for optimum CID efficiency were investigated. Experiment results showed that the max CID efficiency of precursor reserpine ions can be obtained at different trapping waveform voltage and frequency when q and β are different. Based on systematic experimental analysis, the optimum experimental conditions for high CID efficiency can be calculated at any selected β or q. By using digital ion trap technology, the CID process and efficient fragmentation of parent ions can be realized by simply changing the trapping waveform amplitude, frequency, and the β values in the digital ion trap mass spectrometry. The technology and method are simple. It has potential use in ion trap mass spectrometry. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27150507

  19. Characteristics of Ion Activation and Collision Induced Dissociation Using Digital Ion Trap Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fuxing; Dang, Qiankun; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2016-08-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) is one of the most established techniques for tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The CID of mass selected ion could be realized by ion resonance excitation with a digital rectangular waveform. The method is simple, and highly efficient CID result could be obtained by optimizing the experimental parameters, such as digital waveform voltage, frequency, and q value. In this work, the relationship between ion trapping waveform voltage and frequency at preselected q value, the relationship between waveform frequency and the q value at certain ion trapping voltage for optimum CID efficiency were investigated. Experiment results showed that the max CID efficiency of precursor reserpine ions can be obtained at different trapping waveform voltage and frequency when q and β are different. Based on systematic experimental analysis, the optimum experimental conditions for high CID efficiency can be calculated at any selected β or q. By using digital ion trap technology, the CID process and efficient fragmentation of parent ions can be realized by simply changing the trapping waveform amplitude, frequency, and the β values in the digital ion trap mass spectrometry. The technology and method are simple. It has potential use in ion trap mass spectrometry.

  20. Electrostatic particle trap for ion beam sputter deposition

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stephen P.; Burkhart, Scott C.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particulate matter generated in ion beam sputter deposition. The apparatus involves an electrostatic particle trap which generates electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate on which target material is being deposited. The electrostatic particle trap consists of an array of electrode surfaces, each maintained at an electrostatic potential, and with their surfaces parallel or perpendicular to the surface of the substrate. The method involves interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particles achieved by generating electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate, and configuring the fields to force the charged particulate material away from the substrate. The electrostatic charged particle trap enables prevention of charged particles from being deposited on the substrate thereby enabling the deposition of extremely low defect density films, such as required for reflective masks of an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system.

  1. Magnetic interactions and microscopic spin Hamiltonian approaches for 3d 3 ions at trigonal symmetry sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Hao; Zi-Yuan, Yang

    2006-04-01

    The spin-Hamiltonian (SH) parameters ( D, g //, and g ⊥) for 4A2(3d 3)-state ions at trigonal symmetry sites, taking into account the spin-spin (SS), the spin-other-orbit (SOO), the orbit-orbit (OO) magnetic interactions besides the well-known spin-orbit (SO) magnetic interaction, are studied in the intermediate-field coupling scheme using the CDM/MSH (Complete Diagonalization Method/ Microscopic Spin Hamiltonian) program recently developed. It is shown that the SH parameters arise from five microscopic mechanisms including SO coupling mechanism, SS coupling mechanism, SOO coupling mechanism, OO coupling mechanism, and SO-SS-SOO-OO combined coupling mechanism. The relative importance of the five (SO, SS, SOO, OO and combined SO-SS-SOO-OO) contributions to the SH parameters is investigated. It is shown that the SO coupling mechanism in these coupling mechanisms is the most important one. The effect of the OO coupling mechanism on the energy levels is appreciable whereas that on the SH parameters is negligible. The contribution from the SS coupling mechanism to the zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameter D is appreciable but is quite small to g-factors: g // and g ⊥. In contrast, the contribution from the SOO coupling mechanism to the ZFS parameter D is quite small but is appreciable to g-factors. Two perturbation theory method approaches have been examined using CDM/MSH program. It is found that the analytical expressions developed by Macfarlane for D, g //, and g ⊥ work well in most of the CF ranges considered whereas those developed by Zdansky for D do not work well in almost all the CF ranges considered. The illustrative evaluation is performed for typical laser material Cr 3+: Al 2O 3. The good agreements between the theoretical values and the experimental finding are obtained. It is found that the percentage difference δ (=|D-D|/|D|×100%) reaches 20.9% for laser material Cr 3+: Al 2O 3. The investigation indicates that the contribution to the ZFS parameter

  2. Defect trapping of ion-implanted deuterium in nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Besenbacher, F.; Bottiger, J.; Myers, S.M.

    1982-05-01

    Trapping of ion-implanted deuterium by lattice defects in nickel has been studied by ion-beam-analysis techniques in the temperature range between 30 and 380 K. The deuterium-depth profiles were determined by measuring either the ..cap alpha.. particles or the protons from the /sup 3/He-excited nuclear reaction D(/sup 3/He,..cap alpha..)p, and the deuterium lattice location was obtained by means of ion channeling. Linear-ramp annealing (1 K/min) following a 10-keV D/sup +/ implantation in nickel produced two annealing stages at 275 and 320 K, respectively. The release-vs-temperature data were analyzed by solving the diffusion equation with appropriate trapping terms, yielding 0.24 and 0.43 eV for the trap-binding enthalpies associated with the two stages, referred to as an untrapped solution site. The 0.24-eV trap corresponds to deuterium close to the octahedral interstitial site where it is believed to be trapped at a vacancy, whereas it is suggested that the defect correlated with the 0.43-eV trap is a multiple-vacancy defect. The previously air-exposed and electropolished nickel surface was essentially permeable; the surface-recombination coefficient was determined to be K> or approx. =10/sup -19/ cm/sup 4//s at 350 K.

  3. Laser desorption in an ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Eiden, G.C.; Cisper, M.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Hemberger, P.H.; Nogar, N.S.

    1993-02-01

    Laser desorption in a ion-trap mass spectrometer shows significant promise for both qualitative and trace analysis. Several aspects of this methodology are discussed in this work. We previously demonstrated the generation of both negative and positive ions by laser desorption directly within a quadrupole ion trap. In the present work, we explore various combinations of d.c., r.f., and time-varying fields in order to optimize laser generated signals. In addition, we report on the application of this method to analyze samples containing compounds such as amines, metal complexes, carbon clusters, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. In some cases the ability to rapidly switch between positive and negative ion modes provides sufficient specificity to distinguish different compounds of a mixture with a single stage of mass spectrometry. In other experiments, we combined intensity variation studies with tandem mass spectrometry experiments and positive and negative ion detection to further enhance specificity.

  4. Single Ion Trapping for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, Samuel J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-03-28

    In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of {approx_equal} .010 eV.

  5. Towards Laser Cooling Trapped Ions with Telecom Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, Kristina; Becker, Patrick; Donoghue, Liz; Liu, Jackie; Olmschenk, Steven

    2015-05-01

    Quantum information has many potential applications in communication, atomic clocks, and the precision measurement of fundamental constants. Trapped ions are excellent candidates for applications in quantum information because of their isolation from external perturbations, and the precise control afforded by laser cooling and manipulation of the quantum state. For many applications in quantum communication, it would be advantageous to interface ions with telecom light. We present progress towards laser cooling and trapping of doubly-ionized lanthanum, which should require only infrared, telecom-compatible light. Additionally, we present progress on optimization of a second-harmonic generation cavity for laser cooling and trapping barium ions, for future sympathetic cooling experiments. This research is supported by the Army Research Office, Research Corporation for Science Advancement, and Denison University.

  6. Ion trap collision-induced dissociation of locked nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Huang, Teng-yi; Kharlamova, Anastasia; McLuckey, Scott A

    2010-01-01

    Gas-phase dissociation of model locked nucleic acid (LNA) oligonucleotides and functional LNA-DNA chimeras have been investigated as a function of precursor ion charge state using ion trap collision-induced dissociation (CID). For the model LNA 5 and 8 mer, containing all four LNA monomers in the sequence, cleavage of all backbone bonds, generating a/w-, b/x-, c/y-, and d/z-ions, was observed with no significant preference at lower charge states. Base loss ions, except loss of thymine, from the cleavage of N-glycosidic bonds were also present. In general, complete sequence coverage was achieved in all charge states. For the two LNA-DNA chimeras, however, dramatic differences in the relative contributions of the competing dissociation channels were observed among different precursor ion charge states. At lower charge states, sequence information limited to the a-Base/w-fragment ions from cleavage of the 3'C-O bond of DNA nucleotides, except thymidine (dT), was acquired from CID of both the LNA gapmer and mixmer ions. On the other hand, extensive fragmentation from various dissociation channels was observed from post-ion/ion ion trap CID of the higher charge state ions of both LNA-DNA chimeras. This report demonstrates that tandem mass spectrometry is effective in the sequence characterization of LNA oligonucleotides and LNA-DNA chimeric therapeutics.

  7. On the Rigorous Derivation of the 3D Cubic Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation with a Quadratic Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuwen

    2013-11-01

    We consider the dynamics of the three-dimensional N-body Schrödinger equation in the presence of a quadratic trap. We assume the pair interaction potential is N 3 β-1 V( N β x). We justify the mean-field approximation and offer a rigorous derivation of the three-dimensional cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) with a quadratic trap. We establish the space-time bound conjectured by Klainerman and Machedon (Commun Math Phys 279:169-185, 2008) for by adapting and simplifying an argument in Chen and Pavlović (Annales Henri Poincaré, 2013) which solves the problem for in the absence of a trap.

  8. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Rathod, Ketan D.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in optical molasses by turning off the MOT magnetic field before the transfer beams are turned on.

  9. Ion Trapping, Storage, and Ejection in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinyu; Garimella, Venkata BS; Prost, Spencer A.; Webb, Ian K.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Anderson, Gordon A.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-16

    A structure for lossless ion manipulation (SLIM) module was constructed with electrode arrays patterned on a pair of parallel printed circuit boards (PCB) separated by 5 mm and utilized to investigate capabilities for ion trapping at 4 Torr. Positive ions were confined by application of RF having alternating phases on a series of inner rung electrodes and by positive DC potentials on surrounding guard electrodes on each PCB. An axial DC field was also introduced by stepwise varying the DC potential of the inner rung electrodes so as to control the ion transport and accumulation inside the ion trap. We show that ions could be trapped and accumulated with 100% efficiency, stored for at least 5 hours with no losses, and could be rapidly ejected from the SLIM trap.

  10. The uses of electron beam ion traps in the study of highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, D.

    1994-11-02

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is a relatively new tool for the study of highly charged ions. Its development has led to a variety of new experimental opportunities; measurements have been performed with EBITs using techniques impossible with conventional ion sources or storage rings. In this paper, I will highlight the various experimental techniques we have developed and the results we have obtained using the EBIT and higher-energy Super-EBIT built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The EBIT employs a high-current-density electron beam to trap, ionize, and excite a population of ions. The ions can be studied in situ or extracted from the trap for external experiments. The trapped ions form an ionization-state equilibrium determined by the relative ionization and recombination rates. Ions of several different elements may simultaneously be present in the trap. The ions are nearly at rest, and, for most systems, all in their ground-state configurations. The electron-ion interaction energy has a narrow distribution and can be varied over a wide range. We have used the EBIT devices for the measurement of electron-ion interactions, ion structure, ion-surface interactions, and the behavior of low-density plasmas.

  11. Next Generation JPL Ultra-Stable Trapped Ion Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric; Tucker, Blake; Larsen, Kameron; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on two directions: 1) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements, and 2) ultra-stable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate performance. In this paper we present a new ultra-stable trapped ion clock designed, built, and tested in the second category. The first new standard, L10, will be delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use in characterizing DoD space clocks.

  12. Scalable Implementation of Boson Sampling with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C.; Zhang, Z.; Duan, L.-M.

    2014-02-01

    Boson sampling solves a classically intractable problem by sampling from a probability distribution given by matrix permanents. We propose a scalable implementation of boson sampling using local transverse phonon modes of trapped ions to encode the bosons. The proposed scheme allows deterministic preparation and high-efficiency readout of the bosons in the Fock states and universal mode mixing. With the state-of-the-art trapped ion technology, it is feasible to realize boson sampling with tens of bosons by this scheme, which would outperform the most powerful classical computers and constitute an effective disproof of the famous extended Church-Turing thesis.

  13. Direct fabrication of complex 3D hierarchical nanostructures by reactive ion etching of hollow sphere colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Kuo; Li, Jiaqi; Van Cleuvenbergen, Stijn; Clays, Koen

    2016-09-21

    Direct reactive ion etching (RIE) of hollow SiO2 sphere colloidal crystals (HSCCs) is employed as a facile, low-cost method to fabricate complex three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical nanostructures. These multilayered structures are gradually transformed into nanostructures of increasing complexity by controlling the etching time, without complicated procedures (no mask needed). The resulting 3D topologies are unique, and cannot be obtained through traditional approaches. The formation mechanism of these structures is explained in detail by geometrical modeling during the different etching stages, through shadow effects of the higher layers. SEM images confirm the modeled morphological changes. The nanostructures obtained by our approach show very fine features as small as ∼30 nm. Our approach opens new avenues to directly obtain complex 3D nanostructures from colloidal crystals and can find applications in sensing, templating, and catalysis where fine tuning the specific surface might be critical. PMID:27545098

  14. Focussed ion beam serial sectioning and imaging of monolithic materials for 3D reconstruction and morphological parameter evaluation.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Mercedes; Moore, David; He, Xiaoyun; Ben Azouz, Aymen; Nesterenko, Ekaterina; Nesterenko, Pavel; Paull, Brett; Brabazon, Dermot

    2014-01-01

    A new characterisation method, based on the utilisation of focussed ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), has been employed for the evaluation of morphological parameters in porous monolithic materials. Sample FIB serial sectioning, SEM imaging and image processing techniques were used to extract the pore boundaries and reconstruct the 3D porous structure of carbon and silica-based monoliths. Since silica is a non-conducting material, a commercial silica monolith modified with activated carbon was employed instead to minimise the charge build-up during FIB sectioning. This work therefore presents a novel methodology that can be successfully employed for 3D reconstruction of porous monolithic materials which are or can be made conductive through surface or bulk modification. Furthermore, the 3D reconstructions were used for calculation of the monolith macroporosity, which was in good agreement with the porosity values obtained by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP).

  15. [Effect of Temperatures and Lead Ions on 3D-EEMs of Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) Derived from Straw Humification].

    PubMed

    Fan, Chun-hui; Zhang, Ying-chao; Wang, Jia-hong

    2015-11-01

    Straw incorporation is significant for straw reduction and reutilization, and is clearly required in the twelfth five-year-plan for national economic and social development of the People's Republic of China. The incorporated straw will naturally decompose and release the component of dissolved organic matter (DOM). At present, it lacks the research on straw humification behavior controlled by environmental factors and complexation effect between humification component and metal ions with fluorescence spectrometry in the representative region of loess. The fluorescence spectrometry was used to reveal the 3D-EEMs characteristics of DOM affected by temperatures and lead ions in the straw humification process, and the modified Stern-Volmer equation and Van't Hoff equation were applied to indicate the complexation parameters and thermodynamic constants between lead ions and DOM. The results showed: the humification temperatures affected little on fluorescence peaks of DOM and no peaks were obviously found to appear or disappear from the 3D-EEMs results. The fluorescence intensity decreased gradually at higher temperatures and in the presence of lead ions, the quenching effect might work in the process. The binding ability was more significant between lead ions and visible fulvic-like component shown from modified Stern-Volmer equation, and the values of ƒ revealed the complexation effect of lead ions and functional groups in DOM. Static quenching was the primary mechanism during the reaction process. The constants in Van't Hoff equation suggested the reaction was spontaneous and endothermic, and the disordered degree and the complexity were relatively low in the reaction system. The 3D-EEMs were acceptable to illustrate the variation of DOM characteristics under different temperatures and in the presence of lead ions in the straw humification process. PMID:26978920

  16. Cooling of highly charged ions in a Penning trap

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, L

    2000-03-31

    Highly charged ions are extracted from an electron beam ion trap and guided to Retrap, a cryogenic Penning trap, where they are merged with laser cooled Be{sup +} ions. The Be{sup +} ions act as a coolant for the hot highly charged ions and their temperature is dropped by about 8 orders of magnitude in a few seconds. Such cold highly charged ions form a strongly coupled nonneutral plasma exhibiting, under such conditions, the aggregation of clusters and crystals. Given the right mixture, these plasmas can be studied as analogues of high density plasmas like white dwarf interiors, and potentially can lead to the development of cold highly charged ion beams for applications in nanotechnology. Due to the virtually non existent Doppler broadening, spectroscopy on highly charged ions can be performed to an unprecedented precision. The density and the temperature of the Be{sup +} plasma were measured and highly charged ions were sympathetically cooled to similar temperatures. Molecular dynamics simulations confirmed the shape, temperature and density of the highly charged ions. Ordered structures were observed in the simulations.

  17. "Fast excitation" CID in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Murrell, J; Despeyroux, D; Lammert, S A; Stephenson, J L; Goeringer, D E

    2003-07-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer is usually performed by applying a small amplitude excitation voltage at the same secular frequency as the ion of interest. Here we disclose studies examining the use of large amplitude voltage excitations (applied for short periods of time) to cause fragmentation of the ions of interest. This process has been examined using leucine enkephalin as the model compound and the motion of the ions within the ion trap simulated using ITSIM. The resulting fragmentation information obtained is identical with that observed by conventional resonance excitation CID. "Fast excitation" CID deposits (as determined by the intensity ratio of the a(4)/b(4) ion of leucine enkephalin) approximately the same amount of internal energy into an ion as conventional resonance excitation CID where the excitation signal is applied for much longer periods of time. The major difference between the two excitation techniques is the higher rate of excitation (gain in kinetic energy) between successive collisions with helium atoms with "fast excitation" CID as opposed to the conventional resonance excitation CID. With conventional resonance excitation CID ions fragment while the excitation voltage is still being applied whereas for "fast excitation" CID a higher proportion of the ions fragment in the ion cooling time following the excitation pulse. The fragmentation of the (M + 17H)(17+) of horse heart myoglobin is also shown to illustrate the application of "fast excitation" CID to proteins.

  18. "Fast Excitation" CID in Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Murrell, J.; Despeyroux, D.; Lammert, Stephen {Steve} A; Stephenson Jr, James {Jim} L; Goeringer, Doug

    2003-01-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer is usually performed by applying a small amplitude excitation voltage at the same secular frequency as the ion of interest. Here we disclose studies examining the use of large amplitude voltage excitations (applied for short periods of time) to cause fragmentation of the ions of interest. This process has been examined using leucine enkephalin as the model compound and the motion of the ions within the ion trap simulated using ITSIM. The resulting fragmentation information obtained is identical with that observed by conventional resonance excitation CID. ''Fast excitation'' CID deposits (as determined by the intensity ratio of the a{sub 4}/b{sub 4} ion of leucine enkephalin) approximately the same amount of internal energy into an ion as conventional resonance excitation CID where the excitation signal is applied for much longer periods of time. The major difference between the two excitation techniques is the higher rate of excitation (gain in kinetic energy) between successive collisions with helium atoms with ''fast excitation'' CID as opposed to the conventional resonance excitation CID. With conventional resonance excitation CID ions fragment while the excitation voltage is still being applied whereas for ''fast excitation'' CID a higher proportion of the ions fragment in the ion cooling time following the excitation pulse. The fragmentation of the (M + 17H){sup 17+} of horse heart myoglobin is also shown to illustrate the application of ''fast excitation'' CID to proteins.

  19. Electron Cooling of Highly Charged Ions in Penning Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Zwicknagel, Guenter

    2006-10-18

    For recent and planned experiments like the CPT-tests with antihydrogen at CERN (ATHENA, ATRAP) or the QED-tests and various other investigations with slow highly charged ions at GSI (HTTRAP), the ions or antiprotons are cooled with electrons or positrons in Penning traps. In many of these applications an efficient and fast cooling is crucial. In particular for electron cooling of highly charged ions, like e.g. of U92+ in HITRAP, sufficiently large cooling rates are mandatory for avoiding too much losses by recombination or charge exchange processes. Here we present calculations of electron cooling and recombination losses of an ensemble of ions in a Penning traps based on a detailed description of the cooling force and the actual radiative ion-electron recombination rate. We focus on the cooling of highly charged ions, namely bare Uranium, in HITRAP. Both the associated cooling times and recombination losses strongly depend on the density of the electrons and the ratio of the number of ions to the number of electrons in the trap. Our analysis shows that electron cooling of bare Uranium with an initial energy of a few keV/u is feasible with a cooling time less than about a second at less than 10 percent recombination losses.

  20. 3D microstructuring in p-GaAs with proton beam writing using multiple ion fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Borchers, M.; Vetter, U.; Koppe, T.; Hofsäss, H.

    2012-02-01

    We report on a new method of three-dimensional structuring by means of proton beam writing in p-type gallium arsenide. While up to now vertical features have been created by varying the proton beam energy during irradiation which changes the proton penetration depth and thereby the depth of the material modification, we manufactured 3D structures with a single beam energy but different proton doses supplemented by a subsequent controlled electrochemical etching process. This new approach could simplify 3D structuring in semiconductors and the usage of proton beam writing for the manufacturing of micro electromechanical devices with high aspect ratios and smooth sidewalls.

  1. Observations of the 3-D distribution of interplanetary electrons and ions from solar wind plasma to low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Ashford, S.; Carlson, C.; Curtis, D.; Ergun, R.; Larson, D.; McFadden, J.; McCarthy, M.; Parks, G. K.

    1995-01-01

    The 3-D Plasma and Energetic Particle instrument on the GGS Wind spacecraft (launched November 1, 1994) is designed to make measurements of the full three-dimensional distribution of suprathermal electrons and ions from solar wind plasma to low energy cosmic rays, with high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, good energy and angular resolution, and high time resolution. Three pairs of double-ended telescopes, each with two or three closely sandwiched passivated ion implanted silicon detectors measure electrons and ions from approximately 20 keV to greater than or equal to 300 keV. Four top-hat symmetrical spherical section electrostatic analyzers with microchannel plate detectors, a large and a small geometric factor analyzer for electrons and a similar pair for ions, cover from approximately 3 eV to 30 keV. We present preliminary observations of the electron and ion distributions in the absence of obvious solar impulsive events and upstream particles. The quiet time electron energy spectrum shows a smooth approximately power law fall-off extending from the halo population at a few hundred eV to well above approximately 100 keV The quiet time ion energy spectrum also shows significant fluxes over this energy range. Detailed 3-D distributions and their temporal variations will be presented.

  2. Enhanced Light Collection from a Trapped Ion Using a Micromirror Integrated with Surface Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noek, Rachel; Knoernschild, Caleb; Kim, Taehyun; Maunz, Peter; Merrill, True; Hayden, Harley; Pai, C. S.; Kim, Jungsang

    2010-03-01

    Efficient collection of fluorescence from trapped atoms or ions is imperative for high speed, high fidelity quantum information processing. Using low f-number conventional collection optics, less than 7% of light can be collected from a small field of view (FoV, <0.2mm). We add high numerical aperture micromirrors behind each point source, and image the reflected light from the micromirrors with a conventional f/2.55 imaging system and obtain a factor of 18 improvement in collection over the same system without the micromirrors. The FoV expands to 17.8 mm and the numerical aperture is limited by the micromirror behind the ion rather than the conventional optics. We used a fluorescent microbead mounted on a glass pipette and a custom fabricated 100 um diameter Al coated Si micromirror to demonstrate this principle. Micromirrors integrated with surface ion traps are currently under development for improved ion detection and FoV.

  3. Mobility-Selected Ion Trapping and Enrichment Using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Webb, Ian K.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Zhang, Xing; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Deng, Liulin; Karnesky, William E.; Prost, Spencer A.; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; et al

    2016-01-11

    The integration of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with mass spectrometry (MS) and the ability to trap ions in IMS-MS measurements is of great importance for performing reactions, accumulating ions, and increasing analytical measurement sensitivity. The development of Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) offers the potential for ion manipulations in a more reliable and cost-effective manner, while opening opportunities for much more complex sequences of manipulations. Here, we demonstrate an ion separation and trapping module and a method based upon SLIM that consists of a linear mobility ion drift region, a switch/tee and a trapping region that allows the isolationmore » and accumulation of mobility-separated species. The operation and optimization of the SLIM switch/tee and trap are described and demonstrated for the enrichment of the low abundance ions. Lastly, we observed a linear increase in ion intensity with the number of trapping/accumulation events using the SLIM trap, illustrating its potential for enhancing the sensitivity of low abundance or targeted species.« less

  4. A System For High Flexibility Entangling Gates With Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Alistair; Edmunds, Claire; Mavadia, Sandeep; Green, Todd; Biercuk, Michael

    Trapped ion qubits may be entangled via coupling to shared modes of motion using spin-dependent forces generated by optical fields. Residual qubit-motional coupling at the conclusion of the entangling operation is the dominant source of infidelity in this type of gate. For synchronously entangling increasing numbers of ions, longer gate times are required to minimise this residual coupling. We present a scheme that enables the state of each qubit to be simultaneously decoupled from all motional modes in an arbitrarily chosen gate time, increasing the gate fidelity and scalability. This is achieved by implementing discrete phase shifts in the optical field moderating the entangling operation. We describe an experimental system based on trapped ytterbium ions and demonstrate this scheme for two-qubit entangling gates on ytterbium ion pairs.

  5. Memory coherence of a sympathetically cooled trapped-ion qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Home, J. P.; McDonnell, M. J.; Szwer, D. J.; Keitch, B. C.; Lucas, D. M.; Stacey, D. N.; Steane, A. M.

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate sympathetic cooling of a C43a+ trapped-ion “memory” qubit by a C40a+ “coolant” ion sufficiently near the ground state of motion for fault-tolerant quantum logic, while maintaining coherence of the qubit. This is an essential ingredient in trapped-ion quantum computers. The isotope shifts are sufficient to suppress decoherence and phase shifts of the memory qubit due to the cooling light which illuminates both ions. We measure the qubit coherence during ten cycles of sideband cooling, finding a coherence loss of 3.3% per cooling cycle. The natural limit of the method is O(10-4) infidelity per cooling cycle.

  6. Characterization of protonated phospholipids as fragile ions in quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Timothy J.; Merves, Matthew; Yost, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Some ions exhibit “ion fragility” in quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry (QIT-MS) during mass analysis with resonance ejection. In many cases, different ions generated from the same compound exhibit different degrees of ion fragility, with some ions (e.g., the [M+H]+ ion) stable and other ions (e.g., the [M+Na]+ ion) fragile. The ion fragility for quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometry (MS) for protonated and sodiated ions of three phospholipids, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, PC (16:0/16:0), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phophoethanolamine, PE (16:0/16:0), and N-palmitoyl-D-erythro-sphingosylphosphorylcholine, SM (d18:1/16:0), was determined using three previously developed experiments: 1) the peak width using a slow scan speed, 2) the width of the isolation window for efficient isolation, and 3) the energy required for collision-induced dissociation. In addition, ion fragility studies were designed and performed to explore a correlation between ion fragility in QIT mass analysis and ion fragility during transport between the ion source and the ion trap. These experiments were: 1) evaluating the amount of thermal-induced dissociation as a function of heated capillary temperature, and 2) determining the extent of fragmentation occurring with increasing tube lens voltage. All phospholipid species studied exhibited greater ion fragility as protonated species in ion trap mass analysis than as sodiated species. In addition, the protonated species of both SM (d18:0/16:0) and PC (16:0/16:0) exhibited greater tendencies to fragment at higher heated capillary temperatures and high tube lens voltages, whereas the PE (16:0/16:0) ions did not appear to exhibit fragility during ion transport. PMID:22247650

  7. A Modular Quantum System of Trapped Atomic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hucul, David Alexander

    Scaling up controlled quantum systems to involve large numbers of qubits remains one of the outstanding challenges of quantum information science. One path toward scalability is the use of a modular architecture where adjacent qubits may be entangled with applied electromagnetic fields, and remote qubits may be entangled using photon interference. Trapped atomic ion qubits are one of the most promising platforms for scaling up quantum systems by combining long coherence times with high fidelity entangling operations between proximate and remote qubits. In this thesis, I present experimental progress on combining entanglement between remote atomic ions separated by 1 meter with near-field entanglement between atomic ions in the same ion trap. I describe the experimental improvements to increase the remote entanglement rate by orders of magnitude to nearly 5 per second. This is the first experimental demonstration where the remote entanglement rate exceeds the decoherence rate of the entangled qubits. The flexibility of creating remote entanglement through photon interference is demonstrated by using the interference of distinguishable photons without sacrificing remote entanglement rate or fidelity. Next I describe the use of master clock in combination with a frequency comb to lock the phases of all laser-induced interactions between remote ion traps while removing optical phase stability requirements. The combination of both types of entanglement gates to create a small quantum network are described. Finally, I present ways to mitigate cross talk between photonic and memory qubits by using different trapped ion species. I show preliminary work on performing state detection of nuclear spin 0 ions by using entanglement between atomic ion spin and photon polarization. These control techniques may be important for building a large-scale modular quantum system.

  8. Improving ion mobility measurement sensitivity by utilizing helium in an ion funnel trap.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Yehia M; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Baker, Erin S; Smith, Richard D

    2014-06-01

    Ion mobility instruments that utilize nitrogen as buffer gas are often preceded by an ion trap and accumulation region that also uses nitrogen, and for different inert gases, no significant effects upon performance are expected for ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) of larger ions. However, we have observed significantly improved performance for an ion funnel trap upon adding helium; the signal intensities for higher m/z species were improved by more than an order of magnitude compared to using pure nitrogen. The effect of helium upon IMS resolving power was also studied by introducing a He/N2 gas mixture into the drift cell, and in some cases, a slight improvement was observed compared to pure N2. The improvement in signal can be largely attributed to faster and more efficient ion ejection into the drift tube from the ion funnel trap.

  9. Field-free junctions for surface electrode ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordens, Robert; Schmied, R.; Blain, M. G.; Leibfried, D.; Wineland, D.

    2015-05-01

    Intersections between transport guides in a network of RF ion traps are a key ingredient to many implementations of scalable quantum information processing with trapped ions. Several junction architectures demonstrated so far are limited by varying radial secular frequencies, a reduced trap depth, or a non-vanishing RF field along the transport channel. We report on the design and progress in implementing a configurable microfabricated surface electrode Y-junction that employs switchable RF electrodes. An essentially RF-field-free pseudopotential guide between any two legs of the junction can be established by applying RF potential to a suitable pair of electrodes. The transport channel's height above the electrodes, its depth and radial curvature are constant to within 15%. Supported by IARPA, Sandia, NSA, ONR, and the NIST Quantum Information Program.

  10. Dual-Ion-Trap Frequency Standards With Overlapping Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Prestage, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed scheme for enhancing performances of atomic frequency-standard apparatuses calls for two or more ion traps per apparatus interrogated in alternation by radio-frequency pulses. Provides nearly constant feedback gain, thereby providing nearly constant corrections for fluctuations in frequency of local oscillator. Degradation of performance by fluctuations in local oscillators reduced.

  11. Differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Benjamin C.; Kenttamaa, Hilkka I.

    2015-10-20

    The present disclosure provides a new tandem mass spectrometer and methods of using the same for analyzing charged particles. The differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer of the present disclose includes a combination of two linear quadrupole (LQIT) mass spectrometers with differentially pumped vacuum chambers.

  12. Criteria for ultrastable operation of the trapped ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1992-01-01

    The leading systematic perturbations to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL's) mercury trapped ion frequency standard are characterized under present operating conditions. Sensitivity of the standard to environmental variations is measured, and the required regulation of key components to obtain a stability of 10(exp -16) is identified.

  13. Enabling Technologies for Scalable Trapped Ion Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crain, Stephen; Gaultney, Daniel; Mount, Emily; Knoernschild, Caleb; Baek, Soyoung; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang

    2013-05-01

    Scalability is one of the main challenges of trapped ion based quantum computation, mainly limited by the lack of enabling technologies needed to trap, manipulate and process the increasing number of qubits. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology allows one to design movable micromirrors to focus laser beams on individual ions in a chain and steer the focal point in two dimensions. Our current MEMS system is designed to steer 355 nm pulsed laser beams to carry out logic gates on a chain of Yb ions with a waist of 1.5 μm across a 20 μm range. In order to read the state of the qubit chain we developed a 32-channel PMT with a custom read-out circuit operating near the thermal noise limit of the readout amplifier which increases state detection fidelity. We also developed a set of digital to analog converters (DACs) used to supply analog DC voltages to the electrodes of an ion trap. We designed asynchronous DACs to avoid added noise injection at the update rate commonly found in synchronous DACs. Effective noise filtering is expected to reduce the heating rate of a surface trap, thus improving multi-qubit logic gate fidelities. Our DAC system features 96 channels and an integrated FPGA that allows the system to be controlled in real time. This work was supported by IARPA/ARO.

  14. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yung, M-H; Casanova, J; Mezzacapo, A; McClean, J; Lamata, L; Aspuru-Guzik, A; Solano, E

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology. PMID:24395054

  15. Quantum Simulation of Quantum Field Theories in Trapped Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, J.; Lamata, L.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Gerritsma, R.; Roos, C. F.; Garcia-Ripoll, J. J.; Solano, E.

    2011-12-23

    We propose the quantum simulation of fermion and antifermion field modes interacting via a bosonic field mode, and present a possible implementation with two trapped ions. This quantum platform allows for the scalable add up of bosonic and fermionic modes, and represents an avenue towards quantum simulations of quantum field theories in perturbative and nonperturbative regimes.

  16. Quantum energy teleportation with trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hotta, Masahiro

    2009-10-15

    We analyze a protocol of quantum energy teleportation that transports energy from the left edge of a linear ion crystal to the right edge by local operations and classical communication at a speed considerably greater than the speed of a phonon in the crystal. A probe qubit is strongly coupled with phonon fluctuation in the ground state for a short time and it is projectively measured in order to obtain information about this phonon fluctuation. During the measurement process, phonons are excited by the time-dependent measurement interaction and the energy of the excited phonons must be infused from outside the system. The obtained information is transferred to the right edge of the crystal through a classical channel. Even though the phonons excited at the left edge do not arrive at the right edge at the same time as when the information arrives at the right edge, we are able to soon extract energy from the ions at the right edge by using the transferred information. Because the intermediate ions of the crystal are not excited during the execution of the protocol, energy is transmitted in the energy-transfer channel without heat generation.

  17. Fluorescence Imaging for Visualization of the Ion Cloud in a Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, Francis O.; Sciuto, Stephen V.; Jockusch, Rebecca A.

    2013-12-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence is used to visualize populations of gaseous ions stored in a quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometer. Presented images include the first fluorescence image of molecular ions collected under conditions typically used in mass spectrometry experiments. Under these "normal" mass spectrometry conditions, the radial ( r) and axial ( z) full-width at half maxima (FWHM) of the detected ion cloud are 615 and 214 μm, respectively, corresponding to ~6 % of r 0 and ~3 % of z 0 for the QIT used. The effects on the shape and size of the ion cloud caused by varying the pressure of helium bath gas, the number of trapped ions, and the Mathieu parameter q z are visualized and discussed. When a "tickle voltage" is applied to the exit end-cap electrode, as is done in collisionally activated dissociation, a significant elongation in the axial, but not the radial, dimension of the ion cloud is apparent. Finally, using spectroscopically distinguishable fluorophores of two different m/ z values, images are presented that illustrate stratification of the ion cloud; ions of lower m/ z (higher q z ) are located in the center of the trapping region, effectively excluding higher m/ z (lower q z ) ions, which form a surrounding layer. Fluorescence images such as those presented here provide a useful reference for better understanding the collective behavior of ions in radio frequency (rf) trapping devices and how phenomena such as collisions and space-charge affect ion distribution.

  18. Octupole Excitation of Trapped Ion Motion for Precision Mass Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollen, G.; Ringle, R.; Schury, P.; Schwarz, S.; Sun, T.

    2005-04-01

    National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA An azimuthal octupole radiofrequency field has been used to excite the ion motion of ^40Ar^+ ions stored in a Penning trap. A resonant response was observed at twice the ions' true cyclotron frequency φc=q/m.B. The experiment has been performed with the 9.4-T Penning trap system of the recently commissioned LEBIT facility at the NSCL at MSU [1]. Similar to the excitation with an azimuthal quadrupole field at φc [2,3], octupole excitation at 2φc gives rise to a periodic beating of the ion motion between magnetron and reduced cyclotron motion. Differences are observed in the dependence of the excited ion motion on initial amplitudes and phases of the radial eigen motions. The observed behavior of the ions is found to be in good agreement with the results of numerical simulations. The technique still requires further testing but the first results indicate that 2φc excitation may provide benefits that are similar to doubling the magnetic field strength B. In particular precision mass measurements of short-lived rare isotopes may benefit from this technique by being able to reach a given precision with shorter ion storage and observation times. [1] S. Schwarz et al, Nucl. Instr. Meth. B204 (2004) 507 [2] G. Bollen et al., J. Appl. Phys. 68 (1990) 4355 [3] M. König et al., Int. J. Mass Spec. Ion. Proc. 142 (1995) 95

  19. Rapid crystallization of externally produced ions in a Penning trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murböck, T.; Schmidt, S.; Birkl, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Thompson, R. C.; Vogel, M.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the cooling dynamics, formation process, and geometric structure of mesoscopic crystals of externally produced magnesium ions in a Penning trap. We present a cooling model and measurements for a combination of buffer gas cooling and laser cooling which has been found to reduce the ion kinetic energy by eight orders of magnitude from several hundreds of eV to μ eV and below within seconds. With ion numbers of the order of 1 ×103 to 1 ×105 , such cooling leads to the formation of ion Coulomb crystals which display a characteristic shell structure in agreement with the theory of non-neutral plasmas. We show the production and characterization of two-species ion crystals as a means of sympathetic cooling of ions lacking a suitable laser-cooling transition.

  20. Klein tunneling and Dirac potentials in trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, J.; Garcia-Ripoll, J. J.; Gerritsma, R.; Roos, C. F.; Solano, E.

    2010-08-15

    We propose the quantum simulation of the Dirac equation with potentials, allowing the study of relativistic scattering and Klein tunneling. This quantum relativistic effect permits a positive-energy Dirac particle to propagate through a repulsive potential via the population transfer to negative-energy components. We show how to engineer scalar, pseudoscalar, and other potentials in the 1+1 Dirac equation by manipulating two trapped ions. The Dirac spinor is represented by the internal states of one ion, while its position and momentum are described by those of a collective motional mode. The second ion is used to build the desired potentials with high spatial resolution.

  1. Ultra-stable Hg(+) trapped ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Tjoelker, R. L.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1992-01-01

    We report the development of a fieldable frequency standard based on Hg-199(+) ions confined in a hybrid r.f./dc linear ion trap. This trap permits storage of large numbers of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the r.f. confining fields. A 160 mHz wide atomic resonance line for the 40.5 GHz clock transition is used to steer the output of a 5 MHz crystal oscillator to obtain a stability of 2 x 10 exp -15 for 24,000 s averaging times. For longer averaging intervals, measurements are limited by instabilities in available hydrogen maser frequency standards. Measurements with 37 mHz linewidth for the Hg(+) clock transition demonstrate that the inherent stability for this frequency standard is at least as good as 1 x 10 exp -15.

  2. β-delayed neutron spectroscopy using trapped radioactive ions.

    PubMed

    Yee, R M; Scielzo, N D; Bertone, P F; Buchinger, F; Caldwell, S; Clark, J A; Deibel, C M; Fallis, J; Greene, J P; Gulick, S; Lascar, D; Levand, A F; Li, G; Norman, E B; Pedretti, M; Savard, G; Segel, R E; Sharma, K S; Sternberg, M G; Van Schelt, J; Zabransky, B J

    2013-03-01

    A novel technique for β-delayed neutron spectroscopy has been demonstrated using trapped ions. The neutron-energy spectrum is reconstructed by measuring the time of flight of the nuclear recoil following neutron emission, thereby avoiding all the challenges associated with neutron detection, such as backgrounds from scattered neutrons and γ rays and complicated detector-response functions. (137)I(+) ions delivered from a (252)Cf source were confined in a linear Paul trap surrounded by radiation detectors, and the β-delayed neutron-energy spectrum and branching ratio were determined by detecting the β(-) and recoil ions in coincidence. Systematic effects were explored by determining the branching ratio three ways. Improvements to achieve higher detection efficiency, better energy resolution, and a lower neutron-energy threshold are proposed. PMID:23496704

  3. Thermalization of trapped ions: A quantum perturbation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoreaux, S. K.

    1997-12-01

    The rate at which external random thermal fluctuations drive transitions between, and cause decoherence of, the near ground vibrational (harmonic oscillator) quantum states of trapped cold ions is of crucial importance in relation to quantum computing. Presented here is an estimate of these rates, for a single trapped ion, based on a quantum perturbation approach where an external thermal energy reservoir is electrically coupled to the ion. The results are for a general system, and it is shown that the relevant parameter in the interpretation of experimentally observed heating rates is the correlation time of the fluctuations. The rates due to the fluctuating electric field associated with blackbody radiation are also considered and shown to be negligible.

  4. Scalable digital hardware for a trapped ion quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, Emily; Gaultney, Daniel; Vrijsen, Geert; Adams, Michael; Baek, So-Young; Hudek, Kai; Isabella, Louis; Crain, Stephen; van Rynbach, Andre; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang

    2015-09-01

    Many of the challenges of scaling quantum computer hardware lie at the interface between the qubits and the classical control signals used to manipulate them. Modular ion trap quantum computer architectures address scalability by constructing individual quantum processors interconnected via a network of quantum communication channels. Successful operation of such quantum hardware requires a fully programmable classical control system capable of frequency stabilizing the continuous wave lasers necessary for loading, cooling, initialization, and detection of the ion qubits, stabilizing the optical frequency combs used to drive logic gate operations on the ion qubits, providing a large number of analog voltage sources to drive the trap electrodes, and a scheme for maintaining phase coherence among all the controllers that manipulate the qubits. In this work, we describe scalable solutions to these hardware development challenges.

  5. A high-performance Hg(+) trapped ion frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, J. D.; Tjoelker, R. L.; Dick, G. J.; Maleki, L.

    1992-01-01

    A high-performance frequency standard based on (199)Hg(+) ions confined in a hybrid radio frequency (RF)/dc linear ion trap is demonstrated. This trap permits storage of large numbers of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. A 160-mHz-wide atomic resonance line for the 40.5-GHz clock transition is used to steer the output of a 5-mHz crystal oscillator to obtain a stability of 2 x 10(exp -15) for 24,000-second averaging times. Measurements with a 37-mHz line width for the Hg(+) clock transition demonstrate that the inherent stability for this frequency standard is better than 1 x 10(exp -15) at 10,000-second averaging times.

  6. Ion Trap Array-Based Systems And Methods For Chemical Analysis

    DOEpatents

    Whitten, William B [Oak Ridge, TN; Ramsey, J Michael [Knoxville, TN

    2005-08-23

    An ion trap-based system for chemical analysis includes an ion trap array. The ion trap array includes a plurality of ion traps arranged in a 2-dimensional array for initially confining ions. Each of the ion traps comprise a central electrode having an aperture, a first and second insulator each having an aperture sandwiching the central electrode, and first and second end cap electrodes each having an aperture sandwiching the first and second insulator. A structure for simultaneously directing a plurality of different species of ions out from the ion traps is provided. A spectrometer including a detector receives and identifies the ions. The trap array can be used with spectrometers including time-of-flight mass spectrometers and ion mobility spectrometers.

  7. MEMS-based arrays of micro ion traps for quantum simulation scaling.

    SciTech Connect

    Berkeland, Dana J.; Blain, Matthew Glenn; Jokiel, Bernhard, Jr.

    2006-11-01

    In this late-start Tier I Seniors Council sponsored LDRD, we have designed, simulated, microfabricated, packaged, and tested ion traps to extend the current quantum simulation capabilities of macro-ion traps to tens of ions in one and two dimensions in monolithically microfabricated micrometer-scaled MEMS-based ion traps. Such traps are being microfabricated and packaged at Sandia's MESA facility in a unique tungsten MEMS process that has already made arrays of millions of micron-sized cylindrical ion traps for mass spectroscopy applications. We define and discuss the motivation for quantum simulation using the trapping of ions, show the results of efforts in designing, simulating, and microfabricating W based MEMS ion traps at Sandia's MESA facility, and describe is some detail our development of a custom based ion trap chip packaging technology that enables the implementation of these devices in quantum physics experiments.

  8. Microsecond pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange of electrosprayed ubiquitin ions stored in a linear ion trap.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-02-01

    A pulse of D2O vapour on the order of microseconds is allowed to react with the +6 to +9 charge states of ubiquitin confined in a linear ion trap (LIT). Two envelopes of peaks are detected for the ions of ubiquitin, corresponding to the ions that exchange more quickly and more slowly. The deuterium uptake of the protonated sites on ubiquitin ions accounts for the ion population with the fast exchange. The hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics of ubiquitin ions trapped in the LIT for 200 ms showed comparable structural transitions to those trapped for 300 ms. When ions are trapped for longer, i.e. up to 2000 ms, mainly the slow exchanging ion population is detected. In all experiments the +7 ions exchange the most, suggesting a short distance between the surface protonated sites and nearby charged sites, and concomitantly high accessibility of surface protonated sites towards D2O. The +6 ions are more compact than the +7 ions but have one fewer protonated site, therefore fewer surface availabilities for D2O attack. The data suggest that the +6 ions keep most of their solution-phase contacts intact while the hydrophobic core is slightly interrupted in the +7 ions, possibly due to the exposure of charged His68 that is normally buried in the hydrophobic pocket. The +8 and +9 ions have more protonated sites but are less compact than the +7 ions because of Coulombic repulsion, resulting in a larger distance between the protonated sites and the basic sites. The data indicate that the HDX mechanism of ions with the slower exchange corresponding to the second envelope of peaks is primarily governed via a relay mechanism. The results suggest that the pulsed HDX MS method is sampling a population of ubiquitin ions with a similar backbone fold to the solution.

  9. Microsecond pulsed hydrogen/deuterium exchange of electrosprayed ubiquitin ions stored in a linear ion trap.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Khadijeh

    2015-02-01

    A pulse of D2O vapour on the order of microseconds is allowed to react with the +6 to +9 charge states of ubiquitin confined in a linear ion trap (LIT). Two envelopes of peaks are detected for the ions of ubiquitin, corresponding to the ions that exchange more quickly and more slowly. The deuterium uptake of the protonated sites on ubiquitin ions accounts for the ion population with the fast exchange. The hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics of ubiquitin ions trapped in the LIT for 200 ms showed comparable structural transitions to those trapped for 300 ms. When ions are trapped for longer, i.e. up to 2000 ms, mainly the slow exchanging ion population is detected. In all experiments the +7 ions exchange the most, suggesting a short distance between the surface protonated sites and nearby charged sites, and concomitantly high accessibility of surface protonated sites towards D2O. The +6 ions are more compact than the +7 ions but have one fewer protonated site, therefore fewer surface availabilities for D2O attack. The data suggest that the +6 ions keep most of their solution-phase contacts intact while the hydrophobic core is slightly interrupted in the +7 ions, possibly due to the exposure of charged His68 that is normally buried in the hydrophobic pocket. The +8 and +9 ions have more protonated sites but are less compact than the +7 ions because of Coulombic repulsion, resulting in a larger distance between the protonated sites and the basic sites. The data indicate that the HDX mechanism of ions with the slower exchange corresponding to the second envelope of peaks is primarily governed via a relay mechanism. The results suggest that the pulsed HDX MS method is sampling a population of ubiquitin ions with a similar backbone fold to the solution. PMID:25553956

  10. Double well potentials and quantum phase transitions in ion traps.

    PubMed

    Retzker, A; Thompson, R C; Segal, D M; Plenio, M B

    2008-12-31

    We demonstrate that the radial degree of freedom of strings of trapped ions in the quantum regime may be prepared and controlled accurately through the variation of the external trapping potential while at the same time its properties are measurable with high spatial and temporal resolution. This provides a new testbed giving access to static and dynamical properties of the physics of quantum-many-body systems and quantum phase transitions that are hard to simulate on classical computers. Furthermore, it allows for the creation of double well potentials with experimentally accessible tunneling rates, with applications in testing the foundations of quantum physics and precision sensing. PMID:19437628

  11. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Reinard; Kester, Oliver

    2010-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not "sorcery" but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  12. Ion Isolation in a Linear Ion Trap Using Dual Resonance Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Dalton T.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2016-09-01

    Ion isolation in a linear ion trap is demonstrated using dual resonance frequencies, which are applied simultaneously. One frequency is used to eject ions of a broad m/z range higher in m/z than the target ion, and the second frequency is set to eject a range of ions lower in m/z. The combination of the two thus results in ion isolation. Despite the simplicity of the method, even ions of low intensity may be isolated since signal attenuation is less than an order of magnitude in most cases. The performance of dual frequency isolation is demonstrated by isolating individual isotopes of brominated compounds.

  13. The effective temperature of ions stored in a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Donald, William A; Khairallah, George N; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2013-06-01

    The extent of internal energy deposition into ions upon storage, radial ejection, and detection using a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer is investigated as a function of ion size (m/z 59 to 810) using seven ion-molecule thermometer reactions that have well characterized reaction entropies and enthalpies. The average effective temperatures of the reactants and products of the ion-molecule reactions, which were obtained from ion-molecule equilibrium measurements, range from 295 to 350 K and do not depend significantly on the number of trapped ions, m/z value, ion trap q z value, reaction enthalpy/entropy, or the number of vibrational degrees of freedom for the seven reactions investigated. The average of the effective temperature values obtained for all seven thermometer reactions is 318 ± 23 K, which indicates that linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometers can be used to study the structure(s) and reactivity of ions at near ambient temperature.

  14. Study of plasma meniscus formation and beam halo in negative ion source using the 3D3VPIC model

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, S.; Goto, I.; Hatayama, A.; Miyamoto, K.; Fukano, A.

    2015-04-08

    In this paper, the effect of the electron confinement time on the plasma meniscus and the fraction of the beam halo is investigated by 3D3V-PIC (three dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space) (Particle in Cell) simulation in the extraction region of negative ion source. The electron confinement time depends on the characteristic time of electron escape along the magnetic field as well as the characteristic time of diffusion across the magnetic field. Our 3D3V-PIC results support the previous result by 2D3V-PIC results i.e., it is confirmed that the penetration of the plasma meniscus becomes deep into the source plasma region when the effective confinement time is short.

  15. Spectral measurements of few-electron uranium ions produced and trapped in a high-energy electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.

    1994-11-04

    Measurements of 2s{sub l/2}-2p{sub 3/2} electric dipole and 2p{sub 1/2}-2p{sub 3/2} magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole transitions in U{sup 82+} through U{sup 89+} have been made with a high-resolution crystal spectrometer that recorded the line radiation from stationary ions produced and trapped in a high-energy electron beam ion trap. From the measurements we infer {minus}39.21 {plus_minus} 0.23 eV for the QED contribution to the 2s{sub 1/2}-2p{sub 3/2} transition energy of lithiumlike U{sup 89+}. A comparison between our measurements and various computations illustrates the need for continued improvements in theoretical approaches for calculating the atomic structure of ions with two or more electrons in the L shell.

  16. Cryogenic Linear Ion Trap for Large-Scale Quantum Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Guido; Hess, Paul; Kaplan, Harvey; Birckelbaw, Eric; Hernanez, Micah; Lee, Aaron; Smith, Jake; Zhang, Jiehang; Monroe, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Ions confined in RF Paul traps are a useful tool for quantum simulation of long-range spin-spin interaction models. As the system size increases, classical simulation methods become incapable of modeling the exponentially growing Hilbert space, necessitating quantum simulation for precise predictions. Current experiments are limited to less than 30 qubits due to collisions with background gas that regularly destroys the ion crystal. We present progress toward the construction of a cryogenic ion trap apparatus, which uses differential cryopumping to reduce vacuum pressure to a level where collisions do not occur. This should allow robust trapping of about 100 ions/qubits in a single chain with long lifetimes. Such a long chain will provide a platform to investigate simultaneously cooling of various vibrational modes and will enable quantum simulations that outperform their classical counterpart. Our apparatus will provide a powerful test-bed to investigate a large variety of Hamiltonians, including spin 1 and spin 1/2 systems with Ising or XY interactions. This work is supported by the ARO Atomic Physics Program, the AFOSR MURI on Quantum Measurement and Verification, the IC Fellowship Program and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  17. 3D multiple optical trapping of Au-nanoparticles and prokaryote E. coli using intra-cavity generated non-circular beam of inhomogeneous intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Shakher, C.; Mehta, D. S.

    2010-06-01

    We report 3D multiple trapping of dielectric polystyrene (PS) beads and gold nano-particles (GNPs) in single beam optical tweezers system using an asymmetric beam of inhomogeneous intensity distribution. This special kind of beam of quasi-TEM11 profile was generated from intra-cavity CW-laser source operating at 532 nm. Multiple trapping of both the low refractive index rod-like Escherichia coli bacteria and 253 nm plasmonic GNPs dispersed in 1.025 μm PS beads which were homogenized in de-ionized water was realized utilizing this spatial beam. Laser-GNPs interaction rendered the enhancement of local surface plasmon resonance field around GNPs causing long-range aggregation of PS beads. The multiple trapping of plasmonic GNPs by the present simple method might find applications for micro- and nano-connectors, underlying physical processes in light-matter interaction assays for inter-particle force analysis, cancer diagnostic and photothermolysis, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy, and surface plasmon based biological and chemical sensors.

  18. Dipole Field Effects on Ion Ejections from a Paul Ion Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacAskill, J. A.; Chutjian, A.

    2011-01-01

    Attempts at improving the quality of mass spectra obtained from a Paul trap mass spectrometer prompted an investigation of the effects of additional fields to supplement the primary rf quadrupole trapping field. Reported here are the results of the first in a series of tests that focuses on the application of a single dipole field to augment the trapping and subsequent ejections of ions stored within a Paul trap. Measurements are presented for a fixed quadrupole frequency with varying dipole frequencies. The presence of the dipole field during the quadrupole trapping phase causes ion ejections of single m/z species at discrete dipole frequencies. During the mass analysis phase, the varying dipole frequency produces a complex set of resonant structures that impact ejection time (mass range), as well as mass spectral peak intensity and width

  19. 3D modeling of the electron energy distribution function in negative hydrogen ion sources.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, R; Fujino, I; Hatayama, A; Mizuno, T; Inoue, T

    2010-02-01

    For optimization and accurate prediction of the amount of H-ion production in negative ion sources, analysis of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) is necessary. We are developing a numerical code which analyzes EEDF in the tandem-type arc-discharge source. It is a three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation code with realistic geometry and magnetic configuration. Coulomb collision between electrons is treated with the "binary collision" model and collisions with hydrogen species are treated with the "null-collision" method. We applied this code to the analysis of the JAEA 10 A negative ion source. The numerical result shows that the obtained EEDF is in good agreement with experimental results.

  20. Ultrafast emission of ions during laser ablation of metal for 3D atom probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vella, A.; Houard, J.; Vurpillot, F.; Deconihout, B.

    2009-03-01

    The 3D atom probe(3DAP) is an imaging instrument based on the controlled field evaporation of single atoms from a sample having a tip shape with an end radius of 50 nm. In the fs laser assisted 3DAP the evaporation is induced by the laser pulses so that the physical process involved in this 3DAP analysis might correspond to the very early stages of the ablation process. In this paper we present the principle of the 3DAP and we discuss the existing models of the fs assisted evaporation. At last, we test the relevance of these models with pump-probe experiments on tungsten tips in the tomographic atom probe.

  1. Molecular structure studies by 3D imaging of fast ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kanter, E.P.; Vager, Z.; Both, G.; Cooney, P.J.; Faibis, A.; Koenig, W.; Zabransky, B.J.; Zajfman, D.

    1986-01-01

    The use of the Coulomb-explosion technique combined with a radically new multi-particle detector, extremely thin film targets, and low-excitation ion source has enabled, for the first time, direct measurements of the complete stereochemistry of complex polyatomic molecular ions. We outline the methods used and present results for protonated acetylene (C/sub 2/H/sub 3//sup +/) and the methane cation (CH/sub 4//sup +/) as examples. We demonstrate the techniques by which these methods can be generalized to determine directly vibrational motions in polyatomic molecules. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Design, microfabrication, and analysis of micrometer-sized cylindrical ion trap arrays.

    PubMed

    Cruz, D; Chang, J P; Fico, M; Guymon, A J; Austin, D E; Blain, M G

    2007-01-01

    A description of the design and microfabrication of arrays of micrometer-scale cylindrical ion traps is offered. Electrical characterization and initial ion trapping experiments with a massively parallel array of 5 microm internal radius (r(0)) sized cylindrical ion traps (CITs) are also described. The ion trap, materials, and design are presented and shown to be critical in achieving minimal trapping potential while maintaining minimal power consumption. The ion traps, fabricated with metal electrodes, have inner radii of 1, 2, 5, and 10 microm and range from 5 to 24 microm in height. The electrical characteristics of packaged ion trap arrays were measured with a vector network analyzer. The testing focused on trapping toluene (C(7)H(8)), mass 91, 92, or 93 amu, in the 5 microm sized CITs. Ions were formed via electron impact ionization and were ejected by turning off the rf voltage applied to the ring electrode; a current signal was collected at this time. Optimum ionization and trapping conditions, such as a sufficient pseudopotential well and high ionization to ion loss rate ratio (as determined by simulation), proved to be difficult to establish due to the high device capacitance and the presence of exposed dielectric material in the trapping region. However, evidence was obtained suggesting the trapping of ions in 1%-15% of the traps in the array. These first tests on micrometer-scale CITs indicated the necessary materials and device design modifications for realizing ultrasmall and low power ion traps.

  3. Quantum-enhanced deliberation of learning agents using trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunjko, V.; Friis, N.; Briegel, H. J.

    2015-02-01

    A scheme that successfully employs quantum mechanics in the design of autonomous learning agents has recently been reported in the context of the projective simulation (PS) model for artificial intelligence. In that approach, the key feature of a PS agent, a specific type of memory which is explored via random walks, was shown to be amenable to quantization, allowing for a speed-up. In this work we propose an implementation of such classical and quantum agents in systems of trapped ions. We employ a generic construction by which the classical agents are ‘upgraded’ to their quantum counterparts by a nested process of adding coherent control, and we outline how this construction can be realized in ion traps. Our results provide a flexible modular architecture for the design of PS agents. Furthermore, we present numerical simulations of simple PS agents which analyze the robustness of our proposal under certain noise models.

  4. Electromagnetic two-dimensional analysis of trapped-ion eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.; Rewoldt, G.

    1984-11-01

    A two-dimensional electromagnetic analysis of the trapped-ion instability for the tokamak case with ..beta.. not equal to 0 has been made, based on previous work in the electrostatic limit. The quasineutrality condition and the component of Ampere's law along the equilibrium magnetic field are solved for the perturbed electrostatic potential and the component of the perturbed vector potential along the equilibrium magnetic field. The general integro-differential equations are converted into a matrix eigenvalue-eigenfunction problem by expanding in cubic B-spline finite elements in the minor radius and in Fourier harmonics in the poloidal angle. A model MHD equilibrium with circular, concentric magnetic surfaces and large aspect ratio is used which is consistent with our assemption that B << 1. The effect on the trapped-ion mode of including these electromagnetic extensions to the calculation is considered, and the temperature (and ..beta..) scaling of the mode frequency is shown and discussed.

  5. A New Trapped Ion Clock Based on Hg-201(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, S.; Burt, E. A.; Lea, S. N.; Prestage, J. D.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2009-01-01

    There are two stable odd isotopes of mercury with singly ionized hyperfine structure suitable for a microwave clock: Hg-199(+) and Hg-201(+). Virtually all trapped mercury ion clocks to date have used the 199 isotope. We have begun to investigate the viability of a trapped ion clock based on Hg-201(+). We have measured the unperturbed frequency of the (S-2)(sub 1/2) F = 1, m(sub F) = 0 to (S-2)(sub 1/2) F = 2, m(sub F) = 0 clock transition to be 29.9543658211(2) GHz. In this paper we describe initial measurements with Hg-201(+) and new applications to clocks and fundamental physics.

  6. Simple implementation of a quantum search with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Svetoslav S.; Ivanov, Peter A.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.

    2008-09-01

    We propose an ion-trap implementation of Grover’s quantum search algorithm for an unstructured database of arbitrary length N . The experimental implementation is appealingly simple because the linear ion trap allows for a straightforward construction, in a single interaction step and without a multitude of Hadamard transforms, of the reflection operator, which is the engine of the Grover algorithm. Consequently, a dramatic reduction in the number of the required physical steps takes place, to just O(N) , the same as the number of mathematical steps. The proposed setup allows for demonstration of both the original (probabilistic) Grover search and its deterministic variation, and is remarkably robust to imperfections in the register initialization.

  7. Scalable Implementation of Boson Sampling with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chao; Zhang, Zhen; Duan, Luming

    2014-03-01

    Boson sampling solves a classically intractable problem by sampling from a probability distribution given by matrix permanents. We propose a scalable implementation of Boson sampling using local transverse phonon modes of trapped ions to encode the Bosons. The proposed scheme allows deterministic preparation and high-efficiency readout of the Bosons in the Fock states and universal mode mixing. With the state-of-the-art trapped ion technology, it is feasible to realize Boson sampling with tens of Bosons by this scheme, which would outperform the most powerful classical computers and constitute an effective disproof of the famous extended Church-Turing thesis. This work was supported by the NBRPC (973 Program) 2011CBA00300 (2011CBA00302), the IARPA MUSIQC program, the ARO and the AFOSR MURI programs, and the DARPA OLE program.

  8. Towards a realistic 3D simulation of the extraction region in ITER NBI relevant ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Minea, T.

    2015-03-01

    The development of negative ion (NI) sources for ITER is strongly accompanied by modelling activities. The ONIX code addresses the physics of formation and extraction of negative hydrogen ions at caesiated sources as well as the amount of co-extracted electrons. In order to be closer to the experimental conditions the code has been improved. It includes now the bias potential applied to first grid (plasma grid) of the extraction system, and the presence of Cs+ ions in the plasma. The simulation results show that such aspects play an important role for the formation of an ion-ion plasma in the boundary region by reducing the depth of the negative potential well in vicinity to the plasma grid that limits the extraction of the NIs produced at the Cs covered plasma grid surface. The influence of the initial temperature of the surface produced NI and its emission rate on the NI density in the bulk plasma that in turn affects the beam formation region was analysed. The formation of the plasma meniscus, the boundary between the plasma and the beam, was investigated for the extraction potentials of 5 and 10 kV. At the smaller extraction potential the meniscus moves closer to the plasma grid but as in the case of 10 kV the deepest meniscus bend point is still outside of the aperture. Finally, a plasma containing the same amount of NI and electrons (nH- =ne =1017 m-3) , representing good source conditioning, was simulated. It is shown that at such conditions the extracted NI current can reach values of ˜32 mA cm-2 using ITER-relevant extraction potential of 10 kV and ˜19 mA cm-2 at 5 kV. These results are in good agreement with experimental measurements performed at the small scale ITER prototype source at the test facility BATMAN.

  9. Spectroscopy of Argon Excited in an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2005-04-18

    Argon is one of the gases best investigated and most widely used in plasma discharge devices for a multitude of applications that range from wavelength reference standards to controlled fusion experiments. Reviewing atomic physics and spectroscopic problems in various ionization stages of Ar, the past use and future options of employing an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) for better and more complete Ar data in the x-ray, EUV and visible spectral ranges are discussed.

  10. Simulating quantum Brownian motion with single trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Maniscalco, S.; Piilo, J.; Intravaia, F.; Petruccione, F.; Messina, A.

    2004-05-01

    We study the open system dynamics of a harmonic oscillator coupled with an artificially engineered reservoir. We single out the reservoir and system variables governing the passage between Lindblad-type and non-Lindblad-type dynamics of the reduced system's oscillator. We demonstrate the existence of conditions under which virtual exchanges of energy between system and reservoir take place. We propose to use a single trapped ion coupled to engineered reservoirs in order to simulate quantum Brownian motion.

  11. Trapped ion system for for multi-species quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanneke, David

    2015-05-01

    Many atoms and molecules possess interesting spectroscopic transitions, but lack dissipative transitions useful for control and detection of internal states. In particular, molecules are useful candidates for quantum memories, low-temperature chemistry studies, tests of fundamental symmetries, and searches for time-variation of fundamental constants, but most lack a convenient cycling transition. By co-trapping a molecular ion with an atomic ion, the atom can provide all dissipation and detection. We present a system capable of such quantum control and report progress towards its use. This work is supported by the NSF, the Research Corporation for Science Advancement, and Amherst College.

  12. Ion trap quantum computing with transverse phonon modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shi-Liang; Monroe, Chris; Duan, Luming

    2006-03-01

    We propose a scheme to use the transverse modes to implement conditional phase gates on two trapped ions immersed in a large linear crystal of ions, without the sideband addressing. Comparing with the conventional approach using the longitudinal modes, with the cost that the laser power is slightly stronger, the proposed gate operation can be well inside Lamb-Dicke region and the gate infidelity due to the fluctuation of the effective Rabi frequency as well as the fundamental limits of the cooling procedure are approximately two orders smaller.

  13. Connecting trapped ions and quantum dots with photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, Michael

    Coupling individual quantum systems lies at the heart of building scalable quantum networks. Here, we report the first direct photonic coupling between a semiconductor quantum dot and a trapped ion and we demonstrate that single photons generated by a quantum dot controllably change the internal state of an Yb+ ion. We ameliorate the effect of the sixty-fold mismatch of the radiative linewidths with coherent photon generation and a high-finesse fiber-based optical cavity enhancing the coupling between the single photon and the ion. The transfer of information presented here via the classical correlations between the σz projection of the quantum-dot spin and the internal state of the ion provides a promising step towards quantum state-transfer in a hybrid photonic network.

  14. Precision Spectroscopy on Single Cold Trapped Molecular Nitrogen Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegi, Gregor; Najafian, Kaveh; Germann, Matthias; Sergachev, Ilia; Willitsch, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The ability to precisely control and manipulate single cold trapped particles has enabled spectroscopic studies on narrow transitions of ions at unprecedented levels of precision. This has opened up a wide range of applications, from tests of fundamental physical concepts, e.g., possible time-variations of fundamental constants, to new and improved frequency standards. So far most of these experiments have concentrated on atomic ions. Recently, however, attention has also been focused on molecular species, and molecular nitrogen ions have been identified as promising candidates for testing a possible time-variation of the proton/electron mass ratio. Here, we report progress towards precision-spectroscopic studies on dipole-forbidden vibrational transitions in single trapped N2+ ions. Our approach relies on the state-selective generation of single N2+ ions, subsequent infrared excitation using high intensity, narrow-band quantum-cascade lasers and a quantum-logic scheme for non-destructive state readout. We also characterize processes limiting the state lifetimes in our experiment, which impair the measurement fidelity. P. O. Schmidt et. al., Science 309 (2005), 749. M. Kajita et. al., Phys. Rev. A 89 (2014), 032509 M. Germann , X. Tong, S. Willitsch, Nature Physics 10 (2014), 820. X. Tong, A. Winney, S. Willitsch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 (2010), 143001

  15. A new trapped ion atomic clock based on 201Hg+.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2010-03-01

    High-resolution spectroscopy has been performed on the ground-state hyperfine transitions in trapped (201)Hg+ ions as part of a program to investigate the viability of (201)Hg+ for clock applications. Part of the spectroscopy work was directed at magnetic-field-sensitive hyperfine lines with delta m(F) = 0, which allow accurate Doppler-free measurement of the magnetic field experienced by the trapped ions. Although it is possible to measure Doppler-free magnetic-field-sensitive transitions in the commonly used clock isotope, (199)Hg+, it is more difficult. In this paper, we discuss how this (199)Hg+ feature may be exploited to produce a more stable clock or one requiring less magnetic shielding in environments with magnetic field fluctuations far in excess of what is normally found in the laboratory. We have also determined that in discharge-lamp-based trapped mercury ion clocks, the optical pumping time for (201)Hg+ is about 3 times shorter than that of (199)Hg+ This can be used to reduce dead time in the interrogation cycle for these types of clocks, thereby reducing the impact of local oscillator noise aliasing effects.

  16. Absorption mode Fourier transform electrostatic linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hilger, Ryan T; Wyss, Phillip J; Santini, Robert E; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-09-01

    In Fourier transform mass spectrometry, it is well-known that plotting the spectrum in absorption mode rather than magnitude mode has several advantages. However, magnitude spectra remain commonplace due to difficulties associated with determining the phase of each frequency at the onset of data acquisition, which is required for generating absorption spectra. The phasing problem for electrostatic traps is much simpler than for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) instruments, which greatly simplifies the generation of absorption spectra. Here, we present a simple method for generating absorption spectra from a Fourier transform electrostatic linear ion trap mass spectrometer. The method involves time shifting the data prior to Fourier transformation in order to synchronize the onset of data acquisition with the moment of ion acceleration into the electrostatic trap. Under these conditions, the initial phase of each frequency at the onset of data acquisition is zero. We demonstrate that absorption mode provides a 1.7-fold increase in resolution (full width at half maximum, fwhm) as well as reduced peak tailing. We also discuss methodology that may be applied to unsynchronized data in order to determine the time shift required to generate an absorption spectrum.

  17. Ionization of polarized 3He+ ions in EBIS trap with slanted electrostatic mirror.

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin,A.; Zelenski, A.; Kponou, A.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Prelee, K.; Raparia, D.

    2007-09-10

    Methods of producing the nuclear polarized {sup 3}He{sup +} ions and their ionization to {sup 3}H{sup ++} in ion trap of the electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) are discussed. Computer simulations show that injection and accumulation of {sup 3}He{sup +} ions in the EBIS trap with slanted electrostatic mirror can be very effective for injection times longer than the ion traversal time through the trap.

  18. 3D Plant cell architecture of Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae) using focused ion beam–scanning electron microscopy1

    PubMed Central

    Bhawana; Miller, Joyce L.; Cahoon, A. Bruce

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Focused ion beam–scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) combines the ability to sequentially mill the sample surface and obtain SEM images that can be used to create 3D renderings with micron-level resolution. We have applied FIB-SEM to study Arabidopsis cell architecture. The goal was to determine the efficacy of this technique in plant tissue and cellular studies and to demonstrate its usefulness in studying cell and organelle architecture and distribution. • Methods: Seed aleurone, leaf mesophyll, stem cortex, root cortex, and petal lamina from Arabidopsis were fixed and embedded for electron microscopy using protocols developed for animal tissues and modified for use with plant cells. Each sample was sectioned using the FIB and imaged with SEM. These serial images were assembled to produce 3D renderings of each cell type. • Results: Organelles such as nuclei and chloroplasts were easily identifiable, and other structures such as endoplasmic reticula, lipid bodies, and starch grains were distinguishable in each tissue. • Discussion: The application of FIB-SEM produced 3D renderings of five plant cell types and offered unique views of their shapes and internal content. These results demonstrate the usefulness of FIB-SEM for organelle distribution and cell architecture studies. PMID:25202629

  19. Correlation effects on the fine-structure splitting within the 3d9 ground configuration in highly-charged Co-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue-Ling, Guo; Min, Huang; Jun, Yan; Shuang, Li; Kai, Wang; Ran, Si; Chong-Yang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study of correlation effects on the fine-structure splitting within the ground configuration 3d9 of the Co-like Hf45+, Ta46+, W47+, and Au52+ ions is performed by employing the multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method in the active space approximation. It shows that the core-valence correlation with the inner-core 2p electron is more significant than with the outer 3p and 3s electrons, and the correlation with the 2s electron is also noticeable. The core-core correlation seems to be small and can be ignored. The calculated 2D3/2,5/2 splitting energies agree with the recent electron-beam ion-trap measurements [Phys. Rev. A 83 032517 (2011), Eur. Phys. J. D 66 286 (2012)] to within the experimental uncertainties. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11076009 and 11374062), the Chinese Association of Atomic and Molecular Data, the Chinese National Fusion Project for ITER (Grant No. 2015GB117000), and the Leading Academic Discipline Project of Shanghai City, China (Grant No. B107).

  20. Flexible, solid-state, ion-conducting membrane with 3D garnet nanofiber networks for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kun Kelvin; Gong, Yunhui; Dai, Jiaqi; Gong, Amy; Han, Xiaogang; Yao, Yonggang; Wang, Chengwei; Wang, Yibo; Chen, Yanan; Yan, Chaoyi; Li, Yiju; Wachsman, Eric D; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-06-28

    Beyond state-of-the-art lithium-ion battery (LIB) technology with metallic lithium anodes to replace conventional ion intercalation anode materials is highly desirable because of lithium's highest specific capacity (3,860 mA/g) and lowest negative electrochemical potential (∼3.040 V vs. the standard hydrogen electrode). In this work, we report for the first time, to our knowledge, a 3D lithium-ion-conducting ceramic network based on garnet-type Li6.4La3Zr2Al0.2O12 (LLZO) lithium-ion conductor to provide continuous Li(+) transfer channels in a polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based composite. This composite structure further provides structural reinforcement to enhance the mechanical properties of the polymer matrix. The flexible solid-state electrolyte composite membrane exhibited an ionic conductivity of 2.5 × 10(-4) S/cm at room temperature. The membrane can effectively block dendrites in a symmetric Li | electrolyte | Li cell during repeated lithium stripping/plating at room temperature, with a current density of 0.2 mA/cm(2) for around 500 h and a current density of 0.5 mA/cm(2) for over 300 h. These results provide an all solid ion-conducting membrane that can be applied to flexible LIBs and other electrochemical energy storage systems, such as lithium-sulfur batteries. PMID:27307440

  1. Flexible, solid-state, ion-conducting membrane with 3D garnet nanofiber networks for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, Kelvin; Gong, Yunhui; Dai, Jiaqi; Gong, Amy; Han, Xiaogang; Yao, Yonggang; Wang, Chengwei; Wang, Yibo; Chen, Yanan; Yan, Chaoyi; Li, Yiju; Wachsman, Eric D.; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-06-01

    Beyond state-of-the-art lithium-ion battery (LIB) technology with metallic lithium anodes to replace conventional ion intercalation anode materials is highly desirable because of lithium's highest specific capacity (3,860 mA/g) and lowest negative electrochemical potential (˜3.040 V vs. the standard hydrogen electrode). In this work, we report for the first time, to our knowledge, a 3D lithium-ion-conducting ceramic network based on garnet-type Li6.4La3Zr2Al0.2O12 (LLZO) lithium-ion conductor to provide continuous Li+ transfer channels in a polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based composite. This composite structure further provides structural reinforcement to enhance the mechanical properties of the polymer matrix. The flexible solid-state electrolyte composite membrane exhibited an ionic conductivity of 2.5 × 10-4 S/cm at room temperature. The membrane can effectively block dendrites in a symmetric Li | electrolyte | Li cell during repeated lithium stripping/plating at room temperature, with a current density of 0.2 mA/cm2 for around 500 h and a current density of 0.5 mA/cm2 for over 300 h. These results provide an all solid ion-conducting membrane that can be applied to flexible LIBs and other electrochemical energy storage systems, such as lithium-sulfur batteries.

  2. Numerical modeling of the Linac4 negative ion source extraction region by 3D PIC-MCC code ONIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Lettry, J.; Minea, T.; Lifschitz, A. F.; Schmitzer, C.; Midttun, O.; Steyaert, D.

    2013-02-01

    At CERN, a high performance negative ion (NI) source is required for the 160 MeV H- linear accelerator Linac4. The source is planned to produce 80 mA of H- with an emittance of 0.25 mm mradN-RMS which is technically and scientifically very challenging. The optimization of the NI source requires a deep understanding of the underling physics concerning the production and extraction of the negative ions. The extraction mechanism from the negative ion source is complex involving a magnetic filter in order to cool down electrons' temperature. The ONIX (Orsay Negative Ion eXtraction) code is used to address this problem. The ONIX is a selfconsistent 3D electrostatic code using Particles-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions (PIC-MCC) approach. It was written to handle the complex boundary conditions between plasma, source walls, and beam formation at the extraction hole. Both, the positive extraction potential (25kV) and the magnetic field map are taken from the experimental set-up, in construction at CERN. This contribution focuses on the modeling of two different extractors (IS01, IS02) of the Linac4 ion sources. The most efficient extraction system is analyzed via numerical parametric studies. The influence of aperture's geometry and the strength of the magnetic filter field on the extracted electron and NI current will be discussed. The NI production of sources based on volume extraction and cesiated surface are also compared.

  3. Comparison of experimental data and 3D simulations of ion beam neutralization from the neutralized transport experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D.R.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Eylon, S.; Gilson, E.P.

    2004-09-22

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been designed to study the final focus and neutralization of high perveance ion beams for applications in heavy ion fusion (HIF) and high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments. Pre-formed plasmas in the last meter before the target of the scaled experiment provide a source of electrons which neutralize the ion current and prevent the space-charge induced spreading of the beam spot. NTX physics issues are discussed and experimental data is analyzed and compared with 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Along with detailed target images, 4D phase-space data of the NTX at the entrance of the neutralization region has been acquired. This data is used to provide a more accurate beam distribution with which to initialize the simulation. Previous treatments have used various idealized beam distributions which lack the detailed features of the experimental ion beam images. Simulation results are compared with NTX experimental measurements for 250 keV K{sup +} ion beams with dimensionless perveance of 1-7 x 10{sup -4}. In both simulation and experiment, the deduced beam charge neutralization is close to the predicted maximum value.

  4. Flexible, solid-state, ion-conducting membrane with 3D garnet nanofiber networks for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kun Kelvin; Gong, Yunhui; Dai, Jiaqi; Gong, Amy; Han, Xiaogang; Yao, Yonggang; Wang, Chengwei; Wang, Yibo; Chen, Yanan; Yan, Chaoyi; Li, Yiju; Wachsman, Eric D; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-06-28

    Beyond state-of-the-art lithium-ion battery (LIB) technology with metallic lithium anodes to replace conventional ion intercalation anode materials is highly desirable because of lithium's highest specific capacity (3,860 mA/g) and lowest negative electrochemical potential (∼3.040 V vs. the standard hydrogen electrode). In this work, we report for the first time, to our knowledge, a 3D lithium-ion-conducting ceramic network based on garnet-type Li6.4La3Zr2Al0.2O12 (LLZO) lithium-ion conductor to provide continuous Li(+) transfer channels in a polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based composite. This composite structure further provides structural reinforcement to enhance the mechanical properties of the polymer matrix. The flexible solid-state electrolyte composite membrane exhibited an ionic conductivity of 2.5 × 10(-4) S/cm at room temperature. The membrane can effectively block dendrites in a symmetric Li | electrolyte | Li cell during repeated lithium stripping/plating at room temperature, with a current density of 0.2 mA/cm(2) for around 500 h and a current density of 0.5 mA/cm(2) for over 300 h. These results provide an all solid ion-conducting membrane that can be applied to flexible LIBs and other electrochemical energy storage systems, such as lithium-sulfur batteries.

  5. A 3D Model for Ion Beam Formation and Transport Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Todd, D.; Leitner, D.

    2006-02-07

    In this paper, we present a three-dimensional model forself-consistently modeling ion beam formation from plasma ion sources andtransporting in low energy beam transport systems. A multi-sectionoverlapped computational domain has been used to break the originaltransport system into a number of weakly coupled subsystems. Within eachsubsystem, macro-particle tracking is used to obtain the charge densitydistribution in this subdomain. The three-dimensional Poisson equation issolved within the subdomain after each particle tracking to obtain theself-consistent space-charge forces and the particle tracking is repeateduntil the solution converges. Two new Poisson solvers based on acombination of the spectral method and the finite difference multigridmethod have been developed to solve the Poisson equation in cylindricalcoordinates for the straight beam transport section and in Frenet-Serretcoordinates for the bending magnet section. This model can have importantapplication in design and optimization of the low energy beam line opticsof the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) front end.

  6. 3D-PIC simulation of an inductively coupled ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrich, Robert; Muehlich, Nina Sarah; Becker, Michael; Heiliger, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Inductively coupled ion sources are applied to a wide range of plasma applications, especially surface modifications. The knowledge of the behavior and precise information of the plasma parameters are of main importance. These values are tedious to measure without influencing the discharge. By applying our fully three-dimensional PlasmaPIC tool we are able to reach these plasma parameters with a spatial and temporal resolution which is quite hard to achieve experimentally. PlasmaPIC is used for modeling discharges in arbitrary geometries without limitations to any symmetry. By this means we are able to demonstrate that the plasma density has an irrotational character. Furthermore, we will show the dependence of the plasma parameters of different working conditions. We will show that for gridded inductively coupled ion sources the neutral gas pressure inside the discharge chamber depends on the extraction of ions. This effect is considered in PlasmaPIC by a self-consistent coupling of the neutral gas simulation and the plasma simulation whereas the neutral gas distribution is calculated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). This work has been supported by the ``Bundesministerium fuer Wirtschaft und Energie.'' Grant 50RS1507.

  7. Study of Ion Beam Forming Process in Electric Thruster Using 3D FEM Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Jin, Xiaolin; Hu, Quan; Li, Bin; Yang, Zhonghai

    2015-11-01

    There are two algorithms to simulate the process of ion beam forming in electric thruster. The one is electrostatic steady state algorithm. Firstly, an assumptive surface, which is enough far from the accelerator grids, launches the ion beam. Then the current density is calculated by theory formula. Secondly these particles are advanced one by one according to the equations of the motions of ions until they are out of the computational region. Thirdly, the electrostatic potential is recalculated and updated by solving Poisson Equation. At the end, the convergence is tested to determine whether the calculation should continue. The entire process will be repeated until the convergence is reached. Another one is time-depended PIC algorithm. In a global time step, we assumed that some new particles would be produced in the simulation domain and its distribution of position and velocity were certain. All of the particles that are still in the system will be advanced every local time steps. Typically, we set the local time step low enough so that the particle needs to be advanced about five times to move the distance of the edge of the element in which the particle is located.

  8. In situ plasma removal of surface contaminants from ion trap electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Haltli, Raymond A.

    2015-05-01

    In this thesis, the construction and implementation of an in situ plasma discharge designed to remove surface contaminants from electrodes in an ion trapping experimental system is presented with results. In recent years, many advances have been made in using ion traps for quantum information processing. All of the criteria defined by DiVincenzo for using ion traps for implementing a quantum computer have been individually demonstrated, and in particular surface traps provide a scalable platform for ions. In order to be used for quantum algorithms, trapped ions need to be cooled to their motional (quantum mechanical) ground state. One of the hurdles in integrating surface ion traps for a quantum computer is minimizing electric field noise, which causes the ion to heat out of its motional ground state and which increases with smaller ion-to-electrode distances realized with surface traps. Surface contamination of trap electrodes is speculated to be the primary source of electric field noise. The main goal achieved by this work was to implement an in situ surface cleaning solution for surface electrode ion traps, which would not modify the ion trap electrode surface metal. Care was taken in applying the RF power in order to localize a plasma near the trap electrodes. A method for characterizing the energy of the plasma ions arriving at the ion trap surface is presented and results for plasma ion energies are shown. Finally, a method for quantifying the effectiveness of plasma cleaning of trap electrodes, using the surface analysis technique of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for measuring the amount and kind of surface contaminants, is described. A significant advantage of the trap electrode surface cleaning method presented here is the minimal changes necessary for implementation on a working ion trap experimental system.

  9. Integrated System Technologies for Modular Trapped Ion Quantum Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crain, Stephen G.

    Although trapped ion technology is well-suited for quantum information science, scalability of the system remains one of the main challenges. One of the challenges associated with scaling the ion trap quantum computer is the ability to individually manipulate the increasing number of qubits. Using micro-mirrors fabricated with micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, laser beams are focused on individual ions in a linear chain and steer the focal point in two dimensions. Multiple single qubit gates are demonstrated on trapped 171Yb+ qubits and the gate performance is characterized using quantum state tomography. The system features negligible crosstalk to neighboring ions (< 3e-4), and switching speeds comparable to typical single qubit gate times (< 2 mus). In a separate experiment, photons scattered from the 171Yb+ ion are coupled into an optical fiber with 63% efficiency using a high numerical aperture lens (0.6 NA). The coupled photons are directed to superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPD), which provide a higher detector efficiency (69%) compared to traditional photomultiplier tubes (35%). The total system photon collection efficiency is increased from 2.2% to 3.4%, which allows for fast state detection of the qubit. For a detection beam intensity of 11 mW/cm 2, the average detection time is 23.7 mus with 99.885(7)% detection fidelity. The technologies demonstrated in this thesis can be integrated to form a single quantum register with all of the necessary resources to perform local gates as well as high fidelity readout and provide a photon link to other systems.

  10. Ion-selective interactions of biologically relevant inorganic ions with alanine zwitterion: a 3D-RISM study.

    PubMed

    Fedotova, Marina V; Dmitrieva, Olga A

    2015-05-01

    The ion-molecular association between inorganic ions and the charged groups of alanine zwitterion in biologically relevant aqueous salt solutions, namely NaCl(aq), KCl(aq), MgCl2(aq), and CaCl2(aq), has been investigated over a wide range of electrolyte concentration. The influence of salt concentration on the stability of the formed ion-molecular associates is analyzed. The structure of the formed aggregates and its dependence on salt concentration and chemical nature of the inorganic ion are discussed.

  11. 1D versus 3D quantum confinement in 1-5 nm ZnO nanoparticle agglomerations for application in charge-trapping memory devices.

    PubMed

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2016-07-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted considerable interest from industry and researchers due to their excellent properties with applications in optoelectronic devices, sunscreens, photocatalysts, sensors, biomedical sciences, etc. However, the agglomeration of NPs is considered to be a limiting factor since it can affect the desirable physical and electronic properties of the NPs. In this work, 1-5 nm ZnO NPs deposited by spin- and dip-coating techniques are studied. The electronic and physical properties of the resulting agglomerations of NPs are studied using UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their application in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) memory devices is analyzed. The results show that both dip- and spin-coating techniques lead to agglomerations of the NPs mostly in the horizontal direction. However, the width of the ZnO clusters is larger with dip-coating which leads to 1D quantum confinement, while the smaller ZnO clusters obtained by spin-coating enable 3D quantum confinement in ZnO. The ZnO NPs are used as the charge-trapping layer of a MOS-memory structure and the analysis of the high-frequency C-V measurements allow further understanding of the electronic properties of the ZnO agglomerations. A large memory window is achieved in both devices which confirms that ZnO NPs provide large charge-trapping density. In addition, ZnO confined in 3D allows for a larger memory window at lower operating voltages due to the Poole-Frenkel charge-emission mechanism. PMID:27232717

  12. 1D versus 3D quantum confinement in 1-5 nm ZnO nanoparticle agglomerations for application in charge-trapping memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2016-07-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted considerable interest from industry and researchers due to their excellent properties with applications in optoelectronic devices, sunscreens, photocatalysts, sensors, biomedical sciences, etc. However, the agglomeration of NPs is considered to be a limiting factor since it can affect the desirable physical and electronic properties of the NPs. In this work, 1-5 nm ZnO NPs deposited by spin- and dip-coating techniques are studied. The electronic and physical properties of the resulting agglomerations of NPs are studied using UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their application in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) memory devices is analyzed. The results show that both dip- and spin-coating techniques lead to agglomerations of the NPs mostly in the horizontal direction. However, the width of the ZnO clusters is larger with dip-coating which leads to 1D quantum confinement, while the smaller ZnO clusters obtained by spin-coating enable 3D quantum confinement in ZnO. The ZnO NPs are used as the charge-trapping layer of a MOS-memory structure and the analysis of the high-frequency C-V measurements allow further understanding of the electronic properties of the ZnO agglomerations. A large memory window is achieved in both devices which confirms that ZnO NPs provide large charge-trapping density. In addition, ZnO confined in 3D allows for a larger memory window at lower operating voltages due to the Poole-Frenkel charge-emission mechanism.

  13. 1D versus 3D quantum confinement in 1–5 nm ZnO nanoparticle agglomerations for application in charge-trapping memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2016-07-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted considerable interest from industry and researchers due to their excellent properties with applications in optoelectronic devices, sunscreens, photocatalysts, sensors, biomedical sciences, etc. However, the agglomeration of NPs is considered to be a limiting factor since it can affect the desirable physical and electronic properties of the NPs. In this work, 1–5 nm ZnO NPs deposited by spin- and dip-coating techniques are studied. The electronic and physical properties of the resulting agglomerations of NPs are studied using UV–vis–NIR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their application in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) memory devices is analyzed. The results show that both dip- and spin-coating techniques lead to agglomerations of the NPs mostly in the horizontal direction. However, the width of the ZnO clusters is larger with dip-coating which leads to 1D quantum confinement, while the smaller ZnO clusters obtained by spin-coating enable 3D quantum confinement in ZnO. The ZnO NPs are used as the charge-trapping layer of a MOS-memory structure and the analysis of the high-frequency C–V measurements allow further understanding of the electronic properties of the ZnO agglomerations. A large memory window is achieved in both devices which confirms that ZnO NPs provide large charge-trapping density. In addition, ZnO confined in 3D allows for a larger memory window at lower operating voltages due to the Poole–Frenkel charge-emission mechanism.

  14. Demonstration of Long Vacuum Integrity Lifetime of a Trapped-Ion Clock Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandi, T.; Prestage, J.; Chung, S.; Le, T.; Yu, N.

    2016-02-01

    A compact Hg ion trap package that has been vacuum-sealed since 2005 has been demonstrated to be successfully operational. This work shows the reliability of such units in view of next-generation ground and spaceborne trapped-ion clocks. The excellent vacuum property of the trap package allowed us to study charge transfer relaxation effects between neutral Hg and trapped Hg ions.

  15. Rank-four spin-Hamiltonian parameters of a 3d5 ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan-Lun, Yu

    1990-05-01

    Crystal-field theory is applied to the study of the rank-four spin-Hamiltonian parameters a and F of a S6-state ion in tetragonal symmetry. Fifth-order perturbation expressions are derived for the parameters and are further simplified, using the perturbation procedure suggested by Macfarlane and Zdansky. It is shown that the tetragonal field components contribute to the ``cubic'' splitting parameter a value, a', which is roughly equal to -(1/2)F, suggesting that one cannot omit the low-symmetric-field effect in the calculation of a unless he has confirmed the axial term F to be negligibly small compared with it. Both a' and F arise mainly from the interaction of the ground state S6 with the excited states T41, T42, E4, T22, and E2 via spin-orbit coupling. The two tetragonal field components, B20 and B'40, have a similar significance in affecting a', and F, unlike the case of the rank-two term D, where B20 plays a negligible role. The crystal-field model suggests F to be identical in sign to D. Numerical calculations are performed for Mn2+ ions in K2ZnF4 and K2MgF4 of D4h symmetry and for Fe3+ ions at the tetrahedral D2d sites in YGaG, YA1G, LuGaG, and LuAlG, (where G represents garnet), and the results are reasonable.

  16. Eliminating degradation and uncovering ion-trapping dynamics in electrochromic WO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Rui-Tao; Granqvist, Claes G.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.

    2015-10-01

    There is keen interest in the use of amorphous WO3 thin films as cathodic electrodes in transmittance-modulating electrochromic devices. However, these films suffer from ion-trapping-induced degradation of optical modulation and reversibility on extended Li+-ion exchange. Here, we demonstrate that ion-trapping-induced degradation, which is commonly believed to be irreversible, can be successfully eliminated by constant-current-driven de-trapping; that is, WO3 films can be rejuvenated and regain their initial highly reversible electrochromic performance. Pronounced ion trapping occurs when x exceeds ~0.65 in LixWO3 during ion insertion. We find two main kinds of Li+-ion-trapping site (intermediate and deep) in WO3, where the intermediate ones are most prevalent. Li+ ions can be completely removed from intermediate traps but are irreversibly bound in deep traps. Our results provide a general framework for developing and designing superior electrochromic materials and devices.

  17. Upgrade of the electron beam ion trap in Shanghai

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, D.; Yang, Y.; Xiao, J.; Shen, Y.; Fu, Y.; Wei, B.; Yao, K.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y.

    2014-09-15

    Over the last few years the Shanghai electron beam ion trap (EBIT) has been successfully redesigned and rebuilt. The original machine, developed under collaboration with the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, first produced an electron beam in 2005. It could be tuned with electron energies between 1 and 130 keV and beam current up to 160 mA. After several years of operation, it was found that several modifications for improvements were necessary to reach the goals of better electron optics, higher photon detection, and ion injection efficiencies, and more economical running costs. The upgraded Shanghai-EBIT is made almost entirely from Ti instead of stainless steel and achieves a vacuum of less than 10{sup −10} Torr, which helps to minimize the loss of highly changed ions through charge exchange. Meanwhile, a more compact structure and efficient cryogenic system, and excellent optical alignment have been of satisfactory. The magnetic field in the central trap region can reach up till 4.8 T with a uniformity of 2.77 × 10{sup −4}. So far the upgraded Shanghai-EBIT has been operated up to an electron energy of 151 keV and a beam current of up to 218 mA, although promotion to even higher energy is still in progress. Radiation from ions as highly charged as Xe{sup 53+,} {sup 54+} has been produced and the characterization of current density is estimated from the measured electron beam width.

  18. Monitoring Trace Contaminants in Air Via Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Karr, Dane; Pearson, Richard; Valero, Gustavo; Wong, Carla

    1995-01-01

    Recent passage of the Clean Air Act with its stricter regulation of toxic gas emissions, and the ever-growing number of applications which require faster turnaround times between sampling and analysis are two major factors which are helping to drive the development of new instrument technologies for in-situ, on-line, real-time monitoring. The ion trap, with its small size, excellent sensitivity, and tandem mass spectrometry capability is a rapidly evolving technology which is well-suited for these applications. In this paper, we describe the use of a commercial ion trap instrument for monitoring trace levels of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. A number of sample introduction devices including a direct transfer line interface, short column GC, and a cryotrapping interface are employed to achieve increasing levels of sensitivity. MS, MS/MS, and MS/MS/MS methods are compared to illustrate trade-offs between sensitivity and selectivity. Filtered Noise Field (FNF) technology is found to be an excellent means for achieving lower detection limits through selective storage of the ion(s) of interest during ionization. Figures of merit including typical sample sizes, detection limits, and response times are provided. The results indicate the potential of these techniques for atmospheric assessments, the High Speed Research Program, and advanced life support monitoring applications for NASA.

  19. Laser desorption lamp ionization source for ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinghao; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    A two-step laser desorption lamp ionization source coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer (LDLI-ITMS) has been constructed and characterized. The pulsed infrared (IR) output of an Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) is directed to a target inside a chamber evacuated to ~15 Pa causing desorption of molecules from the target's surface. The desorbed molecules are ionized by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp (filled with xenon, major wavelength at 148 nm). The resulting ions are stored and detected in a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap modified from a Finnigan Mat LCQ mass spectrometer operated at a pressure of ≥ 0.004 Pa. The limit of detection for desorbed coronene molecules is 1.5 pmol, which is about two orders of magnitude more sensitive than laser desorption laser ionization mass spectrometry using a fluorine excimer laser (157 nm) as the ionization source. The mass spectrum of four standard aromatic compounds (pyrene, coronene, rubrene and 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (OPC)) shows that parent ions dominate. By increasing the infrared laser power, this instrument is capable of detecting inorganic compounds. PMID:25601688

  20. Upgrade of the electron beam ion trap in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Lu, D; Yang, Y; Xiao, J; Shen, Y; Fu, Y; Wei, B; Yao, K; Hutton, R; Zou, Y

    2014-09-01

    Over the last few years the Shanghai electron beam ion trap (EBIT) has been successfully redesigned and rebuilt. The original machine, developed under collaboration with the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, first produced an electron beam in 2005. It could be tuned with electron energies between 1 and 130 keV and beam current up to 160 mA. After several years of operation, it was found that several modifications for improvements were necessary to reach the goals of better electron optics, higher photon detection, and ion injection efficiencies, and more economical running costs. The upgraded Shanghai-EBIT is made almost entirely from Ti instead of stainless steel and achieves a vacuum of less than 10(-10) Torr, which helps to minimize the loss of highly changed ions through charge exchange. Meanwhile, a more compact structure and efficient cryogenic system, and excellent optical alignment have been of satisfactory. The magnetic field in the central trap region can reach up till 4.8 T with a uniformity of 2.77 × 10(-4). So far the upgraded Shanghai-EBIT has been operated up to an electron energy of 151 keV and a beam current of up to 218 mA, although promotion to even higher energy is still in progress. Radiation from ions as highly charged as Xe(53+, 54+) has been produced and the characterization of current density is estimated from the measured electron beam width.

  1. Flexible, solid-state, ion-conducting membrane with 3D garnet nanofiber networks for lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, Kelvin; Gong, Yunhui; Dai, Jiaqi; Gong, Amy; Han, Xiaogang; Yao, Yonggang; Wang, Chengwei; Wang, Yibo; Chen, Yanan; Yan, Chaoyi; Li, Yiju; Wachsman, Eric D.; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-06-01

    Beyond state-of-the-art lithium-ion battery (LIB) technology with metallic lithium anodes to replace conventional ion intercalation anode materials is highly desirable because of lithium's highest specific capacity (3,860 mA/g) and lowest negative electrochemical potential (˜3.040 V vs. the standard hydrogen electrode). In this work, we report for the first time, to our knowledge, a 3D lithium-ion–conducting ceramic network based on garnet-type Li6.4La3Zr2Al0.2O12 (LLZO) lithium-ion conductor to provide continuous Li+ transfer channels in a polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based composite. This composite structure further provides structural reinforcement to enhance the mechanical properties of the polymer matrix. The flexible solid-state electrolyte composite membrane exhibited an ionic conductivity of 2.5 × 10‑4 S/cm at room temperature. The membrane can effectively block dendrites in a symmetric Li | electrolyte | Li cell during repeated lithium stripping/plating at room temperature, with a current density of 0.2 mA/cm2 for around 500 h and a current density of 0.5 mA/cm2 for over 300 h. These results provide an all solid ion-conducting membrane that can be applied to flexible LIBs and other electrochemical energy storage systems, such as lithium–sulfur batteries.

  2. Relating the 3D electrode morphology to Li-ion battery performance; a case for LiFePO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhao; Verhallen, Tomas W.; Singh, Deepak P.; Wang, Hongqian; Wagemaker, Marnix; Barnett, Scott

    2016-08-01

    One of the main goals in lithium ion battery electrode design is to increase the power density. This requires insight in the relation between the complex heterogeneous microstructure existing of active material, conductive additive and electrolyte providing the required electronic and Li-ion transport. FIB-SEM is used to determine the three phase 3D morphology, and Li-ion concentration profiles obtained with Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP) are compared for two cases, conventional LiFePO4 electrodes and better performing carbonate templated LiFePO4 electrodes. This provides detailed understanding of the impact of key parameters such as the tortuosity for electron and Li-ion transport though the electrodes. The created hierarchical pore network of the templated electrodes, containing micron sized pores, appears to be effective only at high rate charge where electrolyte depletion is hindering fast discharge. Surprisingly the carbonate templating method results in a better electronic conductive CB network, enhancing the activity of LiFePO4 near the electrolyte-electrode interface as directly observed with NDP, which in a large part is responsible for the improved rate performance both during charge and discharge. The results demonstrate that standard electrodes have a far from optimal charge transport network and that significantly improved electrode performance should be possible by engineering the microstructure.

  3. A mass- and velocity-broadband ion deflector for off-axis ion injection into a cyclotron resonance ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Shenheng; Marshall, Alan G.

    1996-02-01

    Off-axis ion injection into an FT-ICR ion trap is desirable for capturing ions from a continuously generated beam (e.g., electrospray). A conventional E×B (Wien) filter focuses ions of a single velocity (independent of mass). Here we show that by segmenting opposed flat electrodes into small sections, the electric field may be tailored to produce well-focused ion trajectories over a wide range of ion velocity and mass-to-charge ratio, m/z. In the limit of infinitely extended deflector electrodes, small m/z, and/or high B, ion trajectories vary as powers or roots of distance.

  4. 3D self-consistent modeling of a matrix source of negative hydrogen ions.

    PubMed

    Tarnev, Kh; Demerdjiev, A; Shivarova, A; Lishev, St

    2016-02-01

    The paper is in the scope of studies on the rf driving of a matrix source of negative hydrogen ions: a matrix of small radius discharges with planar-coil inductive driving and single aperture extraction from each discharge. The results from a three-dimensional model, in which plasma description is coupled to electrodynamics, confirm former conclusion that a single coil driving of the whole matrix by a zigzag coil with an omega-shaped conductor on the bottom of each discharge tube ensures efficient rf power deposition to the plasma. The latter is due to similarities with the rf driving of a single discharge by a single planar coil, shown by the obtained induced current and spatial distribution of the plasma parameters. Distinctions associated with the coil configuration as a single coil for the whole matrix are also discussed. PMID:26932005

  5. Investigation of ion capture in an electron beam ion trap charge-breeder for rare isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittimanapun, Kritsada

    Charge breeding of rare isotope ions has become an important ingredient for providing reaccelerated rare isotope beams for science. At the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), a reaccelerator, ReA, has been built that employs an advanced Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) as a charge breeder. ReA will provide rare-isotope beams with energies of a few hundred keV/u up to tens of MeV/u to enable the study of properties of rare isotopes via low energy Coulomb excitation and transfer reactions, and to investigate nuclear reactions important for nuclear astrophysics. ReA consists of an EBIT charge breeder, a charge-over-mass selector, a room temperature radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator, and a superconducting radio-frequency linear accelerator. The EBIT charge breeder features a high-current electron gun, a long trap structure, and a hybrid superconducting magnet to reach both high acceptance for injected low-charge ions as well as high-electron beam current densities for fast charge breeding. In this work, continuous ion injection and capture in the EBIT have been investigated with a dedicated Monte-Carlo simulation code and in experimental studies. The Monte-Carlo code NEBIT considers the electron-impact ionization cross sections, space charge due to the electron beam current, ion dynamics, electric field from electrodes, and magnetic field from the superconducting magnet. Experiments were performed to study the capture efficiency as a function of injected ion beam current, electron beam current, trap size, and trap potential depth. The charge state evolution of trapped ions was studied, providing information about the effective current density of the electron beam inside the EBIT. An attempt was made to measure the effective space-charge potential of the electron beam by studying the dynamics of a beam injected and reflected inside the trap.

  6. Quantum Simulation of the Klein Paradox with Trapped Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gerritsma, R.; Lanyon, B. P.; Kirchmair, G.; Zaehringer, F.; Hempel, C.; Blatt, R.; Roos, C. F.; Casanova, J.; Garcia-Ripoll, J. J.; Solano, E.

    2011-02-11

    We report on quantum simulations of relativistic scattering dynamics using trapped ions. The simulated state of a scattering particle is encoded in both the electronic and vibrational state of an ion, representing the discrete and continuous components of relativistic wave functions. Multiple laser fields and an auxiliary ion simulate the dynamics generated by the Dirac equation in the presence of a scattering potential. Measurement and reconstruction of the particle wave packet enables a frame-by-frame visualization of the scattering processes. By precisely engineering a range of external potentials we are able to simulate text book relativistic scattering experiments and study Klein tunneling in an analogue quantum simulator. We describe extensions to solve problems that are beyond current classical computing capabilities.

  7. Analysis of the energy distribution of interface traps related to tunnel oxide degradation using charge pumping techniques for 3D NAND flash applications

    SciTech Connect

    An, Ho-Myoung; Kim, Hee-Dong; Kim, Tae Geun

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The degradation tendency extracted by CP technique was almost the same in both the bulk-type and TFT-type cells. - Highlights: • D{sub it} is directly investigated from bulk-type and TFT-type CTF memory. • Charge pumping technique was employed to analyze the D{sub it} information. • To apply the CP technique to monitor the reliability of the 3D NAND flash. - Abstract: The energy distribution and density of interface traps (D{sub it}) are directly investigated from bulk-type and thin-film transistor (TFT)-type charge trap flash memory cells with tunnel oxide degradation, under program/erase (P/E) cycling using a charge pumping (CP) technique, in view of application in a 3-demension stackable NAND flash memory cell. After P/E cycling in bulk-type devices, the interface trap density gradually increased from 1.55 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} to 3.66 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} due to tunnel oxide damage, which was consistent with the subthreshold swing and transconductance degradation after P/E cycling. Its distribution moved toward shallow energy levels with increasing cycling numbers, which coincided with the decay rate degradation with short-term retention time. The tendency extracted with the CP technique for D{sub it} of the TFT-type cells was similar to those of bulk-type cells.

  8. Site-Specific Cryo-focused Ion Beam Sample Preparation Guided by 3D Correlative Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Jan; Mahamid, Julia; Lucic, Vladan; de Marco, Alex; Fernandez, Jose-Jesus; Laugks, Tim; Mayer, Tobias; Hyman, Anthony A; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Plitzko, Jürgen M

    2016-02-23

    The development of cryo-focused ion beam (cryo-FIB) for the thinning of frozen-hydrated biological specimens enabled cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) analysis in unperturbed cells and tissues. However, the volume represented within a typical FIB lamella constitutes a small fraction of the biological specimen. Retaining low-abundance and dynamic subcellular structures or macromolecular assemblies within such limited volumes requires precise targeting of the FIB milling process. In this study, we present the development of a cryo-stage allowing for spinning-disk confocal light microscopy at cryogenic temperatures and describe the incorporation of the new hardware into existing workflows for cellular sample preparation by cryo-FIB. Introduction of fiducial markers and subsequent computation of three-dimensional coordinate transformations provide correlation between light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy/FIB. The correlative approach is employed to guide the FIB milling process of vitrified cellular samples and to capture specific structures, namely fluorescently labeled lipid droplets, in lamellas that are 300 nm thick. The correlation procedure is then applied to localize the fluorescently labeled structures in the transmission electron microscopy image of the lamella. This approach can be employed to navigate the acquisition of cryo-ET data within FIB-lamellas at specific locations, unambiguously identified by fluorescence microscopy.

  9. Visualizing nanoscale 3D compositional fluctuation of lithium in advanced lithium-ion battery cathodes

    PubMed Central

    Devaraj, A.; Gu, M.; Colby, R.; Yan, P.; Wang, C. M.; Zheng, J. M.; Xiao, J.; Genc, A.; Zhang, J. G.; Belharouak, I.; Wang, D.; Amine, K.; Thevuthasan, S.

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of cations in Li-ion battery cathodes as a function of cycling is a pivotal characteristic of battery performance. The transition metal cation distribution has been shown to affect cathode performance; however, Li is notoriously challenging to characterize with typical imaging techniques. Here laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT) is used to map the three-dimensional distribution of Li at a sub-nanometre spatial resolution and correlate it with the distribution of the transition metal cations (M) and the oxygen. As-fabricated layered Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 is shown to have Li-rich Li2MO3 phase regions and Li-depleted Li(Ni0.5Mn0.5)O2 regions. Cycled material has an overall loss of Li in addition to Ni-, Mn- and Li-rich regions. Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 is shown to have a uniform distribution of all cations. APT results were compared to energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping with a scanning transmission electron microscope to confirm the transition metal cation distribution. PMID:26272722

  10. Micromotion based single-qubit addressing with trapped-ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Navon, Nir; Kotler, Shlomi; Glickman, Yinnon; Almog, Ido; Ozeri, Roee

    2013-05-01

    Individual-particle addressing is a necessary capability in many quantum information experiments. For example, characterization of multi-qubit operations with quantum process tomography (QPT). We propose and demonstrate a scheme that exploits the inhomogeneous excess micromotion in ion trap to address single-qubits in a chain of several ion-qubits, separated by only few microns. The scheme uses a laser field which is resonant with the micromotion sideband of a narrow optical quadrupole transition and acts as a dressing field with a spatially-dependent coupling along the chain. As a consequence, the level spacing of each ion, in the dressed state picture, becomes position dependent and individual ions can be spectrally separated. We have demonstrated Individual Rabi flops with 85% fidelity in a three-ion chain. For the case of only two ions, the coupling can be tailored to vanish on one of the two. This allows preparing any two-qubit product state as well as completing state tomography without direct spatially-selective imaging. We demonstrate full QPT for two-qubit Sørensen-Mølmer entangling interaction (Bell-state preparation fidelity of 98%) which has not been process-analyzed yet. Our tomography resulted process fidelity of 92%. N. Navon et al. arXiv:1210.7336 (1012).

  11. Infrared spectra of small molecular ions trapped in solid neon

    SciTech Connect

    Jacox, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-22

    The infrared spectrum of a molecular ion provides a unique signature for that species, gives information on its structure, and is amenable to remote sensing. It also serves as a comparison standard for refining ab initio calculations. Experiments in this laboratory trap molecular ions in dilute solid solution in neon at 4.2 K in sufficient concentration for observation of their infrared spectra between 450 and 4000 cm{sup !1}. Discharge-excited neon atoms produce cations by photoionization and/or Penning ionization of the parent molecule. The resulting electrons are captured by other molecules, yielding anions which provide for overall charge neutrality of the deposit. Recent observations of ions produced from C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and BF{sub 3} will be discussed. Because of their relatively large possibility of having low-lying excited electronic states, small, symmetric molecular cations are especially vulnerable to breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Some phenomena which can result from this breakdown will be discussed. Ion-molecule reaction rates are sufficiently high that in some systems absorptions of dimer cations and anions are also observed. When H{sub 2} is introduced into the system, the initially-formed ion may react with it. Among the species resulting from such ion-molecule reactions that have recently been studied are O{sub 4}{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, HOCO{sup +}, and HCO{sub 2}{sup !}.

  12. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Robert; Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Marek, Aleš; Peng, Bo; Bush, Matthew F.; Lavanant, Helène; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2016-10-01

    Heptapeptide ions containing combinations of polar Lys, Arg, and Asp residues with non-polar Leu, Pro, Ala, and Gly residues were designed to study polar effects on gas-phase ion conformations. Doubly and triply charged ions were studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry and electron structure theory using correlated ab initio and density functional theory methods and found to exhibit tightly folded 3D structures in the gas phase. Manipulation of the basic residue positions in LKGPADR, LRGPADK, KLGPADR, and RLGPADK resulted in only minor changes in the ion collision cross sections in helium. Replacement of the Pro residue with Leu resulted in only marginally larger collision cross sections for the doubly and triply charged ions. Disruption of zwitterionic interactions in doubly charged ions was performed by converting the C-terminal and Asp carboxyl groups to methyl esters. This resulted in very minor changes in the collision cross sections of doubly charged ions and even slightly diminished collision cross sections in most triply charged ions. The experimental collision cross sections were related to those calculated for structures of lowest free energy ion conformers that were obtained by extensive search of the conformational space and fully optimized by density functional theory calculations. The predominant factors that affected ion structures and collision cross sections were due to attractive hydrogen bonding interactions and internal solvation of the charged groups that overcompensated their Coulomb repulsion. Structure features typically assigned to the Pro residue and zwitterionic COO-charged group interactions were only secondary in affecting the structures and collision cross sections of these gas-phase peptide ions.

  13. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Robert; Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Marek, Aleš; Peng, Bo; Bush, Matthew F.; Lavanant, Helène; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2016-07-01

    Heptapeptide ions containing combinations of polar Lys, Arg, and Asp residues with non-polar Leu, Pro, Ala, and Gly residues were designed to study polar effects on gas-phase ion conformations. Doubly and triply charged ions were studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry and electron structure theory using correlated ab initio and density functional theory methods and found to exhibit tightly folded 3D structures in the gas phase. Manipulation of the basic residue positions in LKGPADR, LRGPADK, KLGPADR, and RLGPADK resulted in only minor changes in the ion collision cross sections in helium. Replacement of the Pro residue with Leu resulted in only marginally larger collision cross sections for the doubly and triply charged ions. Disruption of zwitterionic interactions in doubly charged ions was performed by converting the C-terminal and Asp carboxyl groups to methyl esters. This resulted in very minor changes in the collision cross sections of doubly charged ions and even slightly diminished collision cross sections in most triply charged ions. The experimental collision cross sections were related to those calculated for structures of lowest free energy ion conformers that were obtained by extensive search of the conformational space and fully optimized by density functional theory calculations. The predominant factors that affected ion structures and collision cross sections were due to attractive hydrogen bonding interactions and internal solvation of the charged groups that overcompensated their Coulomb repulsion. Structure features typically assigned to the Pro residue and zwitterionic COO-charged group interactions were only secondary in affecting the structures and collision cross sections of these gas-phase peptide ions.

  14. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Robert; Laszlo, Kenneth J; Marek, Aleš; Peng, Bo; Bush, Matthew F; Lavanant, Helène; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2016-10-01

    Heptapeptide ions containing combinations of polar Lys, Arg, and Asp residues with non-polar Leu, Pro, Ala, and Gly residues were designed to study polar effects on gas-phase ion conformations. Doubly and triply charged ions were studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry and electron structure theory using correlated ab initio and density functional theory methods and found to exhibit tightly folded 3D structures in the gas phase. Manipulation of the basic residue positions in LKGPADR, LRGPADK, KLGPADR, and RLGPADK resulted in only minor changes in the ion collision cross sections in helium. Replacement of the Pro residue with Leu resulted in only marginally larger collision cross sections for the doubly and triply charged ions. Disruption of zwitterionic interactions in doubly charged ions was performed by converting the C-terminal and Asp carboxyl groups to methyl esters. This resulted in very minor changes in the collision cross sections of doubly charged ions and even slightly diminished collision cross sections in most triply charged ions. The experimental collision cross sections were related to those calculated for structures of lowest free energy ion conformers that were obtained by extensive search of the conformational space and fully optimized by density functional theory calculations. The predominant factors that affected ion structures and collision cross sections were due to attractive hydrogen bonding interactions and internal solvation of the charged groups that overcompensated their Coulomb repulsion. Structure features typically assigned to the Pro residue and zwitterionic COO-charged group interactions were only secondary in affecting the structures and collision cross sections of these gas-phase peptide ions. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Robert; Laszlo, Kenneth J; Marek, Aleš; Peng, Bo; Bush, Matthew F; Lavanant, Helène; Afonso, Carlos; Tureček, František

    2016-10-01

    Heptapeptide ions containing combinations of polar Lys, Arg, and Asp residues with non-polar Leu, Pro, Ala, and Gly residues were designed to study polar effects on gas-phase ion conformations. Doubly and triply charged ions were studied by ion mobility mass spectrometry and electron structure theory using correlated ab initio and density functional theory methods and found to exhibit tightly folded 3D structures in the gas phase. Manipulation of the basic residue positions in LKGPADR, LRGPADK, KLGPADR, and RLGPADK resulted in only minor changes in the ion collision cross sections in helium. Replacement of the Pro residue with Leu resulted in only marginally larger collision cross sections for the doubly and triply charged ions. Disruption of zwitterionic interactions in doubly charged ions was performed by converting the C-terminal and Asp carboxyl groups to methyl esters. This resulted in very minor changes in the collision cross sections of doubly charged ions and even slightly diminished collision cross sections in most triply charged ions. The experimental collision cross sections were related to those calculated for structures of lowest free energy ion conformers that were obtained by extensive search of the conformational space and fully optimized by density functional theory calculations. The predominant factors that affected ion structures and collision cross sections were due to attractive hydrogen bonding interactions and internal solvation of the charged groups that overcompensated their Coulomb repulsion. Structure features typically assigned to the Pro residue and zwitterionic COO-charged group interactions were only secondary in affecting the structures and collision cross sections of these gas-phase peptide ions. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27400696

  16. On the application of focused ion beam nanotomography in characterizing the 3D pore space geometry of Opalinus clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Lukas M.; Holzer, Lorenz; Wepf, Roger; Gasser, Philippe; Münch, Beat; Marschall, Paul

    The evaluation and optimization of radioactive disposal systems requires a comprehensive understanding of mass transport processes. Among others, mass transport in porous geomaterials depends crucially on the topology and geometry of the pore space. Thus, understanding the mechanism of mass transport processes ultimately requires a 3D characterization of the pore structure. Here, we demonstrate the potential of focused ion beam nanotomography (FIB-nT) in characterizing the 3D geometry of pore space in clay rocks, i.e. Opalinus clay. In order to preserve the microstructure and to reduce sample preparation artefacts we used high pressure freezing and subsequent freeze drying to prepare the samples. Resolution limitations placed the lower limit in pore radii that can be analyzed by FIB-nT to about 10-15 nm. Image analysis and the calculation of pore size distribution revealed that pores with radii larger than 15 nm are related to a porosity of about 3 vol.%. To validate the method, we compared the pores size distribution obtained by FIB-nT with the one obtained by N 2 adsorption analysis. The latter yielded a porosity of about 13 vol.%. This means that FIB-nT can describe around 20-30% of the total pore space. For pore radii larger than 15 nm the pore size distribution obtained by FIB-nT and N 2 adsorption analysis were in good agreement. This suggests that FIB-nT can provide representative data on the spatial distribution of pores for pore sizes in the range of about 10-100 nm. Based on the spatial analysis of 3D data we extracted information on the spatial distribution of pore space geometrical properties.

  17. Design of blade-shaped-electrode linear ion traps with reduced anharmonic contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, K.; Che, H.; Ge, Y. P.; Xu, Z. T.; Yuan, W. H.; Zhang, J.; Lu, Z. H.; Lan, Y.

    2015-09-21

    RF quadrupole linear Paul traps are versatile tools in quantum physics experiments. Linear Paul traps with blade-shaped electrodes have the advantages of larger solid angles for fluorescence collection. But with these kinds of traps, the existence of higher-order anharmonic terms of the trap potentials can cause large heating rate for the trapped ions. In this paper, we theoretically investigate the dependence of higher-order terms of trap potentials on the geometry of blade-shaped traps, and offer an optimized design. A modified blade electrodes trap is proposed to further reduce higher-order anharmonic terms while still retaining large fluorescence collection angle.

  18. Calculations with spectroscopic accuracy for the ground configuration (3 d9 ) forbidden transition in Co-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X. L.; Si, R.; Li, S.; Huang, M.; Hutton, R.; Wang, Y. S.; Chen, C. Y.; Zou, Y. M.; Wang, K.; Yan, J.; Li, C. Y.; Brage, T.

    2016-01-01

    We present systematic and large-scale calculations for the fine-structure energy splitting and transition rate between the 3 d93/2,5/2,2D levels of Co-like ions with 28 ≤Z ≤100 . Two different fully relativistic approaches are used, based on the multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) theory and the relativistic many-body-perturbation theory (RMBPT). Especially the former gives results of similar accuracy as experiments for a large range of ions. Our calculations are therefore accurate enough to probe Breit and quantum-electro-dynamic effects. To obtain spectroscopic accuracy, we show that it is important to include deep core-valence correlation, down to and including the n =2 shell. We estimate that the uncertainties of our wavelengths are within the uncertainty of experiments, i.e., 0.02%. We also show that the frequently used flexible atomic code has an inaccurate treatment of the self-energy (SE) contribution and of the M 1 -transition properties for lower-Z ions. After correcting for the SE calculation, the resulting RMBPT transition energies are in good agreement with the MCDHF ones, especially for the high-Z end of the Co-like sequence.

  19. Magnetically induced electron shelving in a trapped Ca{sup +} ion

    SciTech Connect

    Crick, D. R.; Donnellan, S.; Segal, D. M.; Thompson, R. C.

    2010-05-15

    Atomic states are perturbed by externally applied magnetic fields (Zeeman effect). As well as the usual Zeeman splittings, the magnetic field leads to mixing of states with different values of the J quantum number. We report on the direct experimental measurement of this effect using the electron shelving technique (employed to great effect in single-ion spectroscopy and quantum-information processing). Specifically we observe shelving to the metastable (3p{sup 6}3d) {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} state in a single {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion, via spontaneous decay on the strongly forbidden 4p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2{r_reversible}}3d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} transition. The rate of this transition is shown to scale as the square of the magnetic-field strength. The scaling and magnitude of the effect is compared to the result derived from first-order perturbation theory. For applications in quantum-information processing the J-mixing effect causes a degradation of readout fidelity. We show that this degradation is at a tolerable level for Ca{sup +} and is much less problematic for other trapped ionic species.

  20. LiFePO4 - 3D carbon nanofiber composites as cathode materials for Li-ions batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimesso, L.; Spanheimer, C.; Jaegermann, W.; Zhang, Y.; Yarin, A. L.

    2012-03-01

    The characterization of carbon nanofiber 3D nonwovens, prepared by electrospinning process, coated with olivine structured lithium iron phosphate is reported. The LiFePO4 as cathode material for lithium ion batteries was prepared by a Pechini-assisted reversed polyol process. The coating has been successfully performed on carbon nanofiber 3D nonwovens by soaking in aqueous solution containing lithium, iron salts and phosphates at 70 °C for 2-4 h. After drying-out, the composites were annealed at 600 °C for 5 h under nitrogen. The surface investigation of the prepared composites showed a uniform coating of the carbon nonwoven nanofibers as well as the formation of cauliflower-like crystalline structures which are uniformly distributed all over the surface area of the carbon nanofibers. The electrochemical measurements on the composites showed good performances delivering a discharge specific capacity of 156 mAhg- 1 at a discharging rate of C/25 and 152 mAhg- 1 at a discharging rate of C/10 at room temperature.

  1. Augmenting Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers Using a Frequency Modulated Drift Tube Ion Mobility Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Kelsey A; Siems, William F; Clowers, Brian H

    2016-03-15

    Historically, high pressure ion mobility drift tubes have suffered from low ion duty cycles and this problem is magnified when such instrumentation is coupled with ion trap mass spectrometers. To significantly alleviate these issues, we outline the result from coupling an atmospheric pressure, dual-gate drift tube ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) to a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LIT-MS) via modulation of the ion beam with a linear frequency chirp. The time-domain ion current, once Fourier transformed, reveals a standard ion mobility drift spectrum that corresponds to the standard mode of mobility analysis. By multiplexing the ion beam, it is possible to successfully obtain drift time spectra for an assortment of simple peptide and protein mixtures using an LIT-MS while showing improved signal intensity versus the more common signal averaging technique. Explored here are the effects of maximum injection time, solution concentration, total experiment time, and frequency swept on signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and resolving power. Increased inject time, concentration, and experiment time all generally led to an improvement in SNR, while a greater frequency swept increases the resolving power at the expense of SNR. Overall, chirp multiplexing of a dual-gate IMS system coupled to an LIT-MS improves ion transmission, lowers analyte detection limits, and improves spectral quality. PMID:26854901

  2. 3D Woven-Like Carbon Micropattern Decorated with Silicon Nanoparticles for Use in Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kang, Da-Young; Kim, Cheolho; Gueon, Donghee; Park, Gyulim; Kim, Jung Sub; Lee, Joong Kee; Moon, Jun Hyuk

    2015-10-26

    Carbon/silicon composite materials are a promising anode substrate for use in lithium-ion batteries. In this study, we suggest a new architecture for a composite electrode made of a woven-like carbon material decorated with silicon nanoparticles. The 3D woven-like carbon (WLC) structure was fabricated using direct carbonization of multi-beam interference lithography polymer patterns. Subsequent solution coating was applied to decorate the WLC with silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs). The SiNP/WLC electrode exhibited a specific capacity of 930 mAh g(-1) , which is three times higher than the specific capacity of the bare electrode. Specifically, the SiNP/WLC electrode exhibited an outstanding retention capacity of 81 % after 50 cycles and a Coulombic efficiency of more than 98 %. This rate capability performance was attributed to the WLC structure and the uniform decoration of the SiNPs.

  3. Anti-hydrogen production with positron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Itahashi, Takahisa

    2008-08-08

    In low-energy antiproton physics, it is advantageous to be able to manipulate anti-particles as freely as normal particles. A robust production and storage system for high-quality positrons and antiprotons would be a substantial advance for the development of anti-matter science. The idea of electron beam ion trap could be applied for storage of anti-particle when the electron beam could be replaced by the positron beam. The bright positron beam would be brought about using synchrotron radiation source with a superconducting wiggler. The new scheme for production of anti-particles is proposed by using new accelerator technologies.

  4. Cotrapping different species in ion traps using multiple radio frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trypogeorgos, Dimitris; Foot, Christopher J.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the stability of systems subjected to periodic parametric driving in the context of ions confined by oscillating electric fields. The behavior of these systems can be understood in terms of a pseudopotential approximation and resonances arising from parametric excitation. We investigate the key properties of a way of operating a linear Paul trap with two radio frequencies that simultaneously confines two species with extremely different charge-to-mass ratios. The theoretical calculations have been verified by molecular dynamics simulations and normal modes analysis.

  5. Trilinear hamiltonian with trapped ions and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shiqian; Maslennikov, Gleb; Hablutzel, Roland; Matsukevich, Dzmitry

    2016-05-01

    The model of three harmonic oscillators coupled by the trilinear Hamiltonian of the form a† bc + ab†c† can describe wide range of physical processes. We experimentally realize such interaction between three modes of motion in the system of 3 trapped Yb ions. We discuss several application of this coupling, including implementation of the quantum absorption refrigerator, simulation of the interaction between light and atoms described by a Tavis-Cummings model, simulation of the non-degenerate parametric down conversion process in the fully quantum regime and studies of a simple model of Hawking radiation.

  6. Robust quantum gates between trapped ions using shaped pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Ming

    2015-12-01

    We improve two existing entangling gate schemes between trapped ion qubits immersed in a large linear crystal. Based on the existing two-qubit gate schemes by applying segmented forces on the individually addressed qubits, we present a systematic method to optimize the shapes of the forces to suppress the dominant source of infidelity. The spin-dependent forces in the scheme can be from periodic photon kicks or from continuous optical pulses. The entangling gates are fast, robust, and have high fidelity. They can be used to implement scalable quantum computation and quantum simulation.

  7. Selective interactions in trapped ions: State reconstruction and quantum logic

    SciTech Connect

    Solano, E.

    2005-01-01

    We propose the implementation of selective interactions of atom-motion subspaces in trapped ions. These interactions yield resonant exchange of population inside a selected subspace, leaving the others in a highly dispersive regime. Selectivity allows us to generate motional Fock (and other nonclassical) states with high purity out of a wide class of initial states, and becomes an unconventional cooling mechanism when the ground state is chosen. Individual population of number states can be distinctively measured, as well as the motional Wigner function. Furthermore, a protocol for implementing quantum logic through a suitable control of selective subspaces is presented.

  8. Selective control of the symmetric Dicke subspace in trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, C. E.; Retamal, J. C.; Solano, E.

    2007-09-15

    We propose a method of manipulating selectively the symmetric Dicke subspace in the internal degrees of freedom of N trapped ions. We show that the direct access to ionic-motional subspaces, based on a suitable tuning of motion-dependent ac Stark shifts, induces a two-level dynamics involving previously selected ionic Dicke states. In this manner, it is possible to produce, sequentially and unitarily, ionic Dicke states with increasing excitation number. Moreover, we propose a probabilistic technique to produce directly any ionic Dicke state assuming suitable initial conditions.

  9. MEMS Fabrication of Micro Cylindrical Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer for CubeSats Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) technology is used to fabricate arrays of micro Cylindrical Ion Traps (μCIT) which are integrated into a miniaturized mass spectrometer (MS). The micro μCITs are built from silicon wafers and requires high machining precision, smooth surface, and high dimensional uniformity across the array for optimum mass spectrometer performance. In order to build these 3D miniature structures several MEMS processing techniques were explored and a process was developed and tested. By using the developed MEMS process, the required μCIT 4 x 4 arrays were fabricated. This included a chip design variation in which mechanical locking pits and posts were machined in the Ring Electrode (RE) chip and End Plate (EP) chips respectively, for self-assembly. The size of the assembled μCIT is only 12 mm x 12 mm x 1.5 mm. It is a key component for the miniature mass spectrometer. The micro cylindrical ion trap mass spectrometer has the advantages of low-power operation, simpler electronics and less-stringent vacuum system requirements. The MEMS batch production capabilities will also greatly lower the cost. It is a promising candidate for CubeSat and nanoSats applications for exploration of chemical distributions in space.

  10. Linear ion trap for second-order Doppler shift reduction in frequency standard applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Janik, Gary R.; Dick, G. John; Maleki, Lute

    1990-01-01

    The authors have designed and are presently testing a novel linear ion trap that permits storage of a large number of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. This new trap should store about 20 times the number of ions as a conventional RF trap with no corresponding increase in second-order Doppler shift from the confining field. In addition, the sensitivity of this shift to trapping parameters, i.e., RF voltage, RF frequency, and trap size, is greatly reduced. The authors have succeeded in trapping mercury ions and xenon ions in the presence of helium buffer gas. Trap times as long as 2000 s have been measured.

  11. Low power RF amplifier circuit for ion trap applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, J. R.; García-Delgado, L. A.; Gómez-Fuentes, R.; García-Juárez, A.

    2016-09-01

    A low power RF amplifier circuit for ion trap applications is presented and described. The amplifier is based on a class-D half-bridge amplifier with a voltage mirror driver. The RF amplifier is composed of an RF class-D amplifier, an envelope modulator to ramp up the RF voltage during the ion analysis stage, a detector or amplitude demodulation circuit for sensing the output signal amplitude, and a feedback amplifier that linearizes the steady state output of the amplifier. The RF frequency is set by a crystal oscillator and the series resonant circuit is tuned to the oscillator frequency. The resonant circuit components have been chosen, in this case, to operate at 1 MHz. In testings, the class-D stage operated at a maximum of 78 mW at 1.1356 MHz producing 225 V peak.

  12. Digital quantum simulation of Dirac equation with a trapped ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yangchao; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Junhua; Casanova, Jorge; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Yung, Man-Hong; Zhang, Jingning; Kim, Kihwan; Department Of Physical Chemistry Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    Recently there has been growing interest in simulating relativistic effects in controllable physical system. We digitally simulate the Dirac equation in 3 +1 dimensions with a single trapped ion. We map four internal levels of 171Yb+ ion to the Dirac bispinor. The time evolution of the Dirac equation is implemented by trotter expansion. In the 3 +1 dimension, we can observe a helicoidal motion of a free Dirac particle which reduces to Zitterbewegung in 1 +1 dimension. This work was supported in part by the National Basic Research Program of China Grant 2011CBA00300, 2011CBA00301, the National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant 61033001, 61061130540. KK acknowledge the support from the recruitment program of global youth experts.

  13. Sympathetic cooling of 171 Yb+ qubit ions on a scalable ion trap chip using Yb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Yeong-Dae; Ahn, Jun Sik; Hong, Seokjun; Lee, Minjae; Cheon, Hongjin; Cho, Dongil ``Dan''; Kim, Taehyun

    2016-05-01

    To achieve ion trap based large-scale quantum computing devices, motional states of qubit ions must be regulated against heating from ion transportation or noise on the chip surface while leaving internal states of the ions intact. Sympathetic cooling is a natural solution for this problem, but trapping two different species of ions generally requires two sets of optical devices including separate lasers for each ion type, increasing the complexity and the cost of the setup. We tested Doppler-cooled 174 Yb+ ions to sympathetically cool 171 Yb+ qubit ions. Since these two isotopes have energy levels close to each other, the optical setup can be vastly simplified. We also verified that the tail of non-ideally focused cooling beam and the scattered light from the surface create excited state population in the 171 Yb+ qubit ions, as expected. This leads to occasional spontaneous emission events, which currently limits the coherence time of our qubit to a few seconds. We will also discuss our plans for optimizing the experiment, which may increase the coherence time by one or two orders of magnitude. This work was partially supported by ICT R&D program of MSIP/IITP. [10043464, Development of quantum repeater technology for the application to communication systems].

  14. Linear Ion Trap for the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckerhoff, William; Arevalo, Ricardo; Danell, Ryan; van Amerom, Friso; Pinnick, Veronica; Li, Xiang; Hovmand, Lars; Getty, Stephanie; Mahaffy, Paul; Goesmann, Fred; Steininger, Harald

    2014-05-01

    The 2018 ExoMars rover mission includes the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation. MOMA will examine the chemical composition of samples acquired from depths of up to two meters below the martian surface, where organics may be protected from radiative and oxidative degradation. When combined with the complement of instruments in the rover's Pasteur Payload, MOMA has the potential to reveal the presence of a wide range of organics preserved in a variety of mineralogical environments, and to begin to understand the structural character and potential origin of those compounds. MOMA includes a linear, or 2D, ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) that is designed to analyze molecular composition of (i) gas evolved from pyrolyzed powder samples and separated on a gas chromatograph and (ii) ions directly desorbed from solid samples at Mars ambient pressure using a pulsed laser and a fast-valve capillary ion inlet system. This "dual source" approach gives MOMA unprecedented breadth of detection over a wide range of molecular weights and volatilities. Analysis of nonvolatile, higher-molecular weight organics such as carboxylic acids and peptides even in the presence of significant perchlorate concentrations is enabled by the extremely short (~1 ns) pulses of the desorption laser. Use of the ion trap's tandem mass spectrometry mode permits selective focus on key species for isolation and controlled fragmentation, providing structural analysis capabilities. The flight-like engineering test unit (ETU) of the ITMS, now under construction, will be used to verify breadboard performance with high fidelity, while simultaneously supporting the development of analytical scripts and spectral libraries using synthetic and natural Mars analog samples guided by current results from MSL. ETU campaign data will strongly advise the specifics of the calibration applied to the MOMA flight model as well as the science operational procedures during the mission.

  15. Development and Evaluation of a Variable-Temperature Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Derkits, David; Wiseman, Alex; Snead, Russell F; Dows, Martina; Harge, Jasmine; Lamp, Jared A; Gronert, Scott

    2016-02-01

    A new, variable-temperature mass spectrometer system is described. By applying polyimide heating tape to the end-cap electrodes of a Bruker (Bremen, Germany) Esquire ion trap, it is possible to vary the effective temperature of the system between 40 and 100°C. The modification does not impact the operation of the ion trap and the heater can be used for extended periods without degradation of the system. The accuracy of the ion trap temperatures was assessed by examining two gas-phase equilibrium processes with known thermochemistry. In each case, the variable-temperature ion trap provided data that were in good accord with literature data, indicating the effective temperature in the ion trap environment was being successfully modulated by the changes in the set-point temperatures on the end-cap electrodes. The new design offers a convenient and effective way to convert commercial ion trap mass spectrometers into variable-temperature instruments. PMID:26483183

  16. A long-lived Zeeman trapped-ion qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruster, T.; Schmiegelow, C. T.; Kaufmann, H.; Warschburger, C.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Poschinger, U. G.

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate unprecedentedly long lifetimes for electron spin superposition states of a single trapped ^{40}Ca^+ ion. For a Ramsey measurement, we achieve a 1{/}√{e} coherence time of 300(50) ms, while a spin-echo experiment yields a coherence time of 2.1(1) s. The latter corresponds to residual effective rms magnetic field fluctuations ≤ 2.7× 10^{-12} T during a measurement time of about 1500 s. The suppression of decoherence induced by fluctuating magnetic fields is achieved by combining a two-layer μ-metal shield, which reduces external magnetic noise by 20-30 dB for frequencies of 50 Hz-100 kHz, with Sm_2Co_{17} permanent magnets for generating a quantizing magnetic field of 0.37 mT. Our results extend the coherence time of the simple-to-operate trapped-ion spin qubit to ultralong coherence times which so far have been observed only for magnetic insensitive transitions in atomic qubits with hyperfine structure.

  17. Numerical observation of preferred directionality in ion ejection from stretched rectilinear ion traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaveni, A.; Kumar Verma, Neeraj; Menon, A. G.; Mohanty, Atanu K.

    2008-08-01

    We report on numerical investigations of directionality of ion ejection in stretched rectilinear ion traps (RIT). Three 4-electrode trap geometries have been investigated. In all cases, one pair of electrodes has slits at their center and the other pair has no slits. The studied traps include the RIT-S, in which the mass analyzer electrodes are symmetrically positioned around the central axis; the RIT-X, in which the mass analyzer has a stretch in the direction of the electrodes which have slits (labeled as x-direction); and the RIT-Y, in which the mass analyzer has a stretch in the direction of the electrodes which have no slits (labeled as y-direction). Our analysis has been carried out on two-dimensional (2D) fields at the centre of an infinitely long mass analyzer. The boundary element method (BEM) has been used for field computations. The trajectory of ion motion has been generated using Runge Kutta fourth order integration. Three sets of simulations have been carried out on each of the RIT-S, the RIT-X and the RIT-Y to check for directionality of ion ejection. In the first, we numerically obtain the stability region on the potential (Udc- Vrf) axes. In the second we generate an escape velocity plot with UdcD0 for different values of Vrf. In the third, we simulate the mass selective boundary ejection experiment on a single ion. In the symmetric RIT-S, as expected, all three simulations show that there is an equal probability of ion reaching the trap boundary in either of the x- or y-directions. For the stretched traps, however, the results are dramatically different. For the RIT-X, all three simulations suggest that ion destabilization at the stability boundary occurs in the x-directionE Similarly, for the RIT-Y, ions preferentially get destabilized in the y-direction. That is, ions reaching the trap boundary overwhelmingly prefer the stretch direction.

  18. Theory of the zero-field splitting of 6S(3d5)-state ions in cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan-Lun, Yu; Tao, Tan

    1994-02-01

    A study is made of the zero-field splitting (ZFS) of 6S(3d5) ions in cubic crystals, based on an extended crystal-field (CF) model which assumes two constants ζte and ζtt in the description of the spin-orbit (SO) interaction. In addition to the recognized origin for the ZFS, namely, the combined effect of the CF and the SO couplings, a second source is found to arise from the SO interaction alone through a difference between ζte and ζtt caused by covalency. To understand this second effect, we have investigated the SO coupling processes which contribute to the ZFS, using the Macfarlane-Zdansky perturbation procedure. Processes in which the couplings are all between states of different configurations tm2e5-m are found to make a positive contribution proportional to ζ4te. Other processes contribute negatively through a term in ζ2teζ2tt. The ZFS is thus determined by the relative magnitudes of these two parts, and a small difference between ζte and ζtt will cause a great change in its value. Application of this new theory is successfully made to Mn2+ ions in tetrahedral II-VI compounds and in fluoroperovskites.

  19. Simultaneous optimization of surface chemistry and pore morphology of 3D graphene-sulfur cathode via multi-ion modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Cheng, Shuang; Li, Wanfei; Zhang, Su; Li, Hongfei; Zheng, Zhaozhao; Li, Fujin; Shi, Liyi; Lin, Hongzhen; Zhang, Yuegang

    2016-07-01

    Lithium/sulfur (Li/S) battery is a promising next-generation energy storage system owing to its high theoretical energy density. However, for practical use there remains some key problems to be solved, such as low active material utilization and rapid capacity fading, especially at high areal sulfur loadings. Here, we report a facile one-pot method to prepare porous three-dimensional nitrogen, sulfur-codoped graphene through hydrothermal reduction of graphene oxide with multi-ion mixture modulation. We show solid evidence that the results of multi-ion mixture modulation can not only improve the surface affinity of the nanocarbons to polysulfides, but also alter their assembling manner and render the resultant 3D network a more favorable pore morphology for accommodating and confining sulfur. It also had an excellent rate performance and cycling stability, showing an initial capacity of 1304 mA h g-1 at 0.05C, 613 mA h g-1 at 5C and maintaining a reversible capacity of 462 mA h g-1 after 1500 cycles at 2C with capacity fading as low as 0.028% per cycle. Moreover, a high areal capacity of 5.1 mA h cm-2 at 0.2C is achieved at an areal sulfur loading of 6.3 mg cm-2, which are the best values reported so far for dual-doped sulfur cathodes.

  20. Multi-element logic gates for trapped-ion qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, T. R.; Gaebler, J. P.; Lin, Y.; Wan, Y.; Bowler, R.; Leibfried, D.; Wineland, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Precision control over hybrid physical systems at the quantum level is important for the realization of many quantum-based technologies. In the field of quantum information processing (QIP) and quantum networking, various proposals discuss the possibility of hybrid architectures where specific tasks are delegated to the most suitable subsystem. For example, in quantum networks, it may be advantageous to transfer information from a subsystem that has good memory properties to another subsystem that is more efficient at transporting information between nodes in the network. For trapped ions, a hybrid system formed of different species introduces extra degrees of freedom that can be exploited to expand and refine the control of the system. Ions of different elements have previously been used in QIP experiments for sympathetic cooling, creation of entanglement through dissipation, and quantum non-demolition measurement of one species with another. Here we demonstrate an entangling quantum gate between ions of different elements which can serve as an important building block of QIP, quantum networking, precision spectroscopy, metrology, and quantum simulation. A geometric phase gate between a 9Be+ ion and a 25Mg+ ion is realized through an effective spin-spin interaction generated by state-dependent forces induced with laser beams. Combined with single-qubit gates and same-species entangling gates, this mixed-element entangling gate provides a complete set of gates over such a hybrid system for universal QIP. Using a sequence of such gates, we demonstrate a CNOT (controlled-NOT) gate and a SWAP gate. We further demonstrate the robustness of these gates against thermal excitation and show improved detection in quantum logic spectroscopy. We also observe a strong violation of a CHSH (Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt)-type Bell inequality on entangled states composed of different ion species.

  1. Multi-element logic gates for trapped-ion qubits.

    PubMed

    Tan, T R; Gaebler, J P; Lin, Y; Wan, Y; Bowler, R; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2015-12-17

    Precision control over hybrid physical systems at the quantum level is important for the realization of many quantum-based technologies. In the field of quantum information processing (QIP) and quantum networking, various proposals discuss the possibility of hybrid architectures where specific tasks are delegated to the most suitable subsystem. For example, in quantum networks, it may be advantageous to transfer information from a subsystem that has good memory properties to another subsystem that is more efficient at transporting information between nodes in the network. For trapped ions, a hybrid system formed of different species introduces extra degrees of freedom that can be exploited to expand and refine the control of the system. Ions of different elements have previously been used in QIP experiments for sympathetic cooling, creation of entanglement through dissipation, and quantum non-demolition measurement of one species with another. Here we demonstrate an entangling quantum gate between ions of different elements which can serve as an important building block of QIP, quantum networking, precision spectroscopy, metrology, and quantum simulation. A geometric phase gate between a (9)Be(+) ion and a (25)Mg(+) ion is realized through an effective spin-spin interaction generated by state-dependent forces induced with laser beams. Combined with single-qubit gates and same-species entangling gates, this mixed-element entangling gate provides a complete set of gates over such a hybrid system for universal QIP. Using a sequence of such gates, we demonstrate a CNOT (controlled-NOT) gate and a SWAP gate. We further demonstrate the robustness of these gates against thermal excitation and show improved detection in quantum logic spectroscopy. We also observe a strong violation of a CHSH (Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt)-type Bell inequality on entangled states composed of different ion species. PMID:26672553

  2. 3-D ion distribution and evolution in storm-time RC Retrieved from TWINS ENA by differential voxel CT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, S.; Yan, W.; Xu, L.

    2013-12-01

    The quantitative retrieval of the 3-D spatial distribution of the parent energetic ions of ENA from a 2-D ENA image is a quite challenge task. The Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission of NASA is the first constellation to perform stereoscopic magnetospheric imaging of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) from a pair of spacecraft flying on two widely-separated Molniya orbits. TWINS provides a unique opportunity to retrieve the 3-D distribution of ions in the ring current (RC) by using a volumetric pixel (voxel) CT inversion method. In this study the voxel CT method is implemented for a series of differential ENA fluxes averaged over about 6 to 7 sweeps (corresponding to a time period of about 9 min.) at different energy levels ranging from 5 to 100 keV, obtained simultaneously by the two satellites during the main phase of a great magnetic storm with minimum Sym-H of -156 nT on 24-25 October 2011. The data were selected to span a period about 50 minutes during which a large substorm was undergoing its expansion phase first and then recovery. The ENA species of O and H are distinguished for some time-segments by analyzing the signals of pulse heights of second electrons emitted from the carbon foil and impacted on the MCP detector in the TWINS sensors. In order to eliminate the possible influence on retrieval induced by instrument bias error, a differential voxel CT technique is applied. The flux intensity of the ENAs' parent ions in the RC has been obtained as a function of energy, L value, MLT sector and latitude, along with their time evolution during the storm-time substorm expansion phase. Forward calculations proved the reliability of the retrieved results. It shows that the RC is highly asymmetric, with a major concentration in the midnight to dawn sector for equatorial latitudes. Halfway through the substorm expansion there occurred a large enhancement of equatorial ion flux at lower energy (5 keV) in the dusk sector, with narrow extent

  3. Design, microfabrication, and analysis of micrometer-sized cylindrical ion trap arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, D.; Chang, J. P.; Fico, M.; Guymon, A. J.; Austin, D. E.; Blain, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    A description of the design and microfabrication of arrays of micrometer-scale cylindrical ion traps is offered. Electrical characterization and initial ion trapping experiments with a massively parallel array of 5μm internal radius (r0) sized cylindrical ion traps (CITs) are also described. The ion trap, materials, and design are presented and shown to be critical in achieving minimal trapping potential while maintaining minimal power consumption. The ion traps, fabricated with metal electrodes, have inner radii of 1, 2, 5, and 10μm and range from 5to24μm in height. The electrical characteristics of packaged ion trap arrays were measured with a vector network analyzer. The testing focused on trapping toluene (C7H8), mass 91, 92, or 93amu, in the 5μm sized CITs. Ions were formed via electron impact ionization and were ejected by turning off the rf voltage applied to the ring electrode; a current signal was collected at this time. Optimum ionization and trapping conditions, such as a sufficient pseudopotential well and high ionization to ion loss rate ratio (as determined by simulation), proved to be difficult to establish due to the high device capacitance and the presence of exposed dielectric material in the trapping region. However, evidence was obtained suggesting the trapping of ions in 1%-15% of the traps in the array. These first tests on micrometer-scale CITs indicated the necessary materials and device design modifications for realizing ultrasmall and low power ion traps.

  4. Design, microfabrication, and analysis of micrometer-sized cylindrical ion trap arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, D.; Chang, J. P.; Fico, M.; Guymon, A. J.; Austin, D. E.; Blain, M. G.

    2007-01-15

    A description of the design and microfabrication of arrays of micrometer-scale cylindrical ion traps is offered. Electrical characterization and initial ion trapping experiments with a massively parallel array of 5 {mu}m internal radius (r{sub 0}) sized cylindrical ion traps (CITs) are also described. The ion trap, materials, and design are presented and shown to be critical in achieving minimal trapping potential while maintaining minimal power consumption. The ion traps, fabricated with metal electrodes, have inner radii of 1, 2, 5, and 10 {mu}m and range from 5 to 24 {mu}m in height. The electrical characteristics of packaged ion trap arrays were measured with a vector network analyzer. The testing focused on trapping toluene (C{sub 7}H{sub 8}), mass 91, 92, or 93 amu, in the 5 {mu}m sized CITs. Ions were formed via electron impact ionization and were ejected by turning off the rf voltage applied to the ring electrode; a current signal was collected at this time. Optimum ionization and trapping conditions, such as a sufficient pseudopotential well and high ionization to ion loss rate ratio (as determined by simulation), proved to be difficult to establish due to the high device capacitance and the presence of exposed dielectric material in the trapping region. However, evidence was obtained suggesting the trapping of ions in 1%-15% of the traps in the array. These first tests on micrometer-scale CITs indicated the necessary materials and device design modifications for realizing ultrasmall and low power ion traps.

  5. Electron Flood Charge Compensation Device for Ion Trap Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Appelhans, Anthony David; Ward, Michael Blair; Olson, John Eric

    2002-11-01

    During secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analyses of organophosphorous compounds adsorbed onto soils, the measured anion signals were lower than expected and it was hypothesized that the low signals could be due to sample charging. An electron flood gun was designed, constructed and used to investigate sample charging of these and other sample types. The flood gun was integrated into one end cap of an ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer and the design maintained the geometry of the self-stabilizing extraction optics used in this instrument. The SIMION ion optics program was used to design the flood gun, and experimental results agreed with the predicted performance. Results showed the low anion signals from the soils were not due to sample charging. Other insulating and conducting samples were tested using both a ReO4- and a Cs+ primary ion beam. The proximity of the sample and electron source to the ion trap aperture resulted in generation of background ions in the ion trap via electron impact (EI) ionization during the period the electron gun was flooding the sample region. When using the electron gun with the ReO4- primary beam, the required electron current was low enough that the EI background was negligible; however, the high electron flood current required with the Cs+ beam produced background EI ions that degraded the quality of the mass spectra. The consequences of the EI produced cations will have to be evaluated on a sample-by-sample basis when using electron flood. It was shown that the electron flood gun could be intentionally operated to produce EI spectra in this instrument. This offers the opportunity to measure, nearly simultaneously, species evaporating from a sample, via EI, and species bound to the surface, via SIMS.

  6. Integrated fiber-mirror ion trap for strong ion-cavity coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandstätter, B.; McClung, A.; Schüppert, K.; Casabone, B.; Friebe, K.; Stute, A.; Schmidt, P. O.; Deutsch, C.; Reichel, J.; Blatt, R.; Northup, T. E.

    2013-12-01

    We present and characterize fiber mirrors and a miniaturized ion-trap design developed to integrate a fiber-based Fabry-Perot cavity (FFPC) with a linear Paul trap for use in cavity-QED experiments with trapped ions. Our fiber-mirror fabrication process not only enables the construction of FFPCs with small mode volumes, but also allows us to minimize the influence of the dielectric fiber mirrors on the trapped-ion pseudopotential. We discuss the effect of clipping losses for long FFPCs and the effect of angular and lateral displacements on the coupling efficiencies between cavity and fiber. Optical profilometry allows us to determine the radii of curvature and ellipticities of the fiber mirrors. From finesse measurements, we infer a single-atom cooperativity of up to 12 for FFPCs longer than 200 μm in length; comparison to cavities constructed with reference substrate mirrors produced in the same coating run indicates that our FFPCs have similar scattering losses. We characterize the birefringence of our fiber mirrors, finding that careful fiber-mirror selection enables us to construct FFPCs with degenerate polarization modes. As FFPCs are novel devices, we describe procedures developed for handling, aligning, and cleaning them. We discuss experiments to anneal fiber mirrors and explore the influence of the atmosphere under which annealing occurs on coating losses, finding that annealing under vacuum increases the losses for our reference substrate mirrors. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate that these losses may be attributable to oxygen depletion in the mirror coating. Special design considerations enable us to introduce a FFPC into a trapped ion setup. Our unique linear Paul trap design provides clearance for such a cavity and is miniaturized to shield trapped ions from the dielectric fiber mirrors. We numerically calculate the trap potential in the absence of fibers. In the experiment additional electrodes can be used to compensate

  7. Integrated fiber-mirror ion trap for strong ion-cavity coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Brandstätter, B. Schüppert, K.; Casabone, B.; Friebe, K.; Stute, A.; Northup, T. E.; McClung, A.; Schmidt, P. O.; Deutsch, C.; Reichel, J.

    2013-12-15

    We present and characterize fiber mirrors and a miniaturized ion-trap design developed to integrate a fiber-based Fabry-Perot cavity (FFPC) with a linear Paul trap for use in cavity-QED experiments with trapped ions. Our fiber-mirror fabrication process not only enables the construction of FFPCs with small mode volumes, but also allows us to minimize the influence of the dielectric fiber mirrors on the trapped-ion pseudopotential. We discuss the effect of clipping losses for long FFPCs and the effect of angular and lateral displacements on the coupling efficiencies between cavity and fiber. Optical profilometry allows us to determine the radii of curvature and ellipticities of the fiber mirrors. From finesse measurements, we infer a single-atom cooperativity of up to 12 for FFPCs longer than 200 μm in length; comparison to cavities constructed with reference substrate mirrors produced in the same coating run indicates that our FFPCs have similar scattering losses. We characterize the birefringence of our fiber mirrors, finding that careful fiber-mirror selection enables us to construct FFPCs with degenerate polarization modes. As FFPCs are novel devices, we describe procedures developed for handling, aligning, and cleaning them. We discuss experiments to anneal fiber mirrors and explore the influence of the atmosphere under which annealing occurs on coating losses, finding that annealing under vacuum increases the losses for our reference substrate mirrors. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicate that these losses may be attributable to oxygen depletion in the mirror coating. Special design considerations enable us to introduce a FFPC into a trapped ion setup. Our unique linear Paul trap design provides clearance for such a cavity and is miniaturized to shield trapped ions from the dielectric fiber mirrors. We numerically calculate the trap potential in the absence of fibers. In the experiment additional electrodes can be used to compensate

  8. Intermediate-spin state of a 3d ion in the octahedral environment and generalization of the Tanabe-Sugano diagrams.

    PubMed

    Lamonova, Karina V; Zhitlukhina, Elena S; Babkin, Roman Yu; Orel, Sergei M; Ovchinnikov, Sergei G; Pashkevich, Yurii G

    2011-11-24

    Electronic spectra of 3d(n) transition ions in an octahedral ligand surrounding have been studied using the modified crystal field approach (MCFA), which includes a relativistic spin-orbital interaction. A new variable parameter, the effective nuclear charge Z(eff) of a metal ion that allows accounting implicitly the covalence degree of a metal-ligand bond, has been introduced. Energy diagrams similar to the Tanabe-Sugano ones have been calculated. To study the spin state evolution of the metal ion in an arbitrary distorted octahedral complex, a spin state diagram approach has been proposed. The intermediate-spin (IS) state problem for 3d(4), 3d(5), and 3d(6) metal ions has been considered and conditions for the IS state realization have been formulated. The regions of the mixed high-, intermediate-, and low-spin states have been found. The possibility of coexistence of the different spin states of 3d ions in the octahedral complexes has been considered using crystallography data for the YBaCo(2)O(5.5) layered cobaltite.

  9. Effect of ion release from Cu-doped 45S5 Bioglass® on 3D endothelial cell morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stähli, Christoph; James-Bhasin, Mark; Hoppe, Alexander; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Nazhat, Showan N

    2015-06-01

    Both silicate-based bioactive glasses and copper ions have demonstrated angiogenic activity and therefore represent promising bioinorganic agents for the promotion of vascularization in tissue-engineered scaffolds. This study examined the effect of ionic release products from 45S5 Bioglass® doped with 0 and 2.5 wt.% CuO (BG and Cu-BG respectively) on the formation of capillary-like networks by SVEC4-10 endothelial cells (ECs) seeded in a three-dimensional (3D) type I collagen matrix. Copper and silicon release following 24h dissolution increased non-proportionally with Cu-BG concentration in cell culture medium, while calcium levels were decreased below the initial medium concentration. EC network length, connectivity, branching, quantified by means of a 3D morphometric image analysis method, as well as proliferation and metabolic activity were reduced in a dose-dependent fashion by BG and Cu-BG ionic release products. This reduction was less prominent for BG compared to an equivalent concentration of Cu-BG, which was attributed to a lower extent of silicon release and calcium consumption. Moreover, a CuCl2 dose equivalent to the highest concentration of Cu-BG exhibited no effect on ECs. In conclusion, while the previously reported pro-angiogenic activity of both Bioglass® and copper may not be reflected in a direct response of ECs, this study provides a maximum glass concentration for non-harmful angiogenic stimulation to be examined in future work.

  10. Cycle Time Reduction in Trapped Mercury Ion Atomic Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric A.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Taghavi, Shervin

    2011-01-01

    The use of the mercury ion isotope (201)Hg(+) was examined for an atomic clock. Taking advantage of the faster optical pumping time in (201)Hg(+) reduces both the state preparation and the state readout times, thereby decreasing the overall cycle time of the clock and reducing the impact of medium-term LO noise on the performance of the frequency standard. The spectral overlap between the plasma discharge lamp used for (201)Hg(+) state preparation and readout is much larger than that of the lamp used for the more conventional (199)Hg(+). There has been little study of (201)Hg(+) for clock applications (in fact, all trapped ion clock work in mercury has been with (199)Hg(+); however, recently the optical pumping time in (201)Hg(+) has been measured and found to be 0.45 second, or about three times faster than in (199)Hg(+) due largely to the better spectral overlap. This can be used to reduce the overall clock cycle time by over 2 seconds, or up to a factor of 2 improvement. The use of the (201)Hg(+) for an atomic clock is totally new. Most attempts to reduce the impact of LO noise have focused on reducing the interrogation time. In the trapped ion frequency standards built so far at JPL, the optical pumping time is already at its minimum so that no enhancement can be had by shortening it. However, by using (201)Hg(+), this is no longer the case. Furthermore, integrity monitoring, the mechanism that determines whether the clock is functioning normally, cannot happen faster than the clock cycle time. Therefore, a shorter cycle time will enable quicker detection of failure modes and recovery from them.

  11. 10 K Ring Electrode Trap - Tandem Mass Spectrometer for Infrared Spectroscopy of Mass Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Goebbert, Daniel J.; Meijer, Gerard; Asmis, Knut R.

    2009-03-17

    A novel instrumental setup for measuring infrared photodissociation spectra of buffer gas cooled, mass-selected ions is described and tested. It combines a cryogenically cooled, linear radio frequency ion trap with a tandem mass spectrometer, optimally coupling continuous ion sources to pulsed laser experiments. The use of six independently adjustable DC potentials superimposed over the trapping radio frequency field provides control over the ion distribution within, as well as the kinetic energy distribution of the ions extracted from the ion trap. The scheme allows focusing the ions in space and time, such that they can be optimally irradiated by a pulsed, widely tunable infrared photodissociation laser. Ion intensities are monitored with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer mounted orthogonally to the ion trap axis.

  12. Two regimes in the decay behavior of ions from a linear r.f. Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwolek, Jonathan; Wells, James; Goodman, Douglas; Blümel, Reinhold; Smith, Winthrop

    2016-05-01

    A linear Paul trap (LPT) enables ions to be trapped for use in a variety of experiments. In many of these experiments, such as those measuring charge exchange or sympathetic cooling, the decay of ions from the trap is used to measure some quantity of interest. This decay is typically modeled as a single exponential. We have found that in cases where the trap is loaded to high numbers of ions, the ion decay is better described by a double exponential decay function. We have experimentally examined the decay of ions from an LPT loaded by photoionization from a magneto-optical trap as a function of the q stability parameter of the Paul trap. The LPT is loaded to steady-state, then the loading is stopped and the number of trapped ions as a function of time is monitored to determine the decay. We present numerical simulations and experimental results that demonstrate two distinct regions in the decay. For high steady-state values, the trap exhibits a double-exponential behavior. However, if the trap is filled to a steady-state value below a threshold, the decay recovers the typical single-exponential behavior. This behavior should be universal to any Paul trap regardless of the geometry or species trapped. NSF Grant No. PHY-1307874.

  13. Adsorption of ions onto nanosolids dispersed in liquid crystals: Towards understanding the ion trapping effect in nanocolloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbovskiy, Yuriy

    2016-05-01

    The ion capturing effect in liquid crystal nanocolloids was quantified by means of the ion trapping coefficient. The dependence of the ion trapping coefficient on the concentration of nano-dopants and their ionic purity was calculated for a variety of nanosolids dispersed in liquid crystals: carbon nanotubes, graphene nano-flakes, diamond nanoparticles, anatase nanoparticles, and ferroelectric nanoparticles. The proposed method perfectly fits existing experimental data and can be useful in the design of highly efficient ion capturing nanomaterials.

  14. A Dual Pressure Linear Ion Trap Orbitrap Instrument with Very High Sequencing Speed*

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Jesper V.; Schwartz, Jae C.; Griep-Raming, Jens; Nielsen, Michael L.; Damoc, Eugen; Denisov, Eduard; Lange, Oliver; Remes, Philip; Taylor, Dennis; Splendore, Maurizio; Wouters, Eloy R.; Senko, Michael; Makarov, Alexander; Mann, Matthias; Horning, Stevan

    2009-01-01

    Since its introduction a few years ago, the linear ion trap Orbitrap (LTQ Orbitrap) instrument has become a powerful tool in proteomics research. For high resolution mass spectrometry measurements ions are accumulated in the linear ion trap and passed on to the Orbitrap analyzer. Simultaneously with acquisition of this signal, the major peaks are isolated in turn, fragmented and recorded at high sensitivity in the linear ion trap, combining the strengths of both mass analyzer technologies. Here we describe a next generation LTQ Orbitrap system termed Velos, with significantly increased sensitivity and scan speed. This is achieved by a vacuum interface using a stacked ring radio frequency ion guide with 10-fold higher transfer efficiency in MS/MS mode and 3–5-fold in full scan spectra, by a dual pressure ion trap configuration, and by reduction of overhead times between scans. The first ion trap efficiently captures and fragments ions at relatively high pressure whereas the second ion trap realizes extremely fast scan speeds at reduced pressure. Ion injection times for MS/MS are predicted from full scans instead of performing automatic gain control scans. Together these improvements routinely enable acquisition of up to ten fragmentation spectra per second. Furthermore, an improved higher-energy collisional dissociation cell with increased ion extraction capabilities was implemented. Higher-collision energy dissociation with high mass accuracy Orbitrap readout is as sensitive as ion trap MS/MS scans in the previous generation of the instrument. PMID:19828875

  15. Operation of a planar-electrode ion-trap array with adjustable RF electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumph, M.; Holz, P.; Langer, K.; Meraner, M.; Niedermayr, M.; Brownnutt, M.; Blatt, R.

    2016-02-01

    One path to realizing systems of trapped atomic ions suitable for large-scale quantum computing and simulation is to create a two-dimensional (2D) array of ion traps. Interactions between nearest-neighbouring ions could then be turned on and off by tuning the ions’ relative positions and frequencies. We demonstrate and characterize the operation of a planar-electrode ion-trap array. By driving the trap with a network of phase-locked radio-frequency resonators which provide independently variable voltage amplitudes we vary the position and motional frequency of a Ca+ ion in two-dimensions within the trap array. Work on fabricating a miniaturised form of this 2D trap array is also described, which could ultimately provide a viable architecture for large-scale quantum simulations.

  16. Rapid, Site-Selective Loading of a Scalable Array of Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzewicz, Colin; McConnell, Robert; Chiaverini, John; Sage, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    Rapid trap reloading is a requirement for any scalable quantum information processor based on trapped-ion qubits. Even cryogenic systems with trap lifetimes in excess of 10 hours will require loading rates of approximately 100 s-1 to maintain arrays of millions of ions. Further, the reloading process should not introduce unacceptable levels of decoherence into other ions within the array. Here, we demonstrate rapid, site-selective, random-access loading of a 2x2 array of trapped ions that satisfies the major criteria for scalable quantum processing. This scheme uses a continuous flux of pre-cooled strontium atoms and a pair of orthogonal photo-ionization lasers to load surface-electrode point Paul traps at average rates greater than 400 s-1. Additionally, we have conducted a series of Ramsey experiments to measure the effects of loading on the coherence of nearby trapped ions.

  17. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Joshua A.; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Park, Melvin A.

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory.

  18. High-precision force sensing using a single trapped ion.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Peter A; Vitanov, Nikolay V; Singer, Kilian

    2016-01-01

    We introduce quantum sensing schemes for measuring very weak forces with a single trapped ion. They use the spin-motional coupling induced by the laser-ion interaction to transfer the relevant force information to the spin-degree of freedom. Therefore, the force estimation is carried out simply by observing the Ramsey-type oscillations of the ion spin states. Three quantum probes are considered, which are represented by systems obeying the Jaynes-Cummings, quantum Rabi (in 1D) and Jahn-Teller (in 2D) models. By using dynamical decoupling schemes in the Jaynes-Cummings and Jahn-Teller models, our force sensing protocols can be made robust to the spin dephasing caused by the thermal and magnetic field fluctuations. In the quantum-Rabi probe, the residual spin-phonon coupling vanishes, which makes this sensing protocol naturally robust to thermally-induced spin dephasing. We show that the proposed techniques can be used to sense the axial and transverse components of the force with a sensitivity beyond the range, i.e. in the (xennonewton, 10(-27)). The Jahn-Teller protocol, in particular, can be used to implement a two-channel vector spectrum analyzer for measuring ultra-low voltages. PMID:27306426

  19. High-precision force sensing using a single trapped ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Peter A.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.; Singer, Kilian

    2016-06-01

    We introduce quantum sensing schemes for measuring very weak forces with a single trapped ion. They use the spin-motional coupling induced by the laser-ion interaction to transfer the relevant force information to the spin-degree of freedom. Therefore, the force estimation is carried out simply by observing the Ramsey-type oscillations of the ion spin states. Three quantum probes are considered, which are represented by systems obeying the Jaynes-Cummings, quantum Rabi (in 1D) and Jahn-Teller (in 2D) models. By using dynamical decoupling schemes in the Jaynes-Cummings and Jahn-Teller models, our force sensing protocols can be made robust to the spin dephasing caused by the thermal and magnetic field fluctuations. In the quantum-Rabi probe, the residual spin-phonon coupling vanishes, which makes this sensing protocol naturally robust to thermally-induced spin dephasing. We show that the proposed techniques can be used to sense the axial and transverse components of the force with a sensitivity beyond the range, i.e. in the (xennonewton, 10‑27). The Jahn-Teller protocol, in particular, can be used to implement a two-channel vector spectrum analyzer for measuring ultra-low voltages.

  20. High-precision force sensing using a single trapped ion

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Peter A.; Vitanov, Nikolay V.; Singer, Kilian

    2016-01-01

    We introduce quantum sensing schemes for measuring very weak forces with a single trapped ion. They use the spin-motional coupling induced by the laser-ion interaction to transfer the relevant force information to the spin-degree of freedom. Therefore, the force estimation is carried out simply by observing the Ramsey-type oscillations of the ion spin states. Three quantum probes are considered, which are represented by systems obeying the Jaynes-Cummings, quantum Rabi (in 1D) and Jahn-Teller (in 2D) models. By using dynamical decoupling schemes in the Jaynes-Cummings and Jahn-Teller models, our force sensing protocols can be made robust to the spin dephasing caused by the thermal and magnetic field fluctuations. In the quantum-Rabi probe, the residual spin-phonon coupling vanishes, which makes this sensing protocol naturally robust to thermally-induced spin dephasing. We show that the proposed techniques can be used to sense the axial and transverse components of the force with a sensitivity beyond the range, i.e. in the (xennonewton, 10−27). The Jahn-Teller protocol, in particular, can be used to implement a two-channel vector spectrum analyzer for measuring ultra-low voltages. PMID:27306426

  1. Conformation-specific spectroscopy of peptide fragment ions in a low-temperature ion trap.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Tobias N; Boyarkin, Oleg V; Paizs, Béla; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2012-06-01

    We have applied conformer-selective infrared-ultraviolet (IR-UV) double-resonance photofragment spectroscopy at low temperatures in an ion trap mass spectrometer for the spectroscopic characterization of peptide fragment ions. We investigate b- and a-type ions formed by collision-induced dissociation from protonated leucine-enkephalin. The vibrational analysis and assignment are supported by nitrogen-15 isotopic substitution of individual amino acid residues and assisted by density functional theory calculations. Under such conditions, b-type ions of different size are found to appear exclusively as linear oxazolone structures with protonation on the N-terminus, while a rearrangement reaction is confirmed for the a (4) ion in which the side chain of the C-terminal phenylalanine residue is transferred to the N-terminal side of the molecule. The vibrational spectra that we present here provide a particularly stringent test for theoretical approaches.

  2. Conformation-Specific Spectroscopy of Peptide Fragment Ions in a Low-Temperature Ion Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassermann, Tobias N.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.; Paizs, Béla; Rizzo, Thomas R.

    2012-06-01

    We have applied conformer-selective infrared-ultraviolet (IR-UV) double-resonance photofragment spectroscopy at low temperatures in an ion trap mass spectrometer for the spectroscopic characterization of peptide fragment ions. We investigate b- and a-type ions formed by collision-induced dissociation from protonated leucine-enkephalin. The vibrational analysis and assignment are supported by nitrogen-15 isotopic substitution of individual amino acid residues and assisted by density functional theory calculations. Under such conditions, b-type ions of different size are found to appear exclusively as linear oxazolone structures with protonation on the N-terminus, while a rearrangement reaction is confirmed for the a 4 ion in which the side chain of the C-terminal phenylalanine residue is transferred to the N-terminal side of the molecule. The vibrational spectra that we present here provide a particularly stringent test for theoretical approaches.

  3. Formation of molecular ions by radiative association of cold trapped atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulieu, Olivier; da Silva, Humberto, Jr.; Aymar, Mireille; Raoult, Maurice

    2015-05-01

    Radiative emission during cold collisions between trapped laser-cooled Rb atoms and alkaline-earth ions (Ca+ , Sr+ , Ba+) and Yb+ are studied theoretically, using accurate effective-core-potential based quantum chemistry calculations of potential energy curves and transition dipole moments of the related molecular ions. Radiative association of molecular ions is predicted to occur for all systems with a cross section two to ten times larger than the radiative charge transfer one. Partial and total rate constants are also calculated and compared to available experiments. Narrow shape resonances are expected, which could be detectable at low temperature with an experimental resolution at the limit of the present standards. Vibrational distributions show that the final molecular ions are not created in their ground state level. Supported by the Marie-Curie ITN ``COMIQ: Cold Molecular Ions at the Quantum limit'' of the EU (#607491).

  4. Quantum simulation of dynamical maps with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, P.; Müller, M.; Nigg, D.; Barreiro, J. T.; Martinez, E. A.; Hennrich, M.; Monz, T.; Diehl, S.; Zoller, P.; Blatt, R.

    2013-06-01

    Dynamical maps describe general transformations of the state of a physical system--their iteration interpreted as generating a discrete time evolution. Prime examples include classical nonlinear systems undergoing transitions to chaos. Quantum mechanical counterparts show intriguing phenomena such as dynamical localization on the single-particle level. Here we extend the concept of dynamical maps to a many-particle context, where the time evolution involves both coherent and dissipative elements: we experimentally explore the stroboscopic dynamics of a complex many-body spin model with a universal trapped ion quantum simulator. We generate long-range phase coherence of spin by an iteration of purely dissipative quantum maps and demonstrate the characteristics of competition between combined coherent and dissipative non-equilibrium evolution--the hallmark of a previously unobserved dynamical phase transition. We assess the influence of experimental errors in the quantum simulation and tackle this problem by developing an efficient error detection and reduction toolbox based on quantum feedback.

  5. Gate Set Tomography on a trapped ion qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Erik; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Gamble, John; Rundinger, Kenneth; Mizrahi, Jonathan; Sterk, Johathan; Maunz, Peter

    2015-03-01

    We present enhancements to gate-set tomography (GST), which is a framework in which an entire set of quantum logic gates (including preparation and measurement) can be fully characterized without need for pre-calibrated operations. Our new method, ``extended Linear GST'' (eLGST) uses fast, reliable analysis of structured long gate sequences to deliver tomographic precision at the Heisenberg limit with GST's calibration-free framework. We demonstrate this precision on a trapped-ion qubit, and show significant (orders of magnitude) advantage over both standard process tomography and randomized benchmarking. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Fast control of trapped ion qubits using shaped optical pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangan, Chitra; Monroe, C. R.; Bucksbaum, P. H.; Bloch, A. M.

    2003-05-01

    We present a fast control scheme for producing arbitrary states of trapped ion qubits via shaped optical pulses. When the atomic wavepacket is not localized to under a wavelength (beyond the Lamb-Dicke limit), we show that, we show that the Hilbert space of the qubit-harmonic oscillator can be made finite, and the Schrödinger equation controllable. We then implement an optimal control formalism to determine the pulse shapes that can drive the system to any desired state. This process is faster than using sequential single-frequency laser fields to achieve the same final state. We discuss control schemes for producing entangled states of two qubits. We show progress towards achieving decoherence-free subspaces that could be used in error correction schemes.

  7. Limiting temperature of sympathetically cooled ions in a radio-frequency trap

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Taro; Shimizu, Tadao

    2003-01-01

    The limiting temperature achieved by sympathetic cooling in an rf trap is calculated with a theoretical model in which no fitting parameters are used. The calculated result agrees well with observation. The dependence of the temperature on trapping parameters and ion mass is also analyzed. The results can be used for designing an rf trap system.

  8. Ejection of Coulomb Crystals from a Linear Paul Ion Trap for Ion-Molecule Reaction Studies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, K A E; Pollum, L L; Petralia, L S; Tauschinsky, A; Rennick, C J; Softley, T P; Heazlewood, B R

    2015-12-17

    Coulomb crystals are being increasingly employed as a highly localized source of cold ions for the study of ion-molecule chemical reactions. To extend the scope of reactions that can be studied in Coulomb crystals-from simple reactions involving laser-cooled atomic ions, to more complex systems where molecular reactants give rise to multiple product channels-sensitive product detection methodologies are required. The use of a digital ion trap (DIT) and a new damped cosine trap (DCT) are described, which facilitate the ejection of Coulomb-crystallized ions onto an external detector for the recording of time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectra. This enables the examination of reaction dynamics and kinetics between Coulomb-crystallized ions and neutral molecules: ionic products are typically cotrapped, thus ejecting the crystal onto an external detector reveals the masses, identities, and quantities of all ionic species at a selected point in the reaction. Two reaction systems are examined: the reaction of Ca(+) with deuterated isotopologues of water, and the charge exchange between cotrapped Xe(+) with deuterated isotopologues of ammonia. These reactions are examples of two distinct types of experiment, the first involving direct reaction of the laser-cooled ions, and the second involving reaction of sympathetically-cooled heavy ions to form a mixture of light product ions. Extensive simulations are conducted to interpret experimental results and calculate optimal operating parameters, facilitating a comparison between the DIT and DCT approaches. The simulations also demonstrate a correlation between crystal shape and image shape on the detector, suggesting a possible means for determining crystal geometry for nonfluorescing ions.

  9. The ion dependence of carbohydrate binding of CBM36: an MD and 3D-RISM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Shoichi; Higashi, Masahiro; Yoshida, Norio; Nakano, Haruyuki

    2016-09-01

    The molecular recognition process of the carbohydrate-binding module family 36 (CBM36) was examined theoretically. The mechanism of xylan binding by CBM36 and the role of Ca2+ were investigated by the combined use of molecular dynamics simulations and the 3D reference interaction site model method. The CBM36 showed affinity for xylan after Ca2+ binding, but not after Mg2+ binding. Free-energy component analysis of the xylan-binding process revealed that the major factor for xylan-binding affinity is the electrostatic interaction between the Ca2+ and the hydroxyl oxygens of xylan. The van der Waals interaction between the hydrophobic side chain of CBM36 and the glucopyranose ring of xylan also contributes to the stabilization of the xylan-binding state. Dehydration on the formation of the complex has the opposite effect on these interactions. The affinity of CBM36 for xylan results from a balance of the interactions between the binding ion and solvents, hydrophilic residues around xylan, and the hydroxyl oxygens of xylan. When CBM binds Ca2+, these interactions are well balanced; in contrast, when CBM binds Mg2+, the dehydration penalty is excessively large.

  10. In vivo 3D analysis of systemic effects after local heavy-ion beam irradiation in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Kento; Hashimoto, Chika; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Itoh, Kazusa; Yasuda, Takako; Ohta, Kousaku; Oonishi, Hisako; Igarashi, Kento; Suzuki, Michiyo; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Nishimaki, Toshiyuki; Katsumura, Takafumi; Oota, Hiroki; Ogawa, Motoyuki; Oga, Atsunori; Ikemoto, Kenzo; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is widely used in cancer treatment. In addition to inducing effects in the irradiated area, irradiation may induce effects on tissues close to and distant from the irradiated area. Japanese medaka, Oryzias latipes, is a small teleost fish and a model organism for evaluating the environmental effects of radiation. In this study, we applied low-energy carbon-ion (26.7 MeV/u) irradiation to adult medaka to a depth of approximately 2.2 mm from the body surface using an irradiation system at the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology. We histologically evaluated the systemic alterations induced by irradiation using serial sections of the whole body, and conducted a heart rate analysis. Tissues from the irradiated side showed signs of serious injury that corresponded with the radiation dose. A 3D reconstruction analysis of the kidney sections showed reductions in the kidney volume and blood cell mass along the irradiated area, reflecting the precise localization of the injuries caused by carbon-beam irradiation. Capillary aneurysms were observed in the gill in both ventrally and dorsally irradiated fish, suggesting systemic irradiation effects. The present study provides an in vivo model for further investigation of the effects of irradiation beyond the locally irradiated area. PMID:27345436

  11. UV photodissociation of trapped ions following ion mobility separation in a Q-ToF mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Bellina, Bruno; Brown, Jeffery M; Ujma, Jakub; Murray, Paul; Giles, Kevin; Morris, Michael; Compagnon, Isabelle; Barran, Perdita E

    2014-12-21

    An ion mobility mass spectrometer has been modified to allow optical interrogation of ions with different mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios and/or mobilities (K). An ion gating and trapping procedure has been developed which allows us to store ions for several seconds enabling UV photodissociation (UVPD).

  12. 'Programming' Electron Beam Ion Traps To Produce Atomic Data Relevant To Plasma Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Currell, Fred; O'Rourke, Brian; Kavanagh, Anthony; Li Yueming; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Ohtani, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Hirofumi

    2009-09-10

    After a brief review of the processes taking place in electron beam ions traps (EBITs), the means by which EBITs are used to make measurements of electron impact ionization cross-sections and dielectronic recombination resonance strengths are discussed. In particular, results from a study involving holmium ions extracted from an electron beam ion trap are used to illustrate a technique for studying dielectronic recombination in open-shell target ions.

  13. Trapping of Intact, Singly-Charged, Bovine Serum Albumin Ions Injected from the Atmosphere with a 10-cm Diameter, Frequency-Adjusted Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, Hideya; Whitten, William B; Reilly, Pete

    2008-12-01

    High-resolution real-time particle mass measurements have not been achievable because the enormous amount of kinetic energy imparted to the particles upon expansion into vacuum competes with and overwhelms the forces applied to the charged particles within the mass spectrometer. It is possible to reduce the kinetic energy of a collimated particulate ion beam through collisions with a buffer gas while radially constraining their motion using a quadrupole guide or trap over a limited mass range. Controlling the pressure drop of the final expansion into a quadrupole trap permits a much broader mass range at the cost of sacrificing collimation. To achieve high-resolution mass analysis of massive particulate ions, an efficient trap with a large tolerance for radial divergence of the injected ions was developed that permits trapping a large range of ions for on-demand injection into an awaiting mass analyzer. The design specifications required that frequency of the trapping potential be adjustable to cover a large mass range and the trap radius be increased to increase the tolerance to divergent ion injection. The large-radius linear quadrupole ion trap was demonstrated by trapping singly-charged bovine serum albumin ions for on-demand injection into a mass analyzer. Additionally, this work demonstrates the ability to measure an electrophoretic mobility cross section (or ion mobility) of singly-charged intact proteins in the low-pressure regime. This work represents a large step toward the goal of high-resolution analysis of intact proteins, RNA, DNA, and viruses.

  14. Adiabatic coherent control in the anharmonic ion trap: Numerical analysis of vibrational anharmonicities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lei; Babikov, Dmitri

    2011-02-15

    Anharmonicity of the quantized motional states of ions in a Paul trap can be utilized to address the state-to-state transitions selectively and control the motional modes of trapped ions coherently and adiabatically [Zhao and Babikov, Phys. Rev. A 77, 012338 (2008)]. In this paper we study two sources of the vibrational anharmonicity in the ion traps: the intrinsic Coulomb anharmonicity due to ion-ion interactions and the external anharmonicity of the trapping potential. An accurate numerical approach is used to compute energies and wave functions of vibrational eigenstates. The magnitude of the Coulomb anharmonicity is determined and shown to be insufficient for successful control. In contrast, anharmonicity of the trapping potential allows one to control the motion of ions very efficiently using the time-varying electric fields. Optimal control theory is used to derive the control pulses. One ion in a slightly anharmonic trap can be easily controlled. In the two- and three-ion systems the symmetric stretching mode is dark and cannot be controlled at all. The other two normal modes of the three-ion system can be controlled and used, for example, to encode a two-qubit system into the motional states of ions. A trap architecture that allows the necessary amount of vibrational anharmonicity to be achieved is proposed.

  15. Technologies for trapped-ion quantum information systems - Progress toward scalability with hybrid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltony, Amira M.; Gangloff, Dorian; Shi, Molu; Bylinskii, Alexei; Vuletić, Vladan; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2016-03-01

    Scaling up from prototype systems to dense arrays of ions on chip, or vast networks of ions connected by photonic channels, will require developing entirely new technologies that combine miniaturized ion trapping systems with devices to capture, transmit, and detect light, while refining how ions are confined and controlled. Building a cohesive ion system from such diverse parts involves many challenges, including navigating materials incompatibilities and undesired coupling between elements. Here, we review our recent efforts to create scalable ion systems incorporating unconventional materials such as graphene and indium tin oxide, integrating devices like optical fibers and mirrors, and exploring alternative ion loading and trapping techniques.

  16. Stability Diagrams for Paul Ion Traps Driven by Two-Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Possa, Gabriela C; Roncaratti, Luiz F

    2016-07-14

    In this paper, we present and discuss stability diagrams for Paul traps driven by two ac voltages. In contrast to a typical Paul trap, here we suggest a secondary ac voltage whose frequency is twice the frequency of the primary one. The ratio between their amplitudes can be used to expand the region of stability and to access different states of motion of trapped ions. This provides a further mechanism to trap, cool, and manipulate single ions and also to improve the experimental framework where ion clouds and crystals can be prepared and controlled. Such approach opens the possibility of designing more sophisticated trapping architectures, leading to a wide variety of applications on ion trap research and mass analysis techniques.

  17. Uranyl Ion Complexes with Long-Chain Aliphatic α,ω-Dicarboxylates and 3d-Block Metal Counterions.

    PubMed

    Thuéry, Pierre; Harrowfield, Jack

    2016-03-01

    Twelve new complexes were obtained from reaction of uranyl ions with the aliphatic dicarboxylic acids HOOC-(CH2)n-2-COOH (H2Cn; n = 7-10 and 12) under solvo-hydrothermal conditions, in the presence of 3d-block metal ions (Mn(2+), Fe(3+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Cu(2+)) and 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen). In contrast to previously reported triple-stranded helicates obtained with C9(2-) and C12(2-), all these complexes crystallize as polymeric one-dimensional (1D) or two-dimensional (2D) species. [Fe(bipy)3][(UO2)2(C7)3]·3H2O (1), [Cu(phen)2]2[(UO2)3(C7)4(H2O)2]·2H2O (2), and [Cu(bipy)2]2[(UO2)2(C9)3] (6), in which the 3d cation was reduced in situ, are 1D ladderlike polymers displaying tetra- or hexanuclear rings, of sufficient width to encompass two counterions in 2 and 6. The three complexes [Co(phen)3][(UO2)3(C8)3(O)]·H2O (3), [Ni(phen)3][(UO2)3(C8)3(O)]·H2O (4) and [Co(phen)3][(UO2)3(C9)3(O)]·H2O (5) contain bis(μ3-oxo)-bridged tetranuclear secondary building units, and they crystallize as deeply furrowed 2D assemblies. Depending on the nature of the counterion, C10(2-) gives [Ni(bipy)3][(UO2)2(C10)3]·2H2O (7), a 2D network displaying elongated decanuclear rings containing the counterions, or [Mn(phen)3][(UO2)2(C10)3]·6H2O (8), [Co(phen)3][(UO2)2(C10)3]·7H2O (9), and [Ni(phen)3][(UO2)2(C10)3]·7H2O (10), which consist of 2D assemblies with honeycomb topology; the hexanuclear rings in 8-10 are chairlike and occupied by one counterion and two uranyl groups from neighboring layers. Two complexes of the ligand with the longest chain, C12(2-), are reported. [UO2(C12)(bipy)] (11) is a neutral 1D species in which bipy chelates the uranyl ion and plays an important role in the packing through π-stacking interactions. Two polymeric units, 1D and 2D, coexist in the complex [Ni(bipy)3][(UO2)2(C12)3][UO2(C12)(H2O)2]·H2O (12); the 2D network has the honeycomb topology, but the hexanuclear rings are markedly convoluted, with local features akin to

  18. Mechanism of Relaxation Enhancement of Spin Labels in Membranes by Paramagnetic Ion Salts: Dependence on 3 d and 4 f Ions and on the Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livshits, V. A.; Dzikovski, B. G.; Marsh, D.

    2001-02-01

    Progressive saturation EPR measurements and EPR linewidth determinations have been performed on spin-labeled lipids in fluid phospholipid bilayer membranes to elucidate the mechanisms of relaxation enhancement by different paramagnetic ion salts. Such paramagnetic relaxation agents are widely used for structural EPR studies in biological systems, particularly with membranes. Metal ions of the 3d and 4f series were used as their chloride, sulfate, and perchlorate salts. For a given anion, the efficiency of relaxation enhancement is in the order Mn2+ ≥ Cu2+ > Ni2+ > Co2+ ≈ Dy3+. A pronounced dependence of the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement on the anion is found in the order ClO-4 > Cl- > SO2-4. This is in the order of the octanol partition coefficients multiplied by spin exchange rate constants that were determined for the different paramagnetic salts in methanol. Detailed studies coupled with theoretical estimates reveal that, for the chlorides and perchlorates of Ni2+ (and Co2+), the relaxation enhancements are dominated by Heisenberg spin exchange interactions with paramagnetic ions dissolved in fluid membranes. The dependence on membrane composition of the relaxation enhancement by intramembrane Heisenberg exchange indicates that the diffusion of the ions within the membrane takes place via water-filled defects. For the corresponding Cu2+ salts, additional relaxation enhancements arise from dipolar interactions with ions within the membrane. For the case of Mn2+ salts, static dipolar interactions with paramagnetic ions in the aqueous phase also make a further appreciable contribution to the spin-label relaxation enhancement. On this basis, different paramagnetic agents may be chosen to optimize sensitivity to different structurally correlated interactions. These results therefore will aid further spin-label EPR studies in structural biology.

  19. Excitation of High-Frequency Internal Kink Mode by Deeply-Trapped Energetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen; Wang, Shaojie

    2010-08-01

    Deeply trapped energetic ions can destabilize the internal kink mode with both high and low frequencies with a potato-orbit limit in the EAST-like tokamaks. The threshold beta value of the deeply trapped energetic ions, the real frequency, and the growth rate of the internal kink mode are predicted in this paper.

  20. X-ray spectroscopy of highly-ionized atoms in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R.E.; Bennett, C.; Chen, M.H.; Cowan, T.; Dietrich, D.; Henderson, J.R.; Knapp, D.A.; Levine, M.A.; Schneider, M.B.; Scofield, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    An Electron Beam Ion Trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being used to produce and trap very-highly-charged-ions (q /le/ 70+) for x-ray spectroscopy measurements. Recent measurements of dielectronic recombination, electron impact excitation and transition energies are presented. 15 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Divalent ion trapping inside potassium channels of human T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Using the patch-clamp whole-cell recording technique, we investigated the influence of external Ca2+, Ba2+, K+, Rb+, and internal Ca2+ on the rate of K+ channel inactivation in the human T lymphocyte-derived cell line, Jurkat E6-1. Raising external Ca2+ or Ba2+, or reducing external K+, accelerated the rate of the K+ current decay during a depolarizing voltage pulse. External Ba2+ also produced a use-dependent block of the K+ channels by entering the open channel and becoming trapped inside. Raising internal Ca2+ accelerated inactivation at lower concentrations than external Ca2+, but increasing the Ca2+ buffering with BAPTA did not affect inactivation. Raising [K+]o or adding Rb+ slowed inactivation by competing with divalent ions. External Rb+ also produced a use-dependent removal of block of K+ channels loaded with Ba2+ or Ca2+. From the removal of this block we found that under normal conditions approximately 25% of the channels were loaded with Ca2+, whereas under conditions with 10 microM internal Ca2+ the proportion of channels loaded with Ca2+ increased to approximately 50%. Removing all the divalent cations from the external and internal solution resulted in the induction of a non-selective, voltage-independent conductance. We conclude that Ca2+ ions from the outside or the inside can bind to a site at the K+ channel and thereby block the channel or accelerate inactivation. PMID:2786551

  2. Quantum Simulation with 2D Arrays of Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richerme, Philip

    2016-05-01

    The computational difficulty of solving fully quantum many-body spin problems is a significant obstacle to understanding the behavior of strongly correlated quantum matter. This work proposes the design and construction of a 2D quantum spin simulator to investigate the physics of frustrated materials, highly entangled states, mechanisms potentially underpinning high-temperature superconductivity, and other topics inaccessible to current 1D systems. The effective quantum spins will be encoded within the well-isolated electronic levels of trapped ions, confined in a two-dimensional planar geometry, and made to interact using phonon-mediated optical dipole forces. The system will be scalable to 100+ quantum particles, far beyond the realm of classical intractability, while maintaining individual-ion control, long quantum coherence times, and site-resolved projective spin measurements. Once constructed, the two-dimensional quantum simulator will implement a broad range of spin models on a variety of reconfigurable lattices and characterize their behavior through measurements of spin-spin correlations and entanglement. This versatile tool will serve as an important experimental resource for exploring difficult quantum many-body problems in a regime where classical methods fail.

  3. Ion collision cross section analyses in quadrupole ion traps using the filter diagonalization method: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ting; He, Miyi; Guo, Dan; Zhai, Yanbing; Xu, Wei

    2016-04-28

    Previously, we have demonstrated the feasibility of measuring ion collision cross sections (CCSs) within a quadrupole ion trap by performing time-frequency analyses of simulated ion trajectories. In this study, an improved time-frequency analysis method, the filter diagonalization method (FDM), was applied for data analyses. Using the FDM, high resolution could be achieved in both time- and frequency-domains when calculating ion time-frequency curves. Owing to this high-resolution nature, ion-neutral collision induced ion motion frequency shifts were observed, which further cause the intermodulation of ion trajectories and thus accelerate image current attenuation. Therefore, ion trap operation parameters, such as the ion number, high-order field percentage and buffer gas pressure, were optimized for ion CCS measurements. Under optimized conditions, simulation results show that a resolving power from 30 to more than 200 could be achieved for ion CCS measurements. PMID:27066889

  4. Control of the conformations of ion Coulomb crystals in a Penning trap.

    PubMed

    Mavadia, Sandeep; Goodwin, Joseph F; Stutter, Graham; Bharadia, Shailen; Crick, Daniel R; Segal, Daniel M; Thompson, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    Laser-cooled atomic ions form ordered structures in radiofrequency ion traps and in Penning traps. Here we demonstrate in a Penning trap the creation and manipulation of a wide variety of ion Coulomb crystals formed from small numbers of ions. The configuration can be changed from a linear string, through intermediate geometries, to a planar structure. The transition from a linear string to a zigzag geometry is observed for the first time in a Penning trap. The conformations of the crystals are set by the applied trap potential and the laser parameters, and agree with simulations. These simulations indicate that the rotation frequency of a small crystal is mainly determined by the laser parameters, independent of the number of ions and the axial confinement strength. This system has potential applications for quantum simulation, quantum information processing and tests of fundamental physics models from quantum field theory to cosmology. PMID:24096901

  5. Control of the conformations of ion Coulomb crystals in a Penning trap.

    PubMed

    Mavadia, Sandeep; Goodwin, Joseph F; Stutter, Graham; Bharadia, Shailen; Crick, Daniel R; Segal, Daniel M; Thompson, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    Laser-cooled atomic ions form ordered structures in radiofrequency ion traps and in Penning traps. Here we demonstrate in a Penning trap the creation and manipulation of a wide variety of ion Coulomb crystals formed from small numbers of ions. The configuration can be changed from a linear string, through intermediate geometries, to a planar structure. The transition from a linear string to a zigzag geometry is observed for the first time in a Penning trap. The conformations of the crystals are set by the applied trap potential and the laser parameters, and agree with simulations. These simulations indicate that the rotation frequency of a small crystal is mainly determined by the laser parameters, independent of the number of ions and the axial confinement strength. This system has potential applications for quantum simulation, quantum information processing and tests of fundamental physics models from quantum field theory to cosmology.

  6. Guidelines for Designing Surface Ion Traps Using the Boundary Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seokjun; Lee, Minjae; Cheon, Hongjin; Kim, Taehyun; Cho, Dong-il “Dan”

    2016-01-01

    Ion traps can provide both physical implementation of quantum information processing and direct observation of quantum systems. Recently, surface ion traps have been developed using microfabrication technologies and are considered to be a promising platform for scalable quantum devices. This paper presents detailed guidelines for designing the electrodes of surface ion traps. First, we define and explain the key specifications including trap depth, q-parameter, secular frequency, and ion height. Then, we present a numerical-simulation-based design procedure, which involves determining the basic assumptions, determining the shape and size of the chip, designing the dimensions of the radio frequency (RF) electrode, and analyzing the direct current (DC) control voltages. As an example of this design procedure, we present a case study with tutorial-like explanations. The proposed design procedure can provide a practical guideline for designing the electrodes of surface ion traps. PMID:27136559

  7. Control of the conformations of ion Coulomb crystals in a Penning trap

    PubMed Central

    Mavadia, Sandeep; Goodwin, Joseph F.; Stutter, Graham; Bharadia, Shailen; Crick, Daniel R.; Segal, Daniel M.; Thompson, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-cooled atomic ions form ordered structures in radiofrequency ion traps and in Penning traps. Here we demonstrate in a Penning trap the creation and manipulation of a wide variety of ion Coulomb crystals formed from small numbers of ions. The configuration can be changed from a linear string, through intermediate geometries, to a planar structure. The transition from a linear string to a zigzag geometry is observed for the first time in a Penning trap. The conformations of the crystals are set by the applied trap potential and the laser parameters, and agree with simulations. These simulations indicate that the rotation frequency of a small crystal is mainly determined by the laser parameters, independent of the number of ions and the axial confinement strength. This system has potential applications for quantum simulation, quantum information processing and tests of fundamental physics models from quantum field theory to cosmology. PMID:24096901

  8. Resonance excitation of ions stored in a quadrupole ion trap. Part IV. Theory of quadrupolar excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfred, Roland L.; Londry, Frank A.; March, Raymond E.

    1993-06-01

    A new theoretical treatment is presented for quadrupolar resonance excitation of ions stored in a quadrupole ion trap. When the ratio of the tickle voltage amplitude to that of the drive potential is small, the equation of ion motion can be expressed in the form of a perturbation series. Exact and approximate solutions to the first-order perturbation eqations are presented. Ion trajectories calculated from these solutions are compared with those calculated by numerical integration. The resonance conditions were found to correspond to a series of angular frequencies given by [omega]u,n = n + [beta]u - [infinity] < n < [infinity]. Some of these, [beta]z[Omega], (1 + [beta]z)[Omega](1 - [beta]z)[Omega] [beta],[Omega], had been observed previously in simulation studies.

  9. A monolithic array of three-dimensional ion traps fabricated with conventional semiconductor technology.

    PubMed

    Wilpers, Guido; See, Patrick; Gill, Patrick; Sinclair, Alastair G

    2012-09-01

    The coherent control of quantum-entangled states of trapped ions has led to significant advances in quantum information, quantum simulation, quantum metrology and laboratory tests of quantum mechanics and relativity. All of the basic requirements for processing quantum information with arrays of ion-based quantum bits (qubits) have been proven in principle. However, so far, no more than 14 ion-based qubits have been entangled with the ion-trap approach, so there is a clear need for arrays of ion traps that can handle a much larger number of qubits. Traps consisting of a two-dimensional electrode array have undergone significant development, but three-dimensional trap geometries can create a superior confining potential. However, existing three-dimensional approaches, as used in the most advanced experiments with trap arrays, cannot be scaled up to handle greatly increased numbers of ions. Here, we report a monolithic three-dimensional ion microtrap array etched from a silica-on-silicon wafer using conventional semiconductor fabrication technology. We have confined individual (88)Sr(+) ions and strings of up to 14 ions in a single segment of the array. We have measured motional frequencies, ion heating rates and storage times. Our results demonstrate that it should be possible to handle several tens of ion-based qubits with this approach. PMID:22820742

  10. Resonant oscillation modes of sympathetically cooled ions in a radio-frequency trap

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Taro; Shimizu, Tadao

    2002-12-01

    Sympathetic cooling of Ca{sup +}, Zn{sup +}, Sr{sup +}, Ba{sup +}, and Yb{sup +} as guest ions with laser-cooled {sup 24}Mg{sup +} as host ions in a rf ion trap is carried out, and resonant frequencies of their motion in the trap potential are measured. Various oscillation modes of the sympathetically cooled ions are observed. The resonant frequency of the oscillation mode is different from the frequency of either the collective oscillation frequency of the trapped ions or the oscillation frequency of each ion without host ions. This difference is well explained by a theoretical model in which coupled equations of motion of the host ion cloud with a single guest ion are considered.

  11. Facile synthesis of a 3D-porous LiNbO3 nanocomposite as a novel electrode material for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qi; Lei, Lixu; Sun, Yueming

    2014-07-01

    A facile and efficient synthesis was developed to fabricate a 3D-porous LiNbO3 nanocomposite by microwave-induced auto-combustion. Such a material shows a high reversible capacity, excellent rate performance and stable cycle performance indicating its great potential as a promising anode material for Li-ion batteries.

  12. Nitrogen-doped 3D macroporous graphene frameworks as anode for high performance lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaowu; Wu, Ying; Yang, Zhenzhong; Pan, Fusen; Zhong, Xiongwu; Wang, Jiaqing; Gu, Lin; Yu, Yan

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogen-doped 3D graphene frameworks (N-3D GFs) were synthesized by a facile two-step method: Polystyrene (PS) encapsulated in graphene oxide (GO) composites (denoted as PS@GO) are first synthesized, followed by a post-thermal annealing in ammonia step to get N-doped 3D GFs. The resulting N-3D GFs inherit the advantages of graphene, which possesses high electrical conductivity and high specific surface area. Furthermore, the well-defined 3D interconnected structure can facilitate the access of the electrolyte to the electrode surface, thus shortening the diffusion length of both Li+/e-, keeping the overall electrode highly conductive and active in lithium storage. Simultaneously, the in-situ formation of pyridinic N and pyrrolic N in 3D GFs provide high electronic conductivity and structure stability for lithium storage. The designed N-3D GFs electrode delivers a high specific capacity of 1094 mAhg-1 after 100 cycles at 200 mAg-1 and superior rate capability (691 mAhg-1 after 500 cycles at 1000 mAg-1) when used as anode for LIBs. We believe that such an inherently inexpensive, scalable, facile method can significantly increase the feasibility of building high performance energy storage system.

  13. Infrared ion spectroscopy in a modified quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer at the FELIX free electron laser laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Jonathan; Berden, Giel; Gebhardt, Christoph R.; Oomens, Jos

    2016-10-01

    We report on modifications made to a Paul-type quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer and discuss its application in infrared ion spectroscopy experiments. Main modifications involve optical access to the trapped ions and hardware and software coupling to a variety of infrared laser sources at the FELIX infrared free electron laser laboratory. In comparison to previously described infrared ion spectroscopy experiments at the FELIX laboratory, we find significant improvements in efficiency and sensitivity. Effects of the trapping conditions of the ions on the IR multiple photon dissociation spectra are explored. Enhanced photo-dissociation is found at lower pressures in the ion trap. Spectra obtained under reduced pressure conditions are found to more closely mimic those obtained in the high-vacuum conditions of an Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. A gas-mixing system is described enabling the controlled addition of a secondary gas into helium buffer gas flowing into the trap and allows for ion/molecule reactions in the trap. The electron transfer dissociation (ETD) option of the mass spectrometer allows for IR structure characterization of ETD-generated peptide dissociation products.

  14. Penning traps with unitary architecture for storage of highly charged ions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Joseph N; Brewer, Samuel M; Guise, Nicholas D

    2012-02-01

    Penning traps are made extremely compact by embedding rare-earth permanent magnets in the electrode structure. Axially-oriented NdFeB magnets are used in unitary architectures that couple the electric and magnetic components into an integrated structure. We have constructed a two-magnet Penning trap with radial access to enable the use of laser or atomic beams, as well as the collection of light. An experimental apparatus equipped with ion optics is installed at the NIST electron beam ion trap (EBIT) facility, constrained to fit within 1 meter at the end of a horizontal beamline for transporting highly charged ions. Highly charged ions of neon and argon, extracted with initial energies up to 4000 eV per unit charge, are captured and stored to study the confinement properties of a one-magnet trap and a two-magnet trap. Design considerations and some test results are discussed.

  15. Ion irradiation of graphene on Ir(111): From trapping to blistering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, Charlotte; Åhlgren, E. Harriet; Valerius, Philipp; Schröder, Ulrike A.; Martínez-Galera, Antonio J.; Arman, Mohammad A.; Kotakoski, Jani; Knudsen, Jan; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Michely, Thomas

    Graphene grown epitaxially on Ir(111) is irradiated with low energy noble gas ions and the processes induced by atomic collision and subsequent annealing are analyzed using scanning tunneling microscopy, low energy electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron diffraction and thermal desorption spectroscopy. Upon room temperature ion irradiation graphene amorphizes and recovers its crystalline structure during annealing. The energetic noble gas projectiles are trapped with surprisingly high efficiency under the graphene cover up to extremely high temperatures beyond 1300K. The energy, angle, and ion species dependence of trapping are quantified. At elevated temperatures the trapped gas forms well developed and highly pressurized blisters under the graphene cover. We use molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio calculations to elucidate the trapping mechanism and its thermal robustness. Similar trapping and blistering are observed after ion irradiation of a single layer of hexagonal boron nitride on Ir(111) and we speculate on the generality of the observed phenomena.

  16. Ascorbic acid decomposition into oxalate ions: a simple synthetic route towards oxalato-bridged heterometallic 3d-4f clusters.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Alina S; Shova, Sergiu; Ion, Adrian E; Maxim, Catalin; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel; Andruh, Marius

    2015-04-28

    Two types of oxalato-bridged heterometallic 3d-4f dodeca- and hexanuclear compounds have been obtained by connecting six bi- and, respectively, trinuclear moieties through oxalato bridges arising from the slow decomposition of the L-ascorbic acid.

  17. Visualizing the 3D Architecture of Multiple Erythrocytes Infected with Plasmodium at Nanoscale by Focused Ion Beam-Scanning Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Soares Medeiros, Lia Carolina; De Souza, Wanderley; Jiao, Chengge; Barrabin, Hector; Miranda, Kildare

    2012-01-01

    Different methods for three-dimensional visualization of biological structures have been developed and extensively applied by different research groups. In the field of electron microscopy, a new technique that has emerged is the use of a focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy for 3D reconstruction at nanoscale resolution. The higher extent of volume that can be reconstructed with this instrument represent one of the main benefits of this technique, which can provide statistically relevant 3D morphometrical data. As the life cycle of Plasmodium species is a process that involves several structurally complex developmental stages that are responsible for a series of modifications in the erythrocyte surface and cytoplasm, a high number of features within the parasites and the host cells has to be sampled for the correct interpretation of their 3D organization. Here, we used FIB-SEM to visualize the 3D architecture of multiple erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium chabaudi and analyzed their morphometrical parameters in a 3D space. We analyzed and quantified alterations on the host cells, such as the variety of shapes and sizes of their membrane profiles and parasite internal structures such as a polymorphic organization of hemoglobin-filled tubules. The results show the complex 3D organization of Plasmodium and infected erythrocyte, and demonstrate the contribution of FIB-SEM for the obtainment of statistical data for an accurate interpretation of complex biological structures. PMID:22432024

  18. A hand-portable digital linear ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bing; Sun, Lulu; Huang, Zhengxu; Gao, Wei; Fan, Rongrong; Cheng, Ping; Ding, Li; Ma, Li; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    A hand-portable digital linear ion trap mass spectrometer (DLIT-MS) has been developed for VOC analysis. It has a weight of 18 kg with dimensions of 49 cm × 39 cm × 16 cm, and consumes an average power of ca. 60 W. As a result of the introduction of a digital waveform, the DLIT-MS can be driven at a lower voltage (±100 V) to cover a mass range of 30-300 Th with a unit resolution. Compact electronics has been designed to control the DLIT-MS and record mass spectra. The mass drift was reduced after the improvement in electronics to stabilize the digital waveform voltage during the mass scan. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS) has been achieved by using digital asymmetric waveform isolation (DAWI), forward and reverse scan, and collision induced dissociation (CID). The isolation and CID efficiency for methyl salicylate were 83.9% and 81.3%, respectively. A novel buffer gas inlet system was designed to enhance the sensitivity and allow easy and safe use of the instrument. Limits of detection below 1 ppbv were obtained for several mixed gaseous samples. PMID:27396834

  19. A hand-portable digital linear ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bing; Sun, Lulu; Huang, Zhengxu; Gao, Wei; Fan, Rongrong; Cheng, Ping; Ding, Li; Ma, Li; Zhou, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    A hand-portable digital linear ion trap mass spectrometer (DLIT-MS) has been developed for VOC analysis. It has a weight of 18 kg with dimensions of 49 cm × 39 cm × 16 cm, and consumes an average power of ca. 60 W. As a result of the introduction of a digital waveform, the DLIT-MS can be driven at a lower voltage (±100 V) to cover a mass range of 30-300 Th with a unit resolution. Compact electronics has been designed to control the DLIT-MS and record mass spectra. The mass drift was reduced after the improvement in electronics to stabilize the digital waveform voltage during the mass scan. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS) has been achieved by using digital asymmetric waveform isolation (DAWI), forward and reverse scan, and collision induced dissociation (CID). The isolation and CID efficiency for methyl salicylate were 83.9% and 81.3%, respectively. A novel buffer gas inlet system was designed to enhance the sensitivity and allow easy and safe use of the instrument. Limits of detection below 1 ppbv were obtained for several mixed gaseous samples.

  20. Experimental simulation and limitations of quantum walks with trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matjeschk, R.; Schneider, Ch; Enderlein, M.; Huber, T.; Schmitz, H.; Glueckert, J.; Schaetz, T.

    2012-03-01

    We examine the prospects of discrete quantum walks (QWs) with trapped ions. In particular, we analyze in detail the limitations of the protocol of Travaglione and Milburn (2002 Phys. Rev. A 65 032310) that has been implemented by several experimental groups in recent years. Based on the first realization in our group (Schmitz et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 090504), we investigate the consequences of leaving the scope of the approximations originally made, such as the Lamb-Dicke approximation. We explain the consequential deviations from the idealized QW for different experimental realizations and an increasing number of steps by taking into account higher-order terms of the quantum evolution. It turns out that these already become significant after a few steps, which is confirmed by experimental results and is currently limiting the scalability of this approach. Finally, we propose a new scheme using short laser pulses, derived from a protocol from the field of quantum computation. We show that this scheme is not subject to the above-mentioned restrictions and analytically and numerically evaluate its limitations, based on a realistic implementation with our specific setup. Implementing the protocol with state-of-the-art techniques should allow for substantially increasing the number of steps to 100 and beyond and should be extendable to higher-dimensional QWs.

  1. Ion Trap with Narrow Aperture Detection Electrodes for Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O.; Kozhinov, Anton N.; Tsybin, Oleg Y.; Tsybin, Yury O.

    2015-05-01

    The current paradigm in ion trap (cell) design for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) is the ion detection with wide aperture detection electrodes. Specifically, excitation and detection electrodes are typically 90° wide and positioned radially at a similar distance from the ICR cell axis. Here, we demonstrate that ion detection with narrow aperture detection electrodes (NADEL) positioned radially inward of the cell's axis is feasible and advantageous for FT-ICR MS. We describe design details and performance characteristics of a 10 T FT-ICR MS equipped with a NADEL ICR cell having a pair of narrow aperture (flat) detection electrodes and a pair of standard 90° excitation electrodes. Despite a smaller surface area of the detection electrodes, the sensitivity of the NADEL ICR cell is not reduced attributable to improved excite field distribution, reduced capacitance of the detection electrodes, and their closer positioning to the orbits of excited ions. The performance characteristics of the NADEL ICR cell are comparable with the state-of-the-art FT-ICR MS implementations for small molecule, peptide, protein, and petroleomics analyses. In addition, the NADEL ICR cell's design improves the flexibility of ICR cells and facilitates implementation of advanced capabilities (e.g., quadrupolar ion detection for improved mainstream applications). It also creates an intriguing opportunity for addressing the major bottleneck in FTMS—increasing its throughput via simultaneous acquisition of multiple transients or via generation of periodic non-sinusoidal transient signals.

  2. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Zeolite Materials: Observation of Abundant Aluminosilicate Oligomers Using an Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, Gary Steven; Kessinger, Glen Frank; Scott, Jill Rennee; Gianotto, Anita Kay; Appelhans, Anthony David; Delmore, James Edward

    2000-12-01

    Oligomeric oxyanions were observed in the secondary ion mass spectra (SIMS) of zeolite materials. The oxyanions have the general composition AlmSinO2(m+n)H(m-1)- (m + n = 2 to 8) and are termed dehydrates. For a given mass, multiple elemental compositions are possible because (Al + H) is an isovalent and isobaric substitute for Si. Using 18 keV Ga+ as a projectile, oligomer abundances are low relative to the monomers. Oligomer abundance can be increased by using the polyatomic projectile ReO4- (~5 keV). Oligomer abundance can be further increased using an ion trap (IT-) SIMS; in this instrument, long ion lifetimes (tens of ms) and relatively high He pressure result in significant collisional stabilization and increased high-mass abundance. The dehydrates rapidly react with adventitious H2O present in the IT-SIMS to form mono-, di-, and trihydrates. The rapidity of the reaction and comparison to aluminum oxyanion hydration suggest that H2O adds to the aluminosilicate oxyanions in a dissociative fashion, forming covalently bound product ions. In addition to these findings, it was noted that production of abundant oligomeric aluminosilicates could be significantly increased by substituting the countercation (NH4+) with the larger alkali ions Rb+ and Cs+. This constitutes a useful tactic for generating large aluminosilicate oligomers for surface characterization and ion-molecule reactivity studies.

  3. Experimental system design for the integration of trapped-ion and superconducting qubit systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Motte, D.; Grounds, A. R.; Rehák, M.; Rodriguez Blanco, A.; Lekitsch, B.; Giri, G. S.; Neilinger, P.; Oelsner, G.; Il'ichev, E.; Grajcar, M.; Hensinger, W. K.

    2016-07-01

    We present a design for the experimental integration of ion trapping and superconducting qubit systems as a step towards the realization of a quantum hybrid system. The scheme addresses two key difficulties in realizing such a system: a combined microfabricated ion trap and superconducting qubit architecture, and the experimental infrastructure to facilitate both technologies. Developing upon work by Kielpinski et al. (Phys Rev Lett 108(13):130504, 2012. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.130504), we describe the design, simulation and fabrication process for a microfabricated ion trap capable of coupling an ion to a superconducting microwave LC circuit with a coupling strength in the tens of kHz. We also describe existing difficulties in combining the experimental infrastructure of an ion trapping set-up into a dilution refrigerator with superconducting qubits and present solutions that can be immediately implemented using current technology.

  4. Trapped-ion quantum logic gates based on oscillating magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Ospelkaus, C; Langer, C E; Amini, J M; Brown, K R; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2008-08-29

    Oscillating magnetic fields and field gradients can be used to implement single-qubit rotations and entangling multiqubit quantum gates for trapped-ion quantum information processing (QIP). With fields generated by currents in microfabricated surface-electrode traps, it should be possible to achieve gate speeds that are comparable to those of optically induced gates for realistic distances between the ion crystal and the electrode surface. Magnetic-field-mediated gates have the potential to significantly reduce the overhead in laser-beam control and motional-state initialization compared to current QIP experiments with trapped ions and will eliminate spontaneous scattering, a fundamental source of decoherence in laser-mediated gates.

  5. Radial transport of energetic ions in the presence of trapped electron mode turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, J.; Wang, W.; Ethier, S.; Manickam, J.; Ganesh, R.

    2011-11-15

    The nature of transport of hot ions is studied in the presence of microturbulence generated by the trapped electron mode in a Tokamak using massively parallel, first principle based global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation, and with the help of a passive tracer method. Passing and trapped hot ions are observed to exhibit inverse and inverse square scaling with energy, while those with isotropic pitch distribution are found to exhibit inverse dependence on energy. For all types of hot ions, namely, isotropic, passing, and trapped, the radial transport appears to be subdiffusive for the parameters considered.

  6. Controlled collisions of a single atom and an ion guided by movable trapping potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Idziaszek, Zbigniew; Calarco, Tommaso; Zoller, Peter

    2007-09-15

    We consider a system composed of a trapped atom and a trapped ion. The ion charge induces in the atom an electric dipole moment, which attracts it with an r{sup -4} dependence at large distances. In the regime considered here, the characteristic range of the atom-ion interaction is comparable or larger than the characteristic size of the trapping potential, which excludes the application of the contact pseudopotential. The short-range part of the interaction is described in the framework of quantum-defect theory, by introducing some short-range parameters, which can be related to the s-wave scattering length. When the separation between traps is changed we observe trap-induced shape resonances between molecular bound states and vibrational states of the external trapping potential. Our analysis is extended to quasi-one-dimensional geometries, when the scattering exhibit confinement-induced resonances, similar to the ones studied before for short-range interactions. For quasi-one-dimensional systems we investigate the effects of coupling between the center of mass and relative motion, which occurs for different trapping frequencies of atom and ion traps. Finally, we show how the two types of resonances can be employed for quantum state control and spectroscopy of atom-ion molecules.

  7. Assembling a ring-shaped crystal in a microfabricated surface ion trap

    DOE PAGES

    Stick, Daniel Lynn; Tabakov, Boyan; Benito, Francisco; Blain, Matthew; Clark, Craig R.; Clark, Susan; Haltli, Raymond A.; Maunz, Peter; Sterk, Jonathan D.; Tigges, Chris

    2015-09-01

    We report on experiments with a microfabricated surface trap designed for confining a chain of ions in a ring. Uniform ion separation over most of the ring is achieved with a rotationally symmetric design and by measuring and suppressing undesired electric fields. After reducing stray fields, the ions are confined primarily by a radio-frequency pseudopotential and their mutual Coulomb repulsion. As a result, approximately 400 40Ca+ ions with an average separation of 9 μm comprise the ion crystal.

  8. Lifetime measurements in an electrostatic ion beam trap using image charge monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Rahinov, Igor; Toker, Yoni; Heber, Oded; Rappaport, Michael; Zajfman, Daniel; Strasser, Daniel; Schwalm, Dirk

    2012-03-15

    A technique for mass-selective lifetime measurements of keV ions in a linear electrostatic ion beam trap is presented. The technique is based on bunching the ions using a weak RF potential and non-destructive ion detection by a pick-up electrode. This method has no mass-limitation, possesses the advantage of inherent mass-selectivity, and offers a possibility of measuring simultaneously the lifetimes of different ion species with no need for prior mass-selection.

  9. Multivariate analysis of X-ray, ion and electron spectral images: from surface to 3D materials characterization.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Keenan, Michael Robert

    2005-02-01

    Spectral imaging where a complete spectrum is collected from each of a series of spatial locations (1D lines, 2D images or 3D volumes) is now available on a wide range of analytical tools - from electron and x-ray to ion beam instruments. With this capability to collect extremely large spectral images comes the need for automated data analysis tools that can rapidly and without bias reduce a large number of raw spectra to a compact, chemically relevant, and easily interpreted representation. It is clear that manual interrogation of individual spectra is impractical even for very small spectral images (< 5000 spectra). More typical spectral images can contain tens of thousands to millions of spectra, which given the constraint of acquisition time may contain between 5 and 300 counts per 1000-channel spectrum. Conventional manual approaches to spectral image analysis such as summing spectra from regions or constructing x-ray maps are prone to bias and possibly error. One way to comprehensively analyze spectral image data, which has been automated, is to utilize an unsupervised self-modeling multivariate statistical analysis method such as multivariate curve resolution (MCR). This approach has proven capable of solving a wide range of analytical problems based upon the counting of x-rays (SEM/STEM-EDX, XRF, PIXE), electrons (EELS, XPS) and ions (TOF-SIMS). As an example of the MCR approach, a STEM x-ray spectral image from a ZrB2-SiC composite was acquired and analyzed. The data were generated in a FEI Tecnai F30-ST TEM/STEM operated at 300kV, equipped with an EDAX SUTW x-ray detector. The spectral image was acquired with the TIA software on the STEM at 128 by 128 pixels (12nm/pixel) for 100msec dwell per pixel (total acquisition time was 30 minutes) with a probe of approximately the same size as each pixel. Each spectrum in the image had, on average, 500 counts. The calculation took 5 seconds on a PC workstation with dual 2.4GHz PentiumIV Xeon processors and 2Gbytes

  10. The JPL Hg(sup +) Extended Linear Ion Trap Frequency Standard: Status, Stability, and Accuracy Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjoelker, R. L.; Prestage, J. D.; Maleki, L.

    1996-01-01

    Microwave frequency standards based on room temperature (sup 199)Hg(sup +) ions in a Linear Ion Trap (LITS) presently achieve a Signal to Noise and line Q inferred short frequency stability. Long term stability has been measured for averaging intervals up to 5 months with apparent sensitivity to variations in ion number/temperature limiting the flicker floor.

  11. Production of Ar{sup q+} ions with a tandem linear Paul trap

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, H. Nagayasu, K.; Iwai, T.; Ito, K.; Okamoto, H.

    2015-06-29

    A tandem linear Paul trap was used to create highly charged Argon ions by electron impact ionizations. By improving the operation scheme, the production of Ar{sup 4+} ions was confirmed. Possible improvements for the future experiments with laser cooled Ca{sup +} ions are suggested.

  12. Ion Funnel Trap Interface for Orthogonal Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Prior, David C.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-10-15

    A combined electrodynamic ion funnel and ion trap coupled to an orthogonal acceleration (oa)-time-of-flight mass spectrometer was developed and characterized. The ion trap was incorporated through the use of added terminal electrodynamic ion funnel electrodes enabling control over the axial dc gradient in the trap section. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of ~1 Torr, and measurements indicate a maximum charge capacity of ~3 × 107 charges. An order of magnitude increase in sensitivity was observed in the analysis of low concentration peptides mixtures with orthogonal acceleration (oa)-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (oa-TOF MS) in the trapping mode as compared to the continuous regime. A signal increase in the trapping mode was accompanied by reduction in the chemical background, due to more efficient desolvation of, for example, solvent related clusters. Controlling the ion trap ejection time was found to result in efficient removal of singly charged species and improving signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for the multiply charged analytes.

  13. Temperature variable ion trap studies of C3Hn+ with H2 and HD.

    PubMed

    Savić, I; Gerlich, D

    2005-03-01

    Hydrogenation and deuteration of C3+, C3H+, C3H2+ in collisions with H2 and HD has been studied from room temperature down to 10 K using a 22-pole ion trap. Although exothermic, hydrogenation of C3+ is rather slow at room temperature but becomes faster with decreasing temperature. In addition to the increasing lifetime of the collision complex this behavior may be caused by the floppy structure of C3+ and the freezing of soft bending modes below 50 K. For C3(+) + HD it has been shown that production of C3D+ is slightly favored over C3H+ formation. The controversy over which products are really formed in C3H(+) + H2 collisions and deuterated variants has a long history. Previous and new ion trap results prove that formation of C3H2(+) + H is not endothermic but rather fast, in contradiction to erroneous conclusions from flow tube experiments and ab initio calculations. In addition the reaction shows a complicated isotope dependence, most probably caused by the influence of zero point energies in entrance and exit transition states. For example hydrogen abstraction with HD is faster than with H2 while radiative association is slower. The most surprising result has been obtained for C3H(+) + HD. Here C3HD+ formation is over one hundred times faster than C3H2+. In addition to the details of the potential energy surface it may be that in this case an H-HD exchange reaction takes place via an open-chain propargyl cation intermediate (H2CCCH+). Reactions of C3H2+ and C3H3+ with H2 are very slow but, due to the unique sensitivity of the trapping technique, significant rate coefficients have been determined. The presented results are of fundamental importance for understanding the energetics, structures and reaction dynamics of the deuterated variant of the C3Hn+ collision system. They indicate that the previous quantum chemical calculations are not accurate enough for understanding the low energy behavior of the Cn,Hm+ reaction systems. The laboratory experiments are of

  14. Laser printing and femtosecond laser structuring of electrode materials for the manufacturing of 3D lithium-ion micro-batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyrek, P.; Kim, H.; Zheng, Y.; Seifert, H. J.; Piqué, A.; Pfleging, W.

    2016-04-01

    Recently, three-dimensional (3D) electrode architectures have attracted great interest for the development of lithium-ion micro-batteries applicable for Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), sensors, and hearing aids. Since commercial available micro-batteries are mainly limited in overall cell capacity by their electrode footprint, new processing strategies for increasing both capacity and electrochemical performance have to be developed. In case of such standard microbatteries, two-dimensional (2D) electrode arrangements are applied with thicknesses up to 200 μm. These electrode layers are composed of active material, conductive agent, graphite, and polymeric binder. Nevertheless, with respect to the type of active material, the active material to conductive agent ratio, and the film thickness, such thick-films suffer from low ionic and electronic conductivities, poor electrolyte accessibility, and finally, limited electrochemical performance under challenging conditions. In order to overcome these drawbacks, 3D electrode arrangements are under intense investigation since they allow the reduction of lithium-ion diffusion pathways in between inter-digitated electrodes, even for electrodes with enhanced mass loadings. In this paper, we present how to combine laser-printing and femtosecond laser-structuring for the development of advanced 3D electrodes composed of Li(Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3)O2 (NMC). In a first step, NMC thick-films were laser-printed and calendered to achieve film thicknesses in the range of 50 μm - 80 μm. In a second step, femtosecond laser-structuring was carried out in order to generate 3D architectures directly into thick-films. Finally, electrochemical cycling of laser-processed films was performed in order to evaluate the most promising 3D electrode designs suitable for application in long life-time 3D micro-batteries.

  15. Nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion plasma with trapped electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alinejad, H.; Sobhanian, S.; Mahmoodi, J.

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made for ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma. A more realistic situation in which plasma consists of a negatively charged ion fluid, free positrons, and trapped as well as free electrons is considered. The properties of stationary structures are studied by the reductive perturbation method, which is valid for small but finite amplitude limit, and by pseudopotential approach, which is valid for large amplitude. With an appropriate modified form of the electron number density, two new equations for the ion dynamics have been found. When deviations from isothermality are finite, the modified Korteweg-deVries equation has been found, and for the case that deviations from isothermality are small, calculations lead to a generalized Korteweg-deVries equation. It is shown from both weakly and highly nonlinear analysis that the presence of the positrons may allow solitary waves to exist. It is found that the effect of the positron density changes the maximum value of the amplitude and M (Mach number) for which solitary waves can exist. The present theory is applicable to analyze arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic waves associated with positrons which may occur in space plasma.

  16. Nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion plasma with trapped electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Alinejad, H.; Sobhanian, S.; Mahmoodi, J.

    2006-01-15

    A theoretical investigation has been made for ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma. A more realistic situation in which plasma consists of a negatively charged ion fluid, free positrons, and trapped as well as free electrons is considered. The properties of stationary structures are studied by the reductive perturbation method, which is valid for small but finite amplitude limit, and by pseudopotential approach, which is valid for large amplitude. With an appropriate modified form of the electron number density, two new equations for the ion dynamics have been found. When deviations from isothermality are finite, the modified Korteweg-deVries equation has been found, and for the case that deviations from isothermality are small, calculations lead to a generalized Korteweg-deVries equation. It is shown from both weakly and highly nonlinear analysis that the presence of the positrons may allow solitary waves to exist. It is found that the effect of the positron density changes the maximum value of the amplitude and M (Mach number) for which solitary waves can exist. The present theory is applicable to analyze arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic waves associated with positrons which may occur in space plasma.

  17. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D. S.; Ryne, R. D.

    2005-03-01

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV. For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  18. Development of the 3D Parallel Particle-In-Cell Code IMPACT to Simulate the Ion Beam Transport System of VENUS (Abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D.S.; Ryne, R.D.

    2005-03-15

    The superconducting ECR ion source VENUS serves as the prototype injector ion source for the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) driver linac. The RIA driver linac requires a great variety of high charge state ion beams with up to an order of magnitude higher intensity than currently achievable with conventional ECR ion sources. In order to design the beam line optics of the low energy beam line for the RIA front end for the wide parameter range required for the RIA driver accelerator, reliable simulations of the ion beam extraction from the ECR ion source through the ion mass analyzing system are essential. The RIA low energy beam transport line must be able to transport intense beams (up to 10 mA) of light and heavy ions at 30 keV.For this purpose, LBNL is developing the parallel 3D particle-in-cell code IMPACT to simulate the ion beam transport from the ECR extraction aperture through the analyzing section of the low energy transport system. IMPACT, a parallel, particle-in-cell code, is currently used to model the superconducting RF linac section of RIA and is being modified in order to simulate DC beams from the ECR ion source extraction. By using the high performance of parallel supercomputing we will be able to account consistently for the changing space charge in the extraction region and the analyzing section. A progress report and early results in the modeling of the VENUS source will be presented.

  19. A carbon-cluster laser ion source for TRIGA-TRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorra, C.; Blaum, K.; Eberhardt, K.; Eibach, M.; Ketelaer, J.; Ketter, J.; Knuth, K.; Nagy, Sz

    2009-08-01

    A new laser ablation ion source was developed and tested for the Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP in order to provide carbon-cluster ions for absolute mass calibration. Ions of different cluster sizes up to C+24 were successfully produced, covering the mass range up to the heavy actinide elements. The ions were captured in a Penning trap, and their time-of-flight cyclotron resonances recorded in order to determine their cyclotron frequency. Furthermore, the same ion source was used to produce GdO+ ions from a gadolinium target in sufficient amount for mass spectrometry purposes. The design of the source and its characteristics are presented. This paper comprises partly the PhD theses of J Ketelaer and C Smorra.

  20. Cascade emission in electron beam ion trap plasma of W25+ ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonauskas, V.; Pütterich, T.; Kučas, S.; Masys, Š.; Kynienė, A.; Gaigalas, G.; Kisielius, R.; Radžiūtė, L.; Rynkun, P.; Merkelis, G.

    2015-07-01

    Spectra of the W25+ ion are studied using the collisional-radiative model (CRM) with an ensuing cascade emission. It is determined that the cascade emission boosts intensities only of a few lines in the 10-30 nm range. The cascade emission is responsible for the disappearance of structure of lines at about 6 nm in the electron beam ion trap plasma. Emission band at 4.5-5.3 nm is also affected by the cascade emission. The strongest lines in the CRM spectrum correspond to 4d9 4f4 → 4f3 transitions, while 4f2 5 d → 4f3 transitions arise after the cascade emission is taken into account.

  1. Extending the applicability of an open-ring trap to perform experiments with a single laser-cooled ion.

    PubMed

    Cornejo, J M; Colombano, M; Doménech, J; Block, M; Delahaye, P; Rodríguez, D

    2015-10-01

    A special ion trap was initially built up to perform β-ν correlation experiments with radioactive ions. The trap geometry is also well suited to perform experiments with laser-cooled ions, serving for the development of a new type of Penning trap, in the framework of the project TRAPSENSOR at the University of Granada. The goal of this project is to use a single (40)Ca(+) ion as detector for single-ion mass spectrometry. Within this project and without any modification to the initial electrode configuration, it was possible to perform Doppler cooling on (40)Ca(+) ions, starting from large clouds and reaching single ion sensitivity. This new feature of the trap might be important also for other experiments with ions produced at radioactive ion beam facilities. In this publication, the trap and the laser system will be described, together with their performance with respect to laser cooling applied to large ion clouds down to a single ion.

  2. in situ plasma removal of surface contaminants from ion trap electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Haltli, Raymond A.

    2015-04-01

    This research resulted in a construction and implementation of an in situ plasma discharge to remove surface contaminants from electrodes in an ion trapping experimental system is presented with results.

  3. Miniaturized gas chromatograph-Paul ion trap system: applications to environmental monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortt, B. J.; Darrach, M. R.; Holland, Paul M.; Chutjian, A.

    2004-01-01

    A miniature gas chromatograph (GC) and miniature Paul ion trap (PT) mass spectrometer system has been developed for identifying and quantifying chemical species present in closed environments having a complex mixture of gases.

  4. Measurement of ion motional heating rates over a range of trap frequencies and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M.; Chiaverini, J.

    2015-04-01

    We present measurements of the motional heating rate of a trapped ion at different trap frequencies and temperatures between ˜0.6 and 1.5 MHz and ˜4 and 295 K. Additionally, we examine the possible effect of adsorbed surface contaminants with boiling points below ˜105 ∘C by measuring the ion heating rate before and after locally baking our ion trap chip under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. We compare the heating rates presented here to those calculated from available electric-field noise models. We can tightly constrain a subset of these models based on their expected frequency and temperature scaling interdependence. Discrepancies between the measured results and predicted values point to the need for refinement of theoretical noise models in order to more fully understand the mechanisms behind motional trapped-ion heating.

  5. Development and Characterization of a Ytterbium-171 Miniature Ion Trap Frequency Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partner, Heather L.

    This dissertation reports on the development of a low-power, high-stability miniature atomic frequency standard based on 171Yb+ ions. The ions are buffer-gas cooled and held in a linear quadrupole trap that is integrated into a sealed, getter-pumped vacuum package, and interrogated on the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition. We hope to achieve a long-term fractional frequency stability of 10-14 with this miniature clock while consuming only 50 mW of power and occupying a volume of 5 cm 3, as part of a project funded to rapidly develop an advanced miniaturized frequency standard that has exceptional long-term stability. I discuss our progress through several years of development on this project. We began by building a relatively conventional tabletop clock system to act as a "test bed" for future components and for testing new techniques in a controlled environment. We moved on to develop and test several designs of miniature ion-trap vacuum packages, while also developing techniques for various aspects of the clock operation, including ion loading, laser and magnetic field stabilization, and a low power ion trap drive. The ion traps were modeled using boundary element software to assist with the design and parameter optimization of new trap geometries. We expect a novel trap geometry made using a material that is new to ion traps to lead to an exceptionally small ion trap vacuum package in the next phase of the project. To achieve the long-term stability required, we have also considered the sensitivity of the clock frequency to magnetic fields. A study of the motion of the individual ions in a room-temperature cloud in the trap was performed. The purpose of this simulation was to understand the effect of both spatially varying and constant magnetic fields on the clock resonance and therefore the operation of the clock. These effects were studied experimentally and theoretically for several traps. In summary, this dissertation is a contribution to the design, development

  6. High-resolution high-sensitivity elemental imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry: from traditional 2D and 3D imaging to correlative microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, T.; Philipp, P.; Audinot, J.-N.; Dowsett, D.; Eswara, S.

    2015-10-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) constitutes an extremely sensitive technique for imaging surfaces in 2D and 3D. Apart from its excellent sensitivity and high lateral resolution (50 nm on state-of-the-art SIMS instruments), advantages of SIMS include high dynamic range and the ability to differentiate between isotopes. This paper first reviews the underlying principles of SIMS as well as the performance and applications of 2D and 3D SIMS elemental imaging. The prospects for further improving the capabilities of SIMS imaging are discussed. The lateral resolution in SIMS imaging when using the microprobe mode is limited by (i) the ion probe size, which is dependent on the brightness of the primary ion source, the quality of the optics of the primary ion column and the electric fields in the near sample region used to extract secondary ions; (ii) the sensitivity of the analysis as a reasonable secondary ion signal, which must be detected from very tiny voxel sizes and thus from a very limited number of sputtered atoms; and (iii) the physical dimensions of the collision cascade determining the origin of the sputtered ions with respect to the impact site of the incident primary ion probe. One interesting prospect is the use of SIMS-based correlative microscopy. In this approach SIMS is combined with various high-resolution microscopy techniques, so that elemental/chemical information at the highest sensitivity can be obtained with SIMS, while excellent spatial resolution is provided by overlaying the SIMS images with high-resolution images obtained by these microscopy techniques. Examples of this approach are given by presenting in situ combinations of SIMS with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), helium ion microscopy (HIM) and scanning probe microscopy (SPM).

  7. Universal quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces with hot trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Aolita, Leandro; Davidovich, Luiz; Kim, Kihwan; Haeffner, Hartmut

    2007-05-15

    We consider interactions that generate a universal set of quantum gates on logical qubits encoded in a collective-dephasing-free subspace, and discuss their implementations with trapped ions. This allows for the removal of the by-far largest source of decoherence in current trapped-ion experiments, collective dephasing. In addition, an explicit parametrization of all two-body Hamiltonians able to generate such gates without the system's state ever exiting the protected subspace is provided.

  8. Ultraviolet Photodissociation Induced by Light-Emitting Diodes in a Planar Ion Trap.

    PubMed

    Holden, Dustin D; Makarov, Alexander; Schwartz, Jae C; Sanders, James D; Zhuk, Eugene; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2016-09-26

    The first application of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) mass spectrometry is reported. LEDs provide a compact, low cost light source and have been incorporated directly into the trapping cell of an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. MS/MS efficiencies of over 50 % were obtained using an extended irradiation period, and UVPD was optimized by modulating the ion trapping parameters to maximize the overlap between the ion cloud and the irradiation volume.

  9. Instability due to trapped electrons in magnetized multi-ion dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, M. M.; Ferdous, T.; Duha, S. S.

    2015-05-01

    An attempt has been made to find out the effects of trapped electrons in dust-ion-acoustic solitary waves in magnetized multi-ion plasmas, as in most space plasmas, the hot electrons follow the trapped/vortex-like distribution. To do so, we have derived modified Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation using reductive perturbation method and its solution. A small- perturbation technique was employed to find out the instability criterion and growth rate of such a wave.

  10. Ultraviolet Photodissociation Induced by Light-Emitting Diodes in a Planar Ion Trap.

    PubMed

    Holden, Dustin D; Makarov, Alexander; Schwartz, Jae C; Sanders, James D; Zhuk, Eugene; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2016-09-26

    The first application of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) mass spectrometry is reported. LEDs provide a compact, low cost light source and have been incorporated directly into the trapping cell of an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. MS/MS efficiencies of over 50 % were obtained using an extended irradiation period, and UVPD was optimized by modulating the ion trapping parameters to maximize the overlap between the ion cloud and the irradiation volume. PMID:27605434

  11. A new technique for unbiased external ion accumulation in a quadrupole two-dimensional ion trap for electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Belov, M E; Nikolaev, E N; Alving, K; Smith, R D

    2001-01-01

    External ion accumulation in a two-dimensional (2D) multipole trap has been shown to increase the sensitivity, dynamic range and duty cycle of a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. However, it is important that trapped ions be detected without significant bias at longer accumulation times in the external 2D multipole trap. With increasing ion accumulation time pronounced m/z discrimination was observed when trapping ions in an accumulation quadrupole. In this work we show that superimposing lower rf-amplitude dipolar excitation over the main rf-field in the accumulation quadrupole results in disruption of the m/z discrimination and can potentially be used to achieve unbiased external ion accumulation with FTICR.

  12. Description of ion motion in a Paul trap immersed in a cold atomic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krych, Michał; Idziaszek, Zbigniew

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the problem of a single ion in a radio-frequency trap immersed in an ultracold Bose gas in either a condensed or a noncondensed phase. We develop a master-equation formalism describing the sympathetic cooling, and we determine the cooling rates of ions. We show that the cold atomic reservoir modifies the stability diagram of the ion in the Paul trap, creating regions where the ion is either cooled or heated due to the energy quanta exchanged with the time-dependent potential.

  13. Background and Pickup Ion Velocity Distribution Dynamics in Titan's Plasma Environment: 3D Hybrid Simulation and Comparison with CAPS T9 Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Simpson, D. G.

    2011-01-01

    In this report we discuss the ion velocity distribution dynamics from the 3D hybrid simulation. In our model the background, pickup, and ionospheric ions are considered as a particles, whereas the electrons are described as a fluid. Inhomogeneous photoionization, electron-impact ionization and charge exchange are included in our model. We also take into account the collisions between the ions and neutrals. The current simulation shows that mass loading by pickup ions H(+); H2(+), CH4(+) and N2(+) is stronger than in the previous simulations when O+ ions are introduced into the background plasma. In our hybrid simulations we use Chamberlain profiles for the atmospheric components. We also include a simple ionosphere model with average mass M = 28 amu ions that were generated inside the ionosphere. The moon is considered as a weakly conducting body. Special attention will be paid to comparing the simulated pickup ion velocity distribution with CAPS T9 observations. Our simulation shows an asymmetry of the ion density distribution and the magnetic field, including the formation of the Alfve n wing-like structures. The simulation also shows that the ring-like velocity distribution for pickup ions relaxes to a Maxwellian core and a shell-like halo.

  14. Microfabrication of Surface Ion Trap Chip and State Manipulation of Single 171Yb+ Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokjun; Lee, Minjae; Cheon, Hongjin; Ahn, Jun Sik; Kim, Taehyun; Cho, Dong-Il ``Dan''; ASRI/ISRC; Department of Electrical; Computer Engineering, Seoul National University Team; Quantum Tech. Lab., SK Telecom Team

    2015-05-01

    Ion traps are one of the promising physical implementations of quantum information processing. This paper presents new ion trap chips using a copper sacrificial layer. Boundary element method (BEM) simulation results show that the fabricated ion trap chip has a trap depth of 0.063 eV at 81 um above the top electrodes and radial secular frequencies of 1.52 and 1.6 MHz. Up to six 174Yb+ ions and three 171Yb+ ions have been successfully trapped. This paper also demonstrates the state manipulation of single 171Yb+ qubit through Rabi oscillation induced by microwave with frequency of 12.628 GHz. Using the new copper sacrificial method, accurate overhang dimensions that can effectively shield stray electric fields from dielectric layers, which in turn can reduce the micromotion of trapped ions, can be achieved. Acknowledgement: This work was partially supported by ICT R&D program of MSIP/IITP. [10043464, Development of quantum repeater technology for the application to communication systems].

  15. Successive Resonances for Ion Ejection at Arbitrary Frequencies in an Ion Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Dalton T.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2016-09-01

    The use of successive resonances for ion ejection is demonstrated here as a method of scanning quadrupole ion traps with improvement in both resolution and sensitivity compared with single frequency resonance ejection. The conventional single frequency resonance ejection waveform is replaced with a dual-frequency waveform. The two included frequencies are spaced very closely and their relative amplitudes are adjusted so that the first frequency that ions encounter excites them to higher amplitudes where space charge effects are less prominent, thereby giving faster and more efficient ejection when the ions come into resonance with the second frequency. The method is applicable at any arbitrary frequency, unlike double and triple resonance methods. However, like double and triple resonance ejection, ejection using successive resonances requires the rf and AC waveforms to be phase-locked in order to retain mass accuracy and mass precision. The improved performance is seen in mass spectra acquired by rf amplitude scans (resonance ejection) as well as by secular frequency scans.

  16. Beta decay measurements from 6He using an electrostatic ion beam trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviv, O.; Vaintraub, S.; Hirsh, T.; Dhal, A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Melnik, D.; Heber, O.; Schwalm, D.; Zajfman, D.; Blaum, K.; Hass, M.

    2012-02-01

    We plan to establish the ground work of a novel experimental setup that will enable precision measurements of β-ν correlation from 6He using a unique method which incorporates a radioactive ion beam, ion trapping, ion bunching, and a radiation detection system. For the production of the 6He radioisotopes we plan to use neutron-induced reactions and an electron ion beam trap (EBIT) for ionization. The 6He+ radioisotopes will be stored in an electrostatic ion beam trap (EIBT), commonly used in atomic and molecular physics. The entire apparatus will be built at the Weizmann Institute. In the following we present the method, the present status of the setup and future plans.

  17. The laser ion source trap for highest isobaric selectivity in online exotic isotope productiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwellnus, F.; Blaum, K.; Catherall, R.; Crepieux, B.; Fedosseev, V.; Gottwald, T.; Kluge, H.-J.; Marsh, B.; Mattolat, C.; Rothe, S.; Stora, T.; Wendt, K.

    2010-02-01

    The improvement in the performance of a conventional laser ion source in the laser ion source and trap (LIST) project is presented, which envisages installation of a repeller electrode and a linear Paul trap/ion guide structure. This approach promises highest isobaric purity and optimum temporal and spatial control of the radioactive ion beam produced at an online isotope separator facility. The functionality of the LIST was explored at the offline test separators of University of Mainz (UMz) and ISOLDE/CERN, using the UMz solid state laser system. Ionization efficiency and selectivity as well as time structure and transversal emittance of the produced ion beam was determined. Next step after complete characterization is the construction and installation of the radiation-hard final trap structure and its first online application.

  18. The laser ion source trap for highest isobaric selectivity in online exotic isotope production.

    PubMed

    Schwellnus, F; Blaum, K; Catherall, R; Crepieux, B; Fedosseev, V; Gottwald, T; Kluge, H-J; Marsh, B; Mattolat, C; Rothe, S; Stora, T; Wendt, K

    2010-02-01

    The improvement in the performance of a conventional laser ion source in the laser ion source and trap (LIST) project is presented, which envisages installation of a repeller electrode and a linear Paul trap/ion guide structure. This approach promises highest isobaric purity and optimum temporal and spatial control of the radioactive ion beam produced at an online isotope separator facility. The functionality of the LIST was explored at the offline test separators of University of Mainz (UMz) and ISOLDE/CERN, using the UMz solid state laser system. Ionization efficiency and selectivity as well as time structure and transversal emittance of the produced ion beam was determined. Next step after complete characterization is the construction and installation of the radiation-hard final trap structure and its first online application. PMID:20192370

  19. Advances in ion trap mass spectrometry: Photodissociation as a tool for structural elucidation

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, J.L. Jr.; Booth, M.M.; Eyler, J.R.; Yost, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Photo-induced dissociation (PID) is the next most frequently used method (after collisional activation) for activation of Polyatomic ions in tandem mass spectrometry. The range of internal energies present after the photon absorption process are much narrower than those obtained with collisional energy transfer. Therefore, the usefulness of PID for the study of ion structures is greatly enhanced. The long storage times and instrumental configuration of the ion trap mass spectrometer are ideally suited for photodissociation experiments. This presentation will focus on both the fundamental and analytical applications of CO{sub 2} lasers in conjunction with ion trap mass spectrometry. The first portion of this talk will examine the fundamental issues of wavelength dependence, chemical kinetics, photoabsorption cross section, and collisional effects on photodissociation efficiency. The second half of this presentation will look at novel instrumentation for electrospray/ion trap mass spectrometry, with the concurrent development of photodissociation as a tool for structural elucidation of organic compounds and antibiotics.

  20. Effects of trapped electrons on the oblique propagation of ion acoustic solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, M. G.; Roy, N. C.; Talukder, M. R.; Hossain Ali, M.

    2016-08-01

    The characteristics of the nonlinear oblique propagation of ion acoustic solitary waves in unmagnetized plasmas consisting of Boltzmann positrons, trapped electrons and ions are investigated. The modified Kadomtsev-Petviashivili ( m K P ) equation is derived employing the reductive perturbation technique. The parametric effects on phase velocity, Sagdeev potential, amplitude and width of solitons, and electrostatic ion acoustic solitary structures are graphically presented with the relevant physical explanations. This study may be useful for the better understanding of physical phenomena concerned in plasmas in which the effects of trapped electrons control the dynamics of wave.

  1. Excitation of internal kink modes by trapped energetic beam ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; White, R.B.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1983-10-01

    Energetic trapped particles are shown to have a destabilizing effect on the internal kink mode in tokamaks. The plasma pressure threshold for the mode is lowered by the particles. The growth rate is near the ideal magnetohydrodynamic value, but the frequency is comparable to the trapped particle precission frequency. A model for the instability cycle gives stability properties, associated particle losses, and neutron emissivity consistent with the fishbone events observed in PDX.

  2. Multiple mass analysis using an ion trap array (ITA) mass analyzer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao; Chu, Yanqiu; Ling, Xing; Ding, Zhengzhi; Xu, Chongsheng; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2013-09-01

    A novel ion trap array (ITA) mass analyzer with six ion trapping and analyzing channels was investigated. It is capable of analyzing multiple samples simultaneously. The ITA was built with several planar electrodes made of stainless steel and 12 identical parallel zirconia ceramic substrates plated with conductive metal layers. Each two of the opposing ceramic electrode plates formed a boundary of an ion trap channel and six identical ion trapping and analyzing channels were placed in parallel without physical electrode between any two adjacent channels. The electric field distribution inside each channel was studied with simulation. The new design took the advantage of high precision machining attributable to the rigidity of ceramic, and the convenience of surface patterning technique. The ITA system was tested by using a two-channel electrospray ionization source, a multichannel simultaneous quadruple ion guide, and two detectors. The simultaneous analysis of two different samples with two adjacent ITA channels was achieved and independent mass spectra were obtained. For each channel, the mass resolution was tested. Additional ion trap functions such as mass-selected ion isolation and collision-induced dissociation (CID) were also tested. The results show that one ITA is well suited for multiple simultaneous mass analyses. PMID:23797864

  3. Multiple Mass Analysis Using an Ion Trap Array (ITA) Mass Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yu; Chu, Yanqiu; Ling, Xing; Ding, Zhengzhi; Xu, Chongsheng; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2013-09-01

    A novel ion trap array (ITA) mass analyzer with six ion trapping and analyzing channels was investigated. It is capable of analyzing multiple samples simultaneously. The ITA was built with several planar electrodes made of stainless steel and 12 identical parallel zirconia ceramic substrates plated with conductive metal layers. Each two of the opposing ceramic electrode plates formed a boundary of an ion trap channel and six identical ion trapping and analyzing channels were placed in parallel without physical electrode between any two adjacent channels. The electric field distribution inside each channel was studied with simulation. The new design took the advantage of high precision machining attributable to the rigidity of ceramic, and the convenience of surface patterning technique. The ITA system was tested by using a two-channel electrospray ionization source, a multichannel simultaneous quadruple ion guide, and two detectors. The simultaneous analysis of two different samples with two adjacent ITA channels was achieved and independent mass spectra were obtained. For each channel, the mass resolution was tested. Additional ion trap functions such as mass-selected ion isolation and collision-induced dissociation (CID) were also tested. The results show that one ITA is well suited for multiple simultaneous mass analyses.

  4. Computer Modeling of an Ion Trap Mass Analyzer, Part I: Low Pressure Regime.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Dragan; Madzunkov, Stojan M; Darrach, Murray R

    2015-12-01

    We present the multi-particle simulation program suite Computational Ion Trap Analyzer (CITA) designed to calculate the ion trajectories within a Paul quadrupole ion trap developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). CITA uses an analytical expression of the electrodynamic field, employing up to six terms in multipole expansion and a modified velocity-Verlet method to numerically calculate ion trajectories. The computer code is multithreaded and designed to run on shared-memory architectures. CITA yields near real-time simulations with full propagation of 26 particles per second per core. As a consequence, a realistic numbers of trapped ions (100+ million) can be used and their trajectories modeled, yielding a representative prediction of mass spectrometer analysis of trace gas species. When the model is compared with experimental results conducted at low pressures using the conventional quadrupole and dipole excitation modes, there is an excellent agreement with the observed peak shapes. Owing to the program's efficiency, CITA has been used to explore regions of trapping stability that are of interest to experimental research. These results are expected to facilitate a fast and reliable modeling of ion dynamics in miniature quadrupole ion trap and improve the interpretation of observed mass spectra. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26286456

  5. Computer Modeling of an Ion Trap Mass Analyzer, Part I: Low Pressure Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Dragan; Madzunkov, Stojan M.; Darrach, Murray R.

    2015-12-01

    We present the multi-particle simulation program suite Computational Ion Trap Analyzer (CITA) designed to calculate the ion trajectories within a Paul quadrupole ion trap developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). CITA uses an analytical expression of the electrodynamic field, employing up to six terms in multipole expansion and a modified velocity-Verlet method to numerically calculate ion trajectories. The computer code is multithreaded and designed to run on shared-memory architectures. CITA yields near real-time simulations with full propagation of 26 particles per second per core. As a consequence, a realistic numbers of trapped ions (100+ million) can be used and their trajectories modeled, yielding a representative prediction of mass spectrometer analysis of trace gas species. When the model is compared with experimental results conducted at low pressures using the conventional quadrupole and dipole excitation modes, there is an excellent agreement with the observed peak shapes. Owing to the program's efficiency, CITA has been used to explore regions of trapping stability that are of interest to experimental research. These results are expected to facilitate a fast and reliable modeling of ion dynamics in miniature quadrupole ion trap and improve the interpretation of observed mass spectra.

  6. Experimental Characterization of Secular Frequency Scanning in Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Dalton T; Pulliam, Christopher J; Wiley, Joshua S; Duncan, Jason; Cooks, R Graham

    2016-07-01

    Secular frequency scanning is implemented and characterized using both a benchtop linear ion trap and a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer. Separation of tetraalkylammonium ions and those from a mass calibration mixture and from a pesticide mixture is demonstrated with peak widths approaching unit resolution for optimized conditions using the benchtop ion trap. The effects on the spectra of ion trap operating parameters, including waveform amplitude, scan direction, scan rate, and pressure are explored, and peaks at black holes corresponding to nonlinear (higher-order field) resonance points are investigated. Reverse frequency sweeps (increasing mass) on the Mini 12 are shown to result in significantly higher ion ejection efficiency and superior resolution than forward frequency sweeps that decrement mass. This result is accounted for by the asymmetry in ion energy absorption profiles as a function of AC frequency and the shift in ion secular frequency at higher amplitudes in the trap due to higher order fields. We also found that use of higher AC amplitudes in forward frequency sweeps biases ions toward ejection at points of higher order parametric resonance, despite using only dipolar excitation. Higher AC amplitudes also increase peak width and decrease sensitivity in both forward and reverse frequency sweeps. Higher sensitivity and resolution were obtained at higher trap pressures in the secular frequency scan, in contrast to conventional resonance ejection scans, which showed the opposite trend in resolution on the Mini 12. Mass range is shown to be naturally extended in secular frequency scanning when ejecting ions by sweeping the AC waveform through low frequencies, a method which is similar, but arguably superior, to the more usual method of mass range extension using low q resonance ejection. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27032650

  7. Experimental Characterization of Secular Frequency Scanning in Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Dalton T.; Pulliam, Christopher J.; Wiley, Joshua S.; Duncan, Jason; Cooks, R. Graham

    2016-07-01

    Secular frequency scanning is implemented and characterized using both a benchtop linear ion trap and a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer. Separation of tetraalkylammonium ions and those from a mass calibration mixture and from a pesticide mixture is demonstrated with peak widths approaching unit resolution for optimized conditions using the benchtop ion trap. The effects on the spectra of ion trap operating parameters, including waveform amplitude, scan direction, scan rate, and pressure are explored, and peaks at black holes corresponding to nonlinear (higher-order field) resonance points are investigated. Reverse frequency sweeps (increasing mass) on the Mini 12 are shown to result in significantly higher ion ejection efficiency and superior resolution than forward frequency sweeps that decrement mass. This result is accounted for by the asymmetry in ion energy absorption profiles as a function of AC frequency and the shift in ion secular frequency at higher amplitudes in the trap due to higher order fields. We also found that use of higher AC amplitudes in forward frequency sweeps biases ions toward ejection at points of higher order parametric resonance, despite using only dipolar excitation. Higher AC amplitudes also increase peak width and decrease sensitivity in both forward and reverse frequency sweeps. Higher sensitivity and resolution were obtained at higher trap pressures in the secular frequency scan, in contrast to conventional resonance ejection scans, which showed the opposite trend in resolution on the Mini 12. Mass range is shown to be naturally extended in secular frequency scanning when ejecting ions by sweeping the AC waveform through low frequencies, a method which is similar, but arguably superior, to the more usual method of mass range extension using low q resonance ejection.

  8. Advanced Quadrupole Ion Trap Instrumentation for Low Level Vehicle Emissions Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    Quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry has been evaluated for its potential use in vehicle emissions measurements in vehicle test facilities as an analyzer for the top 15 compounds contributing to smog generation. A variety of ionization methods were explored including ion trap in situ chemical ionization, atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization, and nitric oxide chemical ionization in a glow discharge ionization source coupled with anion trap mass spectrometer. Emphasis was placed on the determination of hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons at parts per million to parts per billion levels. Ion trap in situ water chemical ionization and atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization were both shown to be amendable to the analysis of arenes, alcohols, aldehydes and, to some degree, alkenes. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge also generated molecular ions of methy-t-butyl ether (MTBE). Neither of these ionization methods, however, were found to generate diagnostic ions for the alkanes. Nitric oxide chemical ionization, on the other hand, was found to yield diagnostic ions for alkanes, alkenes, arenes, alcohols, aldehydes, and MTBE. The ability to measure a variety of hydrocarbons present at roughly 15 parts per billion at measurement rates of 3 Hz was demonstrated. All of the ions with potential to serve as parent ions in a tandem mass spectrometry experiment were found to yield parent-to-product conversion efficiencies greater than 75%. The flexibility afforded to the ion trap by use of tailored wave-forms applied to the end-caps allows parallel monitoring schemes to be devised that provide many of the advantages of tandem mass spectrometry without major loss in measurement rate. A large loss in measurement rate would ordinarily result from the use of conventional tandem mass spectrometry experiments carried out in series for a large number of targeted components. These results have demonstrated that the ion trap has an excellent combination of

  9. Experimental Characterization of Secular Frequency Scanning in Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Dalton T; Pulliam, Christopher J; Wiley, Joshua S; Duncan, Jason; Cooks, R Graham

    2016-07-01

    Secular frequency scanning is implemented and characterized using both a benchtop linear ion trap and a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer. Separation of tetraalkylammonium ions and those from a mass calibration mixture and from a pesticide mixture is demonstrated with peak widths approaching unit resolution for optimized conditions using the benchtop ion trap. The effects on the spectra of ion trap operating parameters, including waveform amplitude, scan direction, scan rate, and pressure are explored, and peaks at black holes corresponding to nonlinear (higher-order field) resonance points are investigated. Reverse frequency sweeps (increasing mass) on the Mini 12 are shown to result in significantly higher ion ejection efficiency and superior resolution than forward frequency sweeps that decrement mass. This result is accounted for by the asymmetry in ion energy absorption profiles as a function of AC frequency and the shift in ion secular frequency at higher amplitudes in the trap due to higher order fields. We also found that use of higher AC amplitudes in forward frequency sweeps biases ions toward ejection at points of higher order parametric resonance, despite using only dipolar excitation. Higher AC amplitudes also increase peak width and decrease sensitivity in both forward and reverse frequency sweeps. Higher sensitivity and resolution were obtained at higher trap pressures in the secular frequency scan, in contrast to conventional resonance ejection scans, which showed the opposite trend in resolution on the Mini 12. Mass range is shown to be naturally extended in secular frequency scanning when ejecting ions by sweeping the AC waveform through low frequencies, a method which is similar, but arguably superior, to the more usual method of mass range extension using low q resonance ejection. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. High-Fidelity Two-Qubit Gates in a Surface Ion Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobser, Daniel; Blain, Matthew; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Fortier, Kevin; Mizrahi, Jonathan; Nielsen, Erik; Rudinger, Kenneth; Sterk, Jonathan; Stick, Daniel; Maunz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are capable of supporting a variety of exotic trapping geometries and provide a scalable system for trapped ion Quantum Information Processing (QIP). However, the feasibility of using surface traps for QIP has long been a point of contention because the close proximity of the ions to trap electrodes increases heating rates and might lead to laser-induced charging of the trap. As surface traps continue to evolve at a remarkable rate, their performance is rapidly approaching that of macroscopic electrode traps. Using Sandia's High-Optical-Access surface trap, we demonstrate robust single-qubit gates, both laser- and microwave-based. Our gates are accurately characterized by Gate Set Tomography (GST) and we report the first diamond norm measurements near the fault-tolerance threshold. Extending these techniques, we've realized a Mølmer-Sørensen two-qubit gate that is stable for several hours. This stability has allowed us to perform the first GST measurements of a two-qubit gate, yielding a process fidelity of 99.58(6)%. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Sandia National Laboratories.

  11. A novel oxime-derived 3d-4f single-molecule magnet exhibiting two single-ion magnetic relaxations.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui-Ming; Li, Yan; Liu, Zhong-Yi; Yang, En-Cui; Zhao, Xiao-Jun

    2016-08-01

    A new oxime-derived {DyNi} cluster with a paramagnetic butterfly-shaped Dy core and peripheral diamagnetic planar-square Ni(II) ions was solvothermally synthesized. The weak ferromagnetically coupled cluster exhibits field-induced single-molecule magnetic behavior with two thermally activated single-ion relaxations. PMID:27377056

  12. Analysis of thermal radiation in ion traps for optical frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doležal, M.; Balling, P.; Nisbet-Jones, P. B. R.; King, S. A.; Jones, J. M.; Klein, H. A.; Gill, P.; Lindvall, T.; Wallin, A. E.; Merimaa, M.; Tamm, C.; Sanner, C.; Huntemann, N.; Scharnhorst, N.; Leroux, I. D.; Schmidt, P. O.; Burgermeister, T.; Mehlstäubler, T. E.; Peik, E.

    2015-12-01

    In many of the high-precision optical frequency standards with trapped atoms or ions that are under development to date, the ac Stark shift induced by thermal radiation leads to a major contribution to the systematic uncertainty. We present an analysis of the inhomogeneous thermal environment experienced by ions in various types of ion traps. Finite element models which allow the determination of the temperature of the trap structure and the temperature of the radiation were developed for five ion trap designs, including operational traps at PTB and NPL and further optimized designs. Models were refined based on comparison with infrared camera measurement until an agreement of better than 10% of the measured temperature rise at critical test points was reached. The effective temperature rises of the radiation seen by the ion range from 0.8 K to 2.1 K at standard working conditions. The corresponding fractional frequency shift uncertainties resulting from the uncertainty in temperature are in the 10-18 range for optical clocks based on the Sr+ and Yb+ E2 transitions, and even lower for Yb+ E3, In+ and Al+. Issues critical for heating of the trap structure and its predictability were identified and design recommendations developed.

  13. The characterization and optimization of NIO1 ion source extraction aperture using a 3D particle-in-cell code.

    PubMed

    Taccogna, F; Minelli, P; Cavenago, M; Veltri, P; Ippolito, N

    2016-02-01

    The geometry of a single aperture in the extraction grid plays a relevant role for the optimization of negative ion transport and extraction probability in a hybrid negative ion source. For this reason, a three-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision model of the extraction region around the single aperture including part of the source and part of the acceleration (up to the extraction grid (EG) middle) regions has been developed for the new aperture design prepared for negative ion optimization 1 source. Results have shown that the dimension of the flat and chamfered parts and the slope of the latter in front of the source region maximize the product of production rate and extraction probability (allowing the best EG field penetration) of surface-produced negative ions. The negative ion density in the plane yz has been reported. PMID:26932027

  14. Ion Trapping in the SLAC B-factory High Energy Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Villevald, D.; Heifets, S.; /SLAC

    2006-09-07

    The presence of trapped ions in electron storage rings has caused significant degradation in machine performance. The best known way to prevent the ion trapping is to leave a gap in the electron bunch train. The topic of this paper is the dynamics of ions in the field of the bunch train with uneven bunch filling. We consider High Energy Ring (HER) of the PEP-II B-factory. In the first section we summarize mechanisms of the ion production. Then the transverse and longitudinal dynamics are analyzed for a beam with and without gap. After that, the effect of the ions is considered separating all ions in the ring in several groups depending on their transverse and longitudinal stability. The main effects of the ions are the tune shift and the tune spread of the betatron oscillations of the electrons. The tune spread is produced by bunch to bunch variation of the electric field of ions and by nonlinearity of the field. It is shown that the main contribution to the shift and spread of the betatron tune of the beam is caused by two groups of ions: one-turn ions and trapped ions. One-turn ions are the ions generated during the last passage of the bunch train. Trapped ions are the ions with stable transverse and longitudinal motion. In the last section we discuss shortly related problems of parameters of the clearing electrodes, injection scenario, and collective effects. Clearing electrodes should be located at the defocusing in x-plane quadrupole magnets. An electric DC field of value 1.0 kv/cm will be enough to prevent the ion trapping process. During the injection, it is recommended to fill the bucket with the design number of the particles per bunch N{sub B} before going to the next bucket. In addition, it is recommended to have the sequential filling of the ring, i.e. the filling from one bucket to the next sequentially. It was shown that ions will not be trapped at the location of the interaction point. The reason for this is that the current of the positron beam is

  15. A 3D Porous Architecture of Si/graphene Nanocomposite as High-performance Anode Materials for Li-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Xin X.; Zhu Y.; Zhou, X.; Wang, F.; Yao, X.; Xu, X.; Liu, Z.

    2012-04-28

    A 3D porous architecture of Si/graphene nanocomposite has been rationally designed and constructed through a series of controlled chemical processes. In contrast to random mixture of Si nanoparticles and graphene nanosheets, the porous nanoarchitectured composite has superior electrochemical stability because the Si nanoparticles are firmly riveted on the graphene nanosheets through a thin SiO{sub x} layer. The 3D graphene network enhances electrical conductivity, and improves rate performance, demonstrating a superior rate capability over the 2D nanostructure. This 3D porous architecture can deliver a reversible capacity of {approx}900 mA h g{sup -1} with very little fading when the charge rates change from 100 mA g{sup -1} to 1 A g{sup -1}. Furthermore, the 3D nanoarchitechture of Si/graphene can be cycled at extremely high Li{sup +} extraction rates, such as 5 A g{sup -1} and 10 A g{sup -1}, for over than 100 times. Both the highly conductive graphene network and porous architecture are considered to contribute to the remarkable rate capability and cycling stability, thereby pointing to a new synthesis route to improving the electrochemical performances of the Si-based anode materials for advanced Li-ion batteries.

  16. Dielectric and infrared properties of SrTiO3 single crystal doped by 3d (V, Mn, Fe, Ni) and 4f (Nd, Sm, Er) ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletic, S.; Maletic, D.; Petronijevic, I.; Dojcilovic, J.; M. Popovic, D.

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the effects of doping by 3d (V, Mn, Fe, Ni) and 4f (Nd, Sm, Er) ions on dielectric and infrared properties of SrTiO3 (STO) single crystals are investigated. It is well known that doping of the SrTiO3 can change the dielectric properties of the STO from an insulator to an n-type semiconductor, and even to a metallic conductor. Dielectric and infrared (IR) properties of the undoped STO and doped STO single crystals are analyzed using dielectric spectroscopy (80 kHz-5 MHz), transmission (200 cm-1-4000 cm-1), and reflection spectroscopy (50 cm-1-2000 cm-1). It is found that doping by the 3d ions reduces the value of dielectric permittivity, but the trend of temperature dependence of the dielectric permittivity remains almost unchanged. On the other hand, dielectric spectroscopy measurements for samples doped by 4f ions show the anomalous behaviors of the dielectric permittivity at temperatures around the temperature of the structural phase transition. There are two fractures of temperature dependences of inverse dielectric permittivity ɛr-1(T). Transmittance spectroscopy measurements show that there are differences in the shape of the spectrum in the mid-IR region between the undoped STO and the one doped by 4f ions. The differences in the reflectance spectrum between the STO:Nd and STO are analyzed in detail.

  17. Highly charged ion research at the Livermore electron beam ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P

    2004-01-04

    Spectroscopy performed with the three Livermore electron beam ion traps is reviewed, which is continuing and complementing the innumerable contributions to atomic physics provided over the years by heavy-ion accelerators. Numerous spectrometers were developed that cover the spectral bands from the visible to the hard x ray region. These enabled exhaustive line surveys useful for x-ray astrophysics and for systematic studies along iso-electronic sequences, such as the 4s-4p, 3s-3p, and 2s-2p transitions in ions of the Cu-I, Na-I, and Li-I sequences useful for studying QED and correlation effects as well as for precise determinations of atomic-nuclear interactions. They also enabled measurements of radiative transition probabilities of very long-lived (milli- and microseconds) and very short-live (femtosecond) levels. Because line excitation processes can be controlled by choice of the electron beam energy, the observed line intensities are used to infer cross sections for electron-impact excitation, dielectronic recombination, resonance excitation, and innershell ionization. These capabilities have recently been expanded to simulate x-ray emission from comets by charge exchange. Specific contributions to basic atomic physics, nuclear physics, and high-temperature diagnostics are illustrated.

  18. Multisectional linear ion trap and novel loading method for optical spectroscopy of electron and nuclear transitions.

    PubMed

    Sysoev, Alexey A; Troyan, Victor I; Borisyuk, Peter V; Krasavin, Andrey V; Vasiliev, Oleg S; Palchikov, Vitaly G; Avdeev, Ivan A; Chernyshev, Denis M; Poteshin, Sergey S

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing need for the development of atomic and nuclear frequency standards because of the important contribution of methods for precision time and frequency measurements to the development of fundamental science, technology, and the economy. It is also conditioned by their potential use in optical clocks and quantum logic applications. It is especially important to develop a universal method that could allow one to use ions of most elements effectively (including ones that are not easily evaporated) proposed for the above-mentioned applications. A linear quadrupole ion trap for the optical spectroscopy of electron and nuclear transitions has been developed and evaluated experimentally. An ion source construction is based on an ultra-high vacuum evaporator in which a metal sample is subjected to an electron beam of energy up to 1 keV, resulting in the appearance of gaseous atoms and ions of various charge state. The linear ion trap consists of five successive quadrupole sections including an entrance quadrupole section, quadrupole mass filter, quadrupole ion guide, ion-trap section, and exit quadrupole section. The same radiofrequency but a different direct current voltage feeds the quadrupole sections. The instrument allows the mass and energy selected trapping of ions from ion beams of various intensities and their localization in the area of laser irradiation. The preliminary results presented show that the proposed instrument and methods allow one to produce effectively up to triply charged thorium ions as well as to trap ions for future spectroscopic study. The instrument is proposed for future use in optical clocks and quantum logic application development. PMID:25906029

  19. Multisectional linear ion trap and novel loading method for optical spectroscopy of electron and nuclear transitions.

    PubMed

    Sysoev, Alexey A; Troyan, Victor I; Borisyuk, Peter V; Krasavin, Andrey V; Vasiliev, Oleg S; Palchikov, Vitaly G; Avdeev, Ivan A; Chernyshev, Denis M; Poteshin, Sergey S

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing need for the development of atomic and nuclear frequency standards because of the important contribution of methods for precision time and frequency measurements to the development of fundamental science, technology, and the economy. It is also conditioned by their potential use in optical clocks and quantum logic applications. It is especially important to develop a universal method that could allow one to use ions of most elements effectively (including ones that are not easily evaporated) proposed for the above-mentioned applications. A linear quadrupole ion trap for the optical spectroscopy of electron and nuclear transitions has been developed and evaluated experimentally. An ion source construction is based on an ultra-high vacuum evaporator in which a metal sample is subjected to an electron beam of energy up to 1 keV, resulting in the appearance of gaseous atoms and ions of various charge state. The linear ion trap consists of five successive quadrupole sections including an entrance quadrupole section, quadrupole mass filter, quadrupole ion guide, ion-trap section, and exit quadrupole section. The same radiofrequency but a different direct current voltage feeds the quadrupole sections. The instrument allows the mass and energy selected trapping of ions from ion beams of various intensities and their localization in the area of laser irradiation. The preliminary results presented show that the proposed instrument and methods allow one to produce effectively up to triply charged thorium ions as well as to trap ions for future spectroscopic study. The instrument is proposed for future use in optical clocks and quantum logic application development.

  20. Quantum information experiments with 2D arrays of hundreds of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Kevin; Bohnet, Justin; Sawyer, Brian; Britton, Joseph; Wall, Michael; Foss-Feig, Michael; Rey, Ana Maria; Bollinger, John

    2016-05-01

    We summarize recent experimental work with 2D arrays of hundreds of trapped 9 Be+ ions stored in a Penning trap. Penning traps utilize static magnetic and electric fields to confine ions, and enable the trapping and laser cooling of ion crystals larger than typically possible in RF ion traps. We work with single-plane ion crystals where the ions form a triangular lattice through minimization of their Coulomb potential energy. The crystals rotate, and we present numerical studies that determine optimal operating parameters for producing low temperature, stable 2-dimensional crystals with Doppler laser cooling and a rotating wall potential. Our qubit is the electron spin-flip transition in the ground state of 9 Be+ and is sensitive to magnetic field fluctuations. Through mitigation of part-per-billion, vibration-induced magnetic field fluctuations we demonstrate T2 coherence times longer than 50 ms. We engineer long-range Ising interactions with spin-dependent optical dipole forces, and summarize recent measurements that characterize the entanglement generated through single-axis twisting. Supported by: JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PHY-1521080, ARO, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI.

  1. Precision Experiments with Single Particles in Ion Traps for Tests of Fundamental Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quint, Wolfgang

    2007-06-01

    Ion trap technology has made it possible to store, cool and observe single ions or ensembles of few ions under well controlled experimental conditions and at very low temperatures [1]. Single particles in traps allow for clean investigations of basic interactions and also for the determination of fundamental constants. This has been demonstrated by investigations of Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) with respect to the g-factor of the free electron [2] and of the electron bound in hydrogen-like carbon and oxygen [3], which form the most precise determinations of the fine-structure constant and of the mass of the electron, respectively. A precision test of CPT invariance has been performed in a proton-antiproton mass comparison with single particles in a Penning trap [4]. Optical quantum jump spectroscopy with single laser-cooled ions in rf traps has paved the way for optical frequency standards and for the investigation of a possible variation of fundamental constants. With the novel technique of deceleration, trapping and cooling, even high-accuracy experiments with highly charged ions up to uranium U91+ will be possible at the HITRAP facility at GSI Darmstadt [5]. [1] Observation of a Phase Transition of Stored Laser-Cooled Ions, F. Diedrich, E. Peik, J.M. Chen, W. Quint, H. Walther, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 2931 (1987) [2] New Determination of the Fine Structure Constant from the Electron g Value and QED, G. Gabrielse et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 030802 (2006). [3] New Determination of the Electron's Mass, T. Beier et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 011603 (2002). [4] Precision Mass Spectroscopy of the Antiproton and Proton Using Simultaneously Trapped Particles, G. Gabrielse et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3198 (1999). [5] Trapping ions of hydrogen-like uranium: The HITRAP project at GSI, T. Beier et al., NIM B 235, 473 (2005).

  2. An electrodynamic ion funnel interface for greater sensitivity and higher throughput with linear ion trap mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-09-01

    An electrospray ionization interface incorporating an electrodynamic ion funnel has been designed and implemented in conjunction with a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (Thermo Electron, LTQ). We found ion transmission to be greatly improved by replacing the standard capillary-skimmer interface with the capillary-ion funnel interface. An infusion study using a serial dilution of a reserpine solution showed that ion injection times to fill the ion trap were reduced by ~90% which resulted in an ~10-fold increase in reported peak intensities. In liquid chromatography (LC)-MS and LC tandem MS (MS/MS) experiments performed using a proteomic sample from the bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis, the ion funnel interface provided an ~7-fold reduction in ion injection (accumulation) times. In a series of LC-MS/MS experiments we found that more dilute S. oneidensis samples provided more peptide and protein identifications when the ion funnel interface was used in place of the standard interface. This improvement was most pronounced at lower sample concentrations, where extended ion accumulation times are required, resulting in an ~2-fold increase in the number of protein identifications. Implementation of the ion funnel interface with a LTQ Fourier transform (FT) MS requiring much greater ion populations resulted in spectrum acquisition times reduced by ~25 to 50%.

  3. Dynamics of a Cold Trapped Ion in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Stefan; Haerter, Arne; Denschlag, Johannes Hecker

    2010-09-24

    We investigate the interaction of a laser-cooled trapped ion (Ba{sup +} or Rb{sup +}) with an optically confined {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate. The system features interesting dynamics of the ion and the atom cloud as determined by their collisions and their motion in their respective traps. Elastic as well as inelastic processes are observed and their respective cross sections are determined. We demonstrate that a single ion can be used to probe the density profile of an ultracold atom cloud.

  4. High resolution extreme ultraviolet spectrometer for an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Hayato; Yatsurugi, Junji; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.

    2011-08-15

    An extreme ultraviolet spectrometer has been developed for spectroscopic studies of highly charged ions with an electron beam ion trap. It has a slit-less configuration with a spherical varied-line-spacing grating that provides a flat focal plane for grazing incidence light. Alternative use of two different gratings enables us to cover the wavelength range 1-25 nm. Test observations with the Tokyo electron beam ion trap demonstrate the high performance of the present spectrometer such as a resolving power of above 1000.

  5. Bound-Free and Bound-Bound Spectroscopy of Cold Trapped Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wester, Roland

    2016-06-01

    Cryogenic radiofrequency ion traps have become a versatile tool to study the spectroscopy and state-selected collision dynamics of molecular ions. Different types of action spectroscopy have been developed to obtain a precise and sensitive spectroscopic signature. In this talk I will give an introduction to molecular ion spectroscopy in multipole traps. Then I will present recent experimental and theoretical investigations from our group on photodetachment spectroscopy and state-selected collisions of cold OH- anions colliding with helium and hydrogen. Based on these results we performed high resolution terahertz spectroscopy on the two lowest rotational transitions of OD-. Work is in progress to extend the rotational spectroscopy to polyatomic molecular anions.

  6. Dynamics of pickup ion velocity distribution function in Titan's plasma environment (TA encounter): 3D hybrid kinetic modeling and comparison with CAPS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. G.; Lipatov, A. S.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Wave-particle interactions play a very important role in the plasma dynamics near Titan: mass loading, excitation of the low-frequency waves and the formation of the particle velocity distribution function, e.g. ring/shell-like distributions, etc. The kinetic approach is important for estimation of the collision processes e.g. a charge exchange. The particle velocity distribution function also plays a key role for understanding the observed particle fluxes. In this report we discuss the ion velocity distribution function dynamics from 3D hybrid modeling. The modeling is based on recent analysis of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) ion measurements during the TA flyby. In our model the background ions, all pickup ions, and ionospheric ions are considered as particles, whereas the electrons are described as a fluid. Inhomogeneous photoionization, electron-impact ionization and charge exchange are included in our model. The temperatures of the background electrons and pickup electrons were also included into the generalized Ohm's law. We also take into account the collisions between the ions and neutrals. We use Chamberlain profiles for the exosphere's components and include a simple ionosphere model with M=28 ions that were generated inside the ionosphere. The moon is considered as a weakly conducting body. Our modeling shows that interaction between background plasma and pickup ions H+, H2+, CH4+ and N2+ has a more complicated structure than was observed in the T9 flyby and modeling due to the large gyroradius of the background O+ ions [1,2,3,4]. Special attention will be paid to comparing the simulated pickup ion velocity distribution with CAPS TA observations. We also compare our kinetic modeling with other hybrid and MHD modeling of Titan's environment. References [1] Sittler, E.C., et al., Energy Deposition Processes in Titan's Upper Atmosphere and Its Induced Magnetosphere. In: Titan from Cassini-Huygens, Brown, R.H., Lebreton J.P., Waite, J.H., Eds

  7. A 3D computer simulation of negative ion extraction influenced by electron diffusion and weak magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Turek, M.; Sielanko, J.

    2008-03-19

    The numerical model of negative ion beam extraction from the RF ion source by different kinds of large extraction grid systems is considered. The model takes into account the influence of the transversal magnetic field and the electron diffusion. The magnetic filter field increases H{sup -} yields significantly. The random-walk electron diffusion model enables electrons to travel through magnetic field. The H{sup -} currents obtained from simulations with or without the diffusion are compared.

  8. Novel assembly and electrochemical properties of anatase TiO2-graphene aerogel 3D hybrids as lithium-ion battery anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingjie; Zhou, Yizhuo; Zheng, Guangping; Huang, Qiuying; Zheng, Xiucheng; Liu, Pu; Zhang, Jianmin; Guan, Xinxin

    2016-10-01

    TiO2-graphene aerogel (TiO2-GA) 3D hybrids were directly assembled via a one-pot hydrothermal process followed by freeze-drying without using any structure-directing agent. The hybrids with a hierarchical structure exhibited large surface area (SBET = 283.6 m2 g-1) and high pore volume (Vp = 0.278 cm3 g-1), in which the ultradispersed TiO2 nanoparticles were in a single crystal phase of anatase. When used as the anodes for lithium ion battery, the TiO2-GA hybrids exhibited higher reversible capacity, more stable cycling performance and better rate-capability than TiO2 ascribed to the unique 3D nanoporous structure and the synergistic interaction of GA and TiO2.

  9. Reduced graphene oxide/carbon double-coated 3-D porous ZnO aggregates as high-performance Li-ion anode materials.

    PubMed

    Wi, Sungun; Woo, Hyungsub; Lee, Sangheon; Kang, Joonhyeon; Kim, Jaewon; An, Subin; Kim, Chohui; Nam, Seunghoon; Kim, Chunjoong; Park, Byungwoo

    2015-01-01

    The reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/carbon double-coated 3-D porous ZnO aggregates (RGO/C/ZnO) have been successfully synthesized as anode materials for Li-ion batteries with excellent cyclability and rate capability. The mesoporous ZnO aggregates prepared by a simple solvothermal method are sequentially modified through distinct carbon-based double coating. These novel architectures take unique advantages of mesopores acting as space to accommodate volume expansion during cycling, while the conformal carbon layer on each nanoparticle buffering volume changes, and conductive RGO sheets connect the aggregates to each other. Consequently, the RGO/C/ZnO exhibits superior electrochemical performance, including remarkably prolonged cycle life and excellent rate capability. Such improved performance of RGO/C/ZnO may be attributed to synergistic effects of both the 3-D porous nanostructures and RGO/C double coating.

  10. Effects of trapped electrons on ion reflection in an oblique shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Toida, Mieko; Inagaki, Junya

    2015-06-15

    A magnetosonic shock wave propagating obliquely to an external magnetic field can trap electrons and accelerate them to ultrarelativistic energies. The trapped electrons excite two-dimensional (2D) electromagnetic fluctuations with finite wavenumbers along the shock front. We study effects of the trapped electrons on ion motions through the 2D fluctuations. It is analytically shown that the fraction of ions reflected from the shock front is enhanced by the 2D fluctuations. This is confirmed by 2D (two space coordinates and three velocities) relativistic, electromagnetic particle simulations with full ion and electron dynamics and calculation of test ions in the electromagnetic fields averaged along the shock front. A comparison between 2D and one-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulations is also shown.

  11. Finite-geometry models of electric field noise from patch potentials in ion traps

    SciTech Connect

    Low, Guang Hao; Herskind, Peter F.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2011-11-15

    We model electric field noise from fluctuating patch potentials on conducting surfaces by taking into account the finite geometry of the ion trap electrodes to gain insight into the origin of anomalous heating in ion traps. The scaling of anomalous heating rates with surface distance d is obtained for several generic geometries of relevance to current ion trap designs, ranging from planar to spheroidal electrodes. The influence of patch size is studied both by solving Laplace's equation in terms of the appropriate Green's function as well as through an eigenfunction expansion. Scaling with surface distance is found to be highly dependent on the choice of geometry and the relative scale between the spatial extent of the electrode, the ion-electrode distance, and the patch size. Our model generally supports the d{sup -4} dependence currently found by most experiments and models, but also predicts geometry-driven deviations from this trend.

  12. Phase-Stable Free-Space Optical Lattices for Trapped Ions.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, C T; Kaufmann, H; Ruster, T; Schulz, J; Kaushal, V; Hettrich, M; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Poschinger, U G

    2016-01-22

    We demonstrate control of the absolute phase of an optical lattice with respect to a single trapped ion. The lattice is generated by off-resonant free-space laser beams, and we actively stabilize its phase by measuring its ac-Stark shift on a trapped ion. The ion is localized within the standing wave to better than 2% of its period. The locked lattice allows us to apply displacement operations via resonant optical forces with a controlled direction in phase space. Moreover, we observe the lattice-induced phase evolution of spin superposition states in order to analyze the relevant decoherence mechanisms. Finally, we employ lattice-induced phase shifts for inferring the variation of the ion position over the 157  μm range along the trap axis at accuracies of better than 6 nm.

  13. Paul trapping of radioactive 6He+ ions and direct observation of their beta decay.

    PubMed

    Fléchard, X; Liénard, E; Méry, A; Rodríguez, D; Ban, G; Durand, D; Duval, F; Herbane, M; Labalme, M; Mauger, F; Naviliat-Cuncic, O; Thomas, J C; Velten, Ph

    2008-11-21

    We demonstrate that abundant quantities of short-lived beta unstable ions can be trapped in a novel transparent Paul trap and that their decay products can directly be detected in coincidence. Low energy 6He+ (807 ms half-life) ions were extracted from the SPIRAL source at GANIL, then decelerated, cooled, and bunched by means of the buffer gas cooling technique. More than 10(8) ions have been stored over a measuring period of six days, and about 10(5) decay coincidences between the beta particles and the 6Li++ recoiling ions have been recorded. The technique can be extended to other short-lived species, opening new possibilities for trap assisted decay experiments.

  14. 3D strain engineered self-rolled thin-film architecture for high-energy density lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbey, Griffin; Gong, Chen; Yu, Cynthia; Blythe, Clayton; Leite, Marina

    Recently, multiple 3D geometries have been implemented into energy storage devices (e . g . nanowire anodes and arrays of interdigitated rods) in order to better accommodate the large volume expansion experienced by the anode during lithiation and to increase the structure energy density. However, most approached structures are difficult to scale up. Here we show how self-rolled thin-films can maintain a high energy density and can potentially accommodate the volume expansion suffered by the anode. The self-rolled tubes are fabricated by physical deposition of the active layers, creating a stress gradient between thin-film stack due to differences in coefficient of thermal expansion. Upon a sacrificial layer removal, the thin-film rolls to relieve this built-in stress. We predict the final dimension of self-rolled battery tubes using known elastic properties of materials commonly used as the active layers of the device. We will discuss an appropriate figure-of-merit that defines how the winding process can ultimately affect the volumetric capacity of 3D self-rolled batteries.

  15. Universal nonmonotonic structure in the saturation curves of magneto-optical-trap-loaded Na+ ions stored in an ion-neutral hybrid trap: Prediction and observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümel, R.; Wells, J. E.; Goodman, D. S.; Kwolek, J. M.; Smith, W. W.

    2015-12-01

    We predict that the maximal, steady-state ion capacity Ns(λ ) of radio-frequency (rf) traps, loaded at a rate of λ particles per rf cycle, shows universal, nonlinear, nonmonotonic behavior as a function of loading rate λ . The shape of Ns(λ ) , characterized by four dynamical regimes, is universal; i.e., it is predicted to manifest itself in all types of rf traps independent of the details of their construction and independent of particle species loaded. For λ ≪ 1 (region I), as expected, Ns(λ ) increases monotonically with λ . However, contrary to intuition, at intermediate λ ˜1 (region II), Ns(λ ) reaches a maximum, followed by a local minimum of Ns(λ ) (region III). For λ ≫1 (region IV), Ns(λ ) again rises monotonically. In region IV, numerical simulations, analytical calculations, and experiments show Ns(λ ) ˜λ2 /3 . We confirm our predictions both experimentally with magneto-optical-trap-loaded Na+ ions stored in a hybrid ion-neutral trap and numerically with the help of detailed ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations.

  16. Microfabricated ion trap mass spectrometry for characterization of organics and potential biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Daniel

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful analytical technique with a strong history in planetary exploration, and is the method of choice for detection and identification of organic and biological molecules. MS instrumentation can also be combined with techniques such as gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, or chiral separation, which are particularly important for analysis of complex mixtures or possible homochirality. Ion traps have several inherent advantages, including speed of analysis (important for GC-MS), MS/MS capabilities (important to identification of unknown compounds), excellent sensitivity, and ease of coupling with ambient ionization techniques that are under development for biomolecule detection. We report on progress in using microfabrication techniques to produce radiofrequency quadrupole ion traps that are much smaller, lighter, and lower power than existing instruments. We produce ion traps using an assembly of two ceramic plates, the facing surfaces of which are lithographically patterned with electrodes. This approach allows great flexibility in the trap geometry, and we have demonstrated working mass spectrometers with quadrupole, linear, and toroidal trapping fields. The approach also allows correction of higher-order terms in the electric field. With this system, mass resolution of up to 1300 has been demonstrated, which is adequate for identification of a wide range of potential biomarkers. Capabilities such as tandem analysis have also been demonstrated. Of particular interest is an ion trap that contains both quadrupole and toroidal trapping regions simultaneously and coaxially. Ions can be trapped as a large reservoir in the toroidal region and introduced in small batches to the quadrupole region for mass analysis. This capability is particularly valuable where the sample of interest is very small, such as microfossil with trace organics, and where the organic inventory is both complex and unknown. Development and results of this device

  17. Final Report - Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program - Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Sandia National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, W.B.

    2002-12-18

    This report covers the three main projects that collectively comprised the Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program. Chapter 1 describes the direct interrogation of individual particles by laser desorption within the ion trap mass spectrometer analyzer. The goals were (1) to develop an ''intelligent trigger'' capable of distinguishing particles of biological origin from those of nonbiological origin in the background and interferent particles and (2) to explore the capability for individual particle identification. Direct interrogation of particles by laser ablation and ion trap mass spectrometry was shown to have good promise for discriminating between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin, although detailed protocols and operating conditions were not worked out. A library of more than 20,000 spectra of various types of biological particles has been assembled. Methods based on multivariate analysis and on neural networks were used to discriminate between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin. It was possible to discriminate between at least some species of bacteria if mass spectra of several hundred similar particles were obtained. Chapter 2 addresses the development of a new ion trap mass analyzer geometry that offers the potential for a significant increase in ion storage capacity for a given set of analyzer operating conditions. This geometry may lead to the development of smaller, lower-power field-portable ion trap mass spectrometers while retaining laboratory-scale analytical performance. A novel ion trap mass spectrometer based on toroidal ion storage geometry has been developed. The analyzer geometry is based on the edge rotation of a quadrupolar ion trap cross section into the shape of a torus. Initial performance of this device was poor, however, due to the significant contribution of nonlinear fields introduced by the rotation of the symmetric ion-trapping geometry. These nonlinear resonances

  18. Blue-sky bifurcation of ion energies and the limits of neutral-gas sympathetic cooling of trapped ions

    PubMed Central

    Schowalter, Steven J.; Dunning, Alexander J.; Chen, Kuang; Puri, Prateek; Schneider, Christian; Hudson, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic cooling of trapped ions through collisions with neutral buffer gases is critical to a variety of modern scientific fields, including fundamental chemistry, mass spectrometry, nuclear and particle physics, and atomic and molecular physics. Despite its widespread use over four decades, there remain open questions regarding its fundamental limitations. To probe these limits, here we examine the steady-state evolution of up to 10 barium ions immersed in a gas of three-million laser-cooled calcium atoms. We observe and explain the emergence of nonequilibrium behaviour as evidenced by bifurcations in the ion steady-state temperature, parameterized by ion number. We show that this behaviour leads to the limitations in creating and maintaining translationally cold samples of trapped ions using neutral-gas sympathetic cooling. These results may provide a route to studying non-equilibrium thermodynamics at the atomic level. PMID:27511602

  19. Blue-sky bifurcation of ion energies and the limits of neutral-gas sympathetic cooling of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schowalter, Steven J.; Dunning, Alexander J.; Chen, Kuang; Puri, Prateek; Schneider, Christian; Hudson, Eric R.

    2016-08-01

    Sympathetic cooling of trapped ions through collisions with neutral buffer gases is critical to a variety of modern scientific fields, including fundamental chemistry, mass spectrometry, nuclear and particle physics, and atomic and molecular physics. Despite its widespread use over four decades, there remain open questions regarding its fundamental limitations. To probe these limits, here we examine the steady-state evolution of up to 10 barium ions immersed in a gas of three-million laser-cooled calcium atoms. We observe and explain the emergence of nonequilibrium behaviour as evidenced by bifurcations in the ion steady-state temperature, parameterized by ion number. We show that this behaviour leads to the limitations in creating and maintaining translationally cold samples of trapped ions using neutral-gas sympathetic cooling. These results may provide a route to studying non-equilibrium thermodynamics at the atomic level.

  20. Blue-sky bifurcation of ion energies and the limits of neutral-gas sympathetic cooling of trapped ions.

    PubMed

    Schowalter, Steven J; Dunning, Alexander J; Chen, Kuang; Puri, Prateek; Schneider, Christian; Hudson, Eric R

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic cooling of trapped ions through collisions with neutral buffer gases is critical to a variety of modern scientific fields, including fundamental chemistry, mass spectrometry, nuclear and particle physics, and atomic and molecular physics. Despite its widespread use over four decades, there remain open questions regarding its fundamental limitations. To probe these limits, here we examine the steady-state evolution of up to 10 barium ions immersed in a gas of three-million laser-cooled calcium atoms. We observe and explain the emergence of nonequilibrium behaviour as evidenced by bifurcations in the ion steady-state temperature, parameterized by ion number. We show that this behaviour leads to the limitations in creating and maintaining translationally cold samples of trapped ions using neutral-gas sympathetic cooling. These results may provide a route to studying non-equilibrium thermodynamics at the atomic level. PMID:27511602