Science.gov

Sample records for 3d island growth

  1. 3-D perspective of Saint Pierre and Miquelon Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image shows two islands, Miquelon and Saint Pierre, located south of Newfoundland, Canada. These islands, along with five smaller islands, are a self-governing territory of France. A thin barrier beach divides Miquelon, with Grande Miquelon to the north and Petite Miquelon to the south. Saint Pierre Island is located to the lower right. With the islands' location in the north Atlantic Ocean and their deep water ports, fishing is the major part of the economy. The maximum elevation of the island is 240 meters (787 feet). The land mass of the islands is about 242 square kilometers, or 1.5 times the size of Washington DC.

    This image shows how data collected by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) can be used to enhance other satellite images. Color and natural shading are provided by a Landsat 7 image acquired on September 1, 1999. Terrain perspective and shading were derived from SRTM elevation data acquired on February 12, 2000. Topography is exaggerated by about six times vertically. The United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) DataCenter, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, provided the Landsat data.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies

  2. 3-D Perspective View, Miquelon and Saint Pierre Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image shows Miquelon and Saint Pierre Islands, located south of Newfoundland, Canada. These islands, along with five smaller islands, are a self-governing territory of France. North is in the top right corner of the image. The island of Miquelon, in the background, is divided by a thin barrier beach into Petite Miquelon on the left, and Grande Miquelon on the right. Saint Pierre Island is seen in the foreground. The maximum elevation of this land is 240 meters (787 feet). The land mass of the islands is about 242square kilometers (94 square miles) or 1.5 times the size of Washington, DC.

    This three-dimensional perspective view is one of several still photographs taken from a simulated flyover of the islands. It shows how elevation data collected by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) can be used to enhance other satellite images. Color and natural shading are provided by a Landsat 7 image taken on September 7, 1999. The Landsat image was draped over the SRTM data. Terrain perspective and shading are from SRTM. The vertical scale has been increased six times to make it easier to see the small features. This also makes the sea cliffs around the edges of the islands look larger. In this view the capital city of Saint Pierre is seen as the bright area in the foreground of the island. The thin bright line seen in the water is a breakwater that offers some walled protection for the coastal city.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and

  3. The 3D Elevation Program: summary for Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carswell, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Elevation data are essential to a broad range of applications, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. For the State of Rhode Island, elevation data are critical for flood risk management, natural resources conservation, coastal zone management, sea level rise and subsidence, agriculture and precision farming, and other business uses. Today, high-quality light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the sources for creating elevation models and other elevation datasets. Federal, State, and local agencies work in partnership to (1) replace data, on a national basis, that are (on average) 30 years old and of lower quality and (2) provide coverage where publicly accessible data do not exist. A joint goal of State and Federal partners is to acquire consistent, statewide coverage to support existing and emerging applications enabled by lidar data. The new 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative (Snyder, 2012a,b), managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other three-dimensional representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

  4. The PIES2012 Code for Calculating 3D Equilibria with Islands and Stochastic Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monticello, Donald; Reiman, Allan; Raburn, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    We have made major modifications to the PIES 3D equilibrium code to produce a new version, PIES2012. The new version uses an adaptive radial grid for calculating equilibrium currents. A subset of the flux surfaces conform closely to island separatrices, providing an accurate treatment of the effects driving the neoclassical tearing mode. There is now a set of grid surfaces that conform to the flux surfaces in the interiors of the islands, allowing the proper treatment of the current profiles in the islands, which play an important role in tearing phenomena. We have verified that we can introduce appropriate current profiles in the islands to suppress their growth, allowing us to simulate situations where islands are allowed to grow at some rational surfaces but not others. Placement of grid surfaces between islands is guided by the locations of high order fixed points, allowing us to avoid spectral polution and providing a more robust, and smoother convergence of the code. The code now has an option for turning on a vertical magnetic field to fix the position of the magnetic axis, which models the horizontal feedback positioning of a tokamak plasma. The code has a new option for using a Jacobian-Free Newton Krylov scheme for convergence. The code now also contains a model that properly handles stochastic regions with nonzero pressure gradients. Work supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  5. 3D DIII-D Equilibrium Calculations with Magnetic Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiman, Allan; Monticello, Don; Lazerson, Sam

    2012-10-01

    We discuss 3D equilibrium calculations for the DIII-D tokamak that have been performed using the PIES code, focusing particularly on a single shot that has been studied by a number of different codes in the context of the FY 2012 FES Theory Milestone. The shot was part of an experimental campaign to study the suppression of edge localized modes (ELMs) using an externally imposed nonaxisymmetric magnetic perturbation.

  6. 3-D Volumetric Evaluation of Human Mandibular Growth

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Mathew; Reynolds, Michael; Adeeb, Samer; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2011-01-01

    Bone growth is a complex process that is controlled by a multitude of mechanisms that are not fully understood.Most of the current methods employed to measure the growth of bones focus on either studying cadaveric bones from different individuals of different ages, or successive two-dimensional (2D) radiographs. Both techniques have their known limitations. The purpose of this study was to explore a technique for quantifying the three dimensional (3D) growth of an adolescent human mandible over the period of one year utilizing cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans taken for regular orthodontic records. Three -dimensional virtual models were created from the CBCT data using mainstream medical imaging software. A comparison between computer-generated surface meshes of successive 3-D virtual models illustrates the magnitude of relative mandible growth. The results of this work are in agreement with previously reported data from human cadaveric studies and implantable marker studies. The presented method provides a new relatively simple basis (utilizing commercially available software) to visualize and evaluate individualized 3D (mandibular) growth in vivo. PMID:22046201

  7. 3D fold growth rates in transpressional tectonic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel

    2015-04-01

    Geological folds are inherently three-dimensional (3D) structures; hence, they also grow in 3D. In this study, fold growth in all three dimensions is quantified numerically using a finite-element algorithm for simulating deformation of Newtonian media in 3D. The presented study is an extension and generalization of the work presented in Frehner (2014), which only considered unidirectional layer-parallel compression. In contrast, the full range from strike slip settings (i.e., simple shear) to unidirectional layer-parallel compression is considered here by varying the convergence angle of the boundary conditions; hence the results are applicable to general transpressional tectonic settings. Only upright symmetrical single-layer fold structures are considered. The horizontal higher-viscous layer exhibits an initial point-like perturbation. Due to the mixed pure- and simple shear boundary conditions a mechanical buckling instability grows from this perturbation in all three dimensions, described by: Fold amplification (vertical growth): Fold amplification describes the growth from a fold shape with low limb-dip angle to a shape with higher limb-dip angle. Fold elongation (growth parallel to fold axis): Fold elongation describes the growth from a dome-shaped (3D) structure to a more cylindrical fold (2D). Sequential fold growth (growth perpendicular to fold axial plane): Sequential fold growth describes the growth of secondary (and further) folds adjacent to the initial isolated fold. The term 'lateral fold growth' is used as an umbrella term for both fold elongation and sequential fold growth. In addition, the orientation of the fold axis is tracked as a function of the convergence angle. Even though the absolute values of all three growth rates are markedly reduced with increasing simple-shear component at the boundaries, the general pattern of the quantified fold growth under the studied general-shear boundary conditions is surprisingly similar to the end

  8. 3D modelling of the Tejeda Caldera cone-sheet swarm, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samrock, Lisa K.; Jensen, Max J.; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R.; Mattsson, Tobias; Geiger, Harri

    2015-04-01

    . 2011, and references therein), and we discuss the implications of this architecture for the feeding system of the Tejeda volcano and the associated temporal variations of cone-sheet emplacement. References: Burchardt, S., Tanner, D.C., Troll, V.R., Krumbholz, M., Gustafsson, L.E. (2011) Three-dimensional geometry of concentric intrusive sheet swarms in the Geitafell and the Dyrfjöll volcanoes, eastern Iceland. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems 12(7): Q0AB09. Burchardt, S., Troll, V.R., Mathieu, L., Emeleus, H.C., Donaldson, C.H. (2013) Ardnamruchan 3D cone-sheet architecture explained by a single elongate magma chamber. Scientific Reports 3:2891. Schirnick, C. (1996) Formation of an intracaldera cone sheet dike swarm (Tejeda Caldera, Gran Canaria) (Dissertation). Christian-Albrechts-Universität, Kiel, Germany. Schirnick, C., van den Bogaard, P., Schmincke, H.-U. (1999) Cone-sheet formation and intrusive growth of an oceanic island - The Miocene Tejeda complex on Gran Canaria (Canary Islands). Geology, 27: 207-210.

  9. 3D Simulation of the Growth of Alloy Semiconductor Quantum Dots Considering Morphological and Compositional Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Junyan; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Narayanaswamy, Sridhar

    2012-02-01

    Fabrication of quantum dots (QDs) with high density may be realized by self-assembly via heteroepitaxial growth of thin films. Since the electronic and optoelectronic properties of QDs are sensitive to size, morphology, strain and especially composition, it is of great importance to control their composition profiles and morphology, and engineer the strain in them. Since the growth is a dynamic process, which carries out via surface diffusion driven primarily by strain relaxation and entropy change due to chemical intermixing, a strong coupling between morphological and composition evolutions during this process leads to a rather complex dynamics, which has not been fully understood. In this work, a 3-D finite element model is developed, which is capable of modeling the formation, self-assembly and coarsening of hetero-epitaxial alloy islands by considering the coupling of morphological and compositional evolution. Several interesting experimental observations, such as fast coarsening kinetics; asymmetries in composition profile and island shape; lateral motion of alloy islands have been observed in our simulations. Our model predictions have painted a rather complete picture for the entire dynamic evolution during the growth of nanoscale heteroepitaxial islands.

  10. Reconstructing the Vulcano Island evolution from 3D modeling of magnetic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napoli, Rosalba; Currenti, Gilda

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution ground and marine magnetic data are exploited for a detailed definition of a 3D model of the Vulcano Island volcanic complex. The resulting 3D magnetic imaging, obtained by 3-D inverse modeling technique, has delivered useful constraints both to reconstruct the Vulcano Island evolution and to be used as input data for volcanic hazard assessment models. Our results constrained the depth and geometry of the main geo-structural features revealing more subsurface volcanic structures than exposed ones and allowing to elucidate the relationships between them. The recognition of two different magnetization sectors, approximatively coincident with the structural depressions of Piano caldera, in the southern half of the island, and La Fossa caldera at the north, suggests a complex structural and volcanic evolution. Magnetic highs identified across the southern half of the island reflect the main crystallized feeding systems, intrusions and buried vents, whose NNW-SSE preferential alignment highlights the role of the NNW-SSE Tindari-Letojanni regional system from the initial activity of the submarine edifice, to the more recent activity of the Vulcano complex. The low magnetization area, in the middle part of the island may result from hydrothermally altered rocks. Their presence not only in the central part of the volcano edifice but also in other peripheral areas, is a sign of a more diffuse historical hydrothermal activity than in present days. Moreover, the high magnetization heterogeneity within the upper flanks of La Fossa cone edifice is an imprint of a composite distribution of unaltered and altered rocks with different mechanical properties, which poses in this area a high risk level for failure processes especially during volcanic or hydrothermal crisis.

  11. Seismic source inversion using Green's reciprocity and a 3-D structural model for the Japanese Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simutė, S.; Fichtner, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a feasibility study for seismic source inversions using a 3-D velocity model for the Japanese Islands. The approach involves numerically calculating 3-D Green's tensors, which is made efficient by exploiting Green's reciprocity. The rationale for 3-D seismic source inversion has several aspects. For structurally complex regions, such as the Japan area, it is necessary to account for 3-D Earth heterogeneities to prevent unknown structure polluting source solutions. In addition, earthquake source characterisation can serve as a means to delineate existing faults. Source parameters obtained for more realistic Earth models can then facilitate improvements in seismic tomography and early warning systems, which are particularly important for seismically active areas, such as Japan. We have created a database of numerically computed 3-D Green's reciprocals for a 40°× 40°× 600 km size area around the Japanese Archipelago for >150 broadband stations. For this we used a regional 3-D velocity model, recently obtained from full waveform inversion. The model includes attenuation and radial anisotropy and explains seismic waveform data for periods between 10 - 80 s generally well. The aim is to perform source inversions using the database of 3-D Green's tensors. As preliminary steps, we present initial concepts to address issues that are at the basis of our approach. We first investigate to which extent Green's reciprocity works in a discrete domain. Considering substantial amounts of computed Green's tensors we address storage requirements and file formatting. We discuss the importance of the initial source model, as an intelligent choice can substantially reduce the search volume. Possibilities to perform a Bayesian inversion and ways to move to finite source inversion are also explored.

  12. 3D numerical investigation on landslide generated tsunamis around a conical island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagna, Francesca; Bellotti, Giorgio

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents numerical computations of tsunamis generated by subaerial and submerged landslides falling along the flank of a conical island. The study is inspired by the tsunamis that on 30th December 2002 attacked the coast of the volcanic island of Stromboli (South Tyrrhenian sea, Italy). In particular this paper analyzes the important feature of the lateral spreading of landside generated tsunamis and the associated flooding hazard. The numerical model used in this study is the full three dimensional commercial code FLOW-3D. The model has already been successfully used (Choi et al., 2007; 2008; Chopakatla et al, 2008) to study the interaction of waves and structures. In the simulations carried out in this work a particular feature of the code has been employed: the GMO (General Moving Object) algorithm. It allows to reproduce the interaction between moving objects, as a landslide, and the water. FLOW-3D has been firstly validated using available 3D experiments reproducing tsunamis generated by landslides at the flank of a conical island. The experiments have been carried out in the LIC laboratory of the Polytechnic of Bari, Italy (Di Risio et al., 2009). Numerical and experimental time series of run-up and sea level recorded at gauges located at the flanks of the island and offshore have been successfully compared. This analysis shows that the model can accurately represent the generation, the propagation and the inundation of landslide generated tsunamis and suggests the use of the numerical model as a tool for preparing inundation maps. At the conference we will present the validation of the model and parametric analyses aimed to investigate how wave properties depend on the landslide kinematic and on further parameters such as the landslide volume and shape, as well as the radius of the island. The expected final results of the research are precomputed inundation maps that depend on the characteristics of the landslide and of the island. Finally we

  13. A 3D seismic tomography of the Lesser Antilles Subduction Zone offshore Dominica and Martinique islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evain, Mikaël.; Galve, Audrey; Charvis, Philippe; Laigle, Mireille; Flueh, Ernst; Weinzierl, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    Along the eastern border of the Caribbean plate the Lesser Antilles islands form an active volcanic arc above the Atlantic subducting lithosphere. The crustal structure of this convergent margin is presented here from first arrival tomographic inversion of a 3D wide-angle seismic dataset acquired offshore Dominica and Martinique islands by a network of 27 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS). The resulting 3D velocity model shows good resolution from 7-8 km down to ~15 km depth in a 150 km x 150 km area. Though our study area is located at the northern termination of one of the world's largest accretionary prisms we still observe about 5 to 7 km of sediment (v< 4 km/s) in the southeastern corner of our model. Our network is centered on a remarkable bathymetric feature: the Arawak Basin, a 6 km deep basin trending NW-SE, filled with 3 km of sediment on average. The western side of the Arawak Basin is bordered at depth by a basement high, highlighted by the rise of the 6.0-6.5 km/s velocity contours up to 2 km below seafloor. To the east of the Arawak Basin, below the accretionary prism, SW-NE cross-sections show two successive rises of velocity contours from 4.0 to 6.0 km/s. The first one, also clearly seen on the MCS data, is coincident with the eastern border of the Arawak Basin, while the second one seems located ~30 km to the East, below the thick accretionary prism. We interpret these highs as basement uplifts associated with the subduction of the Tiburon ridge. We do not sample the interplate contact mainly due to high seismic attenuation in the accretionary wedge. More insight into the geometry of this contact may arise from the processing of a ~285 km long wide-angle refraction/reflection profile parallel to the convergence that cross our 3D velocity model in its middle and continues across the entire subduction complex. Preliminary tomographic results from this dataset recorded by 45 densely spaced OBS confirm the observations described above. This new 2D line

  14. 3D Shallow crustal structure of Madeira island revealed from ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, C.; Silveira, G. M.; Matias, L. M.; Ribeiro, L.; Dias, N. A.; Caldeira, R.; Rosa, C.; Krueger, F.

    2013-12-01

    Madeira is an intraplate volcanic island, located at the eastern North Atlantic Ocean, in front of the Moroccan cost, with an emerged area of 737 km2 and maximum altitude of 1861 m. Madeira shows an E-W-oriented elongation, which reflects the orientation of its rift zone. Rift zones play a fundamental role in the constitution and evolution of volcanic islands and it is important to image their internal structure as a function of depth. Constrains like source-receiver geometry, irregular seismicity distribution or, for some methods, low seismicity occurrence did not allow to obtain high-resolution models of the Madeira crustal structure using traditional passive seismology. Seismic interferometry/ambient noise surface-waves tomography allows imaging regions with a resolution that mainly depends on the seismic network coverage. From May 2011 to September 2012, a temporary pool of 23 seismometers has been continuously recording at Madeira Island. This deployment was complemented with other local permanent stations. The ambient noise data was processed following five main steps: (1) Data quality control; (2) Cross-correlation of 1 hour time windows between each station pair and subsequent stacking for the entire recording period; (3) Time-frequency analysis to measure group-velocity dispersion curves between 0.5 and 6 seconds; (4) 2D inversion to obtain lateral variations of the Rayleigh-wave group-velocities as function of the period; (5) Group velocity inversion as a function of depth to map the 3D structure beneath Madeira. From the surface to 4 km depth, the edge of the rift, along which the island possibly grow, is well correlated with a strong positive anomaly on our maps. This anomaly seems to be perturbed by the presence of low velocities at a depth of 2 km. After 5 km the rift signature is no longer visible. This work is supported by project QUAKELOC Reference: PTDC/GEO-FIQ/3522/2012

  15. 3-D Computational Modelling of Oblique Continental Collision near South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatun, L.; Pysklywec, R. N.

    2015-12-01

    The research explores the highly oblique continental convergence at the South Island of New Zealand, considering the fundamental geodynamic mechanisms of sub-crustal lithospheric deformation during the orogenesis. In addition to the high velocity of along-strike plate motion, the oppositely verging subduction zones bounding the collision make the problem inherently three-dimensional. To study such factors during orogenesis, we conduct 3D computational modelling and present the results of a series of new experiments configured for the oblique South Island collision. The geodynamic modelling uses ASPECT - a robust highly-scalable and extendable geodynamic code featuring adaptive mesh refinement and complex rheologies. The model domain is defined by a box with prescribed velocities on the left and right faces with varied ratio of convergent versus strike-slip components, periodic boundary conditions for the front and back faces, free surface on top, and free slip at the bottom. Two different rheology types are used: brittle (pressure-, strain rate-, and material strength-dependent) for crust and visco-plastic (temperature-, pressure- and strain rate-dependent) for mantle. The obtained results provide insight into the behaviour of the lithosphere under the situation of young oblique convergence. We focus on the development of the mantle lithosphere, considering how the morphology of the sub-crustal orogenic root evolves during the convergent/strike-slip plate motions. The numerical experiments explore the dependence of this process on such factors as ratio of convergent versus strike-slip motion at the plate boundary, and rheological parameters of crust and mantle. The behaviour of the crust is also tracked to determine how the deep 3D tectonics may manifest at the surface.

  16. A 3D, finite element model for baroclinic circulation on the Vancouver Island continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Foreman, M.G.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a 3-dimensional model of the barotropic and baroclinic circulation on the continental shelf west of Vancouver Island, Canada. A previous study with a 2D barotropic model and field data revealed that several tidal constituents have a significant baroclinic component (the K1 in particular). Thus we embarked on another study with a 3D model to study the baroclinic effects on the residual and several selected tidal constituents. The 3D model uses a harmonic expansion in time and a finite element discretization in space. All nonlinear terms are retained, including quadratic bottom stress, advection and wave transport (continuity nonlinearity). The equations are solved as a global and a local problem, where the global problem is the solution of the wave equation formulation of the shallow water equations, and the local problem is the solution of the momentum equation for the vertical velocity profile. These equations are coupled to the advection-diffusion equation for density so that density gradient forcing is included in the momentum equations. However, the study presented here describes diagnostic calculations for the baroclinic residual circulation only. The model is sufficiently efficient that it encourages sensitivity testing with a large number of model runs. In this sense, the model is akin to an extension of analytical solutions to the domain of irregular geometry and bottom topography where this parameter space can be explored in some detail. In particular, the consequences of the sigma coordinate system used by the model are explored. Test cases using an idealized representation of the continental shelf, shelf break and shelf slope, lead to an estimation of the velocity errors caused by interpolation errors inherent in the sigma coordinate system. On the basis of these estimates, the computational grid used in the 2D model is found to have inadequate resolution. Thus a new grid is generated with increased

  17. Digital holographic microscopy for imaging growth and treatment response in 3D tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuyu; Petrovic, Ljubica; Celli, Jonathan P.; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.

    2014-03-01

    While three-dimensional tumor models have emerged as valuable tools in cancer research, the ability to longitudinally visualize the 3D tumor architecture restored by these systems is limited with microscopy techniques that provide only qualitative insight into sample depth, or which require terminal fixation for depth-resolved 3D imaging. Here we report the use of digital holographic microscopy (DHM) as a viable microscopy approach for quantitative, non-destructive longitudinal imaging of in vitro 3D tumor models. Following established methods we prepared 3D cultures of pancreatic cancer cells in overlay geometry on extracellular matrix beds and obtained digital holograms at multiple timepoints throughout the duration of growth. The holograms were digitally processed and the unwrapped phase images were obtained to quantify nodule thickness over time under normal growth, and in cultures subject to chemotherapy treatment. In this manner total nodule volumes are rapidly estimated and demonstrated here to show contrasting time dependent changes during growth and in response to treatment. This work suggests the utility of DHM to quantify changes in 3D structure over time and suggests the further development of this approach for time-lapse monitoring of 3D morphological changes during growth and in response to treatment that would otherwise be impractical to visualize.

  18. Axisymmetric and 3D calculations of melt flow during VCz growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bänsch, E.; Davis, D.; Langmach, H.; Miller, W.; Rehse, U.; Reinhardt, G.; Uhle, M.

    2004-05-01

    Axisymmetric and 3D calculations of melt flow have been performed for a configuration used at the vapour-pressure-controlled Czochalski growth of GaAs single crystals. Thermal boundary conditions were adapted from a global simulation of the temperature field. The axisymmetric calculations with the code NAVIER confirmed the ones previously perfomed with FIDAP TM. The 3D calculations showed that the flow exhibits an asymmetric transient behaviour beyond a certain critical Reynolds number.

  19. 3D Bayesian inversion of magnetic data applied to Basse-Terre volcanic island, Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnoud, Anne; Bouligand, Claire; Coutant, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    We linearly invert magnetic data for 3D magnetization distribution using a Bayesian methodology with a grid discretization of the space. The Bayesian approach introduces covariance matrices to regularize the ill-posed problem and overcome the non-uniqueness of the solution (Tarantola & Valette, 1982). The use of spatial covariance matrices and grid discretization leads to smooth and compact models. The algorithm provides 3D magnetization models along with resolution parameters extracted from the resolution matrix. The direct computation of the magnetic field includes the surface topography and assumes a linear relationship between rock magnetization and the magnetic field they produce. The methodology is applied to aeromagnetic data from the volcanic island of Basse-Terre in Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles (Le Borgne & Le Mouël 1976, Le Mouël et al., 1979). Low magnetizations (a few A/m) allow linear inversion that takes into account polarity inversions of the geomagnetic field that occurred across the volcanic history of the island. Inverted magnetizations are consistent with paleomagnetic measurements on surface samples (Carlut et al., 2000 ; Samper et al., 2007). The resulting 3D model is validated against a 2D inversion performed in the Fourier domain (Parker & Huestis, 1974; Bouligand et al., 2014). The 3D distribution of magnetization helps identifying the different volcanic edifices that build the island both at the surface and up to 3 km depth.

  20. X-Ray Laue Microdiffraction Study of 3D Grain Growth in Polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budai, J. D.; Yang, W.; Tischler, J. Z.; Larson, B. C.; Liu, W.; Ice, G. E.

    2004-11-01

    We describe a new technique for studying 3D grain growth in polycrystalline materials using white x-ray microdiffraction with micron spatial resolution. This scanning technique uses focussed, polychromatic x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source to measure the local crystal structure and lattice orientation. The capabilities of this method are demonstrated by 3D grain growth studies of aluminium during thermal annealing. 3D grain orientation maps were obtained from hot-rolled (200ºC) polycrystalline aluminum ( 1Fe,Si). The sample was then annealed to induce grain growth, cooled, and re-mapped to measure the thermal migration of all grain boundaries within the same volume region. Initial observations reveal significant grain growth above 360ºC, involving movement of both low- and high-angle boundaries. Systematic measurements obtained after annealing at successively higher temperatures provide a detailed description of the microstructural evolution in a bulk material. These measurements provide the 3D experimental link needed for testing theories and large-scale computer models of 3D grain growth in advanced materials. Support by DOE Division of Materials Sciences under contract with ORNL managed by UT-Battelle, LLC; UNI-CAT is supported by ORNL, UIUC-MRL, NIST, and UOP LLC; APS supported by DOE.

  1. Enhancement of neurite outgrowth in neuron cancer stem cells by growth on 3-D collagen scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Kuo, Shyh Ming; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Chen, Wan-Nan U.; Chuang, Chin-Wen; Liu, Li-Feng

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) behave high multiply of growth on collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement of NCSCs neurite outgrowth on porous collagen scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3-D collagen culture of NCSCs shows an advance differentiation than 2-D culture. -- Abstract: Collagen is one component of the extracellular matrix that has been widely used for constructive remodeling to facilitate cell growth and differentiation. The 3-D distribution and growth of cells within the porous scaffold suggest a clinical significance for nerve tissue engineering. In the current study, we investigated proliferation and differentiation of neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) on a 3-D porous collagen scaffold that mimics the natural extracellular matrix. We first generated green fluorescence protein (GFP) expressing NCSCs using a lentiviral system to instantly monitor the transitions of morphological changes during growth on the 3-D scaffold. We found that proliferation of GFP-NCSCs increased, and a single cell mass rapidly grew with unrestricted expansion between days 3 and 9 in culture. Moreover, immunostaining with neuronal nuclei (NeuN) revealed that NCSCs grown on the 3-D collagen scaffold significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Our findings confirmed that the 80 {mu}m porous collagen scaffold could enhance attachment, viability and differentiation of the cancer neural stem cells. This result could provide a new application for nerve tissue engineering and nerve regeneration.

  2. Direct-growth carbon nanotubes on 3D structural microelectrodes for electrophysiological recording.

    PubMed

    Pan, Alice Ian; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Chung, Hui-Wen; Chen, Hsin; Yeh, Shih-Rung; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chang, Yen-Chung; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2016-01-01

    A novel 3D carbon nanotube (CNT) microelectrode was developed through direct growth of CNTs on a gold pin-shaped 3D microelectrode at a low temperature (400 °C) for applications in neural and cardiac recording. With an electroplated Ni catalyst layer covering the entire surface of the pin-shaped structure, CNTs were synthesized on a 3D microelectrode by catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD). According to the analyses by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, the impedance of 3D microelectrodes after CNT growth and UV/O3 treatment decreased from 9.3 Ω mm(-2) to 1.2 Ω mm(-2) and the capacitance increased largely from 2.2 mF cm(-2) to 73.3 mF cm(-2). The existence of UVO3-treated CNT led to a large improvement of interfacial capacitance, contributing to the decrease of impedance. The electrophysiological detection capability of this 3D CNT microelectrode was demonstrated by the distinguished P waves, QRS complex and T waves in the electrocardiogram of the zebrafish heart and the action potential recorded from individual rat hippocampal neurons. The compatibility of integration with ICs, high resolution in space, electrophysiological signals, and non-invasive long-term recording suggest that the 3D CNT microelectrode exhibits promising potential for applications in electrophysiological research and clinical trials.

  3. Possible use of a 3-D clinostat to analyze plant growth processes under microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Hoson, T; Kamisaka, S; Buchen, B; Sievers, A; Yamashita, M; Masuda, Y

    1996-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) clinostat equipped with two rotation axes placed at right angles was constructed, and various growth processes of higher plants grown on this clinostat were compared with ground controls, with plants grown on the conventional horizontal clinostat, and with those under real microgravity in space. On the 3-D clinostat, cress roots developed a normal root cap and the statocytes showed the typical polar organization except a random distribution of statoliths. The structural features of clinostatted statocytes were fundamentally similar to those observed under real microgravity. The graviresponse of cress roots grown on the 3-D clinostat was the same as the control roots. On the 3-D clinostat, shoots and roots exhibited a spontaneous curvature as well as an altered growth direction. Such an automorphogenesis was sometimes exaggerated when plants were subjected to the horizontal rotation, whereas the curvature was suppressed on the vertical rotation. These discrepancies in curvature between the 3-D clinostat and the conventional ones appear to be brought about by the centrifugal force produced. Thus, the 3-D clinostat was proven as a useful device to simulate microgravity. PMID:11538636

  4. Direct-growth carbon nanotubes on 3D structural microelectrodes for electrophysiological recording.

    PubMed

    Pan, Alice Ian; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Chung, Hui-Wen; Chen, Hsin; Yeh, Shih-Rung; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chang, Yen-Chung; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2016-01-01

    A novel 3D carbon nanotube (CNT) microelectrode was developed through direct growth of CNTs on a gold pin-shaped 3D microelectrode at a low temperature (400 °C) for applications in neural and cardiac recording. With an electroplated Ni catalyst layer covering the entire surface of the pin-shaped structure, CNTs were synthesized on a 3D microelectrode by catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD). According to the analyses by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, the impedance of 3D microelectrodes after CNT growth and UV/O3 treatment decreased from 9.3 Ω mm(-2) to 1.2 Ω mm(-2) and the capacitance increased largely from 2.2 mF cm(-2) to 73.3 mF cm(-2). The existence of UVO3-treated CNT led to a large improvement of interfacial capacitance, contributing to the decrease of impedance. The electrophysiological detection capability of this 3D CNT microelectrode was demonstrated by the distinguished P waves, QRS complex and T waves in the electrocardiogram of the zebrafish heart and the action potential recorded from individual rat hippocampal neurons. The compatibility of integration with ICs, high resolution in space, electrophysiological signals, and non-invasive long-term recording suggest that the 3D CNT microelectrode exhibits promising potential for applications in electrophysiological research and clinical trials. PMID:26588673

  5. Hydrodynamic growth experiments with the 3-D, “native-roughness” modulations on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, S. V.; Casey, D.; Clark, D. S.; Coppari, F.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hsing, W.; Landen, O.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H. F.; Weber, C. R.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrodynamic instability growth experiments with threedimensional (3-D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on plastic (CH) shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The initial capsule outer-surface roughness was similar to the standard specifications (“native roughness”) used in a majority of implosions on NIF. At a convergence ratio of ∼3, the measured tent modulations were close to those predicted by 3-D simulations (within ∼15-20%), while measured 3-D, broadband modulations were ∼3-4 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. One of the hypotheses to explain the results is based on the increased instability amplitudes due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. These new experiments results have prompted looking for ways to reduce UV light exposure during target fabrication.

  6. The effect of anisotropic heat transport on magnetic islands in 3-D configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Schlutt, M. G.; Hegna, C. C.

    2012-08-15

    An analytic theory of nonlinear pressure-induced magnetic island formation using a boundary layer analysis is presented. This theory extends previous work by including the effects of finite parallel heat transport and is applicable to general three dimensional magnetic configurations. In this work, particular attention is paid to the role of finite parallel heat conduction in the context of pressure-induced island physics. It is found that localized currents that require self-consistent deformation of the pressure profile, such as resistive interchange and bootstrap currents, are attenuated by finite parallel heat conduction when the magnetic islands are sufficiently small. However, these anisotropic effects do not change saturated island widths caused by Pfirsch-Schlueter current effects. Implications for finite pressure-induced island healing are discussed.

  7. The clustering of CpG islands may constitute an important determinant of the 3D organization of interphase chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Gushchanskaya, Ekaterina S; Artemov, Artem V; Ulyanov, Sergey V; Logacheva, Maria D; Penin, Aleksey A; Kotova, Elena S; Akopov, Sergey B; Nikolaev, Lev G; Iarovaia, Olga V; Sverdlov, Eugene D; Gavrilov, Alexey A; Razin, Sergey V

    2014-07-01

    We used the 4C-Seq technique to characterize the genome-wide patterns of spatial contacts of several CpG islands located on chromosome 14 in cultured chicken lymphoid and erythroid cells. We observed a clear tendency for the spatial clustering of CpG islands present on the same and different chromosomes, regardless of the presence or absence of promoters within these CpG islands. Accordingly, we observed preferential spatial contacts between Sp1 binding motifs and other GC-rich genomic elements, including the DNA sequence motifs capable of forming G-quadruplexes. However, an anchor placed in a gene/CpG island-poor area formed spatial contacts with other gene/CpG island-poor areas on chromosome 14 and other chromosomes. These results corroborate the two-compartment model of the spatial organization of interphase chromosomes and suggest that the clustering of CpG islands constitutes an important determinant of the 3D organization of the eukaryotic genome in the cell nucleus. Using the ChIP-Seq technique, we mapped the genome-wide CTCF deposition sites in the chicken lymphoid and erythroid cells that were used for the 4C analysis. We observed a good correlation between the density of CTCF deposition sites and the level of 4C signals for the anchors located in CpG islands but not for an anchor located in a gene desert. It is thus possible that CTCF contributes to the clustering of CpG islands observed in our experiments. PMID:24736527

  8. The clustering of CpG islands may constitute an important determinant of the 3D organization of interphase chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gushchanskaya, Ekaterina S; Artemov, Artem V; Ulyanov, Sergey V; Logacheva, Maria D; Penin, Aleksey A; Kotova, Elena S; Akopov, Sergey B; Nikolaev, Lev G; Iarovaia, Olga V; Sverdlov, Eugene D; Gavrilov, Alexey A; Razin, Sergey V

    2014-01-01

    We used the 4C-Seq technique to characterize the genome-wide patterns of spatial contacts of several CpG islands located on chromosome 14 in cultured chicken lymphoid and erythroid cells. We observed a clear tendency for the spatial clustering of CpG islands present on the same and different chromosomes, regardless of the presence or absence of promoters within these CpG islands. Accordingly, we observed preferential spatial contacts between Sp1 binding motifs and other GC-rich genomic elements, including the DNA sequence motifs capable of forming G-quadruplexes. However, an anchor placed in a gene/CpG island-poor area formed spatial contacts with other gene/CpG island-poor areas on chromosome 14 and other chromosomes. These results corroborate the two-compartment model of the spatial organization of interphase chromosomes and suggest that the clustering of CpG islands constitutes an important determinant of the 3D organization of the eukaryotic genome in the cell nucleus. Using the ChIP-Seq technique, we mapped the genome-wide CTCF deposition sites in the chicken lymphoid and erythroid cells that were used for the 4C analysis. We observed a good correlation between the density of CTCF deposition sites and the level of 4C signals for the anchors located in CpG islands but not for an anchor located in a gene desert. It is thus possible that CTCF contributes to the clustering of CpG islands observed in our experiments. PMID:24736527

  9. QSAR and 3D QSAR of inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto-Bazurco, Mariano; Tsakovska, Ivanka; Pajeva, Ilza

    This article reports quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) and 3D QSAR models of 134 structurally diverse inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase. Free-Wilson analysis was used to derive the QSAR model. It identified the substituents in aniline, the polycyclic system, and the substituents at the 6- and 7-positions of the polycyclic system as the most important structural features. Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) were used in the 3D QSAR modeling. The steric and electrostatic interactions proved the most important for the inhibitory effect. Both QSAR and 3D QSAR models led to consistent results. On the basis of the statistically significant models, new structures were proposed and their inhibitory activities were predicted.

  10. A Tunable Scaffold of Microtubular Graphite for 3D Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aerographite (AG) is a novel carbon-based material that exists as a self-supportive 3D network of interconnected hollow microtubules. It can be synthesized in a variety of architectures tailored by the growth conditions. This flexibility in creating structures presents interesting bioengineering possibilities such as the generation of an artificial extracellular matrix. Here we have explored the feasibility and potential of AG as a scaffold for 3D cell growth employing cyclic RGD (cRGD) peptides coupled to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) conjugated phospholipids for surface functionalization to promote specific adhesion of fibroblast cells. Successful growth and invasion of the bulk material was followed over a period of 4 days. PMID:27258400

  11. Space-charge driven emittance growth in a 3D mismatched anisotropic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.D.; Hofmann, I.

    2002-12-03

    In this paper we present a 3D simulation study of the emittance growth in a mismatched anisotropic beam. The equipartitioning driven by a 4th order space-charge resonance can be significantly modified by the presence of mismatch oscillation and halo formation. This causes emittance growth in both the longitudinal and transverse directions which could drive the beam even further away from equipartition. The averaged emittance growth per degree freedom follows the upper bound of the 2D free energy limit plus the contributions from equipartitioning.

  12. Slider thickness promotes lubricity: from 2D islands to 3D clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Roberto; Tosatti, Erio; Vanossi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    The sliding of three-dimensional clusters and two-dimensional islands adsorbed on crystal surfaces represents an important test case to understand friction. Even for the same material, monoatomic islands and thick clusters will not as a rule exhibit the same friction, but specific differences have not been explored. Through realistic molecular dynamics simulations of the static friction of gold on graphite, an experimentally relevant system, we uncover as a function of gold thickness a progressive drop of static friction from monolayer islands, that are easily pinned, towards clusters, that slide more readily. The main ingredient contributing to this thickness-induced lubricity appears to be the increased effective rigidity of the atomic contact, acting to reduce the cluster interdigitation with the substrate. A second element which plays a role is the lateral contact size, which can accommodate the solitons typical of the incommensurate interface only above a critical contact diameter, which is larger for monolayer islands than for thick clusters. The two effects concur to make clusters more lubric than islands, and large sizes more lubric than smaller ones. These conclusions are expected to be of broader applicability in diverse nanotribological systems, where the role played by static, and dynamic, friction is generally quite important.

  13. Seismic attribute analysis for 3-D structural interpretation of the offshore South Marsh Island, Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horozal, Senay; Lee, Gwang Hoon; Cukur, Deniz; Pigott, John D.

    2013-04-01

    Structural and seismic attribute analyses of 3-D seismic reflection data from southwest offshore South Marsh Island, Louisiana, Gulf of Mexico, reveal complex structures affected by salt tectonics triggered by interaction between salt, faults and rapid deltaic sedimentation on the shallow continental shelf. Salt exercises the main control on the sedimentary processes in the study area to move, to divert sediment, to create instability, and to block sediment transport pathways. The depths of salt range about 4,300 m (14,000 ft) to 6,500 m (21,600 ft). Salt is very deep and forms a thin sheet in the southwestern part of the area, whereas it rises to shallow depths, forming a dome in the central part. Salt is seen at relatively shallow stratigraphic levels in the northwest and south where it forms thin salt rollers. The margins of Miocene strata are deformed by salt movement and faulting in the study area. The study area is riddled by numerous normal faults which are mostly E-trending and some N- and NW-trending with southward gradual increase in growth factors. Eight main normal faults were interpreted from seismic data which are mostly E-trending S-dipping, and are accompanied by smaller secondary faults. Three of E-trending down-to-the-basin growth faults cut across the study area separating the area into four blocks. These faults form a stair-stepping structure in the south direction. Two conjugate-crossing normal faults are located over the central salt dome which may indicate active salt doming. Seismic attribute analysis was applied as output of seismic volumes, and horizon and time-slice maps in order to identify the structure of study area. These attribute volumes together with time- and horizon-slices gave amplitude anomalies at discontinuities (faults) and lithological changes (sand to shale, salt). Faults interpreted and mapped from seismic profiles and those identified by seismic attribute slices are compatible, therefore, seismic attribute analysis can

  14. 3D cell culture systems modeling tumor growth determinants in cancer target discovery.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Claudio R; Zimmermann, Miriam; Agarkova, Irina; Kelm, Jens M; Krek, Wilhelm

    2014-04-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells, cell biological context, heterotypic crosstalk and the microenvironment are key determinants of the multistep process of tumor development. They sign responsible, to a significant extent, for the limited response and resistance of cancer cells to molecular-targeted therapies. Better functional knowledge of the complex intra- and intercellular signaling circuits underlying communication between the different cell types populating a tumor tissue and of the systemic and local factors that shape the tumor microenvironment is therefore imperative. Sophisticated 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) systems provide an emerging tool to model the phenotypic and cellular heterogeneity as well as microenvironmental aspects of in vivo tumor growth. In this review we discuss the cellular, chemical and physical factors contributing to zonation and cellular crosstalk within tumor masses. On this basis, we further describe 3D cell culture technologies for growth of MCTS as advanced tools for exploring molecular tumor growth determinants and facilitating drug discovery efforts. We conclude with a synopsis on technological aspects for on-line analysis and post-processing of 3D MCTS models.

  15. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Bacterial Colony Growth in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xinxian; Mugler, Andrew; Nemenman, Ilya

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial cells growing in liquid culture have been well studied and modeled. However, in nature, bacteria often grow as biofilms or colonies in physically structured habitats. A comprehensive model for population growth in such conditions has not yet been developed. Based on the well-established theory for bacterial growth in liquid culture, we develop a model for colony growth in 3D in which a homogeneous colony of cells locally consume a diffusing nutrient. We predict that colony growth is initially exponential, as in liquid culture, but quickly slows to sub-exponential after nutrient is locally depleted. This prediction is consistent with our experiments performed with E. coli in soft agar. Our model provides a baseline to which studies of complex growth process, such as such as spatially and phenotypically heterogeneous colonies, must be compared.

  16. The study of craniofacial growth patterns using 3D laser scanning and geometric morphometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friess, Martin

    2006-02-01

    Throughout childhood, braincase and face grow at different rates and therefore exhibit variable proportions and positions relative to each other. Our understanding of the direction and magnitude of these growth patterns is crucial for many ergonomic applications and can be improved by advanced 3D morphometrics. The purpose of this study is to investigate this known growth allometry using 3D imaging techniques. The geometry of the head and face of 840 children, aged 2 to 19, was captured with a laser surface scanner and analyzed statistically. From each scan, 18 landmarks were extracted and registered using General Procrustes Analysis (GPA). GPA eliminates unwanted variation due to position, orientation and scale by applying a least-squares superimposition algorithm to individual landmark configurations. This approach provides the necessary normalization for the study of differences in size, shape, and their interaction (allometry). The results show that throughout adolescence, boys and girls follow a different growth trajectory, leading to marked differences not only in size but also in shape, most notably in relative proportions of the braincase. These differences can be observed during early childhood, but become most noticeable after the age of 13 years, when craniofacial growth in girls slows down significantly, whereas growth in boys continues for at least 3 more years.

  17. Real-time 3D imaging of microstructure growth in battery cells using indirect MRI.

    PubMed

    Ilott, Andrew J; Mohammadi, Mohaddese; Chang, Hee Jung; Grey, Clare P; Jerschow, Alexej

    2016-09-27

    Lithium metal is a promising anode material for Li-ion batteries due to its high theoretical specific capacity and low potential. The growth of dendrites is a major barrier to the development of high capacity, rechargeable Li batteries with lithium metal anodes, and hence, significant efforts have been undertaken to develop new electrolytes and separator materials that can prevent this process or promote smooth deposits at the anode. Central to these goals, and to the task of understanding the conditions that initiate and propagate dendrite growth, is the development of analytical and nondestructive techniques that can be applied in situ to functioning batteries. MRI has recently been demonstrated to provide noninvasive imaging methodology that can detect and localize microstructure buildup. However, until now, monitoring dendrite growth by MRI has been limited to observing the relatively insensitive metal nucleus directly, thus restricting the temporal and spatial resolution and requiring special hardware and acquisition modes. Here, we present an alternative approach to detect a broad class of metallic dendrite growth via the dendrites' indirect effects on the surrounding electrolyte, allowing for the application of fast 3D (1)H MRI experiments with high resolution. We use these experiments to reconstruct 3D images of growing Li dendrites from MRI, revealing details about the growth rate and fractal behavior. Radiofrequency and static magnetic field calculations are used alongside the images to quantify the amount of the growing structures.

  18. Non-twist map bifurcation of drift-lines and drift-island formation in saturated 3D MHD equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfefferle, David; Cooper, Wilfred A.; Graves, Jonathan P.

    2015-11-01

    Based on non-canonical perturbation theory, guiding-centre drift equations are identified as perturbed magnetic field-line equations. The topology of passing-particle orbits, called drift-lines, is completely determined by the magnetic configuration. In axisymmetric tokamak fields, drift-lines lie on shifted flux-surfaces, called drift-surfaces. Field-lines and drift-lines are subject to island structures at rational surfaces only when a non-axisymmetric component is added. The picture is different in the case of 3D saturated MHD equilibrium like the helical core associated with a non-resonant internal kink mode. In assuming nested flux-surfaces, these bifurcated states, expected for a reversed q-profile with qmin close yet above unity and conveniently obtained in VMEC, feature integrable field-lines. The helical drift-lines however become resonant with the axisymmetric component in the region of qmin and spontaneously generate drift-islands. Due to the locally reversed sheared q-profile, the drift-island structure follows the bifurcation/reconnection mechanism of non-twist maps. This result provides a theoretical interpretation of NBI fast ion helical hot-spots in Long-Lived Modes as well as snake-like impurity density accumulation in internal MHD activity.

  19. Development of Inundation Map for Bantayan Island, Cebu Using Delft3D-Flow Storm Surge Simulations of Typhoon Haiyan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadra, Camille; Suarez, John Kenneth; Biton, Nophi Ian; Cabacaba, Krichi May; Lapidez, John Phillip; Santiago, Joy; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo; Malano, Vicente

    2014-05-01

    On average, 20 typhoons enter the Philippine area of responsibility annually, making it vulnerable to different storm hazards. Apart from the frequency of tropical cyclones, the archipelagic nature of the country makes it particularly prone to storm surges. On 08 November 2013, Haiyan, a Category 5 Typhoon with maximum one-minute sustained wind speed of 315 kph, hit the central region of the Philippines. In its path, the howler devastated Bantayan Island, a popular tourist destination. The island is located north of Cebu City, the second largest metropolis of the Philippines in terms of populace. Having been directly hit by Typhoon Haiyan, Bantayan Island was severely damaged by strong winds and storm surges, with more than 11,000 houses totally destroyed while 5,000 more suffered minor damage. The adverse impacts of possible future storm surge events in the island can only be mitigated if hazard maps that depict inundation of the coastal areas of Bantayan are generated. To create such maps, Delft3D-Flow, a hydrodynamic model was used to simulate storm surges. These simulations were made over a 10-m per pixel resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO) bathymetry. The results of the coastal inundation model for Typhoon Haiyan's storm surges were validated using data collected from field work and local government reports. The hydrodynamic model of Bantayan was then calibrated using the field data and further simulations were made with varying typhoon tracks. This was done to generate scenarios on the farthest possible inland incursion of storm surges. The output of the study is a detailed storm surge inundation map that depicts safe zones for development of infrastructure near coastal areas and for construction of coastal protection structures. The storm surge inundation map can also be used as basis for disaster preparedness plans of coastal communities threatened by approaching typhoons.

  20. Neurite outgrowth at the interface of 2D and 3D growth environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofron, Celinda M.; Fong, Vivian J.; Hoffman-Kim, Diane

    2009-02-01

    Growing neurons navigate complex environments, but in vitro systems for studying neuronal growth typically limit the cues to flat surfaces or a single type of cue, thereby limiting the resulting growth. Here we examined the growth of neurons presented with two-dimensional (2D) substrate-bound cues when these cues were presented in conjunction with a more complex three-dimensional (3D) architecture. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explants were cultured at the interface between a collagen I matrix and a glass coverslip. Laminin (LN) or chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) were uniformly coated on the surface of the glass coverslip or patterned in 50 µm tracks by microcontact printing. Quantitative analysis of neurite outgrowth with a novel grid system at multiple depths in the gel revealed several interesting trends. Most of the neurites extended at the surface of the gel when LN was presented whereas more neurites extended into the gel when CSPG was presented. Patterning of cues did not affect neurite density or depth of growth. However, neurite outgrowth near the surface of the gel aligned with LN patterns, and these extensions were significantly longer than neurites extended in other cultures. In interface cultures, DRG growth patterns varied with the type of cue where neurite density was higher in cultures presenting LN than in cultures presenting CSPG. These results represent an important step toward understanding how neurons integrate local structural and chemical cues to make net growth decisions.

  1. 3D Multi-Cell Simulation of Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shirinifard, Abbas; Gens, J. Scott; Zaitlen, Benjamin L.; Popławski, Nikodem J.; Swat, Maciej; Glazier, James A.

    2009-01-01

    We present a 3D multi-cell simulation of a generic simplification of vascular tumor growth which can be easily extended and adapted to describe more specific vascular tumor types and host tissues. Initially, tumor cells proliferate as they take up the oxygen which the pre-existing vasculature supplies. The tumor grows exponentially. When the oxygen level drops below a threshold, the tumor cells become hypoxic and start secreting pro-angiogenic factors. At this stage, the tumor reaches a maximum diameter characteristic of an avascular tumor spheroid. The endothelial cells in the pre-existing vasculature respond to the pro-angiogenic factors both by chemotaxing towards higher concentrations of pro-angiogenic factors and by forming new blood vessels via angiogenesis. The tumor-induced vasculature increases the growth rate of the resulting vascularized solid tumor compared to an avascular tumor, allowing the tumor to grow beyond the spheroid in these linear-growth phases. First, in the linear-spherical phase of growth, the tumor remains spherical while its volume increases. Second, in the linear-cylindrical phase of growth the tumor elongates into a cylinder. Finally, in the linear-sheet phase of growth, tumor growth accelerates as the tumor changes from cylindrical to paddle-shaped. Substantial periods during which the tumor grows slowly or not at all separate the exponential from the linear-spherical and the linear-spherical from the linear-cylindrical growth phases. In contrast to other simulations in which avascular tumors remain spherical, our simulated avascular tumors form cylinders following the blood vessels, leading to a different distribution of hypoxic cells within the tumor. Our simulations cover time periods which are long enough to produce a range of biologically reasonable complex morphologies, allowing us to study how tumor-induced angiogenesis affects the growth rate, size and morphology of simulated tumors. PMID:19834621

  2. Thrust fault growth within accretionary wedges: New Insights from 3D seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, H.; Bell, R. E.; Jackson, C. A. L.

    2015-12-01

    The shallow parts of subduction megathrust faults are typically thought to be aseismic and incapable of propagating seismic rupture. The 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, however, ruptured all the way to the trench, proving that in some locations rupture can propagate through the accretionary wedge. An improved understanding of the structural character and physical properties of accretionary wedges is therefore crucial to begin to assess why such anomalously shallow seismic rupture occurs. Despite its importance, we know surprisingly little regarding the 3D geometry and kinematics of thrust network development in accretionary prisms, largely due to a lack of 3D seismic reflection data providing high-resolution, 3D images of entire networks. Thus our current understanding is largely underpinned by observations from analogue and numerical modelling, with limited observational data from natural examples. In this contribution we use PSDM, 3D seismic reflection data from the Nankai margin (3D Muroto dataset, available from the UTIG Academic Seismic Portal, Marine Geoscience Data System) to examine how imbricate thrust fault networks evolve during accretionary wedge growth. Previous studies have reported en-echelon thrust fault geometries from the NW part of the dataset, and have related this complex structure to seamount subduction. We unravel the evolution of faults within the protothrust and imbricate thrust zones by interpreting multiple horizons across faults and measuring fault displacement and fold amplitude along-strike; by doing this, we are able to investigate the three dimensional accrual of strain. We document a number of local displacement minima along-strike of faults, suggesting that, the protothrust and imbricate thrusts developed from the linkage of smaller, previously isolated fault segments. We also demonstrate that the majority of faults grew upward from the décollement, although there is some evidence for downward fault propagation. Our observations

  3. Nucleation Of Ge 3D-islands On Pit-patterned Si Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, P. L.; Smagina, J. V.; Vlasov, D. Yu.; Deryabin, A. S.; Kozhukhov, A. S.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.

    2011-12-23

    Joint experimental and theoretical study of Ge nanoislands growth on pit-patterned Si substrate is carried out. Si substrates that have been templated by means of electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching have been used to grow Ge by molecular-beam epitaxy. Atomic-force-microscopy studies show that at Si(100) substrate temperature 550 deg. C, Ge nanoislands are formed at the pits' edges, rather than between the pits. The effect is interpreted in terms of energy barrier, that is formed near the edge of a pit and prevents Ge transport inside the pit. By molecular dynamics calculations the value of the energy barrier 0.9 eV was obtained.

  4. Spatially-dense 3D facial asymmetry assessment in both typical and disordered growth

    PubMed Central

    Claes, Peter; Walters, Mark; Vandermeulen, Dirk; Clement, John Gerald

    2011-01-01

    Mild facial asymmetries are common in typical growth patterns. Therefore, detection of disordered facial growth patterns in individuals characterized by asymmetries is preferably accomplished by reference to the typical variation found in the general population rather than to some ideal of perfect symmetry, which rarely exists. This presents a challenge in developing an asymmetry assessment tool that is applicable, without modification, to detect both mild and severe facial asymmetries. In this paper we use concepts from geometric morphometrics to obtain robust and spatially-dense asymmetry assessments using a superimposition protocol for comparison of a face with its mirror image. Spatially-dense localization of asymmetries was achieved using an anthropometric mask consisting of uniformly sampled quasi-landmarks that were automatically indicated on 3D facial images. Robustness, in the sense of an unbiased analysis under increasing asymmetry, was ensured by an adaptive, robust, least-squares superimposition. The degree of overall asymmetry in an individual was scored using a root-mean-squared-error, and the proportion was scored using a novel relative significant asymmetry percentage. This protocol was applied to a database of 3D facial images from 359 young healthy individuals and three individuals with disordered facial growth. Typical asymmetry statistics were derived and were mainly located on, but not limited to, the lower two-thirds of the face in males and females. The asymmetry in males was more extensive and of a greater magnitude than in females. This protocol and proposed scoring of asymmetry with accompanying reference statistics will be useful for the detection and quantification of facial asymmetry in future studies. PMID:21740426

  5. 3D choroid neovascularization growth prediction based on reaction-diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shuxia; Chen, Xinjian; Shi, Fei; Xiang, Dehui; Zhu, Weifang; Chen, Haoyu

    2016-03-01

    Choroid neovascularization (CNV) is a kind of pathology from the choroid and CNV-related disease is one important cause of vision loss. It is desirable to predict the CNV growth rate so that appropriate treatment can be planned. In this paper, we seek to find a method to predict the growth of CNV based on 3D longitudinal Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images. A reaction-diffusion model is proposed for prediction. The method consists of four phases: pre-processing, meshing, CNV growth modeling and prediction. We not only apply the reaction-diffusion model to the disease region, but also take the surrounding tissues into consideration including outer retinal layer, inner retinal layer and choroid layer. The diffusion in these tissues is considered as isotropic. The finite-element-method (FEM) is used to solve the partial differential equations (PDE) in the diffusion model. The curve of CNV growth with treatment are fitted and then we can predict the CNV status in a future time point. The preliminary results demonstrated that our proposed method is accurate and the validity and feasibility of our model is obvious.

  6. Dynamic coupling between fluid flow and vein growth in fractures: a 3D numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, J.-O.; Enzmann, F.

    2012-04-01

    Fluid flow is one of the main mass transport mechanisms in the Earth's crust and abundant mineral vein networks are important indicators for fluid flow and fluid rock interaction. These systems are dynamic and part of the so called RTM processes (reaction-transport-mechanics). Understanding of mineral vein systems requires coupling of these processes. Here we present a conceptional model for dynamic vein growth of syntaxial, posttectonic veins generated by advective fluid flow and show first results of a numerical model for this scenario. Vein generation requires three processes to occur: (i) fracture generation by mechanical stress e.g. hydro-fracturing, (ii) flow of a supersaturated fluid on that fracture and (iii) crystallization of phase(s) on or in the fracture. 3D synthetic fractures are generated with the SynFrac code (Ogilvie, et al. 2006). Subsequently solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation for this fracture are computed by a computational fluid dynamics code called GeoDict (Wiegmann 2007). Transport (advective and diffusive) of chemical species to growth sites in the fracture and vein growth are computed by a self-written MATLAB script. The numerical model discretizes the wall rock and fracture geometry by volumetric pixels (voxels). Based on this representation, the model computes the three basic functions for vein generation: (a) nucleation, (b) fluid flow with transport of chemical species and (c) growth. The following conditions were chosen for these three modules. Nucleation is heterogeneous and occurs instantaneously at the wall rock/fracture interface. Advective and diffusive flow of a supersaturated fluid and related transport of chemical species occurs according to the computed fluid flow field by GeoDict. Concentration of chemical species at the inflow is constant, representing external fluid buffering. Changes/decrease in the concentration of chemical species occurs only due to vein growth. Growth of nuclei is limited either by transport of

  7. 3D characterization of leading-edge vortex formation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoue, Kyohei; Breuer, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    We examine the vorticity transport mechanisms responsible for regulating the stability and strength of the leading-edge vortex (LEV) on rapidly pitching plates with different planforms (swept vs. rectangular) in a uniform airflow. All experiments are carried out using a cyber-physical experimental setup (Onoue et al., 2015, JFS vol. 55) and synchronized 3D PIV measurements. In the case of a swept wing, two distinct regions of intense spanwise flow are observed around the LEV centroid--a feature conspicuously absent on a rectangular pitching plate. The interaction between these spanwise flows and the LEV core seems to play a role in prolonging the LEV residence time at the cost of the vortex circulation growth rate and magnitude. Detailed control volume analysis is performed to elucidate the flow physics at work. This research is funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).

  8. Differences in growth properties of endometrial cancer in three dimensional (3D) culture and 2D cell monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Chitcholtan, Kenny; Asselin, Eric; Parent, Sophie; Sykes, Peter H.; Evans, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models have an invaluable role in understanding the behaviour of tumour cells in a well defined microenvironment. This is because some aspects of tumour characteristics cannot be fully recapitulated in a cell monolayer (2D). In the present study, we compared growth patterns, expression of signalling molecules, and metabolism-associated proteins of endometrial cancer cell lines in 3D and 2D cell cultures. Cancer cells formed spherical structures in 3D reconstituted basement membrane (3D rBM), and the morphological appearance was cell line dependent. Cell differentiation was observed after 8 days in the 3D rBM. There was reduced proliferation, detected by less expression of PCNA in 3D rBM than in 2D cell monolayers. The addition of exogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF) to cancer cells induced phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt in both cell culture conditions. The uptake of glucose was selectively altered in the 3D rBM, but there was a lack of association with Glut-1 expression. The secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) was selectively altered in 3D rBM, and it was cell line dependent. Our data demonstrated that 3D rBM as an in vitro model can influence proliferation and metabolism of endometrial cancer cell behaviour compared to 2D cell monolayer. Changes are specific to individual cell types. The use of 3D rBM is, therefore, important in the in vitro study of targeted anticancer therapies.

  9. MBE Growth of InN/GaN(0001) and Shape Transitions of InN islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yongge; Xie, Maohai; Liu, Ying; Ng, Y. F.

    2003-03-01

    Plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxial growth of InN on GaN(0001) is investigated. Both layer-by-layer and Stranski-Krastanov (SK) growth modes are observed under different growth windows. Strain relaxation is studied by real-time recording of the in-plane lattice spacing evolutions on RHEED pattern, which suggest a gradual relaxation of the strain in InN film commenced during the first bilayer (BL) deposition and almost completed after 2-4 BLs. For SK growth, 3D islanding initiates after the strain has mostly been relieved, presumably by dislocations. Based on statistical analysis, the shape transitions of 3D islands are firstly observed in the III-nitrides system. The InN islands transform gradually from pyramids to platelets with increasing of In flux. Under In-rich growth condition, the reverse trend of island shape evolution dependence on volume size, compared with Equilibrium Crystal Shape (ECS) theory, is induced by the Indium self-surfactant effects, in which Indium adlayer on the top surface of InN islands will depress the thermodynamic driving force for the vertical growth of 3D islands. Lateral growth of 3D islands is not only the result of kinetic process but also favored by thermodynamics while Indium self-surfactant exist.

  10. Use of 2D and 3D Imaging Techniques to Understand Fracture Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockner, D. A.

    2004-05-01

    The monitoring of acoustic emissions (AE) is a valuable tool for studying the brittle fracture process in rock. With the improved characterization of transducer response, researchers are able to apply a broad spectrum of seismological techniques to AE catalogues collected in the laboratory; i.e., moment tensor analysis, Vp/Vs ratios, attenuation, event clustering statistics, Gutenberg-Richter b-value and aftershock analysis. Since AE occurs spontaneously as a result of unstable microcrack growth during rock deformation experiments, it provides a non-destructive method to observe damage accumulation. I will give examples of visualization techniques that have proven helpful in the analysis of fracture nucleation and growth based on 3D event locations in granite and sandstone samples. These techniques are useful in interpreting the development of complex fracture systems in lab samples. Complementary measurements of wave speed anisotropy and heterogeneity are used to infer both the development of damage zones and the rate of infiltration of water during fluid injection experiments. Finally, spatial clustering of AE events is evaluated in terms of the surface roughness of reactivated faults during triaxial deformation experiments.

  11. Enhanced reversible lithium storage in germanium nano-island coated 3D hexagonal bottle-like Si nanorod arrays.

    PubMed

    Yue, Chuang; Yu, Yingjian; Wu, ZhenGuo; He, Xu; Wang, JianYuan; Li, JunTao; Li, Cheng; Wu, Suntao; Li, Jing; Kang, Junyong

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of numerous microscale electronic devices, such as smart dust, micro or nano bio-sensors, medical implants and so on, has induced an urgent demand for integratable micro or nano battery supplies with high energy and power densities. In this work, 3D hexagonal bottle-like Si/Ge composite nanorod (NR) array electrodes with good uniformity and mechanical stability potentially used in micro or nano rechargeable Li-ion batteries (LIBs) were fabricated on Si substrates by a cost-effective, wafer scale and Si-compatible process. The optimized Ge nano-islands coated Si NR composite arrays as anode materials exhibit superior areal capacities and cycling performances by virtue of their favourable structural and improved conductivity features. The unique Si-based composite electrode in nanostructures can be technically and fundamentally employed to configurate all-solid-state Li-ion micro-batteries as on-chip power systems integrated into micro-electronic devices such as M/NEMS devices or autonomous wireless microsystems.

  12. The Cultural Divide: Exponential Growth in Classical 2D and Metabolic Equilibrium in 3D Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Borkowski, Kamil; Schwämmle, Veit; Dai, Jie; Joensen, Kira Eyd; Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Carvalho, Vasco Botelho; Fey, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cellular metabolism can be considered to have two extremes: one is characterized by exponential growth (in 2D cultures) and the other by a dynamic equilibrium (in 3D cultures). We have analyzed the proteome and cellular architecture at these two extremes and found that they are dramatically different. Results Structurally, actin organization is changed, microtubules are increased and keratins 8 and 18 decreased. Metabolically, glycolysis, fatty acid metabolism and the pentose phosphate shunt are increased while TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation is unchanged. Enzymes involved in cholesterol and urea synthesis are increased consistent with the attainment of cholesterol and urea production rates seen in vivo. DNA repair enzymes are increased even though cells are predominantly in Go. Transport around the cell – along the microtubules, through the nuclear pore and in various types of vesicles has been prioritized. There are numerous coherent changes in transcription, splicing, translation, protein folding and degradation. The amount of individual proteins within complexes is shown to be highly coordinated. Typically subunits which initiate a particular function are present in increased amounts compared to other subunits of the same complex. Summary We have previously demonstrated that cells at dynamic equilibrium can match the physiological performance of cells in tissues in vivo. Here we describe the multitude of protein changes necessary to achieve this performance. PMID:25222612

  13. 3-D Anisotropic Ambient Noise Tomography of Piton De La Fournaise Volcano (La Réunion Island)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, A.; Rivet, D. N.; Landes, M.; Shapiro, N.

    2014-12-01

    We cross-correlate four years of seismic noise continuously recorded by the seismic monitoring network of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano (La Réunion Island). The network is composed of 40 stations 27 of which have 3-component sensors. We use Vertical-to-Vertical (ZZ) cross-correlation components from all stations and Radial-to-Radial (RR) and Transverse-to-Transverse (TT) cross-correlations computed from 3-component records. The group velocity dispersion curves for Rayleigh and Love waves are measured using a Frequency-Time Analysis. We average measurements from ZZ and RR components to finally obtain 577 Rayleigh-wave dispersion curves. 395 Love-wave dispersion curves are obtained from the TT cross-correlations. We then regionalize the group velocities measurements to construct 2D dispersion maps at a set of periods between 0.4 and 8 s. Finally, we construct a 3D shear-velocity model down to 3 km below the sea level by jointly inverting the Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity maps with a Neighborhood Algorithm and with taking into account the radial anisotropy. The distribution of 3-D Voigt averaged S-wave velocities shows three distinct high-velocity anomalies surrounded by a low-velocity ring. The most western high-velocity anomaly is located below the actual "Plaine des Sables" and could be attributed to an old intrusive body at the location of the former volcanic center before it migrated toward its present location. The second high-velocity body is located below the summit of the volcano and likely corresponds to the actual preferential dyke intrusion zone as highlighted by the seismicity. The third high-velocity anomaly is located below the "Grandes Pentes" and the "Grand Brûlé" areas and is thought to be an imprint of the solidified magma chamber of the ancient dismantled "Les Alizé" volcano. The distribution of the radial anisotropy shows two main anomalies: a positive anisotropy (Vsh>Vsv) above sea level highlighting the recent edifice of Piton de

  14. Bulge Growth and Quenching Since Z=2.5 in Candels/3D-HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Phillip; Wuyts, Stijn; Somerville, Rachel S.; Schreiber, Natascha M. Foerster; Genzel, Reinhard; Bell, Eric F.; Brammer, Gabe; Dekel, Avishai; Faber, Sandra M.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lutz, Dieter; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Primack, Joel R.; Rosario, David J.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Tacconi, Linda J.; van Dokkum, Peter G.; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2014-01-01

    Exploiting the deep high-resolution imaging of all 5 CANDELS fields, and accurate redshift informationprovided by 3D-HST, we investigate the relation between structure and stellar populations fora mass-selected sample of 6764 galaxies above 1010 M, spanning the redshift range 0.5 z 2.5.For the first time, we fit 2-dimensional models comprising a single Sersic fit and two-component (i.e.,bulge + disk) decompositions not only to the H-band light distributions, but also to the stellar massmaps reconstructed from resolved stellar population modeling. We confirm that the increased bulgeprominence among quiescent galaxies, as reported previously based on rest-optical observations, remainsin place when considering the distributions of stellar mass. Moreover, we observe an increaseof the typical Sersic index and bulge-to-total ratio (with median BT reaching 40-50) among starforminggalaxies above 1011 M. Given that quenching for these most massive systems is likely tobe imminent, our findings suggest that significant bulge growth precedes a departure from the starformingmain sequence. We demonstrate that the bulge mass (and ideally knowledge of the bulge andtotal mass) is a more reliable predictor of the star-forming versus quiescent state of a galaxy thanthe total stellar mass. The same trends are predicted by the state-of-the-art semi-analytic model bySomerville et al. In the latter, bulges and black holes grow hand in hand through merging andordisk instabilities, and AGN-feedback shuts off star formation. Further observations will be requiredto pin down star formation quenching mechanisms, but our results imply they must be internal to thegalaxies and closely associated with bulge growth.

  15. Bulge growth and quenching since z = 2.5 in CANDELS/3D-HST

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Philipp; Wuyts, Stijn; Schreiber, Natascha M. Förster; Genzel, Reinhard; Lutz, Dieter; Rosario, David J.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Bell, Eric F.; Brammer, Gabe; Dekel, Avishai; Faber, Sandra M.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Kocevski, Dale D.; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Nelson, Erica J.; Primack, Joel R.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; and others

    2014-06-10

    Exploiting the deep high-resolution imaging of all five CANDELS fields, and accurate redshift information provided by 3D-HST, we investigate the relation between structure and stellar populations for a mass-selected sample of 6764 galaxies above 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, spanning the redshift range 0.5 < z < 2.5. For the first time, we fit two-dimensional models comprising a single Sérsic fit and two-component (i.e., bulge + disk) decompositions not only to the H-band light distributions, but also to the stellar mass maps reconstructed from resolved stellar population modeling. We confirm that the increased bulge prominence among quiescent galaxies, as reported previously based on rest-optical observations, remains in place when considering the distributions of stellar mass. Moreover, we observe an increase of the typical Sérsic index and bulge-to-total ratio (with median B/T reaching 40%-50%) among star-forming galaxies above 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. Given that quenching for these most massive systems is likely to be imminent, our findings suggest that significant bulge growth precedes a departure from the star-forming main sequence. We demonstrate that the bulge mass (and ideally knowledge of the bulge and total mass) is a more reliable predictor of the star-forming versus quiescent state of a galaxy than the total stellar mass. The same trends are predicted by the state-of-the-art, semi-analytic model by Somerville et al. In this model, bulges and black holes grow hand in hand through merging and/or disk instabilities, and feedback from active galactic nuclei shuts off star formation. Further observations will be required to pin down star formation quenching mechanisms, but our results imply that they must be internal to the galaxies and closely associated with bulge growth.

  16. Delft3D Storm Surge Simulation of Typhoon Haiyan for Projection of Coastal Inundation in the Visayas Islands, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, J. K. B.; Cabacaba, K. M.; Biton, N. I.; Cuadra, C.; Santiago, J. T.; Mendoza, J.; Lagmay, A. M. F. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Philippines is geographically prone to tropical cyclones with an annual average of 20 typhoons entering the country's area of responsibility. On 08 November 2013, a Category 5 Typhoon Haiyan with maximum one-minute sustained wind speed of 315 kph, hit the central area of the archipelago. The damage from the typhoon reached two billion US dollars with 6,300 reported casualties. The adverse impacts of possible future storm surge events in the Philippine archipelago specifically in the Visayan region can only be mitigated if a storm surge model that will include the inundation of the coastal areas is generated. The hydrodynamic modeling software, Delft3D, was used in the storm surge simulation of the Visayas Islands. An overall model of the Visayas with a coarse grid cell size was nested to a detailed model on hardly stricken populated areas with a 10-m per pixel resolution Digital Elevation Model and General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans bathymetry. Due to lack of observed water level data during the onslaught of Typhoon Haiyan, the overall Visayas model was calibrated by simulating previous typhoons with recorded data acquired from tide stations. Several simulations were carried out to generate farthest possible inland incursion of storm surges. This was done by translating the actual typhoon track vertically and horizontally with a specified increment. The output of the study is a storm surge inundation map that can be used to determine safe zones for development of infrastructure near coastal areas. The storm surge inundation map can also be used as basis for disaster preparedness plans of coastal communities threatened by approaching typhoons.

  17. Delft3D Storm Surge Simulation of Typhoon Haiyan for Projection of Coastal Inundation in the Visayas Islands, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, John Kenneth; Cabacaba, Krichi May; Biton, Nophi Ian; Cuadra, Camille; Santiago, Joy; Mendoza, Jerico; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo

    2015-04-01

    The Philippines is geographically prone to tropical cyclones with an annual average of 20 typhoons entering the country's area of responsibility. Majority of these typhoons pass through the central part of the archipelago in the Visayas Region. On 08 November 2013, a Category 5 Typhoon Haiyan with maximum ten-minute sustained wind speed of 230 kph hit the Visayas region causing damage amounting to two billion US dollars with 6,300 reported casualties. The adverse impacts of future storm surge events in the Philippine archipelago, specifically in the Visayan region, can be mitigated if a storm surge model that will include the inundation of coastal areas is generated. The hydrodynamic modeling software, Delft3D, was used in creating hydrodynamic models for areas in the Visayas Islands. High resolution hydrodynamic models of the hardly stricken areas with 10-m per pixel resolution Digital Elevation Model and General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans bathymetry were nested to an overall model of Visayas with a coarse grid cell size. Due to the lack of observed water level data during the onslaught of Typhoon Haiyan, the overall Visayas model was calibrated by creating hydrodynamic models for the same Haiyan-affected areas using previous typhoons with recorded data acquired from tide stations as wind forcing. Several simulations were carried out to generate the farthest possible inland incursion of storm surges. This was done by translating the actual typhoon track vertically and horizontally with a specified increment. The output of the study is a storm surge inundation map showing the worst case scenario of inundation for a Category 5 typhoon. This storm surge inundation map can be used to determine safe zones for development of infrastructure near coastal areas. The storm surge inundation map can also be used as basis for disaster preparedness plans of coastal communities threatened by approaching typhoons.

  18. Constraints on 3D fault and fracture distribution in layered volcanic- volcaniclastic sequences from terrestrial LIDAR datasets: Faroe Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raithatha, Bansri; McCaffrey, Kenneth; Walker, Richard; Brown, Richard; Pickering, Giles

    2013-04-01

    Hydrocarbon reservoirs commonly contain an array of fine-scale structures that control fluid flow in the subsurface, such as polyphase fracture networks and small-scale fault zones. These structures are unresolvable using seismic imaging and therefore outcrop-based studies have been used as analogues to characterize fault and fracture networks and assess their impact on fluid flow in the subsurface. To maximize recovery and enhance production, it is essential to understand the geometry, physical properties, and distribution of these structures in 3D. Here we present field data and terrestrial LIDAR-derived 3D, photo-realistic virtual outcrops of fault zones at a range of displacement scales (0.001- 4.5 m) within a volcaniclastic sand- and basaltic lava unit sequence in the Faroe Islands. Detailed field observations were used to constrain the virtual outcrop dataset, and a workflow has been developed to build a discrete fracture network (DFN) models in GOCAD® from these datasets. Model construction involves three main stages: (1) Georeferencing and processing of LIDAR datasets; (2) Structural interpretation to discriminate between faults, fractures, veins, and joint planes using CAD software and RiSCAN Pro; and (3) Building a 3D DFN in GOCAD®. To test the validity of this workflow, we focus here on a 4.5 m displacement strike-slip fault zone that displays a complex polymodal fracture network in the inter-layered basalt-volcaniclastic sequence, which is well-constrained by field study. The DFN models support our initial field-based hypothesis that fault zone geometry varies with increasing displacement through volcaniclastic units. Fracture concentration appears to be greatest in the upper lava unit, decreases into the volcaniclastic sediments, and decreases further into the lower lava unit. This distribution of fractures appears to be related to the width of the fault zone and the amount of fault damage on the outcrop. For instance, the fault zone is thicker in

  19. Mechanical constraints imposed by 3D cellular geometry and arrangement modulate growth patterns in the Arabidopsis embryo.

    PubMed

    Bassel, George W; Stamm, Petra; Mosca, Gabriella; Barbier de Reuille, Pierre; Gibbs, Daniel J; Winter, Robin; Janka, Ales; Holdsworth, Michael J; Smith, Richard S

    2014-06-10

    Morphogenesis occurs in 3D space over time and is guided by coordinated gene expression programs. Here we use postembryonic development in Arabidopsis plants to investigate the genetic control of growth. We demonstrate that gene expression driving the production of the growth-stimulating hormone gibberellic acid and downstream growth factors is first induced within the radicle tip of the embryo. The center of cell expansion is, however, spatially displaced from the center of gene expression. Because the rapidly growing cells have very different geometry from that of those at the tip, we hypothesized that mechanical factors may contribute to this growth displacement. To this end we developed 3D finite-element method models of growing custom-designed digital embryos at cellular resolution. We used this framework to conceptualize how cell size, shape, and topology influence tissue growth and to explore the interplay of geometrical and genetic inputs into growth distribution. Our simulations showed that mechanical constraints are sufficient to explain the disconnect between the experimentally observed spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression and early postembryonic growth. The center of cell expansion is the position where genetic and mechanical facilitators of growth converge. We have thus uncovered a mechanism whereby 3D cellular geometry helps direct where genetically specified growth takes place.

  20. Low intensity pulse ultrasound stimulate chondrocytes growth in a 3-D alginate scaffold through improved porosity and permeability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Ji, Hongfei; Ma, Yong; Dong, Rui; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    A 3-D scaffold culture system has been used to promote in producing functional chondrocytes for repairing damaged cartilage. In the present study, the low intensity pulse ultrasound (LIPUS) (P(-)=0, 0.055, 0.085 and 0.11 MPa) was applied to improve the porosity and permeability of a 3-D alginate scaffold which was beneficial for the nutrition supply and metabolism during cell growth in 3-D alginate scaffold. The porosity and permeability of the scaffold was quantitatively analyzed based on scanning electron microscopy examination and fluorescence image observation. The results suggest that, for the scaffold exposed to LIPUS, its porosity and permeability could be significantly enhanced by the increasing LIPUS amplitude, which might be induced by the microstreaming shear stress generated by ultrasound-driven microbubble oscillations. Furthermore, the assessments of cell proliferation and collagen II expression confirmed that chondrocytes growth could be effectively promoted in 3-D alginate scaffolds treated by LIPUS, because of the improved scaffold porosity and permeability might benefit cell growth space and nutrition supply. It should also be noticed that appropriate LIPUS driving parameters should be adapted to achieve optimized chondrocytes culture effect in 3-D alginate scaffold. PMID:25543661

  1. Low intensity pulse ultrasound stimulate chondrocytes growth in a 3-D alginate scaffold through improved porosity and permeability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Ji, Hongfei; Ma, Yong; Dong, Rui; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    A 3-D scaffold culture system has been used to promote in producing functional chondrocytes for repairing damaged cartilage. In the present study, the low intensity pulse ultrasound (LIPUS) (P(-)=0, 0.055, 0.085 and 0.11 MPa) was applied to improve the porosity and permeability of a 3-D alginate scaffold which was beneficial for the nutrition supply and metabolism during cell growth in 3-D alginate scaffold. The porosity and permeability of the scaffold was quantitatively analyzed based on scanning electron microscopy examination and fluorescence image observation. The results suggest that, for the scaffold exposed to LIPUS, its porosity and permeability could be significantly enhanced by the increasing LIPUS amplitude, which might be induced by the microstreaming shear stress generated by ultrasound-driven microbubble oscillations. Furthermore, the assessments of cell proliferation and collagen II expression confirmed that chondrocytes growth could be effectively promoted in 3-D alginate scaffolds treated by LIPUS, because of the improved scaffold porosity and permeability might benefit cell growth space and nutrition supply. It should also be noticed that appropriate LIPUS driving parameters should be adapted to achieve optimized chondrocytes culture effect in 3-D alginate scaffold.

  2. 3D growth rates from tomographic images: local measurements for a better understanding of snow metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flin, F.; Calonne, N.; Denis, R.; Caneill, R.; Bernard, L.; Anne, D.; Philip, A.; Roulle, J.; Rolland du Roscoat, S.; Geindreau, C.

    2015-12-01

    Once deposited on the ground, snow forms a complex porous material whose microstructure constantly transforms over time. These evolutions, which strongly impact the physical and mechanical properties of snow (e.g. Srivastava et al, 2010; Calonne et al, 2014) need to be considered in details for an accurate snowpack modeling. However, some of the physical mechanisms involved in metamorphism are still poorly understood.To address this problem, several investigations combining X-ray tomography and 3D micro-modeling have been carried out (e.g. Flin et al, 2003; Kämpfer and Plapp, 2009; Pinzer et al, 2012) but precise comparisons between experimentation and modeling remain difficult. One of the difficulties comes from the lack of high resolution time-lapse series for experiments occurring with very well-defined boundary conditions, and from which precise measurements of the interfacial growth rates can be done.Thanks to a recently developed cryogenic cell (Calonne et al, 2015), we conducted in situ time-lapse tomographic experiments on several snow and ice samples under various conditions (isothermal metamorphism at -7°C, temperature gradient metamorphism at -2°C under a TG of 18 K/m, air cavity migration in a single crystal at -4°C under a TG of 50 K/m). The non-destructive nature of X-ray microtomography yielded series of 8 micron resolution images that were acquired with a 2 to 12 h time step. An image analysis method was then developed to estimate the normal growth rates on each point of the ice-air interface and applied to the series obtained.The analysis of the results and their comparison to those of existing models (e.g. Flin et al, 2003; Flin and Brzoska, 2008) give interesting outlooks for the understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in snow metamorphism. References:Calonne, N., et al (2015), Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, 3911-3918.Calonne, N., et al (2014), The Cryosphere, 8, 2255-2274.Flin, F. and J.-B. Brzoska (2008), Ann. Glaciol., 49, 17-21.Flin

  3. Kinematics of a growth fault/raft system on the West African margin using 3-D restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouby, Delphine; Raillard, Stéphane; Guillocheau, François; Bouroullec, Renaud; Nalpas, Thierry

    2002-04-01

    The ability to quantify the movement history associated with growth structures is crucial in the understanding of fundamental processes such as the growth of folds or faults in 3-D. In this paper, we present an application of an original approach to restore in 3-D a listric growth fault system resulting from gravity-induced extension located on the West African margin. Our goal is to establish the 3-D structural framework and kinematics of the study area. We construct a 3-D geometrical model of the fault system (from 3-D seismic data), then restore six stratigraphic surfaces and reconstruct the 3-D geometry of the system at six incremental steps of its history. The evolution of the growth fault/raft system corresponds to the progressive separation of two rafts by regional extension, resulting in the development of an intervening basin located between them that evolved in three main stages: (1) the rise of an evaporite wall, (2) the development of a symmetric basin as the elevation of the diapir is reduced and buried, and (3) the development of asymmetric basins related to two systems of listric faults (the main fault F1 and the graben located between the rollovers and the lower raft). Important features of the growth fault/raft system could only be observed in 3-D and with increments of deformation restored. The rollover anticline (associated with the listric fault F1) is composed of two sub-units separated by an E-W oriented transverse graben indicating that the displacement field was divergent in map view. The rollover units are located within the overlap area of two fault systems and displays a 'mock-turtle' anticline structure. The seaward translation of the lower raft is associated with two successive vertical axis rotations in the opposite sense (clockwise then counter-clockwise by about 10°). This results from the fact that the two main fault systems developed successively. Fault system F1 formed during the Upper Albian, and the graben during the Cenomanian

  4. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Epitaxial Thin Film Growth: Formation of Submonolayer Islands and Multilayer Mounds

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J. W.; Thiel, P. A.; Li, Maozhi

    2007-06-14

    We consider homoepitaxy (or low-misfit heteroepitaxy) via vapor deposition or MBE under UHV conditions. Thin film growth is initiated by nucleation and growth of 2D islands in the submonolayer regime. For atoms subsequently deposited on top of islands, a step edge barrier often inhibits downward transport and produces kinetic roughening during multilayer growth. Such unstable growth is characterized by the formation of 3D mounds (multilayer stacks of 2D islands). Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation of suitable atomistic lattice-gas models can address fundamental or general issues related to both submonolayer and multilayer film evolution, and can also provide a predictive tool for morphological evolution in specific systems. Examples of the successes of KMC modeling are provided for metal homoepitaxial film growth, specifically for contrasting behavior in the classic Ag/Ag(100) and Ag/Ag(111) systems.

  5. Space-time evolution of a growth fold (Betic Cordillera, Spain). Evidences from 3D geometrical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Rojas, Ivan; Alfaro, Pedro; Estévez, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    We present a study that encompasses several software tools (iGIS©, ArcGIS©, Autocad©, etc.) and data (geological mapping, high resolution digital topographic data, high resolution aerial photographs, etc.) to create a detailed 3D geometric model of an active fault propagation growth fold. This 3D model clearly shows structural features of the analysed fold, as well as growth relationships and sedimentary patterns. The results obtained permit us to discuss the kinematics and structural evolution of the fold and the fault in time and space. The study fault propagation fold is the Crevillente syncline. This fold represents the northern limit of the Bajo Segura Basin, an intermontane basin in the Eastern Betic Cordillera (SE Spain) developed from upper Miocene on. 3D features of the Crevillente syncline, including growth pattern, indicate that limb rotation and, consequently, fault activity was higher during Messinian than during Tortonian; consequently, fault activity was also higher. From Pliocene on our data point that limb rotation and fault activity steadies or probably decreases. This in time evolution of the Crevillente syncline is not the same all along the structure; actually the 3D geometric model indicates that observed lateral heterogeneity is related to along strike variation of fault displacement.

  6. Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW)-Based Biosensing for Quantification of Cell Growth in 2D and 3D Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Green, Ryan; Nair, Rajesh Ramakrishnan; Howell, Mark; Mohapatra, Subhra; Guldiken, Rasim; Mohapatra, Shyam Sundar

    2015-01-01

    Detection and quantification of cell viability and growth in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures commonly involve harvesting of cells and therefore requires a parallel set-up of several replicates for time-lapse or dose–response studies. Thus, developing a non-invasive and touch-free detection of cell growth in longitudinal studies of 3D tumor spheroid cultures or of stem cell regeneration remains a major unmet need. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs) permit mass loading-based biosensing and have been touted due to their many advantages including low cost, small size and ease of assembly, we examined the potential of SAW-biosensing to detect and quantify cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that a shear horizontal-surface acoustic waves (SH-SAW) device comprising two pairs of resonators consisting of interdigital transducers and reflecting fingers can be used to quantify mass loading by the cells in suspension as well as within a 3D cell culture platform. A 3D COMSOL model was built to simulate the mass loading response of increasing concentrations of cells in suspension in the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) well in order to predict the characteristics and optimize the design of the SH-SAW biosensor. The simulated relative frequency shift from the two oscillatory circuit systems (one of which functions as control) were found to be concordant to experimental data generated with RAW264.7 macrophage and A549 cancer cells. In addition, results showed that SAW measurements per se did not affect viability of cells. Further, SH-SAW biosensing was applied to A549 cells cultured on a 3D electrospun nanofiber scaffold that generate tumor spheroids (tumoroids) and the results showed the device's ability to detect changes in tumor spheroid growth over the course of eight days. Taken together, these results demonstrate the use of SH-SAW device for detection and quantification of cell growth changes over time in 2D suspension cultures and in 3D cell

  7. Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW)-Based Biosensing for Quantification of Cell Growth in 2D and 3D Cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Green, Ryan; Nair, Rajesh Ramakrishnan; Howell, Mark; Mohapatra, Subhra; Guldiken, Rasim; Mohapatra, Shyam Sundar

    2015-01-01

    Detection and quantification of cell viability and growth in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures commonly involve harvesting of cells and therefore requires a parallel set-up of several replicates for time-lapse or dose-response studies. Thus, developing a non-invasive and touch-free detection of cell growth in longitudinal studies of 3D tumor spheroid cultures or of stem cell regeneration remains a major unmet need. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs) permit mass loading-based biosensing and have been touted due to their many advantages including low cost, small size and ease of assembly, we examined the potential of SAW-biosensing to detect and quantify cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that a shear horizontal-surface acoustic waves (SH-SAW) device comprising two pairs of resonators consisting of interdigital transducers and reflecting fingers can be used to quantify mass loading by the cells in suspension as well as within a 3D cell culture platform. A 3D COMSOL model was built to simulate the mass loading response of increasing concentrations of cells in suspension in the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) well in order to predict the characteristics and optimize the design of the SH-SAW biosensor. The simulated relative frequency shift from the two oscillatory circuit systems (one of which functions as control) were found to be concordant to experimental data generated with RAW264.7 macrophage and A549 cancer cells. In addition, results showed that SAW measurements per se did not affect viability of cells. Further, SH-SAW biosensing was applied to A549 cells cultured on a 3D electrospun nanofiber scaffold that generate tumor spheroids (tumoroids) and the results showed the device's ability to detect changes in tumor spheroid growth over the course of eight days. Taken together, these results demonstrate the use of SH-SAW device for detection and quantification of cell growth changes over time in 2D suspension cultures and in 3D cell

  8. Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW)-Based Biosensing for Quantification of Cell Growth in 2D and 3D Cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Green, Ryan; Nair, Rajesh Ramakrishnan; Howell, Mark; Mohapatra, Subhra; Guldiken, Rasim; Mohapatra, Shyam Sundar

    2015-12-19

    Detection and quantification of cell viability and growth in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures commonly involve harvesting of cells and therefore requires a parallel set-up of several replicates for time-lapse or dose-response studies. Thus, developing a non-invasive and touch-free detection of cell growth in longitudinal studies of 3D tumor spheroid cultures or of stem cell regeneration remains a major unmet need. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs) permit mass loading-based biosensing and have been touted due to their many advantages including low cost, small size and ease of assembly, we examined the potential of SAW-biosensing to detect and quantify cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that a shear horizontal-surface acoustic waves (SH-SAW) device comprising two pairs of resonators consisting of interdigital transducers and reflecting fingers can be used to quantify mass loading by the cells in suspension as well as within a 3D cell culture platform. A 3D COMSOL model was built to simulate the mass loading response of increasing concentrations of cells in suspension in the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) well in order to predict the characteristics and optimize the design of the SH-SAW biosensor. The simulated relative frequency shift from the two oscillatory circuit systems (one of which functions as control) were found to be concordant to experimental data generated with RAW264.7 macrophage and A549 cancer cells. In addition, results showed that SAW measurements per se did not affect viability of cells. Further, SH-SAW biosensing was applied to A549 cells cultured on a 3D electrospun nanofiber scaffold that generate tumor spheroids (tumoroids) and the results showed the device's ability to detect changes in tumor spheroid growth over the course of eight days. Taken together, these results demonstrate the use of SH-SAW device for detection and quantification of cell growth changes over time in 2D suspension cultures and in 3D cell

  9. Custom fabrication of biomass containment devices using 3-D printing enables bacterial growth analyses with complex insoluble substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Cassandra E.; Beri, Nina R.; Gardner, Jeffrey G.

    2016-09-21

    Physiological studies of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation are challenging for several reasons, one of which is the difficulty in obtaining a reproducibly accurate real-time measurement of bacterial growth using insoluble substrates. Current methods suffer from several problems including (i) high background noise due to the insoluble material interspersed with cells, (ii) high consumable and reagent cost and (iii) significant time delay between sampling and data acquisition. A customizable substrate and cell separation device would provide an option to study bacterial growth using optical density measurements. To test this hypothesis we used 3-D printing to create biomass containment devices that allow interactionmore » between insoluble substrates and microbial cells but do not interfere with spectrophotometer measurements. Evaluation of materials available for 3-D printing indicated that UV-cured acrylic plastic was the best material, being superior to nylon or stainless steel when examined for heat tolerance, reactivity, and ability to be sterilized. Cost analysis of the 3-D printed devices indicated they are a competitive way to quantitate bacterial growth compared to viable cell counting or protein measurements, and experimental conditions were scalable over a 100-fold range. The presence of the devices did not alter growth phenotypes when using either soluble substrates or insoluble substrates. Furthermore, we applied biomass containment to characterize growth of Cellvibrio japonicus on authentic lignocellulose (non-pretreated corn stover), and found physiological evidence that xylan is a significant nutritional source despite an abundance of cellulose present.« less

  10. Study of dendritic growth and coarsening using a 3-D phase field model: Implementation of the Para-AMR algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z.; Xiong, S. M.

    2015-06-01

    To efficiently solve the coupled phase field equations in 3-D, an algorithm comprising of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and parallel (Para-) computing capabilities was developed. Dendritic growth and subsequent coarsening were studied by employing the model to simulate multi-dendrite growth under isothermal conditions. Quantitative comparison including decrease of interface area (S) and nonlinear growing of the characteristic length (ratio between solid volume V and surface area S i.e. V/S) as time was performed between the simulation results and these predicted by the existing theories. In particular, various mechanisms including growth of lower curvature area in expense of higher curvature one, coalescence of neighbouring dendrite arms and groove advancement at the root of higher order arms for dendritic coarsening were identified and successfully revealed via the 3-D phase field simulation. In addition, results showed that the proposed algorithm could greatly shorten the computing time for 3-D phase field simulation and enable one to gain much more insight in understanding the underlying physics during dendrite growth in solidification.

  11. Fourier-Space Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Measurements of 3D Laser-Imprinted Modulations in Planar Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Sadot, O.; Delettrez, J.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.

    2005-12-05

    Nonlinear growth of 3-D broadband nonuniformities was measured near saturation levels using x-ray radiography in planar foils accelerated by laser light. The initial target modulations were seeded by laser nonuniformities and later amplified during acceleration by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The nonlinear saturation velocities are measured for the first time and are found to be in excellent agreement with Haan predictions. The measured growth of long-wavelength modes is consistent with enhanced, nonlinear, long-wavelength generation in ablatively driven targets.

  12. 3D Assessment of Mandibular Growth Based on Image Registration: A Feasibility Study in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, I.; Oliveira, M. E.; Duncan, W. J.; Cioffi, I.; Farella, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Our knowledge of mandibular growth mostly derives from cephalometric radiography, which has inherent limitations due to the two-dimensional (2D) nature of measurement. Objective. To assess 3D morphological changes occurring during growth in a rabbit mandible. Methods. Serial cone-beam computerised tomographic (CBCT) images were made of two New Zealand white rabbits, at baseline and eight weeks after surgical implantation of 1 mm diameter metallic spheres as fiducial markers. A third animal acted as an unoperated (no implant) control. CBCT images were segmented and registered in 3D (Implant Superimposition and Procrustes Method), and the remodelling pattern described used color maps. Registration accuracy was quantified by the maximal of the mean minimum distances and by the Hausdorff distance. Results. The mean error for image registration was 0.37 mm and never exceeded 1 mm. The implant-based superimposition showed most remodelling occurred at the mandibular ramus, with bone apposition posteriorly and vertical growth at the condyle. Conclusion. We propose a method to quantitatively describe bone remodelling in three dimensions, based on the use of bone implants as fiducial markers and CBCT as imaging modality. The method is feasible and represents a promising approach for experimental studies by comparing baseline growth patterns and testing the effects of growth-modification treatments. PMID:24527442

  13. A western gray whale mitigation and monitoring program for a 3-D seismic survey, Sakhalin Island, Russia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S R; Richardson, W J; Yazvenko, S B; Blokhin, S A; Gailey, G; Jenkerson, M R; Meier, S K; Melton, H R; Newcomer, M W; Perlov, A S; Rutenko, S A; Würsig, B; Martin, C R; Egging, D E

    2007-11-01

    The introduction of anthropogenic sounds into the marine environment can impact some marine mammals. Impacts can be greatly reduced if appropriate mitigation measures and monitoring are implemented. This paper concerns such measures undertaken by Exxon Neftegas Limited, as operator of the Sakhalin-1 Consortium, during the Odoptu 3-D seismic survey conducted during 17 August-9 September 2001. The key environmental issue was protection of the critically endangered western gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus), which feeds in summer and fall primarily in the Piltun feeding area off northeast Sakhalin Island. Existing mitigation and monitoring practices for seismic surveys in other jurisdictions were evaluated to identify best practices for reducing impacts on feeding activity by western gray whales. Two buffer zones were established to protect whales from physical injury or undue disturbance during feeding. A 1 km buffer protected all whales from exposure to levels of sound energy potentially capable of producing physical injury. A 4-5 km buffer was established to avoid displacing western gray whales from feeding areas. Trained Marine Mammal Observers (MMOs) on the seismic ship Nordic Explorer had the authority to shut down the air guns if whales were sighted within these buffers. Additional mitigation measures were also incorporated: Temporal mitigation was provided by rescheduling the program from June-August to August-September to avoid interference with spring arrival of migrating gray whales. The survey area was reduced by 19% to avoid certain waters <20 m deep where feeding whales concentrated and where seismic acquisition was a lower priority. The number of air guns and total volume of the air guns were reduced by about half (from 28 to 14 air guns and from 3,390 in(3) to 1,640 in(3)) relative to initial plans. "Ramp-up" (="soft-start") procedures were implemented. Monitoring activities were conducted as needed to implement some mitigation measures, and to assess

  14. Review on Chalcogenide 3D Nano-structured Crystals: Synthesis and Growth Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) nano-structured crystals have received extensive attention for their superior properties over zero dimensional (0D), one dimensional (1D), or two dimensional (2D) nanomaterials in many areas. This review is generalized for the group of chalcogenide nanoflowers (NFs) by the synthetic techniques, such as solvothermal, wet chemical, sol-gel, surface oxidation, microwave, coating, electrochemical, and several other methods. The formation mechanism was also described for the purpose of opening up new food for thoughts to bring up new functionality of materials by tuning the morphology of crystals. The pH value or the template plays fundamental role in forming the nano-flowered structure. Moreover, the correlations between the surface area (SA), contact angle (CA), and the NFs are also discussed within the context. Here, we also discussed some patents relevant to the topic.

  15. Pressure-Induced Oriented Attachment Growth of Large-Size Crystals for Constructing 3D Ordered Superstructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Lian, Gang; Si, Haibin; Wang, Qilong; Cui, Deliang; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-26

    Oriented attachment (OA), a nonclassical crystal growth mechanism, provides a powerful bottom-up approach to obtain ordered superstructures, which also demonstrate exciting charge transmission characteristic. However, there is little work observably pronouncing the achievement of 3D OA growth of crystallites with large size (e.g., submicrometer crystals). Here, we report that SnO2 3D ordered superstructures can be synthesized by means of a self-limited assembly assisted by OA in a designed high-pressure solvothermal system. The size of primary building blocks is 200-250 nm, which is significantly larger than that in previous results (normally <10 nm). High pressure plays the key role in the formation of 3D configuration and fusion of adjacent crystals. Furthermore, this high-pressure strategy can be readily expanded to additional materials. We anticipate that the welded structures will constitute an ideal system with relevance to applications in optical responses, lithium ion battery, solar cells, and chemical sensing.

  16. Direct growth of single-crystal Pt nanowires on Sn@CNT Nanocable: 3D electrodes for highly active electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuhui; Zhang, Gaixia; Geng, Dongsheng; Chen, Yougui; Banis, Mohammad Norouzi; Li, Ruying; Cai, Mei; Sun, Xueliang

    2010-01-18

    A newly designed and fabricated novel three dimensional (3D) nanocomposite composed of single-crystal Pt nanowires (PtNW) and a coaxial nanocable support consisting of a tin nanowire and a carbon nanotube (Sn@CNT) is reported. This nanocomposite is fabricated by the synthesis of Sn@CNT nanocables by means of a thermal evaporation method, followed by the direct growth with PtNWs through a facile aqueous solution approach at room temperature. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the PtNW--Sn@CNT 3D electrode exhibits enhanced electrocatalytic performance in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), methanol oxidation (MOR) for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), and CO tolerance compared with commercial ETEK Pt/C catalyst made of Pt nanoparticles. PMID:20024993

  17. Ga adsorption on si(111) analysed by in situ ellipsometry: 2D and 3D growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrieu, S.; d'Avitaya, F. Arnaud; Pfister, J. C.

    1990-11-01

    In this paper, Ga adsorption on Si(111) is analysed by in situ ellipsometry. Three regimes of adsorption and two orders of desorption are distinguished. The results are interpreted as amorphous growth at room temperature, Stranski-Krastanov growth in the substrate temperature range 400-600°C, and Volmer-Weber growth at higher temperatures. The difference in ellipsometric response between both growth modes allows an estimation of the critical coverage at which three-dimensional nucleation takes place. A phase diagram is thus proposed, taking into account the 3 × 3 superstructures occurring between 0 and 1/3 ML on Si(111). These results are compared to those obtained on Si(100), and show marked similarities.

  18. CYCD3 D-type cyclins regulate cambial cell proliferation and secondary growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Carl; Maruthi, N. M.; Jahn, Courtney E.

    2015-01-01

    A major proportion of plant biomass is derived from the activity of the cambium, a lateral meristem responsible for vascular tissue formation and radial organ enlargement in a process termed secondary growth. In contrast to our relatively good understanding of the regulation of primary meristems, remarkably little is known concerning the mechanisms controlling secondary growth, particularly how cambial cell divisions are regulated and integrated with vascular differentiation. A genetic loss-of-function approach was used here to reveal a rate-limiting role for the Arabidopsis CYCLIN D3 (CYCD3) subgroup of cell-cycle genes in the control of cambial cell proliferation and secondary growth, providing conclusive evidence of a direct link between the cell cycle and vascular development. It is shown that all three CYCD3 genes are specifically expressed in the cambium throughout vascular development. Analysis of a triple loss-of-function CYCD3 mutant revealed a requirement for CYCD3 in promoting the cambial cell cycle since mutant stems and hypocotyls showed a marked reduction in diameter linked to reduced mitotic activity in the cambium. Conversely, loss of CYCD3 provoked an increase in xylem cell size and the expression of differentiation markers, showing that CYCD3 is required to restrain the differentiation of xylem precursor cells. Together, our data show that tight control of cambial cell division through developmental- and cell type-specific regulation of CYCD3 is required for normal vascular development, constituting part of a novel mechanism controlling organ growth in higher plants. PMID:26022252

  19. The influence of plasma technology coupled to chemical grafting on the cell growth compliance of 3D hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Russo, Laura; Zanini, Stefano; Giannoni, Paolo; Landi, Elena; Villa, Anna; Sandri, Monica; Riccardi, Claudia; Quarto, Rodolfo; Doglia, Silvia M; Nicotra, Francesco; Cipolla, Laura

    2012-11-01

    The development of advanced materials with biomimetic features in order to elicit desired biological responses and to guarantee tissue biocompatibility is recently gaining attention for tissue engineering applications. Bioceramics, such as hydroxyapatite-based biomaterials are now used in a number of different applications throughout the body, covering all areas of the skeleton, due to their biological and chemical similarity to the inorganic phases of bones. When bioactive sintered hydroxyapatite (HA) is desired, biomolecular modification of these materials is needed. In the present work, we investigated the influence of plasma surface modification coupled to chemical grafting on the cell growth compliance of HA 3D scaffolds.

  20. Simulation of 3D tumor cell growth using nonlinear finite element method.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shoubing; Yan, Yannan; Tang, Liqun; Meng, Junping; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel parallel computing framework for a nonlinear finite element method (FEM)-based cell model and apply it to simulate avascular tumor growth. We derive computation formulas to simplify the simulation and design the basic algorithms. With the increment of the proliferation generations of tumor cells, the FEM elements may become larger and more distorted. Then, we describe a remesh and refinement processing of the distorted or over large finite elements and the parallel implementation based on Message Passing Interface to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the simulation. We demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the FEM model and the parallelization methods in simulations of early tumor growth. PMID:26213205

  1. Transition from Ignition to Flame Growth under External Radiation in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashiwagi, Takashi; Nakamura, Yuji; Mell, William E.; Olson, Sandra L.

    2004-01-01

    This study focuses on localized ignition by external radiant flux and subsequent flame growth over thin polymeric materials (plastic and paper) in microgravity. Two transition stages were observed. The first transition stage covers the period from the onset of ignition to the formation of stabilized flame near the ignited area. This is followed by the second transition of the flame growth stage from the initial stabilized flame to sustained fire growth away from the ignited area. For the first stage, ignition experiments of thin PMMA sheets were conducted using a CO2 laser as an external source in the 10 s drop tower. The results of front side surface ignition and of backside surface ignition were observed. The effects of imposed flow velocity, sample thickness, and ambient oxygen concentration on ignition are obtained. Numerical study was conducted to investigate to understand and predict ignition behavior observed in the experiments. For the second stage, numerical study is being conducted to describe the effects of gravity on heat release rate of a PMMA sheet. The gravity level was varied from zero to normal gravity. The preliminary results show that the maximum heat release occurs at around 0.02 g.

  2. Transition from Ignition to Flame Growth under External Radiation in Three Dimensions (TIGER-3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashiwagi, Takashi; Nakamura, Yuji; Olson, Sandra L.; Mell, William

    2004-01-01

    This study focuses on localized ignition by external radiant flux and subsequent flame growth over thin polymeric materials (plastic and paper) in microgravity. Two transition stages were observed. The first transition stage covers the period from the onset of ignition to the formation of stabilized flame near the ignited area. This is followed by the second transition of the flame growth stage from the initial stabilized flame to sustained fire growth away from the ignited area. For the first stage, ignition experiments of thin PMMA sheets were conducted using a CO2 laser as an external source in the 10 s drop tower. The results of front side surface ignition and of backside surface ignition were observed. The effects of imposed flow velocity, sample thickness, and ambient oxygen concentration on ignition are obtained. Numerical study was conducted to investigate to understand and predict ignition behavior observed in the experiments. For the second stage, numerical study is being conducted to describe the effects of gravity on heat release rate of a PMMA sheet. The gravity level was varied from zero to normal gravity. The preliminary results show that the maximum heat release occurs at around 0.02 g.

  3. 3-D simulations to investigate initial condition effects on the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Malcolm J

    2008-01-01

    The effect of initial conditions on the growth rate of turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing has been studied using carefully formulated numerical simulations. An integrated large-eddy simulation (ILES) that uses a finite-volume technique was employed to solve the three-dimensional incompressible Euler equations with numerical dissipation. The initial conditions were chosen to test the dependence of the RT growth parameters ({alpha}{sub b}, {alpha}{sub s}) on variations in (a) the spectral bandwidth, (b) the spectral shape, and (c) discrete banded spectra. Our findings support the notion that the overall growth of the RT mixing is strongly dependent on initial conditions. Variation in spectral shapes and bandwidths are found to have a complex effect of the late time development of the RT mixing layer, and raise the question of whether we can design RT transition and turbulence based on our choice of initial conditions. In addition, our results provide a useful database for the initialization and development of closures describing RT transition and turbulence.

  4. Thermal structure and basal sliding parametrisation at Pine Island Glacier - a 3-D full-Stokes model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkens, N.; Behrens, J.; Kleiner, T.; Rippin, D.; Rückamp, M.; Humbert, A.

    2015-04-01

    Pine Island Glacier is one of the fastest changing glaciers of the Antarctic Ice Sheet and therefore of scientific interest. The glacier holds enough ice to raise the global sea level significantly (~ 0.5 m) when fully melted. The question addressed by numerous modelling studies of the glacier focuses on whether the observed changes are a start of an uncontrolled and accelerating retreat. The movement of the glacier is, in the fast-flowing areas, dominated by basal motion. In modelling studies the parametrisation of the basal motion is therefore crucial. Inversion methods are commonly applied to reproduce the complex surface flow structure of Pine Island Glacier by using information of the observed surface velocity field to constrain, among other things, basal sliding. We introduce two different approaches of combining a physical parameter, the basal roughness, with basal sliding parametrisations. This way basal sliding is again connected closer to its original formulation. We show that the basal roughness is an important and helpful parameter to consider and that many features of the flow structure can be reproduced with these approaches.

  5. Growth and Transfer of Seamless 3D Graphene-Nanotube Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Dong; Li, Yilun; Wang, Gunuk; Fan, Xiujun; Jiang, Jinlong; Li, Lei; Ji, Yongsung; Ruan, Gedeng; Hauge, Robert H; Tour, James M

    2016-02-10

    Seamlessly connected graphene and carbon nanotube hybrids (GCNTs) have great potential as carbon platform structures in electronics due to their high conductivity and high surface area. Here, we introduce a facile method for making patterned GCNTs and their intact transfer onto other substrates. The mechanism for selective growth of vertically aligned CNTs (VA-CNTs) on the patterned graphene is discussed. The complete transfer of the GCNT pattern onto other substrates is possible because of the mechanical strength of the GCNT hybrids. Electrical conductivity measurements of the transferred GCNT structures show Ohmic contact through the VA-CNTs to graphene--evidence of its integrity after the transfer process.

  6. Biologically relevant 3D tumor arrays: imaging-based methods for quantification of reproducible growth and analysis of treatment response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Jonathan P.; Rizvi, Imran; Blanden, Adam R.; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O.; Spring, Bryan Q.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2011-02-01

    Three-dimensional in vitro tumor models have emerged as powerful research tools in cancer biology, though the vast potential of these systems as high-throughput, biologically relevant reporters of treatment response has yet to be adequately explored. Here, building on previous studies, we demonstrate the utility of using 3D models for ovarian and pancreatic cancers in conjunction with quantitative image processing to reveal aspects of growth behavior and treatment response that would not be evident without either modeling or quantitative analysis component. In this report we specifically focus on recent improvements in the imaging component of this integrative research platform and emphasize analysis to establish reproducible growth properties in 3D tumor arrays, a key consideration in establishing the utility of this platform as a reliable reporter of therapeutic response. Building on previous studies using automated segmentation of low magnification image fields containing large numbers of nodules to study size dependent treatment effects, we introduce an improvement to this method using multiresolution decomposition to remove gradient background from transmitted light images for more reliable feature identification. This approach facilitates the development of a new treatment response metric, disruption fraction (Dfrac), which quantifies dose dependent distribution shifts from nodular fragmentation induced by cytotoxic therapies. Using this approach we show that PDT treatment is associated with significant dose-dependent increases in Dfrac, while this is not observed with carboplatin treatment. The ability to quantify this response to therapy could play a key role in design of combination regimens involving these two modalities.

  7. Hybrid C-nanotubes/Si 3D nanostructures by one-step growth in a dual-plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toschi, Francesco; Orlanducci, Silvia; Guglielmotti, Valeria; Cianchetta, Ilaria; Magni, Corrado; Terranova, Maria Letizia; Pasquali, Matteo; Tamburri, Emanuela; Matassa, Roberto; Rossi, Marco

    2012-06-01

    Hybrid nanostructures consisting of Si polycrystalline nanocones, with an anemone-like termination coated with C-nanotubes bundles, have been generated on a (1 0 0) Si substrate in a dual mode microwave/radio-frequency plasma reactor. The substrate is both heated and bombarded by energetic H ions during the synthesis process. The nanocones growth is explained considering pull of the growing Si nanocrystalline phase along the lines of the electrical field, likely via a molten/recrystallization mechanism. The one-step building of the achieved complex 3D architectures is described in terms of dynamic competition between Si and C nanotubes growth under the peculiar conditions of kinetically driven processes.

  8. Modeling induction heating and 3-D heat transfer for growth of rectangular crystals using FIDAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, L. J.; Martin, R. W.

    1988-09-01

    We are developing a process to grow large rectangular crystals for use as solid state lasers by a Bridgman-like method. The process is based on induction heating of two graphite susceptors which transfer energy to an ampoule containing the melt and crystal. The induction heating version of FIDAP developed by Gresho and Derby is applied to this system to determine the power deposition profile in electrically conducting regions. The calculated power is subsequently used as a source term in the heat equation to calculate the temperature profile. Results are presented which examine the sensitivity of the system to electrical and thermal conductivities, and design modifications are illustrated which could improve the temperature field for crystal growth applications.

  9. Polymorphism, crystal nucleation and growth in the phase-field crystal model in 2D and 3D.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gyula I; Tegze, György; Pusztai, Tamás; Tóth, Gergely; Gránásy, László

    2010-09-15

    We apply a simple dynamical density functional theory, the phase-field crystal (PFC) model of overdamped conservative dynamics, to address polymorphism, crystal nucleation, and crystal growth in the diffusion-controlled limit. We refine the phase diagram for 3D, and determine the line free energy in 2D and the height of the nucleation barrier in 2D and 3D for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation by solving the respective Euler-Lagrange (EL) equations. We demonstrate that, in the PFC model, the body-centered cubic (bcc), the face-centered cubic (fcc), and the hexagonal close-packed structures (hcp) compete, while the simple cubic structure is unstable, and that phase preference can be tuned by changing the model parameters: close to the critical point the bcc structure is stable, while far from the critical point the fcc prevails, with an hcp stability domain in between. We note that with increasing distance from the critical point the equilibrium shapes vary from the sphere to specific faceted shapes: rhombic dodecahedron (bcc), truncated octahedron (fcc), and hexagonal prism (hcp). Solving the equation of motion of the PFC model supplied with conserved noise, solidification starts with the nucleation of an amorphous precursor phase, into which the stable crystalline phase nucleates. The growth rate is found to be time dependent and anisotropic; this anisotropy depends on the driving force. We show that due to the diffusion-controlled growth mechanism, which is especially relevant for crystal aggregation in colloidal systems, dendritic growth structures evolve in large-scale isothermal single-component PFC simulations. An oscillatory effective pair potential resembling those for model glass formers has been evaluated from structural data of the amorphous phase obtained by instantaneous quenching. Finally, we present results for eutectic solidification in a binary PFC model. PMID:21386517

  10. Electron microscopic evidence for nucleation and growth of 3D acetylcholine receptor microcrystals in structured lipid-detergent matrices.

    PubMed

    Paas, Yoav; Cartaud, Jean; Recouvreur, Michel; Grailhe, Regis; Dufresne, Virginie; Pebay-Peyroula, Eva; Landau, Ehud M; Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2003-09-30

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) belong to a superfamily of oligomeric proteins that transduce electric signals across the cell membrane on binding of neurotransmitters. These receptors harbor a large extracellular ligand-binding domain directly linked to an ion-conducting channel-forming domain that spans the cell membrane 20 times and considerably extends into the cytoplasm. Thus far, none of these receptor channels has been crystallized in three dimensions. The crystallization of the AChR from Torpedo marmorata electric organs is challenged here in lipidic-detergent matrices. Detergent-soluble AChR complexed with alpha-bungarotoxin (alphaBTx), a polypeptidic competitive antagonist, was purified. The AChR-alphaBTx complex was reconstituted in a lipidic matrix composed of monoolein bilayers that are structured in three dimensions. The alphaBTx was conjugated to a photo-stable fluorophore, enabling us to monitor the physical behavior of the receptor-toxin complex in the lipidic matrix under light stereomicroscope, and to freeze fracture regions containing the receptor-toxin complex for visualization under a transmission electron microscope. Conditions were established for forming 2D receptor-toxin lattices that are stacked in the third dimension. 3D AChR nanocrystals were thereby grown inside the highly viscous lipidic 3D matrix. Slow emulsification of the lipidic matrix converted these nanocrystals into 3D elongated thin crystal plates of micrometer size. The latter are stable in detergent-containing aqueous solutions and can currently be used for seeding and epitaxial growth, en route to crystals of appropriate dimensions for x-ray diffraction studies.

  11. A 3-D model analysis of the slowdown and interannual variability in the methane growth rate from 1988 to 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, James S.; Logan, Jennifer A.; McElroy, Michael B.; Duncan, Bryan N.; Megretskaia, Inna A.; Yantosca, Robert M.

    2004-09-01

    Methane has exhibited significant interannual variability with a slowdown in its growth rate beginning in the 1980s. We use a 3-D chemical transport model accounting for interannually varying emissions, transport, and sinks to analyze trends in CH4 from 1988 to 1997. Variations in CH4 sources were based on meteorological and country-level socioeconomic data. An inverse method was used to optimize the strengths of sources and sinks for a base year, 1994. We present a best-guess budget along with sensitivity tests. The analysis suggests that the sum of emissions from animals, fossil fuels, landfills, and wastewater estimated using Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change default methodology is too high. Recent bottom-up estimates of the source from rice paddies appear to be too low. Previous top-down estimates of emissions from wetlands may be a factor of 2 higher than bottom-up estimates because of possible overestimates of OH. The model captures the general decrease in the CH4 growth rate observed from 1988 to 1997 and the anomalously low growth rates during 1992-1993. The slowdown in the growth rate is attributed to a combination of slower growth of sources and increases in OH. The economic downturn in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe made a significant contribution to the decrease in the growth rate of emissions. The 1992-1993 anomaly can be explained by fluctuations in wetland emissions and OH after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo. The results suggest that the recent slowdown of CH4 may be temporary.

  12. 3D seismic analysis of gravity-driven and basement influenced normal fault growth in the deepwater Otway Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, A. G.; King, R. C.; Holford, S. P.

    2016-08-01

    We use three-dimensional (3D) seismic reflection data to analyse the structural style and growth of a normal fault array located at the present-day shelf-edge break and into the deepwater province of the Otway Basin, southern Australia. The Otway Basin is a Late Jurassic to Cenozoic, rift-to-passive margin basin. The seismic reflection data images a NW-SE (128-308) striking, normal fault array, located within Upper Cretaceous clastic sediments and which consists of ten fault segments. The fault array contains two hard-linked fault assemblages, separated by only 2 km in the dip direction. The gravity-driven, down-dip fault assemblage is entirely contained within the 3D seismic survey, is located over a basement plateau and displays growth commencing and terminating during the Campanian-Maastrichtian, with up to 1.45 km of accumulated throw (vertical displacement). The up-dip normal fault assemblage penetrates deeper than the base of the seismic survey, but is interpreted to be partially linked along strike at depth to major basement-involved normal faults that can be observed on regional 2D seismic lines. This fault assemblage displays growth initiating in the Turonian-Santonian and has accumulated up to 1.74 km of throw. Our detailed analysis of the 3D seismic data constraints post-Cenomanian fault growth of both fault assemblages into four evolutionary stages: [1] Turonian-Santonian basement reactivation during crustal extension between Australia and Antarctica. This either caused the upward propagation of basement-involved normal faults or the nucleation of a vertically isolated normal fault array in shallow cover sediments directly above the reactivated basement-involved faults; [2] continued Campanian-Maastrichtian crustal extension and sediment loading eventually created gravitational instability on the basement plateau, nucleating a second, vertically isolated normal fault array in the cover sediments; [3] eventual hard-linkage of fault segments in both fault

  13. The growth of non-colinear normal fault systems; What can we learn from 3D seismic reflection data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeve, Matthew T.; Bell, Rebecca E.; Duffy, Oliver B.; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Sansom, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Many rift zones exhibit a range of fault orientations, rather than simple colinear faults that strike orthogonal to the inferred least principal stress. The formation of non-colinear fault sets has implications for assessing rift-zone kinematics, as well as determining palaeo-stress state in extensional basins. Using 3D seismic reflection data, we deduce the likely mechanisms responsible for the formation of a population of non-colinear faults in the Måløy Slope area of the northern North Sea. Three basement-displacing fault populations exist on the Måløy Slope; (i) large (>1 km throw), N-S-striking faults, (ii) smaller (<250 m throw) N-S-striking faults and (iii) small (<250 m throw) NE-SW-striking faults. All were initiated in the Middle Jurassic. Coeval growth of these fault populations, and the apparent correlation between the NE-SW faults and a NE-SW-trending gravity and magnetic anomaly high lead us to suggest that the NE-SW faults are the result of deflection of the otherwise E-W-orientated least principal stress by NE-trending intrabasement weaknesses. Our study's results have implications for the large-scale kinematic evolution of the North Sea, arguing that major rotations in extension direction are not required to generate multiple fault sets locally or across the rift. This study also highlights the importance of using borehole-constrained 3D seismic data as a tool in understanding non-colinear fault growth, and its broader implications for regional tectonic history.

  14. Understanding the thermal history, exhumation patterns, and role of fault systems on Goodenough Island, Papua New Guinea: Insights from 3D thermo-kinematic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, M. A.; Baldwin, S.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Braun, J.

    2012-12-01

    The world's youngest eclogites, exhumed from depths of ca. 90 km since 8 Ma, are located in the D'Entrecasteaux Islands in the active Woodlark rift of southeastern Papua New Guinea. These (U)HP rocks formed during/following subduction of Australian margin-derived volcaniclastic sediments, and were exhumed during rifting within the larger, obliquely convergent Australian-Pacific plate boundary zone. Several (U)HP exhumation mechanisms have been proposed including diapiric rise of buoyant crust from mantle to crustal depths, and rifting of heterogeneous crust ahead of the east-to-west propagating Woodlark seafloor spreading center. In order to constrain the relative importance of different exhumation mechanisms through time (i.e., timing and rates of diapirism vs crustal faulting), we apply 3D thermo-kinematic modeling (Pecube) to constrain cooling and exhumation histories derived from thermochronologic data from Goodenough Island, the western-most of the D'Entrecasteaux Islands. More than 500,000 Pecube inverse models were run to evaluate scenarios involving vertical exhumation velocities (i.e., simulating simple buoyancy due to diapirism), low-angle normal faulting and combinations of both processes. These preliminary models assume steady-state topography. Preliminary models (starting at 8 Ma) include: (i) continuous exhumation, (ii) two exhumation phases with different exhumation rates (increasing and/or decreasing), and (iii) three exhumation phases with variable exhumation rates. For buoyancy-only models, the first two scenarios (i and ii) result in poor fits between model-derived and observed (experimental) data. Notably, scenarios (i) and (ii) produce indistinguishable ages for all thermochronologic systems, uniformly long apatite fission-track (AFT) lengths, excessive temperatures at the Moho and geological starting parameters (depth, T) that are not consistent with other data. Scenario (iii) with three exhumation phases has the least misfit between model

  15. 3D rotating wall vessel and 2D cell culture of four veterinary virus pathogens: A comparison of virus yields, portions of infectious particles and virus growth curves.

    PubMed

    Malenovská, Hana

    2016-02-01

    Only very few comparative studies have been performed that evaluate general trends of virus growth under 3D in comparison with 2D cell culture conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate differences when four animal viruses are cultured in 2D and 3D. Suid herpesvirus 1 (SuHV-1), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSIV), Bovine adenovirus (BAdV) and Bovine parainfluenza 3 virus (BPIV-3) were cultivated in 3D rotating wall vessels (RWVs) and conventional 2D cultures. The production of virus particles, the portion of infectious particles, and the infectious growth curves were compared. For all viruses, the production of virus particles (related to cell density), including the non-infectious ones, was lower in 3D than in 2D culture. The production of only infectious particles was significantly lower in BAdV and BPIV-3 in 3D cultures in relation to cell density. The two cultivation approaches resulted in significantly different virus particle-to-TCID50 ratios in three of the four viruses: lower in SuHV-1 and BPIV-3 and higher in BAdV in 3D culture. The infectious virus growth rates were not significantly different in all viruses. Although 3D RWV culture resulted in lower production of virus particles compared to 2D systems, the portion of infectious particles was higher for some viruses.

  16. Effect of Aflatoxin B1 on Growth of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells in 3D and Monolayer Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Forouharmehr, Ali; Harkinezhad, Taher; Qasemi-Panahi, Babak

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Many studies have been showed transfer of aflatoxins, toxins produced by Aspergillus flvaus and Aspergillus parasiticus fungi, into milk. These toxins are transferred into the milk through digestive system by eating contaminated food. Due to the toxicity of these materials, it seems that it has side effects on the growth of mammary cells. Therefore, the present work aimed to investigate possible toxic effects of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) on bovine mammary epithelial cells in monolayer and three-dimensional cultures. Methods: Specimens of the mammary tissue of bovine were sized out in size 2×2 cm in slaughterhouse. After disinfection and washing in sterile PBS, primary cell culture was performed by enzymatic digestion of tissue with collagenase. When proper numbers of cells were achieved in monolayer culture, cells were seeded in a 24-well culture plate for three-dimensional (3D) culture in Matrigel matrix. After 21 days of 3D culture and reaching the required number of cells, the concentrations of 15, 25 and 35 µL of AFB1 were added to the culture in quadruplicate and incubated for 8 hours. Cellular cytotoxicity was examined using standard colorimetric assay and finally, any change in the morphology of the cells was studied by microscopic technique. Results: Microscopic investigations showed necrosis of the AFB1-exposed cells compared to the control cells. Also, bovine mammary epithelial cells were significantly affected by AFB1 in dose and time dependent manner in cell viability assays. Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that AFB1 can induce cytotoxicity and necrosis in bovine mammary epithelial cells. PMID:24312827

  17. Numerical Simulation of 3D Thermo-Elastic Fatigue Crack Growth Problems Using Coupled FE-EFG Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Himanshu; Singh, Akhilendra; Singh, Indra Vir

    2016-06-01

    In this work, finite element method (FEM) and element free Galerkin method (EFGM) are coupled for solving 3D crack domains subjected to cyclic thermal load of constant amplitude. Crack growth contours and fatigue life have been obtained for each of the considered numerical examples. Thermo-elastic problems are decoupled into thermal and elastic problems . Firstly, the unknown temperature field is obtained by solving heat conduction equation, then, it is used as the input load in the elastic problem to calculate the displacement and stress fields. The geometrical discontinuity across crack surface is modelled by extrinsically enriched EFGM and the remaining part of the domain is approximated by standard finite element method. At the crack interface, a ramp function based interpolation scheme has been implemented. This coupled approach combines the advantages of both EFGM and FEM. A linear successive crack increment approach is used to model crack growth. The growing crack surface is traced by level set function. Standard Paris law is used for life estimation of the three-dimensional crack models. Different cases of planar and non-planar crack problems have been solved and their results are compared with the results obtained using extended finite element method to check accuracy, efficiency and robustness of the coupled FE-EFG approach implemented in this study.

  18. Diacylglycerol kinase α promotes 3D cancer cell growth and limits drug sensitivity through functional interaction with Src.

    PubMed

    Torres-Ayuso, Pedro; Daza-Martín, Manuel; Martín-Pérez, Jorge; Ávila-Flores, Antonia; Mérida, Isabel

    2014-10-30

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK)α converts diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid. This lipid kinase sustains survival, migration and invasion of tumor cells, with no effect over untransformed cells, suggesting its potential as a cancer-specific target. Nonetheless the mechanisms that underlie DGKα specific contribution to cancer survival have not been elucidated. Using three-dimensional (3D) colon and breast cancer cell cultures, we demonstrate that DGKα upregulation is part of the transcriptional program that results in Src activation in these culture conditions. Pharmacological or genetic DGKα silencing impaired tumor growth in vivo confirming its function in malignant transformation. DGKα-mediated Src regulation contributed to limit the effect of Src inhibitors, and its transcriptional upregulation in response to PI3K/Akt inhibitors resulted in reduced toxicity. Src oncogenic properties and contribution to pharmacological resistance have been linked to its overactivation in cancer. DGKα participation in this central node helps to explain why its pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated targeting specifically alters tumor viability with no effect on untransformed cells. Our results identify DGKα-mediated stabilization of Src activation as an important mechanism in tumor growth, and suggest that targeting this enzyme, alone or in combination with other inhibitors in wide clinical use, could constitute a treatment strategy for aggressive forms of cancer.

  19. Diacylglycerol kinase α promotes 3D cancer cell growth and limits drug sensitivity through functional interaction with Src

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Ayuso, Pedro; Daza-Martín, Manuel; Martín-Pérez, Jorge; Ávila-Flores, Antonia; Mérida, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK)α converts diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid. This lipid kinase sustains survival, migration and invasion of tumor cells, with no effect over untransformed cells, suggesting its potential as a cancer-specific target. Nonetheless the mechanisms that underlie DGKα specific contribution to cancer survival have not been elucidated. Using three-dimensional (3D) colon and breast cancer cell cultures, we demonstrate that DGKα upregulation is part of the transcriptional program that results in Src activation in these culture conditions. Pharmacological or genetic DGKα silencing impaired tumor growth in vivo confirming its function in malignant transformation. DGKα-mediated Src regulation contributed to limit the effect of Src inhibitors, and its transcriptional upregulation in response to PI3K/Akt inhibitors resulted in reduced toxicity. Src oncogenic properties and contribution to pharmacological resistance have been linked to its overactivation in cancer. DGKα participation in this central node helps to explain why its pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated targeting specifically alters tumor viability with no effect on untransformed cells. Our results identify DGKα-mediated stabilization of Src activation as an important mechanism in tumor growth, and suggest that targeting this enzyme, alone or in combination with other inhibitors in wide clinical use, could constitute a treatment strategy for aggressive forms of cancer. PMID:25339152

  20. Pressure driven currents near magnetic islands in 3D MHD equilibria: Effects of pressure variation within flux surfaces and of symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiman, Allan H.

    2016-07-01

    In toroidal, magnetically confined plasmas, the heat and particle transport is strongly anisotropic, with transport along the field lines sufficiently strong relative to cross-field transport that the equilibrium pressure can generally be regarded as constant on the flux surfaces in much of the plasma. The regions near small magnetic islands, and those near the X-lines of larger islands, are exceptions, having a significant variation of the pressure within the flux surfaces. It is shown here that the variation of the equilibrium pressure within the flux surfaces in those regions has significant consequences for the pressure driven currents. It is further shown that the consequences are strongly affected by the symmetry of the magnetic field if the field is invariant under combined reflection in the poloidal and toroidal angles. (This symmetry property is called "stellarator symmetry.") In non-stellarator-symmetric equilibria, the pressure-driven currents have logarithmic singularities at the X-lines. In stellarator-symmetric MHD equilibria, the singular components of the pressure-driven currents vanish. These equilibria are to be contrasted with equilibria having B ṡ∇p =0 , where the singular components of the pressure-driven currents vanish regardless of the symmetry. They are also to be contrasted with 3D MHD equilibrium solutions that are constrained to have simply nested flux surfaces, where the pressure-driven current goes like 1 /x near rational surfaces, where x is the distance from the rational surface, except in the case of quasi-symmetric flux surfaces. For the purpose of calculating the pressure-driven currents near magnetic islands, we work with a closed subset of the MHD equilibrium equations that involves only perpendicular force balance, and is decoupled from parallel force balance. It is not correct to use the parallel component of the conventional MHD force balance equation, B ṡ∇p =0 , near magnetic islands. Small but nonzero values of B

  1. Elsevier Trophoblast Research Award Lecture: Searching for an early pregnancy 3-D morphometric ultrasound marker to predict fetal growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Collins, S L; Stevenson, G N; Noble, J A; Impey, L

    2013-03-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a major cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality, even in term babies. An effective screening test to identify pregnancies at risk of FGR, leading to increased antenatal surveillance with timely delivery, could decrease perinatal mortality and morbidity. Placental volume, measured with commercially available packages and a novel, semi-automated technique, has been shown to predict small for gestational age babies. Placental morphology measured in 2-D in the second trimester and ex-vivo post delivery, correlates with FGR. This has also been investigated using 2-D estimates of diameter and site of cord insertion obtained using the Virtual Organ Computer-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL) software. Data is presented describing a pilot study of a novel 3-D method for defining compactness of placental shape. We prospectively recruited women with a singleton pregnancy and BMI of <35. A 3-D ultrasound scan was performed between 11 and 13 + 6 weeks' gestation. The placental volume, total placental surface area and the area of the utero-placental interface were calculated using our validated technique. From these we generated dimensionless indices including sphericity (ψ), standardised placental volume (sPlaV) and standardised functional area (sFA) using Buckingham π theorem. The marker for FGR used was small for gestational age, defined as <10th customised birth weight centile (cSGA). Regression analysis examined which of the morphometric indices were independent predictors of cSGA. Data were collected for 143 women, 20 had cSGA babies. Only sPlaV and sFA were significantly correlated to birth weight (p < 0.001). Regression demonstrated all dimensionless indices were inter-dependent co-factors. ROC curves showed no advantage for using sFA over the simpler sPlaV. The generated placental indices are not independent of placental volume this early in gestation. It is hoped that another placental ultrasound marker based on vascularity can improve the

  2. The Role of Faulting on the Growth of a Carbonate Platform: Evidence from 3D Seismic Analysis and Section Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur Fathiyah Jamaludin, Siti; Pubellier, Manuel; Prasad Ghosh, Deva; Menier, David; Pierson, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Tectonics in addition to other environmental factors impacts the growth of carbonate platforms and plays an important role in shaping the internal architecture of the platforms. Detailed of faults and fractures development and healing in carbonate environment have not been explored sufficiently. Using 3D seismic and well data, we attempt to reconstruct the structural evolution of a Miocene carbonate platform in Central Luconia Province, offshore Malaysia. Luconia Province is located in the NW coast of Borneo and has become one of the largest carbonate factories in SE Asia. Seismic interpretations including seismic attribute analysis are applied to the carbonate platform to discern its sedimentology and structural details. Detailed seismic interpretations highlight the relationships of carbonate deposition with syn-depositional faulting. Branching conjugate faults are common in this carbonate platform and have become a template for reef growth, attesting lateral facies changes within the carbonate environments. Structural restoration was then appropriately performed on the interpreted seismic sections based on sequential restoration techniques, and provided images different from those of horizon flattening methods. This permits us to compensate faults' displacement, remove recent sediment layers and finally restore the older rock units prior to the fault motions. It allows prediction of platform evolution as a response to faulting before and after carbonate deposition and also enhances the pitfalls of interpretation. Once updated, the reconstructions allow unravelling of the un-seen geological features underneath the carbonate platform, such as paleo-structures and paleo-topography which in turn reflects the paleo-environment before deformations took place. Interestingly, sections balancing and restoration revealed the late-phase (Late Oligocene-Early Miocene) rifting of South China Sea, otherwise difficult to visualize on seismic sections. Later it is shown that

  3. On the Correlation Between Fatigue Striation Spacing and Crack Growth Rate: A Three-Dimensional (3-D) X-ray Synchrotron Tomography Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jason J.; Yazzie, Kyle E.; Connor Phillips, N.; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Xiao, Xinghui; de Carlo, Francesco; Iyyer, Nagaraja; Kittur, Maddan

    2011-12-01

    In situ three-dimensional (3-D) X-ray synchrotron tomography of fatigue crack growth was conducted in a 7075-T6 aluminum alloy. Local measurements of da/ dN were possible with the 3-D data sets obtained from tomography. A comparison with fatigue striation spacings obtained from scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surfaces yielded excellent correlation with da/ dN obtained from tomography. The X-ray tomography technique can be used to obtain a highly accurate and representative measurements of crack growth locally in the microstructure of the material.

  4. Inhibition of B cell growth factor (BCGF) by monoclonal antibodies directed against the C3d receptor (CR2).

    PubMed

    Perri, R T; Wilson, B S; Kay, N E

    1986-04-01

    Normal human B cell proliferation is controlled by various immunoregulatory signals including the T cell-derived lymphokine B cell growth factor (BCGF). Human BCGF provides the final proliferative signal to normal, activated B cells. We herein show that anti-CR2 monoclonal antibodies inhibit human B cell responsiveness to purified BCGF. Addition of anti-CR2 antibody, AB5, was capable of completely inhibiting BCGF-mediated enhancement of either anti-mu or staphylococcal protein A-activated human B cells (191 +/- 21 cpm vs. 3942 +/- 622 cpm, mean +/- SEM). Inhibition of B cell response to BCGF by AB5 occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Monoclonal antibody anti-B2, which recognizes the same 140-kDa glycoprotein as AB5, in comparable concentrations also inhibited B cell responsiveness to BCGF. Monoclonal antibodies of the same subclass (IgG1) showed no inhibitory effect on BCGF enhancement of B cell proliferation. The F(ab')2 fragment of AB5 generated by pepsin digestion was similarly inhibitory as was the intact Ig. AB5-mediated inhibition was independent of the target B cell state of activation. Both resting and activated B cells (anti-mu or staphylococcal protein A activated) incubated with similar concentrations of AB5 were unresponsive to BCGF. The ability of anti-CR2 antibodies to block BCGF-dependent B cell proliferation suggests that occupancy of C3d membrane receptors may result in modulation of B cell proliferation in physiologic or clinical disease states. PMID:2938967

  5. Modeling of early stages of island growth during pulsed deposition: Role of closed compact islands

    SciTech Connect

    Kotrla, M.; Masin, M.

    2011-03-24

    After a brief review of recent modeling of growth during Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD), we present the study of a role of adatom interactions on growth of surface islands during PLD in submonolayer regime. We employ kinetic Monte Carlo simulation with reversible growth. Attachment of monomers to islands is irreversible at low temperatures while it becomes reversible at higher temperatures, small islands become unstable with growing temperature. In the case of real system we have to take into account not only diffusion of monomers but also diffusivity of dimers and larger clusters and theirs stability. Our new code allows us to study processes which proceed on different time scales which are typical in PLD experiments: fast deposition (on scale order of 10{sup -5} s) during individual pulses, and relaxation of a system between pulses (on scale order of 0.1 s). We calculate and compare the temperature dependence of island density for two modes pulsed deposition and continuous Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) growth. The island densities in PLD mode are substantially higher than in MBE mode, provided the temperature is sufficiently high. In the case of PLD, we observe anomalous temperature dependence of the island density in a certain temperature interval. It is due to the interplay between a cluster decay time and an interval between pulses. The cluster decay time depends not only on temperature but also on clusters size and shape. The anomalous behavior is caused by the temperature limited stability of the closed--compact clusters. This scenario was revealed for the simplified model with only nearest-neighbor interaction. Now, it is elucidated further and we also include interaction to second and third neighbors. We analyze role of the closed-compact surface island in kinetics of both growth modes. Furthermore, by varying interactions energies, diffusion barrier and parameters of deposition, we compare results of simulations with the PLD experiment for Fe/Mo system.

  6. Prognostic simulations of Pine Island Glacier using a 3D full-Stokes model and an inverse method to infer basal drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, L.; Zwinger, T.; Gillet-Chaulet, F.; Durand, G.; Gagliardini, O.

    2012-04-01

    Ice discharge and grounding line retreat in West Antarctica have been accelerated during the last decades. One of the most striking example is Pine Island Glacier (PIG) which accelerated dramatically over the last 30 years. Such rapid changes in this part of Antarctica are due to large modifications of ice dynamics which are nevertheless poorly understood, and badly represented in numerical models, as pointed out by the IPCC fourth assessment report. Here, a 3D full-Stokes model of a marine ice sheet is used to carry out prognostic simulations of PIG over the next two centuries. The flow problem is coupled with the evolution of the upper and lower free surfaces, and the position of the grounding line is determined by solving the contact problem between the ice-shelf/ice-sheet lower surface and the bedrock. The upper and lower surfaces, and the bathymetry provided on a 1 km grid (courtesy of A. Le Brocq) are used to produce the initial geometry of the entire PIG basin. The mesh refinement is a function of the surface velocities (also provided on a 1 km grid by A. Le Brocq) Hessian matrix and the distance to the grounding line. Surface velocities are also used to infer the basal drag through the resolution of an inverse Robin problem. The initial surface is first relaxed and the results are compared to the observed current surface elevation, surface velocity and change in surface elevation. A perturbation experiment is then performed for which the whole ice-shelf is instantaneously removed. This test can be seen as a worst case scenario as all the buttressing induced by the ice shelf is lost instantaneously. The effect of the ice-shelf disintegration for the following two centuries is discussed in terms of grounding line retreat and increase in sea level.

  7. In situ growth of manganese oxide on 3D graphene by a reverse microemulsion method for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Bing; Wang, Lidong; Wang, Yang; Yuan, Yinan; Miao, Qinghua; Yang, Ziyue; Fei, Weidong

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a new, effective strategy is reported for the fabrication of composites using manganese oxide (MnO2) grown in situ on three-dimensional (3D) graphene by the reverse microemulsion (water-in-oil) method. A uniform coating of nanoscale MnO2 layers can be observed on the internal surface of 3D graphene, which could benefit rapid ionic and electronic transport. The electrochemical performance of the MnO2/3D graphene composites is optimized by the control of the composite structure and mass loading of MnO2. The MnO2/3D graphene composite thus prepared exhibits a significantly high specific capacitance of 659.7 F g-1 at 0.3 A g-1 and an excellent retention life of 106% after 1000 cycles. The facile synthesis and excellent electrochemical performance of the MnO2/3D graphene composites indicate that the developed method demonstrates potential applications for the fabrication of novel electrode materials for use in energy storage devices.

  8. Two-photon polymerization of 3-D zirconium oxide hybrid scaffolds for long-term stem cell growth.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Shelby A; Nguyen, Alexander K; Kumar, Girish; Zheng, Jiwen; Goering, Peter L; Koroleva, Anastasia; Chichkov, Boris N; Narayan, Roger J

    2014-06-01

    Two-photon polymerization is a technique that involves simultaneous absorption of two photons from a femtosecond laser for selective polymerization of a photosensitive material. In this study, two-photon polymerization was used for layer-by-layer fabrication of 3-D scaffolds composed of an inorganic-organic zirconium oxide hybrid material. Four types of scaffold microarchitectures were created, which exhibit layers of parallel line features at various orientations as well as pores between the line features. Long-term cell culture studies involving human bone marrow stromal cells were conducted using these 3-D scaffolds. Cellular adhesion and proliferation were demonstrated on all of the scaffold types; tissuelike structure was shown to span the pores. This study indicates that two-photon polymerization may be used to create microstructured scaffolds out of an inorganic-organic zirconium oxide hybrid material for use in 3-D tissue culture systems.

  9. Bulk crystal growth and electronic characterization of the 3D Dirac semimetal Na{sub 3}Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Kushwaha, Satya K.; Krizan, Jason W.; Cava, R. J.; Feldman, Benjamin E.; Gyenis, András; Randeria, Mallika T.; Xiong, Jun; Xu, Su-Yang; Alidoust, Nasser; Belopolski, Ilya; Liang, Tian; Zahid Hasan, M.; Ong, N. P.; Yazdani, A.

    2015-04-01

    High quality hexagon plate-like Na{sub 3}Bi crystals with large (001) plane surfaces were grown from a molten Na flux. The freshly cleaved crystals were analyzed by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, allowing for the characterization of the three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetal (TDS) behavior and the observation of the topological surface states. Landau levels were observed, and the energy-momentum relations exhibited a linear dispersion relationship, characteristic of the 3D TDS nature of Na{sub 3}Bi. In transport measurements on Na{sub 3}Bi crystals, the linear magnetoresistance and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillations are observed for the first time.

  10. Thermodynamic Self-Limiting Growth of Heteroepitaxial Islands Induced by Nonlinear Elastic Effect.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Niu, Xiaobin; Liu, Feng

    2016-06-01

    We investigate nonlinear elastic effect (NLEF) on the growth of heteroepitaxial islands, a topic of both scientific and technological significance for their applications as quantum dots. We show that the NLEF induces a thermodynamic self-limiting growth mechanism that hinders the strain relaxation of coherent island beyond a maximum size, which is in contrast to indefinite strain relaxation with increasing island size in the linear elastic regime. This self-limiting growth effect shows a strong dependence on the island facet angle, which applies also to islands inside pits patterned in a substrate surface with an additional dependence on the pit inclination angle. Consequently, primary islands nucleate and grow first in the pits and then secondary islands nucleate at the rim around the pits after the primary islands reach the self-limited maximum size. Our theory sheds new lights on understanding the heteroepitaxial island growth and explains a number of past and recent experimental observations. PMID:27203611

  11. Bioconductive 3D nano-composite constructs with tunable elasticity to initiate stem cell growth and induce bone mineralization.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Nitin; Khanna, Kunal; Sardesai, Varda S; Singh, Atul K; Temgire, Mayur; Kalita, Mridula Phukan; Kadam, Sachin S; Soni, Vivek P; Bhartiya, Deepa; Bellare, Jayesh R

    2016-12-01

    Bioactive 3D composites play an important role in advanced biomaterial design to provide molecular coupling and improve integrity with the cellular environment of the native bone. In the present study, a hybrid lyophilized polymer composite blend of anionic charged sodium salt of carboxymethyl chitin and gelatin (CMChNa-GEL) reinforced with nano-rod agglomerated hydroxyapatite (nHA) has been developed with enhanced biocompatibility and tunable elasticity. The scaffolds have an open, uniform and interconnected porous structure with an average pore diameter of 157±30μm and 89.47+0.03% with four dimensional X-ray. The aspect ratio of ellipsoidal pores decrease from 4.4 to 1.2 with increase in gelatin concentration; and from 2.14 to 1.93 with decrease in gelling temperature. The samples were resilient with elastic stain at 1.2MPa of stress also decreased from 0.33 to 0.23 with increase in gelatin concentration. The crosslinker HMDI (hexamethylene diisocyanate) yielded more resilient samples at 1.2MPa in comparison to glutaraldehyde. Increased crosslinking time from 2 to 4h in continuous compression cycle show no improvement in maximum elastic stain of 1.2MPa stress. This surface elasticity of the scaffold enables the capacity of these materials for adherent self renewal and cultivation of the NTERA-2 cL.D1 (NT2/D1), pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cell with biomechanical surface, as is shown here. Proliferation with MG-63, ALP activity and Alizarin red mineralization assay on optimized scaffold demonstrated ***p<0.001 between different time points thus showing its potential for bone healing. In pre-clinical study histological bone response of the scaffold construct displayed improved activity of bone regeneration in comparison to self healing of control groups (sham) up to week 07 after implantation in rabbit tibia critical-size defect. Therefore, this nHA-CMChNa-GEL scaffold composite exhibits inherent and efficient physicochemical, mechanical and biological

  12. Direct Growth of Graphene Films on 3D Grating Structural Quartz Substrates for High-Performance Pressure-Sensitive Sensors.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuefen; Sun, Tai; Yang, Jun; Yu, Leyong; Wei, Dacheng; Fang, Liang; Lu, Bin; Du, Chunlei; Wei, Dapeng

    2016-07-01

    Conformal graphene films have directly been synthesized on the surface of grating microstructured quartz substrates by a simple chemical vapor deposition process. The wonderful conformality and relatively high quality of the as-prepared graphene on the three-dimensional substrate have been verified by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectra. This conformal graphene film possesses excellent electrical and optical properties with a sheet resistance of <2000 Ω·sq(-1) and a transmittance of >80% (at 550 nm), which can be attached with a flat graphene film on a poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrate, and then could work as a pressure-sensitive sensor. This device possesses a high-pressure sensitivity of -6.524 kPa(-1) in a low-pressure range of 0-200 Pa. Meanwhile, this pressure-sensitive sensor exhibits super-reliability (≥5000 cycles) and an ultrafast response time (≤4 ms). Owing to these features, this pressure-sensitive sensor based on 3D conformal graphene is adequately introduced to test wind pressure, expressing higher accuracy and a lower background noise level than a market anemometer. PMID:27269362

  13. SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method for Analyzing 3D Non-Planar Cracks and Their Growth in Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikishkov, G. P.; Park, J. H.; Atluri, S. N.

    2001-01-01

    The highly accurate and efficient Symmetric Galerkin Boundary Element Method (SGBEM), a Finite Element Method (FEM)-based alternating method, is proposed for analyzing three-dimensional non-planar cracks and their growth. The cracks are modeled using the symmetric Galerkin boundary element method as a distribution of displacement discontinuities, simulating an infinite medium. The finite element method only analyzes the stress for the uncracked body. The solution for the cracked structural component is determined by an iteration procedure. This process alternates between an FEM solution for the uncracked body and the SGBEM solution for a crack in an infinite body. Numerical analysis, and the Java code used, evaluate stress intensity factors and model fatigue crack growth. Examples of non-planar cracks in infinite media and planar cracks in finite bodies, as well as growth under fatigue, show the accuracy of the method.

  14. Facile bench-top fabrication of enclosed circular microchannels provides 3D confined structure for growth of prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dolega, Monika E; Wagh, Jayesh; Gerbaud, Sophie; Kermarrec, Frederique; Alcaraz, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Donald K; Gidrol, Xavier; Picollet-D'hahan, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple bench-top method to fabricate enclosed circular channels for biological experiments. Fabricating the channels takes less than 2 hours by using glass capillaries of various diameters (from 100 µm up to 400 µm) as a mould in PDMS. The inner surface of microchannels prepared in this way was coated with a thin membrane of either Matrigel or a layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte to control cellular adhesion. The microchannels were then used as scaffolds for 3D-confined epithelial cell culture. To show that our device can be used with several epithelial cell types from exocrine glandular tissues, we performed our biological studies on adherent epithelial prostate cells (non-malignant RWPE-1 and invasive PC3) and also on breast (non-malignant MCF10A) cells We observed that in static conditions cells adhere and proliferate to form a confluent layer in channels of 150 µm in diameter and larger, whereas cellular viability decreases with decreasing diameter of the channel. Matrigel and PSS (poly (sodium 4-styrenesulphonate)) promote cell adhesion, whereas the cell proliferation rate was reduced on the PAH (poly (allylamine hydrochloride))-terminated surface. Moreover infusing channels with a continuous flow did not induce any cellular detachment. Our system is designed to simply grow cells in a microchannel structure and could be easily fabricated in any biological laboratory. It offers opportunities to grow epithelial cells that support the formation of a light. This system could be eventually used, for example, to collect cellular secretions, or study cell responses to graduated hypoxia conditions, to chemicals (drugs, siRNA, …) and/or physiological shear stress.

  15. Facile Bench-Top Fabrication of Enclosed Circular Microchannels Provides 3D Confined Structure for Growth of Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dolega, Monika E.; Wagh, Jayesh; Gerbaud, Sophie; Kermarrec, Frederique; Alcaraz, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Donald K.; Gidrol, Xavier; Picollet-D’hahan, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple bench-top method to fabricate enclosed circular channels for biological experiments. Fabricating the channels takes less than 2 hours by using glass capillaries of various diameters (from 100 µm up to 400 µm) as a mould in PDMS. The inner surface of microchannels prepared in this way was coated with a thin membrane of either Matrigel or a layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte to control cellular adhesion. The microchannels were then used as scaffolds for 3D-confined epithelial cell culture. To show that our device can be used with several epithelial cell types from exocrine glandular tissues, we performed our biological studies on adherent epithelial prostate cells (non-malignant RWPE-1 and invasive PC3) and also on breast (non-malignant MCF10A) cells We observed that in static conditions cells adhere and proliferate to form a confluent layer in channels of 150 µm in diameter and larger, whereas cellular viability decreases with decreasing diameter of the channel. Matrigel and PSS (poly (sodium 4-styrenesulphonate)) promote cell adhesion, whereas the cell proliferation rate was reduced on the PAH (poly (allylamine hydrochloride))-terminated surface. Moreover infusing channels with a continuous flow did not induce any cellular detachment. Our system is designed to simply grow cells in a microchannel structure and could be easily fabricated in any biological laboratory. It offers opportunities to grow epithelial cells that support the formation of a light. This system could be eventually used, for example, to collect cellular secretions, or study cell responses to graduated hypoxia conditions, to chemicals (drugs, siRNA, …) and/or physiological shear stress. PMID:24945245

  16. Direct growth of carbon nanofibers to generate a 3D porous platform on a metal contact to enable an oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Pan, David; Ombaba, Matthew; Zhou, Zhi-You; Liu, Yang; Chen, Shaowei; Lu, Jennifer

    2012-12-21

    For carbon nanotube-based electronics to achieve their full performance potential, it is imperative to minimize the contact resistance between macroscale metal contacts and the carbon nanotube (CNT) nanoelectrodes. We have developed a three-dimensional electrode platform that consists of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) that are directly grown on a metal contact, such as copper (Cu). Carbon nanofiber morphology can be tailored by adjusting the annealing time of a thin electrochemically deposited nickel catalyst layer on copper. We demonstrate that increasing the annealing time increases the amount of copper infused into the nickel catalyst layer. This reduces the carbon deposition rate, and consequently a more well-defined CNF 3D architecture can be fabricated. This direct growth of CNFs on a Cu substrate yields an excellent electron transfer pathway, with contact resistance between CNFs and Cu being comparable to that of a Cu-Cu interface. Furthermore, the excellent bonding strength between CNFs and Cu can be maintained over prolonged periods of ultrasonication. The porous 3D platform affixed with intertwined CNFs allows facile surface functionalization. Using a simple solution soaking procedure, the CNF surface has been successfully functionalized with iron(II) phthalocyanine (FePc). FePc functionalized CNFs exhibit excellent oxygen reduction capability, equivalent to platinum-carbon electrodes. This result demonstrates the technological promise of this new 3D electrode platform that can be exploited in other applications that include sensing, battery, and supercapacitors. PMID:23171171

  17. A 3D Hybrid Model for Tissue Growth: The Interplay between Cell Population and Mass Transport Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gang; Markenscoff, Pauline; Zygourakis, Kyriacos

    2009-01-01

    Abstract To provide theoretical guidance for the design and in vitro cultivation of bioartificial tissues, we have developed a multiscale computational model that can describe the complex interplay between cell population and mass transport dynamics that governs the growth of tissues in three-dimensional scaffolds. The model has three components: a transient partial differential equation for the simultaneous diffusion and consumption of a limiting nutrient; a cellular automaton describing cell migration, proliferation, and collision; and equations that quantify how the varying nutrient concentration modulates cell division and migration. The hybrid discrete-continuous model was parallelized and solved on a distributed-memory multicomputer to study how transport limitations affect tissue regeneration rates under conditions encountered in typical bioreactors. Simulation results show that the severity of transport limitations can be estimated by the magnitude of two dimensionless groups: the Thiele modulus and the Biot number. Key parameters including the initial seeding mode, cell migration speed, and the hydrodynamic conditions in the bioreactor are shown to affect not only the overall rate, but also the pattern of tissue growth. This study lays the groundwork for more comprehensive models that can handle mixed cell cultures, multiple nutrients and growth factors, and other cellular processes, such as cell death. PMID:19619455

  18. 3-D matrix template-assisted growth of oriented oxide nanowire arrays using glancing angle pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, N.; Mateo-Feliciano, D.; Ostoski, A.; Mukherjee, P.; Witanachchi, S.

    Nanosphere lithography is a combination of different methods to nanofabrication. In this work nanosphere lithography is used to study the growth of Zinc Oxide Nano-columns (ZnO NCs) on different diameter Silica Nanosphere (SNS) self-assembled templates. ZnO NCs are promising building blocks for many existing and emerging optical, electrical, and piezoelectric devices, specifically, the seeded growth of other oxide materials. Recently, reports have shown a ferroelectric phase of zinc stannate (ZnSnO3) and while lead zirconium titanate oxide (PZT) has been the main material of interest in ferroelectric and piezoelectric applications, the toxicity of lead has been of great concern. The possibility of developing lead free piezoelectric materials is of great interest in the ferroelectric community. Langmuir-Blodgett method was used to construct a self-assembled monolayer of SNSs on silicon substrates. Oriented ZnO NCs were grown on top of the spheres using the glancing angle pulsed laser deposition technique. Columns were formed in a spatially ordered closed-packed hexagonal configuration. Growth of ZnO NCs was studied as function of ambient Oxygen pressure with SNS size ranging from 250-1000 nm. Cross-sectional Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to study the template structure. Relative aspect ratios were studied and showed tunability of column dimensions with sphere size. XRD revealed ZnO NC arrays were c-axis oriented with hexagonal wurtzite structure.

  19. Coupling curvature-dependent and shear stress-stimulated neotissue growth in dynamic bioreactor cultures: a 3D computational model of a complete scaffold.

    PubMed

    Guyot, Y; Papantoniou, I; Luyten, F P; Geris, L

    2016-02-01

    The main challenge in tissue engineering consists in understanding and controlling the growth process of in vitro cultured neotissues toward obtaining functional tissues. Computational models can provide crucial information on appropriate bioreactor and scaffold design but also on the bioprocess environment and culture conditions. In this study, the development of a 3D model using the level set method to capture the growth of a microporous neotissue domain in a dynamic culture environment (perfusion bioreactor) was pursued. In our model, neotissue growth velocity was influenced by scaffold geometry as well as by flow- induced shear stresses. The neotissue was modeled as a homogenous porous medium with a given permeability, and the Brinkman equation was used to calculate the flow profile in both neotissue and void space. Neotissue growth was modeled until the scaffold void volume was filled, thus capturing already established experimental observations, in particular the differences between scaffold filling under different flow regimes. This tool is envisaged as a scaffold shape and bioprocess optimization tool with predictive capacities. It will allow controlling fluid flow during long-term culture, whereby neotissue growth alters flow patterns, in order to provide shear stress profiles and magnitudes across the whole scaffold volume influencing, in turn, the neotissue growth. PMID:26758425

  20. Order parameter re-mapping algorithm for 3D phase field model of grain growth using FEM

    DOE PAGES

    Permann, Cody J.; Tonks, Michael R.; Fromm, Bradley; Gaston, Derek R.

    2016-01-14

    Phase field modeling (PFM) is a well-known technique for simulating microstructural evolution. To model grain growth using PFM, typically each grain is assigned a unique non-conserved order parameter and each order parameter field is evolved in time. Traditional approaches using a one-to-one mapping of grains to order parameters present a challenge when modeling large numbers of grains due to the computational expense of using many order parameters. This problem is exacerbated when using an implicit finite element method (FEM), as the global matrix size is proportional to the number of order parameters. While previous work has developed methods to reducemore » the number of required variables and thus computational complexity and run time, none of the existing approaches can be applied for an implicit FEM implementation of PFM. Here, we present a modular, dynamic, scalable reassignment algorithm suitable for use in such a system. Polycrystal modeling with grain growth and stress require careful tracking of each grain’s position and orientation which is lost when using a reduced order parameter set. In conclusion, the method presented in this paper maintains a unique ID for each grain even after reassignment, to allow the PFM to be tightly coupled to calculations of the stress throughout the polycrystal. Implementation details and comparative results of our approach are presented.« less

  1. Fibroblast-derived 3D matrix differentially regulates the growth and drug-responsiveness of human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Acacia; Golemis, Erica A.; Cukierman, Edna

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the importance of cellular microenvironment in modulating cell growth and signaling. In vitro, collagen matrices, Matrigel, and other synthetic support systems have been used to simulate in vivo microenvironments, and epithelial cells grown in these matrices manifest significant differences in proliferation, differentiation, response to drugs, and other parameters. However, these substrates do not closely resemble the mesenchymal microenvironment that is typically associated with advanced carcinomas in vivo, which is produced to a large extent by fibroblasts. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of a fibroblast-derived three-dimensional matrix to regulate the growth of a panel of 11 human tumor epithelial cell lines. Although proliferative and morphological responses to three-dimensional cues segregated independently, general responsiveness to the matrix correlated with the ability of matrix to influence drug responses. Fibroblast-derived three-dimensional matrix increased β1-integrin-dependent survival of a subset of human cancer cell lines during taxol treatment, while it sensitized or minimally influenced survival of other cells. β1-integrin-dependent changes in cell resistance to taxol did not correlate with degree of modulation of FAK and Akt, implying additional signaling factors are involved. Based on these results, we propose these matrices potentially have value as in vitro drug screening platforms. PMID:18411046

  2. Effect of bioglass on growth and biomineralization of SaOS-2 cells in hydrogel after 3D cell bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Tolba, Emad; Schröder, Heinz C; Neufurth, Meik; Feng, Qingling; Diehl-Seifert, Bärbel; Müller, Werner E G

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of bioglass (bioactive glass) on growth and mineralization of bone-related SaOS-2 cells, encapsulated into a printable and biodegradable alginate/gelatine hydrogel. The hydrogel was supplemented either with polyphosphate (polyP), administered as polyP • Ca2+-complex, or silica, or as biosilica that had been enzymatically prepared from ortho-silicate by silicatein. These hydrogels, together with SaOS-2 cells, were bioprinted to computer-designed scaffolds. The results revealed that bioglass (nano)particles, with a size of 55 nm and a molar ratio of SiO2 : CaO : P2O5 of 55 : 40 : 5, did not affect the growth of the encapsulated cells. If silica, biosilica, or polyP • Ca2+-complex is co-added to the cell-containing alginate/gelatin hydrogel the growth behavior of the cells is not changed. Addition of 5 mg/ml of bioglass particles to this hydrogel significantly enhanced the potency of the entrapped SaOS-2 cells to mineralize. If compared with the extent of the cells to form mineral deposits in the absence of bioglass, the cells exposed to bioglass together with 100 µmoles/L polyP • Ca2+-complex increased their mineralization activity from 2.1- to 3.9-fold, or with 50 µmoles/L silica from 1.8- to 2.9-fold, or with 50 µmoles/L biosilica from 2.7- to 4.8-fold or with the two components together (100 µmoles/L polyP • Ca2+-complex and 50 µmoles/L biosilica) from 4.1- to 6.8-fold. Element analysis by EDX spectrometry of the mineral nodules formed by SaOS-2 revealed an accumulation of O, P, Ca and C, indicating that the mineral deposits contain, besides Ca-phosphate also Ca-carbonate. The results show that bioglass added to alginate/gelatin hydrogel increases the proliferation and mineralization of bioprinted SaOS-2 cells. We conclude that the development of cell-containing scaffolds consisting of a bioprintable, solid and cell-compatible inner matrix surrounded by a printable hard and flexible outer matrix containing bioglass, provide

  3. Effect of Bioglass on Growth and Biomineralization of SaOS-2 Cells in Hydrogel after 3D Cell Bioprinting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; Tolba, Emad; Schröder, Heinz C.; Neufurth, Meik; Feng, Qingling; Diehl-Seifert, Bärbel; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of bioglass (bioactive glass) on growth and mineralization of bone-related SaOS-2 cells, encapsulated into a printable and biodegradable alginate/gelatine hydrogel. The hydrogel was supplemented either with polyphosphate (polyP), administered as polyP•Ca2+-complex, or silica, or as biosilica that had been enzymatically prepared from ortho-silicate by silicatein. These hydrogels, together with SaOS-2 cells, were bioprinted to computer-designed scaffolds. The results revealed that bioglass (nano)particles, with a size of 55 nm and a molar ratio of SiO2∶CaO∶P2O5 of 55∶40∶5, did not affect the growth of the encapsulated cells. If silica, biosilica, or polyP•Ca2+-complex is co-added to the cell-containing alginate/gelatin hydrogel the growth behavior of the cells is not changed. Addition of 5 mg/ml of bioglass particles to this hydrogel significantly enhanced the potency of the entrapped SaOS-2 cells to mineralize. If compared with the extent of the cells to form mineral deposits in the absence of bioglass, the cells exposed to bioglass together with 100 µmoles/L polyP•Ca2+-complex increased their mineralization activity from 2.1- to 3.9-fold, or with 50 µmoles/L silica from 1.8- to 2.9-fold, or with 50 µmoles/L biosilica from 2.7- to 4.8-fold or with the two components together (100 µmoles/L polyP•Ca2+-complex and 50 µmoles/L biosilica) from 4.1- to 6.8-fold. Element analysis by EDX spectrometry of the mineral nodules formed by SaOS-2 revealed an accumulation of O, P, Ca and C, indicating that the mineral deposits contain, besides Ca-phosphate also Ca-carbonate. The results show that bioglass added to alginate/gelatin hydrogel increases the proliferation and mineralization of bioprinted SaOS-2 cells. We conclude that the development of cell-containing scaffolds consisting of a bioprintable, solid and cell-compatible inner matrix surrounded by a printable hard and flexible outer matrix containing bioglass, provide a

  4. 3D bone tissue growth in hollow fibre membrane bioreactor: implications of various process parameters on tissue nutrition.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, N S; Das, D B; Ye, H; Cui, Z F

    2006-09-01

    New experimental evidence shows that hollow fibre membrane bioreactor (HFMB) may be applied to grow bulky bone tissues which may then be implanted into patients to repair skeletal defects. To design effective bone tissue engineering protocols, it is necessary to determine the quantitative relationships between the cell environment and tissue behaviour in HFMBs and their relationship with nutrient supply. It is also necessary to determine under what conditions nutritional limitations may occur and, hence, may cause cell death. These require that the appropriate bioreactor conditions for generating neotissues, and the nutrient transfer behaviour and chemical reaction during cell growth and extracellular matrix formation are studied thoroughly. In this paper, we aim to use an existing mathematical framework to analyse the influence of various relevant parameters on nutrient supply for bone tissue growth in HFMB. We adopt the well-known Krogh cylinder approximation of the HFMB. The model parameters (e.g., cell metabolic rates) and operating conditions for the mathematical model have been obtained from, or correspond to, in-house experiments with the exception of a few variables which have been taken from the literature. The framework is then used to study oxygen and glucose transport behaviour in the HFMB. Influence of a number of important process parameters, e.g., reaction kinetics, cell density, inlet concentration of nutrients, etc, on the nutrient distributions have been systematically analysed. The work presented in this paper provides insights on unfavourable system designs and specifications which may be avoided to prevent mass transfer limitations for growing bone tissues in HFMB.

  5. Indium Growth and Island Height Control on Si Submonolayer Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jizhou

    2009-01-01

    ) have a wave length of 13.4 nm so it can curve on the surface of an sample to make structure as small as the order of 10 nm. however, lithograph usually causes permanent damages to the surface and in many cases the QDs are damaged during the lithograph and therefore result in high percentage of defects. Quantum size effect has attracted more and more interests in surface science due to many of its effects. One of its effects is the height preference in film growing and the resulting possibility of uniformly sized self-assemble nanostructure. The experiment of Pb islands on In 4x1 phase shows that both the height and the width can be controlled by proper growth conditions, which expands the growth dimensions from 1 to 2. This discover leads us to study the In/Pb interface. In Ch.3, we found that the Pb islands growing on In 4x1-Si(111) surface which have uniform height due to QSE and uniform width due to the constriction of In 4x1 lattice have unexpected stability. These islands are stable in even RT, unlike usual nanostructures on Pb/Si surface which are stable only at low temperature. Since similar structures are usually grown at low temperature, this discovery makes the grown structures closer to technological applications. It also shows the unusual of In/Pb interface. Then we studied the In islands grown on Pb-α-√3x√3-Si(111) phase in Ch.4. These islands have fcc structure in the first few layers, and then convert to bct structure. The In fcc islands have sharp height preference due to QSE like Pb islands. However, the preferred height is different (7 layer for Pb on Si 7x7 and 4 layer for Pb on In 4x1), due to the difference of interface. The In islands structure prefers to be bct than fcc with coverage increase. It is quantitatively supported by first-principle calculation. Unexpectedly, the In islands grown on various of In interfaces didn't show QSE effects and phase transition from fcc and bct structures as on the Pb-α interface (Ch.6). In g(s) curve there

  6. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  7. Structural assessment of the impact of environmental constraints on Arabidopsis thaliana leaf growth: a 3D approach.

    PubMed

    Wuyts, Nathalie; Massonnet, Catherine; Dauzat, Myriam; Granier, Christine

    2012-09-01

    Light and soil water content affect leaf surface area expansion through modifications in epidermal cell numbers and area, while effects on leaf thickness and mesophyll cell volumes are far less documented. Here, three-dimensional imaging was applied in a study of Arabidopsis thaliana leaf growth to determine leaf thickness and the cellular organization of mesophyll tissues under moderate soil water deficit and two cumulative light conditions. In contrast to surface area, thickness was highly conserved in response to water deficit under both low and high cumulative light regimes. Unlike epidermal and palisade mesophyll tissues, no reductions in cell number were observed in the spongy mesophyll; cells had rather changed in volume and shape. Furthermore, leaf features of a selection of genotypes affected in leaf functioning were analysed. The low-starch mutant pgm had very thick leaves because of unusually large palisade mesophyll cells, together with high levels of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance. By means of an open stomata mutant and a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase overexpressor, it was shown that stomatal conductance does not necessarily have a major impact on leaf dimensions and cellular organization, pointing to additional mechanisms for the control of CO(2) diffusion under high and low stomatal conductance, respectively.

  8. Hydrogen effect on the morphology and structure of 3D porous titanium in the HFCVD-diamond growth environment

    SciTech Connect

    Braga, N.A.; Ferreira, N.G.; Baldan, M.R.

    2011-10-15

    Titanium hydride was obtained from hydrogenation process on pure titanium (Ti) using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition reactor. The Ti samples were produced from powder metallurgy technique and present three-dimensional porosity. The experimental parameters of the hydrogenation process were controlled in a similar way as those for diamond growth. The pressure inside the reactor was kept at 6.6 kPa for a H{sub 2} flow rate of 100 sccm and hydrogenation time of 1 hour. The distance from the filaments to the Ti surface was kept at 5 mm. Hydrogenation processes were carried out at different temperatures of 773, 873, 973 and 1073 K. The morphology of the titanium hydrides was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The images showed an increase in the roughness titanium surface as well as the formation of cracks due to the hydride titanium precipitation. The structure of these titanium hydrides was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, performed through {theta}-2{theta} scans from 1 to 15{sup o} grazing incident angle. The results revealed that the temperature enhanced the titanium hydride concentration in the samples with a predominant precipitation of TiH phase for the four temperatures studied. - Highlights: {yields} Hydrogen quickly spread out in the Ti matrix reacting and generating TiH phases. {yields} The higher the hydrogenation temperature the higher the amount of TiH formation. {yields} The volume increasing associated with the TiH formation caused tensions in the Ti metallic matrix. {yields} The TiH increases the Ti surface roughness influencing the grain size reduction.

  9. Growth of porous anodized alumina on the sputtered aluminum films with 2D-3D morphology for high specific surface area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, M. W.; Chung, C. K.

    2014-08-01

    The porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with high-aspect-ratio pore channels is widely used as a template for fabricating nanowires or other one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures. The high specific surface area of AAO can also be applied to the super capacitor and the supporting substrate for catalysis. The rough surface could be helpful to enhance specific surface area but it generally results in electrical field concentration even to ruin AAO. In this article, the aluminum (Al) films with the varied 2D-3D morphology on Si substrates were prepared using magnetron sputtering at a power of 50 W-185 W for 1 h at a working pressure of 2.5 × 10-1 Pa. Then, AAO was fabricated from the different Al films by means of one-step hybrid pulse anodizing (HPA) between the positive 40 V and the negative -2 V (1 s:1 s) for 3 min in 0.3 M oxalic acid at a room temperature. The microstructure and morphology of Al films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope, respectively. Some hillocks formed at the high target power could be attributed to the grain texture growth in the normal orientation of Al(1 1 1). The 3D porous AAO structure which is different from the conventional 2D planar one has been successfully demonstrated using HPA on the film with greatly rough hillock-surface formed at the highest power of 185 W. It offers a potential application of the new 3D AAO to high specific surface area devices.

  10. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  11. Epidermal growth factor promotes a mesenchymal over an amoeboid motility of MDA-MB-231 cells embedded within a 3D collagen matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geum, Dongil T.; Kim, Beum Jun; Chang, Audrey E.; Hall, Matthew S.; Wu, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    The receptor of epidermal growth factor (EGFR) critically regulates tumor cell invasion and is a potent therapeutic target for treatment of many types of cancers, including carcinomas and glioblastomas. It is known that EGF regulates cell motility when tumor cells are embedded within a 3D biomatrix. However, roles of EGF in modulating tumor cell motility phenotype are largely unknown. In this article, we report that EGF promotes a mesenchymal over an amoeboid motility phenotype using a malignant breast tumor cell line, MDA-MB-231, embedded within a 3D collagen matrix. Amoeboid cells are rounded in shape, while mesenchymal cells are elongated, and their migrations are governed by a distinctly different set of biomolecules. Using single cell tracking analysis, we also show that EGF promotes cell dissemination through a significant increase in cell persistence along with a moderate increase of speed. The increase of persistence is correlated with the increase of the percentage of the mesenchymal cells within the population. Our work reveals a novel role of microenvironmental cue, EGF, in modulating heterogeneity and plasticity of tumor cell motility phenotype. In addition, it suggests a potential visual cue for diagnosing invasive states of breast cancer cells. This work can be easily extended beyond breast cancer cells.

  12. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  13. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  14. Two step formation of metal aggregates by surface X-ray radiolysis under Langmuir monolayers: 2D followed by 3D growth

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Smita; Fauré, Marie-Claude; Goldmann, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary In order to form a nanostructured metallic layer below a Langmuir monolayer, radiolysis synthesis was carried out in an adapted geometry that we call surface X-ray radiolysis. In this procedure, an X-ray beam produced by a synchrotron beamline intercepts the surface of an aqueous metal-ion solution covered by a Langmuir monolayer at an angle of incidence below the critical angle for total internal reflection. Underneath the organic layer, the X-ray beam induces the radiolytic synthesis of a nanostructured metal–organic layer whose ultrathin thickness is defined by the vertical X-ray penetration depth. We have shown that increasing the X-ray flux on the surface, which considerably enhances the kinetics of the silver layer formation, results in a second growth regime of silver nanocrystals. Here the formation of the oriented thin layer is followed by the appearance of a 3D powder of silver clusters. PMID:26734531

  15. Volcano-tectonic implications of 3-D velocity structures derived from joint active and passive source tomography of the island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.; Morgan, J.K.; Zelt, C.A.; Okubo, P.G.

    2009-01-01

    We present a velocity model of the onshore and offshore regions around the southern part of the island of Hawaii, including southern Mauna Kea, southeastern Hualalai, and the active volcanoes of Mauna Loa, and Kilauea, and Loihi seamount. The velocity model was inverted from about 200,000 first-arrival traveltime picks of earthquakes and air gun shots recorded at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). Reconstructed volcanic structures of the island provide us with an improved understanding of the volcano-tectonic evolution of Hawaiian volcanoes and their interactions. The summits and upper rift zones of the active volcanoes are characterized by high-velocity materials, correlated with intrusive magma cumulates. These high-velocity materials often do not extend the full lengths of the rift zones, suggesting that rift zone intrusions may be spatially limited. Seismicity tends to be localized seaward of the most active intrusive bodies. Low-velocity materials beneath parts of the active rift zones of Kilauea and Mauna Loa suggest discontinuous rift zone intrusives, possibly due to the presence of a preexisting volcanic edifice, e.g., along Mauna Loa beneath Kilauea's southwest rift zone, or alternatively, removal of high-velocity materials by large-scale landsliding, e.g., along Mauna Loa's western flank. Both locations also show increased seismicity that may result from edifice interactions or reactivation of buried faults. New high-velocity regions are recognized and suggest the presence of buried, and in some cases, previously unknown rift zones, within the northwest flank of Mauna Loa, and the south flanks of Mauna Loa, Hualalai, and Mauna Kea. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Supra-salt normal fault growth during the rise and fall of a diapir: Perspectives from 3D seismic reflection data, Norwegian North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvedt, Anette B. M.; Rotevatn, Atle; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.

    2016-10-01

    Normal faulting and the deep subsurface flow of salt are key processes controlling the structural development of many salt-bearing sedimentary basins. However, our detailed understanding of the spatial and temporal relationship between normal faulting and salt movement is poor due to a lack of natural examples constraining their geometric and kinematic relationship in three-dimensions. To improve our understanding of these processes, we here use 3D seismic reflection and borehole data from the Egersund Basin, offshore Norway, to determine the structure and growth of a normal fault array formed during the birth, growth and decay of an array of salt structures. We show that the fault array and salt structures developed in response to: (i) Late Triassic-to-Middle Jurassic extension, which involved thick-skinned, sub-salt and thin-skinned supra-salt faulting with the latter driving reactive diapirism; (ii) Early Cretaceous extensional collapse of the walls; and (iii) Jurassic-to-Neogene, active and passive diapirism, which was at least partly coeval with and occurred along-strike from areas of reactive diapirism and wall collapse. Our study supports physical model predictions, showcasing a three-dimensional example of how protracted, multiphase salt diapirism can influence the structure and growth of normal fault arrays.

  17. Combination of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate with diethyldithiocarbamate markedly inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth in 3D culture and in immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, HUARONG; CAO, KAJIA; MALIK, SAQUIB; ZHANG, QIUYAN; LI, DONGLI; CHANG, RICHARD; WANG, HUAQIAN; LIN, WEIPING; VAN DOREN, JEREMIAH; ZHANG, KUN; DU, ZHIYUN; ZHENG, XI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) alone or in combination on human pancreatic cancer cells cultured in vitro and grown as xenograft tumors in nude mice. Pancreatic cancer cells were treated with either DDTC or TPA alone, or in combination and the number of viable cells was then determined by trypan blue ecxlusion assay and the number of apoptotic cells was determined by morphological assessment by staining the cells with propidium idiode and examining them under a fluorescence microscope. Treatment with DDTC or TPA alone inhibited the growth and promoted the apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects were more prominent following treatment with TPA in combination with DDTC than following treatment with either agent alone in PANC-1 cells in monolayer cultures and in 3 dimensional (3D) cultures. The potent effects of the combination treatment on PANC-1 cells were associated with the inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and the decreased expression of Bcl-2 induced by DDTC, as shown by NF-κB-dependent reporter gene expression assay and western blot analysis. Furthermore, treatment of nude mice with DDTC + TPA strongly inhibited the growth of PANC-1 xenograft tumors. The results of the present study indicate that the administration of TPA and DDTC in combination may be an effective strategy for inhibiting the growth of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25847449

  18. An elastic/viscoelastic finite element analysis method for crustal deformation using a 3-D island-scale high-fidelity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimura, Tsuyoshi; Agata, Ryoichiro; Hori, Takane; Hirahara, Kazuro; Hashimoto, Chihiro; Hori, Muneo; Fukahata, Yukitoshi

    2016-07-01

    As a result of the accumulation of high-resolution observation data, 3-D high-fidelity crustal structure data for large domains are becoming available. However, it has been difficult to use such data to perform elastic/viscoelastic crustal deformation analyses in large domains with quality assurance of the numerical simulation that guarantees convergence of the numerical solution with respect to the discretization size because the costs of analysis are significantly high. This paper proposes a method of constructing a high-fidelity crustal structure finite element (FE) model using high-fidelity crustal structure data and fast FE analysis to reduce the costs of analysis (based on automatic FE model generation for parallel computation, OpenMP/MPI hybrid parallel computation on distributed memory computers, a geometric multigrid, variable preconditioning and multiple precision arithmetic). Using the proposed methods, we construct 10 billion degree-of-freedom high-fidelity crustal structure FE models for the entire Japan, and conduct elastic/viscoelastic crustal deformation analysis using this model with enough high accuracy of the numerical simulation.

  19. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  20. Developments in Characterizing Capture Zone Distributions in Island Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einstein, T. L.; Pimpinelli, Alberto; GonzáLez, Diego Luis; Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh

    2013-03-01

    The utility of using the distribution of capture zones (CZD) to characterize epitaxial growth continues to mount. For non-Poisson deposition (i.e. when island nucleation is not fully random) the areas of these Voronoi cells (proximity polygons) can be well described by the generalized Wigner distribution (GWD), particularly in the central region around the mean area. We discuss several recent applications to experimental systems, showing how this perspective leads to insights about the critical nucleus size. In contrast, several studies have shown that the GWD may not describe the numerical data from painstaking simulations in both tails. We discuss some refinements that have been proposed. Finally, we comment on applications to social phenomena such as area distributions of secondary administrative units (like counties) and of Voronoi cells around Metro stops. Work at UMD supported by NSF-MRSEC Grant DMR 05-20471 and NSF CHE 07-49949

  1. Pitcairn Island: fertility and population growth, 1790-1856.

    PubMed

    Refshauge, W F; Walsh, R J

    1981-01-01

    The hybrid English-Tahitian community which lived on Pitcairn Island between 1790 and 1856 exhibited a high population growth (3% overall). Unlike some other isolated groups, they did not live long lives (expectation of life at birth was 50.4 years overall for both sexes combined), but infant mortality, at 5.5% of births is lower than might have been expected. The level of marital fertility on Pitcairn was extremely high, higher even than for the Hutterites. Although births outside marriage were uncommon, brides were frequently pregnant at marriage. Age at first marriage changed markedly in response to changes in the community. There is some evidence that premarital sex became more frequent, possibly as an adjustment to Tahitian behavioural norms within the community's English religious ethic.

  2. Growth of gold-manganese oxide nanostructures on a 3D origami device for glucose-oxidase label based electrochemical immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Long; Xu, Jinmeng; Zheng, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Chao; Song, Xianrang; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua; Yan, Mei

    2014-11-15

    Flexible biosensors are of considerable current interest for the development of portable point-of-care medical products, minimally invasive implantable devices, and compact diagnostic platforms. Here, we reported an electrochemical paper based analytical device fabricated (EPADs) by sequentially growing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and manganese oxide (MnO2) nanowires networks on a freestanding three dimensional (3D) origami device. This fabricated through the growth of an AuNPs layer on the surfaces of cellulose fibers in the screen-printed paper working electrode (PWE), and thus developed a gold paper working electrode (Au-PWE). Subsequently, MnO2 nanowires were successfully electrodeposited on Au-PWE to form a 3D network with large surface areas. Based on this novel EPADs and the principle of origami, we presented herein a simple immunosensing scheme using glucose oxidase (GOx) as an enzyme label, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) as a redox terminator, and glucose as an enzyme substrate. The electrochemical enzymatic redox cycling was applied to the detection of prostate protein antigen (PSA), a biomarker of prostatic cancer. The proposed method successfully fulfilled the highly sensitive detection of PSA with a linear range of 0.005 ng mL(-1)-100 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.0012 ng mL(-1). This EPADs exhibited high sensitivity, specificity and excellent performance in real human serum assay, and could be applied in point-of-care testing of other tumor markers for remote regions and developing countries.

  3. Abundance, behavior, and movement patterns of western gray whales in relation to a 3-D seismic survey, Northeast Sakhalin Island, Russia.

    PubMed

    Gailey, Glenn; Würsig, Bernd; McDonald, Trent L

    2007-11-01

    A geophysical seismic survey was conducted in the summer of 2001 off the northeastern coast of Sakhalin Island, Russia. The area of seismic exploration was immediately adjacent to the Piltun feeding grounds of the endangered western gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus). This study investigates relative abundance, behavior, and movement patterns of gray whales in relation to occurrence and proximity to the seismic survey by employing scan sampling, focal follow, and theodolite tracking methodologies. These data were analyzed in relation to temporal, environmental, and seismic related variables to evaluate potential disturbance reactions of gray whales to the seismic survey. The relative numbers of whales and pods recorded from five shore-based stations were not significantly different during periods when seismic surveys were occurring compared to periods when no seismic surveys were occurring and to the post-seismic period. Univariate analyses indicated no significant statistical correlation between seismic survey variables and any of the eleven movement and behavior variables. Multiple regression analyses indicated that, after accounting for temporal and environmental variables, 6 of 11 movement and behavior variables (linearity, acceleration, mean direction, blows per surfacing, and surface-dive blow rate) were not significantly associated with seismic survey variables, and 5 of 11 variables (leg speed, reorientation rate, distance-from-shore, blow interval, and dive time) were significantly associated with seismic survey variables. In summary, after accounting for environmental variables, no correlation was found between seismic survey variables and the linearity of whale movements, changes in whale swimming speed between theodolite fixes, mean direction of whale movement, mean number of whale exhalations per minute at the surface, mean time at the surface, and mean number of exhalations per minute during a whales surface-to-dive cycle. In contrast, at higher

  4. Modelling of facial growth in Czech children based on longitudinal data: Age progression from 12 to 15 years using 3D surface models.

    PubMed

    Koudelová, Jana; Dupej, Ján; Brůžek, Jaroslav; Sedlak, Petr; Velemínská, Jana

    2015-03-01

    Dealing with the increasing number of long-term missing children and juveniles requires more precise and objective age progression techniques for the prediction of their current appearance. Our contribution includes detailed and real facial growth information used for modelling age progression during adolescence. This study was based on an evaluation of the overall 180 three-dimensional (3D) facial scans of Czech children (23 boys, 22 girls), which were longitudinally studied from 12 to 15 years of age and thus revealed the real growth-related changes. The boys underwent more marked changes compared with the girls, especially in the regions of the eyebrow ridges, nose and chin. Using modern geometric morphometric methods, together with their applications, we modelled the ageing and allometric trajectories for both sexes and simulated the age-progressed effects on facial scans. The facial parts that are important for facial recognition (eyes, nose, mouth and chin) all deviated less than 0.75mm, whereas the areas with the largest deviations were situated on the marginal parts of the face. The mean error between the predicted and real facial morphology obtained by modelling the children from 12 to 15 years of age was 1.92mm in girls and 1.86mm in boys. This study is beneficial for forensic artists as it reduces the subjectivity of age progression methods.

  5. Spontaneous healing and growth of locked magnetic island chains in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R.; Waelbroeck, F. L.

    2012-11-15

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that locked magnetic island chains in stellarator plasmas spontaneously heal under certain conditions, and spontaneously grow under others. A formalism initially developed to study magnetic island dynamics in tokamak plasmas is employed to investigate this phenomenon. It is found that island healing/growth transitions can be caused either by a breakdown in torque balance in the vicinity of the island chain, or by an imbalance between the various terms in the island width evolution equation. The scaling of the healing/growth thresholds with the standard dimensionless plasma parameters {beta}, {nu}{sub *}, and {rho}{sub *} is determined. In accordance with the experimental data, it is found that island healing generally occurs at high {beta} and low {nu}{sub *}, and island growth at low {beta} and high {nu}{sub *}. In further agreement, it is found that island healing is accompanied an ion poloidal velocity shift in the electron diamagnetic direction, and island growth by a velocity shift in the ion diamagnetic direction. Finally, it is found that there is considerable hysteresis in the healing/growth cycle, as is also seen experimentally.

  6. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  7. Progress in characterizing submonolayer island growth: Capture-zone distributions, growth exponents, & hot precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einstein, Theodore L.; Pimpinelli, Alberto; González, Diego Luis; Morales-Cifuentes, Josue R.

    2015-09-01

    In studies of epitaxial growth, analysis of the distribution of the areas of capture zones (i.e. proximity polygons or Voronoi tessellations with respect to island centers) is often the best way to extract the critical nucleus size i. For non-random nucleation the normalized areas s of these Voronoi cells are well described by the generalized Wigner distribution (GWD) Pβ(s) = asβ exp(-bs2), particularly in the central region 0.5 < s < 2 where data are least noisy. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations reveal inadequacies of our earlier mean field analysis, suggesting β = i + 2 for diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). Since simulations generate orders of magnitude more data than experiments, they permit close examination of the tails of the distribution, which differ from the simple GWD form. One refinement is based on a fragmentation model. We also compare island-size distributions. We compare analysis by island-size distribution and by scaling of island density with flux. Modifications appear for attach-limited aggregation (ALA). We focus on the experimental system para-hexaphenyl on amorphous mica, comparing the results of the three analysis techniques and reconciling their results via a novel model of hot precursors based on rate equations, pointing out the existence of intermediate scaling regimes between DLA and ALA.

  8. Episodic swell growth inferred from variable uplift of the Cape Verde hotspot islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramalho, R.; Helffrich, G.; Cosca, M.; Vance, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Schmidt, D.N.

    2010-01-01

    On the Beagle voyage, Charles Darwin first noted the creation and subsidence of ocean islands, establishing in geology's infancy that island freeboard changes with time. Hotspot ocean islands have an obvious mechanism for freeboard change through the growth of the bathymetric anomaly, or swell, on which the islands rest. Models for swell development indicate that flexural, thermal or dynamic pressure contributions, as well as spreading of melt residue from the hotspot, can all contribute to island uplift. Here we test various models for swell development using the uplift histories for the islands of the Cape Verde hotspot, derived from isotopic dating of marine terraces and subaerial to submarine lava-flow morphologies. The island uplift histories, in conjunction with inter-island spacing, uplift rate and timing differences, rule out flexural, thermal or dynamic pressure contributions. We also find that uplift cannot be reconciled with models that advocate the spreading of melt residue in swell development unless swell growth is episodic. Instead, we infer from the uplift histories that two processes have acted to raise the islands during the past 6 Myr. During an initial phase, mantle processes acted to build the swell. Subsequently, magmatic intrusions at the island edifice caused 350 m of local uplift at the scale of individual islands. Finally, swell-wide uplift contributed a further 100 m of surface rise.

  9. Episodic swell growth inferred from variable uplift of the Cape Verde hotspot islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalho, R.; Helffrich, G.; Cosca, M.; Vance, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Schmidt, D. N.

    2010-11-01

    On the Beagle voyage, Charles Darwin first noted the creation and subsidence of ocean islands, establishing in geology's infancy that island freeboard changes with time. Hotspot ocean islands have an obvious mechanism for freeboard change through the growth of the bathymetric anomaly, or swell, on which the islands rest. Models for swell development indicate that flexural, thermal or dynamic pressure contributions, as well as spreading of melt residue from the hotspot, can all contribute to island uplift. Here we test various models for swell development using the uplift histories for the islands of the Cape Verde hotspot, derived from isotopic dating of marine terraces and subaerial to submarine lava-flow morphologies. The island uplift histories, in conjunction with inter-island spacing, uplift rate and timing differences, rule out flexural, thermal or dynamic pressure contributions. We also find that uplift cannot be reconciled with models that advocate the spreading of melt residue in swell development unless swell growth is episodic. Instead, we infer from the uplift histories that two processes have acted to raise the islands during the past 6Myr. During an initial phase, mantle processes acted to build the swell. Subsequently, magmatic intrusions at the island edifice caused 350m of local uplift at the scale of individual islands. Finally, swell-wide uplift contributed a further 100m of surface rise.

  10. Evaluation of surface/interface-related physicochemical and microstructural properties of gelatin 3D scaffolds, and their influence on fibroblast growth and morphology.

    PubMed

    Gorgieva, Selestina; Štrancar, Janez; Kokol, Vanja

    2014-11-01

    This article present new insights in complex relation between surface- and interface-related physicochemical properties and microstructuring of three-dimensional (3D) gelatin scaffolds, being fabricated by simultaneous temperature-controlled freeze-thawing cycle and in situ cross-linking using variable conditions (pH) and molarity of carbodiimide reagents, on the seeding and growth of fibroblast cells with subsequent tracking of their spreading and morphology. Rarely populated cells with rounded morphology and small elongations are observed on negative charge-rich scaffold surface with a lower cross-linking degree (CD), and consequently higher molecular mobility and availability of cell-recognition sequences, in comparison with the prominently elongated and densely populated cells on a positively charged scaffold's surface with higher CD and low mobility. Surface microstructure effect was demonstrated by cell vacuolization and their pure intercommunication being present on scaffold's bottom side with smaller pores (25 ± 19 µm) and pore wall thickness (9 ± 5 µm), over the air-exposed side with twice bigger pores (56 ± 38 µm) and pore wall thicknesses (12 ± 6 µm). Strong correlations of CD (r(2) = 0.96) and local molecular mobility (r(2)  = -0.44) with pH and reagents molarity, as well as microstructure features being related to temperature gradient, imply on possibility to modulate scaffold's properties in a direction to guide cell viability and most likely its genotype development.

  11. Adhesion and growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on precise-geometry 3D organic-inorganic composite scaffolds for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Chatzinikolaidou, Maria; Rekstyte, Sima; Danilevicius, Paulius; Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Papadaki, Helen; Farsari, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Engineering biomaterial scaffolds that promote attachment and growth of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions is a crucial parameter for successful bone tissue engineering. Towards this direction, a lot of research effort has focused recently into the development of three-dimensional porous scaffolds, aiming to elicit positive cellular behavior. However, the fabrication of three-dimensional tissue scaffolds with a precise geometry and complex micro- and nano-features, supporting cell in-growth remains a challenge. In this study we report on a positive cellular response of human bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) onto hybrid material scaffolds consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide, and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). First, we use Direct fs Laser Writing, a 3D scaffolding technology to fabricate the complex structures. Subsequently, we investigate the morphology, viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid scaffolds and examine the cellular response from different donors. Finally, we explore the effect of the materials' chemical composition on cell proliferation, employing three different material surfaces: (i) a hybrid consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide and 50mol% DMAEMA, (ii) a hybrid material comprising methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and zirconium propoxide, and (iii) a purely organic polyDMAEMA. Our results show a strong adhesion of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid material containing 50% DMAEMA from the first 2h after seeding, and up to several days, and a proliferation increase after 14 and 21days, similar to the polystyrene control, independent of cell donor. These findings support the potential use of our proposed cell-material combination in bone tissue engineering.

  12. Volcano growth and evolution of the island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Clague, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    The seven volcanoes comprising the island of Hawaii and its submarine base are, in order of growth, Mahukona, Kohala, Mauna Kea, Hualalai, Mauna Loa, Kilauea, and Loihi. The first four have completed their shield-building stage, and the timing of this event can be determined from the depth of the slope break associated with the end of shield building, calibrated using the ages and depths of a series of dated submerged coral reefs off northwest Hawaii. On each volcano, the transition from eruption of tholeiitic to alkalic lava occurs near the end of shield building. The rate of southeastern progression of the end of shield building in the interval from Haleakala to Hualalai is about 13 cm/yr. Based on this rate and an average spacing of volcanoes on each loci line of 40-60km, the volcanoes required about 600 thousand years to grow from the ocean floor to the time of the end of shield building. They arrive at the ocean surface about midway through this period. -from Authors

  13. The transition from ripples to islands in strained heteroepitaxial growth under low driving forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsch, W.; Steiner, B.; Albrecht, M.; Strunk, H. P.; Wawra, H.; Wagner, G.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the morphological evolution during the growth of strained Ge xSi 1 - x layers from ln solution (5 ⩽ x ⩽ 15%). Surface ripples develop due to elastic stress relaxation. These ripples self-organize in a way that a defined wavelength and a two-dimensional pattern aligned along (1 0 0) directions develops. During further growth, the ripples transform into pseudomorphic islands and island growth proceeds in vertical direction at constant island width. The ripple wavelength and the island size are controlled by the germanium content and verify energetical predictions. Further, the theoretical expectation is corroborated that island development occurs even at low misfits when deposition is controlled by energetics.

  14. STM Studies of the Growth of Ni and Cu Islands on TiO_2(110)-(1x1): Controlling Island Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Donna; Zhou, Jing; Kang, Yong-Cheol

    2003-03-01

    We have investigated the growth of Cu and Ni islands on rutile TiO_2(110)-(1x1) surfaces using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Both Cu and Ni islands grow 3-dimensionally at room temperature even at low coverages. The narrowness of the size distributions for both Ni and Cu islands are controlled by the diffusion (D) to deposition flux (F) ratios, with the smallest values for D/F corresponding to most uniform size distributions. Increasing the deposition flux resulted in smaller islands with higher island densities, while increasing the diffusion rate at elevated deposition temperatures produced larger islands with lower island densities. As the metal coverage is increased, the island density increases even up to coverages as high as 2-3 ML, whereas the island diameters do not change much throughout entire coverage range. Islands do grow with increasing coverage, but this growth is mainly due to an increase in island height. Based on the stronger admetal-oxide interaction for Ni compared to Cu, it was expected that the Ni islands might have smaller aspect ratios compared to the Cu islands. Furthermore, the stronger admetal-oxide interactions could result in decreased diffusion rates for Ni compared to Cu. However, we found that Ni islands do not grow flatter on the surface compared to Cu, and there is no evidence for slower Ni adatom diffusion at room temperature. A major difference between Ni and Cu island growth is that the sintering of Ni islands occurs at much higher temperatures. We have shown that the rate limiting step in the sintering of Ni and Cu islands is adatom detachment, not adatom diffusion. Therefore, the slower sintering of Ni islands compared to Cu can be explained by the stronger metal-metal bond strength for Ni.

  15. Growth and study of antimony selenide island films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushkhov, A. R.; Gaev, D. S.; Rabinovich, O. I.; Stolyarov, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    Nanosized Sb2Se3 island films are prepared by the incongruent evaporation of Sb1 - x Se x ( x = 0.9 at fractions) thin films. The surface morphology of the structures is investigated by optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It is shown that an increase in the evaporation temperature leads to a decrease in the surface density of islands.

  16. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  17. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  18. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  19. Growth and study of antimony selenide island films

    SciTech Connect

    Kushkhov, A. R.; Gaev, D. S.; Rabinovich, O. I.; Stolyarov, A. G.

    2013-03-15

    Nanosized Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} island films are prepared by the incongruent evaporation of Sb{sub 1-x}Se{sub x} (x = 0.9 at fractions) thin films. The surface morphology of the structures is investigated by optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It is shown that an increase in the evaporation temperature leads to a decrease in the surface density of islands.

  20. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  1. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  2. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  3. Enhancement of island size by dynamic substrate disorder in simulations of graphene growth.

    PubMed

    Enstone, Gwilym; Brommer, Peter; Quigley, David; R Bell, Gavin

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a new mechanism in the early stages of sub-monolayer epitaxial island growth, using Monte Carlo simulations motivated by experimental observations on the growth of graphene on copper foil. In our model, the substrate is "dynamically rough", by which we mean (i) the interaction strength between Cu and C varies randomly from site to site, and (ii) these variable strengths themselves migrate from site to site. The dynamic roughness provides a simple representation of the near-molten state of the Cu substrate in the case of real graphene growth. Counterintuitively, the graphene island size increases when dynamic roughness is included, compared to a static and smooth substrate. We attribute this effect to destabilisation of small graphene islands by fluctuations in the substrate, allowing them to break up and join larger islands which are more stable against roughness. In the case of static roughness, when process (ii) is switched off, island growth is strongly inhibited and the scale-free behaviour of island size distributions, present in the smooth-static and rough-dynamic cases, is destroyed. The effects of the dynamic substrate roughness cannot be mimicked by parameter changes in the static cases. PMID:27199250

  4. Properties of plane discrete Poisson-Voronoi tessellations on triangular tiling formed by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami growth of triangular islands.

    PubMed

    Korobov, A

    2011-08-01

    Discrete uniform Poisson-Voronoi tessellations of two-dimensional triangular tilings resulting from the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) growth of triangular islands have been studied. This shape of tiles and islands, rarely considered in the field of random tessellations, is prompted by the birth-growth process of Ir(210) faceting. The growth mode determines a triangular metric different from the Euclidean metric. Kinetic characteristics of tessellations appear to be metric sensitive, in contrast to area distributions. The latter have been studied for the variant of nuclei growth to the first impingement in addition to the conventional case of complete growth. Kiang conjecture works in both cases. The averaged number of neighbors is six for all studied densities of random tessellations, but neighbors appear to be mainly different in triangular and Euclidean metrics. Also, the applicability of the obtained results for simulating birth-growth processes when the 2D nucleation and impingements are combined with the 3D growth in the particular case of similar shape and the same orientation of growing nuclei is briefly discussed.

  5. Real-time x-ray studies of indium island growth kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Demasi, Alexander; Rainville, Meliha G.; Ludwig, Karl F.

    2015-03-15

    The authors have investigated the early stages of indium island formation and growth by vapor phase deposition on room temperature sapphire using real-time grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS), followed by ex-situ atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results are consistent with the formation and coalescence of hemispherical islands, as described by Family and Meakin. Monte Carlo simulations of systems of coalescing islands were used to supplement and quantify the results of GISAXS, and a good agreement is seen between the data and the simulations.

  6. Hug-like island growth of Ge on strained vicinal Si(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persichetti, L.; Menditto, R.; Sgarlata, A.; Fanfoni, M.; Balzarotti, A.

    2011-10-01

    We examine the structure and the evolution of Ge islands epitaxially grown on vicinal Si(111) surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy. Contrary to what is observed on the singular surface, three-dimensional Ge nanoislands form directly through the elastic relaxation of step-edge protrusions during the unstable step-flow growth. As the substrate misorientation is increased, the islands undergo a shape transformation which is driven by surface energy minimization and controlled by the miscut angle. Using finite element simulations, we show that the dynamics of islanding observed in the experiment results from the anisotropy of the strain relaxation.

  7. Taming supersymmetric defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group {SL}(N,{{C}}), in the context of its relation with 3d { N }=2 theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d (2,0) theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold \\hat{M}. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d {SL}(N,{{C}}) CS theory, in 3d { N }=2 theory, in 5d { N }=2 super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper [1], which contains more details and more results.

  8. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  9. Assessment of Groundwater Resources of Dauphin Island and its Connection to Urban Sprawl and Economic Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, K. S.

    2009-12-01

    Dauphin Island is a barrier island about 28 miles south of Mobile, Alabama. The island relies heavily on the shallow aquifer underlying the barrier island. Worldwide, the largest volume of water used for human consumption and use comes from groundwater resources. On barrier islands such as Dauphin Island, the proportion of water used by humans coming from groundwater resources is even higher. Additionally, tourism is very important to the economy of Dauphin Island, and the hotels and tourist attractions rely on groundwater. Because of the large influx of people there are peaks in water demand during tourist season. The goal of this project is to quantify the impacts of urban growth on the aquifer and provide an estimate for sustainable withdrawal rates. The project will be carried out in two main phases. In the first phase a water resource assessment and analysis will be conducted using the SEAWAT model. SEAWAT simulates three-dimensional variable-density ground-water flow coupled with multi-species solute and heat transport. In the second phase the calibrated groundwater model for the island will be used to perform a scenario analysis which would help link groundwater availability with urban sprawl. In this paper we will describe the research methodology and procedures that will be used in the project.

  10. Growth and collapse of the Reunion Island volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehler, Jean-François; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2008-04-01

    This work presents the first exhaustive study of the entire surface of the Reunion Island volcanic system. The focus is on the submarine part, for which a compilation of all multibeam data collected during the last 20 years has been made. Different types of submarine features have been identified: a coastal shelf, debris avalanches and sedimentary deposits, erosion canyons, volcanic constructions near the coast, and seamounts offshore. Criteria have been defined to differentiate the types of surfaces and to establish their relative chronology where possible. Debris avalanche deposits are by far the most extensive and voluminous formations in the submarine domain. They have built four huge Submarine Bulges to the east, north, west, and south of the island. They form fans 20-30 km wide at the coastline and 100-150 km wide at their ends, 70-80 km offshore. They were built gradually by the superimposition and/or juxtaposition of products moved during landslide episodes, involving up to several hundred cubic kilometers of material. About 50 individual events deposits can be recognized at the surface. The landslides have recurrently dismantled Piton des Neiges, Les Alizés, and Piton de La Fournaise volcanoes since 2 Ma. About one third are interpreted as secondary landslides, affecting previously emplaced debris avalanche deposits. On land, landslide deposits are observed in the extensively eroded central area of Piton des Neiges and in its coastal areas. Analysis of the present-day topography and of geology allows us to identify presumed faults and scars of previous large landslides. The Submarine Bulges are dissected and bound by canyons up to 200 m deep and 40 km long, filled with coarse-grained sediments, and generally connected to streams onshore. A large zone of sedimentary accumulation exists to the north-east of the island. It covers a zone 20 km in width, extending up to 15 km offshore. Volcanic constructions are observed near the coast on both Piton des Neiges

  11. DYNA3D. Explicit 3-d Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Englemann, B.E. )

    1993-11-30

    DYNA3D is an explicit, three-dimensional, finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids and structures. DYNA3D contains 30 material models and 10 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, Blatz-Ko rubber, high explosive burn, hydrodynamic without deviatoric stresses, elastoplastic hydrodynamic, temperature-dependent elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic with failure, soil and crushable foam with failure, Johnson/Cook plasticity model, pseudo TENSOR geological model, elastoplastic with fracture, power law isotropic plasticity, strain rate dependent plasticity, rigid, thermal orthotropic, composite damage model, thermal orthotropic with 12 curves, piecewise linear isotropic plasticity, inviscid two invariant geologic cap, orthotropic crushable model, Moonsy-Rivlin rubber, resultant plasticity, closed form update shell plasticity, and Frazer-Nash rubber model. The hydrodynamic material models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 10 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, tabulated, and TENSOR pore collapse. DYNA3D generates three binary output databases. One contains information for complete states at infrequent intervals; 50 to 100 states is typical. The second contains information for a subset of nodes and elements at frequent intervals; 1,000 to 10,000 states is typical. The last contains interface data for contact surfaces.

  12. QM/MD studies on graphene growth from small islands on the Ni(111) surface.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Menggai; Song, Wei; Qian, Hu-Jun; Wang, Ying; Wu, Zhijian; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-02-01

    Quantum chemical molecular dynamics simulations of graphene growth from small island precursors in different carbon nucleation densities on the Ni(111) surface at high temperatures have been conducted. The results indicate that small islands are not static, i.e. lateral diffusion and vertical fluctuation are frequently observed. In the case of low carbon nucleation density, carbon atoms or small carbon patches diffuse and attach to the edge of the nuclei to expand the size of the growing carbon network. The growth of graphene precursors is accompanied by the corresponding changes in the bonding of nickel atoms with the precipitation of subsurface carbon atoms. This is because the carbon-carbon interaction is stronger than the nickel-carbon interaction. In the case of high carbon nucleation densities, the dominant ripening mechanism depends on different growth stages. In the initial stage, the coalescence of carbon islands takes place via the Smoluchowski ripening mechanism. In the later stage the Smoluchowski ripening process is damped owing to the higher diffusion barrier of larger clusters and the restriction of movement by self-assembled nickel step edges. The cross-linking mechanism eventually takes over by the coalescence of extended polyyne chains between graphene islands. In either case, the Ostwald ripening process is not found in our molecular dynamics simulations due to the stability of carbon-carbon bonds within the islands. These investigations should be instructive to the control of graphene growth in experiments. PMID:26785739

  13. QM/MD studies on graphene growth from small islands on the Ni(111) surface.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Menggai; Song, Wei; Qian, Hu-Jun; Wang, Ying; Wu, Zhijian; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-02-01

    Quantum chemical molecular dynamics simulations of graphene growth from small island precursors in different carbon nucleation densities on the Ni(111) surface at high temperatures have been conducted. The results indicate that small islands are not static, i.e. lateral diffusion and vertical fluctuation are frequently observed. In the case of low carbon nucleation density, carbon atoms or small carbon patches diffuse and attach to the edge of the nuclei to expand the size of the growing carbon network. The growth of graphene precursors is accompanied by the corresponding changes in the bonding of nickel atoms with the precipitation of subsurface carbon atoms. This is because the carbon-carbon interaction is stronger than the nickel-carbon interaction. In the case of high carbon nucleation densities, the dominant ripening mechanism depends on different growth stages. In the initial stage, the coalescence of carbon islands takes place via the Smoluchowski ripening mechanism. In the later stage the Smoluchowski ripening process is damped owing to the higher diffusion barrier of larger clusters and the restriction of movement by self-assembled nickel step edges. The cross-linking mechanism eventually takes over by the coalescence of extended polyyne chains between graphene islands. In either case, the Ostwald ripening process is not found in our molecular dynamics simulations due to the stability of carbon-carbon bonds within the islands. These investigations should be instructive to the control of graphene growth in experiments.

  14. Tailored Surface Treatment of 3D Printed Porous Ti6Al4V by Microarc Oxidation for Enhanced Osseointegration via Optimized Bone In-Growth Patterns and Interlocked Bone/Implant Interface.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Peng; Jia, Zhaojun; Lv, Jia; Yin, Chuan; Cheng, Yan; Zhang, Ke; Song, Chunli; Leng, Huijie; Zheng, Yufeng; Cai, Hong; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-07-20

    3D printed porous titanium (Ti) holds enormous potential for load-bearing orthopedic applications. Although the 3D printing technique has good control over the macro-sturctures of porous Ti, the surface properties that affect tissue response are beyond its control, adding the need for tailored surface treatment to improve its osseointegration capacity. Here, the one step microarc oxidation (MAO) process was applied to a 3D printed porous Ti6Al4V (Ti64) scaffold to endow the scaffold with a homogeneous layer of microporous TiO2 and significant amounts of amorphous calcium-phosphate. Following the treatment, the porous Ti64 scaffolds exhibited a drastically improved apatite forming ability, cyto-compatibility, and alkaline phosphatase activity. In vivo test in a rabbit model showed that the bone in-growth at the untreated scaffold was in a pattern of distance osteogenesis by which bone formed only at the periphery of the scaffold. In contrast, the bone in-growth at the MAO-treated scaffold exhibited a pattern of contact osteogenesis by which bone formed in situ on the entire surface of the scaffold. This pattern of bone in-growth significantly increased bone formation both in and around the scaffold possibly through enhancement of bone formation and disruption of bone remodeling. Moreover, the implant surface of the MAO-treated scaffold interlocked with the bone tissues through the fabricated microporous topographies to generate a stronger bone/implant interface. The increased osteoinetegration strength was further proven by a push out test. MAO exhibits a high efficiency in the enhancement of osteointegration of porous Ti64 via optimizing the patterns of bone in-growth and bone/implant interlocking. Therefore, post-treatment of 3D printed porous Ti64 with MAO technology might open up several possibilities for the development of bioactive customized implants in orthopedic applications. PMID:27341499

  15. Tailored Surface Treatment of 3D Printed Porous Ti6Al4V by Microarc Oxidation for Enhanced Osseointegration via Optimized Bone In-Growth Patterns and Interlocked Bone/Implant Interface.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Peng; Jia, Zhaojun; Lv, Jia; Yin, Chuan; Cheng, Yan; Zhang, Ke; Song, Chunli; Leng, Huijie; Zheng, Yufeng; Cai, Hong; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-07-20

    3D printed porous titanium (Ti) holds enormous potential for load-bearing orthopedic applications. Although the 3D printing technique has good control over the macro-sturctures of porous Ti, the surface properties that affect tissue response are beyond its control, adding the need for tailored surface treatment to improve its osseointegration capacity. Here, the one step microarc oxidation (MAO) process was applied to a 3D printed porous Ti6Al4V (Ti64) scaffold to endow the scaffold with a homogeneous layer of microporous TiO2 and significant amounts of amorphous calcium-phosphate. Following the treatment, the porous Ti64 scaffolds exhibited a drastically improved apatite forming ability, cyto-compatibility, and alkaline phosphatase activity. In vivo test in a rabbit model showed that the bone in-growth at the untreated scaffold was in a pattern of distance osteogenesis by which bone formed only at the periphery of the scaffold. In contrast, the bone in-growth at the MAO-treated scaffold exhibited a pattern of contact osteogenesis by which bone formed in situ on the entire surface of the scaffold. This pattern of bone in-growth significantly increased bone formation both in and around the scaffold possibly through enhancement of bone formation and disruption of bone remodeling. Moreover, the implant surface of the MAO-treated scaffold interlocked with the bone tissues through the fabricated microporous topographies to generate a stronger bone/implant interface. The increased osteoinetegration strength was further proven by a push out test. MAO exhibits a high efficiency in the enhancement of osteointegration of porous Ti64 via optimizing the patterns of bone in-growth and bone/implant interlocking. Therefore, post-treatment of 3D printed porous Ti64 with MAO technology might open up several possibilities for the development of bioactive customized implants in orthopedic applications.

  16. Growth of hierarchical 3D mesoporous NiSix /NiCo2 O4 core/shell heterostructures on nickel foam for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiaobao; Chen, Huixin; Wang, Jiexi; Xu, Daguo; Li, Xinhai; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Kaili

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate the facile and well-controlled design and fabrication of heterostructured and hierarchical 3D mesoporous NiSix /NiCo2 O4 core/shell nanowire arrays on nickel foam through a facile chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique combined with a simple but powerful chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. The smart hybridization of NiCo2 O4 and NiSix nanostructures results in an intriguing mesoporous hierarchical core/shell nanowire-array architecture. The nanowire arrays demonstrate enhanced electrochemical performance as binder- and conductive-agent-free electrodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) with excellent capacity retention and high rate capability on cycling. The electrodes can maintain a high reversible capacity of 1693 mA h g(-1) after 50 cycles at 20 mA g(-1) . Given the outstanding performance and simple, efficient, cost-effective fabrication, we believe that these 3D NiSix /NiCo2 O4 core/shell heterostructured arrays have great potential application in high-performance LIBs.

  17. The role of Ag buffer layer in Fe islands growth on Ge (111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Tsu-Yi Wu, Jia-Yuan; Jhou, Ming-Kuan; Hsu, Hung-Chan

    2015-05-07

    Sub-monolayer iron atoms were deposited at room temperature on Ge (111)-c(2 × 8) substrates with and without Ag buffer layers. The behavior of Fe islands growth was investigated by using scanning tunneling microscope (STM) after different annealing temperatures. STM images show that iron atoms will cause defects and holes on substrates at room temperature. As the annealing temperature rises, iron atoms pull out germanium to form various kinds of alloyed islands. However, the silver layer can protect the Ag/Ge(111)-(√3×√3) reconstruction from forming defects. The phase diagram shows that ring, dot, and triangular defects were only found on Ge (111)-c(2 × 8) substrates. The kinds of islands found in Fe/Ge system are similar to Fe/Ag/Ge system. It indicates that Ge atoms were pulled out to form islands at high annealing temperatures whether there was a Ag layer or not. But a few differences in big pyramidal or strip islands show that the silver layer affects the development of islands by changing the surface symmetry and diffusion coefficient. The structure characters of various islands are also discussed.

  18. Effect of viewing distance on 3D fatigue caused by viewing mobile 3D content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Sungchul; Lee, Dong-Su; Park, Min-Chul; Yano, Sumio

    2013-05-01

    With an advent of autostereoscopic display technique and increased needs for smart phones, there has been a significant growth in mobile TV markets. The rapid growth in technical, economical, and social aspects has encouraged 3D TV manufacturers to apply 3D rendering technology to mobile devices so that people have more opportunities to come into contact with many 3D content anytime and anywhere. Even if the mobile 3D technology leads to the current market growth, there is an important thing to consider for consistent development and growth in the display market. To put it briefly, human factors linked to mobile 3D viewing should be taken into consideration before developing mobile 3D technology. Many studies have investigated whether mobile 3D viewing causes undesirable biomedical effects such as motion sickness and visual fatigue, but few have examined main factors adversely affecting human health. Viewing distance is considered one of the main factors to establish optimized viewing environments from a viewer's point of view. Thus, in an effort to determine human-friendly viewing environments, this study aims to investigate the effect of viewing distance on human visual system when exposing to mobile 3D environments. Recording and analyzing brainwaves before and after watching mobile 3D content, we explore how viewing distance affects viewing experience from physiological and psychological perspectives. Results obtained in this study are expected to provide viewing guidelines for viewers, help ensure viewers against undesirable 3D effects, and lead to make gradual progress towards a human-friendly mobile 3D viewing.

  19. Selective growth of Pb islands on graphene/SiC buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. T.; Miao, Y. P.; Ma, D. Y.; Hu, T. W.; Ma, F. E-mail: kwxu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Chu, Paul K.; Xu, K. W. E-mail: kwxu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

    2015-02-14

    Graphene is fabricated by thermal decomposition of silicon carbide (SiC) and Pb islands are deposited by Pb flux in molecular beam epitaxy chamber. It is found that graphene domains and SiC buffer layer coexist. Selective growth of Pb islands on SiC buffer layer rather than on graphene domains is observed. It can be ascribed to the higher adsorption energy of Pb atoms on the 6√(3) reconstruction of SiC. However, once Pb islands nucleate on graphene domains, they will grow very large owing to the lower diffusion barrier of Pb atoms on graphene. The results are consistent with first-principle calculations. Since Pb atoms on graphene are nearly free-standing, Pb islands grow in even-number mode.

  20. Oxopyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidines as Covalent L858R/T790M Mutant Selective Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the threonine790–methionine790 (T790M) point mutation of EGFR kinase is one of the leading causes of acquired resistance to the first generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as gefitinib and erlotinib. Herein, we describe the optimization of a series of 7-oxopyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidinyl-derived irreversible inhibitors of EGFR kinase. This led to the discovery of compound 24 which potently inhibits gefitinib-resistant EGFRL858R,T790M with 100-fold selectivity over wild-type EGFR. Compound 24 displays strong antiproliferative activity against the H1975 nonsmall cell lung cancer cell line, the first line mutant HCC827 cell line, and promising antitumor activity in an EGFRL858R,T790M driven H1975 xenograft model sparing the side effects associated with the inhibition of wild-type EGFR. PMID:26396685

  1. Zinc oxide nanorod growth on gold islands prepared by microsphere lithography on silicon and quartz.

    PubMed

    Blackledge, Charles W; Szarko, Jodi M; Dupont, Aurélie; Chan, George H; Read, Elizabeth L; Leone, Stephen R

    2007-09-01

    Gold islands, vapor deposited on silicon and quartz by microsphere lithography patterning, are used to nucleate arrays of ZnO nanorods. ZnO is grown on approximately 0.32 microm2 Au islands by carbothermal reduction in a tube furnace. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive atomic X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) confirm that the gold effectively controls the sites of nucleation of ZnO. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) shows that approximately 30 nm diameter nanorods grow horizontally, along the surface. Alloy droplets that are characteristic of the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism are observed at the tips of the nanorods. The spatial growth direction of VLS catalyzed ZnO nanorods is along the substrate when they nucleate from gold islands on silicon and quartz. The energy of adhesion of the VLS droplet to the surface can account for the horizontal growth. PMID:18019171

  2. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  3. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  4. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  5. Dynamic competition between island growth and coalescence in metal-on-insulator deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lü, B.; Elofsson, V.; Münger, E. P.; Sarakinos, K.

    2014-10-20

    The morphology of thin metal films and nanostructures synthesized from the vapor phase on insulating substrates is strongly influenced by the coalescence of islands. Here, we derive analytically the quantitative criterion for coalescence suppression by combining atomistic nucleation theory and a classical model of coalescence. Growth simulations show that using this criterion, a coalescence-free growth regime can be reached in which morphological evolution is solely determined by island nucleation, growth, and impingement. Experimental validation for the ability to control the rate of coalescence using this criterion and navigate between different growth regimes is provided by in situ monitoring of Ag deposition on SiO{sub 2}. Our findings pave the way for creating thin films and nanostructures that exhibit a wide range of morphologies and physical attributes in a knowledge-based manner.

  6. Growth of fcc(111) Dy multi-height islands on 6H-SiC(0001) graphene.

    PubMed

    Hershberger, M T; Hupalo, M; Thiel, P A; Tringides, M C

    2013-06-01

    Graphene based spintronic devices require an understanding of the growth of magnetic metals. Rare earth metals have large bulk magnetic moments so they are good candidates for such applications, and it is important to identify their growth mode. Dysprosium was deposited on epitaxial graphene, prepared by thermally annealing 6H-SiC(0001). The majority of the grown islands have triangular instead of hexagonal shapes. This is observed both for single layer islands nucleating at the top of incomplete islands and for fully completed multi-height islands. We analyze the island shape distribution and stacking sequence of successively grown islands to deduce that the Dy islands have fcc(111) structure, and that the triangular shapes result from asymmetric barriers to corner crossing.

  7. Understanding the effects of strain on morphological instabilities of a nanoscale island during heteroepitaxial growth

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Lu; Wang, Jing; Wang, Shibin; Li, Linan; Shen, Min; Wang, Zhiyong; Chen, Zhenfei; Zhao, Yang

    2015-07-21

    A comprehensive morphological stability analysis of a nanoscale circular island during heteroepitaxial growth is presented based on continuum elasticity theory. The interplay between kinetic and thermodynamic mechanisms is revealed by including strain-related kinetic processes. In the kinetic regime, the Burton-Cabrera-Frank model is adopted to describe the growth front of the island. Together with kinetic boundary conditions, various kinetic processes including deposition flow, adatom diffusion, attachment-detachment kinetics, and the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier can be taken into account at the same time. In the thermodynamic regime, line tension, surface energy, and elastic energy are considered. As the strain relief in the early stages of heteroepitaxy is more complicated than commonly suggested by simple consideration of lattice mismatch, we also investigate the effects of external applied strain and elastic response due to perturbations on the island shape evolution. The analytical expressions for elastic fields induced by mismatch strain, external applied strain, and relaxation strain are presented. A systematic approach is developed to solve the system via a perturbation analysis which yields the conditions of film morphological instabilities. Consistent with previous experimental and theoretical work, parametric studies show the kinetic evolution of elastic relaxation, island morphology, and film composition under various conditions. Our present work offers an effective theoretical approach to get a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between different growth mechanisms and how to tailor the growth mode by controlling the nature of the crucial factors.

  8. Understanding the effects of strain on morphological instabilities of a nanoscale island during heteroepitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lu; Wang, Jing; Wang, Shibin; Li, Linan; Shen, Min; Wang, Zhiyong; Chen, Zhenfei; Zhao, Yang

    2015-07-01

    A comprehensive morphological stability analysis of a nanoscale circular island during heteroepitaxial growth is presented based on continuum elasticity theory. The interplay between kinetic and thermodynamic mechanisms is revealed by including strain-related kinetic processes. In the kinetic regime, the Burton-Cabrera-Frank model is adopted to describe the growth front of the island. Together with kinetic boundary conditions, various kinetic processes including deposition flow, adatom diffusion, attachment-detachment kinetics, and the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier can be taken into account at the same time. In the thermodynamic regime, line tension, surface energy, and elastic energy are considered. As the strain relief in the early stages of heteroepitaxy is more complicated than commonly suggested by simple consideration of lattice mismatch, we also investigate the effects of external applied strain and elastic response due to perturbations on the island shape evolution. The analytical expressions for elastic fields induced by mismatch strain, external applied strain, and relaxation strain are presented. A systematic approach is developed to solve the system via a perturbation analysis which yields the conditions of film morphological instabilities. Consistent with previous experimental and theoretical work, parametric studies show the kinetic evolution of elastic relaxation, island morphology, and film composition under various conditions. Our present work offers an effective theoretical approach to get a comprehensive understanding of the interplay between different growth mechanisms and how to tailor the growth mode by controlling the nature of the crucial factors.

  9. 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean V; Atala, Anthony

    2014-08-01

    Additive manufacturing, otherwise known as three-dimensional (3D) printing, is driving major innovations in many areas, such as engineering, manufacturing, art, education and medicine. Recent advances have enabled 3D printing of biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components into complex 3D functional living tissues. 3D bioprinting is being applied to regenerative medicine to address the need for tissues and organs suitable for transplantation. Compared with non-biological printing, 3D bioprinting involves additional complexities, such as the choice of materials, cell types, growth and differentiation factors, and technical challenges related to the sensitivities of living cells and the construction of tissues. Addressing these complexities requires the integration of technologies from the fields of engineering, biomaterials science, cell biology, physics and medicine. 3D bioprinting has already been used for the generation and transplantation of several tissues, including multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, tracheal splints, heart tissue and cartilaginous structures. Other applications include developing high-throughput 3D-bioprinted tissue models for research, drug discovery and toxicology. PMID:25093879

  10. NGT-3D: a simple nematode cultivation system to study Caenorhabditis elegans biology in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tong Young; Yoon, Kyoung-hye; Lee, Jin Il

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is one of the premier experimental model organisms today. In the laboratory, they display characteristic development, fertility, and behaviors in a two dimensional habitat. In nature, however, C. elegans is found in three dimensional environments such as rotting fruit. To investigate the biology of C. elegans in a 3D controlled environment we designed a nematode cultivation habitat which we term the nematode growth tube or NGT-3D. NGT-3D allows for the growth of both nematodes and the bacteria they consume. Worms show comparable rates of growth, reproduction and lifespan when bacterial colonies in the 3D matrix are abundant. However, when bacteria are sparse, growth and brood size fail to reach levels observed in standard 2D plates. Using NGT-3D we observe drastic deficits in fertility in a sensory mutant in 3D compared to 2D, and this defect was likely due to an inability to locate bacteria. Overall, NGT-3D will sharpen our understanding of nematode biology and allow scientists to investigate questions of nematode ecology and evolutionary fitness in the laboratory. PMID:26962047

  11. NGT-3D: a simple nematode cultivation system to study Caenorhabditis elegans biology in 3D.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tong Young; Yoon, Kyoung-Hye; Lee, Jin Il

    2016-01-01

    The nematodeCaenorhabditiselegansis one of the premier experimental model organisms today. In the laboratory, they display characteristic development, fertility, and behaviors in a two dimensional habitat. In nature, however,C. elegansis found in three dimensional environments such as rotting fruit. To investigate the biology ofC. elegansin a 3D controlled environment we designed a nematode cultivation habitat which we term the nematode growth tube or NGT-3D. NGT-3D allows for the growth of both nematodes and the bacteria they consume. Worms show comparable rates of growth, reproduction and lifespan when bacterial colonies in the 3D matrix are abundant. However, when bacteria are sparse, growth and brood size fail to reach levels observed in standard 2D plates. Using NGT-3D we observe drastic deficits in fertility in a sensory mutant in 3D compared to 2D, and this defect was likely due to an inability to locate bacteria. Overall, NGT-3D will sharpen our understanding of nematode biology and allow scientists to investigate questions of nematode ecology and evolutionary fitness in the laboratory. PMID:26962047

  12. Nucleation-Mediated Lateral Growth of Crystalline Islands on Foreign Substrate: an Origin of Long-Range Ordering in Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mu; Shu, Dajun; Peng, Ruwen; Ming, Naiben

    2007-06-01

    Heteroepitaxial thin film growth may start by nucleating three-dimensional (3D) or two-dimensional (2D) islands on foreign substrate. Depending on the interfacial energies, heteroepitaxial growth can be categorized into three modes: Frank-van der Merwe (FM), Stranski-Krastanow (SK), and Volmer-Weber (VW). In this lecture, we concentrate on the detail process of horizontal extension of a crystalline island on foreign substrate via successive nucleation at the concave corner of the crystal facet and the foreign substrate. It is demonstrated that due to the difference of surface tensions at the concave corner, once a nucleus appears at the corner, the crystallographic orientation of the nucleus is spontaneously twisted. By successive nucleation at the concave corner, the crystalline layer develops laterally, with its crystallographic orientation continuously rotated. Such a previously untouched effect could be the physical origin to form a few regular spatial patterns in the interfacial growth. A theory is developed, which provides a criterion to observe such an effect in the nucleation-mediated lateral growth.

  13. Design, synthesis, anti-tumor activity, and molecular modeling of quinazoline and pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ju; Wan, Shanhe; Wang, Guangfa; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Zhonghuang; Tian, Yuanxin; Yu, Yonghuan; Wu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Jiajie

    2016-08-01

    Three series of novel quinazoline and pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit EGFR tyrosine kinase and a panel of five human cancer cell lines (MCF-7, A549, BT-474, SK-BR-3, and MDA-MB-231). Bioassay results indicated that five of these prepared compounds (12c-12e and 13c-13d) exhibited remarkably higher inhibitory activities against EGFR and SK-BR-3 cell line. Compounds 12c and 12e displayed the most potent EGFR inhibitory activity (IC50 = 2.97 nM and 3.58 nM, respectively) and good anti-proliferative effect against SK-BR-3 cell with the IC50 values of 3.10 μM and 5.87 μM, respectively. Furthermore, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies verified that compound 12c and 12e shared similar binding pattern with gefitinib in the binding pocket of EGFR. MM-GBSA binding free energy revealed that the compound 12c and 12e have almost the same inhibitory activity against EGFR as gefitinib, and that the dominating effect of van der Waals interactions drives the binding process. PMID:27132165

  14. Design, synthesis, anti-tumor activity, and molecular modeling of quinazoline and pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ju; Wan, Shanhe; Wang, Guangfa; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Zhonghuang; Tian, Yuanxin; Yu, Yonghuan; Wu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Jiajie

    2016-08-01

    Three series of novel quinazoline and pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit EGFR tyrosine kinase and a panel of five human cancer cell lines (MCF-7, A549, BT-474, SK-BR-3, and MDA-MB-231). Bioassay results indicated that five of these prepared compounds (12c-12e and 13c-13d) exhibited remarkably higher inhibitory activities against EGFR and SK-BR-3 cell line. Compounds 12c and 12e displayed the most potent EGFR inhibitory activity (IC50 = 2.97 nM and 3.58 nM, respectively) and good anti-proliferative effect against SK-BR-3 cell with the IC50 values of 3.10 μM and 5.87 μM, respectively. Furthermore, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies verified that compound 12c and 12e shared similar binding pattern with gefitinib in the binding pocket of EGFR. MM-GBSA binding free energy revealed that the compound 12c and 12e have almost the same inhibitory activity against EGFR as gefitinib, and that the dominating effect of van der Waals interactions drives the binding process.

  15. Efficient generation of smooth muscle cells from adipose-derived stromal cells by 3D mechanical stimulation can substitute the use of growth factors in vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Mojtaba; Bolhuis-Versteeg, Lydia A M; Poot, André A; Harmsen, Martin C

    2016-07-01

    Occluding artery disease causes a high demand for bioartificial replacement vessels. We investigated the combined use of biodegradable and creep-free poly (1,3-trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) with smooth muscle cells (SMC) derived by biochemical or mechanical stimulation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASC) to engineer bioartificial arteries. Biochemical induction of cultured ASC to SMC was done with TGF-β1 for 7d. Phenotype and function were assessed by qRT-PCR, immunodetection and collagen contraction assays. The influence of mechanical stimulation on non-differentiated and pre-differentiated ASC, loaded in porous tubular PTMC scaffolds, was assessed after culturing under pulsatile flow for 14d. Assays included qRT-PCR, production of extracellular matrix and scanning electron microscopy. ASC adhesion and TGF-β1-driven differentiation to contractile SMC on PTMC did not differ from tissue culture polystyrene controls. Mesenchymal and SMC markers were increased compared to controls. Interestingly, pre-differentiated ASC had only marginal higher contractility than controls. Moreover, in 3D PTMC scaffolds, mechanical stimulation yielded well-aligned ASC-derived SMC which deposited ECM. Under the same conditions, pre-differentiated ASC-derived SMC maintained their SMC phenotype. Our results show that mechanical stimulation can replace TGF-β1 pre-stimulation to generate SMC from ASC and that pre-differentiated ASC keep their SMC phenotype with increased expression of SMC markers.

  16. An open source image processing method to quantitatively assess tissue growth after non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging in human bone marrow stromal cell seeded 3D polymeric scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Leferink, Anne M; Fratila, Raluca M; Koenrades, Maaike A; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Velders, Aldrik; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring extracellular matrix (ECM) components is one of the key methods used to determine tissue quality in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds for regenerative medicine and clinical purposes. This is even more important when multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) are used, as it could offer a method to understand in real time the dynamics of stromal cell differentiation and eventually steer it into the desired lineage. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a promising tool to overcome the challenge of a limited transparency in opaque 3D scaffolds. Technical limitations of MRI involve non-uniform background intensity leading to fluctuating background signals and therewith complicating quantifications on the retrieved images. We present a post-imaging processing sequence that is able to correct for this non-uniform background intensity. To test the processing sequence we investigated the use of MRI for in vitro monitoring of tissue growth in three-dimensional poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)-poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) scaffolds. Results showed that MRI, without the need to use contrast agents, is a promising non-invasive tool to quantitatively monitor ECM production and cell distribution during in vitro culture in 3D porous tissue engineered constructs. PMID:25502022

  17. An Open Source Image Processing Method to Quantitatively Assess Tissue Growth after Non-Invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Seeded 3D Polymeric Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Leferink, Anne M.; Fratila, Raluca M.; Koenrades, Maaike A.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.; Velders, Aldrik; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring extracellular matrix (ECM) components is one of the key methods used to determine tissue quality in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds for regenerative medicine and clinical purposes. This is even more important when multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) are used, as it could offer a method to understand in real time the dynamics of stromal cell differentiation and eventually steer it into the desired lineage. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a promising tool to overcome the challenge of a limited transparency in opaque 3D scaffolds. Technical limitations of MRI involve non-uniform background intensity leading to fluctuating background signals and therewith complicating quantifications on the retrieved images. We present a post-imaging processing sequence that is able to correct for this non-uniform background intensity. To test the processing sequence we investigated the use of MRI for in vitro monitoring of tissue growth in three-dimensional poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)–poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT) scaffolds. Results showed that MRI, without the need to use contrast agents, is a promising non-invasive tool to quantitatively monitor ECM production and cell distribution during in vitro culture in 3D porous tissue engineered constructs. PMID:25502022

  18. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  19. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  20. Investigation of new 2-aryl substituted Benzothiopyrano[4,3-d]pyrimidines as kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Silvia; Marini, Anna Maria; Fornaciari, Giacomo; Simorini, Francesca; La Motta, Concettina; Taliani, Sabrina; Sartini, Stefania; Da Settimo, Federico; García-Argáez, Aída Nelly; Gia, Ornella; Cosconati, Sandro; Novellino, Ettore; D'Ocon, Pilar; Fioravanti, Anna; Orlandi, Paola; Bocci, Guido; Dalla Via, Lisa

    2015-10-20

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) pathway has emerged as one of the most important positive modulators of Angiogenesis, a central process implicated in tumour growth and metastatic dissemination. This led to the design and development of anti-VEGF monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule ATP-competitive VEGFR-inhibitors. In this study, we describe the synthesis and the biological evaluation of novel 2-aryl substituted benzothiopyrano-fused pyrimidines 1a-i, 2a-i and 3a-i. The ability of the compounds to target the VEGF pathway was determined in vitro exploiting the compounds' antiproliferative efficacy against HUVEC cells. The VEGFR-2 inhibition was confirmed by enzymatic assays on recombinant human kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), by cell-based phospho-VEGFR-2 inhibition assays, and by ex vivo rat aortic ring tests. The selectivity profile of the best performing derivatives belonging to series 2 was further explored combining modeling studies and additional assays in a panel of human cell lines and other kinases.

  1. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  2. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamloo, Amir; Amirifar, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies.

  3. 3D equilibrium crystal shapes in the new light of STM and AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonzel, H. P.

    2003-10-01

    A systematic study of 3D equilibrium crystal shapes (ECS) can yield important surface energetic quantities, such as step, kink, surface and step-step interaction free energies. Observations of the ECS, especially of flat facets and adjacent vicinal regions, will provide primarily relative step and surface free energies. An advanced goal is to determine absolute step free energies, kink formation and step interaction energies. Absolute values of these energies are important in governing crystal growth morphologies, high temperature phase changes and kinetic processes associated with shape changes. Furthermore, absolute step and kink energies are the key to absolute surface free energies of well defined low-index orientations. We review new experiments where sections of the ECS are monitored as a function of temperature to extract characteristic morphological parameters, yielding absolute surface energetic quantities. Attention will be paid to the question of attaining true 3D equilibrium of an ensemble of crystallites. The special role of scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopies will be stressed. New ways of overcoming the problem of the activation barrier for facet growth (or shrinkage) through the study of dislocated crystallites will be demonstrated. In the general context of 3D crystallites, the study of 2D nano-crystals, in the form of adatom or vacancy islands on extended flat surfaces, will be discussed. In particular, the connection between the temperature dependent shape of 2D islands and the absolute step and kink formation energies of the bounding steps, complementary to facet shape changes of 3D crystallites, has emerged as an important topic of recent research. Finally, high temperature phase changes, such as surface roughening and surface melting, as they have been observed by scanning electron microscopy on 3D crystallites, will be briefly reviewed.

  4. Controlling island size distributions: a comparison of nickel and copper growth on TiO 2(1 1 0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Kang, Y. C.; Chen, D. A.

    2003-07-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of Ni islands deposited on TiO 2(1 1 0) show that the islands grow three-dimensionally at room temperature with an average height of approximately 6.5 Å and diameter of 30 Å. The broadness of the island size distributions can be controlled by the diffusion ( D) to deposition flux ( F) ratio, with the narrowest distribution corresponding to the smallest D/ F ratio. Decreasing the flux or increasing the diffusion rate by increasing the deposition temperature results in a lower island density, larger islands and a broader size distribution. Although the Ni-TiO 2 interfacial energy should be greater than that of Cu-TiO 2, the Ni islands do not grow flatter on the surface compared to Cu. The higher surface free energy for Ni relative to Cu apparently dominates over the greater interfacial energy for Ni, resulting in Cu and Ni islands with the same aspect ratios. The island densities, average sizes and spatial distributions are roughly the same for both Cu and Ni growth, and we find no evidence that Ni diffusion is slower on TiO 2 compared to Cu diffusion. A major difference between Ni and Cu growth is in island sintering at elevated temperatures. Large Cu islands (67 Å diameter, 22 Å height) are produced after deposition at room temperature and annealing to 800 K, whereas the Ni islands undergo much slower growth under the same conditions (34 Å diameter, 6.6 Å height). This effect is explained by the stronger metal-metal bond strength for Ni compared to Cu since adatom detachment is the rate limiting step in island sintering.

  5. Growth-dissolution-regrowth transitions of Fe3O4 nanoparticles as building blocks for 3D magnetic nanoparticle clusters under hydrothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mouhong; Huang, Haoliang; Liu, Zuotao; Liu, Yingju; Ge, Junbin; Fang, Yueping

    2013-12-10

    Magnetic nanoparticle clusters (MNCs) are a class of secondary structural materials that comprise chemically defined nanoparticles assembled into clusters of defined size. Herein, MNCs are fabricated through a one-pot solvothermal reaction featuring self-limiting assembly of building blocks and the controlled reorganization process. Such growth-dissolution-regrowth fabrication mechanism overcomes some limitations of conventional solvothermal fabrication methods with regard to restricted available feature size and structural complexity, which can be extended to other oxides (as long as one can be chelated by EDTA-2Na). Based on this method, the nanoparticle size of MNCs is tuned between 6.8 and 31.2 nm at a fixed cluster diameter of 120 nm, wherein the critical size for superparamagnetic-ferromagnetic transition is estimated from 13.5 to 15.7 nm. Control over the nature and secondary structure of MNCs gives an excellent model system to understand the nanoparticle size-dependent magnetic properties of MNCs. MNCs have potential applications in many different areas, while this work evaluates their cytotoxicity and Pb(2+) adsorption capacity as initial application study.

  6. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  7. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  8. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  9. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  10. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible.

  11. Growth and characteristics of self-assembly defect-free GaN surface islands by molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kuang-Yuan; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Liu, Chuan-Pu

    2011-04-01

    GaN surface nano-islands of high crystal quality, without any dislocations or other extended defects, are grown on a c-plane sapphire substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Nano-island growth requires special conditions in terms of V/III ratio and substrate temperature, distinct from either film or nanocolumn growth. The insertion of a nitrided Ga layer can effectively improve the uniformity of the nano-islands in both shape and size. The islands are well faced truncated pyramids with island size ranged from 30 to 110 nm, and height ranged from 30 to 55 nm. On, the other hand, the density and facet of the GaN surface islands would be affected by the growth conditions. An increase of the V/III ratio from 30 to 40 led to an increase in density from 1.4 x 10(9) to 4.3 x 10(9) cm(-2) and an evolution from {1-21-1} facets to {1-21-2} facets. The GaN layers containing the surface islands can moderate the compressive strain due to the lattice and thermal mismatch between GaN and c-sapphire. Conductive atomic force microscopy shows that the off-axis sidewall facets are more electrically active than those at the island center. The formation of the GaN surface islands is strongly induced by the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier effect of preexisting islands grown in the early growth stage. GaN surface islands are ideal templates for growing nano-devices.

  12. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  13. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  14. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  15. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  16. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  17. Nucleation and growth of oxide islands during the initial-stage oxidation of (100)Cu-Pt alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Langli; Zhou, Guangwen; Kang, Yihong; Yang, Judith C.

    2015-02-14

    The initial-stage oxidation of (100) Cu-Pt alloys has been examined by in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). It is shown that the oxidation proceeds via the nucleation and growth of Cu{sub 2}O islands that show dependence on the alloy composition and oxidation temperature. The kinetic measurements on the oxide nucleation reveal that both the nucleation density and surface coverage of Cu{sub 2}O islands can be promoted by alloying more Pt in the Cu-Pt alloys. Increasing the oxidation temperature above 700 °C results in the growth of large Cu{sub 2}O islands that transits to a dendritic growth morphology. The ex situ AFM studies reveal that the nucleation of oxide islands can occur on surface terraces and the subsequent oxide growth depletes local terrace Cu atoms that results in the formation of surface pits.

  18. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  19. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  20. 3D geometry of growth strata in a fault-propagation fold: insights into space-time evolution of the Crevillente Fault (Abanilla-Alicante sector), Betic Cordillera, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Rojas, I.; Alfaro, P.; Estévez, A.

    2015-07-01

    This work presents a 3D geometric model of growth strata cropping out in a fault-propagation fold associated with the Crevillente Fault (Abanilla-Alicante sector) from the Bajo Segura Basin (eastern Betic Cordillera, southern Spain). The analysis of this 3D model enables us to unravel the along-strike and along-section variations of the growth strata, providing constraints to assess the fold development, and hence, the fault kinematic evolution in space and time. We postulate that the observed along-strike dip variations are related to lateral variation in fault displacement. Along-section variations of the progressive unconformity opening angles indicate greater fault slip in the upper Tortonian-Messinian time span; from the Messinian on, quantitative analysis of the unconformity indicate a constant or lower tectonic activity of the Crevillente Fault (Abanilla-Alicante sector); the minor abundance of striated pebbles in the Pliocene-Quaternary units could be interpreted as a decrease in the stress magnitude and consequently in the tectonic activity of the fault. At a regional scale, comparison of the growth successions cropping out in the northern and southern limits of the Bajo Segura Basin points to a southward migration of deformation in the basin. This means that the Bajo Segura Fault became active after the Crevillente Fault (Abanilla-Alicante sector), for which activity on the latter was probably decreasing according to our data. Consequently, we propose that the seismic hazard at the northern limit of the Bajo Segura Basin should be lower than at the southern limit.

  1. Modeling volcano growth on the Island of Hawaii: deep-water perspectives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, Peter W.; Calvert, Andrew T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent ocean-bottom geophysical surveys, dredging, and dives, which complement surface data and scientific drilling at the Island of Hawaii, document that evolutionary stages during volcano growth are more diverse than previously described. Based on combining available composition, isotopic age, and geologically constrained volume data for each of the component volcanoes, this overview provides the first integrated models for overall growth of any Hawaiian island. In contrast to prior morphologic models for volcano evolution (preshield, shield, postshield), growth increasingly can be tracked by age and volume (magma supply), defining waxing alkalic, sustained tholeiitic, and waning alkalic stages. Data and estimates for individual volcanoes are used to model changing magma supply during successive compositional stages, to place limits on volcano life spans, and to interpret composite assembly of the island. Volcano volumes vary by an order of magnitude; peak magma supply also varies sizably among edifices but is challenging to quantify because of uncertainty about volcano life spans. Three alternative models are compared: (1) near-constant volcano propagation, (2) near-equal volcano durations, (3) high peak-tholeiite magma supply. These models define inconsistencies with prior geodynamic models, indicate that composite growth at Hawaii peaked ca. 800–400 ka, and demonstrate a lower current rate. Recent age determinations for Kilauea and Kohala define a volcano propagation rate of 8.6 cm/yr that yields plausible inception ages for other volcanoes of the Kea trend. In contrast, a similar propagation rate for the less-constrained Loa trend would require inception of Loihi Seamount in the future and ages that become implausibly large for the older volcanoes. An alternative rate of 10.6 cm/yr for Loa-trend volcanoes is reasonably consistent with ages and volcano spacing, but younger Loa volcanoes are offset from the Kea trend in age-distance plots. Variable magma flux

  2. Simple and Versatile Turbidimetric Monitoring of Bacterial Growth in Liquid Cultures Using a Customized 3D Printed Culture Tube Holder and a Miniaturized Spectrophotometer: Application to Facultative and Strictly Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Margarida R. G.; Marques, Sara; Cabrita, Ana R. J.; Wallace, R. John; Thompson, Gertrude; Fonseca, António J. M.; Oliveira, Hugo M.

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce a novel strategy for turbidimetric monitoring of bacterial growth in liquid culture. The instrumentation comprises a light source, a customized 3D printed culture tube holder and a miniaturized spectrophotometer, connected through optical cables. Due to its small footprint and the possibility to operate with external light, bacterial growth was directly monitored from culture tubes in a simple and versatile fashion. This new portable measurement technique was used to monitor the growth of facultative (Escherichia coli ATCC/25922, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC/29213) and strictly (Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens JW11, Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18, and Propionibacterium acnes DSMZ 1897) anaerobic bacteria. For E. coli and S. aureus, the growth rates calculated from normalized optical density values were compared with those ones obtained using a benchtop spectrophotometer without significant differences (P = 0.256). For the strictly anaerobic species, a high precision (relative standard deviation < 3.5%) was observed between replicates up to 48 h. Regarding its potential for customization, this manifold could accommodate further developments for customized turbidimetric monitoring, such as the use of light-emitting diodes as a light source or flow cells.

  3. Simple and Versatile Turbidimetric Monitoring of Bacterial Growth in Liquid Cultures Using a Customized 3D Printed Culture Tube Holder and a Miniaturized Spectrophotometer: Application to Facultative and Strictly Anaerobic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maia, Margarida R G; Marques, Sara; Cabrita, Ana R J; Wallace, R John; Thompson, Gertrude; Fonseca, António J M; Oliveira, Hugo M

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce a novel strategy for turbidimetric monitoring of bacterial growth in liquid culture. The instrumentation comprises a light source, a customized 3D printed culture tube holder and a miniaturized spectrophotometer, connected through optical cables. Due to its small footprint and the possibility to operate with external light, bacterial growth was directly monitored from culture tubes in a simple and versatile fashion. This new portable measurement technique was used to monitor the growth of facultative (Escherichia coli ATCC/25922, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC/29213) and strictly (Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens JW11, Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18, and Propionibacterium acnes DSMZ 1897) anaerobic bacteria. For E. coli and S. aureus, the growth rates calculated from normalized optical density values were compared with those ones obtained using a benchtop spectrophotometer without significant differences (P = 0.256). For the strictly anaerobic species, a high precision (relative standard deviation < 3.5%) was observed between replicates up to 48 h. Regarding its potential for customization, this manifold could accommodate further developments for customized turbidimetric monitoring, such as the use of light-emitting diodes as a light source or flow cells.

  4. Simple and Versatile Turbidimetric Monitoring of Bacterial Growth in Liquid Cultures Using a Customized 3D Printed Culture Tube Holder and a Miniaturized Spectrophotometer: Application to Facultative and Strictly Anaerobic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maia, Margarida R G; Marques, Sara; Cabrita, Ana R J; Wallace, R John; Thompson, Gertrude; Fonseca, António J M; Oliveira, Hugo M

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce a novel strategy for turbidimetric monitoring of bacterial growth in liquid culture. The instrumentation comprises a light source, a customized 3D printed culture tube holder and a miniaturized spectrophotometer, connected through optical cables. Due to its small footprint and the possibility to operate with external light, bacterial growth was directly monitored from culture tubes in a simple and versatile fashion. This new portable measurement technique was used to monitor the growth of facultative (Escherichia coli ATCC/25922, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC/29213) and strictly (Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens JW11, Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18, and Propionibacterium acnes DSMZ 1897) anaerobic bacteria. For E. coli and S. aureus, the growth rates calculated from normalized optical density values were compared with those ones obtained using a benchtop spectrophotometer without significant differences (P = 0.256). For the strictly anaerobic species, a high precision (relative standard deviation < 3.5%) was observed between replicates up to 48 h. Regarding its potential for customization, this manifold could accommodate further developments for customized turbidimetric monitoring, such as the use of light-emitting diodes as a light source or flow cells. PMID:27630632

  5. Simple and Versatile Turbidimetric Monitoring of Bacterial Growth in Liquid Cultures Using a Customized 3D Printed Culture Tube Holder and a Miniaturized Spectrophotometer: Application to Facultative and Strictly Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Margarida R. G.; Marques, Sara; Cabrita, Ana R. J.; Wallace, R. John; Thompson, Gertrude; Fonseca, António J. M.; Oliveira, Hugo M.

    2016-01-01

    Here we introduce a novel strategy for turbidimetric monitoring of bacterial growth in liquid culture. The instrumentation comprises a light source, a customized 3D printed culture tube holder and a miniaturized spectrophotometer, connected through optical cables. Due to its small footprint and the possibility to operate with external light, bacterial growth was directly monitored from culture tubes in a simple and versatile fashion. This new portable measurement technique was used to monitor the growth of facultative (Escherichia coli ATCC/25922, and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC/29213) and strictly (Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens JW11, Butyrivibrio proteoclasticus P18, and Propionibacterium acnes DSMZ 1897) anaerobic bacteria. For E. coli and S. aureus, the growth rates calculated from normalized optical density values were compared with those ones obtained using a benchtop spectrophotometer without significant differences (P = 0.256). For the strictly anaerobic species, a high precision (relative standard deviation < 3.5%) was observed between replicates up to 48 h. Regarding its potential for customization, this manifold could accommodate further developments for customized turbidimetric monitoring, such as the use of light-emitting diodes as a light source or flow cells. PMID:27630632

  6. Seabirds modify El Niño effects on tree growth in a southern Pacific island.

    PubMed

    Molina-Montenegro, Marco A; Torres-Díaz, Cristian; Gallardo-Cerda, Jorge; Leppe, Marcelo; Gianoli, Ernesto

    2013-11-01

    Oceanic island ecosystems are particularly sensitive to El Niño effects due to their dependence on energy and nutrient inputs from marine systems. Seabirds play a key role in transporting resources of marine origin to insular ecosystems. We report tree-growth patterns showing how the effects of El Niño rainy events on tree species in a southern Pacific island depend on the presence of local seabird colonies. We performed manipulative experiments in order to assess the mechanisms underlying these patterns. Tree ring data showed that, in normal years, the growth of all tree species (Aextoxicon punctatum, Cryptocarya alba, and Pinus radiata) was significantly lower in seabird sites compared to adjacent patches without seabirds (control sites). In contrast, in El Niño years, trees formerly hosting seabird colonies grew more than those in control sites. Experiments showed that (1) pine plants on soil from seabird sites grew more than those on soil from control sites, (2) pine individuals with seabird feces on their leaves grew less than those sprayed with an aqueous solution, and (3) soil moisture had little effect on plant growth. The stress produced by massive cormorant nesting on trees, which impairs tree growth and physiological performance, is relieved during El Niño events because of seabird migration due to decreased prey availability and pouring rains that flood nests. Soils enriched by the seabird guano, together with the increased water availability associated with El Niño, foster the growth of trees from seabird sites. We suggest that El Niño may be a key determinant of tree performance in forest communities from island and coastal ecosystems of the Pacific Ocean.

  7. Seabirds modify El Niño effects on tree growth in a southern Pacific island.

    PubMed

    Molina-Montenegro, Marco A; Torres-Díaz, Cristian; Gallardo-Cerda, Jorge; Leppe, Marcelo; Gianoli, Ernesto

    2013-11-01

    Oceanic island ecosystems are particularly sensitive to El Niño effects due to their dependence on energy and nutrient inputs from marine systems. Seabirds play a key role in transporting resources of marine origin to insular ecosystems. We report tree-growth patterns showing how the effects of El Niño rainy events on tree species in a southern Pacific island depend on the presence of local seabird colonies. We performed manipulative experiments in order to assess the mechanisms underlying these patterns. Tree ring data showed that, in normal years, the growth of all tree species (Aextoxicon punctatum, Cryptocarya alba, and Pinus radiata) was significantly lower in seabird sites compared to adjacent patches without seabirds (control sites). In contrast, in El Niño years, trees formerly hosting seabird colonies grew more than those in control sites. Experiments showed that (1) pine plants on soil from seabird sites grew more than those on soil from control sites, (2) pine individuals with seabird feces on their leaves grew less than those sprayed with an aqueous solution, and (3) soil moisture had little effect on plant growth. The stress produced by massive cormorant nesting on trees, which impairs tree growth and physiological performance, is relieved during El Niño events because of seabird migration due to decreased prey availability and pouring rains that flood nests. Soils enriched by the seabird guano, together with the increased water availability associated with El Niño, foster the growth of trees from seabird sites. We suggest that El Niño may be a key determinant of tree performance in forest communities from island and coastal ecosystems of the Pacific Ocean. PMID:24400493

  8. New 3D Bolton standards: coregistration of biplane x rays and 3D CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, David; Subramanyan, Krishna; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    1997-04-01

    The Bolton Standards 'normative' cohort (16 males, 16 females) have been invited back to the Bolton-Brush Growth Study Center for new biorthogonal plain film head x-rays and 3D (three dimensional) head CT-scans. A set of 29 3D landmarks were identified on both their biplane head film and 3D CT images. The current 3D CT image is then superimposed onto the landmarks collected from the current biplane head films. Three post-doctoral fellows have collected 37 3D landmarks from the Bolton Standards' 40 - 70 year old biplane head films. These films were captured annually during their growing period (ages 3 - 18). Using 29 of these landmarks the current 3D CT image is next warped (via thin plate spline) to landmarks taken from each participant's 18th year biplane head films, a process that is successively reiterated back to age 3. This process is demonstrated here for one of the Bolton Standards. The outer skull surfaces will be extracted from each warped 3D CT image and an average will be generated for each age/sex group. The resulting longitudinal series of average 'normative' boney skull surface images may be useful for craniofacial patient: diagnosis, treatment planning, stereotactic procedures, and outcomes assessment.

  9. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  10. Growth and development of thermoregulation in nestling San Miguel Island Song Sparrows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sogge, Mark K.; Kern, Michael D.; Kern, Robert; van Riper, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Patterns of growth (reviewed by Ricklefs 1968, 1969; O'Connor 1984) and the development of endothermy (reviewed by Dawson and Hudson 1970, Dunn 1975, Hill and Beaver 1982) have been well-studied in altricial wild birds, especially passerines. But few studies compare grown and thermogenesis in separate populations of the same species. Results of such studies with emberizids varied among species. King and Hubbard (1981), for example, found that nestlings from subarctic, subalpine, and low-altitude montane populations of White-crowned Sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii) grew at similar rates. In contrast, Rogers (1985) reported that the growth rates of nestlings in different populations of Savannah Sparrows (Passerculus sandwichensis) varied in response to the different environmental constraints of the localities in which they were reared. Nice (1937) and Smith et al. (1982) documented patterns of nestling growth in mainland (Ohio) and insular (Mandarte Island, British Columbia, Canada) populations of Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia), respectively, and found that they were similar to those reported for most other passerines by Ricklefs (1968, 1969) and O'Connor (1984). In 1985-1986, we had the opportunity to examine the growth of nestlings from a third race of Song Sparrows, M. m. micronyx, which is endemic to San Miguel Island near Santa Barbara, California. We also studied the development of endothermy in these young birds, a process not hitherto described for nestling Song Sparrows. We report both in this paper.

  11. QM/MD studies on graphene growth from small islands on the Ni(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Menggai; Song, Wei; Qian, Hu-Jun; Wang, Ying; Wu, Zhijian; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Quantum chemical molecular dynamics simulations of graphene growth from small island precursors in different carbon nucleation densities on the Ni(111) surface at high temperatures have been conducted. The results indicate that small islands are not static, i.e. lateral diffusion and vertical fluctuation are frequently observed. In the case of low carbon nucleation density, carbon atoms or small carbon patches diffuse and attach to the edge of the nuclei to expand the size of the growing carbon network. The growth of graphene precursors is accompanied by the corresponding changes in the bonding of nickel atoms with the precipitation of subsurface carbon atoms. This is because the carbon-carbon interaction is stronger than the nickel-carbon interaction. In the case of high carbon nucleation densities, the dominant ripening mechanism depends on different growth stages. In the initial stage, the coalescence of carbon islands takes place via the Smoluchowski ripening mechanism. In the later stage the Smoluchowski ripening process is damped owing to the higher diffusion barrier of larger clusters and the restriction of movement by self-assembled nickel step edges. The cross-linking mechanism eventually takes over by the coalescence of extended polyyne chains between graphene islands. In either case, the Ostwald ripening process is not found in our molecular dynamics simulations due to the stability of carbon-carbon bonds within the islands. These investigations should be instructive to the control of graphene growth in experiments.Quantum chemical molecular dynamics simulations of graphene growth from small island precursors in different carbon nucleation densities on the Ni(111) surface at high temperatures have been conducted. The results indicate that small islands are not static, i.e. lateral diffusion and vertical fluctuation are frequently observed. In the case of low carbon nucleation density, carbon atoms or small carbon patches diffuse and attach to the edge of

  12. QM/MD studies on graphene growth from small islands on the Ni(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Menggai; Song, Wei; Qian, Hu-Jun; Wang, Ying; Wu, Zhijian; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Quantum chemical molecular dynamics simulations of graphene growth from small island precursors in different carbon nucleation densities on the Ni(111) surface at high temperatures have been conducted. The results indicate that small islands are not static, i.e. lateral diffusion and vertical fluctuation are frequently observed. In the case of low carbon nucleation density, carbon atoms or small carbon patches diffuse and attach to the edge of the nuclei to expand the size of the growing carbon network. The growth of graphene precursors is accompanied by the corresponding changes in the bonding of nickel atoms with the precipitation of subsurface carbon atoms. This is because the carbon-carbon interaction is stronger than the nickel-carbon interaction. In the case of high carbon nucleation densities, the dominant ripening mechanism depends on different growth stages. In the initial stage, the coalescence of carbon islands takes place via the Smoluchowski ripening mechanism. In the later stage the Smoluchowski ripening process is damped owing to the higher diffusion barrier of larger clusters and the restriction of movement by self-assembled nickel step edges. The cross-linking mechanism eventually takes over by the coalescence of extended polyyne chains between graphene islands. In either case, the Ostwald ripening process is not found in our molecular dynamics simulations due to the stability of carbon-carbon bonds within the islands. These investigations should be instructive to the control of graphene growth in experiments.Quantum chemical molecular dynamics simulations of graphene growth from small island precursors in different carbon nucleation densities on the Ni(111) surface at high temperatures have been conducted. The results indicate that small islands are not static, i.e. lateral diffusion and vertical fluctuation are frequently observed. In the case of low carbon nucleation density, carbon atoms or small carbon patches diffuse and attach to the edge of

  13. Spatially resolved 3D noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefner, David P.; Preece, Bradley L.; Doe, Joshua M.; Burks, Stephen D.

    2016-05-01

    When evaluated with a spatially uniform irradiance, an imaging sensor exhibits both spatial and temporal variations, which can be described as a three-dimensional (3D) random process considered as noise. In the 1990s, NVESD engineers developed an approximation to the 3D power spectral density (PSD) for noise in imaging systems known as 3D noise. In this correspondence, we describe how the confidence intervals for the 3D noise measurement allows for determination of the sampling necessary to reach a desired precision. We then apply that knowledge to create a smaller cube that can be evaluated spatially across the 2D image giving the noise as a function of position. The method presented here allows for both defective pixel identification and implements the finite sampling correction matrix. In support of the reproducible research effort, the Matlab functions associated with this work can be found on the Mathworks file exchange [1].

  14. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  15. Accepting the T3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

    1994-10-01

    In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

  16. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  17. Arctic ice shelves and ice islands: Origin, growth and disintegration, physical characteristics, structural-stratigraphic variability, and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, M.O. )

    1992-08-01

    Ice shelves are thick, floating ice masses most often associated with Antarctica where they are seaward extensions of the grounded Antarctic ice sheet and sources of many icebergs. However, there are also ice shelves in the Arctic, primarily located along the north coast of Ellesmere Island in the Canadian High Arctic. The only ice shelves in North America and the most extensive in the north polar region, the Ellesmere ice shelves originate from glaciers and from sea ice and are the source of ice islands, the tabular icebergs of the Arctic Ocean. The present state of knowledge and understanding of these ice features is summarized in this paper. It includes historical background to the discovery and early study of ice shelves and ice islands, including the use of ice islands as floating laboratories for polar geophysical research. Growth mechanisms and age, the former extent and the twentieth century disintegration of the Ellesmere ice shelves, and the processes and mechanisms of ice island calving are summarized. Surface features, thickness, thermal regime, and the size, shape, and numbers of ice islands are discussed. The structural-stratigraphic variability of ice islands and ice shelves and the complex nature of their growth and development are described. Large-scale and small-scale dynamics of ice islands are described, and the results of modeling their drift and recurrence intervals are presented. The conclusion identifies some unanswered questions and future research opportunities and needs. 97 refs., 18 figs.

  18. 3D Equilibrium Reconstructions in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.; Ferraro, N. W.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; King, J. D.; Hirshman, H. P.; Lazarus, E. A.; Sontag, A. C.; Hanson, J.; Trevisan, G.

    2013-10-01

    Accurate and efficient 3D equilibrium reconstruction is needed in tokamaks for study of 3D magnetic field effects on experimentally reconstructed equilibrium and for analysis of MHD stability experiments with externally imposed magnetic perturbations. A large number of new magnetic probes have been recently installed in DIII-D to improve 3D equilibrium measurements and to facilitate 3D reconstructions. The V3FIT code has been in use in DIII-D to support 3D reconstruction and the new magnetic diagnostic design. V3FIT is based on the 3D equilibrium code VMEC that assumes nested magnetic surfaces. V3FIT uses a pseudo-Newton least-square algorithm to search for the solution vector. In parallel, the EFIT equilibrium reconstruction code is being extended to allow for 3D effects using a perturbation approach based on an expansion of the MHD equations. EFIT uses the cylindrical coordinate system and can include the magnetic island and stochastic effects. Algorithms are being developed to allow EFIT to reconstruct 3D perturbed equilibria directly making use of plasma response to 3D perturbations from the GATO, MARS-F, or M3D-C1 MHD codes. DIII-D 3D reconstruction examples using EFIT and V3FIT and the new 3D magnetic data will be presented. Work supported in part by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-95ER54309 and DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  19. Ge islands on Si(111) at coverages near the transition from two-dimensional to three-dimensional growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyaev, Alexander A.; Shibata, Motoshi; Ichikawa, Masakazu

    1998-10-01

    We use scanning reflection electron microscopy (SREM) to study three-dimensional Ge island formation on the Si(111) surface at coverages near the transition from two-dimensional to three-dimensional growth under Ge fluxes between 0.001 and 0.02 BL/s and at temperatures between 380 and 690°C. The SREM images clearly show that the formation of flat three-dimensional islands with large lateral dimensions is dominant at higher temperatures. An average critical island size of about nine atoms was obtained from the flux dependence of island density. The existence of such large size critical islands is supported by the intermediate formation of the second Ge bilayer before island nucleation, which then decomposes, and by the rapid saturation of island density. From the temperature dependence of island density the activation energy for a Ge atom to detach from the islands to form an adatom was estimated to be ˜1.1 eV.

  20. LASTRAC.3d: Transition Prediction in 3D Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2004-01-01

    Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) is a general-purpose, physics-based transition prediction code released by NASA for laminar flow control studies and transition research. This paper describes the LASTRAC extension to general three-dimensional (3D) boundary layers such as finite swept wings, cones, or bodies at an angle of attack. The stability problem is formulated by using a body-fitted nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinate system constructed on the body surface. The nonorthogonal coordinate system offers a variety of marching paths and spanwise waveforms. In the extreme case of an infinite swept wing boundary layer, marching with a nonorthogonal coordinate produces identical solutions to those obtained with an orthogonal coordinate system using the earlier release of LASTRAC. Several methods to formulate the 3D parabolized stability equations (PSE) are discussed. A surface-marching procedure akin to that for 3D boundary layer equations may be used to solve the 3D parabolized disturbance equations. On the other hand, the local line-marching PSE method, formulated as an easy extension from its 2D counterpart and capable of handling the spanwise mean flow and disturbance variation, offers an alternative. A linear stability theory or parabolized stability equations based N-factor analysis carried out along the streamline direction with a fixed wavelength and downstream-varying spanwise direction constitutes an efficient engineering approach to study instability wave evolution in a 3D boundary layer. The surface-marching PSE method enables a consistent treatment of the disturbance evolution along both streamwise and spanwise directions but requires more stringent initial conditions. Both PSE methods and the traditional LST approach are implemented in the LASTRAC.3d code. Several test cases for tapered or finite swept wings and cones at an angle of attack are discussed.

  1. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  2. Role of Transient Mobility on Submonolayer Island Growth: Extensions and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales Cifuentes, Josue; Einstein, Theodore; Pimpinelli, Alberto

    In studies of epitaxial growth a major goal is assessing the smallest stable cluster (i + 1 monomers, with i the critical nucleus size), by analyzing the capture zone distribution (CZD) or the scaling of incident flux F to the density of stable islands N (N ~Fα , with α the growth exponent). As noted in the previous talk, the GWD has well described the data in several experiments, including submonolayer para-hexaphenyl (6P) on amorphous mica (i ~ 3). Different scaling (Fα) for 6P at (small) large F is attributed to (DLA) ALA dynamics, i.e. i = (5) 7 +/- 2. Our recent theoretical work considered monomers propagating ballistically before thermalizing or attaching to islands, leading to scaling, non-monotonic crossover, and activation energies that account for the data and reconciling the values of i. We present applications to other experimental systems: 6P on SiO2 and pentacene (5A) on amorphous mica. We describe useful simplifying approximations, and preliminary kinetic Monte Carlo simulations including transient effects on growth. Work at UMD supported by NSF CHE 13-05892.

  3. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  4. Remote 3D Medical Consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Krishnan, Srinivas; Söderholm, Hanna M.

    Two-dimensional (2D) video-based telemedical consultation has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years. Two issues that seem to arise in most relevant case studies are the difficulty associated with obtaining the desired 2D camera views, and poor depth perception. To address these problems we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to synthesize a spatially continuous range of dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and events. The 3D views can be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote viewers with fixed displays or mobile devices such as a personal digital assistant (PDA). The viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewer virtual head- or hand-slaved (PDA-based) remote cameras for mono or stereo viewing. We call this idea remote 3D medical consultation (3DMC). In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical consultation; we describe the relevant computer vision/graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present some early experimental results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical consultation could offer benefits over conventional 2D televideo.

  5. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  6. 3D Printing in Technology and Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Robert L.; Bowden, Nicholas S.; Merrill, Chris

    2014-01-01

    In the past five years, there has been tremendous growth in the production and use of desktop 3D printers. This growth has been driven by the increasing availability of inexpensive computing and electronics technologies. The ability to rapidly share ideas and intelligence over the Internet has also played a key role in the growth. Growth is also…

  7. Fisetin inhibits human melanoma cell growth through direct binding to p70S6K and mTOR: findings from 3-D melanoma skin equivalents and computational modeling.

    PubMed

    Syed, Deeba N; Chamcheu, Jean-Christopher; Khan, Mohammad Imran; Sechi, Mario; Lall, Rahul K; Adhami, Vaqar M; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of melanoma continues to rise. Inspite of treatment advances, the prognosis remains grim once the disease has metastasized, emphasizing the need to explore additional therapeutic strategies. One such approach is through the use of mechanism-based dietary intervention. We previously showed that the flavonoid fisetin inhibits melanoma cell proliferation, in vitro and in vivo. Here, we studied fisetin-mediated regulation of kinases involved in melanoma growth and progression. Time-course analysis in 3-D melanoma constructs that transitioned from radial to vertical growth showed that fisetin treatment resulted in significant decrease in melanocytic lesions in contrast to untreated controls that showed large tumor nests and invading disseminated cells. Further studies in melanoma cultures and mouse xenografts showed that fisetin-mediated growth inhibition was associated with dephosphorylation of AKT, mTOR and p70S6K proteins. In silico modeling indicated direct interaction of fisetin with mTOR and p70S6K with favorable free energy values. These findings were validated by cell-free competition assays that established binding of fisetin to p70S6K and mTOR while little affinity was detected with AKT. Kinase activity studies reflected similar trend with % inhibition observed for p70S6K and mTOR at lower doses than AKT. Our studies characterized, for the first time, the differential interactions of any botanical agent with kinases involved in melanoma growth and demonstrate that fisetin inhibits mTOR and p70S6K through direct binding while the observed inhibitory effect of fisetin on AKT is mediated indirectly, through targeting interrelated pathways.

  8. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) island growth under SiO(2) nanodisks patterned on GaAs substrates.

    PubMed

    Tjahjana, Liliana; Wang, Benzhong; Tanoto, Hendrix; Chua, Soo-Jin; Yoon, Soon Fatt

    2010-05-14

    We report a growth phenomenon where uniform gallium arsenide (GaAs) islands were found to grow underneath an ordered array of SiO(2) nanodisks on a GaAs(100) substrate. Each island eventually grows into a pyramidal shape resulting in the toppling of the supported SiO(2) nanodisk. This phenomenon occurred consistently for each nanodisk across a large patterned area of approximately 50 x 50 microm(2) (with nanodisks of 210 nm diameter and 280 nm spacing). The growth mechanism is attributed to a combination of 'catalytic' growth and facet formation.

  9. Cooperative Island Growth of Large Area Single-Crystal Graphene by Chemical Vapor Deposition on Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Regmi, Murari; Rouleau, Christopher; Puretzky, Alexander A; Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David B; Chen, Jihua; Eastman, Jeffrey; Eres, Gyula

    2014-01-01

    We describe a two-step approach for suppressing nucleation of graphene on Cu using chemical vapor deposition. In the first step, as received Cu foils are oxidized in air at temperatures up to 500 C to remove surface impurities and to induce the regrowth of Cu grains during subsequent annealing in H2 flow at 1040 C prior to graphene growth. In the second step, transient reactant cooling is performed by using a brief Ar pulse at the onset of growth to induce collisional deactivation of the carbon growth species. The combination of these two steps results in a three orders of magnitude reduction in the graphene nucleation density, enabling the growth of millimeter-size single crystal graphene grains. A kinetic model shows that suppressing nucleation promotes a cooperative island growth mode that favors the formation of large area single crystal graphene, and it is accompanied by a roughly 3 orders of magnitude increase in the reactive sticking probability of methane compared to that in random nucleation growth.

  10. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia.

  11. Perennial growth of hermatypic corals at Rottnest Island, Western Australia (32°S)

    PubMed Central

    Falter, James L.; Schoepf, Verena; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the viability of high latitude environments as coral refugia, we report measurements of seasonal changes in seawater parameters (temperature, light, and carbonate chemistry) together with calcification rates for two coral species, Acropora yongei and Pocillopora damicornis from the southernmost geographical limit of these species at Salmon Bay, Rottnest Island (32°S) in Western Australia. Changes in buoyant weight were normalised to colony surface areas as determined from both X-ray computed tomography and geometric estimation. Extension rates for A. yongei averaged 51 ± 4 mm y−1 and were comparable to rates reported for Acroporid coral at other tropical and high latitude locations. Mean rates of calcification for both A. yongei and P. damicornis in winter were comparable to both the preceding and following summers despite a mean seasonal temperature range of ∼6 °C (18.2°–24.3 °C) and more than two-fold changes in the intensity of downwelling light. Seasonal calcification rates for A. yongei (1.31–2.02 mg CaCO3 cm−2 d−1) and P. damicornis (0.34–0.90 mg CaCO3 cm−2 d−1) at Salmon Bay, Rottnest Island were comparable to rates from similar taxa in more tropical environments; however, they appeared to decline sharply once summer temperatures exceeded 23 °C. A coral bleaching event observed in December 2013 provided further evidence of how coral at Rottnest Island are still vulnerable to the deleterious effects of episodic warming despite its high latitude location. Thus, while corals at Rottnest Island can sustain robust year-round rates of coral growth, even over cool winter temperatures of 18°–19 °C, there may be limits on the extent that such environments can provide refuge against the longer term impacts of anthropogenic climate change. PMID:25755921

  12. Perennial growth of hermatypic corals at Rottnest Island, Western Australia (32°S).

    PubMed

    Ross, Claire L; Falter, James L; Schoepf, Verena; McCulloch, Malcolm T

    2015-01-01

    To assess the viability of high latitude environments as coral refugia, we report measurements of seasonal changes in seawater parameters (temperature, light, and carbonate chemistry) together with calcification rates for two coral species, Acropora yongei and Pocillopora damicornis from the southernmost geographical limit of these species at Salmon Bay, Rottnest Island (32°S) in Western Australia. Changes in buoyant weight were normalised to colony surface areas as determined from both X-ray computed tomography and geometric estimation. Extension rates for A. yongei averaged 51 ± 4 mm y(-1) and were comparable to rates reported for Acroporid coral at other tropical and high latitude locations. Mean rates of calcification for both A. yongei and P. damicornis in winter were comparable to both the preceding and following summers despite a mean seasonal temperature range of ∼6 °C (18.2°-24.3 °C) and more than two-fold changes in the intensity of downwelling light. Seasonal calcification rates for A. yongei (1.31-2.02 mg CaCO3 cm(-2) d(-1)) and P. damicornis (0.34-0.90 mg CaCO3 cm(-2) d(-1)) at Salmon Bay, Rottnest Island were comparable to rates from similar taxa in more tropical environments; however, they appeared to decline sharply once summer temperatures exceeded 23 °C. A coral bleaching event observed in December 2013 provided further evidence of how coral at Rottnest Island are still vulnerable to the deleterious effects of episodic warming despite its high latitude location. Thus, while corals at Rottnest Island can sustain robust year-round rates of coral growth, even over cool winter temperatures of 18°-19 °C, there may be limits on the extent that such environments can provide refuge against the longer term impacts of anthropogenic climate change.

  13. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  14. Temperature Dependent Low Energy Electron Microscopy Study of Ge Island Growth on Bare and Ga Terminated Si(112)

    SciTech Connect

    Speckmann, M.; Schmidt, T; Flege, J; Sadowski, J; Sutter, P; Falta, J

    2009-01-01

    The pre-adsorption of Ga on Si(112) leads to a drastic change of the morphology of subsequently grown Ge islands. In contrast to the case for Ge growth on bare Si(112), even nanowire growth can be achieved on Ga terminated Si(112). Employing low energy electron microscopy and low energy electron diffraction, the initial phase of Ge nucleation and Ge island growth was systematically analysed for growth temperatures between 420 and 610 C, both on clean and on Ga terminated Si(112). In both cases the island density exhibits an Arrhenius-like behaviour, from which diffusion barrier heights of about 1.3 and 1.0 eV can be estimated for growth with and without Ga pre-adsorption, respectively. The Ge island shape on the bare Si(112) surface is found to be nearly circular over the whole temperature range, whereas the shapes of the Ge islands on the Ga terminated Si(112) become highly anisotropic for higher temperatures. Ge nanowires with sizes of up to 2 um along the direction are observed.

  15. 3D Printed Programmable Release Capsules.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Maneesh K; Meng, Fanben; Johnson, Blake N; Kong, Yong Lin; Tian, Limei; Yeh, Yao-Wen; Masters, Nina; Singamaneni, Srikanth; McAlpine, Michael C

    2015-08-12

    The development of methods for achieving precise spatiotemporal control over chemical and biomolecular gradients could enable significant advances in areas such as synthetic tissue engineering, biotic-abiotic interfaces, and bionanotechnology. Living organisms guide tissue development through highly orchestrated gradients of biomolecules that direct cell growth, migration, and differentiation. While numerous methods have been developed to manipulate and implement biomolecular gradients, integrating gradients into multiplexed, three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains a critical challenge. Here we present a method to 3D print stimuli-responsive core/shell capsules for programmable release of multiplexed gradients within hydrogel matrices. These capsules are composed of an aqueous core, which can be formulated to maintain the activity of payload biomolecules, and a poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA, an FDA approved polymer) shell. Importantly, the shell can be loaded with plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNRs), which permits selective rupturing of the capsule when irradiated with a laser wavelength specifically determined by the lengths of the nanorods. This precise control over space, time, and selectivity allows for the ability to pattern 2D and 3D multiplexed arrays of enzyme-loaded capsules along with tunable laser-triggered rupture and release of active enzymes into a hydrogel ambient. The advantages of this 3D printing-based method include (1) highly monodisperse capsules, (2) efficient encapsulation of biomolecular payloads, (3) precise spatial patterning of capsule arrays, (4) "on the fly" programmable reconfiguration of gradients, and (5) versatility for incorporation in hierarchical architectures. Indeed, 3D printing of programmable release capsules may represent a powerful new tool to enable spatiotemporal control over biomolecular gradients. PMID:26042472

  16. 3D Printed Programmable Release Capsules

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Maneesh K.; Meng, Fanben; Johnson, Blake N.; Kong, Yong Lin; Tian, Limei; Yeh, Yao-Wen; Masters, Nina; Singamaneni, Srikanth; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    The development of methods for achieving precise spatiotemporal control over chemical and biomolecular gradients could enable significant advances in areas such as synthetic tissue engineering, biotic–abiotic interfaces, and bionanotechnology. Living organisms guide tissue development through highly orchestrated gradients of biomolecules that direct cell growth, migration, and differentiation. While numerous methods have been developed to manipulate and implement biomolecular gradients, integrating gradients into multiplexed, three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains a critical challenge. Here we present a method to 3D print stimuli-responsive core/shell capsules for programmable release of multiplexed gradients within hydrogel matrices. These capsules are composed of an aqueous core, which can be formulated to maintain the activity of payload biomolecules, and a poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA, an FDA approved polymer) shell. Importantly, the shell can be loaded with plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNRs), which permits selective rupturing of the capsule when irradiated with a laser wavelength specifically determined by the lengths of the nanorods. This precise control over space, time, and selectivity allows for the ability to pattern 2D and 3D multiplexed arrays of enzyme-loaded capsules along with tunable laser-triggered rupture and release of active enzymes into a hydrogel ambient. The advantages of this 3D printing-based method include (1) highly monodisperse capsules, (2) efficient encapsulation of biomolecular payloads, (3) precise spatial patterning of capsule arrays, (4) “on the fly” programmable reconfiguration of gradients, and (5) versatility for incorporation in hierarchical architectures. Indeed, 3D printing of programmable release capsules may represent a powerful new tool to enable spatiotemporal control over biomolecular gradients. PMID:26042472

  17. 3D Printed Programmable Release Capsules.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Maneesh K; Meng, Fanben; Johnson, Blake N; Kong, Yong Lin; Tian, Limei; Yeh, Yao-Wen; Masters, Nina; Singamaneni, Srikanth; McAlpine, Michael C

    2015-08-12

    The development of methods for achieving precise spatiotemporal control over chemical and biomolecular gradients could enable significant advances in areas such as synthetic tissue engineering, biotic-abiotic interfaces, and bionanotechnology. Living organisms guide tissue development through highly orchestrated gradients of biomolecules that direct cell growth, migration, and differentiation. While numerous methods have been developed to manipulate and implement biomolecular gradients, integrating gradients into multiplexed, three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains a critical challenge. Here we present a method to 3D print stimuli-responsive core/shell capsules for programmable release of multiplexed gradients within hydrogel matrices. These capsules are composed of an aqueous core, which can be formulated to maintain the activity of payload biomolecules, and a poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA, an FDA approved polymer) shell. Importantly, the shell can be loaded with plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNRs), which permits selective rupturing of the capsule when irradiated with a laser wavelength specifically determined by the lengths of the nanorods. This precise control over space, time, and selectivity allows for the ability to pattern 2D and 3D multiplexed arrays of enzyme-loaded capsules along with tunable laser-triggered rupture and release of active enzymes into a hydrogel ambient. The advantages of this 3D printing-based method include (1) highly monodisperse capsules, (2) efficient encapsulation of biomolecular payloads, (3) precise spatial patterning of capsule arrays, (4) "on the fly" programmable reconfiguration of gradients, and (5) versatility for incorporation in hierarchical architectures. Indeed, 3D printing of programmable release capsules may represent a powerful new tool to enable spatiotemporal control over biomolecular gradients.

  18. Return to the Moon in Second Life, a 3D Metaverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireton, F.; Day, B.; Mitchell, B.; Stockman, S.

    2008-12-01

    Second Life (SL) is one of several virtual 3D simulations or metaverses. Presently there over nine million SL users worldwide with a growth rate of about 10 percent per month. SL has seen explosive growth in the five years it has been available and hosts a number of educational and institutional 'islands' or sims. There are over 200 educational institutions and education specific sims in SL. The SL education group hosts an educational mailing list of over 1,800 and at the recent SL conference conducted education strands all three days. Federal agencies with an SL presence include NASA, NOAA, and EPA. At any one time there may be 40,000-50,000 users on line. Users develop a persona and are seen on screen as a human figure or avatar. Avatars are able to move around the sim islands by walking or flying and move from island to island or remote locations by teleporting. While a big part of the Second Life experience deals with avatar interactions and exploring, there is an active community of builders who create the scenery, buildings, and other artifacts of the SL world including clothing and other personal items. SL builders start with basic shapes and through size manipulation on three axis and adding texture to the shapes create a myriad of objects-a 3D world. This paper will deal with the design and creation of an exhibit hall for NASA's Lunar Precursor Robotics Program (LPRP) and the LRO/LCROSS mission slated for launch in 2009. A Return to the Moon exhibit hall has been placed in the NASA sponsored Co-Lab sim located in the Sci Lands area of Second Life. Storyboards with information about the mission interpret the exhibits for visitors. Links to external websites provide for further information on the missions, both spacecraft instrument suites, and EPO efforts. Future plans for the exhibit include live broadcast of the launch and LCROSS impact.

  19. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  20. SNL3dFace

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial featuresmore » of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.« less

  1. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  2. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  3. Volumetric visualization of 3D data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Gregory; Miles, Richard

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a rapid growth in the ability to obtain detailed data on large complex structures in three dimensions. This development occurred first in the medical field, with CAT (computer aided tomography) scans and now magnetic resonance imaging, and in seismological exploration. With the advances in supercomputing and computational fluid dynamics, and in experimental techniques in fluid dynamics, there is now the ability to produce similar large data fields representing 3D structures and phenomena in these disciplines. These developments have produced a situation in which currently there is access to data which is too complex to be understood using the tools available for data reduction and presentation. Researchers in these areas are becoming limited by their ability to visualize and comprehend the 3D systems they are measuring and simulating.

  4. [Growth and mortality of the fish Haemulon aurolineatum (Teleostei: Haemulidae) from southwest of Margarita Island, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Bravo, Edwis; Eslava, Nora; González, Leo

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed the growth and natural mortality of the fish known locally as cuji (H. aurolineatum) in the southwest of Margarita Island, July 2005 to June 2006. A sample of 1,378 males and 1,143 females from artisanal fishing vessels of Boca del Río was analyzed. The common relation for both sexes was expressed by the equation P=0.038*L(2.87). The asymptotic length (L(infinity)) was estimated with Powell's (1979) routine and Wetherall (1986), and the growth coefficient (k) with ELEFAN I - FISAT II (FAO-ICLARM). The modal progression analysis was used after decomposition of lengths frequency according to Bhattacharya, and the estimations of L(infinity), and k optimized according to Gulland and Holt (1959). The growth curve was fitted to von Bertalanffy (1960); it is exponential, with accelerated growth in the first two years and less growth as the fish approaches maximal length. The rate of natural mortality was high (M=1.15 year(-1)), and probably was caused by high depredation. PMID:19637692

  5. 3D joint dynamics analysis of healthy children's gait.

    PubMed

    Samson, William; Desroches, Guillaume; Cheze, Laurence; Dumas, Raphaël

    2009-11-13

    The 3D joint moments and 2D joint powers have been largely explored in the literature of healthy children's gait, in particular to compare them with pathologic subjects' gait. However, no study reported on 3D joint power in children which could be due to the difficulties in interpreting the results. Recently, the analysis of the 3D angle between the joint moment and the joint angular velocity vectors has been proposed in order to help 3D joint power interpretation. Our hypothesis is that this 3D angle may help in characterizing the level of gait maturation. The present study explores 3D joint moments, 3D joint power and the proposed 3D angle for both children's and adults' gaits to highlight differences in the strategies used. The results seem to confirm that children have an alternative strategy of mainly ankle stabilization and hip propulsion compared to the adults' strategy of mainly ankle resistance and propulsion and hip stabilization. In the future, the same 3D angle analysis should be applied to different age groups for better describing the evolution of the 3D joint dynamic strategies during the growth.

  6. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  7. 3-D Modeling of Double-Diffusive Convection During Directional Solidification of a Non-Dilute Alloy with Application to the HgCdTe Growth Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Andris V.; Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1998-01-01

    A numerical calculation for a non-dilute alloy solidification was performed using the FIDAP finite element code. For low growth velocities plane front solidification occurs. The location and the shape of the interface was determined using melting temperatures from the HgCdTe liquidus curve. The low thermal conductivity of the solid HgCdTe causes thermal short circuit through the ampoule walls, resulting in curved isotherms in the vicinity of the interface. Double-diffusive convection in the melt is caused by radial temperature gradients and by material density inversion with temperature. Cooling from below and the rejection at the solid-melt interface of the heavier HgTe-rich solute each tend to reduce convection. Because of these complicating factors dimensional rather then non-dimensional modeling was performed. Estimates of convection contributions for various gravity conditions was performed parametrically. For gravity levels higher then 1 0 -7 of earth's gravity it was found that the maximum convection velocity is extremely sensitive to gravity vector orientation and can be reduced at least by factor of 50% for precise orientation of the ampoule in the microgravity environment. The predicted interface shape is in agreement with one obtained experimentally by quenching. The results of 3-D modeling are compared with previous 2-D finding. A video film featuring melt convection will be presented.

  8. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  9. 3D Printable Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-08

    In human being's history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today's personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite's linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C(-1) from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  10. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  11. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  12. 3D light scanning macrography.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Keller, M; Robert, D

    2001-08-01

    The technique of 3D light scanning macrography permits the non-invasive surface scanning of small specimens at magnifications up to 200x. Obviating both the problem of limited depth of field inherent to conventional close-up macrophotography and the metallic coating required by scanning electron microscopy, 3D light scanning macrography provides three-dimensional digital images of intact specimens without the loss of colour, texture and transparency information. This newly developed technique offers a versatile, portable and cost-efficient method for the non-invasive digital and photographic documentation of small objects. Computer controlled device operation and digital image acquisition facilitate fast and accurate quantitative morphometric investigations, and the technique offers a broad field of research and educational applications in biological, medical and materials sciences. PMID:11489078

  13. Relationship between species diversity and reef growth in the Holocene at Ishigaki Island, Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongo, Chuki; Kayanne, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Coral reefs are influenced by global and local factors, and living corals are currently faced with a potential loss of species diversity. Knowledge of the relationship between species diversity and reef growth during the Holocene is important in terms of accurately reconstructing natural conditions prior to recent disturbances (e.g., human impact, pollution, and over-harvesting) and in predicting future scenarios (e.g., abrupt sea-level rise, coastal change, and economic services). This study seeks to characterize the Holocene and present-day reef at Ishigaki Island in the Ryukyu Islands, focusing on spatial and temporal variations in the relationship between species diversity and reef growth. The analysis is based on a drilling core obtained for the Holocene reefs and quantitative species-diversity data (Shannon and Weaver's diversity index, H') obtained for the present-day reef. H' was calculated for four coral communities surveyed at the Ibaruma and Fukido reefs. The Holocene sequence was dominated by the corymbose coral community (e.g., Acropora digitifera, A. hyacinthus, Goniastrea retiformis, and Platygyra ryukyuensis), yielding an H' value of 1.6. The encrusting coral community (e.g., Echinopora lamellose and Pachyseris rugosa) showed the highest diversity at the reef ( H' = 2.2); however, this community was not one of the main reef builders during the Holocene. The massive coral community (e.g., Porites lutea and Favites chinensis) showed the lowest diversity ( H' = 0.6). It also made a minor contribution to reef building; this community appeared in a shallow lagoon once sea level had stabilized. The arborescent coral community (e.g., A. formosa and A. nobilis) was one of the main reef builders, although yielding an H' value of much less than 1.0. Species diversity is not a prerequisite in terms of Holocene reef growth. Thus, a few species (e.g., A. digitifera, A. hyacinthus, A. formosa, A. nobilis, G. retiformis, and P. ryukyuensis) from two main reef

  14. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors. 13. Structure-activity relationships for soluble 7-substituted 4-[(3-bromophenyl)amino]pyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidines designed as inhibitors of the tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A M; Murray, D K; Elliott, W L; Fry, D W; Nelson, J A; Showalter, H D; Roberts, B J; Vincent, P W; Denny, W A

    1997-11-21

    The general class of 4-(phenylamino)quinazolines are potent (some members with IC50 values < 1 nM) and selective inhibitors of the tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), via competitive binding at the ATP site of the enzyme, but many of the early analogues had poor aqueous solubility (< 1 mM). A series of 7-substituted 4-[(3-bromophenyl)-amino]pyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidines, together with selected (3-methylphenyl)amino analogues, were prepared by reaction of the analogous 7-fluoro derivatives with appropriate amine nucleophiles in 2-BuOH or aqueous 1-PrOH. All of the compounds were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the tyrosine-phosphorylating action of EGF-stimulated full-length EGFR enzyme. Selected analogues were also evaluated for their inhibition of autophosphorylation of the EGF receptor in A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells in culture and against A431 tumor xenografts in mice. Analogues bearing a wide variety of polyol, cationic, and anionic solubilizing substituents retained activity, but the most effective in terms of both increased aqueous solubility (> 40 mM) and retention of overall inhibitory activity (IC50's of 0.5-10 nM against isolated enzyme and 8-40 nM for inhibition of EGFR autophosphorylation in A431 cells) were weakly basic amine derivatives. These results are broadly consistent with a proposed model for the binding of these compounds to EGFR, in which the 6- and 7-positions of the pyridopyrimidine ring are in a largely hydrophobic binding region of considerable steric freedom, at the entrance of the adenine binding cleft. The most active cationic analogues have a weakly basic side chain where the amine moiety is three or more carbon atoms away from the nucleus. Two of the compounds (bearing weakly basic morpholinopropyl and strongly basic (dimethylamino)butyl solubilizing groups) produced in vivo tumor growth delays of 13-21 days against advanced stage A431 epidermoid xenografts in nude mice, when

  15. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  16. [Real time 3D echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F; Shiota, T; Thomas, J D

    2001-07-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:11494630

  17. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer themore » second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.« less

  18. 3D MHD Simulations of Tokamak Disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James

    2014-10-01

    Two disruption scenarios are modeled numerically by use of the CORSICA 2D equilibrium and NIMROD 3D MHD codes. The work follows the simulations of pressure-driven modes in DIII-D and VDEs in ITER. The aim of the work is to provide starting points for simulation of tokamak disruption mitigation techniques currently in the CDR phase for ITER. Pressure-driven instability growth rates previously observed in simulations of DIIID are verified; Halo and Hiro currents produced during vertical displacements are observed in simulations of ITER with implementation of resistive walls in NIMROD. We discuss plans to exercise new code capabilities and validation.

  19. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  20. Further Developments in Characterizing Capture Zone Distributions (CZD) in Island Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einstein, T. L.; Pimpinelli, Alberto; González, Diego Luis

    2014-03-01

    As argued previously, analysis of the distribution of the areas of capture zones (i.e. proximity polygons [or Voronoi tesselations] with respect to island centers) is often the best way to extract the critical nucleus size in studies of epitaxial growth. For non-Poisson deposition (i.e. when island nucleation is not fully random) the areas of these Voronoi cells can be well described by the generalized Wigner distribution (GWD), particularly in the central region around the mean area where the distribution is largest. We discuss several recent applications to experimental systems, catelogued in a recent minireview,[2] showing how this perspective leads to insights about the critical nucleus size. In contrast, several (but not all) studies have shown that the GWD may not describe the numerical data from painstaking simulations in both tails.2 We discuss some refinements that have been proposed, as well as scaling forms. Finally, we comment on applications to social phenomena. Emphasis is on very recent developments. Work at UMD supported by NSF CHE 13-05892 & NSF MRSEC DMR 05-20471.

  1. Multizone Paper Platform for 3D Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Derda, Ratmir; Hong, Estrella; Mwangi, Martin; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E.; Whitesides, George M.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro 3D culture is an important model for tissues in vivo. Cells in different locations of 3D tissues are physiologically different, because they are exposed to different concentrations of oxygen, nutrients, and signaling molecules, and to other environmental factors (temperature, mechanical stress, etc). The majority of high-throughput assays based on 3D cultures, however, can only detect the average behavior of cells in the whole 3D construct. Isolation of cells from specific regions of 3D cultures is possible, but relies on low-throughput techniques such as tissue sectioning and micromanipulation. Based on a procedure reported previously (“cells-in-gels-in-paper” or CiGiP), this paper describes a simple method for culture of arrays of thin planar sections of tissues, either alone or stacked to create more complex 3D tissue structures. This procedure starts with sheets of paper patterned with hydrophobic regions that form 96 hydrophilic zones. Serial spotting of cells suspended in extracellular matrix (ECM) gel onto the patterned paper creates an array of 200 micron-thick slabs of ECM gel (supported mechanically by cellulose fibers) containing cells. Stacking the sheets with zones aligned on top of one another assembles 96 3D multilayer constructs. De-stacking the layers of the 3D culture, by peeling apart the sheets of paper, “sections” all 96 cultures at once. It is, thus, simple to isolate 200-micron-thick cell-containing slabs from each 3D culture in the 96-zone array. Because the 3D cultures are assembled from multiple layers, the number of cells plated initially in each layer determines the spatial distribution of cells in the stacked 3D cultures. This capability made it possible to compare the growth of 3D tumor models of different spatial composition, and to examine the migration of cells in these structures. PMID:21573103

  2. Interplay between Sb flux and growth temperature during the formation of GaSb islands on GaP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kazzi, S.; Desplanque, L.; Wallart, X.; Wang, Y.; Ruterana, P.

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the influence of the Sb flux on the growth of GaSb islands on a highly mismatched (001) GaP substrate. Between low and medium Sb flux values, standard kinetics drives the GaSb island formation and their relaxation is progressively favored by 90° misfit dislocations at the GaSb/GaP interface. However, under high Sb flux, the GaSb islands are elongated in the [110] direction and their density decreases. Further experiments varying the growth temperature at fixed Sb flux confirm this finding. We relate this observation to an enhancement of Ga diffusion when the effective Sb flux on the surface is increased. This behavior is qualitatively explained by the large cohesive energy of Sb-Sb bonds present on the surface, which impede the Ga adatom incorporation.

  3. High rates of growth recorded for hawksbill sea turtles in Anegada, British Virgin Islands.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Lucy A; McGowan, Andrew; Broderick, Annette C; Gore, Shannon; Wheatley, Damon; White, Jim; Witt, Matthew J; Godley, Brendan J

    2014-04-01

    Management of species of conservation concern requires knowledge of demographic parameters, such as rates of recruitment, survival, and growth. In the Caribbean, hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) have been historically exploited in huge numbers to satisfy trade in their shells and meat. In the present study, we estimated growth rate of juvenile hawksbill turtles around Anegada, British Virgin Islands, using capture-mark-recapture of 59 turtles over periods of up to 649 days. Turtles were recaptured up to six times, having moved up to 5.9 km from the release location. Across all sizes, turtles grew at an average rate of 9.3 cm year(-1) (range 2.3-20.3 cm year(-1)), and gained mass at an average of 3.9 kg year(-1) (range 850 g-16.1 kg year(-1)). Carapace length was a significant predictor of growth rate and mass gain, but there was no relationship between either variable and sea surface temperature. These are among the fastest rates of growth reported for this species, with seven turtles growing at a rate that would increase their body size by more than half per year (51-69% increase in body length). This study also demonstrates the importance of shallow water reef systems for the developmental habitat for juvenile hawksbill turtles. Although growth rates for posthatching turtles in the pelagic, and turtles larger than 61 cm, are not known for this population, the implications of this study are that Caribbean hawksbill turtles in some areas may reach body sizes suggesting sexual maturity in less time than previously considered.

  4. High rates of growth recorded for hawksbill sea turtles in Anegada, British Virgin Islands

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Lucy A; McGowan, Andrew; Broderick, Annette C; Gore, Shannon; Wheatley, Damon; White, Jim; Witt, Matthew J; Godley, Brendan J

    2014-01-01

    Management of species of conservation concern requires knowledge of demographic parameters, such as rates of recruitment, survival, and growth. In the Caribbean, hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) have been historically exploited in huge numbers to satisfy trade in their shells and meat. In the present study, we estimated growth rate of juvenile hawksbill turtles around Anegada, British Virgin Islands, using capture–mark–recapture of 59 turtles over periods of up to 649 days. Turtles were recaptured up to six times, having moved up to 5.9 km from the release location. Across all sizes, turtles grew at an average rate of 9.3 cm year−1 (range 2.3–20.3 cm year−1), and gained mass at an average of 3.9 kg year−1 (range 850 g–16.1 kg year−1). Carapace length was a significant predictor of growth rate and mass gain, but there was no relationship between either variable and sea surface temperature. These are among the fastest rates of growth reported for this species, with seven turtles growing at a rate that would increase their body size by more than half per year (51–69% increase in body length). This study also demonstrates the importance of shallow water reef systems for the developmental habitat for juvenile hawksbill turtles. Although growth rates for posthatching turtles in the pelagic, and turtles larger than 61 cm, are not known for this population, the implications of this study are that Caribbean hawksbill turtles in some areas may reach body sizes suggesting sexual maturity in less time than previously considered. PMID:24834324

  5. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  6. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  7. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  8. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie

    2015-01-09

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  9. [Dana swimming crab growth Callinectes danae (Decapoda: Portunidae) from Margarita Island, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Castillo, Jesylén; Eslava, Nora; González, Leo Walter

    2011-12-01

    Callinectes danae is a common species captured with crab traps in nearby areas of coastal lagoons in Margarita Island. Although its considerable economic importance as a fishery resource, few studies have been done on population dynamics and its fishery potential in local coastal environments to support decision making in fishery administration. We present growth pattern details of Callinectes danae to better estimate its population size and exploitation feasibility. For this, we analyzed a total of 3 623 specimens that were monthly captured in crab pots by artisanal fishermen in Las Marites lagoon, from October 2007 to September 2008. The length-weight ratio was determined, and growth parameters estimated from both length and weight curves of the von Bertalanffy model. The general sex ratio showed no significant difference between males and females (chi2 = 0.04, p > 0.05). However, values of slopes b between males and females were significantly different (t(s) = 2.75, p < 0.05), as well as intercepts a (t(s) = 2.44, p < 0.05). Thus, the length-weight ratio was determined separately: W = 7.48e(-5)*L(2.98) for males and W = 1.21e(-4)*L(2.87) for females, indicating a negative allometric growth in both sexes. Growth parameters were established as: L(infinity) =134.80mm, W(infinity) = 166.04g and k = 0.86/yr for males; L(infinity) = 122.35mm, W(infinity) = 118.45g and k = 0.63/yr for females. Lifespan was estimated at 3.05 years for males and 4.24 years for females. We concluded that Callinectes danae is a species with short lifespan and moderately rapid growth. The coefficient of variation values (CV), of the phi-prime growth performance index (Ø'), showed a different growth pattern compared to those obtained in other regions. We propose that a management strategy will be the periodical review of the minimum capture size for fishing area, after the great variability found in growth parameters. PMID:22208071

  10. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  11. 3D acoustic atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Finn, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing spatially varying 3D atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based. Measurements of the acoustic signature measured onboard a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are compared to ground-based observations of the same signals. The frequency-shifted signal variations are then used to estimate the acoustic propagation delay between the UAV and the ground microphones, which are also affected by atmospheric temperature and wind speed vectors along each sound ray path. The wind and temperature profiles are modelled as the weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), which also allow local meteorological measurements made at the UAV and ground receivers to supplement any acoustic observations. Tomography is used to provide a full 3D reconstruction/visualisation of the observed atmosphere. The technique offers observational mobility under direct user control and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. This paper summarises the tomographic technique and reports on the results of simulations and initial field trials. The technique has practical applications for atmospheric research, sound propagation studies, boundary layer meteorology, air pollution measurements, analysis of wind shear, and wind farm surveys.

  12. Gravitation in 3D Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubenstein, John; Cockream, Kandi

    2009-05-01

    3D spacetime was developed by the IWPD Scale Metrics (SM) team using a coordinate system that translates n dimensions to n-1. 4-vectors are expressed in 3D along with a scaling factor representing time. Time is not orthogonal to the three spatial dimensions, but rather in alignment with an object's axis-of-motion. We have defined this effect as the object's ``orientation'' (X). The SM orientation (X) is equivalent to the orientation of the 4-velocity vector positioned tangent to its worldline, where X-1=θ+1 and θ is the angle of the 4-vector relative to the axis-of -motion. Both 4-vectors and SM appear to represent valid conceptualizations of the relationship between space and time. Why entertain SM? Scale Metrics gravity is quantized and may suggest a path for the full unification of gravitation with quantum theory. SM has been tested against current observation and is in agreement with the age of the universe, suggests a physical relationship between dark energy and dark matter, is in agreement with the accelerating expansion rate of the universe, contributes to the understanding of the fine-structure constant and provides a physical explanation of relativistic effects.

  13. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  14. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  15. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  16. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  17. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C-1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  18. LOTT RANCH 3D PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Lawrence; Bruce Miller

    2004-09-01

    The Lott Ranch 3D seismic prospect located in Garza County, Texas is a project initiated in September of 1991 by the J.M. Huber Corp., a petroleum exploration and production company. By today's standards the 126 square mile project does not seem monumental, however at the time it was conceived it was the most intensive land 3D project ever attempted. Acquisition began in September of 1991 utilizing GEO-SEISMIC, INC., a seismic data contractor. The field parameters were selected by J.M. Huber, and were of a radical design. The recording instruments used were GeoCor IV amplifiers designed by Geosystems Inc., which record the data in signed bit format. It would not have been practical, if not impossible, to have processed the entire raw volume with the tools available at that time. The end result was a dataset that was thought to have little utility due to difficulties in processing the field data. In 1997, Yates Energy Corp. located in Roswell, New Mexico, formed a partnership to further develop the project. Through discussions and meetings with Pinnacle Seismic, it was determined that the original Lott Ranch 3D volume could be vastly improved upon reprocessing. Pinnacle Seismic had shown the viability of improving field-summed signed bit data on smaller 2D and 3D projects. Yates contracted Pinnacle Seismic Ltd. to perform the reprocessing. This project was initiated with high resolution being a priority. Much of the potential resolution was lost through the initial summing of the field data. Modern computers that are now being utilized have tremendous speed and storage capacities that were cost prohibitive when this data was initially processed. Software updates and capabilities offer a variety of quality control and statics resolution, which are pertinent to the Lott Ranch project. The reprocessing effort was very successful. The resulting processed data-set was then interpreted using modern PC-based interpretation and mapping software. Production data, log data

  19. MOCVD Growth and Optical Characterization of Strain-Induced Quantum Dots with InP Island Stressors

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, M. C.; Lu, Z. H.; Cahill, A. F.; Heben, M. J.; Nozik, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    Coherent InP islands, grown by low pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), were used to produce quantum dots by strain confinement. Lateral confinement of carriers in a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well located near the surface was obtained from the inhomogeneous strain produced by the InP islands. The evolution of the InP islands on Al0.3Ga0.7As surfaces with increasing InP coverage at different growth temperatures and substrate orientations was studied using atomic force microscopy. Under certain growth conditions, a fairly uniform distribution of coherent InP islands was obtained which had an average apparent diameter of 140 nm with a standard deviation of 12.2 nm and height of 19.5 {+-} 1.1 nm. Lateral confinement depths up to 100 meV were obtained when using the islands as stressors. Photoluminescence from ensembles of the strain-induced dots exhibit peaks, narrow line widths (16 meV) and high efficiency up to room temperature.

  20. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction.

  1. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction. PMID:26861680

  2. Phase-field modeling of epitaxial growth: Applications to step trains and island dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhengzheng; Lowengrub, John S.; Wise, Steven M.; Voigt, Axel

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new phase-field model including combined effects of edge diffusion, the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier, deposition and desorption to simulate epitaxial growth. A new free energy function together with a correction to the initial phase variable profile is used to efficiently capture the morphological evolution when a large deposition flux is imposed. A formal matched asymptotic analysis is performed to show the reduction of the phase-field model to the classical sharp interface Burton-Cabrera-Frank model for step flow when the interfacial thickness vanishes. The phase-field model is solved by a semi-implicit finite difference scheme, and adaptive block-structured Cartesian meshes are used to dramatically increase the efficiency of the solver. The numerical scheme is used to investigate the evolution of perturbed circularly shaped small islands. The effect of edge diffusion is investigated together with the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier. We also investigate the linear and nonlinear regimes of a step meandering instability. We reproduce the predicted scaling law for the growth of the meander amplitude, which was based on an analysis of a long wavelength regime. New nonlinear behavior is observed when the meander wavelength is comparable to the terrace width. In particular, a previously unobserved regime of coarsening dynamics is found to occur when the meander wavelength is comparable to the terrace width.

  3. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  4. 3D Elastic Wavefield Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, L.; Warner, M.; Stekl, I.; Umpleby, A.; Shah, N.

    2010-12-01

    Wavefield tomography, or waveform inversion, aims to extract the maximum information from seismic data by matching trace by trace the response of the solid earth to seismic waves using numerical modelling tools. Its first formulation dates from the early 80's, when Albert Tarantola developed a solid theoretical basis that is still used today with little change. Due to computational limitations, the application of the method to 3D problems has been unaffordable until a few years ago, and then only under the acoustic approximation. Although acoustic wavefield tomography is widely used, a complete solution of the seismic inversion problem requires that we account properly for the physics of wave propagation, and so must include elastic effects. We have developed a 3D tomographic wavefield inversion code that incorporates the full elastic wave equation. The bottle neck of the different implementations is the forward modelling algorithm that generates the synthetic data to be compared with the field seismograms as well as the backpropagation of the residuals needed to form the direction update of the model parameters. Furthermore, one or two extra modelling runs are needed in order to calculate the step-length. Our approach uses a FD scheme explicit time-stepping by finite differences that are 4th order in space and 2nd order in time, which is a 3D version of the one developed by Jean Virieux in 1986. We chose the time domain because an explicit time scheme is much less demanding in terms of memory than its frequency domain analogue, although the discussion of wich domain is more efficient still remains open. We calculate the parameter gradients for Vp and Vs by correlating the normal and shear stress wavefields respectively. A straightforward application would lead to the storage of the wavefield at all grid points at each time-step. We tackled this problem using two different approaches. The first one makes better use of resources for small models of dimension equal

  5. Conducting Polymer 3D Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Sasso, Luigi; Vazquez, Patricia; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Castillo-León, Jaime; Emnéus, Jenny; Svendsen, Winnie E.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained showed uniformity and good adhesion to both horizontal and vertical surfaces. Electrodes in combination with metal/conducting polymer materials have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and the presence of the conducting polymer film has shown to increase the electrochemical activity when compared with electrodes coated with only metal. An electrochemical characterization of gold/polypyrrole electrodes showed exceptional electrochemical behavior and activity. PC12 cells were finally cultured on the investigated materials as a preliminary biocompatibility assessment. These results show that the described electrodes are possibly suitable for future in-vitro neurological measurements. PMID:22163508

  6. ShowMe3D

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from themore » displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.« less

  7. Bringing macromolecular machinery to life using 3D animation.

    PubMed

    Iwasa, Janet H

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a rapid rise in the use of three-dimensional (3D) animation to depict molecular and cellular processes. Much of the growth in molecular animation has been in the educational arena, but increasingly, 3D animation software is finding its way into research laboratories. In this review, I will discuss a number of ways in which 3d animation software can play a valuable role in visualizing and communicating macromolecular structures and dynamics. I will also consider the challenges of using animation tools within the research sphere.

  8. Powder-based 3D printing for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Brunello, G; Sivolella, S; Meneghello, R; Ferroni, L; Gardin, C; Piattelli, A; Zavan, B; Bressan, E

    2016-01-01

    Bone tissue engineered 3-D constructs customized to patient-specific needs are emerging as attractive biomimetic scaffolds to enhance bone cell and tissue growth and differentiation. The article outlines the features of the most common additive manufacturing technologies (3D printing, stereolithography, fused deposition modeling, and selective laser sintering) used to fabricate bone tissue engineering scaffolds. It concentrates, in particular, on the current state of knowledge concerning powder-based 3D printing, including a description of the properties of powders and binder solutions, the critical phases of scaffold manufacturing, and its applications in bone tissue engineering. Clinical aspects and future applications are also discussed.

  9. Powder-based 3D printing for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Brunello, G; Sivolella, S; Meneghello, R; Ferroni, L; Gardin, C; Piattelli, A; Zavan, B; Bressan, E

    2016-01-01

    Bone tissue engineered 3-D constructs customized to patient-specific needs are emerging as attractive biomimetic scaffolds to enhance bone cell and tissue growth and differentiation. The article outlines the features of the most common additive manufacturing technologies (3D printing, stereolithography, fused deposition modeling, and selective laser sintering) used to fabricate bone tissue engineering scaffolds. It concentrates, in particular, on the current state of knowledge concerning powder-based 3D printing, including a description of the properties of powders and binder solutions, the critical phases of scaffold manufacturing, and its applications in bone tissue engineering. Clinical aspects and future applications are also discussed. PMID:27086202

  10. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  11. Porphyrins as Templates for Site-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition: Vapor Metalation and in Situ Monitoring of Island Growth.

    PubMed

    Avila, Jason R; Emery, Jonathan D; Pellin, Michael J; Martinson, Alex B F; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2016-08-10

    Examinations of enzymatic catalysts suggest one key to efficient catalytic activity is discrete size metallo clusters. Mimicking enzymatic cluster systems is synthetically challenging because conventional solution methods are prone to aggregation or require capping of the cluster, thereby limiting its catalytic activity. We introduce site-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on porphyrins as an alternative approach to grow isolated metal oxide islands that are spatially separated. Surface-bound tetra-acid free base porphyrins (H2TCPP) may be metalated with Mn using conventional ALD precursor exposure to induce homogeneous hydroxide synthetic handles which acts as a nucleation point for subsequent ALD MnO island growth. Analytical fitting of in situ QCM mass uptake reveals island growth to be hemispherical with a convergence radius of 1.74 nm. This growth mode is confirmed with synchrotron grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. Finally, we extend this approach to other ALD chemistries to demonstrate the generality of this route to discrete metallo island materials.

  12. Porphyrins as Templates for Site-Selective Atomic Layer Deposition: Vapor Metalation and in Situ Monitoring of Island Growth.

    PubMed

    Avila, Jason R; Emery, Jonathan D; Pellin, Michael J; Martinson, Alex B F; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2016-08-10

    Examinations of enzymatic catalysts suggest one key to efficient catalytic activity is discrete size metallo clusters. Mimicking enzymatic cluster systems is synthetically challenging because conventional solution methods are prone to aggregation or require capping of the cluster, thereby limiting its catalytic activity. We introduce site-selective atomic layer deposition (ALD) on porphyrins as an alternative approach to grow isolated metal oxide islands that are spatially separated. Surface-bound tetra-acid free base porphyrins (H2TCPP) may be metalated with Mn using conventional ALD precursor exposure to induce homogeneous hydroxide synthetic handles which acts as a nucleation point for subsequent ALD MnO island growth. Analytical fitting of in situ QCM mass uptake reveals island growth to be hemispherical with a convergence radius of 1.74 nm. This growth mode is confirmed with synchrotron grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) measurements. Finally, we extend this approach to other ALD chemistries to demonstrate the generality of this route to discrete metallo island materials. PMID:27454741

  13. Secondary growth mechanism of SiGe islands deposited on a mixed-phase microcrystalline Si by ion beam co-sputtering.

    PubMed

    Ke, S Y; Yang, J; Qiu, F; Wang, Z Q; Wang, C; Yang, Y

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the SiGe island co-sputtering deposition on a microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si) buffer layer and the secondary island growth based on this pre-SiGe island layer. The growth phenomenon of SiGe islands on crystalline silicon (c-Si) is also investigated for comparison. The pre-SiGe layer grown on μc-Si exhibits a mixed-phase structure, including SiGe islands and amorphous SiGe (a-SiGe) alloy, while the layer deposited on c-Si shows a single-phase island structure. The preferential growth and Ostwald ripening growth are shown to be the secondary growth mechanism of SiGe islands on μc-Si and c-Si, respectively. This difference may result from the effect of amorphous phase Si (AP-Si) in μc-Si on the island growth. In addition, the Si-Ge intermixing behavior of the secondary-grown islands on μc-Si is interpreted by constructing the model of lateral atomic migration, while this behavior on c-Si is ascribed to traditional uphill atomic diffusion. It is found that the aspect ratios of the preferential-grown super islands are higher than those of the Ostwald-ripening ones. The lower lateral growth rate of super islands due to the lower surface energy of AP-Si on the μc-Si buffer layer for the non-wetting of Ge at 700 °C and the stronger Si-Ge intermixing effect at 730 °C may be responsible for this aspect ratio difference.

  14. Clinical Applications of 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralbell, Raymond

    Although a significant improvement in cancer cure (i.e. 20% increment) has been obtained in the last 2-3 decades, 30-40% of patients still fail locally after curative radiotherapy. In order to improve local tumor control rates with radiotherapy high doses to the tumor volume are frequently necessary. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) is used to denote a spectrum of radiation planning and delivery techniques that rely on three-dimensional imaging to define the target (tumor) and to distinguish it from normal tissues. Modern, high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques are needed in order to implement the goal of optimal tumor destruction delivering minimal dose to the non-target normal tissues. A better target definition is nowadays possible with contemporary imaging (computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography) and image registration technology. A highly precise dose distributions can be obtained with optimal 3-D CRT treatment delivery techniques such as stereotactic RT, intensity modulated RT (IMRT), or protontherapy (the latter allowing for in-depth conformation). Patient daily set-up repositioning and internal organ immobilization systems are necessary before considering to undertake any of the above mentioned high-precision treatment approaches. Prostate cancer, brain tumors, and base of skull malignancies are among the sites most benefitting of dose escalation approaches. Nevertheless, a significant dose reduction to the normal tissues in the vicinity of the irradiated tumor also achievable with optimal 3-D CRT may also be a major issue in the treatment of pediatric tumors in order to preserve growth, normal development, and to reduce the risk of developing radiation induced diseases such as cancer or endocrinologic disorders.

  15. Microbial metabolic exchange in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Watrous, Jeramie D; Phelan, Vanessa V; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Moree, Wilna J; Duggan, Brendan M; Alexandrov, Theodore; Dorrestein, Pieter C

    2013-01-01

    Mono- and multispecies microbial populations alter the chemistry of their surrounding environments during colony development thereby influencing multicellular behavior and interspecies interactions of neighboring microbes. Here we present a methodology that enables the creation of three-dimensional (3D) models of a microbial chemotype that can be correlated to the colony phenotype through multimodal imaging analysis. These models are generated by performing matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) on serial cross-sections of microbial colonies grown on 8 mm deep agar, registering data sets of each serial section in MATLAB to create a model, and then superimposing the model with a photograph of the colonies themselves. As proof-of-principle, 3D models were used to visualize metabolic exchange during microbial interactions between Bacillus subtilis and Streptomyces coelicolor, as well as, Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The resulting models were able to capture the depth profile of secreted metabolites within the agar medium and revealed properties of certain mass signals that were previously not observable using two-dimensional MALDI-TOF IMS. Most significantly, the 3D models were capable of mapping previously unobserved chemical distributions within the array of sub-surface hyphae of C. albicans and how this chemistry is altered by the presence of P. aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen known to alter virulence of C. albicans. It was determined that the presence of C. albicans triggered increased rhamnolipid production by P. aeruginosa, which in turn was capable of inhibiting embedded hyphal growth produced beneath the C. albicans colony at ambient temperature. PMID:23283018

  16. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  17. 3D printing of microscopic bacterial communities

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Jodi L.; Ritschdorff, Eric T.; Whiteley, Marvin; Shear, Jason B.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria communicate via short-range physical and chemical signals, interactions known to mediate quorum sensing, sporulation, and other adaptive phenotypes. Although most in vitro studies examine bacterial properties averaged over large populations, the levels of key molecular determinants of bacterial fitness and pathogenicity (e.g., oxygen, quorum-sensing signals) may vary over micrometer scales within small, dense cellular aggregates believed to play key roles in disease transmission. A detailed understanding of how cell–cell interactions contribute to pathogenicity in natural, complex environments will require a new level of control in constructing more relevant cellular models for assessing bacterial phenotypes. Here, we describe a microscopic three-dimensional (3D) printing strategy that enables multiple populations of bacteria to be organized within essentially any 3D geometry, including adjacent, nested, and free-floating colonies. In this laser-based lithographic technique, microscopic containers are formed around selected bacteria suspended in gelatin via focal cross-linking of polypeptide molecules. After excess reagent is removed, trapped bacteria are localized within sealed cavities formed by the cross-linked gelatin, a highly porous material that supports rapid growth of fully enclosed cellular populations and readily transmits numerous biologically active species, including polypeptides, antibiotics, and quorum-sensing signals. Using this approach, we show that a picoliter-volume aggregate of Staphylococcus aureus can display substantial resistance to β-lactam antibiotics by enclosure within a shell composed of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:24101503

  18. NIF Ignition Target 3D Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O; Marinak, M; Milovich, J; Callahan, D

    2008-11-05

    We have developed an input file for running 3D NIF hohlraums that is optimized such that it can be run in 1-2 days on parallel computers. We have incorporated increasing levels of automation into the 3D input file: (1) Configuration controlled input files; (2) Common file for 2D and 3D, different types of capsules (symcap, etc.); and (3) Can obtain target dimensions, laser pulse, and diagnostics settings automatically from NIF Campaign Management Tool. Using 3D Hydra calculations to investigate different problems: (1) Intrinsic 3D asymmetry; (2) Tolerance to nonideal 3D effects (e.g. laser power balance, pointing errors); and (3) Synthetic diagnostics.

  19. 3D Kitaev spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Maria

    The Kitaev honeycomb model has become one of the archetypal spin models exhibiting topological phases of matter, where the magnetic moments fractionalize into Majorana fermions interacting with a Z2 gauge field. In this talk, we discuss generalizations of this model to three-dimensional lattice structures. Our main focus is the metallic state that the emergent Majorana fermions form. In particular, we discuss the relation of the nature of this Majorana metal to the details of the underlying lattice structure. Besides (almost) conventional metals with a Majorana Fermi surface, one also finds various realizations of Dirac semi-metals, where the gapless modes form Fermi lines or even Weyl nodes. We introduce a general classification of these gapless quantum spin liquids using projective symmetry analysis. Furthermore, we briefly outline why these Majorana metals in 3D Kitaev systems provide an even richer variety of Dirac and Weyl phases than possible for electronic matter and comment on possible experimental signatures. Work done in collaboration with Kevin O'Brien and Simon Trebst.

  20. Locomotive wheel 3D reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xin; Luo, Zhisheng; Gao, Xiaorong; Wu, Jianle

    2010-08-01

    In the article, a system, which is used to reconstruct locomotive wheels, is described, helping workers detect the condition of a wheel through a direct view. The system consists of a line laser, a 2D camera, and a computer. We use 2D camera to capture the line-laser light reflected by the object, a wheel, and then compute the final coordinates of the structured light. Finally, using Matlab programming language, we transform the coordinate of points to a smooth surface and illustrate the 3D view of the wheel. The article also proposes the system structure, processing steps and methods, and sets up an experimental platform to verify the design proposal. We verify the feasibility of the whole process, and analyze the results comparing to standard date. The test results show that this system can work well, and has a high accuracy on the reconstruction. And because there is still no such application working in railway industries, so that it has practical value in railway inspection system.

  1. 3D ultrafast laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, A.; Goda, K.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2013-03-01

    Laser scanners are essential for scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and medical practice. Unfortunately, often times the speed of conventional laser scanners (e.g., galvanometric mirrors and acousto-optic deflectors) falls short for many applications, resulting in motion blur and failure to capture fast transient information. Here, we present a novel type of laser scanner that offers roughly three orders of magnitude higher scan rates than conventional methods. Our laser scanner, which we refer to as the hybrid dispersion laser scanner, performs inertia-free laser scanning by dispersing a train of broadband pulses both temporally and spatially. More specifically, each broadband pulse is temporally processed by time stretch dispersive Fourier transform and further dispersed into space by one or more diffractive elements such as prisms and gratings. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we perform 1D line scans at a record high scan rate of 91 MHz and 2D raster scans and 3D volumetric scans at an unprecedented scan rate of 105 kHz. The method holds promise for a broad range of scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. To show the utility of our method, we demonstrate imaging, nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry, and high-precision flow cytometry with real-time throughput that conventional laser scanners cannot offer due to their low scan rates.

  2. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  3. Application areas of 3D bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Ozbolat, Ibrahim T; Peng, Weijie; Ozbolat, Veli

    2016-08-01

    Three dimensional (3D) bioprinting has been a powerful tool in patterning and precisely placing biologics, including living cells, nucleic acids, drug particles, proteins and growth factors, to recapitulate tissue anatomy, biology and physiology. Since the first time of cytoscribing cells demonstrated in 1986, bioprinting has made a substantial leap forward, particularly in the past 10 years, and it has been widely used in fabrication of living tissues for various application areas. The technology has been recently commercialized by several emerging businesses, and bioprinters and bioprinted tissues have gained significant interest in medicine and pharmaceutics. This Keynote review presents the bioprinting technology and covers a first-time comprehensive overview of its application areas from tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to pharmaceutics and cancer research. PMID:27086009

  4. Endogenous growth of a Miocene submarine dacite cryptodome, Rebun Island, Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Yoshihiko; McPhie, Jocelyn

    1998-09-01

    Momo-iwa, Rebun Island, Hokkaido, Japan, is a dacite cryptodome 200-300 m across and 190 m high. The dome is inferred to have intruded wet, poorly consolidated sediment in a shallow marine environment. The internal structure of the dome is concentric, with a massive core, banded rim, and narrow brecciated border, all of which are composed of compositionally uniform feldspar-phyric dacite. Boundaries between each of the zones are distinct but gradational. The massive core consists of homogeneous coherent (unfractured) dacite and is characterized by radial columnar joints 60-200 cm across. The banded rim encircles the massive core and is 40 m wide. It is characterized by large-scale flow banding parallel to the dome surface. The flow banding comprises alternating partly crystalline and more glassy bands 80-150 cm thick. The outermost brecciated border is up to 80 cm thick, and consists of in situ breccia and blocky peperite. The in situ breccia comprises polyhedral dacite clasts 5-20 cm across and a cogenetic granular matrix. The blocky peperite consists of polyhedral dacite clasts 0.5-2 cm across separated by the host sediment (mudstone). The internal structures of the dome suggest endogenous growth involving a continuous magma supply during a single intrusive phase and simple expansion from the interior. Although much larger, the internal structures of Momo-iwa closely resemble those of lobes in subaqueous felsic lobe-hyaloclastite lavas.

  5. 2D/3D electron temperature fluctuations near explosive MHD instabilities accompanied by minor and major disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. J.; Park, H. K.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Lee, K. D.; Ko, W.-H.; Park, Y.-S.; Park, B. H.; In, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Minor and major disruptions by explosive MHD instabilities were observed with the novel quasi 3D electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) system in the KSTAR plasma. The fine electron temperature (T e) fluctuation images revealed two types of minor disruptions: a small minor disruption is a q∼ 2 localized fast transport event due to a single m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth, while a large minor disruption is partial collapse of the q≤slant 2 region with two successive fast heat transport events by the correlated m/n  =  2/1 and m/n  =  1/1 instabilities. The m/n  =  2/1 magnetic island growth during the minor disruption is normally limited below the saturation width. However, as the additional interchange-like perturbation grows near the inner separatrix of the 2/1 island, the 2/1 island can expand beyond the limit through coupling with the cold bubble formed by the interchange-like perturbation.

  6. Forward ramp in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder's forward rover ramp can be seen successfully unfurled in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This ramp was not used for the deployment of the microrover Sojourner, which occurred at the end of Sol 2. When this image was taken, Sojourner was still latched to one of the lander's petals, waiting for the command sequence that would execute its descent off of the lander's petal.

    The image helped Pathfinder scientists determine whether to deploy the rover using the forward or backward ramps and the nature of the first rover traverse. The metallic object at the lower left of the image is the lander's low-gain antenna. The square at the end of the ramp is one of the spacecraft's magnetic targets. Dust that accumulates on the magnetic targets will later be examined by Sojourner's Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer instrument for chemical analysis. At right, a lander petal is visible.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  7. 3D grain boundary migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. K.; Bons, P. D.

    2009-04-01

    Microstructures of rocks play an important role in determining rheological properties and help to reveal the processes that lead to their formation. Some of these processes change the microstructure significantly and may thus have the opposite effect in obliterating any fabrics indicative of the previous history of the rocks. One of these processes is grain boundary migration (GBM). During static recrystallisation, GBM may produce a foam texture that completely overprints a pre-existing grain boundary network and GBM actively influences the rheology of a rock, via its influence on grain size and lattice defect concentration. We here present a new numerical simulation software that is capable of simulating a whole range of processes on the grain scale (it is not limited to grain boundary migration). The software is polyhedron-based, meaning that each grain (or phase) is represented by a polyhedron that has discrete boundaries. The boundary (the shell) of the polyhedron is defined by a set of facets which in turn is defined by a set of vertices. Each structural entity (polyhedron, facets and vertices) can have an unlimited number of parameters (depending on the process to be modeled) such as surface energy, concentration, etc. which can be used to calculate changes of the microstructre. We use the processes of grain boundary migration of a "regular" and a partially molten rock to demonstrate the software. Since this software is 3D, the formation of melt networks in a partially molten rock can also be studied. The interconnected melt network is of fundamental importance for melt segregation and migration in the crust and mantle and can help to understand the core-mantle differentiation of large terrestrial planets.

  8. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  9. Imaging a Sustainable Future in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.; Kanngieser, E.

    2012-07-01

    It is the intention of this paper, to contribute to a sustainable future by providing objective object information based on 3D photography as well as promoting 3D photography not only for scientists, but also for amateurs. Due to the presentation of this article by CIPA Task Group 3 on "3D Photographs in Cultural Heritage", the presented samples are masterpieces of historic as well as of current 3D photography concentrating on cultural heritage. In addition to a report on exemplarily access to international archives of 3D photographs, samples for new 3D photographs taken with modern 3D cameras, as well as by means of a ground based high resolution XLITE staff camera and also 3D photographs taken from a captive balloon and the use of civil drone platforms are dealt with. To advise on optimum suited 3D methodology, as well as to catch new trends in 3D, an updated synoptic overview of the 3D visualization technology, even claiming completeness, has been carried out as a result of a systematic survey. In this respect, e.g., today's lasered crystals might be "early bird" products in 3D, which, due to lack in resolution, contrast and color, remember to the stage of the invention of photography.

  10. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology.

  11. Beowulf 3D: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Rob

    2008-02-01

    This paper discusses the creative and technical challenges encountered during the production of "Beowulf 3D," director Robert Zemeckis' adaptation of the Old English epic poem and the first film to be simultaneously released in IMAX 3D and digital 3D formats.

  12. Teaching Geography with 3-D Visualization Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthamatten, Peter; Ziegler, Susy S.

    2006-01-01

    Technology that helps students view images in three dimensions (3-D) can support a broad range of learning styles. "Geo-Wall systems" are visualization tools that allow scientists, teachers, and students to project stereographic images and view them in 3-D. We developed and presented 3-D visualization exercises in several undergraduate courses.…

  13. Expanding Geometry Understanding with 3D Printing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Jill A.; Cochran, Zane; Laney, Kendra; Dean, Mandi

    2016-01-01

    With the rise of personal desktop 3D printing, a wide spectrum of educational opportunities has become available for educators to leverage this technology in their classrooms. Until recently, the ability to create physical 3D models was well beyond the scope, skill, and budget of many schools. However, since desktop 3D printers have become readily…

  14. 3D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    1998-09-23

    E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output.

  15. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  16. Tissue in Cube: In Vitro 3D Culturing Platform with Hybrid Gel Cubes for Multidirectional Observations.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Masaya; Kawahara, Tomohiro; Nobata, Rina

    2016-07-01

    An in vitro 3D culturing platform enabling multidirectional observations of 3D biosamples is presented. The 3D structure of biosamples can be recognized without fluorescence. The cubic platform employs two types of hydrogels that are compatible with conventional culture dishes or well plates, facilitating growth in culture, ease of handling, and viewing at multiple angles. PMID:27128576

  17. Tissue in Cube: In Vitro 3D Culturing Platform with Hybrid Gel Cubes for Multidirectional Observations.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Masaya; Kawahara, Tomohiro; Nobata, Rina

    2016-07-01

    An in vitro 3D culturing platform enabling multidirectional observations of 3D biosamples is presented. The 3D structure of biosamples can be recognized without fluorescence. The cubic platform employs two types of hydrogels that are compatible with conventional culture dishes or well plates, facilitating growth in culture, ease of handling, and viewing at multiple angles.

  18. 3-D Perspective Pasadena, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This perspective view shows the western part of the city of Pasadena, California, looking north towards the San Gabriel Mountains. Portions of the cities of Altadena and La Canada, Flintridge are also shown. The image was created from three datasets: the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) supplied the elevation data; Landsat data from November 11, 1986 provided the land surface color (not the sky) and U.S. Geological Survey digital aerial photography provides the image detail. The Rose Bowl, surrounded by a golf course, is the circular feature at the bottom center of the image. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is the cluster of large buildings north of the Rose Bowl at the base of the mountains. A large landfill, Scholl Canyon, is the smooth area in the lower left corner of the scene. This image shows the power of combining data from different sources to create planning tools to study problems that affect large urban areas. In addition to the well-known earthquake hazards, Southern California is affected by a natural cycle of fire and mudflows. Wildfires strip the mountains of vegetation, increasing the hazards from flooding and mudflows for several years afterwards. Data such as shown on this image can be used to predict both how wildfires will spread over the terrain and also how mudflows will be channeled down the canyons. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission was designed to collect three dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency

  19. Geochronology and subsurface stratigraphy of Pukapuka and Rakahanga atolls, Cook Islands: Late Quaternary reef growth and sea level history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, S.C.; Hein, J.R.; Hausmann, R.; Radtke, U.

    1992-01-01

    Eustatic sea-level cycles superposed on thermal subsidence of an atoll produce layers of high sea-level reefs separated by erosional unconformities. Coral samples from these reefs from cores drilled to 50 m beneath the lagoons of Pukapuka and Rakahanga atolls, northern Cook Islands give electron spin resonance (ESR) and U-series ages ranging from the Holocene to 600,000 yr B.P. Subgroups of these ages and the stratigraphic position of their bounding unconformities define at least 5 periods of reef growth and high sea-level (0-9000 yr B.P., 125,000-180,000 yr B.P., 180,000-230,000 yr B.P., 300,000-460,000 yr B.P., 460,000-650,000 yr B.P.). Only two ages fall within error of the last interglacial high sea-level stand (???125,000-135,000 yr B.P.). This paucity of ages may result from extensive erosion of the last intergracial reef. In addition, post-depositional isotope exchange may have altered the time ages of three coral samples to apparent ages that fall within glacial stage 6. For the record to be preserved, vertical accretion during rising sea-level must compensate for surface lowering from erosion during sea-level lowstands and subsidence of the atoll; erosion rates (6-63 cm/1000 yr) can therefore be calculated from reef accretion rates (100-400 cm/1000 yr), subsidence rates (2-6 cm/1000 yr), and the duration of island submergence (8-15% of the last 600,000 yr). The stratigraphy of coral ages indicates island subsidence rates of 4.5 ?? 2.8 cm/1000 yr for both islands. A model of reef growth and erosion based on the stratigraphy of the Cook Islands atolls suggests average subsidence and erosion rates of between 3-6 and 15-20 cm/1000 yr, respectively. ?? 1992.

  20. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  1. RELAP5-3D User Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Riemke, Richard Allan

    2002-09-01

    The Reactor Excursion and Leak Analysis Program with 3D capability1 (RELAP5-3D) is a reactor system analysis code that has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The 3D capability in RELAP5-3D includes 3D hydrodynamics2 and 3D neutron kinetics3,4. Assessment, verification, and validation of the 3D capability in RELAP5-3D is discussed in the literature5,6,7,8,9,10. Additional assessment, verification, and validation of the 3D capability of RELAP5-3D will be presented in other papers in this users seminar. As with any software, user problems occur. User problems usually fall into the categories of input processing failure, code execution failure, restart/renodalization failure, unphysical result, and installation. This presentation will discuss some of the more generic user problems that have been reported on RELAP5-3D as well as their resolution.

  2. 3D laptop for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Richard; Chenault, David

    2012-06-01

    Polaris Sensor Technologies has developed numerous 3D display systems using a US Army patented approach. These displays have been developed as prototypes for handheld controllers for robotic systems and closed hatch driving, and as part of a TALON robot upgrade for 3D vision, providing depth perception for the operator for improved manipulation and hazard avoidance. In this paper we discuss the prototype rugged 3D laptop computer and its applications to defense missions. The prototype 3D laptop combines full temporal and spatial resolution display with the rugged Amrel laptop computer. The display is viewed through protective passive polarized eyewear, and allows combined 2D and 3D content. Uses include robot tele-operation with live 3D video or synthetically rendered scenery, mission planning and rehearsal, enhanced 3D data interpretation, and simulation.

  3. Mechanism for persistent hexagonal island formation in AlN buffer layer during growth on Si (111) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, K.-Y.; Chung, H.-C.; Liu, C.-P.; Tu, L.-W.

    2007-05-21

    The characteristics of structure and morphology of AlN grown by a growth interruption method on Si (111) with plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy are investigated. It is found that the growth interruption method would improve the surface flatness of the AlN layer without the formation of Al droplets. However, AlN hexagonal islands were present and persistent throughout the entire growth owing to effective strain relaxation and Eherlich-Schowebel barrier effect of preexistent surface islands grown on higher terraces of the Si substrate. The density of threading dislocations underneath the hexagonal islands is much less than elsewhere in the film, which is presumably due to dislocation annihilation during the island growth process.

  4. 3D moviemap and a 3D panorama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naimark, Michael

    1997-05-01

    Two immersive virtual environments produced as art installations investigate 'sense of place' in different but complimentary ways. One is a stereoscopic moviemap, the other a stereoscopic panorama. Moviemaps are interactive systems which allow 'travel' along pre-recorded routes with some control over speed and direction. Panoramas are 360 degree visual representations dating back to the late 18th century but which have recently experienced renewed interest due to 'virtual reality' systems. Moviemaps allow 'moving around' while panoramas allow 'looking around,' but to date there has been little or no attempt to produce either in stereo from camera-based material. 'See Banff stereoscopic moviemap about landscape, tourism, and growth in the Canadian Rocky Mountains. It was filmed with twin 16 mm cameras and displayed as a single-user experience housed in a cabinet resembling a century-old kinetoscope, with a crank on the side for 'moving through' the material. 'Be Now Here (Welcome to the Neighborhood)' (1995-6) is a stereoscopic panorama filmed in public gathering places around the world, based upon the UNESCO World Heritage 'In Danger' list. It was filmed with twin 35 mm motion picture cameras on a rotating tripod and displayed using a synchronized rotating floor.

  5. Island-size distribution and capture numbers in three-dimensional [corrected] nucleation: dependence on island morphology.

    PubMed

    Royston, John; Amar, Jacques G

    2009-10-01

    The scaling of the monomer and island densities, island-size distribution (ISD), and capture-number distribution (CND) as a function of the fraction of occupied sites (coverage) and ratio D(h)/F of the monomer hopping rate D(h) to the (per site) monomer creation rate F are studied for the case of irreversible nucleation and growth of fractal islands in three dimensions (d=3) . We note that our model is a three-dimensional analog of submonolayer growth in the absence of island relaxation and may also be viewed as a simplified model of the early stages of vacancy cluster nucleation and growth under irradiation. In contrast to results previously obtained for point-islands in d=3 , for which mean-field behavior corresponding to a CND which is independent of island size was observed, our results indicate that for fractal islands the scaled CND increases approximately linearly with island size in the asymptotic limit of large D(h)/F . In addition, while the peak height of the scaled ISD for fractal islands appears to diverge with increasing D(h)/F , the dependence on D(h)/F is much weaker than for point-islands in d=3 . The results of a self-consistent rate-equation calculation for the coverage and D(h)/F dependence of the average island and monomer densities are also presented and good agreement with simulation results is obtained. For the case of point-islands, the value of the exponent chi describing the D(h)/F dependence of the island density at fixed coverage, e.g., N(sat) approximately (D(h)/F)-chi , is in good agreement with the value (chi=1/3) expected for irreversible growth. However, for both compact and fractal islands in d=3 , our results indicate that the value of chi (chi approximately 0.42) is significantly larger. In order to explain this behavior, an analytical expression [e.g., chi=d(f)/(3d(f)-2) ] for the dependence of chi on island fractal dimension d(f) in d=3 is derived and found to give reasonable agreement with our simulation and rate

  6. Copper vapor-assisted growth of hexagonal graphene domains on silica islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Shen, Chengmin; Que, Yande; Tian, Yuan; Jiang, Lili; Bao, Deliang; Wang, Yeliang; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Silica (SiO2) islands with a dendritic structure were prepared on polycrystalline copper foil, using silane (SiH4) as a precursor, by annealing at high temperature. Assisted by copper vapor from bare sections of the foil, single-layer hexagonal graphene domains were grown directly on the SiO2 islands by chemical vapor deposition. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectra, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirm that hexagonal graphene domains, each measuring several microns, were synthesized on the silica islands.

  7. In situ x-ray scattering study on the evolution of Ge island morphology and relaxation for low growth rate: Advanced transition to superdomes

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, M.-I.; Holy, V.

    2009-07-15

    The kinetics of the growth of Ge superdomes and their facets on Si(001) surfaces are analyzed as a function of deposited Ge thickness for different growth temperatures and at a low growth rate by in situ grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering in combination with in situ grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. At a low growth rate, intermixing is found to be enhanced and superdomes are formed already at lower coverages than previously reported. In addition, we observe that at the dome-to-superdome transition, a large amount of material is transferred into dislocated islands, either by dome coalescence or by anomalous coarsening. Once dislocated islands are formed, island coalescence is a rare event and introduction of dislocations is preferred. The superdome growth is thus stabilized by the insertion of dislocations during growth.

  8. 3-D Technology Approaches for Biological Ecologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Austin, Robert; U. S-China Physical-Oncology Sciences Alliance (PS-OA) Team

    Constructing three dimensional (3-D) landscapes is an inevitable issue in deep study of biological ecologies, because in whatever scales in nature, all of the ecosystems are composed by complex 3-D environments and biological behaviors. Just imagine if a 3-D technology could help complex ecosystems be built easily and mimic in vivo microenvironment realistically with flexible environmental controls, it will be a fantastic and powerful thrust to assist researchers for explorations. For years, we have been utilizing and developing different technologies for constructing 3-D micro landscapes for biophysics studies in in vitro. Here, I will review our past efforts, including probing cancer cell invasiveness with 3-D silicon based Tepuis, constructing 3-D microenvironment for cell invasion and metastasis through polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) soft lithography, as well as explorations of optimized stenting positions for coronary bifurcation disease with 3-D wax printing and the latest home designed 3-D bio-printer. Although 3-D technologies is currently considered not mature enough for arbitrary 3-D micro-ecological models with easy design and fabrication, I hope through my talk, the audiences will be able to sense its significance and predictable breakthroughs in the near future. This work was supported by the State Key Development Program for Basic Research of China (Grant No. 2013CB837200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474345) and the Beijing Natural Science Foundation (Grant No. 7154221).

  9. Automatic 3D video format detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Zhe; Zhai, Jiefu; Doyen, Didier

    2011-03-01

    Many 3D formats exist and will probably co-exist for a long time even if 3D standards are today under definition. The support for multiple 3D formats will be important for bringing 3D into home. In this paper, we propose a novel and effective method to detect whether a video is a 3D video or not, and to further identify the exact 3D format. First, we present how to detect those 3D formats that encode a pair of stereo images into a single image. The proposed method detects features and establishes correspondences between features in the left and right view images, and applies the statistics from the distribution of the positional differences between corresponding features to detect the existence of a 3D format and to identify the format. Second, we present how to detect the frame sequential 3D format. In the frame sequential 3D format, the feature points are oscillating from frame to frame. Similarly, the proposed method tracks feature points over consecutive frames, computes the positional differences between features, and makes a detection decision based on whether the features are oscillating. Experiments show the effectiveness of our method.

  10. Crustal growth of oceanic island arc inferred from seismic structure of Mariana arc-backarc system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Kodaira, S.; Ito, A.; Klemperer, S. L.; Kaneda, Y.; Suyehiro, K.

    2004-12-01

    The Izu-Ogasawara-Marina arc (IBM arc) is one of the typical oceanic island arcs and it has developed repeating magmatic arc volcanisms and backarc spreading since Eocene. Because tectonics of the IBM arc is relatively simple and does not include collisions between the arc and a continent, it is one of best targets to research crustal growth. In 2003, wide-angle seismic survey using 106 ocean bottom seismographs had been carried out as a part of Margin program in collaboration between US and Japan in Mariana region. The seismic line runs from a serpentine diaper near the trench to Parece Vela basin through the Mariana arc, the Marina trough and the West Mariana ridge. We present the characteristics of the seismic structure of the Mariana arc-backarc system and discuss the crustal growth process by comparison with a structure of the northern Izu-Ogasawara arc. Main structural characteristics of the Mariana arc-backarc system are (1) variation of the crustal thickness (Mariana arc: 20 km, West Mariana ridge: 17 km, Mariana trough and Parece Vela basin: 6 km), (2) distribution of an andesitic middle crust with about P-wave velocity of 6 km/s, (3) variation of P-wave velocity in the middle crust (4) velocity anomalies of the lower crust in transition area between the arc and the backarc, (5) thickening of the lower crust under the Mariana trough axis and (6) slow mantle velocities under the Mariana arc, Mariana trough axis and the West Mariana ridge. Above characteristics from (1) to (4) are common to the seismic structure of the northern Izu-Ogasawara arc. In particular, the vertical P-wave velocity gradients of the middle crust under the forearc in both regions tend to become large rather than those under the arc. Main differences of seismic structures between both regions are the velocity gradients and an existence of a thin transition layer between the middle and lower crust. These differences and similarities of the velocity gradient might originate the age and

  11. RT3D tutorials for GMS users

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, T.P.; Jones, N.L.

    1998-02-01

    RT3D (Reactive Transport in 3-Dimensions) is a computer code that solves coupled partial differential equations that describe reactive-flow and transport of multiple mobile and/or immobile species in a three dimensional saturated porous media. RT3D was developed from the single-species transport code, MT3D (DoD-1.5, 1997 version). As with MT3D, RT3D also uses the USGS groundwater flow model MODFLOW for computing spatial and temporal variations in groundwater head distribution. This report presents a set of tutorial problems that are designed to illustrate how RT3D simulations can be performed within the Department of Defense Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). GMS serves as a pre- and post-processing interface for RT3D. GMS can be used to define all the input files needed by RT3D code, and later the code can be launched from within GMS and run as a separate application. Once the RT3D simulation is completed, the solution can be imported to GMS for graphical post-processing. RT3D v1.0 supports several reaction packages that can be used for simulating different types of reactive contaminants. Each of the tutorials, described below, provides training on a different RT3D reaction package. Each reaction package has different input requirements, and the tutorials are designed to describe these differences. Furthermore, the tutorials illustrate the various options available in GMS for graphical post-processing of RT3D results. Users are strongly encouraged to complete the tutorials before attempting to use RT3D and GMS on a routine basis.

  12. Web 3D for Public, Environmental and Occupational Health: Early Examples from Second Life®

    PubMed Central

    Kamel Boulos, Maged N.; Ramloll, Rameshsharma; Jones, Ray; Toth-Cohen, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Over the past three years (2006–2008), the medical/health and public health communities have shown a growing interest in using online 3D virtual worlds like Second Life® (http://secondlife.com/) for health education, community outreach, training and simulations purposes. 3D virtual worlds are seen as the precursors of ‘Web 3D’, the next major iteration of the Internet that will follow in the coming years. This paper provides a tour of several flagship Web 3D experiences in Second Life®, including Play2Train Islands (emergency preparedness training), the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention—CDC Island (public health), Karuna Island (AIDS support and information), Tox Town at Virtual NLM Island (US National Library of Medicine - environmental health), and Jefferson’s Occupational Therapy Center. We also discuss the potential and future of Web 3D. These are still early days of 3D virtual worlds, and there are still many more untapped potentials and affordances of 3D virtual worlds that are yet to be explored, as the technology matures further and improves over the coming months and years. PMID:19190358

  13. Enhanced lithium ion battery cycling of silicon nanowire anodes by template growth to eliminate silicon underlayer islands.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jeong-Hyun; Picraux, S Tom

    2013-01-01

    It is well-known that one-dimensional nanostructures reduce pulverization of silicon (Si)-based anode materials during Li ion cycling because they allow lateral relaxation. However, even with improved designs, Si nanowire-based structures still exhibit limited cycling stability for extended numbers of cycles, with the specific capacity retention with cycling not showing significant improvements over commercial carbon-based anode materials. We have found that one important reason for the lack of long cycling stability can be the presence of milli- and microscale Si islands which typically form under nanowire arrays during their growth. Stress buildup in these Si island underlayers with cycling results in cracking, and the loss of specific capacity for Si nanowire anodes, due to progressive loss of contact with current collectors. We show that the formation of these parasitic Si islands for Si nanowires grown directly on metal current collectors can be avoided by growth through anodized aluminum oxide templates containing a high density of sub-100 nm nanopores. Using this template approach we demonstrate significantly enhanced cycling stability for Si nanowire-based lithium-ion battery anodes, with retentions of more than ~1000 mA·h/g discharge capacity over 1100 cycles.

  14. The effects of 3-D shaping on ITG stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rorvig, Mordechai; Hegna, Chris

    2012-03-01

    In this work we seek to understand how 3-D shaping can be used to improve ion temperature gradient stability. Part of the difficulty in deducing the role of 3-D shaping is the generation of 3-D MHD equilibria necessary for the calculations. In this work, MHD equilibrium surfaces are generated using local 3-D magnetostatic equilibrium theory [1]. We distinguish three different types of toroidal magnetic surface shaping: axisymmetric shaping, toroidal rotation of the cross section, and toroidal translation of the magnetic axis. We study these types of shaping independently and in combination to look for improvements. Linear growth rates for ITG modes are calculated using the gyrokinetics code GENE [2]. The geometric interface package GIST [3] accepts the equilibrium input data from the local equilibrium calculation. Growth rates for both axisymmetric and 3-D equilibrium calculations are presented. [4pt] [1] C. C. Hegna, Physics of Plasmas 7, 3921 (2000).[0pt] [2] F. Jenko, W. Dorland, M. Kotschenreuther, and B. N. Rogers, Physical Review Letters 7, 1904 (2000).[0pt] [3] P. Xanthopoulos, W. A. Cooper, F. Jenko, Yu. Turkin, A. Runov, and J. Geiger, Physics of Plasmas 16, 082303 (2009).

  15. Diverse growth of Mn, In and Sn islands on thallium-passivated Si(1 1 1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvija, P.; Sobotík, P.; Ošťádal, I.; Kocán, P.

    2015-03-01

    Controlled growth of thin films on highly reactive silicon surfaces has been a challenge for decades. High density of surface dangling bonds, however, hinders the adsorbate diffusion and its self-organization. In our work, we propose a novel use of the Tl-(1 × 1) layer as a passivating agent, which highly enhances diffusion of adsorbates by saturating all dangling bonds of the Si substrate. We use room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy to study structures formed on the Si(1 1 1)/Tl - (1 × 1) surface after deposition of submonolayer amounts of three elemental adsorbates: Mn, In and Sn. As a result, three significantly different surface structures are observed. Manganese atoms aggregate to stable dendritic islands nucleated on Si steps. Indium islands are compact and unstable during observation. Unlike Mn and In, Sn atoms intermix with Tl atoms and arrange into an array of triangular objects. The growth kinetics of the three deposited metals on the Tl - (1 × 1) layer is discussed and compared with the kinetics observed in previously studied systems. The comparison shows that the growth of the layers adsorbed on the Tl-passivated surface is similar to the growth of the adsorbate layers on less reactive metal surfaces.

  16. Long-term monitoring of growth in the Eastern Elliptio, Elliptio complanata (Bivalvia: Unionidae), in Rhode Island: A transplant experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kesler, D.H.; Newton, T.J.; Green, L.

    2007-01-01

    The lengths of marked specimens of the freshwater mussel, Eastern Elliptio (Elliptio complanata [Lightfoot 1786]), were monitored annually in 3 lakes in Rhode Island, USA, from 1991 to 2005. Mussels growing in Worden Pond showed a change in mean shell length of only 4.3 mm over 14 y, whereas mussel growth in 2 nearby lakes was 3 to 8x greater than growth in Worden Pond over the same time period. L???, the length at which shell growth stops, was significantly different (p < 0.001) among lakes and ranged from 60.5 to 87.4 mm. Transplant experiments revealed that mussels moved to Worden Pond stopped growing, whereas mussels moved from Worden Pond to the 2 other lakes grew at rates similar to the rates observed for resident mussels in the 2 lakes. Standard water-quality measures did not explain the observed growth cessation and lower condition indices of mussels in Worden Pond. Our growth data are consistent with food limitation. The consistent slow growth of E. complanata in Worden Pond, without high mortality, and its ability to increase growth when placed in environments more favorable than Worden Pond, suggests both growth plasticity and longevity in these animals. ?? 2007 by The North American Benthological Society.

  17. [Age and growth of the grunt, Haemulon steindachneri (Perciformis: Haemulidae), from the Southwest area of Margarita Island, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Morales, Misael; González, Leo W

    2010-03-01

    Studies on fish age and growth are essential to establish models on population dynamics. We determined age and growth of the grunt Haemulon steindachneri from the Southwest Margarita Island using sagita otoliths (direct method) and length frequency (indirect method). A total of 953 individuals were captured by the handcrafted fleet from Boca del Rio (Margarita Island) between July 2005 and June 2006. The length-weight relation was established and growth parameters from both curves (length and weight) were estimated using the von Bertalanffy model. The analysis of the annual rings in otoliths established four age groups, and group 3+ was the most representative, with 44.5% of the sample. The calculation of marginal increases of otoliths suggested the development of an annual ring in April, which coincides with the maximum reproduction period. There were no significant differences in the slopes of the curves b (ts=-1.81; p>0.05) and the intercepts a (ts=-1.17; p>0.05) of females and males. Length-weight for both sexes was W=0.0003*L(2.89), which indicates an alometric growth pattern. Growth parameters were established as: Linfinity=231 mm, Winfinity=203 g, k=0.569 year(-1) (direct method) and Linfinity=228 mm, Winfinity=195 g, k=0.580 year(-1) (indirect method), which suggests that it is a short life species that grows moderately rapidly. The index of growth phi prime (Ø') coefficient of variation (CV), showed similarity between the growth parameters obtained by both (direct and indirect) methods. The application of the indirect method is recommended, as well as the periodic analysis of population parameters. PMID:20411724

  18. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy study on the growth modes of GaSb islands grown on a semi-insulating GaAs (001) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. H.; Lee, J. Y.; Noh, Y. G.; Kim, M. D.; Oh, J. E.

    2007-06-01

    The initial growth behaviors of GaSb on a GaAs substrate were studied using a high-resolution electron microscope (HRTEM). Four types of GaSb islands were observed by HRTEM. HRTEM micrographs showed that strain relaxation mechanisms were different in the four types of islands. Although 90° misfit dislocations relieve misfit strain in the islands, additional mechanisms are required to relax the remaining strain. The existence of elastic deformation near the surface related to dislocations and intermediate layers between GaSb and GaAs were demonstrated in island growths. Finally, the generation of planar defects to relieve strain was observed in a specific GaSb growth.

  19. Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kent; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Aslan, Can

    2014-03-01

    3D printer applications in the biomedical sciences and medical imaging are expanding and will have an increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Orthopedic and reconstructive surgery has been an obvious area for development of 3D printer applications as the segmentation of bony anatomy to generate printable models is relatively straightforward. There are important issues that should be addressed when using 3D printed models for applications that may affect patient care; in particular the dimensional accuracy of the printed parts needs to be high to avoid poor decisions being made prior to surgery or therapeutic procedures. In this work, the dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebral bodies derived from CT data for a cadaver spine is compared with direct measurements on the ex-vivo vertebra and with measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra using commercial 3D image processing software. The vertebra was printed on a consumer grade 3D printer using an additive print process using PLA (polylactic acid) filament. Measurements were made for 15 different anatomic features of the vertebral body, including vertebral body height, endplate width and depth, pedicle height and width, and spinal canal width and depth, among others. It is shown that for the segmentation and printing process used, the results of measurements made on the 3D printed vertebral body are substantially the same as those produced by direct measurement on the vertebra and measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra.

  20. Stereo 3-D Vision in Teaching Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2012-03-01

    Stereo 3-D vision is a technology used to present images on a flat surface (screen, paper, etc.) and at the same time to create the notion of three-dimensional spatial perception of the viewed scene. A great number of physical processes are much better understood when viewed in stereo 3-D vision compared to standard flat 2-D presentation. The current paper describes the modern stereo 3-D technologies that are applicable to various tasks in teaching physics in schools, colleges, and universities. Examples of stereo 3-D simulations developed by the author can be observed on online.

  1. Software for 3D radiotherapy dosimetry. Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozicki, Marek; Maras, Piotr; Karwowski, Andrzej C.

    2014-08-01

    The subject of this work is polyGeVero® software (GeVero Co., Poland), which has been developed to fill the requirements of fast calculations of 3D dosimetry data with the emphasis on polymer gel dosimetry for radiotherapy. This software comprises four workspaces that have been prepared for: (i) calculating calibration curves and calibration equations, (ii) storing the calibration characteristics of the 3D dosimeters, (iii) calculating 3D dose distributions in irradiated 3D dosimeters, and (iv) comparing 3D dose distributions obtained from measurements with the aid of 3D dosimeters and calculated with the aid of treatment planning systems (TPSs). The main features and functions of the software are described in this work. Moreover, the core algorithms were validated and the results are presented. The validation was performed using the data of the new PABIGnx polymer gel dosimeter. The polyGeVero® software simplifies and greatly accelerates the calculations of raw 3D dosimetry data. It is an effective tool for fast verification of TPS-generated plans for tumor irradiation when combined with a 3D dosimeter. Consequently, the software may facilitate calculations by the 3D dosimetry community. In this work, the calibration characteristics of the PABIGnx obtained through four calibration methods: multi vial, cross beam, depth dose, and brachytherapy, are discussed as well.

  2. [3D reconstructions in radiotherapy planning].

    PubMed

    Schlegel, W

    1991-10-01

    3D Reconstructions from tomographic images are used in the planning of radiation therapy to study important anatomical structures such as the body surface, target volumes, and organs at risk. The reconstructed anatomical models are used to define the geometry of the radiation beams. In addition, 3D voxel models are used for the calculation of the 3D dose distributions with an accuracy, previously impossible to achieve. Further uses of 3D reconstructions are in the display and evaluation of 3D therapy plans, and in the transfer of treatment planning parameters to the irradiation situation with the help of digitally reconstructed radiographs. 3D tomographic imaging with subsequent 3D reconstruction must be regarded as a completely new basis for the planning of radiation therapy, enabling tumor-tailored radiation therapy of localized target volumes with increased radiation doses and improved sparing of organs at risk. 3D treatment planning is currently being evaluated in clinical trials in connection with the new treatment techniques of conformation radiotherapy. Early experience with 3D treatment planning shows that its clinical importance in radiotherapy is growing, but will only become a standard radiotherapy tool when volumetric CT scanning, reliable and user-friendly treatment planning software, and faster and cheaper PACS-integrated medical work stations are accessible to radiotherapists.

  3. FastScript3D - A Companion to Java 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Patti

    2005-01-01

    FastScript3D is a computer program, written in the Java 3D(TM) programming language, that establishes an alternative language that helps users who lack expertise in Java 3D to use Java 3D for constructing three-dimensional (3D)-appearing graphics. The FastScript3D language provides a set of simple, intuitive, one-line text-string commands for creating, controlling, and animating 3D models. The first word in a string is the name of a command; the rest of the string contains the data arguments for the command. The commands can also be used as an aid to learning Java 3D. Developers can extend the language by adding custom text-string commands. The commands can define new 3D objects or load representations of 3D objects from files in formats compatible with such other software systems as X3D. The text strings can be easily integrated into other languages. FastScript3D facilitates communication between scripting languages [which enable programming of hyper-text markup language (HTML) documents to interact with users] and Java 3D. The FastScript3D language can be extended and customized on both the scripting side and the Java 3D side.

  4. 3D PDF - a means of public access to geological 3D - objects, using the example of GTA3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaby, Mark-Fabian; Reimann, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    In geology, 3D modeling has become very important. In the past, two-dimensional data such as isolines, drilling profiles, or cross-sections based on those, were used to illustrate the subsurface geology, whereas now, we can create complex digital 3D models. These models are produced with special software, such as GOCAD ®. The models can be viewed, only through the software used to create them, or through viewers available for free. The platform-independent PDF (Portable Document Format), enforced by Adobe, has found a wide distribution. This format has constantly evolved over time. Meanwhile, it is possible to display CAD data in an Adobe 3D PDF file with the free Adobe Reader (version 7). In a 3D PDF, a 3D model is freely rotatable and can be assembled from a plurality of objects, which can thus be viewed from all directions on their own. In addition, it is possible to create moveable cross-sections (profiles), and to assign transparency to the objects. Based on industry-standard CAD software, 3D PDFs can be generated from a large number of formats, or even be exported directly from this software. In geoinformatics, different approaches to creating 3D PDFs exist. The intent of the Authority for Mining, Energy and Geology to allow free access to the models of the Geotectonic Atlas (GTA3D), could not be realized with standard software solutions. A specially designed code converts the 3D objects to VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language). VRML is one of the few formats that allow using image files (maps) as textures, and to represent colors and shapes correctly. The files were merged in Acrobat X Pro, and a 3D PDF was generated subsequently. A topographic map, a display of geographic directions and horizontal and vertical scales help to facilitate the use.

  5. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability.

  6. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  7. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  8. An aerial 3D printing test mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Michael; McGuire, Thomas; Parsons, Michael; Leake, Skye; Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of an aerial 3D printing technology, its development and its testing. This technology is potentially useful in its own right. In addition, this work advances the development of a related in-space 3D printing technology. A series of aerial 3D printing test missions, used to test the aerial printing technology, are discussed. Through completing these test missions, the design for an in-space 3D printer may be advanced. The current design for the in-space 3D printer involves focusing thermal energy to heat an extrusion head and allow for the extrusion of molten print material. Plastics can be used as well as composites including metal, allowing for the extrusion of conductive material. A variety of experiments will be used to test this initial 3D printer design. High altitude balloons will be used to test the effects of microgravity on 3D printing, as well as parabolic flight tests. Zero pressure balloons can be used to test the effect of long 3D printing missions subjected to low temperatures. Vacuum chambers will be used to test 3D printing in a vacuum environment. The results will be used to adapt a current prototype of an in-space 3D printer. Then, a small scale prototype can be sent into low-Earth orbit as a 3-U cube satellite. With the ability to 3D print in space demonstrated, future missions can launch production hardware through which the sustainability and durability of structures in space will be greatly improved.

  9. Finding Space in Second Life, NASA Education and Public Outreach in a 3D Metaverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireton, F. M.

    2007-12-01

    Second Life (SL) is a virtual 3D simulation or metaverse with almost eight million users worldwide. SL has seen explosive growth in the four years it has been available and hosts a number of educational and institutional "islands" or sims. Federal agencies with an SL presence include NASA and NOAA. There are several educational institutions and education specific sims in SL. At any one time there may be as many as 40,000 users on line. Users develop a persona and are seen on screen as a human figure or avatar. Avatars are able to move around the sim islands by walking or flying and move from island to island or remote locations by teleporting. While a big part of the Second Life experience deals with avatar interactions and exploring, there is an active community of builders who create the scenery, buildings, and other artifacts of the SL world including clothing and other personal items. SL builders start with basic shapes and through size manipulation on three axis and adding texture to the shapes create a myriad of objects - a 3D world. This paper will deal with the design and creation of exhibits halls for NASA's LRO/LCROSS mission slated for launch October 2008 and a NASA sponsored aeronautical engineering student challenge contest. The exhibit halls will be placed on the NASA sponsored Co-Lab sim and will feature models of the spacecraft and the instruments carried on board and student exhibits. There also will be storyboards with information about the mission and contest. Where appropriate there will be links to external websites for further information. The exhibits will be interactive to support the outreach efforts associated with the mission and the contest. Upon completion of the visit to the LRO/LCROSS hall participants will have the opportunity to visit a near by sandbox - SL parlance for a building area - to design and build a spacecraft from a suite of instruments provided for them depending on their area of interest. Real limitations such as mass

  10. Wow! 3D Content Awakens the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Dan

    2010-01-01

    From her first encounter with stereoscopic 3D technology designed for classroom instruction, Megan Timme, principal at Hamilton Park Pacesetter Magnet School in Dallas, sensed it could be transformative. Last spring, when she began pilot-testing 3D content in her third-, fourth- and fifth-grade classrooms, Timme wasn't disappointed. Students…

  11. 3D, or Not to Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norbury, Keith

    2012-01-01

    It may be too soon for students to be showing up for class with popcorn and gummy bears, but technology similar to that behind the 3D blockbuster movie "Avatar" is slowly finding its way into college classrooms. 3D classroom projectors are taking students on fantastic voyages inside the human body, to the ruins of ancient Greece--even to faraway…

  12. 3D Printed Block Copolymer Nanostructures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Turner, C. Heath; Rupar, Paul A.; Jenkins, Alexander H.; Bara, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of 3D printing has dramatically advanced the availability of tangible molecular and extended solid models. Interestingly, there are few nanostructure models available both commercially and through other do-it-yourself approaches such as 3D printing. This is unfortunate given the importance of nanotechnology in science today. In this…

  13. Immersive 3D Geovisualization in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philips, Andrea; Walz, Ariane; Bergner, Andreas; Graeff, Thomas; Heistermann, Maik; Kienzler, Sarah; Korup, Oliver; Lipp, Torsten; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Zeilinger, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate how immersive 3D geovisualization can be used in higher education. Based on MacEachren and Kraak's geovisualization cube, we examine the usage of immersive 3D geovisualization and its usefulness in a research-based learning module on flood risk, called GEOSimulator. Results of a survey among participating students…

  14. 3D elastic control for mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Hachet, Martin; Pouderoux, Joachim; Guitton, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    To increase the input space of mobile devices, the authors developed a proof-of-concept 3D elastic controller that easily adapts to mobile devices. This embedded device improves the completion of high-level interaction tasks such as visualization of large documents and navigation in 3D environments. It also opens new directions for tomorrow's mobile applications.

  15. Static & Dynamic Response of 3D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE3D is a large deformations 3D finite element code used to obtain the resulting displacements and stresses from multi-body static and dynamic structural thermo-mechanics problems with sliding interfaces. Many nonlinear and temperature dependent constitutive models are available.

  16. 3D Printing. What's the Harm?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Tyler S.; Roy, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Health concerns from 3D printing were first documented by Stephens, Azimi, Orch, and Ramos (2013), who found that commercially available 3D printers were producing hazardous levels of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when plastic materials were melted through the extruder. UFPs are particles less than 100 nanometers…

  17. 3D Printing of Molecular Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Adam; Olson, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Physical molecular models have played a valuable role in our understanding of the invisible nano-scale world. We discuss 3D printing and its use in producing models of the molecules of life. Complex biomolecular models, produced from 3D printed parts, can demonstrate characteristics of molecular structure and function, such as viral self-assembly,…

  18. A 3D Geostatistical Mapping Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, W. W.; Stevenson, Graig; Patel, Ketan; Wang, Jun

    1999-02-09

    This software provides accurate 3D reservoir modeling tools and high quality 3D graphics for PC platforms enabling engineers and geologists to better comprehend reservoirs and consequently improve their decisions. The mapping algorithms are fractals, kriging, sequential guassian simulation, and three nearest neighbor methods.

  19. Pathways for Learning from 3D Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrier, L. Mark; Rab, Saira S.; Rosen, Larry D.; Vasquez, Ludivina; Cheever, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if 3D stereoscopic presentation of information in a movie format changes a viewer's experience of the movie content. Four possible pathways from 3D presentation to memory and learning were considered: a direct connection based on cognitive neuroscience research; a connection through "immersion" in that 3D…

  20. Stereo 3-D Vision in Teaching Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabunov, Svetoslav

    2012-01-01

    Stereo 3-D vision is a technology used to present images on a flat surface (screen, paper, etc.) and at the same time to create the notion of three-dimensional spatial perception of the viewed scene. A great number of physical processes are much better understood when viewed in stereo 3-D vision compared to standard flat 2-D presentation. The…

  1. Direct evidence of strain transfer for InAs island growth on compliant Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Marçal, L. A. B.; Magalhães-Paniago, R.; Malachias, Angelo; Richard, M.-I.; Cavallo, F.; Lagally, M. G.; Schmidt, O. G.; Schülli, T. Ü.; Deneke, Ch.

    2015-04-13

    Semiconductor heteroepitaxy on top of thin compliant layers has been explored as a path to make inorganic electronics mechanically flexible as well as to integrate materials that cannot be grown directly on rigid substrates. Here, we show direct evidences of strain transfer for InAs islands on freestanding Si thin films (7 nm). Synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements using a beam size of 300 × 700 nm{sup 2} can directly probe the strain status of the compliant substrate underneath deposited islands. Using a recently developed diffraction mapping technique, three-dimensional reciprocal space maps were reconstructed around the Si (004) peak for specific illuminated positions of the sample. The strain retrieved was analyzed using continuous elasticity theory via Finite-element simulations. The comparison of experiment and simulations yields the amount of strain from the InAs islands, which is transferred to the compliant Si thin film.

  2. Parrotfish erosion underpins reef growth, sand talus development and island building in the Maldives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Kyle M.; Kench, Paul S.

    2016-07-01

    Parrotfish play a key functional role on coral reefs as external bioerosion agents and produce large quantities of carbonate sediment as a by-product of grazing on reef surfaces. Parrotfish are therefore an important potential source of sediment for island construction and maintenance within atoll reef environments, particularly under future scenarios of sea level rise and island morphological change. Here, we present the first field-based estimates of excavating parrotfish erosion (Chlorurus sordidus and Chlorurus strongylocephalus) within the Indian Ocean and quantify the contribution of parrotfish to the carbonate and sediment budgets of an atoll interior reef platform in the Maldives. We note that parrotfish erosion rates are high (6.3 kg m- 2 y- 1), generating large amounts of new coral-based sediment (2.6 kg m- 2 y- 1) that has a comparable grain size distribution to island deposits. Mean erosion rates by individual C. strongylocephalus (405 kg individual y- 1) were higher than C. sordidus (55 kg individual y- 1), but their contribution to erosion per unit area of reef was less due to a lower relative biomass (C. strongylocephalus: 1.3 kg m- 2 y- 1; C. sordidus: 5.0 kg m- 2 y- 1). Parrotfish also facilitate sediment export from reefs (0.7 kg m- 2 y- 1), which contributes extensively to the development of the sand talus on the fore-reef slope and to the evolution of the wider atoll basin. Our results provide strong evidence that parrotfish erosion (and sediment generation) underpins island morphology on Maldivian reefs and highlight the importance of larger parrotfish as producers of island-grade sediment. Ecological processes must therefore be considered within future coastal management strategies for enhancing island stability.

  3. Clinical applications of 3-D dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2015-01-01

    Both 3-D gels and radiochromic plastic dosimeters, in conjunction with dose image readout systems (MRI or optical-CT), have been employed to measure 3-D dose distributions in many clinical applications. The 3-D dose maps obtained from these systems can provide a useful tool for clinical dose verification for complex treatment techniques such as IMRT, SRS/SBRT, brachytherapy, and proton beam therapy. These complex treatments present high dose gradient regions in the boundaries between the target and surrounding critical organs. Dose accuracy in these areas can be critical, and may affect treatment outcome. In this review, applications of 3-D gels and PRESAGE dosimeter are reviewed and evaluated in terms of their performance in providing information on clinical dose verification as well as commissioning of various treatment modalities. Future interests and clinical needs on studies of 3-D dosimetry are also discussed.

  4. Fabrication of 3D Silicon Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, A.; Hansen, T.E.; Hansen, T.A.; Lietaer, N.; Summanwar, A.; Kenney, C.; Hasi, J.; Da Via, C.; Parker, S.I.; /Hawaii U.

    2012-06-06

    Silicon sensors with a three-dimensional (3-D) architecture, in which the n and p electrodes penetrate through the entire substrate, have many advantages over planar silicon sensors including radiation hardness, fast time response, active edge and dual readout capabilities. The fabrication of 3D sensors is however rather complex. In recent years, there have been worldwide activities on 3D fabrication. SINTEF in collaboration with Stanford Nanofabrication Facility have successfully fabricated the original (single sided double column type) 3D detectors in two prototype runs and the third run is now on-going. This paper reports the status of this fabrication work and the resulted yield. The work of other groups such as the development of double sided 3D detectors is also briefly reported.

  5. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  6. 3D Microperiodic Hydrogel Scaffolds for Robust Neuronal Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hanson Shepherd, Jennifer N.; Parker, Sara T.; Shepherd, Robert F.; Gillette, Martha U.; Lewis, Jennifer A.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) microperiodic scaffolds of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) have been fabricated by direct-write assembly of a photopolymerizable hydrogel ink. The ink is initially composed of physically entangled pHEMA chains dissolved in a solution of HEMA monomer, comonomer, photoinitiator and water. Upon printing 3D scaffolds of varying architecture, the ink filaments are exposed to UV light, where they are transformed into an interpenetrating hydrogel network of chemically cross-linked and physically entangled pHEMA chains. These 3D microperiodic scaffolds are rendered growth compliant for primary rat hippocampal neurons by absorption of polylysine. Neuronal cells thrive on these scaffolds, forming differentiated, intricately branched networks. Confocal laser scanning microscopy reveals that both cell distribution and extent of neuronal process alignment depend upon scaffold architecture. This work provides an important step forward in the creation of suitable platforms for in vitro study of sensitive cell types. PMID:21709750

  7. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  8. The psychology of the 3D experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicke, Sophie H.; Ellis, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    With 3D televisions expected to reach 50% home saturation as early as 2016, understanding the psychological mechanisms underlying the user response to 3D technology is critical for content providers, educators and academics. Unfortunately, research examining the effects of 3D technology has not kept pace with the technology's rapid adoption, resulting in large-scale use of a technology about which very little is actually known. Recognizing this need for new research, we conducted a series of studies measuring and comparing many of the variables and processes underlying both 2D and 3D media experiences. In our first study, we found narratives within primetime dramas had the power to shift viewer attitudes in both 2D and 3D settings. However, we found no difference in persuasive power between 2D and 3D content. We contend this lack of effect was the result of poor conversion quality and the unique demands of 3D production. In our second study, we found 3D technology significantly increased enjoyment when viewing sports content, yet offered no added enjoyment when viewing a movie trailer. The enhanced enjoyment of the sports content was shown to be the result of heightened emotional arousal and attention in the 3D condition. We believe the lack of effect found for the movie trailer may be genre-related. In our final study, we found 3D technology significantly enhanced enjoyment of two video games from different genres. The added enjoyment was found to be the result of an increased sense of presence.

  9. Low-cost 3D rangefinder system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bor-Tow; Lou, Wen-Shiou; Chen, Chia-Chen; Lin, Hsien-Chang

    1998-06-01

    Nowadays, 3D data are popularly performed in computer, and 3D browsers manipulate 3D model in the virtual world. Yet, till now, 3D digitizer is still a high-cost product and not a familiar equipment. In order to meet the requirement of 3D fancy world, in this paper, the concept of a low-cost 3D digitizer system is proposed to catch 3D range data from objects. The specified optical design of the 3D extraction is effective to depress the size, and the processing software of the system is compatible with PC to promote its portable capability. Both features contribute a low-cost system in PC environment in contrast to a large system bundled in an expensive workstation platform. In the structure of 3D extraction, laser beam and CCD camera are adopted to construct a 3D sensor. Instead of 2 CCD cameras for capturing laser lines twice before, a 2-in-1 system is proposed to merge 2 images in one CCD which still retains the information of two fields of views to inhibit occlusion problems. Besides, optical paths of two camera views are reflected by mirror in order that the volume of the system can be minified with one rotary axis only. It makes a portable system be more possible to work. Combined with the processing software executable in PC windows system, the proposed system not only saves hardware cost but also processing time of software. The system performance achieves 0.05 mm accuracy. It shows that a low- cost system is more possible to be high-performance.

  10. 3D Visualization Development of SIUE Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellutla, Shravya

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has progressed from the traditional map-making to the modern technology where the information can be created, edited, managed and analyzed. Like any other models, maps are simplified representations of real world. Hence visualization plays an essential role in the applications of GIS. The use of sophisticated visualization tools and methods, especially three dimensional (3D) modeling, has been rising considerably due to the advancement of technology. There are currently many off-the-shelf technologies available in the market to build 3D GIS models. One of the objectives of this research was to examine the available ArcGIS and its extensions for 3D modeling and visualization and use them to depict a real world scenario. Furthermore, with the advent of the web, a platform for accessing and sharing spatial information on the Internet, it is possible to generate interactive online maps. Integrating Internet capacity with GIS functionality redefines the process of sharing and processing the spatial information. Enabling a 3D map online requires off-the-shelf GIS software, 3D model builders, web server, web applications and client server technologies. Such environments are either complicated or expensive because of the amount of hardware and software involved. Therefore, the second objective of this research was to investigate and develop simpler yet cost-effective 3D modeling approach that uses available ArcGIS suite products and the free 3D computer graphics software for designing 3D world scenes. Both ArcGIS Explorer and ArcGIS Online will be used to demonstrate the way of sharing and distributing 3D geographic information on the Internet. A case study of the development of 3D campus for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is demonstrated.

  11. Mapping the Distribution of Sand Live Oak (Quercus geminata) and Determining Growth Responses to Hurricane Katrina (2005) on Cat Island, Mississippi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funderburk, W.; Carter, G. A.; Harley, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    William R. Funderburk, Gregory A. Carter, Grant Harley Gulf Coast Geospatial Center, University of Southern Mississippi Department of Geography and Geology Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 U.S.A. william.funderburk@usm.edu The Mississippi-Alabama barrier islands serve to buffer mainland coastal areas from the impacts of hurricanes and other extreme weather events. On August 29, 2005, they were impacted heavily by the wind, waves, and storm surges of Hurricane Katrina. The purpose of this study is to determine the growth responses of Quercus geminata, a dominant tree species on Cat Island, MS, in relation to the impact of Hurricane Katrina. Remotely sensed data was utilized in conjunction with ground data to assess growth response post Hurricane Katrina. The main objectives of this study were: 1) determine growth response of Q. geminata through tree ring analysis; 2) understand how Q. geminata adapted to intense weather and climatic phenomena on Cat Island. The hypotheses tested were: 1) growth rates of Q. geminata on Cat Island were decreased by the impact of Hurricane Katrina 2) trees at higher elevations survived or recovered while trees at lower elevations did not recover or died. Decadal scale stability is required for forest stand development on siliciclastic barrier islands. Thus, monitoring the distribution of forest climax community species is key to understanding siliciclastic, subsiding, barrier island geomorphic processes and their relationships to successional patterns and growth rates. Preliminary results indicate that Q. geminata produces a faint growth ring, survive for at least two to three hundred years and is well-adapted to frequent salt water flooding. Cat Island: False color Image

  12. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist.

    PubMed

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B; Grant, Gerald T; Rybicki, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  13. 3D facial expression modeling for recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaoguang; Jain, Anil K.; Dass, Sarat C.

    2005-03-01

    Current two-dimensional image based face recognition systems encounter difficulties with large variations in facial appearance due to the pose, illumination and expression changes. Utilizing 3D information of human faces is promising for handling the pose and lighting variations. While the 3D shape of a face does not change due to head pose (rigid) and lighting changes, it is not invariant to the non-rigid facial movement and evolution, such as expressions and aging effect. We propose a facial surface matching framework to match multiview facial scans to a 3D face model, where the (non-rigid) expression deformation is explicitly modeled for each subject, resulting in a person-specific deformation model. The thin plate spline (TPS) is applied to model the deformation based on the facial landmarks. The deformation is applied to the 3D neutral expression face model to synthesize the corresponding expression. Both the neutral and the synthesized 3D surface models are used to match a test scan. The surface registration and matching between a test scan and a 3D model are achieved by a modified Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate that the proposed expression modeling and recognition-by-synthesis schemes improve the 3D matching accuracy.

  14. Digital relief generation from 3D models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meili; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Hongming; Qian, Kun; Chang, Jian; He, Dongjian

    2016-09-01

    It is difficult to extend image-based relief generation to high-relief generation, as the images contain insufficient height information. To generate reliefs from three-dimensional (3D) models, it is necessary to extract the height fields from the model, but this can only generate bas-reliefs. To overcome this problem, an efficient method is proposed to generate bas-reliefs and high-reliefs directly from 3D meshes. To produce relief features that are visually appropriate, the 3D meshes are first scaled. 3D unsharp masking is used to enhance the visual features in the 3D mesh, and average smoothing and Laplacian smoothing are implemented to achieve better smoothing results. A nonlinear variable scaling scheme is then employed to generate the final bas-reliefs and high-reliefs. Using the proposed method, relief models can be generated from arbitrary viewing positions with different gestures and combinations of multiple 3D models. The generated relief models can be printed by 3D printers. The proposed method provides a means of generating both high-reliefs and bas-reliefs in an efficient and effective way under the appropriate scaling factors.

  15. NUBEAM developments and 3d halo modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelenkova, M. V.; Medley, S. S.; Kaye, S. M.

    2012-10-01

    Recent developments related to the 3D halo model in NUBEAM code are described. To have a reliable halo neutral source for diagnostic simulation, the TRANSP/NUBEAM code has been enhanced with full implementation of ADAS atomic physic ground state and excited state data for hydrogenic beams and mixed species plasma targets. The ADAS codes and database provide the density and temperature dependence of the atomic data, and the collective nature of the state excitation process. To be able to populate 3D halo output with sufficient statistical resolution, the capability to control the statistics of fast ion CX modeling and for thermal halo launch has been added to NUBEAM. The 3D halo neutral model is based on modification and extension of the ``beam in box'' aligned 3d Cartesian grid that includes the neutral beam itself, 3D fast neutral densities due to CX of partially slowed down fast ions in the beam halo region, 3D thermal neutral densities due to CX deposition and fast neutral recapture source. More details on the 3D halo simulation design will be presented.

  16. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist.

    PubMed

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B; Grant, Gerald T; Rybicki, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26562233

  17. Perception of detail in 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heynderickx, Ingrid; Kaptein, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    A lot of current 3D displays suffer from the fact that their spatial resolution is lower compared to their 2D counterparts. One reason for this is that the multiple views needed to generate 3D are often spatially multiplexed. Besides this, imperfect separation of the left- and right-eye view leads to blurring or ghosting, and therefore to a decrease in perceived sharpness. However, people watching stereoscopic videos have reported that the 3D scene contained more details, compared to the 2D scene with identical spatial resolution. This is an interesting notion, that has never been tested in a systematic and quantitative way. To investigate this effect, we had people compare the amount of detail ("detailedness") in pairs of 2D and 3D images. A blur filter was applied to one of the two images, and the blur level was varied using an adaptive staircase procedure. In this way, the blur threshold for which the 2D and 3D image contained perceptually the same amount of detail could be found. Our results show that the 3D image needed to be blurred more than the 2D image. This confirms the earlier qualitative findings that 3D images contain perceptually more details than 2D images with the same spatial resolution.

  18. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A.; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K.; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J.; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B.; Grant, Gerald T.

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26562233

  19. Extra Dimensions: 3D in PDF Documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Norman A.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) and the ISO PRC file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. Until recently, Adobe's Acrobat software was also capable of incorporating 3D content into PDF files from a variety of 3D file formats, including proprietary CAD formats. However, this functionality is no longer available in Acrobat X, having been spun off to a separate company. Incorporating 3D content now requires the additional purchase of a separate plug-in. In this talk we present alternatives based on open source libraries which allow the programmatic creation of 3D content in PDF format. While not providing the same level of access to CAD files as the commercial software, it does provide physicists with an alternative path to incorporate 3D content into PDF files from such disparate applications as detector geometries from Geant4, 3D data sets, mathematical surfaces or tesselated volumes.

  20. FUN3D Manual: 12.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.7, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  1. FUN3D Manual: 13.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bill; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2016-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 13.0, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  2. FUN3D Manual: 12.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, William L.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.6, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  3. FUN3D Manual: 12.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, William L.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2014-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.5, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational uid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables ecient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  4. FUN3D Manual: 12.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2016-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.9, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  5. FUN3D Manual: 12.8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2015-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.8, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  6. FUN3D Manual: 12.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Thomas, James L.; Wood, William A.

    2014-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.4, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixedelement unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  7. VALIDATION OF IMPROVED 3D ATR MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Soon Sam Kim; Bruce G. Schnitzler

    2005-11-01

    A full-core Monte Carlo based 3D model of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was previously developed. [1] An improved 3D model has been developed by the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) to eliminate homogeneity of fuel plates of the old model, incorporate core changes into the new model, and to validate against a newer, more complicated core configuration. This new 3D model adds capability for fuel loading design and azimuthal power peaking studies of the ATR fuel elements.

  8. Explicit 3-D Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    2000-11-07

    DYNA3D is a nonlinear explicit finite element code for analyzing 3-D structures and solid continuum. The code is vectorized and available on several computer platforms. The element library includes continuum, shell, beam, truss and spring/damper elements to allow maximum flexibility in modeling physical problems. Many materials are available to represent a wide range of material behavior, including elasticity, plasticity, composites, thermal effects and rate dependence. In addition, DYNA3D has a sophisticated contact interface capability, includingmore » frictional sliding, single surface contact and automatic contact generation.« less

  9. A high capacity 3D steganography algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chao, Min-Wen; Lin, Chao-hung; Yu, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Tong-Yee

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a very high-capacity and low-distortion 3D steganography scheme. Our steganography approach is based on a novel multilayered embedding scheme to hide secret messages in the vertices of 3D polygon models. Experimental results show that the cover model distortion is very small as the number of hiding layers ranges from 7 to 13 layers. To the best of our knowledge, this novel approach can provide much higher hiding capacity than other state-of-the-art approaches, while obeying the low distortion and security basic requirements for steganography on 3D models.

  10. How We 3D-Print Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-23

    A new type of graphene aerogel will make for better energy storage, sensors, nanoelectronics, catalysis and separations. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have made graphene aerogel microlattices with an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The research appears in the April 22 edition of the journal, Nature Communications. The 3D printed graphene aerogels have high surface area, excellent electrical conductivity, are lightweight, have mechanical stiffness and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90 percent compressive strain). In addition, the 3D printed graphene aerogel microlattices show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials and much better mass transport.

  11. FIT3D: Fitting optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Pérez, E.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; González, J. J.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Cano-Díaz, M.; López-Cobá, C.; Marino, R. A.; Gil de Paz, A.; Mollá, M.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Ascasibar, Y.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.

    2016-09-01

    FIT3D fits optical spectra to deblend the underlying stellar population and the ionized gas, and extract physical information from each component. FIT3D is focused on the analysis of Integral Field Spectroscopy data, but is not restricted to it, and is the basis of Pipe3D, a pipeline used in the analysis of datasets like CALIFA, MaNGA, and SAMI. It can run iteratively or in an automatic way to derive the parameters of a large set of spectra.

  12. 3D packaging for integrated circuit systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.; Palmer, D.W.

    1996-11-01

    A goal was set for high density, high performance microelectronics pursued through a dense 3D packing of integrated circuits. A {open_quotes}tool set{close_quotes} of assembly processes have been developed that enable 3D system designs: 3D thermal analysis, silicon electrical through vias, IC thinning, mounting wells in silicon, adhesives for silicon stacking, pretesting of IC chips before commitment to stacks, and bond pad bumping. Validation of these process developments occurred through both Sandia prototypes and subsequent commercial examples.

  13. Investigations in massive 3D gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Accioly, Antonio; Helayeel-Neto, Jose; Morais, Jefferson; Turcati, Rodrigo; Scatena, Eslley

    2011-05-15

    Some interesting gravitational properties of the Bergshoeff-Hohm-Townsend model (massive 3D gravity), such as the presence of a short-range gravitational force in the nonrelativistic limit and the existence of an impact-parameter-dependent gravitational deflection angle, are studied. Interestingly enough, these phenomena have no counterpart in the usual Einstein 3D gravity. In order to better understand the two aforementioned gravitational properties, they are also analyzed in the framework of 3D higher-derivative gravity with the Einstein-Hilbert term with the 'wrong sign'.

  14. An Improved Version of TOPAZ 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly

    2003-07-29

    An improved version of the TOPAZ 3D gun code is presented as a powerful tool for beam optics simulation. In contrast to the previous version of TOPAZ 3D, the geometry of the device under test is introduced into TOPAZ 3D directly from a CAD program, such as Solid Edge or AutoCAD. In order to have this new feature, an interface was developed, using the GiD software package as a meshing code. The article describes this method with two models to illustrate the results.

  15. Multistage nucleation of two-dimensional Si islands on Si(111)-7x7 during MBE growth: STM experiments and extended rate-equation model

    SciTech Connect

    Filimonov, Sergey; Cherepanov, Vasily; Voigtlaender, Bert; Hervieu, Yuri

    2007-07-15

    The submonolayer density of two-dimensional (2D) islands in Si/Si(111)-7x7 molecular beam epitaxy is measured using scanning tunneling microscopy. At a relatively low deposition temperature of 673 K, the density of 2D islands is a power function of the deposition flux N{sub 2D}{proportional_to}F{sup {chi}} with the exponent {chi}=0.24 being smaller than that predicted by the standard nucleation theory. The nonstandard scaling of the 2D island density is explained by the multistage character of the nucleation process on the Si(111)-7x7 surface which involves consecutive stages of formation of stable Si clusters, formation of pairs of clusters, and transformation of the cluster pairs to 2D islands. Using an extended rate-equation model, we analyze the temperature and growth rate dependencies of the density of single clusters, cluster pairs, and 2D islands and show that an activation barrier of {approx}1.26 eV delays the transformation of cluster pairs to 2D islands. The delayed transformation of cluster pairs to 2D islands is the reason for the nonstandard scaling of the 2D island density observed at low deposition temperatures.

  16. JAR3D Webserver: Scoring and aligning RNA loop sequences to known 3D motifs

    PubMed Central

    Roll, James; Zirbel, Craig L.; Sweeney, Blake; Petrov, Anton I.; Leontis, Neocles

    2016-01-01

    Many non-coding RNAs have been identified and may function by forming 2D and 3D structures. RNA hairpin and internal loops are often represented as unstructured on secondary structure diagrams, but RNA 3D structures show that most such loops are structured by non-Watson–Crick basepairs and base stacking. Moreover, different RNA sequences can form the same RNA 3D motif. JAR3D finds possible 3D geometries for hairpin and internal loops by matching loop sequences to motif groups from the RNA 3D Motif Atlas, by exact sequence match when possible, and by probabilistic scoring and edit distance for novel sequences. The scoring gauges the ability of the sequences to form the same pattern of interactions observed in 3D structures of the motif. The JAR3D webserver at http://rna.bgsu.edu/jar3d/ takes one or many sequences of a single loop as input, or else one or many sequences of longer RNAs with multiple loops. Each sequence is scored against all current motif groups. The output shows the ten best-matching motif groups. Users can align input sequences to each of the motif groups found by JAR3D. JAR3D will be updated with every release of the RNA 3D Motif Atlas, and so its performance is expected to improve over time. PMID:27235417

  17. XML3D and Xflow: combining declarative 3D for the Web with generic data flows.

    PubMed

    Klein, Felix; Sons, Kristian; Rubinstein, Dmitri; Slusallek, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have combined XML3D, which provides declarative, interactive 3D scene descriptions based on HTML5, with Xflow, a language for declarative, high-performance data processing. The result lets Web developers combine a 3D scene graph with data flows for dynamic meshes, animations, image processing, and postprocessing. PMID:24808080

  18. Do-It-Yourself: 3D Models of Hydrogenic Orbitals through 3D Printing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Kaitlyn M.; de Cataldo, Riccardo; Fogarty, Keir H.

    2016-01-01

    Introductory chemistry students often have difficulty visualizing the 3-dimensional shapes of the hydrogenic electron orbitals without the aid of physical 3D models. Unfortunately, commercially available models can be quite expensive. 3D printing offers a solution for producing models of hydrogenic orbitals. 3D printing technology is widely…

  19. 3D-printed microfluidic chips with patterned, cell-laden hydrogel constructs.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Ersoy, Fulya; Emadi, Sharareh; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing offers potential to fabricate high-throughput and low-cost fabrication of microfluidic devices as a promising alternative to traditional techniques which enables efficient design iterations in the development stage. In this study, we demonstrate a single-step fabrication of a 3D transparent microfluidic chip using two alternative techniques: a stereolithography-based desktop 3D printer and a two-step fabrication using an industrial 3D printer based on polyjet technology. This method, compared to conventional fabrication using relatively expensive materials and labor-intensive processes, presents a low-cost, rapid prototyping technique to print functional 3D microfluidic chips. We enhance the capabilities of 3D-printed microfluidic devices by coupling 3D cell encapsulation and spatial patterning within photocrosslinkable gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA). The platform presented here serves as a 3D culture environment for long-term cell culture and growth. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the ability to print complex 3D microfluidic channels to create predictable and controllable fluid flow regimes. Here, we demonstrate the novel use of 3D-printed microfluidic chips as controllable 3D cell culture environments, advancing the applicability of 3D printing to engineering physiological systems for future applications in bioengineering.

  20. 3D-printed microfluidic chips with patterned, cell-laden hydrogel constructs.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Ersoy, Fulya; Emadi, Sharareh; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing offers potential to fabricate high-throughput and low-cost fabrication of microfluidic devices as a promising alternative to traditional techniques which enables efficient design iterations in the development stage. In this study, we demonstrate a single-step fabrication of a 3D transparent microfluidic chip using two alternative techniques: a stereolithography-based desktop 3D printer and a two-step fabrication using an industrial 3D printer based on polyjet technology. This method, compared to conventional fabrication using relatively expensive materials and labor-intensive processes, presents a low-cost, rapid prototyping technique to print functional 3D microfluidic chips. We enhance the capabilities of 3D-printed microfluidic devices by coupling 3D cell encapsulation and spatial patterning within photocrosslinkable gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA). The platform presented here serves as a 3D culture environment for long-term cell culture and growth. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the ability to print complex 3D microfluidic channels to create predictable and controllable fluid flow regimes. Here, we demonstrate the novel use of 3D-printed microfluidic chips as controllable 3D cell culture environments, advancing the applicability of 3D printing to engineering physiological systems for future applications in bioengineering. PMID:27321481

  1. Island nucleation, optical and ferromagnetic properties of vertically aligned secondary growth ZnO : Cu nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Zhu, Liping; Hu, Liang; Liu, Shijiang; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Honghai; Yang, Xiaopeng; Sun, Luwei; Li, Dehui; Ye, Zhizhen

    2012-02-01

    The paper reports an island nucleation and secondary growth of aligned ZnO : Cu nanorod arrays via thermal vapor phase transport. Results analysis indicates that the secondary segment is epitaxially grown on the ZnO : Cu nanorods with the radius strongly dependent on temperature and the concentration of zinc vapor. The modified characteristic radius (Rc) model is used to explain the nucleation and secondary growth process. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectra indicate that the band gap emission of the secondary growth nanorods is greatly restrained. A controversial 3.31 eV emission (A line) and two different donor-acceptor pair (DAP) recombinations at 3.24 eV and 2.48 eV are observed at 13 K. The A line shows a different behavior from the two DAP emissions during the heat-up process. Intrinsic room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) is observed in the secondary growth ZnO : Cu nanorods and it can be explained by oxygen vacancy and copper defects related to bound magnetic polar (BMP) or double exchange mechanism.The paper reports an island nucleation and secondary growth of aligned ZnO : Cu nanorod arrays via thermal vapor phase transport. Results analysis indicates that the secondary segment is epitaxially grown on the ZnO : Cu nanorods with the radius strongly dependent on temperature and the concentration of zinc vapor. The modified characteristic radius (Rc) model is used to explain the nucleation and secondary growth process. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectra indicate that the band gap emission of the secondary growth nanorods is greatly restrained. A controversial 3.31 eV emission (A line) and two different donor-acceptor pair (DAP) recombinations at 3.24 eV and 2.48 eV are observed at 13 K. The A line shows a different behavior from the two DAP emissions during the heat-up process. Intrinsic room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) is observed in the secondary growth ZnO : Cu nanorods and it can be explained by oxygen vacancy and copper

  2. TRMM 3-D Flyby of Ingrid

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D flyby of Tropical Storm Ingrid's rainfall was created from TRMM satellite data for Sept. 16. Heaviest rainfall appears in red towers over the Gulf of Mexico, while moderate rainfall stretc...

  3. 3DSEM: A 3D microscopy dataset.

    PubMed

    Tafti, Ahmad P; Kirkpatrick, Andrew B; Holz, Jessica D; Owen, Heather A; Yu, Zeyun

    2016-03-01

    The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) as a 2D imaging instrument has been widely used in many scientific disciplines including biological, mechanical, and materials sciences to determine the surface attributes of microscopic objects. However the SEM micrographs still remain 2D images. To effectively measure and visualize the surface properties, we need to truly restore the 3D shape model from 2D SEM images. Having 3D surfaces would provide anatomic shape of micro-samples which allows for quantitative measurements and informative visualization of the specimens being investigated. The 3DSEM is a dataset for 3D microscopy vision which is freely available at [1] for any academic, educational, and research purposes. The dataset includes both 2D images and 3D reconstructed surfaces of several real microscopic samples. PMID:26779561

  4. 3DSEM: A 3D microscopy dataset

    PubMed Central

    Tafti, Ahmad P.; Kirkpatrick, Andrew B.; Holz, Jessica D.; Owen, Heather A.; Yu, Zeyun

    2015-01-01

    The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) as a 2D imaging instrument has been widely used in many scientific disciplines including biological, mechanical, and materials sciences to determine the surface attributes of microscopic objects. However the SEM micrographs still remain 2D images. To effectively measure and visualize the surface properties, we need to truly restore the 3D shape model from 2D SEM images. Having 3D surfaces would provide anatomic shape of micro-samples which allows for quantitative measurements and informative visualization of the specimens being investigated. The 3DSEM is a dataset for 3D microscopy vision which is freely available at [1] for any academic, educational, and research purposes. The dataset includes both 2D images and 3D reconstructed surfaces of several real microscopic samples. PMID:26779561

  5. Tropical Cyclone Jack in Satellite 3-D

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D flyby from NASA's TRMM satellite of Tropical Cyclone Jack on April 21 shows that some of the thunderstorms were shown by TRMM PR were still reaching height of at least 17 km (10.5 miles). ...

  6. An Augmented Reality based 3D Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Ryo; Kishimoto, Katsumi

    This paper presents a 3D catalog system that uses Augmented Reality technology. The use of Web-based catalog systems that present products in 3D form is increasing in various fields, along with the rapid and widespread adoption of Electronic Commerce. However, 3D shapes could previously only be seen in a virtual space, and it was difficult to understand how the products would actually look in the real world. To solve this, we propose a method that combines the virtual and real worlds simply and intuitively. The method applies Augmented Reality technology, and the system developed based on the method enables users to evaluate 3D virtual products in a real environment.

  7. 3D-printed bioanalytical devices.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Gregory W; Satterwhite-Warden, Jennifer E; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Rusling, James F

    2016-07-15

    While 3D printing technologies first appeared in the 1980s, prohibitive costs, limited materials, and the relatively small number of commercially available printers confined applications mainly to prototyping for manufacturing purposes. As technologies, printer cost, materials, and accessibility continue to improve, 3D printing has found widespread implementation in research and development in many disciplines due to ease-of-use and relatively fast design-to-object workflow. Several 3D printing techniques have been used to prepare devices such as milli- and microfluidic flow cells for analyses of cells and biomolecules as well as interfaces that enable bioanalytical measurements using cellphones. This review focuses on preparation and applications of 3D-printed bioanalytical devices.

  8. Cyclone Rusty's Landfall in 3-D

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D image derived from NASA's TRMM satellite Precipitation Radar data on February 26, 2013 at 0654 UTC showed that the tops of some towering thunderstorms in Rusty's eye wall were reaching hei...

  9. 3-D Animation of Typhoon Bopha

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D animation of NASA's TRMM satellite data showed Typhoon Bopha tracking over the Philippines on Dec. 3 and moving into the Sulu Sea on Dec. 4, 2012. TRMM saw heavy rain (red) was falling at ...

  10. Palacios field: A 3-D case history

    SciTech Connect

    McWhorter, R.; Torguson, B.

    1994-12-31

    In late 1992, Mitchell Energy Corporation acquired a 7.75 sq mi (20.0 km{sup 2}) 3-D seismic survey over Palacios field. Matagorda County, Texas. The company shot the survey to help evaluate the field for further development by delineating the fault pattern of the producing Middle Oligocene Frio interval. They compare the mapping of the field before and after the 3-D survey. This comparison shows that the 3-D volume yields superior fault imaging and interpretability compared to the dense 2-D data set. The problems with the 2-D data set are improper imaging of small and oblique faults and insufficient coverage over a complex fault pattern. Whereas the 2-D data set validated a simple fault model, the 3-D volume revealed a more complex history of faulting that includes three different fault systems. This discovery enabled them to reconstruct the depositional and structural history of Palacios field.

  11. 3D-printed bioanalytical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Gregory W.; Satterwhite-Warden, Jennifer E.; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Rusling, James F.

    2016-07-01

    While 3D printing technologies first appeared in the 1980s, prohibitive costs, limited materials, and the relatively small number of commercially available printers confined applications mainly to prototyping for manufacturing purposes. As technologies, printer cost, materials, and accessibility continue to improve, 3D printing has found widespread implementation in research and development in many disciplines due to ease-of-use and relatively fast design-to-object workflow. Several 3D printing techniques have been used to prepare devices such as milli- and microfluidic flow cells for analyses of cells and biomolecules as well as interfaces that enable bioanalytical measurements using cellphones. This review focuses on preparation and applications of 3D-printed bioanalytical devices.

  12. 3-D TRMM Flyby of Hurricane Amanda

    NASA Video Gallery

    The TRMM satellite flew over Hurricane Amanda on Tuesday, May 27 at 1049 UTC (6:49 a.m. EDT) and captured rainfall rates and cloud height data that was used to create this 3-D simulated flyby. Cred...

  13. Eyes on the Earth 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulikov, anton I.; Doronila, Paul R.; Nguyen, Viet T.; Jackson, Randal K.; Greene, William M.; Hussey, Kevin J.; Garcia, Christopher M.; Lopez, Christian A.

    2013-01-01

    Eyes on the Earth 3D software gives scientists, and the general public, a realtime, 3D interactive means of accurately viewing the real-time locations, speed, and values of recently collected data from several of NASA's Earth Observing Satellites using a standard Web browser (climate.nasa.gov/eyes). Anyone with Web access can use this software to see where the NASA fleet of these satellites is now, or where they will be up to a year in the future. The software also displays several Earth Science Data sets that have been collected on a daily basis. This application uses a third-party, 3D, realtime, interactive game engine called Unity 3D to visualize the satellites and is accessible from a Web browser.

  14. 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jia; Yao, Hai; Mei, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims to fabricate functional tissue for applications in regenerative medicine and drug testing. More recently, 3D printing has shown great promise in tissue fabrication with a structural control from micro- to macro-scale by using a layer-by-layer approach. Whether through scaffold-based or scaffold-free approaches, the standard for 3D printed tissue engineering constructs is to provide a biomimetic structural environment that facilitates tissue formation and promotes host tissue integration (e.g., cellular infiltration, vascularization, and active remodeling). This review will cover several approaches that have advanced the field of 3D printing through novel fabrication methods of tissue engineering constructs. It will also discuss the applications of synthetic and natural materials for 3D printing facilitated tissue fabrication. PMID:26869728

  15. 3DSEM: A 3D microscopy dataset.

    PubMed

    Tafti, Ahmad P; Kirkpatrick, Andrew B; Holz, Jessica D; Owen, Heather A; Yu, Zeyun

    2016-03-01

    The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) as a 2D imaging instrument has been widely used in many scientific disciplines including biological, mechanical, and materials sciences to determine the surface attributes of microscopic objects. However the SEM micrographs still remain 2D images. To effectively measure and visualize the surface properties, we need to truly restore the 3D shape model from 2D SEM images. Having 3D surfaces would provide anatomic shape of micro-samples which allows for quantitative measurements and informative visualization of the specimens being investigated. The 3DSEM is a dataset for 3D microscopy vision which is freely available at [1] for any academic, educational, and research purposes. The dataset includes both 2D images and 3D reconstructed surfaces of several real microscopic samples.

  16. 3D-printed bioanalytical devices.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Gregory W; Satterwhite-Warden, Jennifer E; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Rusling, James F

    2016-07-15

    While 3D printing technologies first appeared in the 1980s, prohibitive costs, limited materials, and the relatively small number of commercially available printers confined applications mainly to prototyping for manufacturing purposes. As technologies, printer cost, materials, and accessibility continue to improve, 3D printing has found widespread implementation in research and development in many disciplines due to ease-of-use and relatively fast design-to-object workflow. Several 3D printing techniques have been used to prepare devices such as milli- and microfluidic flow cells for analyses of cells and biomolecules as well as interfaces that enable bioanalytical measurements using cellphones. This review focuses on preparation and applications of 3D-printed bioanalytical devices. PMID:27250897

  17. Nonlaser-based 3D surface imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shin-yee; Johnson, R.K.; Sherwood, R.J.

    1994-11-15

    3D surface imaging refers to methods that generate a 3D surface representation of objects of a scene under viewing. Laser-based 3D surface imaging systems are commonly used in manufacturing, robotics and biomedical research. Although laser-based systems provide satisfactory solutions for most applications, there are situations where non laser-based approaches are preferred. The issues that make alternative methods sometimes more attractive are: (1) real-time data capturing, (2) eye-safety, (3) portability, and (4) work distance. The focus of this presentation is on generating a 3D surface from multiple 2D projected images using CCD cameras, without a laser light source. Two methods are presented: stereo vision and depth-from-focus. Their applications are described.

  18. 3-D Flyover Visualization of Veil Nebula

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D visualization flies across a small portion of the Veil Nebula as photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope. This region is a small part of a huge expanding remnant from a star that explod...

  19. Future Engineers 3-D Print Timelapse

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Challenges K-12 students to create a model of a container for space using 3-D modeling software. Astronauts need containers of all kinds - from advanced containers that can study fruit flies t...

  20. Modeling Cellular Processes in 3-D

    PubMed Central

    Mogilner, Alex; Odde, David

    2011-01-01

    Summary Recent advances in photonic imaging and fluorescent protein technology offer unprecedented views of molecular space-time dynamics in living cells. At the same time, advances in computing hardware and software enable modeling of ever more complex systems, from global climate to cell division. As modeling and experiment become more closely integrated, we must address the issue of modeling cellular processes in 3-D. Here, we highlight recent advances related to 3-D modeling in cell biology. While some processes require full 3-D analysis, we suggest that others are more naturally described in 2-D or 1-D. Keeping the dimensionality as low as possible reduces computational time and makes models more intuitively comprehensible; however, the ability to test full 3-D models will build greater confidence in models generally and remains an important emerging area of cell biological modeling. PMID:22036197

  1. Modeling one-dimensional island growth with mass-dependent detachment rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinchcombe, R. B.; Aarão Reis, F. D. A.

    2008-01-01

    We study one-dimensional models of particle diffusion and attachment and/or detachment from islands where the detachment rates γ of particles at the cluster edges increase with cluster mass m . They are expected to mimic the effects of lattice mismatch with the substrate and/or long-range repulsive interactions that work against the formation of long islands. Short-range attraction is represented by an overall factor γ≪1 in the detachment rates (masses m⩾2 ) relatively to isolated particle hopping rates ( γ˜e-E/T , where E is a binding energy and T is the temperature). We consider various mass dependences of γ(m) from rapidly increasing forms such as γ(m)˜m to slowly increasing ones, such as γ(m)˜((m)/(m+1))b , with constant b . A mapping onto a column problem shows that these systems are zero-range processes, whose steady state properties are exactly calculated under the assumption of independent column heights in the master equation. Simulation provides accurate island size distributions which confirm analytic reductions and are particularly useful whenever the analytical tools cannot provide results in closed form. The shape of island size distributions can be changed from monomodal to monotonically decreasing by tuning the temperature or changing the coverage (one-dimensional density ρ ). In all cases, small values of the scaling variable X≡γ-1ρ/(1-ρ) favor the monotonically decreasing ones. However, for large X , rapidly increasing rates γ(m) lead to distributions with peaks very close to ⟨m⟩ and rapidly decreasing tails, while slowly increasing γ(m) provide peaks close to ⟨m⟩/2 and fat right tails.

  2. 3D goes digital: from stereoscopy to modern 3D imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerwien, N.

    2014-11-01

    In the 19th century, English physicist Charles Wheatstone discovered stereopsis, the basis for 3D perception. His construction of the first stereoscope established the foundation for stereoscopic 3D imaging. Since then, many optical instruments were influenced by these basic ideas. In recent decades, the advent of digital technologies revolutionized 3D imaging. Powerful readily available sensors and displays combined with efficient pre- or post-processing enable new methods for 3D imaging and applications. This paper draws an arc from basic concepts of 3D imaging to modern digital implementations, highlighting instructive examples from its 175 years of history.

  3. Motif3D: Relating protein sequence motifs to 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Gaulton, Anna; Attwood, Teresa K

    2003-07-01

    Motif3D is a web-based protein structure viewer designed to allow sequence motifs, and in particular those contained in the fingerprints of the PRINTS database, to be visualised on three-dimensional (3D) structures. Additional functionality is provided for the rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors, enabling fingerprint motifs of any of the receptors in this family to be mapped onto the single structure available, that of bovine rhodopsin. Motif3D can be used via the web interface available at: http://www.bioinf.man.ac.uk/dbbrowser/motif3d/motif3d.html.

  4. Assessing 3d Photogrammetry Techniques in Craniometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshobane, M. C.; de Bruyn, P. J. N.; Bester, M. N.

    2016-06-01

    Morphometrics (the measurement of morphological features) has been revolutionized by the creation of new techniques to study how organismal shape co-varies with several factors such as ecophenotypy. Ecophenotypy refers to the divergence of phenotypes due to developmental changes induced by local environmental conditions, producing distinct ecophenotypes. None of the techniques hitherto utilized could explicitly address organismal shape in a complete biological form, i.e. three-dimensionally. This study investigates the use of the commercial software, Photomodeler Scanner® (PMSc®) three-dimensional (3D) modelling software to produce accurate and high-resolution 3D models. Henceforth, the modelling of Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) and Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella) skulls which could allow for 3D measurements. Using this method, sixteen accurate 3D skull models were produced and five metrics were determined. The 3D linear measurements were compared to measurements taken manually with a digital caliper. In addition, repetitive measurements were recorded by varying researchers to determine repeatability. To allow for comparison straight line measurements were taken with the software, assuming that close accord with all manually measured features would illustrate the model's accurate replication of reality. Measurements were not significantly different demonstrating that realistic 3D skull models can be successfully produced to provide a consistent basis for craniometrics, with the additional benefit of allowing non-linear measurements if required.

  5. Exploring interaction with 3D volumetric displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Tovi; Wigdor, Daniel; Balakrishnan, Ravin

    2005-03-01

    Volumetric displays generate true volumetric 3D images by actually illuminating points in 3D space. As a result, viewing their contents is similar to viewing physical objects in the real world. These displays provide a 360 degree field of view, and do not require the user to wear hardware such as shutter glasses or head-trackers. These properties make them a promising alternative to traditional display systems for viewing imagery in 3D. Because these displays have only recently been made available commercially (e.g., www.actuality-systems.com), their current use tends to be limited to non-interactive output-only display devices. To take full advantage of the unique features of these displays, however, it would be desirable if the 3D data being displayed could be directly interacted with and manipulated. We investigate interaction techniques for volumetric display interfaces, through the development of an interactive 3D geometric model building application. While this application area itself presents many interesting challenges, our focus is on the interaction techniques that are likely generalizable to interactive applications for other domains. We explore a very direct style of interaction where the user interacts with the virtual data using direct finger manipulations on and around the enclosure surrounding the displayed 3D volumetric image.

  6. Influence of growth temperature on interdiffusion in uncapped SiGe-islands on Si(001) determined by anomalous x-ray diffraction and reciprocal space mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Schuelli, T.U.; Stoffel, M.; Schmidt, O.G.; Hesse, A.; Stangl, J.; Lechner, R.T.; Wintersberger, E.; Bauer, G.; Sztucki, M.; Metzger, T.H.

    2005-01-15

    The influence of growth temperature in the regime of dome formation in Stranski-Krastanow growth is studied systematically on a series of Ge on Si(001) samples. A combination of complementary x-ray scattering methods is applied, in order to resolve the island size, their strain state, and the composition distribution. The composition is determined using anomalous x-ray diffraction at high momentum transfer in combination with atomic force microscopy and from x-ray reciprocal space mapping. For growth temperatures between 620 and 840 deg. C, the maximum Ge content of the as-grown islands decreases from about 70 to about 22%. The results are corroborated by a selective etching study of the Ge islands.

  7. Recording stereoscopic 3D neurosurgery with a head-mounted 3D camera system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian; Chen, Brian R; Chen, Beverly B; Lu, James Y; Giannotta, Steven L

    2015-06-01

    Stereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) imaging can present more information to the viewer and further enhance the learning experience over traditional two-dimensional (2D) video. Most 3D surgical videos are recorded from the operating microscope and only feature the crux, or the most important part of the surgery, leaving out other crucial parts of surgery including the opening, approach, and closing of the surgical site. In addition, many other surgeries including complex spine, trauma, and intensive care unit procedures are also rarely recorded. We describe and share our experience with a commercially available head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to obtain stereoscopic 3D recordings of these seldom recorded aspects of neurosurgery. The strengths and limitations of using the GoPro(®) 3D system as a head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system in the operating room are reviewed in detail. Over the past several years, we have recorded in stereoscopic 3D over 50 cranial and spinal surgeries and created a library for education purposes. We have found the head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to be a valuable asset to supplement 3D footage from a 3D microscope. We expect that these comprehensive 3D surgical videos will become an important facet of resident education and ultimately lead to improved patient care.

  8. CFL3D, FUN3d, and NSU3D Contributions to the Fifth Drag Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Laflin, Kelly R.; Chaffin, Mark S.; Powell, Nicholas; Levy, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Results presented at the Fifth Drag Prediction Workshop using CFL3D, FUN3D, and NSU3D are described. These are calculations on the workshop provided grids and drag adapted grids. The NSU3D results have been updated to reflect an improvement to skin friction calculation on skewed grids. FUN3D results generated after the workshop are included for custom participant generated grids and a grid from a previous workshop. Uniform grid refinement at the design condition shows a tight grouping in calculated drag, where the variation in the pressure component of drag is larger than the skin friction component. At this design condition, A fine-grid drag value was predicted with a smaller drag adjoint adapted grid via tetrahedral adaption to a metric and mixed-element subdivision. The buffet study produced larger variation than the design case, which is attributed to large differences in the predicted side-of-body separation extent. Various modeling and discretization approaches had a strong impact on predicted side-of-body separation. This large wing root separation bubble was not observed in wind tunnel tests indicating that more work is necessary in modeling wing root juncture flows to predict experiments.

  9. A 3D diamond detector for particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artuso, M.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bartosik, M.; Beacham, J.; Bellini, V.; Belyaev, V.; Bentele, B.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bes, A.; Brom, J.-M.; Bruzzi, M.; Cerv, M.; Chau, C.; Chiodini, G.; Chren, D.; Cindro, V.; Claus, G.; Collot, J.; Costa, S.; Cumalat, J.; Dabrowski, A.; D`Alessandro, R.; de Boer, W.; Dehning, B.; Dobos, D.; Dünser, M.; Eremin, V.; Eusebi, R.; Forcolin, G.; Forneris, J.; Frais-Kölbl, H.; Gan, K. K.; Gastal, M.; Goffe, M.; Goldstein, J.; Golubev, A.; Gonella, L.; Gorišek, A.; Graber, L.; Grigoriev, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gui, B.; Guthoff, M.; Haughton, I.; Hidas, D.; Hits, D.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Hofmann, T.; Hosslet, J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hügging, F.; Jansen, H.; Janssen, J.; Kagan, H.; Kanxheri, K.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R.; Kassel, F.; Kis, M.; Kramberger, G.; Kuleshov, S.; Lacoste, A.; Lagomarsino, S.; Lo Giudice, A.; Maazouzi, C.; Mandic, I.; Mathieu, C.; McFadden, N.; McGoldrick, G.; Menichelli, M.; Mikuž, M.; Morozzi, A.; Moss, J.; Mountain, R.; Murphy, S.; Oh, A.; Olivero, P.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Picollo, F.; Pomorski, M.; Potenza, R.; Quadt, A.; Re, A.; Riley, G.; Roe, S.; Sapinski, M.; Scaringella, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Schreiner, T.; Sciortino, S.; Scorzoni, A.; Seidel, S.; Servoli, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shimchuk, G.; Smith, D. S.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanier, S.; Stenson, K.; Stone, R.; Sutera, C.; Taylor, A.; Traeger, M.; Tromson, D.; Trischuk, W.; Tuve, C.; Uplegger, L.; Velthuis, J.; Venturi, N.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, S.; Wallny, R.; Wang, J. C.; Weilhammer, P.; Weingarten, J.; Weiss, C.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Yamouni, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, results towards the development of a 3D diamond sensor are presented. Conductive channels are produced inside the sensor bulk using a femtosecond laser. This electrode geometry allows full charge collection even for low quality diamond sensors. Results from testbeam show that charge is collected by these electrodes. In order to understand the channel growth parameters, with the goal of producing low resistivity channels, the conductive channels produced with a different laser setup are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy.

  10. [Growth and natural mortality of the fish Haemulon aurolineatum (Teleostei: Haemulidae) in the Southwest of Margarita Island, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Bravo, Edwis; Eslava, Nora; González, Leo

    2009-09-01

    We analyzed the growth and natural mortality of the cují (Haemulon aurolineatum) in the southwest of Margarita Island, from July 2005 through June 2006. A sample of 1,378 males and 1,143 females collected from Boca del Río artisanal fishing vessels was analyzed. The common relation for both sexes was expressed by the equation P=0.038*L(2.87). From the frequency data, a preliminary asymptotic length (L(infinity)) was estimated applying the routine of Powell and Wetherall, and the coefficient of growth (k) through ELEFAN I using program FISAT II (FAO-ICLARM). The modal progression analysis was used, previous decomposition of the frequency of lengths according to Bhattacharya, and it optimized the estimations of L(infinity) and k according to the procedure of Gulland and Holt. The curve of growth in length was fit to the model of von Bertalanffy, and described an exponential curve, where growth accelerated until the two years of age. The rate of natural mortality was high (M = 1.15 year(-1)), probably from high predation. PMID:19928464

  11. Heavy metal concentrations in growth bands of corals: a record of mine tailings input through time (Marinduque Island, Philippines).

    PubMed

    David, C P

    2003-02-01

    The impact of copper mining along the western coast of Marinduque Island was investigated. Historic input of mine tailings in the coastal region was traced through variations in heavy metal concentrations in Porites growth bands. Five samples were collected from three reefs showing different modes and extent of exposure to mine tailings. Baseline metal concentrations in Porites were established using a coral from a reef that is least exposed to contamination. The lowest mean values of Cu (0.7 microg/g), Mn (0.8 microg/g), and Zn (1.0 microg/g) were calculated from annual skeletal bands representing five years of growth. Conversely, a sample from a reef adjacent to an old tailings stockpile displayed consistently elevated metal values in its growth bands. Mean Cu, Mn, and Zn values for this coral are 3.1, 1.0 and 1.8 microg/g, respectively. Corals from the Ihatub reef showed a distinct metal concentration peak in their 1996 growth ring. These peaks coincide with a documented release of mine tailings in the Ihatub area during that year. Other metal peaks observed in coral samples correlate with years of high precipitation which may have resulted in increased sediment transport in the region. The metals are presumed to be mostly bound to the aragonite lattice of the coral skeleton, however, contribution from incorporated detrital materials to the observed metal signal (mainly of Fe) could not be easily discounted.

  12. Self assembled structures for 3D integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Madhav

    Three dimensional (3D) micro-scale structures attached to a silicon substrate have various applications in microelectronics. However, formation of 3D structures using conventional micro-fabrication techniques are not efficient and require precise control of processing parameters. Self assembly is a method for creating 3D structures that takes advantage of surface area minimization phenomena. Solder based self assembly (SBSA), the subject of this dissertation, uses solder as a facilitator in the formation of 3D structures from 2D patterns. Etching a sacrificial layer underneath a portion of the 2D pattern allows the solder reflow step to pull those areas out of the substrate plane resulting in a folded 3D structure. Initial studies using the SBSA method demonstrated low yields in the formation of five different polyhedra. The failures in folding were primarily attributed to nonuniform solder deposition on the underlying metal pads. The dip soldering method was analyzed and subsequently refined. A modified dip soldering process provided improved yield among the polyhedra. Solder bridging referred as joining of solder deposited on different metal patterns in an entity influenced the folding mechanism. In general, design parameters such as small gap-spacings and thick metal pads were found to favor solder bridging for all patterns studied. Two types of soldering: face and edge soldering were analyzed. Face soldering refers to the application of solder on the entire metal face. Edge soldering indicates application of solder only on the edges of the metal face. Mechanical grinding showed that face soldered SBSA structures were void free and robust in nature. In addition, the face soldered 3D structures provide a consistent heat resistant solder standoff height that serve as attachments in the integration of dissimilar electronic technologies. Face soldered 3D structures were developed on the underlying conducting channel to determine the thermo-electric reliability of

  13. PLOT3D Export Tool for Tecplot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The PLOT3D export tool for Tecplot solves the problem of modified data being impossible to output for use by another computational science solver. The PLOT3D Exporter add-on enables the use of the most commonly available visualization tools to engineers for output of a standard format. The exportation of PLOT3D data from Tecplot has far reaching effects because it allows for grid and solution manipulation within a graphical user interface (GUI) that is easily customized with macro language-based and user-developed GUIs. The add-on also enables the use of Tecplot as an interpolation tool for solution conversion between different grids of different types. This one add-on enhances the functionality of Tecplot so significantly, it offers the ability to incorporate Tecplot into a general suite of tools for computational science applications as a 3D graphics engine for visualization of all data. Within the PLOT3D Export Add-on are several functions that enhance the operations and effectiveness of the add-on. Unlike Tecplot output functions, the PLOT3D Export Add-on enables the use of the zone selection dialog in Tecplot to choose which zones are to be written by offering three distinct options - output of active, inactive, or all zones (grid blocks). As the user modifies the zones to output with the zone selection dialog, the zones to be written are similarly updated. This enables the use of Tecplot to create multiple configurations of a geometry being analyzed. For example, if an aircraft is loaded with multiple deflections of flaps, by activating and deactivating different zones for a specific flap setting, new specific configurations of that aircraft can be easily generated by only writing out specific zones. Thus, if ten flap settings are loaded into Tecplot, the PLOT3D Export software can output ten different configurations, one for each flap setting.

  14. RAG-3D: A search tool for RNA 3D substructures

    DOE PAGES

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-08-24

    In this study, to address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D—a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool—designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally describedmore » in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding.« less

  15. RAG-3D: A search tool for RNA 3D substructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-08-24

    In this study, to address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D—a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool—designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally described in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding.

  16. RAG-3D: a search tool for RNA 3D substructures

    PubMed Central

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    To address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D—a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool—designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally described in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding. PMID:26304547

  17. Size, shape, and ordering of SiGe/Si(001) islands grown by means of liquid phase epitaxy under far-nonequilibrium growth conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hanke, M.; Boeck, T.; Gerlitzke, A.-K.; Syrowatka, F.; Heyroth, F.; Koehler, R.

    2005-04-04

    Applying scanning electron microscopy, we have studied the evolution of shape and lateral positional correlation of Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}/Si(001) Stranski-Krastanov islands grown by means of liquid phase epitaxy (LPE). However, in contrast to conventional near-equilibrium LPE, a distinctly higher cooling rate of 10 K/min ensures extremly nonequilibrium growth conditions. The facet inclination of subsequent island stages decreases from nearly vertical sidewalls toward {l_brace}111{r_brace}- and {l_brace}101{r_brace}-type facets. Energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis yields a size-independent germanium content of 8.9% within islands between 760 and 1700 nm base width which is--by more than a factor of 2--smaller than islands of the same concentration grown in a near-equilibrium LPE process. Square-like formations of subsequently smaller islands around a large central island indicate only next to island interactions during the lateral self-assembling.

  18. ICER-3D Hyperspectral Image Compression Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Hua; Kiely, Aaron; Klimesh, matthew; Aranki, Nazeeh

    2010-01-01

    Software has been developed to implement the ICER-3D algorithm. ICER-3D effects progressive, three-dimensional (3D), wavelet-based compression of hyperspectral images. If a compressed data stream is truncated, the progressive nature of the algorithm enables reconstruction of hyperspectral data at fidelity commensurate with the given data volume. The ICER-3D software is capable of providing either lossless or lossy compression, and incorporates an error-containment scheme to limit the effects of data loss during transmission. The compression algorithm, which was derived from the ICER image compression algorithm, includes wavelet-transform, context-modeling, and entropy coding subalgorithms. The 3D wavelet decomposition structure used by ICER-3D exploits correlations in all three dimensions of sets of hyperspectral image data, while facilitating elimination of spectral ringing artifacts, using a technique summarized in "Improving 3D Wavelet-Based Compression of Spectral Images" (NPO-41381), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 3 (March 2009), page 7a. Correlation is further exploited by a context-modeling subalgorithm, which exploits spectral dependencies in the wavelet-transformed hyperspectral data, using an algorithm that is summarized in "Context Modeler for Wavelet Compression of Hyperspectral Images" (NPO-43239), which follows this article. An important feature of ICER-3D is a scheme for limiting the adverse effects of loss of data during transmission. In this scheme, as in the similar scheme used by ICER, the spatial-frequency domain is partitioned into rectangular error-containment regions. In ICER-3D, the partitions extend through all the wavelength bands. The data in each partition are compressed independently of those in the other partitions, so that loss or corruption of data from any partition does not affect the other partitions. Furthermore, because compression is progressive within each partition, when data are lost, any data from that partition received

  19. Nanomagnetic Levitation 3-D Cultures of Breast and Colorectal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bumpers, Harvey L.; Janagama, Dasharatham G.; Manne, Upender; Basson, Marc D.; Katkoori, Venkat

    2014-01-01

    Background Innovative technologies for drug discovery and development, cancer models, stem cell research, tissue engineering, and drug testing in various cell-based platforms require an application similar to the in vivo system. Materials and Methods We developed for the first time nanomagnetically levitated three dimensional (3-D) cultures of breast cancer (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) cells using carbon encapsulated cobalt magnetic nanoparticles. BC and CRC xenografts grown in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice were evaluated for N-cadherin and Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expressions. These phenotypes were compared with 2-D cultures and 3-D cultures grown in a gel matrix. Results The BC and CRC cells grown by magnetic levitation formed microtissues. The levitated cultures had high viability and were maintained in culture for long periods of time. It has been observed that N-cadherin and EGFR activities were highly expressed in the levitated 3-D tumor spheres and xenografts of CRC and BC cells. Conclusions Nanomagnetically levitated 3-D cultures tend to form stable microtissues of BC and CRC and may be more feasible for a range of applications in drug discovery or regenerative medicine. PMID:25617973

  20. T-HEMP3D user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.

    1983-08-01

    The T-HEMP3D (Transportable HEMP3D) computer program is a derivative of the STEALTH three-dimensional thermodynamics code developed by Science Applications, Inc., under the direction of Ron Hofmann. STEALTH, in turn, is based entirely on the original HEMP3D code written at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The primary advantage STEALTH has over its predecessors is that it was designed using modern structured design techniques, with rigorous programming standards enforced. This yields two benefits. First, the code is easily changeable; this is a necessity for a physics code used for research. The second benefit is that the code is easily transportable between different types of computers. The STEALTH program was transferred to LLNL under a cooperative development agreement. Changes were made primarily in three areas: material specification, coordinate generation, and the addition of sliding surface boundary conditions. The code was renamed T-HEMP3D to avoid confusion with other versions of STEALTH. This document summarizes the input to T-HEMP3D, as used at LLNL. It does not describe the physics simulated by the program, nor the numerical techniques employed. Furthermore, it does not describe the separate job steps of coordinate generation and post-processing, including graphical display of results. (WHK)

  1. The importance of 3D dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been getting progressively more complex for the past 20 years. Early radiation therapy techniques needed only basic dosimetry equipment; motorized water phantoms, ionization chambers, and basic radiographic film techniques. As intensity modulated radiation therapy and image guided therapy came into widespread practice, medical physicists were challenged with developing effective and efficient dose measurement techniques. The complex 3-dimensional (3D) nature of the dose distributions that were being delivered demanded the development of more quantitative and more thorough methods for dose measurement. The quality assurance vendors developed a wide array of multidetector arrays that have been enormously useful for measuring and characterizing dose distributions, and these have been made especially useful with the advent of 3D dose calculation systems based on the array measurements, as well as measurements made using film and portal imagers. Other vendors have been providing 3D calculations based on data from the linear accelerator or the record and verify system, providing thorough evaluation of the dose but lacking quality assurance (QA) of the dose delivery process, including machine calibration. The current state of 3D dosimetry is one of a state of flux. The vendors and professional associations are trying to determine the optimal balance between thorough QA, labor efficiency, and quantitation. This balance will take some time to reach, but a necessary component will be the 3D measurement and independent calculation of delivered radiation therapy dose distributions.

  2. 3D Spray Droplet Distributions in Sneezes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Techet, Alexandra; Scharfman, Barry; Bourouiba, Lydia

    2015-11-01

    3D spray droplet clouds generated during human sneezing are investigated using the Synthetic Aperture Feature Extraction (SAFE) method, which relies on light field imaging (LFI) and synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing computational photographic techniques. An array of nine high-speed cameras are used to image sneeze droplets and tracked the droplets in 3D space and time (3D + T). An additional high-speed camera is utilized to track the motion of the head during sneezing. In the SAFE method, the raw images recorded by each camera in the array are preprocessed and binarized, simplifying post processing after image refocusing and enabling the extraction of feature sizes and positions in 3D + T. These binary images are refocused using either additive or multiplicative methods, combined with thresholding. Sneeze droplet centroids, radii, distributions and trajectories are determined and compared with existing data. The reconstructed 3D droplet centroids and radii enable a more complete understanding of the physical extent and fluid dynamics of sneeze ejecta. These measurements are important for understanding the infectious disease transmission potential of sneezes in various indoor environments.

  3. Extra dimensions: 3D in PDF documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Norman A.

    2011-01-11

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universal 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. Furthermore, we demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.

  4. 3D dynamic roadmapping for abdominal catheterizations.

    PubMed

    Bender, Frederik; Groher, Martin; Khamene, Ali; Wein, Wolfgang; Heibel, Tim Hauke; Navab, Nassir

    2008-01-01

    Despite rapid advances in interventional imaging, the navigation of a guide wire through abdominal vasculature remains, not only for novice radiologists, a difficult task. Since this navigation is mostly based on 2D fluoroscopic image sequences from one view, the process is slowed down significantly due to missing depth information and patient motion. We propose a novel approach for 3D dynamic roadmapping in deformable regions by predicting the location of the guide wire tip in a 3D vessel model from the tip's 2D location, respiratory motion analysis, and view geometry. In a first step, the method compensates for the apparent respiratory motion in 2D space before backprojecting the 2D guide wire tip into three dimensional space, using a given projection matrix. To countervail the error connected to the projection parameters and the motion compensation, as well as the ambiguity caused by vessel deformation, we establish a statistical framework, which computes a reliable estimate of the guide wire tip location within the 3D vessel model. With this 2D-to-3D transfer, the navigation can be performed from arbitrary viewing angles, disconnected from the static perspective view of the fluoroscopic sequence. Tests on a realistic breathing phantom and on synthetic data with a known ground truth clearly reveal the superiority of our approach compared to naive methods for 3D roadmapping. The concepts and information presented in this paper are based on research and are not commercially available. PMID:18982662

  5. 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues.

    PubMed

    Mandrycky, Christian; Wang, Zongjie; Kim, Keekyoung; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Bioprinting is a 3D fabrication technology used to precisely dispense cell-laden biomaterials for the construction of complex 3D functional living tissues or artificial organs. While still in its early stages, bioprinting strategies have demonstrated their potential use in regenerative medicine to generate a variety of transplantable tissues, including skin, cartilage, and bone. However, current bioprinting approaches still have technical challenges in terms of high-resolution cell deposition, controlled cell distributions, vascularization, and innervation within complex 3D tissues. While no one-size-fits-all approach to bioprinting has emerged, it remains an on-demand, versatile fabrication technique that may address the growing organ shortage as well as provide a high-throughput method for cell patterning at the micrometer scale for broad biomedical engineering applications. In this review, we introduce the basic principles, materials, integration strategies and applications of bioprinting. We also discuss the recent developments, current challenges and future prospects of 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues. Combined with recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell technologies, 3D-bioprinted tissue models could serve as an enabling platform for high-throughput predictive drug screening and more effective regenerative therapies.

  6. Shim3d Helmholtz Solution Package

    2009-01-29

    This suite of codes solves the Helmholtz Equation for the steady-state propagation of single-frequency electromagnetic radiation in an arbitrary 2D or 3D dielectric medium. Materials can be either transparent or absorptive (including metals) and are described entirely by their shape and complex dielectric constant. Dielectric boundaries are assumed to always fall on grid boundaries and the material within a single grid cell is considered to be uniform. Input to the problem is in the formmore » of a Dirichlet boundary condition on a single boundary, and may be either analytic (Gaussian) in shape, or a mode shape computed using a separate code (such as the included eigenmode solver vwave20), and written to a file. Solution is via the finite difference method using Jacobi iteration for 3D problems or direct matrix inversion for 2D problems. Note that 3D problems that include metals will require different iteration parameters than described in the above reference. For structures with curved boundaries not easily modeled on a rectangular grid, the auxillary codes helmholtz11(2D), helm3d (semivectoral), and helmv3d (full vectoral) are provided. For these codes the finite difference equations are specified on a topological regular triangular grid and solved using Jacobi iteration or direct matrix inversion as before. An automatic grid generator is supplied.« less

  7. Full-color holographic 3D printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Masami; Shigeta, Hiroaki; Nishihara, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Susumu; Ohyama, Nagaaki; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Iwata, Fujio

    2003-05-01

    A holographic 3D printer is a system that produces a direct hologram with full-parallax information using the 3-dimensional data of a subject from a computer. In this paper, we present a proposal for the reproduction of full-color images with the holographic 3D printer. In order to realize the 3-dimensional color image, we selected the 3 laser wavelength colors of red (λ=633nm), green (λ=533nm), and blue (λ=442nm), and we built a one-step optical system using a projection system and a liquid crystal display. The 3-dimensional color image is obtained by synthesizing in a 2D array the multiple exposure with these 3 wavelengths made on each 250mm elementary hologram, and moving recording medium on a x-y stage. For the natural color reproduction in the holographic 3D printer, we take the approach of the digital processing technique based on the color management technology. The matching between the input and output colors is performed by investigating first, the relation between the gray level transmittance of the LCD and the diffraction efficiency of the hologram and second, by measuring the color displayed by the hologram to establish a correlation. In our first experimental results a non-linear functional relation for single and multiple exposure of the three components were found. These results are the first step in the realization of a natural color 3D image produced by the holographic color 3D printer.

  8. DYNA3D Code Practices and Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Zywicz, E.; Raboin, P.

    2000-04-21

    DYNA3D is an explicit, finite element code developed to solve high rate dynamic simulations for problems of interest to the engineering mechanics community. The DYNA3D code has been under continuous development since 1976[1] by the Methods Development Group in the Mechanical Engineering Department of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The pace of code development activities has substantially increased in the past five years, growing from one to between four and six code developers. This has necessitated the use of software tools such as CVS (Concurrent Versions System) to help manage multiple version updates. While on-line documentation with an Adobe PDF manual helps to communicate software developments, periodically a summary document describing recent changes and improvements in DYNA3D software is needed. The first part of this report describes issues surrounding software versions and source control. The remainder of this report details the major capability improvements since the last publicly released version of DYNA3D in 1996. Not included here are the many hundreds of bug corrections and minor enhancements, nor the development in DYNA3D between the manual release in 1993[2] and the public code release in 1996.

  9. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  10. Lifting Object Detection Datasets into 3D.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Joao; Vicente, Sara; Agapito, Lourdes; Batista, Jorge

    2016-07-01

    While data has certainly taken the center stage in computer vision in recent years, it can still be difficult to obtain in certain scenarios. In particular, acquiring ground truth 3D shapes of objects pictured in 2D images remains a challenging feat and this has hampered progress in recognition-based object reconstruction from a single image. Here we propose to bypass previous solutions such as 3D scanning or manual design, that scale poorly, and instead populate object category detection datasets semi-automatically with dense, per-object 3D reconstructions, bootstrapped from:(i) class labels, (ii) ground truth figure-ground segmentations and (iii) a small set of keypoint annotations. Our proposed algorithm first estimates camera viewpoint using rigid structure-from-motion and then reconstructs object shapes by optimizing over visual hull proposals guided by loose within-class shape similarity assumptions. The visual hull sampling process attempts to intersect an object's projection cone with the cones of minimal subsets of other similar objects among those pictured from certain vantage points. We show that our method is able to produce convincing per-object 3D reconstructions and to accurately estimate cameras viewpoints on one of the most challenging existing object-category detection datasets, PASCAL VOC. We hope that our results will re-stimulate interest on joint object recognition and 3D reconstruction from a single image. PMID:27295458

  11. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  12. 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues.

    PubMed

    Mandrycky, Christian; Wang, Zongjie; Kim, Keekyoung; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Bioprinting is a 3D fabrication technology used to precisely dispense cell-laden biomaterials for the construction of complex 3D functional living tissues or artificial organs. While still in its early stages, bioprinting strategies have demonstrated their potential use in regenerative medicine to generate a variety of transplantable tissues, including skin, cartilage, and bone. However, current bioprinting approaches still have technical challenges in terms of high-resolution cell deposition, controlled cell distributions, vascularization, and innervation within complex 3D tissues. While no one-size-fits-all approach to bioprinting has emerged, it remains an on-demand, versatile fabrication technique that may address the growing organ shortage as well as provide a high-throughput method for cell patterning at the micrometer scale for broad biomedical engineering applications. In this review, we introduce the basic principles, materials, integration strategies and applications of bioprinting. We also discuss the recent developments, current challenges and future prospects of 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues. Combined with recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell technologies, 3D-bioprinted tissue models could serve as an enabling platform for high-throughput predictive drug screening and more effective regenerative therapies. PMID:26724184

  13. 3D culture for cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Zuppinger, Christian

    2016-07-01

    This review discusses historical milestones, recent developments and challenges in the area of 3D culture models with cardiovascular cell types. Expectations in this area have been raised in recent years, but more relevant in vitro research, more accurate drug testing results, reliable disease models and insights leading to bioartificial organs are expected from the transition to 3D cell culture. However, the construction of organ-like cardiac 3D models currently remains a difficult challenge. The heart consists of highly differentiated cells in an intricate arrangement.Furthermore, electrical “wiring”, a vascular system and multiple cell types act in concert to respond to the rapidly changing demands of the body. Although cardiovascular 3D culture models have been predominantly developed for regenerative medicine in the past, their use in drug screening and for disease models has become more popular recently. Many sophisticated 3D culture models are currently being developed in this dynamic area of life science. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  14. Miniaturized 3D microscope imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yung-Sung; Chang, Chir-Weei; Sung, Hsin-Yueh; Wang, Yen-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Yi

    2015-05-01

    We designed and assembled a portable 3-D miniature microscopic image system with the size of 35x35x105 mm3 . By integrating a microlens array (MLA) into the optical train of a handheld microscope, the biological specimen's image will be captured for ease of use in a single shot. With the light field raw data and program, the focal plane can be changed digitally and the 3-D image can be reconstructed after the image was taken. To localize an object in a 3-D volume, an automated data analysis algorithm to precisely distinguish profundity position is needed. The ability to create focal stacks from a single image allows moving or specimens to be recorded. Applying light field microscope algorithm to these focal stacks, a set of cross sections will be produced, which can be visualized using 3-D rendering. Furthermore, we have developed a series of design rules in order to enhance the pixel using efficiency and reduce the crosstalk between each microlens for obtain good image quality. In this paper, we demonstrate a handheld light field microscope (HLFM) to distinguish two different color fluorescence particles separated by a cover glass in a 600um range, show its focal stacks, and 3-D position.

  15. Extra dimensions: 3D in PDF documentation

    DOE PAGES

    Graf, Norman A.

    2011-01-11

    Experimental science is replete with multi-dimensional information which is often poorly represented by the two dimensions of presentation slides and print media. Past efforts to disseminate such information to a wider audience have failed for a number of reasons, including a lack of standards which are easy to implement and have broad support. Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF) has in recent years become the de facto standard for secure, dependable electronic information exchange. It has done so by creating an open format, providing support for multiple platforms and being reliable and extensible. By providing support for the ECMA standard Universalmore » 3D (U3D) file format in its free Adobe Reader software, Adobe has made it easy to distribute and interact with 3D content. By providing support for scripting and animation, temporal data can also be easily distributed to a wide, non-technical audience. We discuss how the field of radiation imaging could benefit from incorporating full 3D information about not only the detectors, but also the results of the experimental analyses, in its electronic publications. In this article, we present examples drawn from high-energy physics, mathematics and molecular biology which take advantage of this functionality. Furthermore, we demonstrate how 3D detector elements can be documented, using either CAD drawings or other sources such as GEANT visualizations as input.« less

  16. 3D optical measuring technologies and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugui, Yuri V.

    2005-02-01

    The results of the R & D activity of TDI SIE SB RAS in the field of the 3D optical measuring technologies and systems for noncontact 3D optical dimensional inspection applied to atomic and railway industry safety problems are presented. This activity includes investigations of diffraction phenomena on some 3D objects, using the original constructive calculation method. The efficient algorithms for precise determining the transverse and longitudinal sizes of 3D objects of constant thickness by diffraction method, peculiarities on formation of the shadow and images of the typical elements of the extended objects were suggested. Ensuring the safety of nuclear reactors and running trains as well as their high exploitation reliability requires a 100% noncontact precise inspection of geometrical parameters of their components. To solve this problem we have developed methods and produced the technical vision measuring systems LMM, CONTROL, PROFIL, and technologies for noncontact 3D dimensional inspection of grid spacers and fuel elements for the nuclear reactor VVER-1000 and VVER-440, as well as automatic laser diagnostic COMPLEX for noncontact inspection of geometric parameters of running freight car wheel pairs. The performances of these systems and the results of industrial testing are presented and discussed. The created devices are in pilot operation at Atomic and Railway Companies.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition growth of a periodic array of single-layer MoS2 islands via lithographic patterning of an SiO2/Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dezheng; Nguyen, Ariana E.; Barroso, David; Zhang, Xian; Preciado, Edwin; Bobek, Sarah; Klee, Velveth; Mann, John; Bartels, Ludwig

    2015-12-01

    The growth of micron-scale single-layer MoS2 islands is seeded and distributed at high fidelity by means of a regular array of micron-scale holes that extend through the oxide layer of a 300 nm SiO2/Si substrate. Low coverages exhibit individual sub-micron MoS2 islands directly adjacent to the seed positions. At moderate coverage the seed holes are encircled by merged MoS2 islands, whose overall shape and internal grain boundaries reveal coalescence out of several initial crystallites. Seeded islands are strictly monolayer in height, non-overlapping and they offer high photoluminescence as well as conventional Raman signatures.

  18. 3D simulation of the Cluster-Cluster Aggregation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Xiong, Hailing

    2014-12-01

    We write a program to implement the Cluster-Cluster Aggregation (CCA) model with java programming language. By using the simulation program, the fractal aggregation growth process can be displayed dynamically in the form of a three-dimensional (3D) figure. Meanwhile, the related kinetics data of aggregation simulation can be also recorded dynamically. Compared to the traditional programs, the program has better real-time performance and is more helpful to observe the fractal growth process, which contributes to the scientific study in fractal aggregation. Besides, because of adopting java programming language, the program has very good cross-platform performance.

  19. 3D Simulation: Microgravity Environments and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Steve L.; Dischinger, Charles; Estes, Samantha; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most, if not all, 3-D and Virtual Reality (VR) software programs are designed for one-G gravity applications. Space environments simulations require gravity effects of one one-thousandth to one one-million of that of the Earth's surface (10(exp -3) - 10(exp -6) G), thus one must be able to generate simulations that replicate those microgravity effects upon simulated astronauts. Unfortunately, the software programs utilized by the National Aeronautical and Space Administration does not have the ability to readily neutralize the one-G gravity effect. This pre-programmed situation causes the engineer or analysis difficulty during micro-gravity simulations. Therefore, microgravity simulations require special techniques or additional code in order to apply the power of 3D graphic simulation to space related applications. This paper discusses the problem and possible solutions to allow microgravity 3-D/VR simulations to be completed successfully without program code modifications.

  20. 3D differential phase contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michael; Tian, Lei; Waller, Laura

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) optical phase and amplitude reconstruction based on coded source illumination using a programmable LED array. Multiple stacks of images along the optical axis are computed from recorded intensities captured by multiple images under off-axis illumination. Based on the first Born approximation, a linear differential phase contrast (DPC) model is built between 3D complex index of refraction and the intensity stacks. Therefore, 3D volume reconstruction can be achieved via a fast inversion method, without the intermediate 2D phase retrieval step. Our system employs spatially partially coherent illumination, so the transverse resolution achieves twice the NA of coherent systems, while axial resolution is also improved 2× as compared to holographic imaging.

  1. The CIFIST 3D model atmosphere grid.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, H.-G.; Caffau, E.; Steffen, M.; Freytag, B.; Bonifacio, P.; Kučinskas, A.

    Grids of stellar atmosphere models and associated synthetic spectra are numerical products which have a large impact in astronomy due to their ubiquitous application in the interpretation of radiation from individual stars and stellar populations. 3D model atmospheres are now on the verge of becoming generally available for a wide range of stellar atmospheric parameters. We report on efforts to develop a grid of 3D model atmospheres for late-type stars within the CIFIST Team at Paris Observatory. The substantial demands in computational and human labor for the model production and post-processing render this apparently mundane task a challenging logistic exercise. At the moment the CIFIST grid comprises 77 3D model atmospheres with emphasis on dwarfs of solar and sub-solar metallicities. While the model production is still ongoing, first applications are already worked upon by the CIFIST Team and collaborators.

  2. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve.

    PubMed

    Keating, Steven J; Gariboldi, Maria Isabella; Patrick, William G; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics.

  3. Simnple, portable, 3-D projection routine

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.S.

    1987-04-01

    A 3-D projection routine is presented for use in computer graphics applications. The routine is simple enough to be considered portable, and easily modified for special problems. There is often the need to draw three-dimensional objects on a two-dimensional plotting surface. For the object to appear realistic, perspective effects must be included that allow near objects to appear larger than distant objects. Several 3-D projection routines are commercially available, but they are proprietary, not portable, and not easily changed by the user. Most are restricted to surfaces that are functions of two variables. This makes them unsuitable for viewing physical objects such as accelerator prototypes or propagating beams. This report develops a very simple algorithm for 3-D projections; the core routine is only 39 FORTRAN lines long. It can be easily modified for special problems. Software dependent calls are confined to simple drivers that can be exchanged when different plotting software packages are used.

  4. Ames Lab 101: 3D Metals Printer

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Ryan

    2014-02-13

    To meet one of the biggest energy challenges of the 21st century - finding alternatives to rare-earth elements and other critical materials - scientists will need new and advanced tools. The Critical Materials Institute at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has a new one: a 3D printer for metals research. 3D printing technology, which has captured the imagination of both industry and consumers, enables ideas to move quickly from the initial design phase to final form using materials including polymers, ceramics, paper and even food. But the Critical Materials Institute (CMI) will apply the advantages of the 3D printing process in a unique way: for materials discovery.

  5. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, William G.; Sharma, Sunanda; Kong, David S.; Oxman, Neri

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics. PMID:27525809

  6. Structured light field 3D imaging.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zewei; Liu, Xiaoli; Peng, Xiang; Yin, Yongkai; Li, Ameng; Wu, Jiachen; Gao, Bruce Z

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a method by means of light field imaging under structured illumination to deal with high dynamic range 3D imaging. Fringe patterns are projected onto a scene and modulated by the scene depth then a structured light field is detected using light field recording devices. The structured light field contains information about ray direction and phase-encoded depth, via which the scene depth can be estimated from different directions. The multidirectional depth estimation can achieve high dynamic 3D imaging effectively. We analyzed and derived the phase-depth mapping in the structured light field and then proposed a flexible ray-based calibration approach to determine the independent mapping coefficients for each ray. Experimental results demonstrated the validity of the proposed method to perform high-quality 3D</