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Sample records for 3d large scale

  1. Application of DYNA3D in large scale crashworthiness calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.J.; Hallquist, J.O.; Igarashi, M.; Shimomaki, K.; Mizuno, M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an example of an automobile crashworthiness calculation. Based on our experiences with the example calculation, we make recommendations to those interested in performing crashworthiness calculations. The example presented in this paper was supplied by Suzuki Motor Co., Ltd., and provided a significant shakedown for the new large deformation shell capability of the DYNA3D code. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Solution accelerators for large scale 3D electromagnetic inverse problems

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Gregory A.; Boggs, Paul T.

    2004-04-05

    We provide a framework for preconditioning nonlinear 3D electromagnetic inverse scattering problems using nonlinear conjugate gradient (NLCG) and limited memory (LM) quasi-Newton methods. Key to our approach is the use of an approximate adjoint method that allows for an economical approximation of the Hessian that is updated at each inversion iteration. Using this approximate Hessian as a preconditoner, we show that the preconditioned NLCG iteration converges significantly faster than the non-preconditioned iteration, as well as converging to a data misfit level below that observed for the non-preconditioned method. Similar conclusions are also observed for the LM iteration; preconditioned with the approximate Hessian, the LM iteration converges faster than the non-preconditioned version. At this time, however, we see little difference between the convergence performance of the preconditioned LM scheme and the preconditioned NLCG scheme. A possible reason for this outcome is the behavior of the line search within the LM iteration. It was anticipated that, near convergence, a step size of one would be approached, but what was observed, instead, were step lengths that were nowhere near one. We provide some insights into the reasons for this behavior and suggest further research that may improve the performance of the LM methods.

  3. Polymer physics of chromosome large-scale 3D organisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiariello, Andrea M.; Annunziatella, Carlo; Bianco, Simona; Esposito, Andrea; Nicodemi, Mario

    2016-07-01

    Chromosomes have a complex architecture in the cell nucleus, which serves vital functional purposes, yet its structure and folding mechanisms remain still incompletely understood. Here we show that genome-wide chromatin architecture data, as mapped by Hi-C methods across mammalian cell types and chromosomes, are well described by classical scaling concepts of polymer physics, from the sub-Mb to chromosomal scales. Chromatin is a complex mixture of different regions, folded in the conformational classes predicted by polymer thermodynamics. The contact matrix of the Sox9 locus, a region linked to severe human congenital diseases, is derived with high accuracy in mESCs and its molecular determinants identified by the theory; Sox9 self-assembles hierarchically in higher-order domains, involving abundant many-body contacts. Our approach is also applied to the Bmp7 locus. Finally, the model predictions on the effects of mutations on folding are tested against available data on a deletion in the Xist locus. Our results can help progressing new diagnostic tools for diseases linked to chromatin misfolding.

  4. Polymer physics of chromosome large-scale 3D organisation

    PubMed Central

    Chiariello, Andrea M.; Annunziatella, Carlo; Bianco, Simona; Esposito, Andrea; Nicodemi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomes have a complex architecture in the cell nucleus, which serves vital functional purposes, yet its structure and folding mechanisms remain still incompletely understood. Here we show that genome-wide chromatin architecture data, as mapped by Hi-C methods across mammalian cell types and chromosomes, are well described by classical scaling concepts of polymer physics, from the sub-Mb to chromosomal scales. Chromatin is a complex mixture of different regions, folded in the conformational classes predicted by polymer thermodynamics. The contact matrix of the Sox9 locus, a region linked to severe human congenital diseases, is derived with high accuracy in mESCs and its molecular determinants identified by the theory; Sox9 self-assembles hierarchically in higher-order domains, involving abundant many-body contacts. Our approach is also applied to the Bmp7 locus. Finally, the model predictions on the effects of mutations on folding are tested against available data on a deletion in the Xist locus. Our results can help progressing new diagnostic tools for diseases linked to chromatin misfolding. PMID:27405443

  5. Polymer physics of chromosome large-scale 3D organisation.

    PubMed

    Chiariello, Andrea M; Annunziatella, Carlo; Bianco, Simona; Esposito, Andrea; Nicodemi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomes have a complex architecture in the cell nucleus, which serves vital functional purposes, yet its structure and folding mechanisms remain still incompletely understood. Here we show that genome-wide chromatin architecture data, as mapped by Hi-C methods across mammalian cell types and chromosomes, are well described by classical scaling concepts of polymer physics, from the sub-Mb to chromosomal scales. Chromatin is a complex mixture of different regions, folded in the conformational classes predicted by polymer thermodynamics. The contact matrix of the Sox9 locus, a region linked to severe human congenital diseases, is derived with high accuracy in mESCs and its molecular determinants identified by the theory; Sox9 self-assembles hierarchically in higher-order domains, involving abundant many-body contacts. Our approach is also applied to the Bmp7 locus. Finally, the model predictions on the effects of mutations on folding are tested against available data on a deletion in the Xist locus. Our results can help progressing new diagnostic tools for diseases linked to chromatin misfolding.

  6. Large-scale three-dimensional measurement via combining 3D scanner and laser rangefinder.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinlong; Sun, Zhengxing; Bai, Suqin

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) measurement method of large-scale objects by integrating a 3D scanner and a laser rangefinder. The 3D scanner, used to perform partial section measurement, is fixed on a robotic arm which can slide on a guide rail. The laser rangefinder, used to compute poses of the 3D scanner, is rigidly connected to the 3D scanner. During large-scale measurement, after measuring a partial section, the 3D scanner is straightly moved forward along the guide rail to measure another section. Meanwhile, the poses of the 3D scanner are estimated according to its moved distance for different partial section alignments. The performance and effectiveness are evaluated by experiments. PMID:25967194

  7. Management and services for large-scale virtual 3D urban model data based on network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhengwei; Chen, Jing; Wu, Huayi

    2008-10-01

    The buildings in modern city are complex and diverse, and the quantity is huge. These bring very big challenge for constructing 3D GIS under network circumstance and eventually realizing the Digital Earth. After analyzed the characteristic of network service about massive 3D urban building model data, this paper focuses on the organization and management of spatial data and the network services strategy, proposes a progressive network transmission schema based on the spatial resolution and the component elements of 3D building model data. Next, this paper put forward multistage-link three-dimensional spatial data organization model and encoding method of spatial index based on fully level quadtree structure. Then, a virtual earth platform, called GeoGlobe, was developed using above theory. Experimental results show that above 3D spatial data management model and service theory can availably provide network services for large-scale 3D urban model data. The application results and user experience good .

  8. Real-Time Large Scale 3d Reconstruction by Fusing Kinect and Imu Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huai, J.; Zhang, Y.; Yilmaz, A.

    2015-08-01

    Kinect-style RGB-D cameras have been used to build large scale dense 3D maps for indoor environments. These maps can serve many purposes such as robot navigation, and augmented reality. However, to generate dense 3D maps of large scale environments is still very challenging. In this paper, we present a mapping system for 3D reconstruction that fuses measurements from a Kinect and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) to estimate motion. Our major achievements include: (i) Large scale consistent 3D reconstruction is realized by volume shifting and loop closure; (ii) The coarse-to-fine iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm, the SIFT odometry, and IMU odometry are combined to robustly and precisely estimate pose. In particular, ICP runs routinely to track the Kinect motion. If ICP fails in planar areas, the SIFT odometry provides incremental motion estimate. If both ICP and the SIFT odometry fail, e.g., upon abrupt motion or inadequate features, the incremental motion is estimated by the IMU. Additionally, the IMU also observes the roll and pitch angles which can reduce long-term drift of the sensor assembly. In experiments on a consumer laptop, our system estimates motion at 8Hz on average while integrating color images to the local map and saving volumes of meshes concurrently. Moreover, it is immune to tracking failures, and has smaller drift than the state-of-the-art systems in large scale reconstruction.

  9. PROTEOME-3D: an interactive bioinformatics tool for large-scale data exploration and knowledge discovery.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Deborah H; Eng, Jimmy; Wright, Michael E; Han, David K

    2003-11-01

    Comprehensive understanding of biological systems requires efficient and systematic assimilation of high-throughput datasets in the context of the existing knowledge base. A major limitation in the field of proteomics is the lack of an appropriate software platform that can synthesize a large number of experimental datasets in the context of the existing knowledge base. Here, we describe a software platform, termed PROTEOME-3D, that utilizes three essential features for systematic analysis of proteomics data: creation of a scalable, queryable, customized database for identified proteins from published literature; graphical tools for displaying proteome landscapes and trends from multiple large-scale experiments; and interactive data analysis that facilitates identification of crucial networks and pathways. Thus, PROTEOME-3D offers a standardized platform to analyze high-throughput experimental datasets for the identification of crucial players in co-regulated pathways and cellular processes. PMID:12960178

  10. PROTEOME-3D: An Interactive Bioinformatics Tool for Large-Scale Data Exploration and Knowledge Discovery*

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Deborah H.; Eng, Jimmy; Wright, Michael E.; Han, David K.

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of biological systems requires efficient and systematic assimilation of high-throughput datasets in the context of the existing knowledge base. A major limitation in the field of proteomics is the lack of an appropriate software platform that can synthesize a large number of experimental datasets in the context of the existing knowledge base. Here, we describe a software platform, termed PROTEOME-3D, that utilizes three essential features for systematic analysis of proteomics data: creation of a scalable, queryable, customized database for identified proteins from published literature; graphical tools for displaying proteome landscapes and trends from multiple large-scale experiments; and interactive data analysis that facilitates identification of crucial networks and pathways. Thus, PROTEOME-3D offers a standardized platform to analyze high-throughput experimental datasets for the identification of crucial players in co-regulated pathways and cellular processes. PMID:12960178

  11. 3D fast adaptive correlation imaging for large-scale gravity data based on GPU computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Meng, X.; Guo, L.; Liu, G.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, large scale gravity data sets have been collected and employed to enhance gravity problem-solving abilities of tectonics studies in China. Aiming at the large scale data and the requirement of rapid interpretation, previous authors have carried out a lot of work, including the fast gradient module inversion and Euler deconvolution depth inversion ,3-D physical property inversion using stochastic subspaces and equivalent storage, fast inversion using wavelet transforms and a logarithmic barrier method. So it can be say that 3-D gravity inversion has been greatly improved in the last decade. Many authors added many different kinds of priori information and constraints to deal with nonuniqueness using models composed of a large number of contiguous cells of unknown property and obtained good results. However, due to long computation time, instability and other shortcomings, 3-D physical property inversion has not been widely applied to large-scale data yet. In order to achieve 3-D interpretation with high efficiency and precision for geological and ore bodies and obtain their subsurface distribution, there is an urgent need to find a fast and efficient inversion method for large scale gravity data. As an entirely new geophysical inversion method, 3D correlation has a rapid development thanks to the advantage of requiring no a priori information and demanding small amount of computer memory. This method was proposed to image the distribution of equivalent excess masses of anomalous geological bodies with high resolution both longitudinally and transversely. In order to tranform the equivalence excess masses into real density contrasts, we adopt the adaptive correlation imaging for gravity data. After each 3D correlation imaging, we change the equivalence into density contrasts according to the linear relationship, and then carry out forward gravity calculation for each rectangle cells. Next, we compare the forward gravity data with real data, and

  12. Web tools for large-scale 3D biological images and atlases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Large-scale volumetric biomedical image data of three or more dimensions are a significant challenge for distributed browsing and visualisation. Many images now exceed 10GB which for most users is too large to handle in terms of computer RAM and network bandwidth. This is aggravated when users need to access tens or hundreds of such images from an archive. Here we solve the problem for 2D section views through archive data delivering compressed tiled images enabling users to browse through very-large volume data in the context of a standard web-browser. The system provides an interactive visualisation for grey-level and colour 3D images including multiple image layers and spatial-data overlay. Results The standard Internet Imaging Protocol (IIP) has been extended to enable arbitrary 2D sectioning of 3D data as well a multi-layered images and indexed overlays. The extended protocol is termed IIP3D and we have implemented a matching server to deliver the protocol and a series of Ajax/Javascript client codes that will run in an Internet browser. We have tested the server software on a low-cost linux-based server for image volumes up to 135GB and 64 simultaneous users. The section views are delivered with response times independent of scale and orientation. The exemplar client provided multi-layer image views with user-controlled colour-filtering and overlays. Conclusions Interactive browsing of arbitrary sections through large biomedical-image volumes is made possible by use of an extended internet protocol and efficient server-based image tiling. The tools open the possibility of enabling fast access to large image archives without the requirement of whole image download and client computers with very large memory configurations. The system was demonstrated using a range of medical and biomedical image data extending up to 135GB for a single image volume. PMID:22676296

  13. Turbulent boundary layer over 2D and 3D large-scale wavy walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamed, Ali M.; Kamdar, Arpeet; Castillo, Luciano; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental investigation of the flow over two- and three-dimensional large-scale wavy walls was performed using high-resolution planar particle image velocimetry in a refractive-index-matching (RIM) channel. The 2D wall is described by a sinusoidal wave in the streamwise direction with amplitude to wavelength ratio a/λx = 0.05. The 3D wall is defined with an additional wave superimposed on the 2D wall in the spanwise direction with a/λy = 0.1. The flow over these walls was characterized at Reynolds numbers of 4000 and 40 000, based on the bulk velocity and the channel half height. Flow measurements were performed in a wall-normal plane for the two cases and in wall-parallel planes at three heights for the 3D wavy wall. Instantaneous velocity fields and time-averaged turbulence quantities reveal strong coupling between large-scale topography and the turbulence dynamics near the wall. Turbulence statistics show the presence of a well-structured shear layer that enhances the turbulence for the 2D wavy wall, whereas the 3D wall exhibits different flow dynamics and significantly lower turbulence levels. It is shown that the 3D surface limits the dynamics of the spanwise turbulent vortical structures, leading to reduced turbulence production and turbulent stresses and, consequently, lower average drag (wall shear stress). The likelihood of recirculation bubbles, levels and spatial distribution of turbulence, and rate of the turbulent kinetic energy production are shown to be severely affected when a single spanwise mode is superimposed on the 2D sinusoidal wall. Differences of one and two order of magnitudes are found in the turbulence levels and Reynolds shear stress at the low Reynolds number for the 2D and 3D cases. These results highlight the sensitivity of the flow to large-scale topographic modulations; in particular the levels and production of turbulent kinetic energy as well as the wall shear stress.

  14. Turbulent boundary layer over 2D and 3D large-scale wavy walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Hamed, Ali M.; Castillo, Luciano

    2015-11-01

    In this work, an experimental investigation of the developing and developed flow over two- and three-dimensional large-scale wavy walls was performed using high-resolution planar particle image velocimetry in a refractive-index-matching flume. The 2D wall is described by a sinusoidal wave in the streamwise direction with amplitude to wavelength ratio a/ λx = 0.05. The 3D wall is defined with an additional wave superimposed on the 2D wall in the spanwise direction with a/ λy = 0.1. The flow was characterized at Reynolds numbers of 4000 and 40000, based on the bulk velocity and the flume half height. Instantaneous velocity fields and time-averaged turbulence quantities reveal strong coupling between large-scale topography and the turbulence dynamics near the wall. Turbulence statistics show the presence of a well-structured shear layer that enhances the turbulence for the 2D wavy wall, whereas the 3D wall exhibits different flow dynamics and significantly lower turbulence levels, particularly for which shows about 30% reduction. The likelihood of recirculation bubbles, levels and spatial distribution of turbulence, and the rate of the turbulent kinetic energy production are shown to be severely affected when a single spanwise mode is superimposed on the 2D wall. POD analysis was also performed to further understand distinctive features of the flow structures due to surface topography.

  15. Large-scale Inference Problems in Astronomy: Building a 3D Galactic Dust Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas

    2016-03-01

    The term ''Big Data'' has become trite, as modern technology has made data sets of terabytes or even petabytes easy to store. Such data sets provide a sandbox in which to develop new statistical inference techniques that can extract interesting results from increasingly rich (and large) databases. I will give an example from my work on mapping the interstellar dust of the Milky Way. 2D emission-based maps have been used for decades to estimate the reddening and emission from interstellar dust, with applications from CMB foregrounds to surveys of large-scale structure. For studies within the Milky Way, however, the third dimension is required. I will present our work on a 3D dust map based on Pan-STARRS1 and 2MASS over 3/4 of the sky (http://arxiv.org/abs/1507.01005), assess its usefulness relative to other dust maps, and discuss future work. Supported by the NSF.

  16. Transport of iron oxide nanoparticles in saturated porous media: a large-scale 3D study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velimirovic, Milica; Schmid, Doris; Micić, Vesna; Miyajima, Kumiko; Klaas, Norbert; Braun, Jürgen; Bosch, Julian; Meckenstock, Rainer; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (FeOxNp) have a high potential as electron acceptor for in situ microbial oxidation of a wide range of recalcitrant groundwater contaminants (Bosch et al., 2010). Tosco et al. (2012) reported on high colloidal stability of FeOxNp dispersed in water, their low deposition behavior, and consequently improved transport in column experiments compared to extensively studied zerovalent iron nanoparticles. However, determination of FeOxNp transport behavior at the field-relevant conditions has not been done before. The present work is aimed to evaluate different complementary methods for detection, quantification and transport characterization of FeOxNp in a large-scale three-dimensional (3D) model aquifer. Prior to that, batch-scale experiments were performed in order to elucidate the potential of the selected methods for direct and indirect characterization and detection of FeOxNp. Direct methods included measurements of particle size distribution, particle concentration, Fetot content and turbidity of the FeOxNp suspension. Indirect methods included measurements of particle zeta potential, as well as TOC content and pH of the FeOxNp suspension. The results of the batch experiments indicated that the most suitable approach for detecting and quantifying FeOxNp was measuring Fetot content and suspension turbidity, as well as particle size determined using dynamic light scattering principle. These complementary methods were further applied in a large-scale 3D study containing medium and coarse sand in order to 1) assess the transport of FeOxNp in saturated porous medium during injection (VFeOx = 6 m3, cparticle = 20 g/L, Qinj = 0.7 m3/h), and 2) illustrate their spatial distribution after injection. The outcomes of the large-scale 3D study confirmed that FeOxNp transport can be successfully investigated applying complementary methods. Monitoring data including Fetot content, turbidity and particle size showed the transport of particles towards the

  17. Linearly Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David H.

    2008-07-01

    We present a new linearly scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method for large scale ab initio electronic structure calculations. LS3DF is based on a divide-and-conquer approach, which incorporates a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects due to the subdivision of the system. As a consequence, the LS3DF program yields essentially the same results as direct density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The fragments of the LS3DF algorithm can be calculated separately with different groups of processors. This leads to almost perfect parallelization on tens of thousands of processors. After code optimization, we were able to achieve 35.1 Tflop/s, which is 39percent of the theoretical speed on 17,280 Cray XT4 processor cores. Our 13,824-atom ZnTeO alloy calculation runs 400 times faster than a direct DFTcalculation, even presuming that the direct DFT calculation can scale well up to 17,280 processor cores. These results demonstrate the applicability of the LS3DF method to material simulations, the advantage of using linearly scaling algorithms over conventional O(N3) methods, and the potential for petascale computation using the LS3DF method.

  18. Enhanced ICP for the Registration of Large-Scale 3D Environment Models: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Han, Jianda; Yin, Peng; He, Yuqing; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    One of the main applications of mobile robots is the large-scale perception of the outdoor environment. One of the main challenges of this application is fusing environmental data obtained by multiple robots, especially heterogeneous robots. This paper proposes an enhanced iterative closest point (ICP) method for the fast and accurate registration of 3D environmental models. First, a hierarchical searching scheme is combined with the octree-based ICP algorithm. Second, an early-warning mechanism is used to perceive the local minimum problem. Third, a heuristic escape scheme based on sampled potential transformation vectors is used to avoid local minima and achieve optimal registration. Experiments involving one unmanned aerial vehicle and one unmanned surface vehicle were conducted to verify the proposed technique. The experimental results were compared with those of normal ICP registration algorithms to demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method. PMID:26891298

  19. Enhanced ICP for the Registration of Large-Scale 3D Environment Models: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jianda; Yin, Peng; He, Yuqing; Gu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    One of the main applications of mobile robots is the large-scale perception of the outdoor environment. One of the main challenges of this application is fusing environmental data obtained by multiple robots, especially heterogeneous robots. This paper proposes an enhanced iterative closest point (ICP) method for the fast and accurate registration of 3D environmental models. First, a hierarchical searching scheme is combined with the octree-based ICP algorithm. Second, an early-warning mechanism is used to perceive the local minimum problem. Third, a heuristic escape scheme based on sampled potential transformation vectors is used to avoid local minima and achieve optimal registration. Experiments involving one unmanned aerial vehicle and one unmanned surface vehicle were conducted to verify the proposed technique. The experimental results were compared with those of normal ICP registration algorithms to demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method. PMID:26891298

  20. The linearly scaling 3D fragment method for large scale electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-07-28

    The Linearly Scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method is an O(N) ab initio electronic structure method for large-scale nano material simulations. It is a divide-and-conquer approach with a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects, which exist in all divide-and-conquer schemes. This method has made ab initio simulations of thousand-atom nanosystems feasible in a couple of hours, while retaining essentially the same accuracy as the direct calculation methods. The LS3DF method won the 2008 ACM Gordon Bell Prize for algorithm innovation. Our code has reached 442 Tflop/s running on 147,456 processors on the Cray XT5 (Jaguar) at OLCF, and has been run on 163,840 processors on the Blue Gene/P (Intrepid) at ALCF, and has been applied to a system containing 36,000 atoms. In this paper, we will present the recent parallel performance results of this code, and will apply the method to asymmetric CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods, which have potential applications in electronic devices and solar cells.

  1. The Linearly Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large Scale Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-06-26

    The Linearly Scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method is an O(N) ab initio electronic structure method for large-scale nano material simulations. It is a divide-and-conquer approach with a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects, which exist in all divide-and-conquer schemes. This method has made ab initio simulations of thousand-atom nanosystems feasible in a couple of hours, while retaining essentially the same accuracy as the direct calculation methods. The LS3DF method won the 2008 ACM Gordon Bell Prize for algorithm innovation. Our code has reached 442 Tflop/s running on 147,456 processors on the Cray XT5 (Jaguar) at OLCF, and has been run on 163,840 processors on the Blue Gene/P (Intrepid) at ALCF, and has been applied to a system containing 36,000 atoms. In this paper, we will present the recent parallel performance results of this code, and will apply the method to asymmetric CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods, which have potential applications in electronic devices and solar cells.

  2. The linearly scaling 3D fragment method for large scale electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-07-01

    The linearly scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method is an O(N) ab initio electronic structure method for large-scale nano material simulations. It is a divide-and-conquer approach with a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects, which exist in all divide-and-conquer schemes. This method has made ab initio simulations of thousand-atom nanosystems feasible in a couple of hours, while retaining essentially the same accuracy as the direct calculation methods. The LS3DF method won the 2008 ACM Gordon Bell Prize for algorithm innovation. Our code has reached 442 Tflop/s running on 147,456 processors on the Cray XT5 (Jaguar) at OLCF, and has been run on 163,840 processors on the Blue Gene/P (Intrepid) at ALCF, and has been applied to a system containing 36,000 atoms. In this paper, we will present the recent parallel performance results of this code, and will apply the method to asymmetric CdSe/CdS core/shell nanorods, which have potential applications in electronic devices and solar cells.

  3. Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content

    DOE Data Explorer

    Liu, Guosheng

    2008-01-15

    Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the radar/lidar/radiometer observations at the ARM site are single-point measurement, therefore, do not provide horizontal distribution of condensed water. The intention of this product is to provide large-scale distribution of cloud ice water by merging available surface and satellite measurements. The satellite cloud ice water algorithm uses ARM ground-based measurements as baseline, produces datasets for 3-D cloud ice water distributions in a 10 deg x 10 deg area near ARM site. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) areal measurement. That is, this study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements at the point of ARM site. We use the cloud characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain satellite retrieval, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the cloud ice water distributions within an area, i.e., 10 deg x 10 deg centered at ARM site.

  4. Large-scale 3D simulations of ICF and HEDP targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinak, Michael M.

    2000-10-01

    The radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA continues to be developed and applied to 3D simulations of a variety of targets for both inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high energy density physics. Several packages have been added enabling this code to perform ICF target simulations with similar accuracy as two-dimensional codes of long-time historical use. These include a laser ray trace and deposition package, a heavy ion deposition package, implicit Monte Carlo photonics, and non-LTE opacities, derived from XSN or the linearized response matrix approach.(R. More, T. Kato, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 814 (1998), S. Libby, F. Graziani, R. More, T. Kato, Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Laser Interactions and Related Plasma Phenomena, (AIP, New York, 1997).) LTE opacities can also be calculated for arbitrary mixtures online by combining tabular values generated by different opacity codes. Thermonuclear burn, charged particle transport, neutron energy deposition, electron-ion coupling and conduction, and multigroup radiation diffusion packages are also installed. HYDRA can employ ALE hydrodynamics; a number of grid motion algorithms are available. Multi-material flows are resolved using material interface reconstruction. Results from large-scale simulations run on up to 1680 processors, using a combination of massively parallel processing and symmetric multiprocessing, will be described. A large solid angle simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in a NIF ignition capsule has resolved simultaneously the full spectrum of the most dangerous modes that grow from surface roughness. Simulations of a NIF hohlraum illuminated with the initial 96 beam configuration have also been performed. The effect of the hohlraum’s 3D intrinsic drive asymmetry on the capsule implosion will be considered. We will also discuss results from a Nova experiment in which a copper sphere is crushed by a planar shock. Several interacting hydrodynamic instabilities, including

  5. Error analysis and system implementation for structured light stereo vision 3D geometric detection in large scale condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Li; Zhang, Xuping; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Shun; Zhu, Fan

    2012-11-01

    Stereo vision based 3D metrology technique is an effective approach for relatively large scale object's 3D geometric detection. In this paper, we present a specified image capture system, which implements LVDS interface embedded CMOS sensor and CAN bus to ensure synchronous trigger and exposure. We made an error analysis for structured light vision measurement in large scale condition, based on which we built and tested the system prototype both indoor and outfield. The result shows that the system is very suitable for large scale metrology applications.

  6. Fusion of image and laser-scanning data in a large-scale 3D virtual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Jhih-Syuan; Lin, Ta-Te

    2013-05-01

    Construction of large-scale 3D virtual environment is important in many fields such as robotic navigation, urban planning, transportation, and remote sensing, etc. Laser scanning approach is the most common method used in constructing 3D models. This paper proposes an automatic method to fuse image and laser-scanning data in a large-scale 3D virtual environment. The system comprises a laser-scanning device installed on a robot platform and the software for data fusion and visualization. The algorithms of data fusion and scene integration are presented. Experiments were performed for the reconstruction of outdoor scenes to test and demonstrate the functionality of the system. We also discuss the efficacy of the system and technical problems involved in this proposed method.

  7. Accurate multiple view 3D reconstruction using patch-based stereo for large-scale scenes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shuhan

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a depth-map merging based multiple view stereo method for large-scale scenes which takes both accuracy and efficiency into account. In the proposed method, an efficient patch-based stereo matching process is used to generate depth-map at each image with acceptable errors, followed by a depth-map refinement process to enforce consistency over neighboring views. Compared to state-of-the-art methods, the proposed method can reconstruct quite accurate and dense point clouds with high computational efficiency. Besides, the proposed method could be easily parallelized at image level, i.e., each depth-map is computed individually, which makes it suitable for large-scale scene reconstruction with high resolution images. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method are evaluated quantitatively on benchmark data and qualitatively on large data sets.

  8. Cluster Analysis and Web-Based 3-D Visualization of Large-scale Geophysical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadlec, B. J.; Yuen, D. A.; Bollig, E. F.; Dzwinel, W.; da Silva, C. R.

    2004-05-01

    We present a problem-solving environment WEB-IS (Web-based Data Interrogative System), which we have developed for remote analysis and visualization of geophysical data [Garbow et. al., 2003]. WEB-IS employs agglomerative clustering methods intended for feature extraction and studying the predictions of large magnitude earthquake events. Data-mining is accomplished using a mutual nearest meighbor (MNN) algorithm for extracting event clusters of different density and shapes based on a hierarchical proximity measure. Clustering schemes used in molecular dynamics [Da Silva et. al., 2002] are also considered for increasing computational efficiency using a linked cell algorithm for creating a Verlet neighbor list (VNL) and extracting different cluster structures by applying a canonical backtracking search on the VNL. Space and time correlations between the events are visualized dynamically in 3-D through a filter by showing clusters at different timescales according to defined units of time ranging from days to years. This WEB-IS functionality was tested both on synthetic [Eneva and Ben-Zion, 1997] and actual earthquake catalogs of Japanese earthquakes and can be applied to the soft-computing data mining methods used in hydrology and geoinformatics. Da Silva, C.R.S., Justo, J.F., Fazzio, A., Phys Rev B, vol., 65, 2002. Eneva, M., Ben-Zion, Y.,J. Geophys. Res., 102, 17785-17795, 1997. Garbow, Z.A., Yuen, D.A., Erlebacher, G., Bollig, E.F., Kadlec, B.J., Vis. Geosci., 2003.

  9. Large-scale 3D galaxy correlation function and non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Doré, Olivier; Bertacca, Daniele; Maartens, Roy E-mail: daniele.bertacca@gmail.com E-mail: roy.maartens@gmail.com

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the properties of the 2-point galaxy correlation function at very large scales, including all geometric and local relativistic effects --- wide-angle effects, redshift space distortions, Doppler terms and Sachs-Wolfe type terms in the gravitational potentials. The general three-dimensional correlation function has a nonzero dipole and octupole, in addition to the even multipoles of the flat-sky limit. We study how corrections due to primordial non-Gaussianity and General Relativity affect the multipolar expansion, and we show that they are of similar magnitude (when f{sub NL} is small), so that a relativistic approach is needed. Furthermore, we look at how large-scale corrections depend on the model for the growth rate in the context of modified gravity, and we discuss how a modified growth can affect the non-Gaussian signal in the multipoles.

  10. A 3D Sphere Culture System Containing Functional Polymers for Large-Scale Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Production

    PubMed Central

    Otsuji, Tomomi G.; Bin, Jiang; Yoshimura, Azumi; Tomura, Misayo; Tateyama, Daiki; Minami, Itsunari; Yoshikawa, Yoshihiro; Aiba, Kazuhiro; Heuser, John E.; Nishino, Taito; Hasegawa, Kouichi; Nakatsuji, Norio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Utilizing human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in cell-based therapy and drug discovery requires large-scale cell production. However, scaling up conventional adherent cultures presents challenges of maintaining a uniform high quality at low cost. In this regard, suspension cultures are a viable alternative, because they are scalable and do not require adhesion surfaces. 3D culture systems such as bioreactors can be exploited for large-scale production. However, the limitations of current suspension culture methods include spontaneous fusion between cell aggregates and suboptimal passaging methods by dissociation and reaggregation. 3D culture systems that dynamically stir carrier beads or cell aggregates should be refined to reduce shearing forces that damage hPSCs. Here, we report a simple 3D sphere culture system that incorporates mechanical passaging and functional polymers. This setup resolves major problems associated with suspension culture methods and dynamic stirring systems and may be optimal for applications involving large-scale hPSC production. PMID:24936458

  11. Large-scale 3D mapping of the intergalactic medium using the Lyman α forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbek, Melih; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Khandai, Nishikanta

    2016-03-01

    Maps of the large-scale structure of the Universe at redshifts 2-4 can be made with the Lyman α forest which are complementary to low-redshift galaxy surveys. We apply the Wiener interpolation method of Caucci et al. to construct three-dimensional maps from sets of Lyman α forest spectra taken from cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We mimic some current and future quasar redshift surveys [Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), extended BOSS (eBOSS) and Mid-Scale Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (MS-DESI)] by choosing similar sightline densities. We use these appropriate subsets of the Lyman α absorption sightlines to reconstruct the full three-dimensional Lyman α flux field and perform comparisons between the true and the reconstructed fields. We study global statistical properties of the intergalactic medium (IGM) maps with autocorrelation and cross-correlation analysis, slice plots, local peaks and point-by-point scatter. We find that both the density field and the statistical properties of the IGM are recovered well enough that the resulting IGM maps can be meaningfully considered to represent large-scale maps of the Universe in agreement with Caucci et al., on larger scales and for sparser sightlines than had been tested previously. Quantitatively, for sightline parameters comparable to current and near future surveys the correlation coefficient between true and reconstructed fields is r > 0.9 on scales >30 h-1 Mpc. The properties of the maps are relatively insensitive to the precise form of the covariance matrix used. The final BOSS quasar Lyman α forest sample will allow maps to be made with a resolution of ˜30 h-1 Mpc over a volume of ˜15 h-3 Gpc3 between redshifts 1.9 and 2.3.

  12. Implementation of low communication frequency 3D FFT algorithm for ultra-large-scale micromagnetics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukahara, Hiroshi; Iwano, Kaoru; Mitsumata, Chiharu; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Ono, Kanta

    2016-10-01

    We implement low communication frequency three-dimensional fast Fourier transform algorithms on micromagnetics simulator for calculations of a magnetostatic field which occupies a significant portion of large-scale micromagnetics simulation. This fast Fourier transform algorithm reduces the frequency of all-to-all communications from six to two times. Simulation times with our simulator show high scalability in parallelization, even if we perform the micromagnetics simulation using 32 768 physical computing cores. This low communication frequency fast Fourier transform algorithm enables world largest class micromagnetics simulations to be carried out with over one billion calculation cells.

  13. 5D Modelling: An Efficient Approach for Creating Spatiotemporal Predictive 3D Maps of Large-Scale Cultural Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doulamis, A.; Doulamis, N.; Ioannidis, C.; Chrysouli, C.; Grammalidis, N.; Dimitropoulos, K.; Potsiou, C.; Stathopoulou, E.-K.; Ioannides, M.

    2015-08-01

    Outdoor large-scale cultural sites are mostly sensitive to environmental, natural and human made factors, implying an imminent need for a spatio-temporal assessment to identify regions of potential cultural interest (material degradation, structuring, conservation). On the other hand, in Cultural Heritage research quite different actors are involved (archaeologists, curators, conservators, simple users) each of diverse needs. All these statements advocate that a 5D modelling (3D geometry plus time plus levels of details) is ideally required for preservation and assessment of outdoor large scale cultural sites, which is currently implemented as a simple aggregation of 3D digital models at different time and levels of details. The main bottleneck of such an approach is its complexity, making 5D modelling impossible to be validated in real life conditions. In this paper, a cost effective and affordable framework for 5D modelling is proposed based on a spatial-temporal dependent aggregation of 3D digital models, by incorporating a predictive assessment procedure to indicate which regions (surfaces) of an object should be reconstructed at higher levels of details at next time instances and which at lower ones. In this way, dynamic change history maps are created, indicating spatial probabilities of regions needed further 3D modelling at forthcoming instances. Using these maps, predictive assessment can be made, that is, to localize surfaces within the objects where a high accuracy reconstruction process needs to be activated at the forthcoming time instances. The proposed 5D Digital Cultural Heritage Model (5D-DCHM) is implemented using open interoperable standards based on the CityGML framework, which also allows the description of additional semantic metadata information. Visualization aspects are also supported to allow easy manipulation, interaction and representation of the 5D-DCHM geometry and the respective semantic information. The open source 3DCity

  14. Large scale shaking table test on modal responses of 3-D piping system with friction support

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Kohei; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Hiroe

    1996-12-01

    Friction between pipe and supporting structure is generally known to reduce seismic responses of the piping system. Vibration tests using large-scale piping model of three dimensional configuration with friction support were carried out to evaluate reduction effect of piping response. The piping responses were governed by the first and the second mode of vibration. The test data of load and velocity via displacement showed that the mathematical model of friction in plane motion was reasonably described by f = {minus}{mu}N{nu}/{vert_bar}{nu}{vert_bar}, and was applicable to evaluate the response of the piping with friction support. A seismic response analysis procedure of the piping system with friction was developed by an approximate modal analysis and confirmed to be adequate to evaluate the piping response by comparing simulated results and test results, and consequently, response reduction effect due to friction was evaluated.

  15. Large-scale 3D modeling of projectile impact damage in brittle plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seagraves, A.; Radovitzky, R.

    2015-10-01

    The damage and failure of brittle plates subjected to projectile impact is investigated through large-scale three-dimensional simulation using the DG/CZM approach introduced by Radovitzky et al. [Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Eng. 2011; 200(1-4), 326-344]. Two standard experimental setups are considered: first, we simulate edge-on impact experiments on Al2O3 tiles by Strassburger and Senf [Technical Report ARL-CR-214, Army Research Laboratory, 1995]. Qualitative and quantitative validation of the simulation results is pursued by direct comparison of simulations with experiments at different loading rates and good agreement is obtained. In the second example considered, we investigate the fracture patterns in normal impact of spheres on thin, unconfined ceramic plates over a wide range of loading rates. For both the edge-on and normal impact configurations, the full field description provided by the simulations is used to interpret the mechanisms underlying the crack propagation patterns and their strong dependence on loading rate.

  16. Mapping 3D Large-Scale Structure at z ˜2 with Lyman-α Forest Tomographic Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Hennawi, J. F.; White, M.; Croft, R. A.; Prochaska, J. X.; Schlegel, D. J.; Suzuki, N.; Kneib, J.; Bailey, S. J.; Spergel, D. N.; Rix, H.; Strauss, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Lyman-α (Lyα) forest absorption at z>2 traces the underlying dark-matter distribution, and with a sufficient density of background sightlines can be used to create 3D tomographic maps of large-scale structure. Since the useful Lyα forest in each sightline spans ˜400-500 h-1Mpc, Lyα forest tomography can efficiently map out large-scale structure at z˜2. The Cosmic Lyman-Alpha Program for the Tomographic Reconstruction of Absorption Probes (CLAPTRAP) will be the first survey to attempt this technique. We aim to obtain spectra for a background grid of faint quasars and bright LBGs at 23D map with similar 3 h-1Mpc resolution to be reconstructed from the data. In a recent paper, we have found that spectra with S/N ˜ 4 per Å are sufficient to make excellent-quality tomographic maps that clearly trace the underlying dark-matter distribution at overdensities of order unity. This requires integrations of several hours on moderate-resolution spectrographs mounted on existing 8-10m telescopes, such as LRIS on the Keck-I telescope and VIMOS on the Very Large Telescopes. We aim to observe ˜1500-2000 background sources over 1 sq deg of the COSMOS field with Lyα forest coverage over 2.03D maps of large-scale structure at z>1. In conjunction with the rich multi-wavelength data from the COSMOS survey, these maps will facilitate the study of galaxies in the context of the large-scale environment, reveal the topology of large-scale structure at high-redshifts, and allow the direct detection of galaxy protoclusters at the intersections of the cosmic web. The

  17. Study of materials and machines for 3D printed large-scale, flexible electronic structures using fused deposition modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seyeon

    The 3 dimensional printing (3DP), called to additive manufacturing (AM) or rapid prototyping (RP), is emerged to revolutionize manufacturing and completely transform how products are designed and fabricated. A great deal of research activities have been carried out to apply this new technology to a variety of fields. In spite of many endeavors, much more research is still required to perfect the processes of the 3D printing techniques especially in the area of the large-scale additive manufacturing and flexible printed electronics. The principles of various 3D printing processes are briefly outlined in the Introduction Section. New types of thermoplastic polymer composites aiming to specified functional applications are also introduced in this section. Chapter 2 shows studies about the metal/polymer composite filaments for fused deposition modeling (FDM) process. Various metal particles, copper and iron particles, are added into thermoplastics polymer matrices as the reinforcement filler. The thermo-mechanical properties, such as thermal conductivity, hardness, tensile strength, and fracture mechanism, of composites are tested to figure out the effects of metal fillers on 3D printed composite structures for the large-scale printing process. In Chapter 3, carbon/polymer composite filaments are developed by a simple mechanical blending process with an aim of fabricating the flexible 3D printed electronics as a single structure. Various types of carbon particles consisting of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT), conductive carbon black (CCB), and graphite are used as the conductive fillers to provide the thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) with improved electrical conductivity. The mechanical behavior and conduction mechanisms of the developed composite materials are observed in terms of the loading amount of carbon fillers in this section. Finally, the prototype flexible electronics are modeled and manufactured by the FDM process using Carbon/TPU composite filaments and

  18. 3D-Simulation Of Concentration Distributions Inside Large-Scale Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wischnewski, R.; Ratschow, L.; Hartge, E. U.; Werthe, J.

    With increasing size of modern CFB combustors the lateral mixing of fuels and secondary air gains more and more importance. Strong concentration gradients, which result from improper lateral mixing, can lead to operational problems, high flue gas emissions and lower boiler efficiencies. A 3D-model for the simulation of local gas and solids concentrations inside industrial-sized CFB boilers has been developed. The model is based on a macroscopic approach and considers all major mechanisms during fuel spreading and subsequent combustion of char and volatiles. Typical characteristics of modern boilers like staged combustion, a smaller cross-sectional area in the lower section of the combustion chamber and the co-combustion of additional fuels with coal can be considered. The 252 MWth combustor of Stadtwerke Duisburg AG is used for the validation of the model. A comprehensive picture of the local conditions inside the combustion chamber is achieved by the combination of local gas measurements and the three-dimensional simulation of concentration distributions.

  19. Characterizing and Understanding Large-Scale Wave Propagation in the Atmosphere through Graphs of 3D Information Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y.; Ebert-Uphoff, I.; Chen, J.

    2015-12-01

    Causal discovery seeks to discover potential cause-effect relationships from observational data. Here we adopt the idea of interpreting large-scale atmospheric dynamical processes, particularly those tied to propagation of large-scale waves, as information flow around the globe, which can then be calculated using causal discovery methods. We apply a well-established causal discovery algorithm - based on constraint-based structure learning of probabilistic graphical models - toward 51 years of 6-hourly, atmospheric isobaric-level geopotential height data to construct the first-ever graphs of 3D information flow in the atmosphere. These graphs are created globally for different seasons and their connection to phase/energy propagation of atmospheric waves are investigated. Specifically, we examine the information flows 1) in the topical region that represent horizontal and vertical propagations of Kelvin and Rossby-gravity waves whose associated momentum transfer are known to play a key role in the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO), and 2) in the northern extratropics that represent propagations of planetary-scale waves whose heat/momentum fluxes are responsible for vacillations in the polar stratospheric vortex and occurrences of extreme events such as the stratospheric sudden warming. The sensitivity of the constructed graphs of 3D information flow to data resolution and pre-processing methods (e.g., spatial and temporal filtering) will be discussed.

  20. 3-D imaging of large scale buried structure by 1-D inversion of very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aydmer, A.A.; Chew, W.C.; Cui, T.J.; Wright, D.L.; Smith, D.V.; Abraham, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    A simple and efficient method for large scale three-dimensional (3-D) subsurface imaging of inhomogeneous background is presented. One-dimensional (1-D) multifrequency distorted Born iterative method (DBIM) is employed in the inversion. Simulation results utilizing synthetic scattering data are given. Calibration of the very early time electromagnetic (VETEM) experimental waveforms is detailed along with major problems encountered in practice and their solutions. This discussion is followed by the results of a large scale application of the method to the experimental data provided by the VETEM system of the U.S. Geological Survey. The method is shown to have a computational complexity that is promising for on-site inversion.

  1. Fabrication of Large-Scale Microlens Arrays Based on Screen Printing for Integral Imaging 3D Display.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiongtu; Peng, Yuyan; Peng, Rong; Zeng, Xiangyao; Zhang, Yong-Ai; Guo, Tailiang

    2016-09-14

    The low-cost large-scale fabrication of microlens arrays (MLAs) with precise alignment, great uniformity of focusing, and good converging performance are of great importance for integral imaging 3D display. In this work, a simple and effective method for large-scale polymer microlens arrays using screen printing has been successfully presented. The results show that the MLAs possess high-quality surface morphology and excellent optical performances. Furthermore, the microlens' shape and size, i.e., the diameter, the height, and the distance between two adjacent microlenses of the MLAs can be easily controlled by modifying the reflowing time and the size of open apertures of the screen. MLAs with the neighboring microlenses almost tangent can be achieved under suitable size of open apertures of the screen and reflowing time, which can remarkably reduce the color moiré patterns caused by the stray light between the blank areas of the MLAs in the integral imaging 3D display system, exhibiting much better reconstruction performance. PMID:27540754

  2. Large-scale Parallel Unstructured Mesh Computations for 3D High-lift Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Pirzadeh, S.

    1999-01-01

    A complete "geometry to drag-polar" analysis capability for the three-dimensional high-lift configurations is described. The approach is based on the use of unstructured meshes in order to enable rapid turnaround for complicated geometries that arise in high-lift configurations. Special attention is devoted to creating a capability for enabling analyses on highly resolved grids. Unstructured meshes of several million vertices are initially generated on a work-station, and subsequently refined on a supercomputer. The flow is solved on these refined meshes on large parallel computers using an unstructured agglomeration multigrid algorithm. Good prediction of lift and drag throughout the range of incidences is demonstrated on a transport take-off configuration using up to 24.7 million grid points. The feasibility of using this approach in a production environment on existing parallel machines is demonstrated, as well as the scalability of the solver on machines using up to 1450 processors.

  3. V3D enables real-time 3D visualization and quantitative analysis of large-scale biological image data sets.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hanchuan; Ruan, Zongcai; Long, Fuhui; Simpson, Julie H; Myers, Eugene W

    2010-04-01

    The V3D system provides three-dimensional (3D) visualization of gigabyte-sized microscopy image stacks in real time on current laptops and desktops. V3D streamlines the online analysis, measurement and proofreading of complicated image patterns by combining ergonomic functions for selecting a location in an image directly in 3D space and for displaying biological measurements, such as from fluorescent probes, using the overlaid surface objects. V3D runs on all major computer platforms and can be enhanced by software plug-ins to address specific biological problems. To demonstrate this extensibility, we built a V3D-based application, V3D-Neuron, to reconstruct complex 3D neuronal structures from high-resolution brain images. V3D-Neuron can precisely digitize the morphology of a single neuron in a fruitfly brain in minutes, with about a 17-fold improvement in reliability and tenfold savings in time compared with other neuron reconstruction tools. Using V3D-Neuron, we demonstrate the feasibility of building a 3D digital atlas of neurite tracts in the fruitfly brain. PMID:20231818

  4. Highly ordered large-scale neuronal networks of individual cells - toward single cell to 3D nanowire intracellular interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kwiat, Moria; Elnathan, Roey; Pevzner, Alexander; Peretz, Asher; Barak, Boaz; Peretz, Hagit; Ducobni, Tamir; Stein, Daniel; Mittelman, Leonid; Ashery, Uri; Patolsky, Fernando

    2012-07-25

    The use of artificial, prepatterned neuronal networks in vitro is a promising approach for studying the development and dynamics of small neural systems in order to understand the basic functionality of neurons and later on of the brain. The present work presents a high fidelity and robust procedure for controlling neuronal growth on substrates such as silicon wafers and glass, enabling us to obtain mature and durable neural networks of individual cells at designed geometries. It offers several advantages compared to other related techniques that have been reported in recent years mainly because of its high yield and reproducibility. The procedure is based on surface chemistry that allows the formation of functional, tailormade neural architectures with a micrometer high-resolution partition, that has the ability to promote or repel cells attachment. The main achievements of this work are deemed to be the creation of a large scale neuronal network at low density down to individual cells, that develop intact typical neurites and synapses without any glia-supportive cells straight from the plating stage and with a relatively long term survival rate, up to 4 weeks. An important application of this method is its use on 3D nanopillars and 3D nanowire-device arrays, enabling not only the cell bodies, but also their neurites to be positioned directly on electrical devices and grow with registration to the recording elements underneath.

  5. Automatic Detection, Segmentation and Classification of Retinal Horizontal Neurons in Large-scale 3D Confocal Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Karakaya, Mahmut; Kerekes, Ryan A; Gleason, Shaun Scott; Martins, Rodrigo; Dyer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Automatic analysis of neuronal structure from wide-field-of-view 3D image stacks of retinal neurons is essential for statistically characterizing neuronal abnormalities that may be causally related to neural malfunctions or may be early indicators for a variety of neuropathies. In this paper, we study classification of neuron fields in large-scale 3D confocal image stacks, a challenging neurobiological problem because of the low spatial resolution imagery and presence of intertwined dendrites from different neurons. We present a fully automated, four-step processing approach for neuron classification with respect to the morphological structure of their dendrites. In our approach, we first localize each individual soma in the image by using morphological operators and active contours. By using each soma position as a seed point, we automatically determine an appropriate threshold to segment dendrites of each neuron. We then use skeletonization and network analysis to generate the morphological structures of segmented dendrites, and shape-based features are extracted from network representations of each neuron to characterize the neuron. Based on qualitative results and quantitative comparisons, we show that we are able to automatically compute relevant features that clearly distinguish between normal and abnormal cases for postnatal day 6 (P6) horizontal neurons.

  6. LARGE-SCALE STAR-FORMATION-DRIVEN OUTFLOWS AT 1 < z < 2 IN THE 3D-HST SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, Britt F.; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Bezanson, Rachel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Wake, David; Whitaker, Katherine; Brammer, Gabriel; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Labbe, Ivo; Patel, Shannon; Da Cunha, Elizabete; Rix, Hans Walter; Schmidt, Kasper; Erb, Dawn K.; Fan Xiaohui; Kriek, Mariska; Marchesini, Danilo; and others

    2012-11-20

    We present evidence of large-scale outflows from three low-mass (log(M {sub *}/M {sub Sun }) {approx} 9.75) star-forming (SFR > 4 M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}) galaxies observed at z = 1.24, z = 1.35, and z = 1.75 in the 3D-HST Survey. Each of these galaxies is located within a projected physical distance of 60 kpc around the sight line to the quasar SDSS J123622.93+621526.6, which exhibits well-separated strong (W {sup {lambda}2796} {sub r} {approx}> 0.8 A) Mg II absorption systems matching precisely to the redshifts of the three galaxies. We derive the star formation surface densities from the H{alpha} emission in the WFC3 G141 grism observations for the galaxies and find that in each case the star formation surface density well exceeds 0.1 M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}, the typical threshold for starburst galaxies in the local universe. From a small but complete parallel census of the 0.65 < z < 2.6 galaxies with H {sub 140} {approx}< 24 proximate to the quasar sight line, we detect Mg II absorption associated with galaxies extending to physical distances of 130 kpc. We determine that the W{sub r} > 0.8 A Mg II covering fraction of star-forming galaxies at 1 < z < 2 may be as large as unity on scales extending to at least 60 kpc, providing early constraints on the typical extent of starburst-driven winds around galaxies at this redshift. Our observations additionally suggest that the azimuthal distribution of W{sub r} > 0.4 A Mg II absorbing gas around star-forming galaxies may evolve from z {approx} 2 to the present, consistent with recent observations of an increasing collimation of star-formation-driven outflows with time from z {approx} 3.

  7. Correlation of generation interval and scale of large-scale submarine landslides using 3D seismic data off Shimokita Peninsula, Northeast Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yuki; Ashi, Juichiro; Morita, Sumito

    2016-04-01

    To clarify timing and scale of past submarine landslides is important to understand formation processes of the landslides. The study area is in a part of continental slope of the Japan Trench, where a number of large-scale submarine landslide (slump) deposits have been identified in Pliocene and Quaternary formations by analysing METI's 3D seismic data "Sanrikuoki 3D" off Shimokita Peninsula (Morita et al., 2011). As structural features, swarm of parallel dikes which are likely dewatering paths formed accompanying the slumping deformation, and slip directions are basically perpendicular to the parallel dikes. Therefore, parallel dikes are good indicator for estimation of slip directions. Slip direction of each slide was determined one kilometre grid in the survey area of 40 km x 20 km. The remarkable slip direction varies from Pliocene to Quaternary in the survey area. Parallel dike structure is also available for the distinguishment of the slump deposit and normal deposit on time slice images. By tracing outline of slump deposits at each depth, we identified general morphology of the overall slump deposits, and calculated the volume of the extracted slump deposits so as to estimate the scale of each event. We investigated temporal and spatial variation of depositional pattern of the slump deposits. Calculating the generation interval of the slumps, some periodicity is likely recognized, especially large slump do not occur in succession. Additionally, examining the relationship of the cumulative volume and the generation interval, certain correlation is observed in Pliocene and Quaternary. Key words: submarine landslides, 3D seismic data, Shimokita Peninsula

  8. See-Through Imaging of Laser-Scanned 3d Cultural Heritage Objects Based on Stochastic Rendering of Large-Scale Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Hasegawa, K.; Okamoto, N.; Umegaki, R.; Wang, S.; Uemura, M.; Okamoto, A.; Koyamada, K.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method for the precise 3D see-through imaging, or transparent visualization, of the large-scale and complex point clouds acquired via the laser scanning of 3D cultural heritage objects. Our method is based on a stochastic algorithm and directly uses the 3D points, which are acquired using a laser scanner, as the rendering primitives. This method achieves the correct depth feel without requiring depth sorting of the rendering primitives along the line of sight. Eliminating this need allows us to avoid long computation times when creating natural and precise 3D see-through views of laser-scanned cultural heritage objects. The opacity of each laser-scanned object is also flexibly controllable. For a laser-scanned point cloud consisting of more than 107 or 108 3D points, the pre-processing requires only a few minutes, and the rendering can be executed at interactive frame rates. Our method enables the creation of cumulative 3D see-through images of time-series laser-scanned data. It also offers the possibility of fused visualization for observing a laser-scanned object behind a transparent high-quality photographic image placed in the 3D scene. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by applying it to festival floats of high cultural value. These festival floats have complex outer and inner 3D structures and are suitable for see-through imaging.

  9. Developing a 3D Constrained Variational Analysis Method to Calculate Large Scale Forcing Data and the Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, S.; Zhang, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale forcing data (vertical velocities and advective tendencies) are important atmospheric fields to drive single-column models (SCM), cloud-resolving models (CRM) and large-eddy simulations (LES), but they are difficult to calculate accurately. The current 1-dimensional constrained variational analysis (1D CVA) method (Zhang and Lin, 1997) used by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is limited to represent the average of a sounding network domain. We extended the original 1D CVA algorithm into 3-dimensional along with other improvements, calculated gridded large-scale forcing data, apparent heating sources (Q1) and moisture sinks (Q2), and compared with 5 reanalyses: ERA-Interim, NCEP CFSR, MERRA, JRA55 and NARR for a mid-latitude spring cyclone case. The results from a case study for in March 3rd 2000 at the Southern Great Plain (SGP) show that reanalyses generally captured the structure of the mid-latitude cyclone, but they have serious biases in the 2nd order derivative terms (divergences and horizontal derivations) at regional scales of less than a few hundred kilometers. Our algorithm provides a set of atmospheric fields consistent with the observed constraint variables at the surface and top of the atmosphere better than reanalyses. The analyzed atmospheric fields can be used in SCM, CRM and LES to provide 3-dimensional dynamical forcing, or be used to evaluate reanalyses or model simulations.

  10. Large-scale computer-generated absorption holograms of 3D objects: I. Theoretical background and visual concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Colin D.; Payne, Douglas A.; Sheerin, David T.; Slinger, Christopher W.; Phillips, Nicholas J.; Dodd, Adrian K.

    1999-03-01

    Over many years, the subject of computer generation of holograms has been visited in various guises. Historically, the obvious restrictions imposed by computational power and computer generated hologram (CGH) fabrication techniques have placed limits on what can be taken seriously in terms of image complexity. Modern advances in computational hardware and electro-optic systems now permit both the calculation and the manufacture of CGH's of complex 3D objects which fill a significant volume of space. New methods permit the recording to be made within a reasonable timescale. In addition to advancing fixed CGH generation techniques, the motivation for the work reported here includes assessment of design algorithms, modulation strategies and image quality metrics. These results are of relevance for a novel electroholography system, currently under development at DERA Malvern. This paper describes a complete process of data generation, computation, data manipulation and recording leading to practical techniques for the creation of large area CGH's. As a support to the advances in theoretical understanding and computational methods, we describe (in Part II) a new laser plotter technique that enables, in principle, an unlimited size of pixel array to be plotted efficiently with a rigorous estimate of duration of the plot run time. The results reported here are limited to 2048 X 2048 pixels. In this example, the novel switching techniques employed on the laser plotter permit the pixel array to be printed in approximately 1 hour. However, paths towards easily raising the pixel count and its associated printing rate are presented for both the computational engine and laser plotting processes.

  11. A New FE Modeling Method for Isothermal Local Loading Process of Large-scale Complex Titanium Alloy Components Based on DEFORM-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Dawei; Yang He; Sun Zhichao; Fan Xiaoguang

    2010-06-15

    Isothermal local loading process provides a new way to form large-scale complex titanium alloy components. The forming process is characterized by an extreme size (large scale in global and compared small size in regional), multi-parameter effects, and complicated loading path. To establish a reasonable finite element model is one of the key problems urgently to be solved in the research and development of isothermal local loading forming process of large-scale complex titanium alloy components. In this paper, a new finite element model of the isothermal local loading process is developed under the DEFORM-3D environment based on the solution of some key techniques. The modeling method has the following features: (1) different meshing techniques are used in different loading areas and the number of meshed elements is determined according to the deformation characteristic in different local loading steps in order to improve computational efficiency; (2) the accurate magnitude of the friction factor under titanium alloy hot forming (isothermal forming) condition is adopted instead of the typical value for lubricated hot forming processes; (3) different FEM solvers are chosen at different stages according to the loading characteristic and the contact state; (4) in contrast to the local component model, a full 3D component is modeled to simulate the process. The 3D-FE model is validated by experimental data of a large-scale bulkhead forming under isothermal local loading. The model can describe the quantitative relationships between the forming conditions and the forming results. The results of the present study may provide a basis for studying the local deformation mechanism, selecting the reasonable parameters, optimizing the die design and the process control in isothermal local loading process of large-scale complex titanium alloy components.

  12. A New FE Modeling Method for Isothermal Local Loading Process of Large-scale Complex Titanium Alloy Components Based on DEFORM-3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dawei; Yang, He; Sun, Zhichao; Fan, Xiaoguang

    2010-06-01

    Isothermal local loading process provides a new way to form large-scale complex titanium alloy components. The forming process is characterized by an extreme size (large scale in global and compared small size in regional), multi-parameter effects, and complicated loading path. To establish a reasonable finite element model is one of the key problems urgently to be solved in the research and development of isothermal local loading forming process of large-scale complex titanium alloy components. In this paper, a new finite element model of the isothermal local loading process is developed under the DEFORM-3D environment based on the solution of some key techniques. The modeling method has the following features: (1) different meshing techniques are used in different loading areas and the number of meshed elements is determined according to the deformation characteristic in different local loading steps in order to improve computational efficiency; (2) the accurate magnitude of the friction factor under titanium alloy hot forming (isothermal forming) condition is adopted instead of the typical value for lubricated hot forming processes; (3) different FEM solvers are chosen at different stages according to the loading characteristic and the contact state; (4) in contrast to the local component model, a full 3D component is modeled to simulate the process. The 3D-FE model is validated by experimental data of a large-scale bulkhead forming under isothermal local loading. The model can describe the quantitative relationships between the forming conditions and the forming results. The results of the present study may provide a basis for studying the local deformation mechanism, selecting the reasonable parameters, optimizing the die design and the process control in isothermal local loading process of large-scale complex titanium alloy components.

  13. Large scale 3D geometry of deformation structures in the Aar massif and overlying Helvetic nappes (Central Alps, Switzerland) - A combined remote sensing and field work approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumberger, R.; Wehrens, Ph.; Herwegh, M.

    2012-04-01

    Allowing deep insight into the formation history of a rock complex, shear zones, faults and joint systems represent important sources of geological information. The granitic rocks of the Haslital valley (Switzerland) show very good outcrop conditions to study these mechanical anisotropies. Furthermore, they permit a quantitative characterisation of the above-mentioned deformation structures on the large-scale, in terms of their 3D orientation, 3D spatial distribution, kinematics and evolution in 3D. A key problem while developing valid geological 3D models is the three-dimensional spatial distribution of geological structures, particularly with increasing distance from the surface. That is especially true in regions, where only little or even no "hard" underground data (e.g. bore holes, tunnel mappings and seismics) is available. In the study area, many subsurface data are available (e.g. cross sections, tunnel and pipeline mappings, bore holes etc.). Therefore, two methods dealing with the problems mentioned are developed: (1) A data acquisition, processing and visualisation method, (2) A methodology to improve the reliability of 3D models regarding the spatial trend of geological structures with increasing depth: 1) Using aerial photographs and a high-resolution digital elevation model, a GIS-based remote-sensing structural map of large-scale structural elements (shear zones, faults) of the study area was elaborated. Based on that lineament map, (i) a shear zone map was derived and (ii) a geostatistical analysis was applied to identify sub regions applicable for serving as field areas to test the methodology presented above. During fieldwork, the shear zone map was evaluated by verifying the occurrence and spatial distribution of the structures designated by remote sensing. Additionally, the geometry of the structures (e.g. 3D orientation, width, kinematics) was characterised and parameterised accordingly. These tasks were partially done using a GPS based Slate

  14. High-performance parallel solver for 3D time-dependent Schrodinger equation for large-scale nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainullin, I. K.; Sonkin, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    A parallelized three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE) solver for one-electron systems is presented in this paper. The TDSE Solver is based on the finite-difference method (FDM) in Cartesian coordinates and uses a simple and explicit leap-frog numerical scheme. The simplicity of the numerical method provides very efficient parallelization and high performance of calculations using Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). For example, calculation of 106 time-steps on the 1000ṡ1000ṡ1000 numerical grid (109 points) takes only 16 hours on 16 Tesla M2090 GPUs. The TDSE Solver demonstrates scalability (parallel efficiency) close to 100% with some limitations on the problem size. The TDSE Solver is validated by calculation of energy eigenstates of the hydrogen atom (13.55 eV) and affinity level of H- ion (0.75 eV). The comparison with other TDSE solvers shows that a GPU-based TDSE Solver is 3 times faster for the problems of the same size and with the same cost of computational resources. The usage of a non-regular Cartesian grid or problem-specific non-Cartesian coordinates increases this benefit up to 10 times. The TDSE Solver was applied to the calculation of the resonant charge transfer (RCT) in nanosystems, including several related physical problems, such as electron capture during H+-H0 collision and electron tunneling between H- ion and thin metallic island film.

  15. Constructing a large-scale 3D Geologic Model for Analysis of the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wagoner, J; Myers, S

    2008-04-09

    We have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern Great Basin, in support of a seismic wave propagation investigation of the 1993 Nonproliferation Experiment (NPE) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The model is centered on the NPE and spans longitude -119.5{sup o} to -112.6{sup o} and latitude 34.5{sup o} to 39.8{sup o}; the depth ranges from the topographic surface to 150 km below sea level. The model includes the southern half of Nevada, as well as parts of eastern California, western Utah, and a portion of northwestern Arizona. The upper crust is constrained by both geologic and geophysical studies, while the lower crust and upper mantle are constrained by geophysical studies. The mapped upper crustal geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary deposits, pre-Tertiary deposits, intrusive rocks of all ages, and calderas. The lower crust and upper mantle are parameterized with 5 layers, including the Moho. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geology at the NTS. Digital geologic outcrop data were available for both Nevada and Arizona, whereas geologic maps for California and Utah were scanned and hand-digitized. Published gravity data (2km spacing) were used to determine the thickness of the Cenozoic deposits and thus estimate the depth of the basins. The free surface is based on a 10m lateral resolution DEM at the NTS and a 90m lateral resolution DEM elsewhere. Variations in crustal thickness are based on receiver function analysis and a framework compilation of reflection/refraction studies. We used Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. For seismic studies, the geologic units are mapped to specific seismic velocities. The gross geophysical structure of the crust and upper mantle is taken from regional surface

  16. TRAC code assessment using data from SCTF Core-III, a large-scale 2D/3D facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boyack, B.E.; Shire, P.R.; Harmony, S.C.; Rhee, G.

    1988-01-01

    Nine tests from the SCTF Core-III configuration have been analyzed using TRAC-PF1/MOD1. The objectives of these assessment activities were to obtain a better understanding of the phenomena occurring during the refill and reflood phases of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident, to determine the accuracy to which key parameters are calculated, and to identify deficiencies in key code correlations and models that provide closure for the differential equations defining thermal-hydraulic phenomena in pressurized water reactors. Overall, the agreement between calculated and measured values of peak cladding temperature is reasonable. In addition, TRAC adequately predicts many of the trends observed in both the integral effect and separate effect tests conducted in SCTF Core-III. The importance of assessment activities that consider potential contributors to discrepancies between the measured and calculated results arising from three sources are described as those related to (1) knowledge about the facility configuration and operation, (2) facility modeling for code input, and (3) deficiencies in code correlations and models. An example is provided. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Large-scale preparation of porous ultrathin Ga-doped ZnO nanoneedles from 3D basic zinc carbonate superstructures.

    PubMed

    Du, Shangfeng; Liu, Haidi; Chen, Yunfa

    2009-02-25

    A facile procedure for large-scale preparation of porous ZnO 1D nanomaterials with good electrical conductivity has been demonstrated for the first time. Porous ultrathin Ga-doped ZnO nanoneedles can be prepared by calcining the precursor of ultrathin Ga-doped basic zinc carbonate (BZC) nanoneedles obtained from BZC 3D superstructures, which are synthesized by a simple chemical co-precipitation method at room temperature, without using any catalyst, template or surfactant. There is evidence that the growth mechanisms of the BZC 3D superstructures and nanoneedles are correlated with the concentrations of ammonium ions and ethanol in the synthesis solution. The as-prepared porous Ga-doped ZnO nanoneedles have a thickness of only a couple of nanometers, consisting of many fine nanoparticles in a few nanometers. Electrical conductivity measurements indicate that porous ultrathin ZnO nanoneedles have a volume resistivity similar to that of the spherical Ga-doped ZnO nanoparticles. The porous nanostructures and good electrical conductivity make the porous ultrathin ZnO 1D nanoneedles promising candidates for applications in electrochemical fields.

  18. Practical pseudo-3D registration for large tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuan; Laperre, Kjell; Sasov, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Image registration is a powerful tool in various tomographic applications. Our main focus is on microCT applications in which samples/animals can be scanned multiple times under different conditions or at different time points. For this purpose, a registration tool capable of handling fairly large volumes has been developed, using a novel pseudo-3D method to achieve fast and interactive registration with simultaneous 3D visualization. To reduce computation complexity in 3D registration, we decompose it into several 2D registrations, which are applied to the orthogonal views (transaxial, sagittal and coronal) sequentially and iteratively. After registration in each view, the next view is retrieved with the new transformation matrix for registration. This reduces the computation complexity significantly. For rigid transform, we only need to search for 3 parameters (2 shifts, 1 rotation) in each of the 3 orthogonal views instead of 6 (3 shifts, 3 rotations) for full 3D volume. In addition, the amount of voxels involved is also significantly reduced. For the proposed pseudo-3D method, image-based registration is employed, with Sum of Square Difference (SSD) as the similarity measure. The searching engine is Powell's conjugate direction method. In this paper, only rigid transform is used. However, it can be extended to affine transform by adding scaling and possibly shearing to the transform model. We have noticed that more information can be used in the 2D registration if Maximum Intensity Projections (MIP) or Parallel Projections (PP) is used instead of the orthogonal views. Also, other similarity measures, such as covariance or mutual information, can be easily incorporated. The initial evaluation on microCT data shows very promising results. Two application examples are shown: dental samples before and after treatment and structural changes in materials before and after compression. Evaluation on registration accuracy between pseudo-3D method and true 3D method has

  19. Earthquakes in Action: Incorporating Multimedia, Internet Resources, Large-scale Seismic Data, and 3-D Visualizations into Innovative Activities and Research Projects for Today's High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith-Konter, B.; Jacobs, A.; Lawrence, K.; Kilb, D.

    2006-12-01

    The most effective means of communicating science to today's "high-tech" students is through the use of visually attractive and animated lessons, hands-on activities, and interactive Internet-based exercises. To address these needs, we have developed Earthquakes in Action, a summer high school enrichment course offered through the California State Summer School for Mathematics and Science (COSMOS) Program at the University of California, San Diego. The summer course consists of classroom lectures, lab experiments, and a final research project designed to foster geophysical innovations, technological inquiries, and effective scientific communication (http://topex.ucsd.edu/cosmos/earthquakes). Course content includes lessons on plate tectonics, seismic wave behavior, seismometer construction, fault characteristics, California seismicity, global seismic hazards, earthquake stress triggering, tsunami generation, and geodetic measurements of the Earth's crust. Students are introduced to these topics through lectures-made-fun using a range of multimedia, including computer animations, videos, and interactive 3-D visualizations. These lessons are further enforced through both hands-on lab experiments and computer-based exercises. Lab experiments included building hand-held seismometers, simulating the frictional behavior of faults using bricks and sandpaper, simulating tsunami generation in a mini-wave pool, and using the Internet to collect global earthquake data on a daily basis and map earthquake locations using a large classroom map. Students also use Internet resources like Google Earth and UNAVCO/EarthScope's Jules Verne Voyager Jr. interactive mapping tool to study Earth Science on a global scale. All computer-based exercises and experiments developed for Earthquakes in Action have been distributed to teachers participating in the 2006 Earthquake Education Workshop, hosted by the Visualization Center at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (http

  20. Direct large-scale synthesis of 3D hierarchical mesoporous NiO microspheres as high-performance anode materials for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    bai, Zhongchao; Ju, Zhicheng; Guo, Chunli; Qian, Yitai; Tang, Bin; Xiong, Shenglin

    2014-03-21

    Hierarchically porous materials are an ideal material platform for constructing high performance Li-ion batteries (LIBs), offering great advantages such as large contact area between the electrode and the electrolyte, fast and flexible transport pathways for the electrolyte ions and the space for buffering the strain caused by repeated Li insertion/extraction. In this work, NiO microspheres with hierarchically porous structures have been synthesized via a facile thermal decomposition method by only using a simple precursor. The superstructures are composed of nanocrystals with high specific surface area, large pore volume, and broad pore size distribution. The electrochemical properties of 3D hierarchical mesoporous NiO microspheres were examined by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge studies. The results demonstrate that the as-prepared NiO nanospheres are excellent electrode materials in LIBs with high specific capacity, good retention and rate performance. The 3D hierarchical mesoporous NiO microspheres can retain a reversible capacity of 800.2 mA h g(-1) after 100 cycles at a high current density of 500 mA g(-1).

  1. Directing Matter: Toward Atomic-Scale 3D Nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Jesse, Stephen; Borisevich, Albina Y; Fowlkes, Jason D; Lupini, Andrew R; Rack, Philip D; Unocic, Raymond R; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kalinin, Sergei V; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2016-06-28

    Enabling memristive, neuromorphic, and quantum-based computing as well as efficient mainstream energy storage and conversion technologies requires the next generation of materials customized at the atomic scale. This requires full control of atomic arrangement and bonding in three dimensions. The last two decades witnessed substantial industrial, academic, and government research efforts directed toward this goal through various lithographies and scanning-probe-based methods. These technologies emphasize 2D surface structures, with some limited 3D capability. Recently, a range of focused electron- and ion-based methods have demonstrated compelling alternative pathways to achieving atomically precise manufacturing of 3D structures in solids, liquids, and at interfaces. Electron and ion microscopies offer a platform that can simultaneously observe dynamic and static structures at the nano- and atomic scales and also induce structural rearrangements and chemical transformation. The addition of predictive modeling or rapid image analytics and feedback enables guiding these in a controlled manner. Here, we review the recent results that used focused electron and ion beams to create free-standing nanoscale 3D structures, radiolysis, and the fabrication potential with liquid precursors, epitaxial crystallization of amorphous oxides with atomic layer precision, as well as visualization and control of individual dopant motion within a 3D crystal lattice. These works lay the foundation for approaches to directing nanoscale level architectures and offer a potential roadmap to full 3D atomic control in materials. In this paper, we lay out the gaps that currently constrain the processing range of these platforms, reflect on indirect requirements, such as the integration of large-scale data analysis with theory, and discuss future prospects of these technologies.

  2. Directing Matter: Toward Atomic-Scale 3D Nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Jesse, Stephen; Borisevich, Albina Y; Fowlkes, Jason D; Lupini, Andrew R; Rack, Philip D; Unocic, Raymond R; Sumpter, Bobby G; Kalinin, Sergei V; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2016-06-28

    Enabling memristive, neuromorphic, and quantum-based computing as well as efficient mainstream energy storage and conversion technologies requires the next generation of materials customized at the atomic scale. This requires full control of atomic arrangement and bonding in three dimensions. The last two decades witnessed substantial industrial, academic, and government research efforts directed toward this goal through various lithographies and scanning-probe-based methods. These technologies emphasize 2D surface structures, with some limited 3D capability. Recently, a range of focused electron- and ion-based methods have demonstrated compelling alternative pathways to achieving atomically precise manufacturing of 3D structures in solids, liquids, and at interfaces. Electron and ion microscopies offer a platform that can simultaneously observe dynamic and static structures at the nano- and atomic scales and also induce structural rearrangements and chemical transformation. The addition of predictive modeling or rapid image analytics and feedback enables guiding these in a controlled manner. Here, we review the recent results that used focused electron and ion beams to create free-standing nanoscale 3D structures, radiolysis, and the fabrication potential with liquid precursors, epitaxial crystallization of amorphous oxides with atomic layer precision, as well as visualization and control of individual dopant motion within a 3D crystal lattice. These works lay the foundation for approaches to directing nanoscale level architectures and offer a potential roadmap to full 3D atomic control in materials. In this paper, we lay out the gaps that currently constrain the processing range of these platforms, reflect on indirect requirements, such as the integration of large-scale data analysis with theory, and discuss future prospects of these technologies. PMID:27183171

  3. Directing Matter: Toward Atomic-Scale 3D Nanofabrication

    DOE PAGES

    Jesse, Stephen; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Rack, Philip D.; Unocic, Raymond R.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Belianinov, Alex; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.

    2016-05-16

    Here we report that enabling memristive, neuromorphic, and quantum based computing as well as efficient mainstream energy storage and conversion technologies requires next generation of materials customized at the atomic scale. This requires full control of atomic arrangement and bonding in three dimensions. The last two decades witnessed substantial industrial, academic, and government research efforts directed towards this goal through various lithographies and scanning probe based methods. These technologies emphasize 2D surface structures, with some limited 3D capability. Recently, a range of focused electron and ion based methods have demonstrated compelling alternative pathways to achieving atomically precise manufacturing of 3Dmore » structures in solids, liquids, and at interfaces. Electron and ion microscopies offer a platform that can simultaneously observe dynamic and static structures at the nano and atomic scales, and also induce structural rearrangements and chemical transformation. The addition of predictive modeling or rapid image analytics and feedback enables guiding these in a controlled manner. Here, we review the recent results that used focused electron and ion beams to create free-standing nanoscale 3D structures, radiolysis and the fabrication potential with liquid precursors, epitaxial crystallization of amorphous oxides with atomic layer precision, as well as visualization and control of individual dopant motion within a 3D crystal lattice. These works lay the foundation for new approaches to directing nanoscale level architectures and offer a potential roadmap to full 3D atomic control in materials. Lastly, in this perspective we lay out the gaps that currently constrain the processing range of these platforms, reflect on indirect requirements, such as the integration of large scale data analysis with theory, and discuss future prospects of these technologies.« less

  4. Telecentric scanner for 3D profilometry of very large objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Simon; Borra, Ermanno F.; Szapiel, Stan

    1997-09-01

    Triangulation systems that are based on an autosynchronized scanning principle to provide accurate and fast acquisition of 3D shapes are able to scan large fields. It is done generally by a coordinate measuring machine (CMM) carrying a small-volume 3D camera. However the acquisition speed is limited by the CMM movement and also by the image fusion time required to get the complete 3D shape. This paper describes some practical consideration for large volume 3D inspections with emphasis on telecentric scanning. We present the analytical and the optical design of a large telecentric scanner using a large reflective surface. Some results of the laboratory prototype will be presented. We also discuss applications and the viability of this new approach.

  5. Development and Implementation of 3-D, High Speed Capacitance Tomography for Imaging Large-Scale, Cold-Flow Circulating Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Marashdeh, Qussai

    2013-02-01

    A detailed understanding of multiphase flow behavior inside a Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) requires a 3-D technique capable of visualizing the flow field in real-time. Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography (ECVT) is a newly developed technique that can provide such measurements. The attractiveness of the technique is in its low profile sensors, fast imaging speed and scalability to different section sizes, low operating cost, and safety. Moreover, the flexibility of ECVT sensors enable them to be designed around virtually any geometry, rendering them suitable to be used for measurement of solid flows in exit regions of the CFB. Tech4Imaging LLC has worked under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to develop an ECVT system for cold flow visualization and install it on a 12 inch ID circulating fluidized bed. The objective of this project was to help advance multi-phase flow science through implementation of an ECVT system on a cold flow model at DOE NETL. This project has responded to multi-phase community and industry needs of developing a tool that can be used to develop flow models, validate computational fluid dynamics simulations, provide detailed real-time feedback of process variables, and provide a comprehensive understating of multi-phase flow behavior. In this project, a complete ECVT system was successfully developed after considering different potential electronics and sensor designs. The system was tested at various flow conditions and with different materials, yielding real-time images of flow interaction in a gas-solid flow system. The system was installed on a 12 inch ID CFB of the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Labs. Technical and economic assessment of Scale-up and Commercialization of ECVT was also conducted. Experiments conducted with larger sensors in conditions similar to industrial settings are very promising. ECVT has also the potential to be developed for imaging multi

  6. Active Exploration of Large 3D Model Repositories.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin; Cao, Yan-Pei; Lai, Yu-Kun; Huang, Hao-Zhi; Kobbelt, Leif; Hu, Shi-Min

    2015-12-01

    With broader availability of large-scale 3D model repositories, the need for efficient and effective exploration becomes more and more urgent. Existing model retrieval techniques do not scale well with the size of the database since often a large number of very similar objects are returned for a query, and the possibilities to refine the search are quite limited. We propose an interactive approach where the user feeds an active learning procedure by labeling either entire models or parts of them as "like" or "dislike" such that the system can automatically update an active set of recommended models. To provide an intuitive user interface, candidate models are presented based on their estimated relevance for the current query. From the methodological point of view, our main contribution is to exploit not only the similarity between a query and the database models but also the similarities among the database models themselves. We achieve this by an offline pre-processing stage, where global and local shape descriptors are computed for each model and a sparse distance metric is derived that can be evaluated efficiently even for very large databases. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by interactively exploring a repository containing over 100 K models. PMID:26529460

  7. Large Terrain Continuous Level of Detail 3D Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myint, Steven; Jain, Abhinandan

    2012-01-01

    This software solved the problem of displaying terrains that are usually too large to be displayed on standard workstations in real time. The software can visualize terrain data sets composed of billions of vertices, and can display these data sets at greater than 30 frames per second. The Large Terrain Continuous Level of Detail 3D Visualization Tool allows large terrains, which can be composed of billions of vertices, to be visualized in real time. It utilizes a continuous level of detail technique called clipmapping to support this. It offloads much of the work involved in breaking up the terrain into levels of details onto the GPU (graphics processing unit) for faster processing.

  8. 3D exploitation of large urban photo archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Peter; Snavely, Noah; Anderson, Ross

    2010-04-01

    Recent work in computer vision has demonstrated the potential to automatically recover camera and scene geometry from large collections of uncooperatively-collected photos. At the same time, aerial ladar and Geographic Information System (GIS) data are becoming more readily accessible. In this paper, we present a system for fusing these data sources in order to transfer 3D and GIS information into outdoor urban imagery. Applying this system to 1000+ pictures shot of the lower Manhattan skyline and the Statue of Liberty, we present two proof-of-concept examples of geometry-based photo enhancement which are difficult to perform via conventional image processing: feature annotation and image-based querying. In these examples, high-level knowledge projects from 3D world-space into georegistered 2D image planes and/or propagates between different photos. Such automatic capabilities lay the groundwork for future real-time labeling of imagery shot in complex city environments by mobile smart phones.

  9. On detailed 3D reconstruction of large indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarev, Egor

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present techniques for highly detailed 3D reconstruction of extra large indoor environments. We discuss the benefits and drawbacks of low-range, far-range and hybrid sensing and reconstruction approaches. The proposed techniques for low-range and hybrid reconstruction, enabling the reconstruction density of 125 points/cm3 on large 100.000 m3 models, are presented in detail. The techniques tackle the core challenges for the above requirements, such as a multi-modal data fusion (fusion of a LIDAR data with a Kinect data), accurate sensor pose estimation, high-density scanning and depth data noise filtering. Other important aspects for extra large 3D indoor reconstruction are the point cloud decimation and real-time rendering. In this paper, we present a method for planar-based point cloud decimation, allowing for reduction of a point cloud size by 80-95%. Besides this, we introduce a method for online rendering of extra large point clouds enabling real-time visualization of huge cloud spaces in conventional web browsers.

  10. Large optical 3D MEMS switches in access networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madamopoulos, Nicholas; Kaman, Volkan; Yuan, Shifu; Jerphagnon, Olivier; Helkey, Roger; Bowers, John E.

    2007-09-01

    Interest is high among residential customers and businesses for advanced, broadband services such as fast Internet access, electronic commerce, video-on-demand, digital broadcasting, teleconferencing and telemedicine. In order to satisfy such growing demand of end-customers, access technologies such as fiber-to-the-home/building (FTTH/B) are increasingly being deployed. Carriers can reduce maintenance costs, minimize technology obsolescence and introduce new services easily by reducing active elements in the fiber access network. However, having a passive optical network (PON) also introduces operational and maintenance challenges. Increased diagnostic monitoring capability of the network becomes a necessity as more and more fibers are provisioned to deliver services to the end-customers. This paper demonstrates the clear advantages that large 3D optical MEMS switches offer in solving these access network problems. The advantages in preventative maintenance, remote monitoring, test and diagnostic capability are highlighted. The low optical insertion loss for all switch optical connections of the switch enables the monitoring, grooming and serving of a large number of PON lines and customers. Furthermore, the 3D MEMS switch is transparent to optical wavelengths and data formats, thus making it easy to incorporate future upgrades, such higher bit rates or DWDM overlay to a PON.

  11. Quasi-3D Multi-scale Modeling Framework Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, A.; Jung, J.

    2008-12-01

    When models are truncated in or near an energetically active range of the spectrum, model physics must be changed as the resolution changes. The model physics of GCMs and that of CRMs are, however, quite different from each other and at present there is no unified formulation of model physics that automatically provides transition between these model physics. The Quasi-3D (Q3D) Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) is an attempt to bridge this gap. Like the recently proposed Heterogeneous Multiscale Method (HMM) (E and Engquist 2003), MMF combines a macroscopic model, GCM, and a microscopic model, CRM. Unlike the traditional multiscale methods such as the multi-grid and adapted mesh refinement techniques, HMM and MMF are for solving multi-physics problems. They share the common objective "to design combined macroscopic-microscopic computational methods that are much more efficient than solving the full microscopic model and at the same time give the information we need" (E et al. 2008). The question is then how to meet this objective in practice, which can be highly problem dependent. In HHM, the efficiency is gained typically by localization of the microscale problem. Following the pioneering work by Grabowski and Smolarkiewicz (1999) and Grabowski (2001), MMF takes advantage of the fact that 2D CRMs are reasonably successful in simulating deep clouds. In this approach, the efficiency is gained by sacrificing the three-dimensionality of cloud-scale motion. It also "localizes" the algorithm through embedding a CRM in each GCM grid box using cyclic boundary condition. The Q3D MMF is an attempt to reduce the expense due to these constraints by partially including the cloud-scale 3D effects and extending the CRM beyond individual GCM grid boxes. As currently formulated, the Q3D MMF is a 4D estimation/prediction framework that combines a GCM with a 3D anelastic cloud-resolving vector vorticity equation model (VVM) applied to a network of horizontal grids. The network

  12. Ultrafast superpixel segmentation of large 3D medical datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Antoine; Kauffmann, Claude

    2016-03-01

    Even with recent hardware improvements, superpixel segmentation of large 3D medical images at interactive speed (<500 ms) remains a challenge. We will describe methods to achieve such performances using a GPU based hybrid framework implementing wavefront propagation and cellular automata resolution. Tasks will be scheduled in blocks (work units) using a wavefront propagation strategy, therefore allowing sparse scheduling. Because work units has been designed as spatially cohesive, the fast Thread Group Shared Memory can be used and reused through a Gauss-Seidel like acceleration. The work unit partitioning scheme will however vary on odd- and even-numbered iterations to reduce convergence barriers. Synchronization will be ensured by an 8-step 3D variant of the traditional Red Black Ordering scheme. An attack model and early termination will also be described and implemented as additional acceleration techniques. Using our hybrid framework and typical operating parameters, we were able to compute the superpixels of a high-resolution 512x512x512 aortic angioCT scan in 283 ms using a AMD R9 290X GPU. We achieved a 22.3X speed-up factor compared to the published reference GPU implementation.

  13. 3D virtual screening of large combinatorial spaces.

    PubMed

    Muegge, Ingo; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    A new method for 3D in silico screening of large virtual combinatorial chemistry spaces is described. The software PharmShape screens millions of individual compounds applying a multi-conformational pharmacophore and shape based approach. Its extension, PharmShapeCC, is capable of screening trillions of compounds from tens of thousands of combinatorial libraries. Key elements of PharmShape and PharmShapeCC are customizable pharmacophore features, a composite inclusion sphere, library core intermediate clustering, and the determination of combinatorial library consensus orientations that allow for orthogonal enumeration of libraries. The performance of the software is illustrated by the prospective identification of a novel CXCR5 antagonist and examples of finding novel chemotypes from synthesizing and evaluating combinatorial hit libraries identified from PharmShapeCC screens for CCR1, LTA4 hydrolase, and MMP-13.

  14. 3-D visualisation and interpretation of seismic attributes extracted from large 3-D seismic datasets: Subregional and prospect evaluation, deepwater Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Sola, M.; Haakon Nordby, L.; Dailey, D.V.; Duncan, E.A. )

    1996-01-01

    High resolution 3-D visualization of horizon interpretation and seismic attributes from large 3-D seismic surveys in deepwater Nigeria has greatly enhanced the exploration team's ability to quickly recognize prospective segments of subregional and prospect specific scale areas. Integrated workstation generated structure, isopach and extracted horizon consistent, interval and windowed attributes are particularly useful in illustrating the complex structural and stratigraphical prospectivity of deepwater Nigeria. Large 3-D seismic volumes acquired over 750 square kilometers can be manipulated within the visualization system with attribute tracking capability that allows for real time data interrogation and interpretation. As in classical seismic stratigraphic studies, pattern recognition is fundamental to effective depositions facies interpretation and reservoir model construction. The 3-D perspective enhances the data interpretation through clear representation of relative scale, spatial distribution and magnitude of attributes. In deepwater Nigeria, many prospective traps rely on an interplay between syndepositional structure and slope turbidite depositional systems. Reservoir systems in many prospects appear to be dominated by unconfined to moderately focused slope feeder channel facies. These units have spatially complex facies architecture with feeder channel axes separated by extensive interchannel areas. Structural culminations generally have a history of initial compressional folding with late in extensional collapse and accommodation faulting. The resulting complex trap configurations often have stacked reservoirs over intervals as thick as 1500 meters. Exploration, appraisal and development scenarios in these settings can be optimized by taking full advantage of integrating high resolution 3-D visualization and seismic workstation interpretation.

  15. 3-D visualisation and interpretation of seismic attributes extracted from large 3-D seismic datasets: Subregional and prospect evaluation, deepwater Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Sola, M.; Haakon Nordby, L.; Dailey, D.V.; Duncan, E.A.

    1996-12-31

    High resolution 3-D visualization of horizon interpretation and seismic attributes from large 3-D seismic surveys in deepwater Nigeria has greatly enhanced the exploration team`s ability to quickly recognize prospective segments of subregional and prospect specific scale areas. Integrated workstation generated structure, isopach and extracted horizon consistent, interval and windowed attributes are particularly useful in illustrating the complex structural and stratigraphical prospectivity of deepwater Nigeria. Large 3-D seismic volumes acquired over 750 square kilometers can be manipulated within the visualization system with attribute tracking capability that allows for real time data interrogation and interpretation. As in classical seismic stratigraphic studies, pattern recognition is fundamental to effective depositions facies interpretation and reservoir model construction. The 3-D perspective enhances the data interpretation through clear representation of relative scale, spatial distribution and magnitude of attributes. In deepwater Nigeria, many prospective traps rely on an interplay between syndepositional structure and slope turbidite depositional systems. Reservoir systems in many prospects appear to be dominated by unconfined to moderately focused slope feeder channel facies. These units have spatially complex facies architecture with feeder channel axes separated by extensive interchannel areas. Structural culminations generally have a history of initial compressional folding with late in extensional collapse and accommodation faulting. The resulting complex trap configurations often have stacked reservoirs over intervals as thick as 1500 meters. Exploration, appraisal and development scenarios in these settings can be optimized by taking full advantage of integrating high resolution 3-D visualization and seismic workstation interpretation.

  16. Panoramic, large-screen, 3-D flight display system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Henry; Larson, Brent; Johnson, Michael; Droessler, Justin; Reinhart, William F.

    1995-01-01

    The report documents and summarizes the results of the required evaluations specified in the SOW and the design specifications for the selected display system hardware. Also included are the proposed development plan and schedule as well as the estimated rough order of magnitude (ROM) cost to design, fabricate, and demonstrate a flyable prototype research flight display system. The thrust of the effort was development of a complete understanding of the user/system requirements for a panoramic, collimated, 3-D flyable avionic display system and the translation of the requirements into an acceptable system design for fabrication and demonstration of a prototype display in the early 1997 time frame. Eleven display system design concepts were presented to NASA LaRC during the program, one of which was down-selected to a preferred display system concept. A set of preliminary display requirements was formulated. The state of the art in image source technology, 3-D methods, collimation methods, and interaction methods for a panoramic, 3-D flight display system were reviewed in depth and evaluated. Display technology improvements and risk reductions associated with maturity of the technologies for the preferred display system design concept were identified.

  17. Large distance 3D imaging of hidden objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozban, Daniel; Aharon Akram, Avihai; Kopeika, N. S.; Abramovich, A.; Levanon, Assaf

    2014-06-01

    Imaging systems in millimeter waves are required for applications in medicine, communications, homeland security, and space technology. This is because there is no known ionization hazard for biological tissue, and atmospheric attenuation in this range of the spectrum is low compared to that of infrared and optical rays. The lack of an inexpensive room temperature detector makes it difficult to give a suitable real time implement for the above applications. A 3D MMW imaging system based on chirp radar was studied previously using a scanning imaging system of a single detector. The system presented here proposes to employ a chirp radar method with Glow Discharge Detector (GDD) Focal Plane Array (FPA of plasma based detectors) using heterodyne detection. The intensity at each pixel in the GDD FPA yields the usual 2D image. The value of the I-F frequency yields the range information at each pixel. This will enable 3D MMW imaging. In this work we experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an imaging system based on radar principles and FPA of inexpensive detectors. This imaging system is shown to be capable of imaging objects from distances of at least 10 meters.

  18. 3D multi-scale modelling of mechanical behaviour of sound and leached mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, F.; Kamali-Bernard, S. Prince, W.

    2008-04-15

    A 3D multi-scale modelling of mechanical properties of cement-based materials approach is presented. The proposed approach provides a quantitative means to estimate and predict the mechanical properties of cement-based materials taking into account the eventual changes in the micro-structure. Two numerical tools are combined. First, the NIST's 3D model (CEMHYD3D) is used to generate a realistic 3D Representative Volume Element of cement-based materials at different scales. Then, multi-scale simulations are performed by using the FE software Abaqus for the calculation of the mechanical behaviour. The approach is then successfully applied to a specific mortar in order to determine firstly its mechanical behaviour under tensile and compression loadings and secondly the evolution of its Young's modulus under the leaching phenomenon. This evolution is a key parameter since the leaching may be critical for the mechanical integrity of concrete structures such as radioactive waste storage systems in which cement-based materials may be largely used. The numerical results of the modelling are consistent with the experimental ones.

  19. Generation of Multi-Scale Vascular Network System within 3D Hydrogel using 3D Bio-Printing Technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian K; Lanzi, Alison M; Haygan, Ngo; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Vincent, Peter A; Dai, Guohao

    2014-09-01

    Although 3D bio-printing technology has great potential in creating complex tissues with multiple cell types and matrices, maintaining the viability of thick tissue construct for tissue growth and maturation after the printing is challenging due to lack of vascular perfusion. Perfused capillary network can be a solution for this issue; however, construction of a complete capillary network at single cell level using the existing technology is nearly impossible due to limitations in time and spatial resolution of the dispensing technology. To address the vascularization issue, we developed a 3D printing method to construct larger (lumen size of ~1mm) fluidic vascular channels and to create adjacent capillary network through a natural maturation process, thus providing a feasible solution to connect the capillary network to the large perfused vascular channels. In our model, microvascular bed was formed in between two large fluidic vessels, and then connected to the vessels by angiogenic sprouting from the large channel edge. Our bio-printing technology has a great potential in engineering vascularized thick tissues and vascular niches, as the vascular channels are simultaneously created while cells and matrices are printed around the channels in desired 3D patterns. PMID:25484989

  20. Generation of Multi-Scale Vascular Network System within 3D Hydrogel using 3D Bio-Printing Technology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian K; Lanzi, Alison M; Haygan, Ngo; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Vincent, Peter A; Dai, Guohao

    2014-09-01

    Although 3D bio-printing technology has great potential in creating complex tissues with multiple cell types and matrices, maintaining the viability of thick tissue construct for tissue growth and maturation after the printing is challenging due to lack of vascular perfusion. Perfused capillary network can be a solution for this issue; however, construction of a complete capillary network at single cell level using the existing technology is nearly impossible due to limitations in time and spatial resolution of the dispensing technology. To address the vascularization issue, we developed a 3D printing method to construct larger (lumen size of ~1mm) fluidic vascular channels and to create adjacent capillary network through a natural maturation process, thus providing a feasible solution to connect the capillary network to the large perfused vascular channels. In our model, microvascular bed was formed in between two large fluidic vessels, and then connected to the vessels by angiogenic sprouting from the large channel edge. Our bio-printing technology has a great potential in engineering vascularized thick tissues and vascular niches, as the vascular channels are simultaneously created while cells and matrices are printed around the channels in desired 3D patterns.

  1. Generation of Multi-Scale Vascular Network System within 3D Hydrogel using 3D Bio-Printing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vivian K.; Lanzi, Alison M.; Haygan, Ngo; Yoo, Seung-Schik; Vincent, Peter A.; Dai, Guohao

    2014-01-01

    Although 3D bio-printing technology has great potential in creating complex tissues with multiple cell types and matrices, maintaining the viability of thick tissue construct for tissue growth and maturation after the printing is challenging due to lack of vascular perfusion. Perfused capillary network can be a solution for this issue; however, construction of a complete capillary network at single cell level using the existing technology is nearly impossible due to limitations in time and spatial resolution of the dispensing technology. To address the vascularization issue, we developed a 3D printing method to construct larger (lumen size of ~1mm) fluidic vascular channels and to create adjacent capillary network through a natural maturation process, thus providing a feasible solution to connect the capillary network to the large perfused vascular channels. In our model, microvascular bed was formed in between two large fluidic vessels, and then connected to the vessels by angiogenic sprouting from the large channel edge. Our bio-printing technology has a great potential in engineering vascularized thick tissues and vascular niches, as the vascular channels are simultaneously created while cells and matrices are printed around the channels in desired 3D patterns. PMID:25484989

  2. Scaling laws of coronal loops compared to a 3D MHD model of an active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdin, Ph.-A.; Bingert, S.; Peter, H.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The structure and heating of coronal loops have been investigated for decades. Established scaling laws relate fundamental quantities like the loop apex temperature, pressure, length, and coronal heating. Aims: We test these scaling laws against a large-scale 3D magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) model of the solar corona, which became feasible with current high-performance computing. Methods: We drove an active region simulation with photospheric observations and find strong similarities to the observed coronal loops in X-rays and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength. A 3D reconstruction of stereoscopic observations shows that our model loops have a realistic spatial structure. We compared scaling laws to our model data extracted along an ensemble of field lines. Finally, we fit a new scaling law that represents hot loops and also cooler structures, which was not possible before based only on observations. Results: Our model data gives some support for scaling laws that were established for hot and EUV-emissive coronal loops. For the Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana (RTV) scaling law we find an offset to our model data, which can be explained by 1D considerations of a static loop with a constant heat input and conduction. With a fit to our model data we set up a new scaling law for the coronal heat input along magnetic field lines. Conclusions: RTV-like scaling laws were fitted to hot loops and therefore do not predict well the coronal heat input for cooler structures that are barely observable. The basic differences between 1D and self-consistent 3D modeling account for deviations between earlier scaling laws and ours. We also conclude that a heating mechanism by MHD-turbulent dissipation within a braided flux tube would heat the corona stronger than is consistent with our model corona.

  3. Sensor fusion of cameras and a laser for city-scale 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bok, Yunsu; Choi, Dong-Geol; Kweon, In So

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a sensor fusion system of cameras and a 2D laser sensorfor large-scale 3D reconstruction. The proposed system is designed to capture data on afast-moving ground vehicle. The system consists of six cameras and one 2D laser sensor,and they are synchronized by a hardware trigger. Reconstruction of 3D structures is doneby estimating frame-by-frame motion and accumulating vertical laser scans, as in previousworks. However, our approach does not assume near 2D motion, but estimates free motion(including absolute scale) in 3D space using both laser data and image features. In orderto avoid the degeneration associated with typical three-point algorithms, we present a newalgorithm that selects 3D points from two frames captured by multiple cameras. The problemof error accumulation is solved by loop closing, not by GPS. The experimental resultsshow that the estimated path is successfully overlaid on the satellite images, such that thereconstruction result is very accurate. PMID:25375758

  4. Sensor Fusion of Cameras and a Laser for City-Scale 3D Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Yunsu; Choi, Dong-Geol; Kweon, In So

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a sensor fusion system of cameras and a 2D laser sensor for large-scale 3D reconstruction. The proposed system is designed to capture data on a fast-moving ground vehicle. The system consists of six cameras and one 2D laser sensor, and they are synchronized by a hardware trigger. Reconstruction of 3D structures is done by estimating frame-by-frame motion and accumulating vertical laser scans, as in previous works. However, our approach does not assume near 2D motion, but estimates free motion (including absolute scale) in 3D space using both laser data and image features. In order to avoid the degeneration associated with typical three-point algorithms, we present a new algorithm that selects 3D points from two frames captured by multiple cameras. The problem of error accumulation is solved by loop closing, not by GPS. The experimental results show that the estimated path is successfully overlaid on the satellite images, such that the reconstruction result is very accurate. PMID:25375758

  5. Registration and 3D visualization of large microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosaliganti, Kishore; Pan, Tony; Sharp, Richard; Ridgway, Randall; Iyengar, Srivathsan; Gulacy, Alexandra; Wenzel, Pamela; de Bruin, Alain; Machiraju, Raghu; Huang, Kun; Leone, Gustavo; Saltz, Joel

    2006-03-01

    Inactivation of the retinoblastoma gene in mouse embryos causes tissue infiltrations into critical sections of the placenta, which has been shown to affect fetal survivability. Our collaborators in cancer genetics are extremely interested in examining the three dimensional nature of these infiltrations given a stack of two dimensional light microscopy images. Three sets of wildtype and mutant placentas was sectioned serially and digitized using a commercial light microscopy scanner. Each individual placenta dataset consisted of approximately 1000 images totaling 700 GB in size, which were registered into a volumetric dataset using National Library of Medicine's (NIH/NLM) Insight Segmentation and Registration Toolkit (ITK). This paper describes our method for image registration to aid in volume visualization of tissue level intermixing for both wildtype and Rb - specimens. The registration process faces many challenges arising from the large image sizes, damages during sectioning, staining gradients both within and across sections, and background noise. These issues limit the direct application of standard registration techniques due to frequent convergence to local solutions. In this work, we develop a mixture of automated and semi-automated enhancements with ground-truth validation for the mutual information-based registration algorithm. Our final volume renderings clearly show tissue intermixing differences between both wildtype and Rb - specimens which are not obvious prior to registration.

  6. Large LED screen 3D television system without eyewear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Hayasaki, Yoshio

    2004-10-01

    Since the development of high-brightness blue and green LEDs, the use of outdoor commercial LED displays has been increasing. Because of their high brightness, good visibility, and long-term durability to the weather, LED displays are a preferred technology for outdoor installations such as stadiums, street advertising, and billboards. This paper deals with a large stereoscopic full-color LED display by use of a parallax barrier. We discuss optimization of the viewing area, which depends on LED arrangements. An enlarged viewing area has been demonstrated by using a 3-in-1 chip LED panel that has wider black regions than ordinary LED lamp cluster panels. We have developed a real-time measurement system of a viewer's position and utilized the measurement system for evaluation of performance of the different designs of stereoscopic LED displays, including conventional designs to provide multiple perspective images and designs to eliminate pseudoscopic viewing areas. In order to show real-world images, it is necessary to capture stereo-images, to process them, and to show in real-time. We have developed an active binocular camera and demonstrated the real-time display of stereoscopic movies and real-time control of convergence.

  7. Extending ALE3D, an Arbitrarily Connected hexahedral 3D Code, to Very Large Problem Size (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A L

    2010-12-15

    As the number of compute units increases on the ASC computers, the prospect of running previously unimaginably large problems is becoming a reality. In an arbitrarily connected 3D finite element code, like ALE3D, one must provide a unique identification number for every node, element, face, and edge. This is required for a number of reasons, including defining the global connectivity array required for domain decomposition, identifying appropriate communication patterns after domain decomposition, and determining the appropriate load locations for implicit solvers, for example. In most codes, the unique identification number is defined as a 32-bit integer. Thus the maximum value available is 231, or roughly 2.1 billion. For a 3D geometry consisting of arbitrarily connected hexahedral elements, there are approximately 3 faces for every element, and 3 edges for every node. Since the nodes and faces need id numbers, using 32-bit integers puts a hard limit on the number of elements in a problem at roughly 700 million. The first solution to this problem would be to replace 32-bit signed integers with 32-bit unsigned integers. This would increase the maximum size of a problem by a factor of 2. This provides some head room, but almost certainly not one that will last long. Another solution would be to replace all 32-bit int declarations with 64-bit long long declarations. (long is either a 32-bit or a 64-bit integer, depending on the OS). The problem with this approach is that there are only a few arrays that actually need to extended size, and thus this would increase the size of the problem unnecessarily. In a future computing environment where CPUs are abundant but memory relatively scarce, this is probably the wrong approach. Based on these considerations, we have chosen to replace only the global identifiers with the appropriate 64-bit integer. The problem with this approach is finding all the places where data that is specified as a 32-bit integer needs to be

  8. Multi-scale simulations of space problems with iPIC3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Bettarini, Lapo; Markidis, Stefano

    The implicit Particle-in-Cell method for the computer simulation of space plasma, and its im-plementation in a three-dimensional parallel code, called iPIC3D, are presented. The implicit integration in time of the Vlasov-Maxwell system removes the numerical stability constraints and enables kinetic plasma simulations at magnetohydrodynamics scales. Simulations of mag-netic reconnection in plasma are presented to show the effectiveness of the algorithm. In particular we will show a number of simulations done for large scale 3D systems using the physical mass ratio for Hydrogen. Most notably one simulation treats kinetically a box of tens of Earth radii in each direction and was conducted using about 16000 processors of the Pleiades NASA computer. The work is conducted in collaboration with the MMS-IDS theory team from University of Colorado (M. Goldman, D. Newman and L. Andersson). Reference: Stefano Markidis, Giovanni Lapenta, Rizwan-uddin Multi-scale simulations of plasma with iPIC3D Mathematics and Computers in Simulation, Available online 17 October 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.matcom.2009.08.038

  9. Enhanced Rgb-D Mapping Method for Detailed 3d Modeling of Large Indoor Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shengjun; Zhu, Qing; Chen, Wu; Darwish, Walid; Wu, Bo; Hu, Han; Chen, Min

    2016-06-01

    RGB-D sensors are novel sensing systems that capture RGB images along with pixel-wise depth information. Although they are widely used in various applications, RGB-D sensors have significant drawbacks with respect to 3D dense mapping of indoor environments. First, they only allow a measurement range with a limited distance (e.g., within 3 m) and a limited field of view. Second, the error of the depth measurement increases with increasing distance to the sensor. In this paper, we propose an enhanced RGB-D mapping method for detailed 3D modeling of large indoor environments by combining RGB image-based modeling and depth-based modeling. The scale ambiguity problem during the pose estimation with RGB image sequences can be resolved by integrating the information from the depth and visual information provided by the proposed system. A robust rigid-transformation recovery method is developed to register the RGB image-based and depth-based 3D models together. The proposed method is examined with two datasets collected in indoor environments for which the experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and robustness of the proposed method

  10. Understanding surface processes 3D imaging from micro-scale to regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaboyedoff, Michel; Abellan, Antonio; Carrea, Dario; Derron, Marc-Henri; Franz, Martin; Guerin, Antoine; Humair, Florian; Matasci, Battista; Michoud, Clément; Nicolet, Pierrick; Penna, Ivanna; Rudaz, Benjamin; Voumard, Jeremie; Wyser, Emmanuel

    2015-04-01

    The production of topography using remote sensing techniques has considerably been improved during the last fifteen years due to the advances in electronics and to the increase of computing power. The earth surface is monitored at all the scales using Space Shuttle Missions (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM), or using laser scanner (LS), both terrestrial (TLS) and airborne (ALS), with accuracies that can reach up to less than 50 microns for observations of objects at meter scale. Recently, photogrammetry has been pushed by the progress of LiDAR and thanks to the advance in image recognition. It led to the development of new techniques such as structure-from-motion (SFM), which allows obtaining 3D point cloud based on several pictures of the same object taken from several point of views. Both LiDAR and Photogrammetry produce 3D point clouds. One of the current 3D applications is the surface changes, which is often based simply on the subtraction of DEM at different time intervals, leading to a simple superficial description of the natural processes without information on the mass transport. However, a point cloud has much more information than a simple surface. For instance, shape recognition can be used to track objects or deformations such as a rock mass toppling, either using the shape of the point cloud or a specific moving element. Such method permits, for instance, to study in detail pre-failure accelerations, and are now routinely used in mining industry. Other methods are coupling images and DEMs and are used, for example, to capture the surface vectors of displacements in order to deduce the surface deformations of landslides. These types of surveys have now broad applications to all kinds of erosional processes. The coastal retreat can be monitored, and it displays in some places several centimetres per year of retreat on average. The sediment transports in torrent are now better constraint showing clearly pulses. The seasonal cycles can as well be

  11. Astronomical Scale of Stellar Distances Using 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Chuck; Dotger, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    One of the largest challenges of teaching astronomy is bringing the infinite scale of the universe into the four walls of a classroom. However, concepts of astronomy are often the most interesting to students. This article focuses on an alternative method for learning about stars by exploring visible characteristics of the constellation Orion and…

  12. Multi-scale 3D simulation of lightning and thunderstorm electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabirzadeh, R.; Lehtinen, N. G.; Liang, C.; Cohen, M.; Inan, U.

    2014-12-01

    Despite centuries studying thunderstorm electrodynamics, our understanding of these phenomena remains limited. The difficulty lies partly in the large number of processes and their mutual dependency and the wide range of temporal and the spatial scales involved. In this study we combine two numerical models to move toward a simulation that addresses these broad scales. First, we use a 3D numerical model to calculate the large scale quasi-electrostatic (QES) fields and charge distributions built up by updrafts in the thundercloud. This model self-consistently accounts for the conductivities, particle densities, large scale currents and charging mechanisms inside a thundercloud in the atmosphere. Second, we use a time-domain fractal lightning (TDFL) model developed that takes into account both the thermodynamics and electrodynamics of leader development and the return stroke on small time and spatial scales (Liang et al. 2014). The QES model simulates slow thunderstorm charging dynamics, and then passes the state to the TDFL model when a flash is ready to trigger. Using this combined simulation, we explain some recently observed patterns of lightning inside a thunderstorm and within a flash (e.g. Zoghzoghy et al. 2013, 2014). We attempt to constrain properties of the thundercloud like the size and shape of the charge pockets removed from the thundercloud, the flash rate and updraft currents, the relative occurrence rate of different types of lightning, and the cloud charge distribution structure effects on the lightning type.

  13. Relative Scale Estimation and 3D Registration of Multi-Modal Geometry Using Growing Least Squares.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Nicolas; Dellepiane, Matteo; Scopigno, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The advent of low cost scanning devices and the improvement of multi-view stereo techniques have made the acquisition of 3D geometry ubiquitous. Data gathered from different devices, however, result in large variations in detail, scale, and coverage. Registration of such data is essential before visualizing, comparing and archiving them. However, state-of-the-art methods for geometry registration cannot be directly applied due to intrinsic differences between the models, e.g., sampling, scale, noise. In this paper we present a method for the automatic registration of multi-modal geometric data, i.e., acquired by devices with different properties (e.g., resolution, noise, data scaling). The method uses a descriptor based on Growing Least Squares, and is robust to noise, variation in sampling density, details, and enables scale-invariant matching. It allows not only the measurement of the similarity between the geometry surrounding two points, but also the estimation of their relative scale. As it is computed locally, it can be used to analyze large point clouds composed of millions of points. We implemented our approach in two registration procedures (assisted and automatic) and applied them successfully on a number of synthetic and real cases. We show that using our method, multi-modal models can be automatically registered, regardless of their differences in noise, detail, scale, and unknown relative coverage.

  14. A Computational Model for Suspended Large Rigid Bodies in 3D Unsteady Viscous Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Feng

    1999-11-01

    A 3D numerical model for computing large rigid objects suspended in fluid flow has been developed. Rather than calculating the surface pressure upon the solid body, we evaluate the net force and torque based on a volume force formulation. The total effective force is obtained by summing up the forces at the Eulerian grids occupied by the rigid body. The effects of the moving bodies are coupled to the fluid flow by imposing the velocity field of the bodies to the fluid. A Poisson equation is used to compute the pressure over the whole domain. The objects are identified by color functions and calculated by the PPM scheme and a tangent function transformation which scales the transition region of the computed interface to a compact thickness. The model is then implemented on a parallel computer of distributed memory and validated with Stokes and low Reynolds number flows.

  15. A simple method for the production of large volume 3D macroporous hydrogels for advanced biotechnological, medical and environmental applications

    PubMed Central

    Savina, Irina N.; Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Cundy, Andrew B.; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    The development of bulk, three-dimensional (3D), macroporous polymers with high permeability, large surface area and large volume is highly desirable for a range of applications in the biomedical, biotechnological and environmental areas. The experimental techniques currently used are limited to the production of small size and volume cryogel material. In this work we propose a novel, versatile, simple and reproducible method for the synthesis of large volume porous polymer hydrogels by cryogelation. By controlling the freezing process of the reagent/polymer solution, large-scale 3D macroporous gels with wide interconnected pores (up to 200 μm in diameter) and large accessible surface area have been synthesized. For the first time, macroporous gels (of up to 400 ml bulk volume) with controlled porous structure were manufactured, with potential for scale up to much larger gel dimensions. This method can be used for production of novel 3D multi-component macroporous composite materials with a uniform distribution of embedded particles. The proposed method provides better control of freezing conditions and thus overcomes existing drawbacks limiting production of large gel-based devices and matrices. The proposed method could serve as a new design concept for functional 3D macroporous gels and composites preparation for biomedical, biotechnological and environmental applications. PMID:26883390

  16. A simple method for the production of large volume 3D macroporous hydrogels for advanced biotechnological, medical and environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savina, Irina N.; Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Cundy, Andrew B.; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V.

    2016-02-01

    The development of bulk, three-dimensional (3D), macroporous polymers with high permeability, large surface area and large volume is highly desirable for a range of applications in the biomedical, biotechnological and environmental areas. The experimental techniques currently used are limited to the production of small size and volume cryogel material. In this work we propose a novel, versatile, simple and reproducible method for the synthesis of large volume porous polymer hydrogels by cryogelation. By controlling the freezing process of the reagent/polymer solution, large-scale 3D macroporous gels with wide interconnected pores (up to 200 μm in diameter) and large accessible surface area have been synthesized. For the first time, macroporous gels (of up to 400 ml bulk volume) with controlled porous structure were manufactured, with potential for scale up to much larger gel dimensions. This method can be used for production of novel 3D multi-component macroporous composite materials with a uniform distribution of embedded particles. The proposed method provides better control of freezing conditions and thus overcomes existing drawbacks limiting production of large gel-based devices and matrices. The proposed method could serve as a new design concept for functional 3D macroporous gels and composites preparation for biomedical, biotechnological and environmental applications.

  17. Super Cooled Large Droplet Analysis of Several Geometries Using LEWICE3D Version 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.

    2011-01-01

    Super Cooled Large Droplet (SLD) collection efficiency calculations were performed for several geometries using the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. The computations were performed using the NASA Glenn Research Center SLD splashing model which has been incorporated into the LEWICE3D Version 3 software. Comparisons to experiment were made where available. The geometries included two straight wings, a swept 64A008 wing tip, two high lift geometries, and the generic commercial transport DLR-F4 wing body configuration. In general the LEWICE3D Version 3 computations compared well with the 2D LEWICE 3.2.2 results and with experimental data where available.

  18. Laser Scanning Holographic Lithography for Flexible 3D Fabrication of Multi-Scale Integrated Nano-structures and Optical Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liang Leon; Herman, Peter R

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) periodic nanostructures underpin a promising research direction on the frontiers of nanoscience and technology to generate advanced materials for exploiting novel photonic crystal (PC) and nanofluidic functionalities. However, formation of uniform and defect-free 3D periodic structures over large areas that can further integrate into multifunctional devices has remained a major challenge. Here, we introduce a laser scanning holographic method for 3D exposure in thick photoresist that combines the unique advantages of large area 3D holographic interference lithography (HIL) with the flexible patterning of laser direct writing to form both micro- and nano-structures in a single exposure step. Phase mask interference patterns accumulated over multiple overlapping scans are shown to stitch seamlessly and form uniform 3D nanostructure with beam size scaled to small 200 μm diameter. In this way, laser scanning is presented as a facile means to embed 3D PC structure within microfluidic channels for integration into an optofluidic lab-on-chip, demonstrating a new laser HIL writing approach for creating multi-scale integrated microsystems.

  19. Laser Scanning Holographic Lithography for Flexible 3D Fabrication of Multi-Scale Integrated Nano-structures and Optical Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Liang (Leon); Herman, Peter R.

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) periodic nanostructures underpin a promising research direction on the frontiers of nanoscience and technology to generate advanced materials for exploiting novel photonic crystal (PC) and nanofluidic functionalities. However, formation of uniform and defect-free 3D periodic structures over large areas that can further integrate into multifunctional devices has remained a major challenge. Here, we introduce a laser scanning holographic method for 3D exposure in thick photoresist that combines the unique advantages of large area 3D holographic interference lithography (HIL) with the flexible patterning of laser direct writing to form both micro- and nano-structures in a single exposure step. Phase mask interference patterns accumulated over multiple overlapping scans are shown to stitch seamlessly and form uniform 3D nanostructure with beam size scaled to small 200 μm diameter. In this way, laser scanning is presented as a facile means to embed 3D PC structure within microfluidic channels for integration into an optofluidic lab-on-chip, demonstrating a new laser HIL writing approach for creating multi-scale integrated microsystems.

  20. Laser Scanning Holographic Lithography for Flexible 3D Fabrication of Multi-Scale Integrated Nano-structures and Optical Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liang (Leon); Herman, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) periodic nanostructures underpin a promising research direction on the frontiers of nanoscience and technology to generate advanced materials for exploiting novel photonic crystal (PC) and nanofluidic functionalities. However, formation of uniform and defect-free 3D periodic structures over large areas that can further integrate into multifunctional devices has remained a major challenge. Here, we introduce a laser scanning holographic method for 3D exposure in thick photoresist that combines the unique advantages of large area 3D holographic interference lithography (HIL) with the flexible patterning of laser direct writing to form both micro- and nano-structures in a single exposure step. Phase mask interference patterns accumulated over multiple overlapping scans are shown to stitch seamlessly and form uniform 3D nanostructure with beam size scaled to small 200 μm diameter. In this way, laser scanning is presented as a facile means to embed 3D PC structure within microfluidic channels for integration into an optofluidic lab-on-chip, demonstrating a new laser HIL writing approach for creating multi-scale integrated microsystems. PMID:26922872

  1. Joint Cross-Range Scaling and 3D Geometry Reconstruction of ISAR Targets Based on Factorization Method.

    PubMed

    Lei Liu; Feng Zhou; Xue-Ru Bai; Ming-Liang Tao; Zi-Jing Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, the factorization method is applied to reconstruct the 3D geometry of a target from its sequential inverse synthetic aperture radar images. However, this method requires performing cross-range scaling to all the sub-images and thus has a large computational burden. To tackle this problem, this paper proposes a novel method for joint cross-range scaling and 3D geometry reconstruction of steadily moving targets. In this method, we model the equivalent rotational angular velocity (RAV) by a linear polynomial with time, and set its coefficients randomly to perform sub-image cross-range scaling. Then, we generate the initial trajectory matrix of the scattering centers, and solve the 3D geometry and projection vectors by the factorization method with relaxed constraints. After that, the coefficients of the polynomial are estimated from the projection vectors to obtain the RAV. Finally, the trajectory matrix is re-scaled using the estimated rotational angle, and accurate 3D geometry is reconstructed. The two major steps, i.e., the cross-range scaling and the factorization, are performed repeatedly to achieve precise 3D geometry reconstruction. Simulation results have proved the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  2. 3D movies for teaching seafloor bathymetry, plate tectonics, and ocean circulation in large undergraduate classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, C. D.; Lisiecki, L. E.; Gebbie, G.; Hamann, B.; Kellogg, L. H.; Kreylos, O.; Kronenberger, M.; Spero, H. J.; Streletz, G. J.; Weber, C.

    2015-12-01

    Geologic problems and datasets are often 3D or 4D in nature, yet projected onto a 2D surface such as a piece of paper or a projection screen. Reducing the dimensionality of data forces the reader to "fill in" that collapsed dimension in their minds, creating a cognitive challenge for the reader, especially new learners. Scientists and students can visualize and manipulate 3D datasets using the virtual reality software developed for the immersive, real-time interactive 3D environment at the KeckCAVES at UC Davis. The 3DVisualizer software (Billen et al., 2008) can also operate on a desktop machine to produce interactive 3D maps of earthquake epicenter locations and 3D bathymetric maps of the seafloor. With 3D projections of seafloor bathymetry and ocean circulation proxy datasets in a virtual reality environment, we can create visualizations of carbon isotope (δ13C) records for academic research and to aid in demonstrating thermohaline circulation in the classroom. Additionally, 3D visualization of seafloor bathymetry allows students to see features of seafloor most people cannot observe first-hand. To enhance lessons on mid-ocean ridges and ocean basin genesis, we have created movies of seafloor bathymetry for a large-enrollment undergraduate-level class, Introduction to Oceanography. In the past four quarters, students have enjoyed watching 3D movies, and in the fall quarter (2015), we will assess how well 3D movies enhance learning. The class will be split into two groups, one who learns about the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from diagrams and lecture, and the other who learns with a supplemental 3D visualization. Both groups will be asked "what does the seafloor look like?" before and after the Mid-Atlantic Ridge lesson. Then the whole class will watch the 3D movie and respond to an additional question, "did the 3D visualization enhance your understanding of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge?" with the opportunity to further elaborate on the effectiveness of the visualization.

  3. Time-lapse 3D ground-penetrating radar during plot-scale infiltration experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allroggen, Niklas; Jackisch, Conrad; Tronicke, Jens

    2016-04-01

    In electrical resistive soils, surface-based ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is known as the geophysical tool providing the highest spatial resolution. Thus, 2D and 3D GPR surveys are commonly used for imaging subsurface structures or estimating soil moisture content. Due to its sensitivity to soil moisture and its non-invasive character, GPR provides a large potential to monitor soil moisture variation at high temporal and spatial resolution. As shown in previous experiments, the acquisition of time-lapse GPR data under field conditions requires a high data quality in terms of repeatability as well as spatial and temporal resolution. We present hydrogeophysical field experiments at the plot scale (1m x 1m), during which we record time-lapse 3D GPR. For GPR data acquisition, we use a pulseEKKO PRO GPR system equipped with a pair of 500 MHz antennas in combination with a specially designed metal-free measuring platform. Additionally, we collect tracer and soil moisture data, which are used to improve the interpretation of the GPR data with special focus on preferential flow paths and their structured advective flow field. After an accurate time-lapse GPR data processing, we compare 3D reflection events before and after infiltration and quantitatively interpret their relative time-shift in terms of soil moisture variations. Thereby, we are able to account for basically all of the infiltrated water. The first experiments demonstrate the general applicability of our experimental approach but are limited by the number of acquired time steps and measurement during the sprinkling period (the time of the highest temporal dynamics) are not possible at all. Based on this experience we redesign our experimental setup to continuously collect GPR data during irrigation and infiltration. Thereby, we strongly increase the temporal resolution of our measurements, improve the interpretability of the GPR data, and monitor the temporal and spatial dynamics of shallow subsurface

  4. Formation and properties of 3D metamaterial composites fabricated using nanometer scale laser lithography (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokes, Sharka M.; Perkins, Frank K.; Glembocki, Orest J.

    2015-08-01

    Metamaterials designed for the visible or near IR wavelengths require patterning on the nanometer scale. To achieve this, e-beam lithography is used, but it is extremely difficult and can only produce 2D structures. A new alternative technique to produce 2D and 3D structures involves laser fabrication using the Nanoscribe 3D laser lithography system. This is a direct laser writing technique which can form arbitrary 3D nanostructures on the nanometer scale and is based on multi-photon polymerization. We are creating 2D and 3D metamaterials via this technique, and subsequently conformally coating them using Atomic Layer Deposition of oxides and Ag. We will discuss the optical properties of these novel composite structures and their potential for dual resonant metamaterials.

  5. A novel 3D stitching method for WLI based large range surface topography measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zili; Liu, Xiaojun; Zhao, Li; Chen, Liangzhou; Li, Qian; Yuan, Tengfei; Lu, Wenlong

    2016-01-01

    3D image stitching is an important technique for large range surface topography measurement in White-Light Interferometry (WLI). However, the stitching accuracy is inevitably influenced by noise. To solve this problem, a novel method for 3D image stitching is proposed in this paper. In this method, based on noise mechanism analysis in WLI measurement, a new definition of noise in 3D image is given by an evaluation model for difference between the practical WLI interference signal and the ideal signal. By this new definition, actual noises in 3D image are identified while those practical singular heights on surface will not be wrongly attributed to noise. With the definition, a binary matrix for noise mark corresponding to 3D image is obtained. Then, the matrix is devoted, as an important component, to establish a series of new algorithms of capability for suppressing the adverse effects of noises in each process of the proposed stitching method. By this method, the influence of the noises on stitching is substantially reduced and the stitching accuracy is improved. Through 3D image stitching experiments with noises in WLI, effectiveness of the proposed method is verified.

  6. Meso-Scale Modeling to Characterize Moisture Absorption of 3D Woven Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan; Zhou, Chu-wei

    2016-08-01

    For polymer-matrix composites, moisture is expected to degrade their mechanical properties due to matrix plasticization and moisture introduced micro-scale defects. In this study, the moisture absorptions of bulk epoxy, unidirectional composite (UD) and 3D woven composite (3D WC) were tested. Two-stage features have been observed for all these three materials. Moisture properties for UD and 3D WC were found not in simple direct proportion to their matrix volume fractions. The moisture approach of UD was modeled including the effect of fiber/matrix interphase which promotes the moisture uptake. Then, meso-scale FE model for 3D WC was established to characterize the inhomogeneous moisture diffusion. The moisture properties of resin-rich region and fiber bundle in 3D WC were determined from water uptake experiments of bulk epoxy and UD, respectively. Through homogenizing moisture properties of surface and interior weave structures, a simplified theoretical sandwich moisture diffusion approach was established. The moisture weight gains of 3D WC predicted by both meso-scale FE model and simplified sandwich approach were well agreed with the experimental data.

  7. Multi-scale modelling of strongly heterogeneous 3D composite structures using spatial Voronoi tessellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Said, Bassam; Ivanov, Dmitry; Long, Andrew C.; Hallett, Stephen R.

    2016-03-01

    3D composite materials are characterized by complex internal yarn architectures, leading to complex deformation and failure development mechanisms. Net-shaped preforms, which are originally periodic in nature, lose their periodicity when the fabric is draped, deformed on a tool, and consolidated to create geometrically complex composite components. As a result, the internal yarn architecture, which dominates the mechanical behaviour, becomes dependent on the structural geometry. Hence, predicting the mechanical behaviour of 3D composites requires an accurate representation of the yarn architecture within structural scale models. When applied to 3D composites, conventional finite element modelling techniques are limited to either homogenised properties at the structural scale, or the unit cell scale for a more detailed material property definition. Consequently, these models fail to capture the complex phenomena occurring across multiple length scales and their effects on a 3D composite's mechanical response. Here a multi-scale modelling approach based on a 3D spatial Voronoi tessellation is proposed. The model creates an intermediate length scale suitable for homogenisation to deal with the non-periodic nature of the final material. Information is passed between the different length scales to allow for the effect of the structural geometry to be taken into account on the smaller scales. The stiffness and surface strain predictions from the proposed model have been found to be in good agreement with experimental results. The proposed modelling framework has been used to gain important insight into the behaviour of this category of materials. It has been observed that the strain and stress distributions are strongly dependent on the internal yarn architecture and consequently on the final component geometry. Even for simple coupon tests, the internal architecture and geometric effects dominate the mechanical response. Consequently, the behaviour of 3D woven

  8. From micro-scale 3D simulations to macro-scale model of periodic porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crevacore, Eleonora; Tosco, Tiziana; Marchisio, Daniele; Sethi, Rajandrea; Messina, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    In environmental engineering, the transport of colloidal suspensions in porous media is studied to understand the fate of potentially harmful nano-particles and to design new remediation technologies. In this perspective, averaging techniques applied to micro-scale numerical simulations are a powerful tool to extrapolate accurate macro-scale models. Choosing two simplified packing configurations of soil grains and starting from a single elementary cell (module), it is possible to take advantage of the periodicity of the structures to reduce the computation costs of full 3D simulations. Steady-state flow simulations for incompressible fluid in laminar regime are implemented. Transport simulations are based on the pore-scale advection-diffusion equation, that can be enriched introducing also the Stokes velocity (to consider the gravity effect) and the interception mechanism. Simulations are carried on a domain composed of several elementary modules, that serve as control volumes in a finite volume method for the macro-scale method. The periodicity of the medium involves the periodicity of the flow field and this will be of great importance during the up-scaling procedure, allowing relevant simplifications. Micro-scale numerical data are treated in order to compute the mean concentration (volume and area averages) and fluxes on each module. The simulation results are used to compare the micro-scale averaged equation to the integral form of the macroscopic one, making a distinction between those terms that could be computed exactly and those for which a closure in needed. Of particular interest it is the investigation of the origin of macro-scale terms such as the dispersion and tortuosity, trying to describe them with micro-scale known quantities. Traditionally, to study the colloidal transport many simplifications are introduced, such those concerning ultra-simplified geometry that usually account for a single collector. Gradual removal of such hypothesis leads to a

  9. 3D printed high-throughput hydrothermal reactionware for discovery, optimization, and scale-up.

    PubMed

    Kitson, Philip J; Marshall, Ross J; Long, Deliang; Forgan, Ross S; Cronin, Leroy

    2014-11-17

    3D printing techniques allow the laboratory-scale design and production of reactionware tailored to specific experimental requirements. To increase the range and versatility of reactionware devices, sealed, monolithic reactors suitable for use in hydrothermal synthesis have been digitally designed and realized. The fabrication process allows the introduction of reaction mixtures directly into the reactors during the production, and also enables the manufacture of devices of varying scales and geometries unavailable in traditional equipment. The utility of these devices is shown by the use of 3D printed, high-throughput array reactors to discover two new coordination polymers, optimize the synthesis of one of these, and scale-up its synthesis using larger reactors produced on the same 3D printer. Reactors were also used to produce phase-pure samples of coordination polymers MIL-96 and HKUST-1, in yields comparable to synthesis in traditional apparatus. PMID:25079230

  10. Translation, Enhancement, Filtering, and Visualization of Large 3D Triangle Mesh

    1997-04-21

    The runthru system consists of five programs: workcell filter, just do it, transl8g, decim8, and runthru. The workcell filter program is useful if the source of your 3D triangle mesh model is IGRIP. It will traverse a directory structure of Deneb IGRIP files and filter out any IGRIP part files that are not referenced by an accompanying IGRIP work cell file. The just do it program automates translating and/or filtering of large numbers of partsmore » that are organized in hierarchical directory structures. The transl8g program facilitates the interchange, topology generation, error checking, and enhancement of large 3D triangle meshes. Such data is frequently used to represent conceptual designs, scientific visualization volume modeling, or discrete sample data. Interchange is provided between several popular commercial and defacto standard geometry formats. Error checking is included to identify duplicate and zero area triangles. Model engancement features include common vertex joining, consistent triangle vertex ordering, vertex noemal vector averaging, and triangle strip generation. Many of the traditional O(n2) algorithms required to provide the above features have been recast and are o(nlog(n)) which support large mesh sizes. The decim8 program is based on a data filter algorithm that significantly reduces the number of triangles required to represent 3D models of geometry, scientific visualization results, and discretely sampled data. It eliminates local patches of triangles whose geometries are not appreciably different and replaces them with fewer, larger triangles. The algorithm has been used to reduce triangles in large conceptual design models to facilitate virtual walk throughs and to enable interactive viewing of large 3D iso-surface volume visualizations. The runthru program provides high performance interactive display and manipulation of 3D triangle mesh models.« less

  11. RUNTHRU6.0. Translation, Enhancement, Filtering, and Visualization of Large 3D Triangle Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Janucik, F.X.; Ross, D.M.; Sischo, K.F.

    1997-01-01

    The runthru system consists of five programs: workcell filter, just do it, transl8g, decim8, and runthru. The workcell filter program is useful if the source of your 3D triangle mesh model is IGRIP. It will traverse a directory structure of Deneb IGRIP files and filter out any IGRIP part files that are not referenced by an accompanying IGRIP work cell file. The just do it program automates translating and/or filtering of large numbers of parts that are organized in hierarchical directory structures. The transl8g program facilitates the interchange, topology generation, error checking, and enhancement of large 3D triangle meshes. Such data is frequently used to represent conceptual designs, scientific visualization volume modeling, or discrete sample data. Interchange is provided between several popular commercial and defacto standard geometry formats. Error checking is included to identify duplicate and zero area triangles. Model engancement features include common vertex joining, consistent triangle vertex ordering, vertex noemal vector averaging, and triangle strip generation. Many of the traditional O(n2) algorithms required to provide the above features have been recast and are o(nlog(n)) which support large mesh sizes. The decim8 program is based on a data filter algorithm that significantly reduces the number of triangles required to represent 3D models of geometry, scientific visualization results, and discretely sampled data. It eliminates local patches of triangles whose geometries are not appreciably different and replaces them with fewer, larger triangles. The algorithm has been used to reduce triangles in large conceptual design models to facilitate virtual walk throughs and to enable interactive viewing of large 3D iso-surface volume visualizations. The runthru program provides high performance interactive display and manipulation of 3D triangle mesh models.

  12. Translation, Enhancement, Filtering, and Visualization of Large 3D Triangle Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-21

    The runthru system consists of five programs: workcell filter, just do it, transl8g, decim8, and runthru. The workcell filter program is useful if the source of your 3D triangle mesh model is IGRIP. It will traverse a directory structure of Deneb IGRIP files and filter out any IGRIP part files that are not referenced by an accompanying IGRIP work cell file. The just do it program automates translating and/or filtering of large numbers of parts that are organized in hierarchical directory structures. The transl8g program facilitates the interchange, topology generation, error checking, and enhancement of large 3D triangle meshes. Such data is frequently used to represent conceptual designs, scientific visualization volume modeling, or discrete sample data. Interchange is provided between several popular commercial and defacto standard geometry formats. Error checking is included to identify duplicate and zero area triangles. Model engancement features include common vertex joining, consistent triangle vertex ordering, vertex noemal vector averaging, and triangle strip generation. Many of the traditional O(n2) algorithms required to provide the above features have been recast and are o(nlog(n)) which support large mesh sizes. The decim8 program is based on a data filter algorithm that significantly reduces the number of triangles required to represent 3D models of geometry, scientific visualization results, and discretely sampled data. It eliminates local patches of triangles whose geometries are not appreciably different and replaces them with fewer, larger triangles. The algorithm has been used to reduce triangles in large conceptual design models to facilitate virtual walk throughs and to enable interactive viewing of large 3D iso-surface volume visualizations. The runthru program provides high performance interactive display and manipulation of 3D triangle mesh models.

  13. 2D and 3D reconstruction and geomechanical characterization of kilometre-scale complex folded structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, Andrea; Agliardi, Federico; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Villa, Alberto; Bistacchi, Andrea; Iudica, Gaetano

    2015-04-01

    The geometrical, structural and geomechanical characterization of large-scale folded structures in sedimentary rocks is an important issue for different geological and geo-hazard applications (e.g. hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoir exploitation, natural rock slope stability, mining, and tunnelling). Fold geometry controls topography and the spatial distribution of rock types with different strength and permeability. Fold-related fracture systems condition the fracture intensity, degree of freedom, and overall strength of rock masses. Nevertheless, scale issues and limited accessibility or partial exposure of structures often hamper a complete characterization of these complex structures. During the last years, advances in remote survey techniques as terrestrial Lidar (TLS) allowed significant improvements in the geometrical and geological characterization of large or inaccessible outcrops. However, sound methods relating structures to rock mass geomechanical properties are yet to be developed. Here we present results obtained by integrating remote survey and field assessment techniques to characterize a folded sedimentary succession exposed in unreachable vertical rock walls. The study area is located in the frontal part of the Southern Alps near Bergamo, Italy. We analysed large-scale detachment folds developed in the Upper Triassic sedimentary cover in the Zu Limestone. Folds are parallel and disharmonic, with regular wavelengths and amplitudes of about 200-250 m. We used a Riegl VZ-1000 long-range laser scanner to obtain points clouds with nominal spacings between 5 cm and 20 cm from 9 scan positions characterized by range between 350 m and 1300 m. We fixed shadowing and occlusion effects related to fold structure exposure by filling point clouds with data collected by terrestrial digital photogrammetry (TDP). In addition, we carried out field surveys of fold-related brittle structures and their geomechanical attributes at key locations. We classified cloud

  14. Large-eddy simulation of 3-D corner separation in a linear compressor cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Ma, Wei; Zambonini, Gherardo; Boudet, Jérôme; Ottavy, Xavier; Lu, Lipeng; Shao, Liang

    2015-08-01

    The increase of the thrust/weight ratio of aircraft engines is extremely restricted by different 3-D flow loss mechanisms. One of them is the corner separation that can form at the junction between a blade suction side and a hub or shroud. In this paper, in order to further investigate the turbulent characteristics of corner separation, large-eddy simulation (LES) is conducted on a compressor cascade configuration using NACA65 blade profiles (chord based Reynolds number: 3.82 × 105), in comparison with the previous obtained experimental data. Using the shear-improved Smagorinsky model as subgrid-scale model, the LES gives a good description of the mean aerodynamics of the corner separation, especially for the blade surface static pressure coefficient and the total pressure losses. The turbulent dynamics is then analyzed in detail, in consideration of the turbulent structures, the one-point velocity spectra, and the turbulence anisotropy. Within the recirculation region, the energy appears to concentrate around the largest turbulent eddies, with fairly isotropic characteristics. Concerning the dynamics, an aperiodic shedding of hairpin vortices seems to induce an unsteadiness of the separation envelope.

  15. Automated 3D trajectory measuring of large numbers of moving particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai Shan; Zhao, Qi; Zou, Danping; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2011-04-11

    Complex dynamics of natural particle systems, such as insect swarms, bird flocks, fish schools, has attracted great attention of scientists for years. Measuring 3D trajectory of each individual in a group is vital for quantitative study of their dynamic properties, yet such empirical data is rare mainly due to the challenges of maintaining the identities of large numbers of individuals with similar visual features and frequent occlusions. We here present an automatic and efficient algorithm to track 3D motion trajectories of large numbers of moving particles using two video cameras. Our method solves this problem by formulating it as three linear assignment problems (LAP). For each video sequence, the first LAP obtains 2D tracks of moving targets and is able to maintain target identities in the presence of occlusions; the second one matches the visually similar targets across two views via a novel technique named maximum epipolar co-motion length (MECL), which is not only able to effectively reduce matching ambiguity but also further diminish the influence of frequent occlusions; the last one links 3D track segments into complete trajectories via computing a globally optimal assignment based on temporal and kinematic cues. Experiment results on simulated particle swarms with various particle densities validated the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. As real-world case, our method successfully acquired 3D flight paths of fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) group comprising hundreds of freely flying individuals.

  16. Automated 3D trajectory measuring of large numbers of moving particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai Shan; Zhao, Qi; Zou, Danping; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2011-04-11

    Complex dynamics of natural particle systems, such as insect swarms, bird flocks, fish schools, has attracted great attention of scientists for years. Measuring 3D trajectory of each individual in a group is vital for quantitative study of their dynamic properties, yet such empirical data is rare mainly due to the challenges of maintaining the identities of large numbers of individuals with similar visual features and frequent occlusions. We here present an automatic and efficient algorithm to track 3D motion trajectories of large numbers of moving particles using two video cameras. Our method solves this problem by formulating it as three linear assignment problems (LAP). For each video sequence, the first LAP obtains 2D tracks of moving targets and is able to maintain target identities in the presence of occlusions; the second one matches the visually similar targets across two views via a novel technique named maximum epipolar co-motion length (MECL), which is not only able to effectively reduce matching ambiguity but also further diminish the influence of frequent occlusions; the last one links 3D track segments into complete trajectories via computing a globally optimal assignment based on temporal and kinematic cues. Experiment results on simulated particle swarms with various particle densities validated the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. As real-world case, our method successfully acquired 3D flight paths of fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) group comprising hundreds of freely flying individuals. PMID:21503074

  17. Using the full scale 3D solid anthropometric model in radiation oncology positioning and verification.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuh-Ping; Wu, Ching-Jung

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the full size solid 3D Anthropometric Model using in the positioning and verification process for radiation treatment planning of the skull of cancer patients in radiotherapy. In order to obtain a full scale 3D, solid Anthropometric Model, data is first collected through computed tomography and optical scanning. Through surface reconstruction, a model is made of the patients skull, after which rapid prototyping and rapid tooling is applied to acquire a 1:1 solid model, thus, it can replace the patient for the tumor positioning and verification in radiotherapy. The 3D Anthropometric Model are not only provide a clear picture of the external appearance, but also allow insight into the internal structure of organic bodies, which is of great advantage in radiotherapy. During radiotherapy planning, 3D Anthropometric Model can be used to simulate all kinds of situations on the simulator and the linear accelerator, without the patient needing to be present, so that the medical physicist or dosimetrist will be able to design a precise treatment plan that is tailored to the patient. The 3D Anthropometric Model production system can effectively help us solve problems related to r adiotherapy positioning and verification, helping both radiotherapists and cancer patients. We expect that the application of 3D Anthropometric Model can reduce the time that needs to be spent on pretreatment procedures and enhance the quality of health care for cancer patients.

  18. 3D Spontaneous Rupture Models of Large Earthquakes on the Hayward Fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barall, M.; Harris, R. A.; Simpson, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    We are constructing 3D spontaneous rupture computer simulations of large earthquakes on the Hayward and central Calaveras faults. The Hayward fault has a geologic history of producing many large earthquakes (Lienkaemper and Williams, 2007), with its most recent large event a M6.8 earthquake in 1868. Future large earthquakes on the Hayward fault are not only possible, but probable (WGCEP, 2008). Our numerical simulation efforts use information about the complex 3D fault geometry of the Hayward and Calaveras faults and information about the geology and physical properties of the rocks that surround the Hayward and Calaveras faults (Graymer et al., 2005). Initial stresses on the fault surface are inferred from geodetic observations (Schmidt et al., 2005), seismological studies (Hardebeck and Aron, 2008), and from rate-and- state simulations of the interseismic interval (Stuart et al., 2008). In addition, friction properties on the fault surface are inferred from laboratory measurements of adjacent rock types (Morrow et al., 2008). We incorporate these details into forward 3D computer simulations of dynamic rupture propagation, using the FaultMod finite-element code (Barall, 2008). The 3D fault geometry is constructed using a mesh-morphing technique, which starts with a vertical planar fault and then distorts the entire mesh to produce the desired fault geometry. We also employ a grid-doubling technique to create a variable-resolution mesh, with the smallest elements located in a thin layer surrounding the fault surface, which provides the higher resolution needed to model the frictional behavior of the fault. Our goals are to constrain estimates of the lateral and depth extent of future large Hayward earthquakes, and to explore how the behavior of large earthquakes may be affected by interseismic stress accumulation and aseismic slip.

  19. TRANSL8GDECIM8. Data Translation and Filtering for Large 3D Triangle Mesh Models

    SciTech Connect

    Janucik, F.X.; Ross, D.M.

    1993-09-01

    The TRANSL8GDECIM8 system consists of two programs: TRANSL8G and DECIM8. The TRANSL8G program facilitates the interchange, topology generation, error checking, and enhancement of large 3D triangle meshes. Such data is frequently used to represent conceptual designs, scientific visualization volume modeling, or discrete sample data. Interchange is provided between several popular commercial and defacto standard geometry formats. Error checking is included to identify duplicate and zero area triangles. Model enhancement features include common vertex joining, consistent triangle vertex ordering, vertex normal vector averaging, and triangle strip generation. Many of the traditional O(n squared) algorithms required to provide the above features have been recast and are O(n) which support large mesh sizes. The DECIM8 program is based on a data filter algorithm that significantly reduces the number of triangles required to represent three dimensional (3D) models of geometry, scientific visualization results, and discretely sampled data. The algorithm uses a combined incremental and iterative strategy. It eliminates local patches of triangles whose geometries are not appreciably different and replaces them with fewer larger triangles. The algorithm has been used to reduce triangles in large conceptual design models to facilitate virtual walk throughs and to enable interactive viewing of large 3D iso-surface volume visualizations.

  20. Multi Length Scale Imaging of Flocculated Estuarine Sediments; Insights into their Complex 3D Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, Jonathan; Bushby, Andy; Droppo, Ian; Carr, Simon; Spencer, Kate

    2015-04-01

    Suspended estuarine sediments form flocs that are compositionally complex, fragile and irregularly shaped. The fate and transport of suspended particulate matter (SPM) is determined by the size, shape, density, porosity and stability of these flocs and prediction of SPM transport requires accurate measurements of these three-dimensional (3D) physical properties. However, the multi-scaled nature of flocs in addition to their fragility makes their characterisation in 3D problematic. Correlative microscopy is a strategy involving the spatial registration of information collected at different scales using several imaging modalities. Previously, conventional optical microscopy (COM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have enabled 2-dimensional (2D) floc characterisation at the gross (> 1 µm) and sub-micron scales respectively. Whilst this has proven insightful there remains a critical spatial and dimensional gap preventing the accurate measurement of geometric properties and an understanding of how structures at different scales are related. Within life sciences volumetric imaging techniques such as 3D micro-computed tomography (3D µCT) and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy [FIB-SEM (or FIB-tomography)] have been combined to characterise materials at the centimetre to micron scale. Combining these techniques with TEM enables an advanced correlative study, allowing material properties across multiple spatial and dimensional scales to be visualised. The aims of this study are; 1) to formulate an advanced correlative imaging strategy combining 3D µCT, FIB-tomography and TEM; 2) to acquire 3D datasets; 3) to produce a model allowing their co-visualisation; 4) to interpret 3D floc structure. To reduce the chance of structural alterations during analysis samples were first 'fixed' in 2.5% glutaraldehyde/2% formaldehyde before being embedding in Durcupan resin. Intermediate steps were implemented to improve contrast and remove pore water, achieved by the

  1. Using 3D Geologic Models to Synthesize Large and Disparate Datasets for Site Characterization and Verification Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillesheim, M. B.; Rautman, C. A.; Johnson, P. B.; Powers, D. W.

    2008-12-01

    As we are all aware, increases in computing power and efficiency have allowed for the development of many modeling codes capable of processing large and sometimes disparate datasets (e.g., geological, hydrological, geochemical, etc). Because people sometimes have difficulty visualizing in three dimensions (3D) or understanding how multiple figures of various geologic features relate as a whole, 3D geologic models can be excellent tools to illustrate key concepts and findings, especially to lay persons, such as stakeholders, customers, and other concerned parties. In this presentation, we will show examples of 3D geologic modeling efforts using data collected during site characterization and verification work at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southeastern New Mexico, designed for the safe disposal of transuranic wastes resulting from U.S. defense programs. The 3D geologic modeling efforts focused on refining our understanding of the WIPP site by integrating a variety of geologic data. Examples include: overlaying isopach surfaces of unit thickness and overburden thickness, a map of geologic facies changes, and a transmissivity field onto a 3D structural map of a geologic unit of interest. In addition, we also present a 4D hydrogeologic model of the effects of a large-scale pumping test on water levels. All these efforts have provided additional insights into the controls on transmissivity and flow in the WIPP vicinity. Ultimately, by combining these various types of data we have increased our understanding of the WIPP site's hydrogeologic system, which is a key aspect of continued certification. Sandia is a multi program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000. This research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the Office of Environmental

  2. Virtual rough samples to test 3D nanometer-scale scanning electron microscopy stereo photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarrubia, J. S.; Tondare, V. N.; Vladár, A. E.

    2016-03-01

    The combination of scanning electron microscopy for high spatial resolution, images from multiple angles to provide 3D information, and commercially available stereo photogrammetry software for 3D reconstruction offers promise for nanometer-scale dimensional metrology in 3D. A method is described to test 3D photogrammetry software by the use of virtual samples—mathematical samples from which simulated images are made for use as inputs to the software under test. The virtual sample is constructed by wrapping a rough skin with any desired power spectral density around a smooth near-trapezoidal line with rounded top corners. Reconstruction is performed with images simulated from different angular viewpoints. The software's reconstructed 3D model is then compared to the known geometry of the virtual sample. Three commercial photogrammetry software packages were tested. Two of them produced results for line height and width that were within close to 1 nm of the correct values. All of the packages exhibited some difficulty in reconstructing details of the surface roughness.

  3. Surface and curve skeletonization of large 3D models on the GPU.

    PubMed

    Jalba, Andrei C; Kustra, Jacek; Telea, Alexandru C

    2013-06-01

    We present a GPU-based framework for extracting surface and curve skeletons of 3D shapes represented as large polygonal meshes. We use an efficient parallel search strategy to compute point-cloud skeletons and their distance and feature transforms (FTs) with user-defined precision. We regularize skeletons by a new GPU-based geodesic tracing technique which is orders of magnitude faster and more accurate than comparable techniques. We reconstruct the input surface from skeleton clouds using a fast and accurate image-based method. We also show how to reconstruct the skeletal manifold structure as a polygon mesh and the curve skeleton as a polyline. Compared to recent skeletonization methods, our approach offers two orders of magnitude speed-up, high-precision, and low-memory footprints. We demonstrate our framework on several complex 3D models.

  4. Cadomian tectonics in northern Brittany: a contribution of 3-D crustal-scale modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, J.-P.; Guennoc, P.; Truffert, C.; Vairon, J.; Armor Working Group Of The Geofrance 3-D Program

    2001-02-01

    Both available and newly acquired geological and geophysical data processed in the framework of the ARMOR project have been used to construct a 3-D geometric and geological model of the Cadomian domain of northern Brittany. The major results of the data processing are presented and discussed relative to a composite profile transecting the studied domain and constructed from the surface geology, reflection seismics, magnetotelluric soundings and gravimetric data. They are then extrapolated at regional scale through a series of cross-sections compiled from the surface geology and gravimetric data and calibrated onto the composite profile. The 3-D crustal-scale models were computed according to two procedures. The first, using a STRIM Matra Datavision modeler, defines various interfaces through correlation between adjacent cross-sections and is well adapted to the 3-D representation of geological structures. The second, based on Voronoı̈ diagrams, leads to a volumetric model of the geological units and is a powerful tool for calculating 3-D geophysical responses of the model when the physical properties of the rock units are known. The tectonic implications of the computed 3-D crustal-scale geometry of the Cadomian domain are then discussed in terms of volcanic-arc thrusting, with special emphasis being placed on the obliquity of the shortening direction by reference to the thrust fault trend. Finally, the data are used to demonstrate the reactivation of some Cadomian faults during the deposition of Ordovician sandstones and following the emplacement of the Paleozoic dolerite dyke swarm of northern Brittany.

  5. ActiveSeismoPick3D - automatic first arrival determination for large active seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paffrath, Marcel; Küperkoch, Ludger; Wehling-Benatelli, Sebastian; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    We developed a tool for automatic determination of first arrivals in active seismic data based on an approach, that utilises higher order statistics (HOS) and the Akaike information criterion (AIC), commonly used in seismology, but not in active seismics. Automatic picking is highly desirable in active seismics as the number of data provided by large seismic arrays rapidly exceeds of what an analyst can evaluate in a reasonable amount of time. To bring the functionality of automatic phase picking into the context of active data, the software package ActiveSeismoPick3D was developed in Python. It uses a modified algorithm for the determination of first arrivals which searches for the HOS maximum in unfiltered data. Additionally, it offers tools for manual quality control and postprocessing, e.g. various visualisation and repicking functionalities. For flexibility, the tool also includes methods for the preparation of geometry information of large seismic arrays and improved interfaces to the Fast Marching Tomography Package (FMTOMO), which can be used for the prediction of travel times and inversion for subsurface properties. Output files are generated in the VTK format, allowing the 3D visualization of e.g. the inversion results. As a test case, a data set consisting of 9216 traces from 64 shots was gathered, recorded at 144 receivers deployed in a regular 2D array of a size of 100 x 100 m. ActiveSeismoPick3D automatically checks the determined first arrivals by a dynamic signal to noise ratio threshold. From the data a 3D model of the subsurface was generated using the export functionality of the package and FMTOMO.

  6. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  7. 3D modeling of large targets and clutter utilizing Ka band monopulse SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Jerry A.; Barr, Doug; Shurtz, Ric; Channell, Rob

    2006-05-01

    The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama have developed a dual mode, Ka Band Radar and IIR system for the purpose of data collection and tracker algorithm development. The system is comprised of modified MMW and IIR sensors and is mounted in a stabilized ball on a UH-1 helicopter operated by Redstone Technical Test Center. Several missile programs under development require MMW signatures of multiple target and clutter scenes. Traditionally these target signatures have been successfully collected using static radars and targets mounted on a turntable to produce models from ISAR images; clutter scenes have been homogeneously characterized using information on various classes of clutter. However, current and future radar systems require models of many targets too large for turntables, as well as high resolution 3D scattering characteristics of urban and other non-homogenous clutter scenes. In partnership with industry independent research and development (IRAD) activities the U.S. Army RDEC has developed a technique for generating 3D target and clutter models using SAR imaging in the MMW spectrum. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of funded projects and resulting data products with an emphasis on MMW data reduction and analysis, especially the unique 3D modeling capabilities of the monopulse radar flying SAR profiles. Also, a discussion of lessons learned and planned improvements will be presented.

  8. SCALE 6.2 Continuous-Energy TSUNAMI-3D Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Perfetti, Christopher M; Rearden, Bradley T

    2015-01-01

    The TSUNAMI (Tools for Sensitivity and UNcertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation) capabilities within the SCALE code system make use of sensitivity coefficients for an extensive number of criticality safety applications, such as quantifying the data-induced uncertainty in the eigenvalue of critical systems, assessing the neutronic similarity between different systems, quantifying computational biases, and guiding nuclear data adjustment studies. The need to model geometrically complex systems with improved ease of use and fidelity and the desire to extend TSUNAMI analysis to advanced applications have motivated the development of a SCALE 6.2 module for calculating sensitivity coefficients using three-dimensional (3D) continuous-energy (CE) Monte Carlo methods: CE TSUNAMI-3D. This paper provides an overview of the theory, implementation, and capabilities of the CE TSUNAMI-3D sensitivity analysis methods. CE TSUNAMI contains two methods for calculating sensitivity coefficients in eigenvalue sensitivity applications: (1) the Iterated Fission Probability (IFP) method and (2) the Contributon-Linked eigenvalue sensitivity/Uncertainty estimation via Track length importance CHaracterization (CLUTCH) method. This work also presents the GEneralized Adjoint Response in Monte Carlo method (GEAR-MC), a first-of-its-kind approach for calculating adjoint-weighted, generalized response sensitivity coefficients—such as flux responses or reaction rate ratios—in CE Monte Carlo applications. The accuracy and efficiency of the CE TSUNAMI-3D eigenvalue sensitivity methods are assessed from a user perspective in a companion publication, and the accuracy and features of the CE TSUNAMI-3D GEAR-MC methods are detailed in this paper.

  9. Numerical Analysis of Thermal Remediation in 3D Field-Scale Fractured Geologic Media.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Falta, Ronald W; Murdoch, Lawrence C

    2015-01-01

    Thermal methods are promising for remediating fractured geologic media contaminated with volatile organic compounds, and the success of this process depends on the coupled heat transfer, multiphase flow, and thermodynamics. This study analyzed field-scale removal of trichloroethylene (TCE) and heat transfer behavior in boiling fractured geologic media using the multiple interacting continua method. This method can resolve local gradients in the matrix and is less computationally demanding than alternative methods like discrete fracture-matrix models. A 2D axisymmetric model was used to simulate a single element of symmetry in a repeated pattern of extraction wells inside a large heated zone and evaluate effects of parameter sensitivity on contaminant recovery. The results showed that the removal of TCE increased with matrix permeability, and the removal rate was more sensitive to matrix permeability than any other parameter. Increasing fracture density promoted TCE removal, especially when the matrix permeability was low (e.g., <10(-17) m(2)). A 3D model was used to simulate an entire treatment zone and the surrounding groundwater in fractured material, with the interaction between them being considered. Boiling was initiated in the center of the upper part of the heated region and expanded toward the boundaries. This boiling process resulted in a large increase in the TCE removal rate and spread of TCE to the vadose zone and the peripheries of the heated zone. The incorporation of extraction wells helped control the contaminant from migrating to far regions. After 22 d, more than 99.3% of TCE mass was recovered in the simulation. PMID:25040727

  10. Numerical Analysis of Thermal Remediation in 3D Field-Scale Fractured Geologic Media.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Falta, Ronald W; Murdoch, Lawrence C

    2015-01-01

    Thermal methods are promising for remediating fractured geologic media contaminated with volatile organic compounds, and the success of this process depends on the coupled heat transfer, multiphase flow, and thermodynamics. This study analyzed field-scale removal of trichloroethylene (TCE) and heat transfer behavior in boiling fractured geologic media using the multiple interacting continua method. This method can resolve local gradients in the matrix and is less computationally demanding than alternative methods like discrete fracture-matrix models. A 2D axisymmetric model was used to simulate a single element of symmetry in a repeated pattern of extraction wells inside a large heated zone and evaluate effects of parameter sensitivity on contaminant recovery. The results showed that the removal of TCE increased with matrix permeability, and the removal rate was more sensitive to matrix permeability than any other parameter. Increasing fracture density promoted TCE removal, especially when the matrix permeability was low (e.g., <10(-17) m(2)). A 3D model was used to simulate an entire treatment zone and the surrounding groundwater in fractured material, with the interaction between them being considered. Boiling was initiated in the center of the upper part of the heated region and expanded toward the boundaries. This boiling process resulted in a large increase in the TCE removal rate and spread of TCE to the vadose zone and the peripheries of the heated zone. The incorporation of extraction wells helped control the contaminant from migrating to far regions. After 22 d, more than 99.3% of TCE mass was recovered in the simulation.

  11. Bone tissue phantoms for optical flowmeters at large interoptode spacing generated by 3D-stereolithography

    PubMed Central

    Binzoni, Tiziano; Torricelli, Alessandro; Giust, Remo; Sanguinetti, Bruno; Bernhard, Paul; Spinelli, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    A bone tissue phantom prototype allowing to test, in general, optical flowmeters at large interoptode spacings, such as laser-Doppler flowmetry or diffuse correlation spectroscopy, has been developed by 3D-stereolithography technique. It has been demonstrated that complex tissue vascular systems of any geometrical shape can be conceived. Absorption coefficient, reduced scattering coefficient and refractive index of the optical phantom have been measured to ensure that the optical parameters reasonably reproduce real human bone tissue in vivo. An experimental demonstration of a possible use of the optical phantom, utilizing a laser-Doppler flowmeter, is also presented. PMID:25136496

  12. Bone tissue phantoms for optical flowmeters at large interoptode spacing generated by 3D-stereolithography.

    PubMed

    Binzoni, Tiziano; Torricelli, Alessandro; Giust, Remo; Sanguinetti, Bruno; Bernhard, Paul; Spinelli, Lorenzo

    2014-08-01

    A bone tissue phantom prototype allowing to test, in general, optical flowmeters at large interoptode spacings, such as laser-Doppler flowmetry or diffuse correlation spectroscopy, has been developed by 3D-stereolithography technique. It has been demonstrated that complex tissue vascular systems of any geometrical shape can be conceived. Absorption coefficient, reduced scattering coefficient and refractive index of the optical phantom have been measured to ensure that the optical parameters reasonably reproduce real human bone tissue in vivo. An experimental demonstration of a possible use of the optical phantom, utilizing a laser-Doppler flowmeter, is also presented.

  13. Bone tissue phantoms for optical flowmeters at large interoptode spacing generated by 3D-stereolithography.

    PubMed

    Binzoni, Tiziano; Torricelli, Alessandro; Giust, Remo; Sanguinetti, Bruno; Bernhard, Paul; Spinelli, Lorenzo

    2014-08-01

    A bone tissue phantom prototype allowing to test, in general, optical flowmeters at large interoptode spacings, such as laser-Doppler flowmetry or diffuse correlation spectroscopy, has been developed by 3D-stereolithography technique. It has been demonstrated that complex tissue vascular systems of any geometrical shape can be conceived. Absorption coefficient, reduced scattering coefficient and refractive index of the optical phantom have been measured to ensure that the optical parameters reasonably reproduce real human bone tissue in vivo. An experimental demonstration of a possible use of the optical phantom, utilizing a laser-Doppler flowmeter, is also presented. PMID:25136496

  14. Building continental-scale 3D subsurface layers in the Digital Crust project: constrained interpolation and uncertainty estimation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulaeva, E.; Fan, Y.; Moosdorf, N.; Richard, S. M.; Bristol, S.; Peters, S. E.; Zaslavsky, I.; Ingebritsen, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Digital Crust EarthCube building block creates a framework for integrating disparate 3D/4D information from multiple sources into a comprehensive model of the structure and composition of the Earth's upper crust, and to demonstrate the utility of this model in several research scenarios. One of such scenarios is estimation of various crustal properties related to fluid dynamics (e.g. permeability and porosity) at each node of any arbitrary unstructured 3D grid to support continental-scale numerical models of fluid flow and transport. Starting from Macrostrat, an existing 4D database of 33,903 chronostratigraphic units, and employing GeoDeepDive, a software system for extracting structured information from unstructured documents, we construct 3D gridded fields of sediment/rock porosity, permeability and geochemistry for large sedimentary basins of North America, which will be used to improve our understanding of large-scale fluid flow, chemical weathering rates, and geochemical fluxes into the ocean. In this talk, we discuss the methods, data gaps (particularly in geologically complex terrain), and various physical and geological constraints on interpolation and uncertainty estimation.

  15. Meanie3D - a mean-shift based, multivariate, multi-scale clustering and tracking algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jürgen-Lorenz; Malte, Diederich; Silke, Troemel

    2014-05-01

    Project OASE is the one of 5 work groups at the HErZ (Hans Ertel Centre for Weather Research), an ongoing effort by the German weather service (DWD) to further research at Universities concerning weather prediction. The goal of project OASE is to gain an object-based perspective on convective events by identifying them early in the onset of convective initiation and follow then through the entire lifecycle. The ability to follow objects in this fashion requires new ways of object definition and tracking, which incorporate all the available data sets of interest, such as Satellite imagery, weather Radar or lightning counts. The Meanie3D algorithm provides the necessary tool for this purpose. Core features of this new approach to clustering (object identification) and tracking are the ability to identify objects using the mean-shift algorithm applied to a multitude of variables (multivariate), as well as the ability to detect objects on various scales (multi-scale) using elements of Scale-Space theory. The algorithm works in 2D as well as 3D without modifications. It is an extension of a method well known from the field of computer vision and image processing, which has been tailored to serve the needs of the meteorological community. In spite of the special application to be demonstrated here (like convective initiation), the algorithm is easily tailored to provide clustering and tracking for a wide class of data sets and problems. In this talk, the demonstration is carried out on two of the OASE group's own composite sets. One is a 2D nationwide composite of Germany including C-Band Radar (2D) and Satellite information, the other a 3D local composite of the Bonn/Jülich area containing a high-resolution 3D X-Band Radar composite.

  16. A 3D Frictional Segment-to-Segment Contact Method for Large Deformations and Quadratic Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Puso, M; Laursen, T; Solberg, J

    2004-04-01

    Node-on-segment contact is the most common form of contact used today but has many deficiencies ranging from potential locking to non-smooth behavior with large sliding. Furthermore, node-on-segment approaches are not at all applicable to higher order discretizations (e.g. quadratic elements). In a previous work, [3, 4] we developed a segment-to-segment contact approach for eight node hexahedral elements based on the mortar method that was applicable to large deformation mechanics. The approach proved extremely robust since it eliminated the over-constraint that caused 'locking' and provided smooth force variations in large sliding. Here, we extend this previous approach to treat frictional contact problems. In addition, the method is extended to 3D quadratic tetrahedrals and hexahedrals. The proposed approach is then applied to several challenging frictional contact problems that demonstrate its effectiveness.

  17. Integration of nano-scale components and supports in micromachined 3D silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, J.; Azimi, S.; Y Dang, Z.; Breese, M. B. H.

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a process for the three-dimensional (3D) machining of p-type silicon on a micro- and nano-scale using high-energy ion beam irradiation with one or more energies and fluences, followed by electrochemical anodization in hydrofluoric acid. We present a study of the dependence of our fabricated structures on irradiating ion energies, fluences, geometries and wafer resistivity. All these factors determine whether the micro- and nano-scale features are properly connected to the supports in the 3D silicon structures. If wrongly chosen, any of these factors may cause a breakage at the connection through localized over-etching. Under optimum irradiation and anodization conditions, free-standing patterned membranes can be fabricated with feature dimensions of 100 nm over areas of many square millimeters. This investigation is based on silicon structures but is relevant to any electro-assisted etching process for 3D fabrication, paving the way for achieving free-standing silicon photonics, mechanical resonators and micro-/nano-electromechanical systems.

  18. Simulation of Asymmetric Destabilization of Mine-void Rock Masses Using a Large 3D Physical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, X. P.; Shan, P. F.; Cao, J. T.; Cui, F.; Sun, H.

    2016-02-01

    When mechanized sub-horizontal section top coal caving (SSTCC) is used as an underground mining method for exploiting extremely steep and thick coal seams (ESTCS), a large-scale surrounding rock caving may be violently created and have the potential to induce asymmetric destabilization from mine voids. In this study, a methodology for assessing the destabilization was developed to simulate the Weihuliang coal mine in the Urumchi coal field, China. Coal-rock mass and geological structure characterization were integrated with rock mechanics testing for assessment of the methodology and factors influencing asymmetric destabilization. The porous rock-like composite material ensured accuracy for building a 3D geological physical model of mechanized SSTCC by combining multi-mean timely track monitoring including acoustic emission, crack optical acquirement, roof separation observation, and close-field photogrammetry. An asymmetric 3D modeling analysis for destabilization characteristics was completed. Data from the simulated hydraulic support and buried pressure sensor provided effective information that was linked with stress-strain relationship of the working face in ESTCS. The results of the 3D physical model experiments combined with hybrid statistical methods were effective for predicting dynamic hazards in ESTCS.

  19. Design of a large area 3D surface structure measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenghuai; Li, Xin; Chen, Yurong; Xie, Tiebang

    2010-10-01

    Surface texture plays a vital role in modern engineering products. Currently surface metrology discipline is undergoing a paradigm shift from 2D profile to 3D areal and from stochastic to structured surface characterization. Areal surface texture measurements have greater fully functional significance parameters, better repeatability and more effectively visual express than profile measurements. The existing white light microscopy interference measurement can be used for the non-contact measurement of areal surface texture. However, the measurement field and lateral resolution of this method is restricted to the numerical aperture of objective. To address this issue, a type of vertical scanning white light interference stitching measurement system with large area and seamless has been built up in this paper. This system is based on the compound optical microscopy system and 3D precision displacement system with large travel, nanometer level and displacement measurement. The CCD calibration and angles calculation between CCD and level worktables are settled depending on the measurement system itself. A non-orthogonal worktable moving strategy is used for the seamless stitching measurement of this measurement method, which reduces the cost of stitching and enlarges the measurement field. Therefore the problem, which the lateral resolution and the measurement filed are restricted to the numerical aperture of objective, is solved. An automatic search and location method of fringe for white light interference measurement based on the normalized standard deviation of gray value of interference microscopy images is proposed to solve the problem of inefficiency for the search of interference fringe by hand.

  20. Nodes Localization in 3D Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Multidimensional Scaling Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the recent years, there has been a huge advancement in wireless sensor computing technology. Today, wireless sensor network (WSN) has become a key technology for different types of smart environment. Nodes localization in WSN has arisen as a very challenging problem in the research community. Most of the applications for WSN are not useful without a priory known nodes positions. Adding GPS receivers to each node is an expensive solution and inapplicable for indoor environments. In this paper, we implemented and evaluated an algorithm based on multidimensional scaling (MDS) technique for three-dimensional (3D) nodes localization in WSN using improved heuristic method for distance calculation. Using extensive simulations we investigated our approach regarding various network parameters. We compared the results from the simulations with other approaches for 3D-WSN localization and showed that our approach outperforms other techniques in terms of accuracy. PMID:27437480

  1. Multi-Scale Modeling of Tissues Using CompuCell3D

    PubMed Central

    Swat, Maciej H.; Thomas, Gilberto L.; Belmonte, Julio M.; Shirinifard, Abbas; Hmeljak, Dimitrij; Glazier, James A.

    2013-01-01

    The study of how cells interact to produce tissue development, homeostasis, or diseases was, until recently, almost purely experimental. Now, multi-cell computer simulation methods, ranging from relatively simple cellular automata to complex immersed-boundary and finite-element mechanistic models, allow in silico study of multi-cell phenomena at the tissue scale based on biologically observed cell behaviors and interactions such as movement, adhesion, growth, death, mitosis, secretion of chemicals, chemotaxis, etc. This tutorial introduces the lattice-based Glazier–Graner–Hogeweg (GGH) Monte Carlo multi-cell modeling and the open-source GGH-based CompuCell3D simulation environment that allows rapid and intuitive modeling and simulation of cellular and multi-cellular behaviors in the context of tissue formation and subsequent dynamics. We also present a walkthrough of four biological models and their associated simulations that demonstrate the capabilities of the GGH and CompuCell3D. PMID:22482955

  2. Points based reconstruction and rendering of 3D shapes from large volume dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingchang; Tian, Jie; He, Huiguang; Li, Guangming

    2003-05-01

    In the field of medical imaging, researchers often need visualize lots of 3D datasets to get the informaiton contained in these datasets. But the huge data genreated by modern medical imaging device challenge the real time processing and rendering algorithms at all the time. Spurring by the great achievement of Points Based Rendering (PBR) in the fields of computer graphics to render very large meshes, we propose a new algorithm to use the points as basic primitive of surface reconstruction and rendering to interactively reconstruct and render very large volume dataset. By utilizing the special characteristics of medical image datasets, we obtain a fast and efficient points-based reconstruction and rendering algorithm in common PC. The experimental results show taht this algorithm is feasible and efficient.

  3. Global regularity to the 3D MHD equations with large initial data in bounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haibo

    2016-08-01

    This paper considers the global regularity to the 3D incompressible MHD equations with large initial data in bounded domains. Let μ, ν, u, and b denote the viscosity coefficient, magnetic diffusivity, velocity field, and magnetic field, respectively. We construct new systems for (u - b) and (u + b) to overcome the difficulties caused by the large initial data. It is shown that ↑" separators=" ( u , b ) ↑ H 1 is globally bounded as long as ↑" separators=" ( u0 - b 0 ) ↑ H 1 + |" separators=" μ - ν | ( μ + ν ) - 1 or ↑" separators=" ( u0 + b 0 ) ↑ H 1 + |" separators=" μ - ν | ( μ + ν ) - 1 is sufficiently small, which indicates that the Navier-Stokes equations can be regularized by the magnetic field.

  4. 2D-3D MIGRATION AND CONFORMATIONAL MULTIPLICATION OF CHEMICALS IN LARGE CHEMICAL INVENTORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical interactions are three-dimensional (3D) in nature and require modeling chemicals as 3D entities. In turn, using 3D models of chemicals leads to the realization that a single 2D structure can have hundreds of different conformations, and the electronic properties of these...

  5. 3D imaging of particle-scale rotational motion in cyclically driven granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Matt; Powers, Dylan; Cooper, Eric; Losert, Wolfgang

    Recent experimental advances have enabled three-dimensional (3D) imaging of motion, structure, and failure within granular systems. 3D imaging allows researchers to directly characterize bulk behaviors that arise from particle- and meso-scale features. For instance, segregation of a bidisperse system of spheres under cyclic shear can originate from microscopic irreversibilities and the development of convective secondary flows. Rotational motion and frictional rotational coupling, meanwhile, have been less explored in such experimental 3D systems, especially under cyclic forcing. In particular, relative amounts of sliding and/or rolling between pairs of contacting grains could influence the reversibility of both trajectories, in terms of both position and orientation. In this work, we apply the Refractive Index Matched Scanning technique to a granular system that is cyclically driven and measure both translational and rotational motion of individual grains. We relate measured rotational motion to resulting shear bands and convective flows, further indicating the degree to which pairs and neighborhoods of grains collectively rotate.

  6. Unraveling the 3D genome: genomics tools for multi-scale exploration

    PubMed Central

    Risca, Viviana I.; Greenleaf, William J.

    2015-01-01

    A decade of rapid method development has begun to yield exciting insights into the three-dimensional architecture of the metazoan genome and the roles it may play in regulating transcription. We review here core methods and new tools in the modern genomicist’s toolbox at three length scales, ranging from single base pair to megabase scale chromosomal domains, and discuss the emerging picture of the 3D genome that these tools have revealed. Blind spots remain, especially at intermediate length scales spanning a few nucleosomes, but thanks in part to new technologies that permit targeted alteration of chromatin states and time-resolved studies, the next decade holds great promise for hypothesis-driven research into the mechanisms that drive genome architecture and transcriptional regulation. PMID:25887733

  7. A quality assessment of 3D video analysis for full scale rockfall experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkwein, A.; Glover, J.; Bourrier, F.; Gerber, W.

    2012-04-01

    Main goal of full scale rockfall experiments is to retrieve a 3D trajectory of a boulder along the slope. Such trajectories then can be used to calibrate rockfall simulation models. This contribution presents the application of video analysis techniques capturing rock fall velocity of some free fall full scale rockfall experiments along a rock face with an inclination of about 50 degrees. Different scaling methodologies have been evaluated. They mainly differ in the way the scaling factors between the movie frames and the reality and are determined. For this purpose some scale bars and targets with known dimensions have been distributed in advance along the slope. The single scaling approaches are briefly described as follows: (i) Image raster is scaled to the distant fixed scale bar then recalibrated to the plane of the passing rock boulder by taking the measured position of the nearest impact as the distance to the camera. The distance between the camera, scale bar, and passing boulder are surveyed. (ii) The image raster was scaled using the four nearest targets (identified using frontal video) from the trajectory to be analyzed. The average of the scaling factors was finally taken as scaling factor. (iii) The image raster was scaled using the four nearest targets from the trajectory to be analyzed. The scaling factor for one trajectory was calculated by balancing the mean scaling factors associated with the two nearest and the two farthest targets in relation to their mean distance to the analyzed trajectory. (iv) Same as previous method but with varying scaling factors during along the trajectory. It has shown that a direct measure of the scaling target and nearest impact zone is the most accurate. If constant plane is assumed it doesn't account for the lateral deviations of the rock boulder from the fall line consequently adding error into the analysis. Thus a combination of scaling methods (i) and (iv) are considered to give the best results. For best results

  8. 3D positioning scheme exploiting nano-scale IR-UWB orthogonal pulses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nammoon; Kim, Youngok

    2011-01-01

    In these days, the development of positioning technology for realizing ubiquitous environments has become one of the most important issues. The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a well-known positioning scheme, but it is not suitable for positioning in in-door/building environments because it is difficult to maintain line-of-sight condition between satellites and a GPS receiver. To such problem, various positioning methods such as RFID, WLAN, ZigBee, and Bluetooth have been developed for indoor positioning scheme. However, the majority of positioning schemes are focused on the two-dimension positioning even though three-dimension (3D) positioning information is more useful especially in indoor applications, such as smart space, U-health service, context aware service, etc. In this paper, a 3D positioning system based on mutually orthogonal nano-scale impulse radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) signals and cross array antenna is proposed. The proposed scheme uses nano-scale IR-UWB signals providing fine time resolution and high-resolution multiple signal specification algorithm for the time-of-arrival and the angle-of-arrival estimation. The performance is evaluated over various IEEE 802.15.4a channel models, and simulation results show the effectiveness of proposed scheme. PMID:21970578

  9. Recognizing objects in 3D point clouds with multi-scale local features.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min; Guo, Yulan; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Yanxin; Lei, Yinjie

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing 3D objects from point clouds in the presence of significant clutter and occlusion is a highly challenging task. In this paper, we present a coarse-to-fine 3D object recognition algorithm. During the phase of offline training, each model is represented with a set of multi-scale local surface features. During the phase of online recognition, a set of keypoints are first detected from each scene. The local surfaces around these keypoints are further encoded with multi-scale feature descriptors. These scene features are then matched against all model features to generate recognition hypotheses, which include model hypotheses and pose hypotheses. Finally, these hypotheses are verified to produce recognition results. The proposed algorithm was tested on two standard datasets, with rigorous comparisons to the state-of-the-art algorithms. Experimental results show that our algorithm was fully automatic and highly effective. It was also very robust to occlusion and clutter. It achieved the best recognition performance on all of these datasets, showing its superiority compared to existing algorithms.

  10. Mapping gray-scale image to 3D surface scanning data by ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Jones, Peter R. M.

    1997-03-01

    The extraction and location of feature points from range imaging is an important but difficult task in machine vision based measurement systems. There exist some feature points which are not able to be detected from pure geometric characteristics, particularly in those measurement tasks related to the human body. The Loughborough Anthropometric Shadow Scanner (LASS) is a whole body surface scanner based on structured light technique. Certain applications of LASS require accurate location of anthropometric landmarks from the scanned data. This is sometimes impossible from existing raw data because some landmarks do not appear in the scanned data. Identification of these landmarks has to resort to surface texture of the scanned object. Modifications to LASS were made to allow gray-scale images to be captured before or after the object was scanned. Two-dimensional gray-scale image must be mapped to the scanned data to acquire the 3D coordinates of a landmark. The method to map 2D images to the scanned data is based on the colinearity conditions and ray-tracing method. If the camera center and image coordinates are known, the corresponding object point must lie on a ray starting from the camera center and connecting to the image coordinate. By intersecting the ray with the scanned surface of the object, the 3D coordinates of a point can be solved. Experimentation has demonstrated the feasibility of the method.

  11. The lithospheric-scale 3D structural configuration of the North Alpine Foreland Basin constrained by gravity modelling and the calculation of the 3D load distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybycin, Anna M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Schneider, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The North Alpine Foreland Basin is situated in the northern front of the European Alps and extends over parts of France, Switzerland, Germany and Austria. It formed as a wedge shaped depression since the Tertiary in consequence of the Euro - Adriatic continental collision and the Alpine orogeny. The basin is filled with clastic sediments, the Molasse, originating from erosional processes of the Alps and underlain by Mesozoic sedimentary successions and a Paleozoic crystalline crust. For our study we have focused on the German part of the basin. To investigate the deep structure, the isostatic state and the load distribution of this region we have constructed a 3D structural model of the basin and the Alpine area using available depth and thickness maps, regional scale 3D structural models as well as seismic and well data for the sedimentary part. The crust (from the top Paleozoic down to the Moho (Grad et al. 2008)) has been considered as two-parted with a lighter upper crust and a denser lower crust; the partition has been calculated following the approach of isostatic equilibrium of Pratt (1855). By implementing a seismic Lithosphere-Asthenosphere-Boundary (LAB) (Tesauro 2009) the crustal scale model has been extended to the lithospheric-scale. The layer geometry and the assigned bulk densities of this starting model have been constrained by means of 3D gravity modelling (BGI, 2012). Afterwards the 3D load distribution has been calculated using a 3D finite element method. Our results show that the North Alpine Foreland Basin is not isostatically balanced and that the configuration of the crystalline crust strongly controls the gravity field in this area. Furthermore, our results show that the basin area is influenced by varying lateral load differences down to a depth of more than 150 km what allows a first order statement of the required compensating horizontal stress needed to prevent gravitational collapse of the system. BGI (2012). The International

  12. Modeling Recent Large Earthquakes Using the 3-D Global Wave Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjörleifsdóttir, V.; Kanamori, H.; Tromp, J.

    2003-04-01

    We use the spectral-element method (SEM) to accurately compute waveforms at periods of 40 s and longer for three recent large earthquakes using 3D Earth models and finite source models. The M_w~7.6, Jan~26, 2001, Bhuj, India event had a small rupture area and is well modeled at long periods with a point source. We use this event as a calibration event to investigate the effects of 3-D Earth models on the waveforms. The M_w~7.9, Nov~11, 2001, Kunlun, China, event exhibits a large directivity (an asymmetry in the radiation pattern) even at periods longer than 200~s. We used the source time function determined by Kikuchi and Yamanaka (2001) and the overall pattern of slip distribution determined by Lin et al. to guide the wave-form modeling. The large directivity is consistent with a long fault, at least 300 km, and an average rupture speed of 3±0.3~km/s. The directivity at long periods is not sensitive to variations in the rupture speed along strike as long as the average rupture speed is constant. Thus, local variations in rupture speed cannot be ruled out. The rupture speed is a key parameter for estimating the fracture energy of earthquakes. The M_w~8.1, March~25, 1998, event near the Balleny Islands on the Antarctic Plate exhibits large directivity in long period surface waves, similar to the Kunlun event. Many slip models have been obtained from body waves for this earthquake (Kuge et al. (1999), Nettles et al. (1999), Antolik et al. (2000), Henry et al. (2000) and Tsuboi et al. (2000)). We used the slip model from Henry et al. to compute SEM waveforms for this event. The synthetic waveforms show a good fit to the data at periods from 40-200~s, but the amplitude and directivity at longer periods are significantly smaller than observed. Henry et al. suggest that this event comprised two subevents with one triggering the other at a distance of 100 km. To explain the observed directivity however, a significant amount of slip is required between the two subevents

  13. Novel Anthropometry Based on 3D-Bodyscans Applied to a Large Population Based Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Willscher, Edith; Ahnert, Peter; Wirkner, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Loeffler, Markus; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) whole body scanners are increasingly used as precise measuring tools for the rapid quantification of anthropometric measures in epidemiological studies. We analyzed 3D whole body scanning data of nearly 10,000 participants of a cohort collected from the adult population of Leipzig, one of the largest cities in Eastern Germany. We present a novel approach for the systematic analysis of this data which aims at identifying distinguishable clusters of body shapes called body types. In the first step, our method aggregates body measures provided by the scanner into meta-measures, each representing one relevant dimension of the body shape. In a next step, we stratified the cohort into body types and assessed their stability and dependence on the size of the underlying cohort. Using self-organizing maps (SOM) we identified thirteen robust meta-measures and fifteen body types comprising between 1 and 18 percent of the total cohort size. Thirteen of them are virtually gender specific (six for women and seven for men) and thus reflect most abundant body shapes of women and men. Two body types include both women and men, and describe androgynous body shapes that lack typical gender specific features. The body types disentangle a large variability of body shapes enabling distinctions which go beyond the traditional indices such as body mass index, the waist-to-height ratio, the waist-to-hip ratio and the mortality-hazard ABSI-index. In a next step, we will link the identified body types with disease predispositions to study how size and shape of the human body impact health and disease. PMID:27467550

  14. Novel Anthropometry Based on 3D-Bodyscans Applied to a Large Population Based Cohort.

    PubMed

    Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Willscher, Edith; Ahnert, Peter; Wirkner, Kerstin; Engel, Christoph; Loeffler, Markus; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) whole body scanners are increasingly used as precise measuring tools for the rapid quantification of anthropometric measures in epidemiological studies. We analyzed 3D whole body scanning data of nearly 10,000 participants of a cohort collected from the adult population of Leipzig, one of the largest cities in Eastern Germany. We present a novel approach for the systematic analysis of this data which aims at identifying distinguishable clusters of body shapes called body types. In the first step, our method aggregates body measures provided by the scanner into meta-measures, each representing one relevant dimension of the body shape. In a next step, we stratified the cohort into body types and assessed their stability and dependence on the size of the underlying cohort. Using self-organizing maps (SOM) we identified thirteen robust meta-measures and fifteen body types comprising between 1 and 18 percent of the total cohort size. Thirteen of them are virtually gender specific (six for women and seven for men) and thus reflect most abundant body shapes of women and men. Two body types include both women and men, and describe androgynous body shapes that lack typical gender specific features. The body types disentangle a large variability of body shapes enabling distinctions which go beyond the traditional indices such as body mass index, the waist-to-height ratio, the waist-to-hip ratio and the mortality-hazard ABSI-index. In a next step, we will link the identified body types with disease predispositions to study how size and shape of the human body impact health and disease. PMID:27467550

  15. A crust-scale 3D structural model of the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin (Arctic Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippel, Judith; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Lewerenz, Björn; Kroeger, Karsten Friedrich

    2013-04-01

    The Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin was initiated in the Early Jurassic as part of an Arctic rifted passive continental margin which soon after became overprinted by Cordilleran foreland tectonics. Decades of industrial exploration and scientific research in this petroliferous region have produced a wide spectrum of geological and geophysical data as well as geoscientific knowledge. We have integrated available grids of sedimentary horizons, well data, seismic reflection and refraction data, and the observed regional gravity field into the first crust-scale 3D structural model of the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin. Many characteristics of this model reflect the complex geodynamic and tectonostratigraphic history of the basin. The Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary part of the model comprises seven clastic units (predominantly sandy shales) of which the modelled thickness distributions allow to retrace the well-established history of the basin comprising a gradual north(east)ward shift of the main depocentres as well as diverse phases of localised erosion. As a result of this development, the present-day configuration of the basin reveals that the sedimentary units tend to be younger, more porous, and thus less dense towards the north at a constant depth level. By integrating three refraction seismic profiles and performing combined isostatic and 3D gravity modelling, we have modelled the sub-sedimentary basement of the Beaufort-Mackenzie Basin. The continental basement spans from unstretched domains (as thick as about 42 km) in the south to extremely thinned domains (of less than 5 km thickness) in the north where it probably represents transitional crust attached to the oceanic crust of the Canada Basin. The uppermost parts of the continental crust are less dense (ρ = 2710 kg/m3) and most probably made up by pre-Mesozoic meta-sediments overlying a heavier igneous and metamorphic crust (ρ = 2850 kg/m3). The presented crust-scale 3D structural model shows that the greatest

  16. Large area 3-D optical coherence tomography imaging of lumpectomy specimens for radiation treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cuihuan; Kim, Leonard; Barnard, Nicola; Khan, Atif; Pierce, Mark C.

    2016-02-01

    Our long term goal is to develop a high-resolution imaging method for comprehensive assessment of tissue removed during lumpectomy procedures. By identifying regions of high-grade disease within the excised specimen, we aim to develop patient-specific post-operative radiation treatment regimens. We have assembled a benchtop spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system with 1320 nm center wavelength. Automated beam scanning enables "sub-volumes" spanning 5 mm x 5 mm x 2 mm (500 A-lines x 500 B-scans x 2 mm in depth) to be collected in under 15 seconds. A motorized sample positioning stage enables multiple sub-volumes to be acquired across an entire tissue specimen. Sub-volumes are rendered from individual B-scans in 3D Slicer software and en face (XY) images are extracted at specific depths. These images are then tiled together using MosaicJ software to produce a large area en face view (up to 40 mm x 25 mm). After OCT imaging, specimens were sectioned and stained with HE, allowing comparison between OCT image features and disease markers on histopathology. This manuscript describes the technical aspects of image acquisition and reconstruction, and reports initial qualitative comparison between large area en face OCT images and HE stained tissue sections. Future goals include developing image reconstruction algorithms for mapping an entire sample, and registering OCT image volumes with clinical CT and MRI images for post-operative treatment planning.

  17. A multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold prepared by 3D printing and NFES technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Feifei; Liu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Haiping; Zhang, Fuhua; Zheng, Lulu; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-03-01

    The current focus in the field of life science is the use of tissue engineering scaffolds to repair human organs, which has shown great potential in clinical applications. Extracellular matrix morphology and the performance and internal structure of natural organs are required to meet certain requirements. Therefore, integrating multiple processes can effectively overcome the limitations of the individual processes and can take into account the needs of scaffolds for the material, structure, mechanical properties and many other aspects. This study combined the biological 3D printing technology and the near-field electro-spinning (NFES) process to prepare a multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold. While using 3D printing technology to directly prepare the macro-scaffold, the compositing NFES process to build tissue micro-morphology ultimately formed a tissue engineering scaffold which has the specific extracellular matrix structure. This scaffold not only takes into account the material, structure, performance and many other requirements, but also focuses on resolving the controllability problems in macro- and micro-forming which further aim to induce cell directed differentiation, reproduction and, ultimately, the formation of target tissue organs. It has in-depth immeasurable significance to build ideal scaffolds and further promote the application of tissue engineering.

  18. Virtualizing ancient Rome: 3D acquisition and modeling of a large plaster-of-Paris model of imperial Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, Gabriele; Frischer, Bernard; De Simone, Monica; Cioci, Andrea; Spinetti, Alessandro; Carosso, Luca; Micoli, Laura L.; Russo, Michele; Grasso, Tommaso

    2004-12-01

    Computer modeling through digital range images has been used for many applications, including 3D modeling of objects belonging to our cultural heritage. The scales involved range from small objects (e.g. pottery), to middle-sized works of art (statues, architectural decorations), up to very large structures (architectural and archaeological monuments). For any of these applications, suitable sensors and methodologies have been explored by different authors. The object to be modeled within this project is the "Plastico di Roma antica," a large plaster-of-Paris model of imperial Rome (16x17 meters) created in the last century. Its overall size therefore demands an acquisition approach typical of large structures, but it also is characterized extremely tiny details typical of small objects (houses are a few centimeters high; their doors, windows, etc. are smaller than 1 centimeter). This paper gives an account of the procedures followed for solving this "contradiction" and describes how a huge 3D model was acquired and generated by using a special metrology Laser Radar. The procedures for reorienting in a single reference system the huge point clouds obtained after each acquisition phase, thanks to the measurement of fixed redundant references, are described. The data set was split in smaller sub-areas 2 x 2 meters each for purposes of mesh editing. This subdivision was necessary owing to the huge number of points in each individual scan (50-60 millions). The final merge of the edited parts made it possible to create a single mesh. All these processes were made with software specifically designed for this project since no commercial package could be found that was suitable for managing such a large number of points. Preliminary models are presented. Finally, the significance of the project is discussed in terms of the overall project known as "Rome Reborn," of which the present acquisition is an important component.

  19. Virtualizing ancient Rome: 3D acquisition and modeling of a large plaster-of-Paris model of imperial Rome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, Gabriele; Frischer, Bernard; De Simone, Monica; Cioci, Andrea; Spinetti, Alessandro; Carosso, Luca; Micoli, Laura L.; Russo, Michele; Grasso, Tommaso

    2005-01-01

    Computer modeling through digital range images has been used for many applications, including 3D modeling of objects belonging to our cultural heritage. The scales involved range from small objects (e.g. pottery), to middle-sized works of art (statues, architectural decorations), up to very large structures (architectural and archaeological monuments). For any of these applications, suitable sensors and methodologies have been explored by different authors. The object to be modeled within this project is the "Plastico di Roma antica," a large plaster-of-Paris model of imperial Rome (16x17 meters) created in the last century. Its overall size therefore demands an acquisition approach typical of large structures, but it also is characterized extremely tiny details typical of small objects (houses are a few centimeters high; their doors, windows, etc. are smaller than 1 centimeter). This paper gives an account of the procedures followed for solving this "contradiction" and describes how a huge 3D model was acquired and generated by using a special metrology Laser Radar. The procedures for reorienting in a single reference system the huge point clouds obtained after each acquisition phase, thanks to the measurement of fixed redundant references, are described. The data set was split in smaller sub-areas 2 x 2 meters each for purposes of mesh editing. This subdivision was necessary owing to the huge number of points in each individual scan (50-60 millions). The final merge of the edited parts made it possible to create a single mesh. All these processes were made with software specifically designed for this project since no commercial package could be found that was suitable for managing such a large number of points. Preliminary models are presented. Finally, the significance of the project is discussed in terms of the overall project known as "Rome Reborn," of which the present acquisition is an important component.

  20. Soil water content variability in the 3D 'support-spacing-extent' space of scale metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachepsky, Yakov; Martinez, Gonzalo; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of soil water content variability provides important insight into soil functioning, and is essential in many applications. This variability is known to be scale-dependent, and divergent statements about the change of the variability magnitude with scale can be found in literature. We undertook a systematic review to see how the definition of scale can affect conclusions about the scale-dependence in soil water content variability. Support, spacing, and extent are three metrics used to characterize scale in hydrology. Available data sets describe changes in soil moisture variability with changes in one or more of these scale metrics. We found six types of experiments with the scale change. With data obtained without a change in extent, the scale change in some cases consisted in the simultaneous change of support and spacing. This was done with remote sensing data, and the power law decrease in variance with support increase was found. Datasets that were collected with different support or sample volumes for the same extent and spacing showed the decrease of variance as the sample size increased. A variance increase was common when the scale change consisted in change in spacing without the change in supports and extents. An increase in variance with the extent of the study area was demonstrated with data an evolution of variability with increasing size of the area under investigation (extent) without modification of support. The variance generally increased with the extent when the spacing was changed so that the change in variability at areas of different sizes was studied with the same number of samples with equal support. Finally, there are remote sensing datasets that document decrease in variability with a change in extent for a given support without modification of spacing. Overall, published information on the effect of scale on soil water content variability in the 3D space of scale metrics did not contain controversies in qualitative terms

  1. Exome-Scale Discovery of Hotspot Mutation Regions in Human Cancer Using 3D Protein Structure.

    PubMed

    Tokheim, Collin; Bhattacharya, Rohit; Niknafs, Noushin; Gygax, Derek M; Kim, Rick; Ryan, Michael; Masica, David L; Karchin, Rachel

    2016-07-01

    The impact of somatic missense mutation on cancer etiology and progression is often difficult to interpret. One common approach for assessing the contribution of missense mutations in carcinogenesis is to identify genes mutated with statistically nonrandom frequencies. Even given the large number of sequenced cancer samples currently available, this approach remains underpowered to detect drivers, particularly in less studied cancer types. Alternative statistical and bioinformatic approaches are needed. One approach to increase power is to focus on localized regions of increased missense mutation density or hotspot regions, rather than a whole gene or protein domain. Detecting missense mutation hotspot regions in three-dimensional (3D) protein structure may also be beneficial because linear sequence alone does not fully describe the biologically relevant organization of codons. Here, we present a novel and statistically rigorous algorithm for detecting missense mutation hotspot regions in 3D protein structures. We analyzed approximately 3 × 10(5) mutations from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 216 tumor-type-specific hotspot regions. In addition to experimentally determined protein structures, we considered high-quality structural models, which increase genomic coverage from approximately 5,000 to more than 15,000 genes. We provide new evidence that 3D mutation analysis has unique advantages. It enables discovery of hotspot regions in many more genes than previously shown and increases sensitivity to hotspot regions in tumor suppressor genes (TSG). Although hotspot regions have long been known to exist in both TSGs and oncogenes, we provide the first report that they have different characteristic properties in the two types of driver genes. We show how cancer researchers can use our results to link 3D protein structure and the biologic functions of missense mutations in cancer, and to generate testable hypotheses about driver mechanisms. Our results

  2. Additively Manufactured Device for Dynamic Culture of Large Arrays of 3D Tissue Engineered Constructs.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro F; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Gomes, Manuela E; Reis, Rui L; Vaquette, Cédryck

    2015-04-22

    The ability to test large arrays of cell and biomaterial combinations in 3D environments is still rather limited in the context of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This limitation can be generally addressed by employing highly automated and reproducible methodologies. This study reports on the development of a highly versatile and upscalable method based on additive manufacturing for the fabrication of arrays of scaffolds, which are enclosed into individualized perfusion chambers. Devices containing eight scaffolds and their corresponding bioreactor chambers are simultaneously fabricated utilizing a dual extrusion additive manufacturing system. To demonstrate the versatility of the concept, the scaffolds, while enclosed into the device, are subsequently surface-coated with a biomimetic calcium phosphate layer by perfusion with simulated body fluid solution. 96 scaffolds are simultaneously seeded and cultured with human osteoblasts under highly controlled bidirectional perfusion dynamic conditions over 4 weeks. Both coated and noncoated resulting scaffolds show homogeneous cell distribution and high cell viability throughout the 4 weeks culture period and CaP-coated scaffolds result in a significantly increased cell number. The methodology developed in this work exemplifies the applicability of additive manufacturing as a tool for further automation of studies in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  3. Scale Space Graph Representation and Kernel Matching for Non Rigid and Textured 3D Shape Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Garro, Valeria; Giachetti, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel framework for 3D object retrieval that relies on tree-based shape representations (TreeSha) derived from the analysis of the scale-space of the Auto Diffusion Function (ADF) and on specialized graph kernels designed for their comparison. By coupling maxima of the Auto Diffusion Function with the related basins of attraction, we can link the information at different scales encoding spatial relationships in a graph description that is isometry invariant and can easily incorporate texture and additional geometrical information as node and edge features. Using custom graph kernels it is then possible to estimate shape dissimilarities adapted to different specific tasks and on different categories of models, making the procedure a powerful and flexible tool for shape recognition and retrieval. Experimental results demonstrate that the method can provide retrieval scores similar or better than state-of-the-art on textured and non textured shape retrieval benchmarks and give interesting insights on effectiveness of different shape descriptors and graph kernels.

  4. Digital structural interpretation of mountain-scale photogrammetric 3D models (Kamnik Alps, Slovenia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolžan, Erazem; Vrabec, Marko

    2015-04-01

    georeferenced geological field data acquired along mountain trail transects, mainly using the MVE Field Move software application. In our experience, vertical aerophotos were sufficient to generate precise surface models in all but the steepest mountain cliffs. Therefore, using existing vertical photoimagery (where available) is a very cost-effective alternative to organizing shooting campaigns with rented aircraft. For handling reasonably large models (cca 3 x 3 km, up to 10 million triangles), a low-end computer workstation with mid-range professional 3D graphic card is sufficient. The biggest bottleneck is the photogrammetric processing step which is time-consuming (10s of hrs) and has large RAM requirements, although those can be offset by dividing models into smaller parts. The major problem with geological modeling software like Gocad or Move is that it at present does not handle well projecting of phototextures. Whereas Photoscan-generated orthophotos can be vertically projected onto mesh models, this results in unacceptable distortions and gaps in subvertical or overhanging parts of the mountain cliff models. A real 3D UV texture mapping method, such as implemented in Photoscan, would be required to realistically model such areas. This limitations notwithstanding, digital geological mapping of photogrammetric models of mountains is a very promising, cost- and time-effective method for rapid structural interpretation and mapping of barren mountainous terrains, particularly when it is complemented by field measurements and observations.

  5. Assessing the biomechanical strength of trabecular bone in vitro using 3D anisotropic nonlinear texture measures: the scaling vector method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monetti, Roberto A.; Bohm, Holger F.; Muller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Link, Thomas M.; Rath, Christoph W.

    2004-05-01

    We introduce the scaling vector method (SVM): a technique to obtain local non-linear structural information from data sets suitable in cases where anisotropy plays an important role. We apply the SVM to High Resolution Magnetic Resonance Images (HRMRI) of human proximal femur specimens IN VITRO which contain a large portion of bone tissue forming a complex network of mineralized trabeculae oriented along the major stress lines. By means of the SVM, we extract a 3D non-linear local anisotropic texture measure which we use to compare with similar isotropic texture measures, bone mineral density (BMD) and standard isotropic 2D (linear) morphometric parameters in the prediction of the biomechanical properties of the trabecular bone. Our results show that structural non-linear anisotropic texture measures which account for the preferential direction of the trabeculae are superior to isotropic and bulk measures in the prediction of the mechanical properties of the human proximal femur in vitro.

  6. Fast segmentation of stained nuclei in terabyte-scale, time resolved 3D microscopy image stacks.

    PubMed

    Stegmaier, Johannes; Otte, Jens C; Kobitski, Andrei; Bartschat, Andreas; Garcia, Ariel; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Strähle, Uwe; Mikut, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Automated analysis of multi-dimensional microscopy images has become an integral part of modern research in life science. Most available algorithms that provide sufficient segmentation quality, however, are infeasible for a large amount of data due to their high complexity. In this contribution we present a fast parallelized segmentation method that is especially suited for the extraction of stained nuclei from microscopy images, e.g., of developing zebrafish embryos. The idea is to transform the input image based on gradient and normal directions in the proximity of detected seed points such that it can be handled by straightforward global thresholding like Otsu's method. We evaluate the quality of the obtained segmentation results on a set of real and simulated benchmark images in 2D and 3D and show the algorithm's superior performance compared to other state-of-the-art algorithms. We achieve an up to ten-fold decrease in processing times, allowing us to process large data sets while still providing reasonable segmentation results.

  7. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  8. A constraint logic programming approach to associate 1D and 3D structural components for large protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Dal Palù, Alessandro; Pontelli, Enrico; He, Jing; Lu, Yonggang

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes a novel framework, constructed using Constraint Logic Programming (CLP) and parallelism, to determine the association between parts of the primary sequence of a protein and alpha-helices extracted from 3D low-resolution descriptions of large protein complexes. The association is determined by extracting constraints from the 3D information, regarding length, relative position and connectivity of helices, and solving these constraints with the guidance of a secondary structure prediction algorithm. Parallelism is employed to enhance performance on large proteins. The framework provides a fast, inexpensive alternative to determine the exact tertiary structure of unknown proteins.

  9. Fabrication of 3D fine scale PZT components by ink-jet prototyping process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguera, R.; Dossou-Yovo, C.; Lejeune, M.; Chartier, T.

    2005-09-01

    Different investigations have been carried out to optimize an ink-jet printing technique, devoted to the fabrication of 3D fine scale PZT parts, by adjustment of the fluid properties of the ceramic suspensions and by controlling the ejection and impact phenomena. A 10 vol% PZT loaded suspension characterized by a Newtonian behavior, corresponding to a viscosity of 10mPa.s and to a ratio Re/We1/2 of 5.98 has been selected. The ejection and impact phenomena strongly depend on the driving parameters of the printing head, in particular the formation of the droplet, with satellite or not, as well as its velocity and volume which are function of the pulse amplitude. Moreover, the conditions of ejection (droplet velocity and volume) control the characteristics of the deposit (definition, spreading, thickness uniformity). Sintered PZT pillar array has been achieved by ink-jet printing with a definition equal to 50μm. These structures could be very useful to improve the performances of 1-3 ceramic polymer composites for imaging probes or more generally for ultrasonic transducers and also of micro-deformable mirrors for optical adaptive systems.

  10. Development and Characterization of Embedded Sensory Particles Using Multi-Scale 3D Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, Stephen R.; Leser, William P.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Newman, John A.; Hartl, Darren J.

    2014-01-01

    A method for detecting fatigue cracks has been explored at NASA Langley Research Center. Microscopic NiTi shape memory alloy (sensory) particles were embedded in a 7050 aluminum alloy matrix to detect the presence of fatigue cracks. Cracks exhibit an elevated stress field near their tip inducing a martensitic phase transformation in nearby sensory particles. Detectable levels of acoustic energy are emitted upon particle phase transformation such that the existence and location of fatigue cracks can be detected. To test this concept, a fatigue crack was grown in a mode-I single-edge notch fatigue crack growth specimen containing sensory particles. As the crack approached the sensory particles, measurements of particle strain, matrix-particle debonding, and phase transformation behavior of the sensory particles were performed. Full-field deformation measurements were performed using a novel multi-scale optical 3D digital image correlation (DIC) system. This information will be used in a finite element-based study to determine optimal sensory material behavior and density.

  11. A 3D bioprinting system to produce human-scale tissue constructs with structural integrity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Sang Jin; Ko, In Kap; Kengla, Carlos; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    A challenge for tissue engineering is producing three-dimensional (3D), vascularized cellular constructs of clinically relevant size, shape and structural integrity. We present an integrated tissue-organ printer (ITOP) that can fabricate stable, human-scale tissue constructs of any shape. Mechanical stability is achieved by printing cell-laden hydrogels together with biodegradable polymers in integrated patterns and anchored on sacrificial hydrogels. The correct shape of the tissue construct is achieved by representing clinical imaging data as a computer model of the anatomical defect and translating the model into a program that controls the motions of the printer nozzles, which dispense cells to discrete locations. The incorporation of microchannels into the tissue constructs facilitates diffusion of nutrients to printed cells, thereby overcoming the diffusion limit of 100-200 μm for cell survival in engineered tissues. We demonstrate capabilities of the ITOP by fabricating mandible and calvarial bone, cartilage and skeletal muscle. Future development of the ITOP is being directed to the production of tissues for human applications and to the building of more complex tissues and solid organs. PMID:26878319

  12. A 3D bioprinting system to produce human-scale tissue constructs with structural integrity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Sang Jin; Ko, In Kap; Kengla, Carlos; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    A challenge for tissue engineering is producing three-dimensional (3D), vascularized cellular constructs of clinically relevant size, shape and structural integrity. We present an integrated tissue-organ printer (ITOP) that can fabricate stable, human-scale tissue constructs of any shape. Mechanical stability is achieved by printing cell-laden hydrogels together with biodegradable polymers in integrated patterns and anchored on sacrificial hydrogels. The correct shape of the tissue construct is achieved by representing clinical imaging data as a computer model of the anatomical defect and translating the model into a program that controls the motions of the printer nozzles, which dispense cells to discrete locations. The incorporation of microchannels into the tissue constructs facilitates diffusion of nutrients to printed cells, thereby overcoming the diffusion limit of 100-200 μm for cell survival in engineered tissues. We demonstrate capabilities of the ITOP by fabricating mandible and calvarial bone, cartilage and skeletal muscle. Future development of the ITOP is being directed to the production of tissues for human applications and to the building of more complex tissues and solid organs.

  13. 3D stochastic inversion and joint inversion of potential fields for multi scale parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsipour, Pejman

    stochastic joint inversion method based on cokriging is applied to estimate density and magnetic susceptibility distributions from gravity and total magnetic field data. The method fully integrates the physical relations between the properties (density and magnetic susceptibility) and the indirect observations (gravity and total magnetic field). As a consequence, when the data are considered noise-free, the inverted fields exactly reproduce the observed data. The required density and magnetic susceptibility auto- and cross covariance are assumed to follow a linear model of coregionalization (LCM). In all the methods presented in this thesis, compact and stochastic synthetic models are investigated. The results show the ability of the methods to invert surface and borehole data simultaneously on multiple scale parameters. A case study using ground measurements of total magnetic field and gravity data at the Perseverance mine (Quebec, Canada) is selected and tested with the 3 approaches presented. The recovered 3D susceptibility and density model provides beneficial information that can be used to analyze the geology of massive sulfides for the domain under study.

  14. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  15. HSA: integrating multi-track Hi-C data for genome-scale reconstruction of 3D chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chenchen; Zhang, Yuping; Ouyang, Zhengqing

    2016-03-02

    Genome-wide 3C technologies (Hi-C) are being increasingly employed to study three-dimensional (3D) genome conformations. Existing computational approaches are unable to integrate accumulating data to facilitate studying 3D chromatin structure and function. We present HSA ( http://ouyanglab.jax.org/hsa/ ), a flexible tool that jointly analyzes multiple contact maps to infer 3D chromatin structure at the genome scale. HSA globally searches the latent structure underlying different cleavage footprints. Its robustness and accuracy outperform or rival existing tools on extensive simulations and orthogonal experiment validations. Applying HSA to recent in situ Hi-C data, we found the 3D chromatin structures are highly conserved across various human cell types.

  16. Phosphonate-functionalized large pore 3-D cubic mesoporous (KIT-6) hybrid as highly efficient actinide extracting agent.

    PubMed

    Lebed, Pablo J; de Souza, Kellen; Bilodeau, François; Larivière, Dominic; Kleitz, Freddy

    2011-11-01

    A new type of radionuclide extraction material is reported based on phosphonate functionalities covalently anchored on the mesopore surface of 3-D cubic mesoporous silica (KIT-6). The easily prepared nanoporous hybrid shows largely superior performance in selective sorption of uranium and thorium as compared to the U/TEVA commercial resin and 2-D hexagonal SBA-15 equivalent.

  17. The 3D MHD code GOEMHD3 for astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers. Code description, verification, and computational performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skála, J.; Baruffa, F.; Büchner, J.; Rampp, M.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The numerical simulation of turbulence and flows in almost ideal astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers motivates the implementation of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) computer codes with low resistivity. They need to be computationally efficient and scale well with large numbers of CPU cores, allow obtaining a high grid resolution over large simulation domains, and be easily and modularly extensible, for instance, to new initial and boundary conditions. Aims: Our aims are the implementation, optimization, and verification of a computationally efficient, highly scalable, and easily extensible low-dissipative MHD simulation code for the numerical investigation of the dynamics of astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers in three dimensions (3D). Methods: The new GOEMHD3 code discretizes the ideal part of the MHD equations using a fast and efficient leap-frog scheme that is second-order accurate in space and time and whose initial and boundary conditions can easily be modified. For the investigation of diffusive and dissipative processes the corresponding terms are discretized by a DuFort-Frankel scheme. To always fulfill the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability criterion, the time step of the code is adapted dynamically. Numerically induced local oscillations are suppressed by explicit, externally controlled diffusion terms. Non-equidistant grids are implemented, which enhance the spatial resolution, where needed. GOEMHD3 is parallelized based on the hybrid MPI-OpenMP programing paradigm, adopting a standard two-dimensional domain-decomposition approach. Results: The ideal part of the equation solver is verified by performing numerical tests of the evolution of the well-understood Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and of Orszag-Tang vortices. The accuracy of solving the (resistive) induction equation is tested by simulating the decay of a cylindrical current column. Furthermore, we show that the computational performance of the code scales very

  18. Preliminary results in large bone segmentation from 3D freehand ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanti, Zian; Torres, Fabian; Arámbula Cosío, Fernando

    2013-11-01

    Computer Assisted Orthopedic Surgery (CAOS) requires a correct registration between the patient in the operating room and the virtual models representing the patient in the computer. In order to increase the precision and accuracy of the registration a set of new techniques that eliminated the need to use fiducial markers have been developed. The majority of these newly developed registration systems are based on costly intraoperative imaging systems like Computed Tomography (CT scan) or Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An alternative to these methods is the use of an Ultrasound (US) imaging system for the implementation of a more cost efficient intraoperative registration solution. In order to develop the registration solution with the US imaging system, the bone surface is segmented in both preoperative and intraoperative images, and the registration is done using the acquire surface. In this paper, we present the a preliminary results of a new approach to segment bone surface from ultrasound volumes acquired by means 3D freehand ultrasound. The method is based on the enhancement of the voxels that belongs to surface and its posterior segmentation. The enhancement process is based on the information provided by eigenanalisis of the multiscale 3D Hessian matrix. The preliminary results shows that from the enhance volume the final bone surfaces can be extracted using a singular value thresholding.

  19. Pseudocontact Shift-Driven Iterative Resampling for 3D Structure Determinations of Large Proteins.

    PubMed

    Pilla, Kala Bharath; Otting, Gottfried; Huber, Thomas

    2016-01-29

    Pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) induced by paramagnetic lanthanides produce pronounced effects in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, which are easily measured and which deliver valuable long-range structure restraints. Even sparse PCS data greatly enhance the success rate of 3D (3-dimensional) structure predictions of proteins by the modeling program Rosetta. The present work extends this approach to 3D structures of larger proteins, comprising more than 200 residues, which are difficult to model by Rosetta without additional experimental restraints. The new algorithm improves the fragment assembly method of Rosetta by utilizing PCSs generated from paramagnetic lanthanide ions attached at four different sites as the only experimental restraints. The sparse PCS data are utilized at multiple stages, to identify native-like local structures, to rank the best structural models and to rebuild the fragment libraries. The fragment libraries are refined iteratively until convergence. The PCS-driven iterative resampling algorithm is strictly data dependent and shown to generate accurate models for a benchmark set of eight different proteins, ranging from 100 to 220 residues, using solely PCSs of backbone amide protons.

  20. Measuring large aspherics using a commercially available 3D-coordinate measuring machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Wolfgang; Matthes, Axel; Schiehle, Heinz

    2000-07-01

    A CNC-controlled precision measuring machine is a very powerful tool in the optical shop not only to determine the surface figure, but also to qualify the radius of curvature and conic constant of aspherics. We used a commercially available 3D-coordinate measuring machine (CMM, ZEISS UPMC 850 CARAT S-ACC) to measure the shape of the GEMINI 1-m convex secondary mirrors at different lapping and polishing stages. To determine the measuring accuracy we compared the mechanical measurements with the results achieved by means of an interferometrical test setup. The data obtained in an early stage of polishing were evaluated in Zernike polynomials which show a very good agreement. The deviation concerning long wave rotational symmetrical errors was 20 nm rms, whereas the accuracy measuring of mid spatial frequency deviations was limited to about 100 nm rms.

  1. Population Estimation Using a 3D City Model: A Multi-Scale Country-Wide Study in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo Ohori, Ken; Ledoux, Hugo; Peters, Ravi; Stoter, Jantien

    2016-01-01

    The remote estimation of a region’s population has for decades been a key application of geographic information science in demography. Most studies have used 2D data (maps, satellite imagery) to estimate population avoiding field surveys and questionnaires. As the availability of semantic 3D city models is constantly increasing, we investigate to what extent they can be used for the same purpose. Based on the assumption that housing space is a proxy for the number of its residents, we use two methods to estimate the population with 3D city models in two directions: (1) disaggregation (areal interpolation) to estimate the population of small administrative entities (e.g. neighbourhoods) from that of larger ones (e.g. municipalities); and (2) a statistical modelling approach to estimate the population of large entities from a sample composed of their smaller ones (e.g. one acquired by a government register). Starting from a complete Dutch census dataset at the neighbourhood level and a 3D model of all 9.9 million buildings in the Netherlands, we compare the population estimates obtained by both methods with the actual population as reported in the census, and use it to evaluate the quality that can be achieved by estimations at different administrative levels. We also analyse how the volume-based estimation enabled by 3D city models fares in comparison to 2D methods using building footprints and floor areas, as well as how it is affected by different levels of semantic detail in a 3D city model. We conclude that 3D city models are useful for estimations of large areas (e.g. for a country), and that the 3D approach has clear advantages over the 2D approach. PMID:27254151

  2. Population Estimation Using a 3D City Model: A Multi-Scale Country-Wide Study in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Biljecki, Filip; Arroyo Ohori, Ken; Ledoux, Hugo; Peters, Ravi; Stoter, Jantien

    2016-01-01

    The remote estimation of a region's population has for decades been a key application of geographic information science in demography. Most studies have used 2D data (maps, satellite imagery) to estimate population avoiding field surveys and questionnaires. As the availability of semantic 3D city models is constantly increasing, we investigate to what extent they can be used for the same purpose. Based on the assumption that housing space is a proxy for the number of its residents, we use two methods to estimate the population with 3D city models in two directions: (1) disaggregation (areal interpolation) to estimate the population of small administrative entities (e.g. neighbourhoods) from that of larger ones (e.g. municipalities); and (2) a statistical modelling approach to estimate the population of large entities from a sample composed of their smaller ones (e.g. one acquired by a government register). Starting from a complete Dutch census dataset at the neighbourhood level and a 3D model of all 9.9 million buildings in the Netherlands, we compare the population estimates obtained by both methods with the actual population as reported in the census, and use it to evaluate the quality that can be achieved by estimations at different administrative levels. We also analyse how the volume-based estimation enabled by 3D city models fares in comparison to 2D methods using building footprints and floor areas, as well as how it is affected by different levels of semantic detail in a 3D city model. We conclude that 3D city models are useful for estimations of large areas (e.g. for a country), and that the 3D approach has clear advantages over the 2D approach. PMID:27254151

  3. Automated bone segmentation from large field of view 3D MR images of the hip joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Schwarz, Raphael; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Accurate bone segmentation in the hip joint region from magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide quantitative data for examining pathoanatomical conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement through to varying stages of osteoarthritis to monitor bone and associated cartilage morphometry. We evaluate two state-of-the-art methods (multi-atlas and active shape model (ASM) approaches) on bilateral MR images for automatic 3D bone segmentation in the hip region (proximal femur and innominate bone). Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired at 3T from 30 volunteers. Image sequences included water-excitation dual echo stead state (FOV 38.6 × 24.1 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.61 mm) in all subjects and multi-echo data image combination (FOV 37.6 × 23.5 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.70 mm) for a subset of eight subjects. Following manual segmentation of femoral (head-neck, proximal-shaft) and innominate (ilium+ischium+pubis) bone, automated bone segmentation proceeded via two approaches: (1) multi-atlas segmentation incorporating non-rigid registration and (2) an advanced ASM-based scheme. Mean inter- and intra-rater reliability Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC) for manual segmentation of femoral and innominate bone were (0.970, 0.963) and (0.971, 0.965). Compared with manual data, mean DSC values for femoral and innominate bone volumes using automated multi-atlas and ASM-based methods were (0.950, 0.922) and (0.946, 0.917), respectively. Both approaches delivered accurate (high DSC values) segmentation results; notably, ASM data were generated in substantially less computational time (12 min versus 10 h). Both automated algorithms provided accurate 3D bone volumetric descriptions for MR-based measures in the hip region. The highly computational efficient ASM-based approach is more likely suitable for future clinical applications such as extracting bone-cartilage interfaces for potential cartilage segmentation.

  4. Automated bone segmentation from large field of view 3D MR images of the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S; Schwarz, Raphael; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-10-21

    Accurate bone segmentation in the hip joint region from magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide quantitative data for examining pathoanatomical conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement through to varying stages of osteoarthritis to monitor bone and associated cartilage morphometry. We evaluate two state-of-the-art methods (multi-atlas and active shape model (ASM) approaches) on bilateral MR images for automatic 3D bone segmentation in the hip region (proximal femur and innominate bone). Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired at 3T from 30 volunteers. Image sequences included water-excitation dual echo stead state (FOV 38.6 × 24.1 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.61 mm) in all subjects and multi-echo data image combination (FOV 37.6 × 23.5 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.70 mm) for a subset of eight subjects. Following manual segmentation of femoral (head-neck, proximal-shaft) and innominate (ilium+ischium+pubis) bone, automated bone segmentation proceeded via two approaches: (1) multi-atlas segmentation incorporating non-rigid registration and (2) an advanced ASM-based scheme. Mean inter- and intra-rater reliability Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC) for manual segmentation of femoral and innominate bone were (0.970, 0.963) and (0.971, 0.965). Compared with manual data, mean DSC values for femoral and innominate bone volumes using automated multi-atlas and ASM-based methods were (0.950, 0.922) and (0.946, 0.917), respectively. Both approaches delivered accurate (high DSC values) segmentation results; notably, ASM data were generated in substantially less computational time (12 min versus 10 h). Both automated algorithms provided accurate 3D bone volumetric descriptions for MR-based measures in the hip region. The highly computational efficient ASM-based approach is more likely suitable for future clinical applications such as extracting bone-cartilage interfaces for potential cartilage segmentation.

  5. Some Progress in Large-Eddy Simulation using the 3-D Vortex Particle Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckelmans, G. S.

    1995-01-01

    This two-month visit at CTR was devoted to investigating possibilities in LES modeling in the context of the 3-D vortex particle method (=vortex element method, VEM) for unbounded flows. A dedicated code was developed for that purpose. Although O(N(sup 2)) and thus slow, it offers the advantage that it can easily be modified to try out many ideas on problems involving up to N approx. 10(exp 4) particles. Energy spectrums (which require O(N(sup 2)) operations per wavenumber) are also computed. Progress was realized in the following areas: particle redistribution schemes, relaxation schemes to maintain the solenoidal condition on the particle vorticity field, simple LES models and their VEM extension, possible new avenues in LES. Model problems that involve strong interaction between vortex tubes were computed, together with diagnostics: total vorticity, linear and angular impulse, energy and energy spectrum, enstrophy. More work is needed, however, especially regarding relaxation schemes and further validation and development of LES models for VEM. Finally, what works well will eventually have to be incorporated into the fast parallel tree code.

  6. Use of 3D X-ray Computed Microtomography to Observe in situ Sediment Structure and Colloidal Zirconia Deposits at the Pore Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Packman, A. I.; Keane, D. T.; Gaillard, J.

    2006-12-01

    We are using X-ray Micro-Tomography (XMT) to study in situ sediment structure using the facilities of the DuPont-Northwestern-Dow Collaborative Access Team (DND-CAT), Advanced Photon Source (APS), Argonne National Laboratory. Images of a sediment sample are taken at a number of different angles as the incident x- ray beam passes through it, and a three-dimensional view of the interior of the sample is then reconstructed from these maps using Computed Tomography (CT). These 3D images allow us to observe sediment structure with near-micron-scale resolution. We are also using difference tomography to resolve the distribution of zirconium in sediment cores. Column experiments were performed to observe the deposition of colloidal zirconia (Zr) particles in porous media composed of glass beads. Reconstructed 3D maps of Zr deposition demonstrate strong pore-scale heterogeneity. Most zirconia particles accumulated at the upstream sides of collector beads and in narrow pore throats. Statistical analysis of deposition clusters reveals the average, large-scale filtration behavior. Reconstructed 3D pore structure data were used to investigate scale dependency and the effects of local variation within the porous medium. Statistical representative elementary volumes were calculated for quantities such as porosity, specific surface area, and permeability. Finally, preliminary experiments in flume were conducted in order to investigate zirconia deposition in streambeds at the scale of characteristic topographic features (bedforms).

  7. Very Large Scale Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, Garrett; Townsend, James C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this research under the NASA Small Business Innovative Research program was to develop algorithms and associated software to solve very large nonlinear, constrained optimization tasks. Key issues included efficiency, reliability, memory, and gradient calculation requirements. This report describes the general optimization problem, ten candidate methods, and detailed evaluations of four candidates. The algorithm chosen for final development is a modern recreation of a 1960s external penalty function method that uses very limited computer memory and computational time. Although of lower efficiency, the new method can solve problems orders of magnitude larger than current methods. The resulting BIGDOT software has been demonstrated on problems with 50,000 variables and about 50,000 active constraints. For unconstrained optimization, it has solved a problem in excess of 135,000 variables. The method includes a technique for solving discrete variable problems that finds a "good" design, although a theoretical optimum cannot be guaranteed. It is very scalable in that the number of function and gradient evaluations does not change significantly with increased problem size. Test cases are provided to demonstrate the efficiency and reliability of the methods and software.

  8. Management of Large Size MNGs and STNs Using 3D Endoscopic Technique: a Review of 10 Cases.

    PubMed

    Puntambekar, Shailesh; Sharma, Vikrant; Kumar, Sanjay; Mitkare, Sainath; Joshi, Geetanjali; Dokrimare, Atul; Panse, Mangesh

    2016-04-01

    The role of endoscopic thyroidectomy has shown clear cosmetic benefits in the past. In this current study of 10 patients, we have tried to highlight the importance and benefits of 3D endoscopy in the management of large size multinodular goitres (MNGs) and solitary thyroid nodules (STNs). From March 2014 to July 2014, patients having a large volume of thyroid (>70 cc for one lobe) and nodule size (>6 cm) were enrolled for this study. A total of 10 patients underwent the procedure using the Karl Storz(TM) 3D endoscope system. Out of the 10 patients, 9 were females and 1 was male who underwent total, subtotal, and hemithyroidectomy. Three out of 10 turned out to be malignant for whom completion thyroidectomies were done endoscopically. The average blood loss was 29.5 cc and the mean operative time was 72 min. The average thyroid specimen volume was 115.4 cc with an average nodule size of 6.7 cm. Patients were discharged on the first post-operative day except one on the second post-op day. Post-operative scar was evaluated on the 14th day. 3D endoscopic thyroidectomy is definitely a step ahead in the management of large size MNGs and STNs. It gives excellent depth perception and magnification which helps in identification and preservation of important nerves and vessels which ensures safe removal of the thyroid from its bed. PMID:27303120

  9. 3D coupled heat and mass transfer processes at the scale of sedimentary basisn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacace, M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Kaiser, B. O.

    2014-12-01

    We use coupled 3D simulations of fluid, heat, and transport based on a 3D structural model of a complex geological setting, the Northeast German Basin (NEGB). The geological structure of the NEGB is characterized by a relatively thick layer of Permian Zechstein salt, structured in differnet diapirs (up to 5000 m thick) and pillows locally reaching nearly the surface. Salt is thermally more conductive than other sediments, hydraulically impervious but highly solvable. Thus salt structures have first order influence on the temperature distribution, the deep flow regime and the salinity of groundawater bearing aquifers. In addition, the post-Permian sedimentary sequence is vertically subdivided into several aquifers and aquitards. The shallow Quaternary to late Tertiary freshwater aquifer is separated from the underlying Mesozoic saline aquifers by an embedded Tertiary clay enriched aquitard (Rupelian Aquitard). An important feature of this aquitard is that hydraulic connections between the upper and lower aquifers exist in areas where the Rupelian Aquitard is missing (hydrogeological windows). By means of 3D numerical simulations we explore the role of heat conduction, pressure, and density driven groundwater flow as well as fluid viscosity-related and salinity-dependent effects on the resulting flow and temperature fields. Our results suggest that the regional temperature distribution within the basin results from interactions between regional pressure forces and thermal diffusion locally enhanced by thermal conductivity contrasts between the different sedimentary rocks with the highly conductive salt. Buoyancy forces triggered by temperature-dependent fluid density variations affect only locally the internal thermal configuration. Locations, geometry, and wavelengths of convective thermal anomalies are mainly controlled by the permeability field and thickness values of the respective geological layers. Numerical results from 3D thermo-haline numerical simulations

  10. Adaptation of the three-dimensional wisdom scale (3D-WS) for the Korean cultural context.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungyoun; Knight, Bob G

    2014-10-23

    ABSTRACT Background: Previous research on wisdom has suggested that wisdom is comprised of cognitive, reflective, and affective components and has developed and validated wisdom measures based on samples from Western countries. To apply the measurement to Eastern cultures, the present study revised an existing wisdom scale, the three-dimensional wisdom scale (3D-WS, Ardelt, 2003) for the Korean cultural context. Methods: Participants included 189 Korean heritage adults (age range 19-96) living in Los Angeles. We added a culturally specific factor of wisdom to the 3D-WS: Modesty and Unobtrusiveness (Yang, 2001), which captures an Eastern aspect of wisdom. The structure and psychometrics of the scale were tested. By latent cluster analysis, we determined acculturation subgroups and examined group differences in the means of factors in the revised wisdom scale (3D-WS-K). Results: Three factors, Cognitive Flexibility, Viewpoint Relativism, and Empathic Modesty were found using confirmatory factor analysis. Respondents with high biculturalism were higher on Viewpoint Relativism and lower on Empathic Modesty. Conclusion: This study discovered that a revised wisdom scale had a distinct factor structure and item content in a Korean heritage sample. We also found acculturation influences on the meaning of wisdom.

  11. 3D Visualization of Hydrological Model Outputs For a Better Understanding of Multi-Scale Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, J.; Schertzer, D. J. M.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.

    2014-12-01

    During the last decades, many hydrological models has been created to simulate extreme events or scenarios on catchments. The classical outputs of these models are 2D maps, time series or graphs, which are easily understood by scientists, but not so much by many stakeholders, e.g. mayors or local authorities, and the general public. One goal of the Blue Green Dream project is to create outputs that are adequate for them. To reach this goal, we decided to convert most of the model outputs into a unique 3D visualization interface that combines all of them. This conversion has to be performed with an hydrological thinking to keep the information consistent with the context and the raw outputs.We focus our work on the conversion of the outputs of the Multi-Hydro (MH) model, which is physically based, fully distributed and with a GIS data interface. MH splits the urban water cycle into 4 components: the rainfall, the surface runoff, the infiltration and the drainage. To each of them, corresponds a modeling module with specific inputs and outputs. The superimposition of all this information will highlight the model outputs and help to verify the quality of the raw input data. For example, the spatial and the time variability of the rain generated by the rainfall module will be directly visible in 4D (3D + time) before running a full simulation. It is the same with the runoff module: because the result quality depends of the resolution of the rasterized land use, it will confirm or not the choice of the cell size.As most of the inputs and outputs are GIS files, two main conversions will be applied to display the results into 3D. First, a conversion from vector files to 3D objects. For example, buildings are defined in 2D inside a GIS vector file. Each polygon can be extruded with an height to create volumes. The principle is the same for the roads but an intrusion, instead of an extrusion, is done inside the topography file. The second main conversion is the raster

  12. Multi-scale simulation flow and multi-scale materials characterization for stress management in 3D through-silicon-via integration technologies - Effect of stress on 3D IC interconnect reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, Valeriy; Zschech, Ehrenfried

    2014-06-01

    The paper addresses the growing need in a simulation-based design verification flow capable to analyze any design of 3D IC stacks and to determine across-layers implications in 3D IC reliability caused by through-silicon-via (TSV) and chip-package interaction (CPI) induced mechanical stresses. The limited characterization/measurement capabilities of 3D IC stacks and a strict "good die" requirement make this type of analysis really critical for the achievement of an acceptable level of functional and parametric yield and reliability. The paper focuses on the development of a design-for-manufacturability (DFM) type of methodology for managing mechanical stresses during a sequence of designs of 3D TSV-based dies, stacks and packages. A set of physics-based compact models for a multi-scale simulation, to assess the mechanical stress across the dies stacked and packaged with the 3D TSV technology, is proposed. As an example the effect of CPI/TSV induced stresses on stress migration (SM) and electromigration (EM) in the back-end-of-line (BEoL) and backside-redistribution-layer (BRDL) interconnect lines is considered. A strategy for a simulation feeding data generation and a respective materials characterization approach are proposed, with the goal to generate a database for multi-scale material parameters of wafer-level and package-level structures. A calibration technique based on fitting the simulation results to measured stress components and electrical characteristics of the test-chip devices is discussed.

  13. Overview of 3D registration techniques including loop minimization for the complete acquisition of large manufactured parts and complex environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batlle, E.; Matabosch, C.; Salvi, J.

    2007-01-01

    3D modelling is becoming an important research topic for visual inspection in automatic quality control. Through visual inspection it is possible to determine whether a product fulfills the required specifications or whether it contains surface or volume imperfections. Although some process such as color analysis can be achieved by 2D techniques, more challenging tasks such as volume inspection of large and complex objects/scenes may require the use of accurate 3D registration techniques. 3D Simultaneous Localization and Mapping has become a very important research topic not only in the computer vision community for quality control applications but also in the robotics field for solving problems such as robot navigation and registration of large surfaces. Although their techniques differ slightly depending on the application, both communities tend to solve similar problems by means of different approaches. This paper presents a survey of the techniques used by the robotics and computer vision communities in which every approach has been compared pointing out their pros and cons and their potential applications.

  14. Impact of continuing scaling on the device performance of 3D cylindrical junction-less charge trapping memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xinkai, Li; Zongliang, Huo; Lei, Jin; Dandan, Jiang; Peizhen, Hong; Qiang, Xu; Zhaoyun, Tang; Chunlong, Li; Tianchun, Ye

    2015-09-01

    This work presents a comprehensive analysis of 3D cylindrical junction-less charge trapping memory device performance regarding continuous scaling of the structure dimensions. The key device performance, such as program/erase speed, vertical charge loss, and lateral charge migration under high temperature are intensively studied using the Sentaurus 3D device simulator. Although scaling of channel radius is beneficial for operation speed improvement, it leads to a retention challenge due to vertical leakage, especially enhanced charge loss through TPO. Scaling of gate length not only decreases the program/erase speed but also leads to worse lateral charge migration. Scaling of spacer length is critical for the interference of adjacent cells and should be carefully optimized according to specific cell operation conditions. The gate stack shape is also found to be an important factor affecting the lateral charge migration. Our results provide guidance for high density and high reliability 3D CTM integration. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61474137, 61176073, 61306107).

  15. 3D Simulations for a Micron-Scale, Dielectric-Based Acceleration Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder, R. B.; Travish, G.; Xu Jin; Rosenzweig, J. B.

    2009-01-22

    An experimental program to demonstrate a dielectric, slab-symmetric accelerator structure has been underway for the past two years. These resonant devices are driven by a side-coupled 800-nm laser and can be configured to maintain the field profile necessary for synchronous acceleration and focusing of relativistic or nonrelativistic particles. We present 3D simulations of various versions of the structure geometry, including a metal-walled structure relevant to ongoing cold tests on resonant properties, and an all-dielectric structure to be constructed for a proof-of-principle acceleration experiment.

  16. Fluid–structure interaction involving large deformations: 3D simulations and applications to biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fang-Bao; Dai, Hu; Luo, Haoxiang; Doyle, James F.; Rousseau, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional fluid–structure interaction (FSI) involving large deformations of flexible bodies is common in biological systems, but accurate and efficient numerical approaches for modeling such systems are still scarce. In this work, we report a successful case of combining an existing immersed-boundary flow solver with a nonlinear finite-element solid-mechanics solver specifically for three-dimensional FSI simulations. This method represents a significant enhancement from the similar methods that are previously available. Based on the Cartesian grid, the viscous incompressible flow solver can handle boundaries of large displacements with simple mesh generation. The solid-mechanics solver has separate subroutines for analyzing general three-dimensional bodies and thin-walled structures composed of frames, membranes, and plates. Both geometric nonlinearity associated with large displacements and material nonlinearity associated with large strains are incorporated in the solver. The FSI is achieved through a strong coupling and partitioned approach. We perform several validation cases, and the results may be used to expand the currently limited database of FSI benchmark study. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the present method by applying it to the aerodynamics of elastic wings of insects and the flow-induced vocal fold vibration. PMID:24415796

  17. Fluid-structure interaction involving large deformations: 3D simulations and applications to biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fang-Bao; Dai, Hu; Luo, Haoxiang; Doyle, James F.; Rousseau, Bernard

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction (FSI) involving large deformations of flexible bodies is common in biological systems, but accurate and efficient numerical approaches for modeling such systems are still scarce. In this work, we report a successful case of combining an existing immersed-boundary flow solver with a nonlinear finite-element solid-mechanics solver specifically for three-dimensional FSI simulations. This method represents a significant enhancement from the similar methods that are previously available. Based on the Cartesian grid, the viscous incompressible flow solver can handle boundaries of large displacements with simple mesh generation. The solid-mechanics solver has separate subroutines for analyzing general three-dimensional bodies and thin-walled structures composed of frames, membranes, and plates. Both geometric nonlinearity associated with large displacements and material nonlinearity associated with large strains are incorporated in the solver. The FSI is achieved through a strong coupling and partitioned approach. We perform several validation cases, and the results may be used to expand the currently limited database of FSI benchmark study. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the present method by applying it to the aerodynamics of elastic wings of insects and the flow-induced vocal fold vibration.

  18. 3-D radiative transfer in large-eddy simulations - experiences coupling the TenStream solver to the UCLA-LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakub, Fabian; Mayer, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    The recently developed 3-D TenStream radiative transfer solver was integrated into the University of California, Los Angeles large-eddy simulation (UCLA-LES) cloud-resolving model. This work documents the overall performance of the TenStream solver as well as the technical challenges of migrating from 1-D schemes to 3-D schemes. In particular the employed Monte Carlo spectral integration needed to be reexamined in conjunction with 3-D radiative transfer. Despite the fact that the spectral sampling has to be performed uniformly over the whole domain, we find that the Monte Carlo spectral integration remains valid. To understand the performance characteristics of the coupled TenStream solver, we conducted weak as well as strong-scaling experiments. In this context, we investigate two matrix preconditioner: geometric algebraic multigrid preconditioning (GAMG) and block Jacobi incomplete LU (ILU) factorization and find that algebraic multigrid preconditioning performs well for complex scenes and highly parallelized simulations. The TenStream solver is tested for up to 4096 cores and shows a parallel scaling efficiency of 80-90 % on various supercomputers. Compared to the widely employed 1-D delta-Eddington two-stream solver, the computational costs for the radiative transfer solver alone increases by a factor of 5-10.

  19. Pressure-Induced Oriented Attachment Growth of Large-Size Crystals for Constructing 3D Ordered Superstructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Lian, Gang; Si, Haibin; Wang, Qilong; Cui, Deliang; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-26

    Oriented attachment (OA), a nonclassical crystal growth mechanism, provides a powerful bottom-up approach to obtain ordered superstructures, which also demonstrate exciting charge transmission characteristic. However, there is little work observably pronouncing the achievement of 3D OA growth of crystallites with large size (e.g., submicrometer crystals). Here, we report that SnO2 3D ordered superstructures can be synthesized by means of a self-limited assembly assisted by OA in a designed high-pressure solvothermal system. The size of primary building blocks is 200-250 nm, which is significantly larger than that in previous results (normally <10 nm). High pressure plays the key role in the formation of 3D configuration and fusion of adjacent crystals. Furthermore, this high-pressure strategy can be readily expanded to additional materials. We anticipate that the welded structures will constitute an ideal system with relevance to applications in optical responses, lithium ion battery, solar cells, and chemical sensing.

  20. The role of mechanical heterogeneities during continental breakup: a 3D lithospheric-scale modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclaux, Guillaume; Huismans, Ritske S.; May, Dave

    2015-04-01

    How and why do continents break? More than two decades of analogue and 2D plane-strain numerical experiments have shown that despite the origin of the forces driving extension, the geometry of continental rifts falls into three categories - or modes: narrow rift, wide rift, or core complex. The mode of extension itself is strongly influenced by the rheology (and rheological behaviour) of the modelled layered system. In every model, an initial thermal or mechanical heterogeneity, such as a weak seed or a notch, is imposed to help localise the deformation and avoid uniform stretching of the lithosphere by pure shear. While it is widely accepted that structural inheritance is a key parameter for controlling rift localisation - as implied by the Wilson Cycle - modelling the effect of lithospheric heterogeneities on the long-term tectonic evolution of an extending plate in full 3D remains challenging. Recent progress in finite-element methods applied to computational tectonics along with the improved accessibility to high performance computers, now enable to switch from plane strain thermo-mechanical experiments to full 3D high-resolution experiments. Here we investigate the role of mechanical heterogeneities on rift opening, linkage and propagation during extension of a layered lithospheric systems with pTatin3d, a geodynamics modeling package utilising the material-point-method for tracking material composition, combined with a multigrid finite-element method to solve heterogeneous, incompressible visco-plastic Stokes problems. The initial model setup consists in a box of 1200 km horizontally by 250 km deep. It includes a 35 km layer of continental crust, underlaid by 85 km of sub-continental lithospheric mantle, and an asthenospheric mantle. Crust and mantle have visco-plastic rheologies with a pressure dependent yielding, which includes strain weakening, and a temperature, stress, strain-rate-dependent viscosity based on wet quartzite rheology for the crust, and wet

  1. Lithosphere-scale 3D gravity modelling of the Barents Sea and Kara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klitzke, P.; Faleide, J.; Sippel, J.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Barents - Kara Sea region covers the major part of the European Arctic shelf. Its northern and western boundaries are young passive margins which originate from early Paleocene-Eocene opening of the Eurasia Basin and the Norwegian-Greenland Sea. In contrast, the basement of the Barents and Kara shelves has been consolidated much earlier, during three major late Precambrian to Permian orogenies. Additionally, the shelf experienced multiple episodes of localised subsidence which resulted in the formation of ultra-deep sedimentary basins varying strongly in their geometry between different subregions. Consequently, the preserved sedimentary record is interrupted by major megasequence boundaries that are well-described in the western Barents Sea. Using this subdivision for the sedimentary record, we traced four major megasequence boundaries across the Barents and Kara shelves by analysing interpreted seismic refraction and reflection data, geological maps and previously published 3D-models. We integrate this shallow information into a 3D geological model and complement the latter downward with the top crystalline crust, the Moho and a new lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. The sedimentary units have been assigned physical properties considering the respective lithology to calculate a depth-dependent density distribution. Thereby, the obtained bulk densities also account for late Cenozoic uplift/erosion and the maximum Pleistocene ice sheet thickness. For the lithospheric mantle, the density distribution is constrained by an earlier published velocity model (Levshin et al., 2007). On the base of isostatic calculations and 3D gravity modelling the density configuration of the crystalline crust and the geometry of potential high-density bodies is investigated. Finally, we correlate preserved sediment maxima and reconstructed erosion maps with subsedimentary velocity and density variations to gain new insights into the development of Barents and Kara Sea basins

  2. 3D reconstruction of the source and scale of buried young flood channels on Mars.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Gareth A; Campbell, Bruce A; Carter, Lynn M; Plaut, Jeffrey J; Phillips, Roger J

    2013-05-01

    Outflow channels on Mars are interpreted as the product of gigantic floods due to the catastrophic eruption of groundwater that may also have initiated episodes of climate change. Marte Vallis, the largest of the young martian outflow channels (<500 million years old), is embayed by lava flows that hinder detailed studies and comparisons with older channel systems. Understanding Marte Vallis is essential to our assessment of recent Mars hydrologic activity during a period otherwise considered to be cold and dry. Using data from the Shallow Radar sounder on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, we present a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of buried channels on Mars and provide estimates of paleohydrologic parameters. Our work shows that Cerberus Fossae provided the waters that carved Marte Vallis, and it extended an additional 180 kilometers to the east before the emplacement of the younger lava flows. We identified two stages of channel incision and determined that channel depths were more than twice those of previous estimates.

  3. 3D Reconstruction of the Source and Scale of Buried Young Flood Channels on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Gareth A.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Carter, Lynn M.; Plaut, Jeffrey J.; Phillips, Roger J.

    2013-05-01

    Outflow channels on Mars are interpreted as the product of gigantic floods due to the catastrophic eruption of groundwater that may also have initiated episodes of climate change. Marte Vallis, the largest of the young martian outflow channels (<500 million years old), is embayed by lava flows that hinder detailed studies and comparisons with older channel systems. Understanding Marte Vallis is essential to our assessment of recent Mars hydrologic activity during a period otherwise considered to be cold and dry. Using data from the Shallow Radar sounder on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, we present a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of buried channels on Mars and provide estimates of paleohydrologic parameters. Our work shows that Cerberus Fossae provided the waters that carved Marte Vallis, and it extended an additional 180 kilometers to the east before the emplacement of the younger lava flows. We identified two stages of channel incision and determined that channel depths were more than twice those of previous estimates.

  4. Small-scale effects of underwater bubble clouds on ocean reflectance: 3-D modeling results.

    PubMed

    Piskozub, Jacek; Stramski, Dariusz; Terrill, Eric; Melville, W Kendall

    2009-07-01

    We examined the effect of individual bubble clouds on remote-sensing reflectance of the ocean with a 3-D Monte Carlo model of radiative transfer. The concentrations and size distribution of bubbles were defined based on acoustical measurements of bubbles in the surface ocean. The light scattering properties of bubbles for various void fractions were calculated using Mie scattering theory. We show how the spatial pattern, magnitude, and spectral behavior of remote-sensing reflectance produced by modeled bubble clouds change due to variations in their geometric and optical properties as well as the background optical properties of the ambient water. We also determined that for realistic sizes of bubble clouds, a plane-parallel horizontally homogeneous geometry (1-D radiative transfer model) is inadequate for modeling water-leaving radiance above the cloud.

  5. Real-scale 3D models of the scoliotic spine from biplanar radiography without calibration objects.

    PubMed

    Moura, Daniel C; Barbosa, Jorge G

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a new method for modelling the spines of subjects and making accurate 3D measurements using standard radiologic systems without requiring calibration objects. The method makes use of the focal distance and statistical models for estimating the geometrical parameters of the system. A dataset of 32 subjects was used to assess this method. The results show small errors for the main clinical indices, such as an RMS error of 0.49° for the Cobb angle, 0.50° for kyphosis, 0.38° for lordosis, and 2.62mm for the spinal length. This method is the first to achieve this level of accuracy without requiring the use of calibration objects when acquiring radiographs. We conclude that the proposed method allows for the evaluation of scoliosis with a much simpler setup than currently available methods. PMID:24908193

  6. Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeaman, Andrew R. J.

    Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI), the state-of-the-art production techniques for computer chips, promises such powerful, inexpensive computing that, in the future, people will be able to communicate with computer devices in natural language or even speech. However, before full-scale VLSI implementation can occur, certain salient factors must be…

  7. Stochastic Multi-Scale Reconstruction of 3D Microstructure Consisting of Polycrystalline Grains and Second-Phase Particles from 2D Micrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shaohua; Kirubanandham, Antony; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Jiao, Yang

    2016-03-01

    An accurate knowledge of the 3D polycrystalline microstructure of a material is crucial to its property prediction, performance optimization, and design. Here, we present a multi-scale computational scheme that allows one to stochastically reconstruct the 3D microstructure of a highly heterogeneous polycrystalline material with large variation in grain size, morphology, and spatial distribution, as well as the distribution of second-phase particles, from single-2D electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) micrograph. Specifically, the two-point correlation functions S 2 are employed to statistically characterize grain morphology, orientation, and spatial distribution and are incorporated into the simulated annealing procedure for microstructure reconstruction. During the reconstruction, the original polycrystalline microstructure is coarsened such that the large grains are reconstructed first and the smaller ones are generated later. The second-phase particles are then inserted into the reconstructed polycrystalline material based on the pair-correlation function g 2 sampled from the 2D back-scattered electron micrograph. The utility of our multi-scale scheme is demonstrated by successfully reconstructing a highly heterogeneous polycrystalline Sn-rich solder joint with Cu6Sn5 intermetallic particles. The accuracy of our reconstruction is ascertained by comparing the virtual microstructure with the actual 3D structure of the joint obtained via serial sectioning techniques.

  8. Laser cone beam computed tomography scanner geometry for large volume 3D dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, K. J.; Turnbull, D.; Batista, J. J.

    2013-06-01

    A new scanner geometry for fast optical cone-beam computed tomography is reported. The system consists of a low power laser beam, raster scanned, under computer control, through a transparent object in a refractive index matching aquarium. The transmitted beam is scattered from a diffuser screen and detected by a photomultiplier tube. Modest stray light is present in the projection images since only a single ray is present in the object during measurement and there is no imaging optics to introduce further stray light in the form of glare. A scan time of 30 minutes was required for 512 projections with a field of view of 12 × 18 cm. Initial performance from scanning a 15 cm diameter jar with black solutions is presented. Averaged reconstruction coefficients are within 2% along the height of the jar and within the central 85% of diameter, due to the index mismatch of the jar. Agreement with spectrometer measurements was better than 0.5% for a minimum transmission of 4% and within 4% for a dark, 0.1% transmission sample. This geometry's advantages include high dynamic range and low cost of scaling to larger (>15 cm) fields of view.

  9. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  10. 3-D trajectory model for MDT using micro-spheres implanted within large blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choomphon-anomakhun, Natthaphon; Natenapit, Mayuree

    2016-09-01

    Implant assisted magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) using ferromagnetic spherical targets implanted within large blood vessels and subjected to a uniform externally applied magnetic field (H0) has been investigated and reported for the first time. The capture areas (As) of magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) were determined from the analysis of particle trajectories simulated from equations of motion. Then, the effects of various parameters, such as types of ferromagnetic materials in the targets and MDCPs, blood flow rates, mass fraction of the ferromagnetic material in the MDCPs, average radii of MDCPs (Rp) and the strength of H0 on the As were obtained. Furthermore, the effects of saturation magnetization of the ferromagnetic materials in the MDCPs and within the targets on the As were analyzed. After this, the suitable strengths of H0 and Rp for IA-MDT designs were reported. Dimensionless As, ranging from 2 to 7, was obtained with Rp ranging from 500 to 2500 nm, μ0H0 less than 0.8 T and a blood flow rate of 0.1 m s-1. The target-MDCP materials considered are iron-iron, iron-magnetite and SS409-magnetite, respectively.

  11. ROMY - The First Large 3D Ring Laser Structure for Seismology and Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Karl Ulrich; Igel, Heiner; Wassermann, Joachim; Lin, Chin-Jen; Gebauer, André; Wells, Jon-Paul

    2016-04-01

    Large ring laser gyroscopes have matured to the point that they can routinely observe rotational motions from geophysical processes that can be used in geodesy and seismology. The ring lasers used for this purpose enclose areas between 16 and 800 square meters and have in common that they can only measure rotations around the vertical axis because the structures are horizontally placed on the floor. With the ROMY project we have embarked on the construction of a full 3-dimensional rotation sensor. The actual apparatus consists of four individual triangular ring lasers arranged in the shape of a tetrahedron with 12 m of length on each side. At each corner of the tetrahedron three of the ring lasers are rigidly tied together to the same mechanical reference. The overall size of the installation provides a promising compromise between sensor stability on one side and sensor resolution on the other side. This talk introduces the technical concept of the ROMY ring laser installation and will also briefly outline the requirements for applications in space geodesy.

  12. Evaluation of 3-D flow structure and corresponding scour holes in the vicinity of a submerged wing dike in a large sand bed river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, E. C.; Rennie, C. D.; Jacobson, R. B.

    2009-12-01

    Using a boat mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), highly dense single transect measurements were carried out in the vicinity of a submerged wing dike located in the Lower Missouri River near Columbia, Missouri. The Lower Missouri River channel morphology has changed substantially over the last one hundred years as engineering measures such as wing dikes and revetments have been introduced to stabilize the banks and maintain a deep, narrowed and focused thalweg for barge traffic. At high spring flows the wing dikes become submerged, creating a unique combination of vertical flow separation and overtopping (plunging) flow conditions, causing large scale three-dimensional (3-D) turbulent structures to form. On three different days and for a range of discharges, sampling transects at 5 and 20 m spacing were completed, covering the area adjacent to and upstream and downstream of two different wing dikes and their adjacent scour holes. Single transect measurements were interpolated to generate detailed two-dimensional (2-D) bathymetry maps and 3-D flow fields. The principal goal of this research is to evaluate whether an ADCP can identify and measure large scale flow features such as vortex shedding that develop in the vicinity of a submerged wing dike, and whether or not moving boat (single transect) data are sufficient for resolving complex 3-D flow fields. These results have implications for improving boat mounted ADCP measurement techniques and understanding to what extent these instruments can be used for detailed mapping and analysis of complex flows in large rivers. Unlike previous studies, where multiple transects at the same location were averaged for identifying secondary flow features, these results show that spatial averaging from multiple nearby single transects may be more representative of an inherently complex 3-D flow field. Too much averaging of repeated transects could eliminate the true variability in velocity inherent to naturally

  13. Micro-Macro Scale Mixing Interactions by Intestinal Villi Enhance Absorption: a 3D Lattice-Boltzmann Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanxing; Brasseur, James; Banco, Gino

    2010-11-01

    Muscle-induced villi motions may create a micro-scale flow that couples with a lumen-scale macro flow to enhance nutrient transport and absorption in the intestine. Using a 3D multiscale lattice Boltzmann model of a lid-driven cavity flow with microscale 3-D leaf and finger-like villi in pendular motion at the lower surface, we analyze the coupling between micro and macro-scale nutrient mixing and absorption at the villi surfaces. RESULTS: The villi motions enhance absorption by creating a micro-mixing layer (MML) that pumps low concentration fluid from between villi groups and attracts fluid with high concentration from the macro flow. The MML couples with the macro flow via a diffusion layer. Leaf-like villi create the strongest MML and, consequently, the highest absorption rates. The finger-like villi create a weaker MML due to the existence of flow between villi. The strength of the MML and nutrient absorption increases with villus frequency. The absorption rate also increases with villus length; however the simulations predict an optimal length close to the physiological length of villi in humans. The complex flow structure will be discussed. We conclude that the interaction between micro-scale villi-induced fluid motions and macro-scale motility-induced flow may play a significant role in intestinal absorption. Supported by NSF Grant CTS-056215.

  14. Identifying Components in 3D Density Maps of Protein Nanomachines by Multi-scale Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Pintilie, Grigore; Zhang, Junjie; Chiu, Wah; Gossard, David

    2009-04-01

    Segmentation of density maps obtained using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a challenging task, and is typically accomplished by time-intensive interactive methods. The goal of segmentation is to identify the regions inside the density map that correspond to individual components. We present a multi-scale segmentation method for accomplishing this task that requires very little user interaction. The method uses the concept of scale space, which is created by convolution of the input density map with a Gaussian filter. The latter process smoothes the density map. The standard deviation of the Gaussian filter is varied, with smaller values corresponding to finer scales and larger values to coarser scales. Each of the maps at different scales is segmented using the watershed method, which is very efficient, completely automatic, and does not require the specification of seed points. Some detail is lost in the smoothing process. A sharpening process reintroduces detail into the segmentation at the coarsest scale by using the segmentations at the finer scales. We apply the method to simulated density maps, where the exact segmentation (or ground truth) is known, and rigorously evaluate the accuracy of the resulting segmentations.

  15. Simulation of the 3-D Evolution of Electron Scale Magnetic Reconnection - Motivated by Laboratory Experiments Predictions for MMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buechner, J.; Jain, N.; Sharma, A.

    2013-12-01

    The four s/c of the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, to be launched in 2014, will use the Earth's magnetosphere as a laboratory to study the microphysics of three fundamental plasma processes. One of them is magnetic reconnection, an essentially multi-scale process. While laboratory experiments and past theoretical investigations have shown that important processes necessary to understand magnetic reconnection take place at electron scales the MMS mission for the first time will be able to resolve these scales by in space observations. For the measurement strategy of MMS it is important to make specific predictions of the behavior of current sheets with a thickness of the order of the electron skin depth which play an important role in the evolution of collisionless magnetic reconnection. Since these processes are highly nonlinear and non-local numerical simulation is needed to specify the current sheet evolution. Here we present new results about the nonlinear evolution of electron-scale current sheets starting from the linear stage and using 3-D electron-magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) simulations. The growth rates of the simulated instabilities compared well with the growth rates obtained from linear theory. Mechanisms and conditions of the formation of flux ropes and of current filamentation will be discussed in comparison with the results of fully kinetic simulations. In 3D the X- and O-point configurations of the magnetic field formed in reconnection planes alternate along the out-of-reconnection-plane direction with the wavelength of the unstable mode. In the presence of multiple reconnection sites, the out-of-plane magnetic field can develop nested structure of quadrupoles in reconnection planes, similar to the 2-D case, but now with variations in the out-of-plane direction. The structures of the electron flow and magnetic field in 3-D simulations will be compared with those in 2-D simulations to discriminate the essentially 3D features. We also discuss

  16. Wavelength-scale light concentrator made by direct 3D laser writing of polymer metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moughames, J.; Jradi, S.; Chan, T. M.; Akil, S.; Battie, Y.; Naciri, A. En; Herro, Z.; Guenneau, S.; Enoch, S.; Joly, L.; Cousin, J.; Bruyant, A.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the realization of functional infrared light concentrators based on a thick layer of air-polymer metamaterial with controlled pore size gradients. The design features an optimum gradient index profile leading to light focusing in the Fresnel zone of the structures for two selected operating wavelength domains near 5.6 and 10.4 μm. The metamaterial which consists in a thick polymer containing air holes with diameters ranging from λ/20 to λ/8 is made using a 3D lithography technique based on the two-photon polymerization of a homemade photopolymer. Infrared imaging of the structures reveals a tight focusing for both structures with a maximum local intensity increase by a factor of 2.5 for a concentrator volume of 1.5 λ3, slightly limited by the residual absorption of the selected polymer. Such porous and flat metamaterial structures offer interesting perspectives to increase infrared detector performance at the pixel level for imaging or sensing applications.

  17. Wavelength-scale light concentrator made by direct 3D laser writing of polymer metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Moughames, J.; Jradi, S.; Chan, T. M.; Akil, S.; Battie, Y.; Naciri, A. En; Herro, Z.; Guenneau, S.; Enoch, S.; Joly, L.; Cousin, J.; Bruyant, A.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the realization of functional infrared light concentrators based on a thick layer of air-polymer metamaterial with controlled pore size gradients. The design features an optimum gradient index profile leading to light focusing in the Fresnel zone of the structures for two selected operating wavelength domains near 5.6 and 10.4 μm. The metamaterial which consists in a thick polymer containing air holes with diameters ranging from λ/20 to λ/8 is made using a 3D lithography technique based on the two-photon polymerization of a homemade photopolymer. Infrared imaging of the structures reveals a tight focusing for both structures with a maximum local intensity increase by a factor of 2.5 for a concentrator volume of 1.5 λ3, slightly limited by the residual absorption of the selected polymer. Such porous and flat metamaterial structures offer interesting perspectives to increase infrared detector performance at the pixel level for imaging or sensing applications. PMID:27698476

  18. 3D reconstruction of the source and scale of buried young flood channels on Mars.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Gareth A; Campbell, Bruce A; Carter, Lynn M; Plaut, Jeffrey J; Phillips, Roger J

    2013-05-01

    Outflow channels on Mars are interpreted as the product of gigantic floods due to the catastrophic eruption of groundwater that may also have initiated episodes of climate change. Marte Vallis, the largest of the young martian outflow channels (<500 million years old), is embayed by lava flows that hinder detailed studies and comparisons with older channel systems. Understanding Marte Vallis is essential to our assessment of recent Mars hydrologic activity during a period otherwise considered to be cold and dry. Using data from the Shallow Radar sounder on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, we present a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of buried channels on Mars and provide estimates of paleohydrologic parameters. Our work shows that Cerberus Fossae provided the waters that carved Marte Vallis, and it extended an additional 180 kilometers to the east before the emplacement of the younger lava flows. We identified two stages of channel incision and determined that channel depths were more than twice those of previous estimates. PMID:23470730

  19. FUN3D Airload Predictions for the Full-Scale UH-60A Airloads Rotor in a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    An unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solver for unstructured grids, FUN3D, is used to compute the rotor performance and airloads of the UH-60A Airloads Rotor in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-foot Wind Tunnel. The flow solver is loosely coupled to a rotorcraft comprehensive code, CAMRAD-II, to account for trim and aeroelastic deflections. Computations are made for the 1-g level flight speed-sweep test conditions with the airloads rotor installed on the NFAC Large Rotor Test Apparatus (LRTA) and in the 40- by 80-ft wind tunnel to determine the influence of the test stand and wind-tunnel walls on the rotor performance and airloads. Detailed comparisons are made between the results of the CFD/CSD simulations and the wind tunnel measurements. The computed trends in solidity-weighted propulsive force and power coefficient match the experimental trends over the range of advance ratios and are comparable to previously published results. Rotor performance and sectional airloads show little sensitivity to the modeling of the wind-tunnel walls, which indicates that the rotor shaft-angle correction adequately compensates for the wall influence up to an advance ratio of 0.37. Sensitivity of the rotor performance and sectional airloads to the modeling of the rotor with the LRTA body/hub increases with advance ratio. The inclusion of the LRTA in the simulation slightly improves the comparison of rotor propulsive force between the computation and wind tunnel data but does not resolve the difference in the rotor power predictions at mu = 0.37. Despite a more precise knowledge of the rotor trim loads and flight condition, the level of comparison between the computed and measured sectional airloads/pressures at an advance ratio of 0.37 is comparable to the results previously published for the high-speed flight test condition.

  20. Large scale mechanical metamaterials as seismic shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniaci, Marco; Krushynska, Anastasiia; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2016-08-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most catastrophic natural events affecting mankind. At present, a universally accepted risk mitigation strategy for seismic events remains to be proposed. Most approaches are based on vibration isolation of structures rather than on the remote shielding of incoming waves. In this work, we propose a novel approach to the problem and discuss the feasibility of a passive isolation strategy for seismic waves based on large-scale mechanical metamaterials, including for the first time numerical analysis of both surface and guided waves, soil dissipation effects, and adopting a full 3D simulations. The study focuses on realistic structures that can be effective in frequency ranges of interest for seismic waves, and optimal design criteria are provided, exploring different metamaterial configurations, combining phononic crystals and locally resonant structures and different ranges of mechanical properties. Dispersion analysis and full-scale 3D transient wave transmission simulations are carried out on finite size systems to assess the seismic wave amplitude attenuation in realistic conditions. Results reveal that both surface and bulk seismic waves can be considerably attenuated, making this strategy viable for the protection of civil structures against seismic risk. The proposed remote shielding approach could open up new perspectives in the field of seismology and in related areas of low-frequency vibration damping or blast protection.

  1. Galaxy clustering on large scales.

    PubMed

    Efstathiou, G

    1993-06-01

    I describe some recent observations of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution. The best constraints come from two-dimensional galaxy surveys and studies of angular correlation functions. Results from galaxy redshift surveys are much less precise but are consistent with the angular correlations, provided the distortions in mapping between real-space and redshift-space are relatively weak. The galaxy two-point correlation function, rich-cluster two-point correlation function, and galaxy-cluster cross-correlation function are all well described on large scales ( greater, similar 20h-1 Mpc, where the Hubble constant, H0 = 100h km.s-1.Mpc; 1 pc = 3.09 x 10(16) m) by the power spectrum of an initially scale-invariant, adiabatic, cold-dark-matter Universe with Gamma = Omegah approximately 0.2. I discuss how this fits in with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite detection of large-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation and other measures of large-scale structure in the Universe.

  2. Large-Scale Visual Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Modern high performance computers have speeds measured in petaflops and handle data set sizes measured in terabytes and petabytes. Although these machines offer enormous potential for solving very large-scale realistic computational problems, their effectiveness will hinge upon the ability of human experts to interact with their simulation results and extract useful information. One of the greatest scientific challenges of the 21st century is to effectively understand and make use of the vast amount of information being produced. Visual data analysis will be among our most most important tools in helping to understand such large-scale information. Our research at the Scientific Computing and Imaging (SCI) Institute at the University of Utah has focused on innovative, scalable techniques for large-scale 3D visual data analysis. In this talk, I will present state- of-the-art visualization techniques, including scalable visualization algorithms and software, cluster-based visualization methods and innovate visualization techniques applied to problems in computational science, engineering, and medicine. I will conclude with an outline for a future high performance visualization research challenges and opportunities.

  3. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mehmani, Yashar; Schoenherr, Martin; Pasquali, Andrea; Perkins, William A.; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li -Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Yang, Xiaofan; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Trask, Nathaniel

    2015-09-28

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This paper provides support for confidence

  4. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    DOE PAGES

    Mehmani, Yashar; Schoenherr, Martin; Pasquali, Andrea; Perkins, William A.; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; et al

    2015-09-28

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based onmore » the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This paper provides support for

  5. Benchmark Study of 3D Pore-scale Flow and Solute Transport Simulation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Yang, X.; Mehmani, Y.; Perkins, W. A.; Pasquali, A.; Schoenherr, M.; Kim, K.; Perego, M.; Parks, M. L.; Trask, N.; Balhoff, M.; Richmond, M. C.; Geier, M.; Krafczyk, M.; Luo, L. S.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that benchmark study to include additional models of the first type based on the immersed-boundary method (IMB), lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all five approaches (FVM-based CFD, IMB, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The benchmark study was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence in a variety of pore-scale modeling methods, and motivates further development and application of pore-scale simulation methods.

  6. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schönherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li-Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence

  7. Transferring Multi-Scale Approaches from 3d City Modeling to Ifc-Based Tunnel Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrmann, A.; Kolbe, T. H.; Donaubauer, A.; Steuer, H.; Jubierre, J. R.

    2013-09-01

    A multi-scale representation of the built environment is required to provide information with the adequate level of detail (LoD) for different use cases and objectives. This applies not only to the visualization of city and building models, but in particular to their use in the context of planning and analysis tasks. While in the field of Geographic Information Systems, the handling of multi-scale representations is well established and understood, no formal approaches for incorporating multi-scale methods exist in the field of Building Information Modeling (BIM) so far. However, these concepts are much needed to better support highly dynamic planning processes that make use of very rough information about the facility under design in the early stages and provide increasingly detailed and fine-grained information in later stages. To meet these demands, this paper presents a comprehensive concept for incorporating multi-scale representations with infrastructural building information models, with a particular focus on the representation of shield tunnels. Based on a detailed analysis of the data modeling methods used in CityGML for capturing multiscale representations and the requirements present in the context of infrastructure planning projects, we discuss potential extensions to the BIM data model Industry Foundation Classes (IFC). Particular emphasis is put on providing means for preserving the consistency of the representation across the different Levels-of-Detail (LoD). To this end we make use of a procedural geometry description which makes it possible to define explicit dependencies between geometric entities on different LoDs. The modification of an object on a coarse level consequently results in an automated update of all dependent objects on the finer levels. Finally we discuss the transformation of the IFC-based multi-scale tunnel model into a CityGML compliant tunnel representation.

  8. Large-Scale Networked Virtual Environments: Architecture and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamotte, Wim; Quax, Peter; Flerackers, Eddy

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Scalability is an important research topic in the context of networked virtual environments (NVEs). This paper aims to describe the ALVIC (Architecture for Large-scale Virtual Interactive Communities) approach to NVE scalability. Design/methodology/approach: The setup and results from two case studies are shown: a 3-D learning environment…

  9. A two-scale model for frictional cracks in 3D fractured brittle media with the extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Borja, R. I.

    2009-12-01

    Stress concentration induced by the heterogeneity in brittle geomaterials is generally considered as the driving force in the evolution of the microstructure (such as the crack and pore microstructure). Specifically, modeling heterogeneity is key to properly predicting the nucleation, coalescence and propagation of micro-cracks in brittle solids. In this paper, we propose a two-scale model for frictional cracks in fractured brittle media. The major crack in the study domain is modeled at a macro level, while the micro-cracks are modeled at a finer scale. The macro-scale behavior is described by a standard boundary value problem. The finer-scale problem is modeled using the notion of representative elementary volume (REV) consisting of a solid volume with distributed micro-cracks. Periodic boundary condition and small strain formulation are assumed in the finer-scale analysis. The scale bridging mechanism is borrowed from the standard homogenization technique. The proposed model is implemented with the extended finite element method. The macro stress at each Gauss point in the finite element formulation is computed as the volume average of finer-scale stresses in each corresponding REV. The macro tangent operator is computed using a perturbation method. For 3D problems, six independent linear perturbation analyses are carried out for each numerical integration point. Our numerical examples capture the nucleation and coalescence of micro-cracks, which can be used to infer the potential propagation direction of the major crack.

  10. Role of 3D force networks in linking grain scale to macroscale processes in sheared granular debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, K.; Jettestuen, E.; Abe, S.

    2013-12-01

    Active faults, landslides and subglacial tills contain accumulations of granular debris that evolve during sliding. The macroscopic motion in these environments is at least to some extent determined by processes operating in this sheared granular material. A valid question is how the local behavior at the individual granular contacts actually sums up to influence macroscopic sliding. Laboratory experiments and numerical modeling can potentially help elucidate this. Observations of jamming (stick) and unjamming (flow) as well as concentrated shear bands on the scale of 5-10 grains suggest that a simple continuum description may be insufficient to capture important elements of the behavior. We therefore seek a measure of the organization of the granular fabric and the 3D structure of the load bearing skeleton that effectively demonstrates how the individual grain interactions are manifested in the macroscopic sliding behavior we observe. Contact force networks are an expression of this. Here we investigate the structure and variability of the most connected system spanning force networks produced in 3D discrete element models of granular layers under shear. We use percolation measures to identify, characterize, compare and track the evolution of these strongly connected contact force networks. We show that specific topological measures used in describing the networks, such as number of contacts and coordination number, are sensitive to grain size distribution (and likely the grain shape) of the material as well as loading conditions. Hence, faults of different maturity would be expected to accommodate shear in different ways. Distinct changes in the topological characteristics i.e. the geometry of strong force networks with accumulated strain are directly correlated to fluctuations in macroscopic shearing resistance. This suggests that 3D force networks play an important bridging role between individual grain scale processes and macroscopic sliding behavior.

  11. 3D X-ray Strain Microscopy in Two-Phase Composites at Submicron Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Bei, Hongbin; Ice, Gene E; Gao, Yanfei; Barabash, Oleg M

    2011-01-01

    Author note: Part of this research summary is based on findings first reported in Refs. [3-5, 18]. Renewed interest in composite materials is driven by the fact that their mechanical properties can be superior to those of individual constituent phases. Interfaces between the phases are the key elements responsible for the unique micro-mechanisms of plastic deformation in composites. In this study the depth-dependent residual strain distributed in the two phases and partitioned across the composite interfaces is directly measured at submicron length-scale using X-ray microdiffraction and compared to a detailed simulation within the framework of micromechanical stress analysis. Interface strength is determined from the analysis of the so-called slip zone caused by the near-surface stress relaxation. Two examples are discussed including NiAl/Mo and Ni/Mo composites.

  12. Stress analysis of 3D complex geometries using the scaled boundary polyhedral finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, Hossein; Saputra, Albert; Song, Chongmin

    2016-08-01

    While dominating the numerical stress analysis of solids, the finite element method requires a mesh to conform to the surface of the geometry. Thus the mesh generation of three dimensional complex structures often require tedious human interventions. In this paper, we present a formulation for arbitrary polyhedral elements based on the scaled boundary finite element method, which reduces the difficulties in automatic mesh generation. We also propose a simple method to generate polyhedral meshes with local refinements. The mesh generation method is based on combining an octree mesh with surfaces defined using signed distance functions. Through several numerical examples, we verify the results, study the convergence behaviour and depict the many advantages and capabilities of the presented method. This contribution is intended to assist us to eventually frame a set of numerical methods and associated tools for the full automation of the engineering analysis where minimal human interaction is needed.

  13. A combined method for correlative 3D imaging of biological samples from macro to nano scale

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Manuela; Heidrich, Marko; Lorbeer, Raoul-Amadeus; Antonopoulos, Georgios C.; Knudsen, Lars; Wrede, Christoph; Izykowski, Nicole; Grothausmann, Roman; Jonigk, Danny; Ochs, Matthias; Ripken, Tammo; Kühnel, Mark P.; Meyer, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Correlative analysis requires examination of a specimen from macro to nano scale as well as applicability of analytical methods ranging from morphological to molecular. Accomplishing this with one and the same sample is laborious at best, due to deformation and biodegradation during measurements or intermediary preparation steps. Furthermore, data alignment using differing imaging techniques turns out to be a complex task, which considerably complicates the interconnection of results. We present correlative imaging of the accessory rat lung lobe by combining a modified Scanning Laser Optical Tomography (SLOT) setup with a specially developed sample preparation method (CRISTAL). CRISTAL is a resin-based embedding method that optically clears the specimen while allowing sectioning and preventing degradation. We applied and correlated SLOT with Multi Photon Microscopy, histological and immunofluorescence analysis as well as Transmission Electron Microscopy, all in the same sample. Thus, combining CRISTAL with SLOT enables the correlative utilization of a vast variety of imaging techniques. PMID:27759114

  14. Stress analysis of 3D complex geometries using the scaled boundary polyhedral finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, Hossein; Saputra, Albert; Song, Chongmin

    2016-10-01

    While dominating the numerical stress analysis of solids, the finite element method requires a mesh to conform to the surface of the geometry. Thus the mesh generation of three dimensional complex structures often require tedious human interventions. In this paper, we present a formulation for arbitrary polyhedral elements based on the scaled boundary finite element method, which reduces the difficulties in automatic mesh generation. We also propose a simple method to generate polyhedral meshes with local refinements. The mesh generation method is based on combining an octree mesh with surfaces defined using signed distance functions. Through several numerical examples, we verify the results, study the convergence behaviour and depict the many advantages and capabilities of the presented method. This contribution is intended to assist us to eventually frame a set of numerical methods and associated tools for the full automation of the engineering analysis where minimal human interaction is needed.

  15. Quantum 3D spin-glass system on the scales of space-time periods of external electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gevorkyan, A. S.

    2012-10-15

    A dielectric medium consisting of rigidly polarized molecules has been treated as a quantum 3D disordered spin system. It is shown that using Birkhoff's ergodic hypothesis the initial 3D disordered spin problem on scales of space-time periods of external field is reduced to two conditionally separable 1D problems. The first problem describes a 1D disordered N-particle quantum system with relaxation in random environment while the second one describes statistical properties of ensemble of disordered 1D steric spin chains of certain length. Basing on constructions which are developed in both problems, the coefficient of polarizability related to collective orientational effects under the influence of external field was calculated. On the basis of these investigations the equation of Clausius-Mossotti (CM) has been generalized as well as the equation for permittivity. It is shown that under the influence of weak standing electromagnetic fields in the equation of CM arising of catastrophe is possible, that can substantially change behavior of permittivity in the X-ray region on the macroscopic scale of space.

  16. Strategies for Directing the Structure and Function of 3D Collagen Biomaterials across Length Scales

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Brandan D.; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen type I is a widely used natural biomaterial that has found utility in a variety of biological and medical applications. Its well characterized structure and role as an extracellular matrix protein make it a highly relevant material for controlling cell function and mimicking tissue properties. Collagen type I is abundant in a number of tissues, and can be isolated as a purified protein. This review focuses on hydrogel biomaterials made by reconstituting collagen type I from a solubilized form, with an emphasis on in vitro studies in which collagen structure can be controlled. The hierarchical structure of collagen from the nanoscale to the macroscale is described, with an emphasis on how structure is related to function across scales. Methods of reconstituting collagen into hydrogel materials are presented, including molding of macroscopic constructs, creation of microscale modules, and electrospinning of nanoscale fibers. The modification of collagen biomaterials to achieve desired structures and functions is also addressed, with particular emphasis on mechanical control of collagen structure, creation of collagen composite materials, and crosslinking of collagenous matrices. Biomaterials scientists have made remarkable progress in rationally designing collagen-based biomaterials and in applying them to both the study of biology and for therapeutic benefit. This broad review illustrates recent examples of techniques used to control collagen structure, and to thereby direct its biological and mechanical functions. PMID:24012608

  17. 3D magnetic field configuration of small-scale reconnection events in the solar plasma atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, T.

    2015-10-15

    The outer solar atmosphere, i.e., the corona and the chromosphere, is replete with small energy-release events, which are accompanied by transient brightening and jet-like ejections. These events are considered to be magnetic reconnection events in the solar plasma, and their dynamics have been studied using recent advanced observations from the Hinode spacecraft and other observatories in space and on the ground. These events occur at different locations in the solar atmosphere and vary in their morphology and amount of the released energy. The magnetic field configurations of these reconnection events are inferred based on observations of magnetic fields at the photospheric level. Observations suggest that these magnetic configurations can be classified into two groups. In the first group, two anti-parallel magnetic fields reconnect to each other, yielding a 2D emerging flux configuration. In the second group, helical or twisted magnetic flux tubes are parallel or at a relative angle to each other. Reconnection can occur only between anti-parallel components of the magnetic flux tubes and may be referred to as component reconnection. The latter configuration type may be more important for the larger class of small-scale reconnection events. The two types of magnetic configurations can be compared to counter-helicity and co-helicity configurations, respectively, in laboratory plasma collision experiments.

  18. Droplet fragmentation: 3D imaging of a previously unidentified pore-scale process during multiphase flow in porous media

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Tannaz; Butler, Ian B.; Geiger, Sebastian; van Dijke, Marinus I. J.; Sorbie, Ken S.

    2015-01-01

    Using X-ray computed microtomography, we have visualized and quantified the in situ structure of a trapped nonwetting phase (oil) in a highly heterogeneous carbonate rock after injecting a wetting phase (brine) at low and high capillary numbers. We imaged the process of capillary desaturation in 3D and demonstrated its impacts on the trapped nonwetting phase cluster size distribution. We have identified a previously unidentified pore-scale event during capillary desaturation. This pore-scale event, described as droplet fragmentation of the nonwetting phase, occurs in larger pores. It increases volumetric production of the nonwetting phase after capillary trapping and enlarges the fluid−fluid interface, which can enhance mass transfer between the phases. Droplet fragmentation therefore has implications for a range of multiphase flow processes in natural and engineered porous media with complex heterogeneous pore spaces. PMID:25646491

  19. Landscape scale estimation of soil carbon stock using 3D modelling.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, F; Corstanje, R; Mayr, T

    2014-07-15

    Soil C is the largest pool of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere, and yet the processes of C accumulation, transformation and loss are poorly accounted for. This, in part, is due to the fact that soil C is not uniformly distributed through the soil depth profile and most current landscape level predictions of C do not adequately account the vertical distribution of soil C. In this study, we apply a method based on simple soil specific depth functions to map the soil C stock in three-dimensions at landscape scale. We used soil C and bulk density data from the Soil Survey for England and Wales to map an area in the West Midlands region of approximately 13,948 km(2). We applied a method which describes the variation through the soil profile and interpolates this across the landscape using well established soil drivers such as relief, land cover and geology. The results indicate that this mapping method can effectively reproduce the observed variation in the soil profiles samples. The mapping results were validated using cross validation and an independent validation. The cross-validation resulted in an R(2) of 36% for soil C and 44% for BULKD. These results are generally in line with previous validated studies. In addition, an independent validation was undertaken, comparing the predictions against the National Soil Inventory (NSI) dataset. The majority of the residuals of this validation are between ± 5% of soil C. This indicates high level of accuracy in replicating topsoil values. In addition, the results were compared to a previous study estimating the carbon stock of the UK. We discuss the implications of our results within the context of soil C loss factors such as erosion and the impact on regional C process models.

  20. 3D model of small-scale density cavities in the auroral magnetosphere with field-aligned current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespalov, P. A.; Misonova, V. G.; Savina, O. N.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a 3D model of small-scale density cavities stimulated by an auroral field-aligned current and an oscillating field-aligned current of kinetic Alfvén waves. It is shown that when the field-aligned current increases so that the electron drift velocity exceeds a value of the order of the electron thermal velocity, the plasma becomes unstable to the formation of cavities with low density and strong electric field. The condition of instability is associated with the value of the background magnetic field. In the case of a relatively weak magnetic field (where the electron gyro-radius is greater than the ion acoustic wavelength), the current instability can lead to the formation of one-dimensional cavities along the magnetic field. In the case of a stronger magnetic field (where the ion acoustic wavelength is greater than the electron gyro-radius, but still is less than the ion gyro-radius), the instability can lead to the formation of 3D density cavities. In this case, the spatial scales of the cavity, both along and across the background magnetic field, can be comparable, and at the earlier stage of the cavity formation they are of the order of the ion acoustic wavelength. Rarefactions of the cavity density are accompanied by an increase in the electric field and are limited by the pressure of bipolar electric fields that occur within them. The estimates of typical density cavity characteristics and the results of numerical solutions agree with known experimental data: small-scale structures with a sufficiently strong electric field are observed in the auroral regions with strong field-aligned current.

  1. Line segment extraction for large scale unorganized point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yangbin; Wang, Cheng; Cheng, Jun; Chen, Bili; Jia, Fukai; Chen, Zhonggui; Li, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Line segment detection in images is already a well-investigated topic, although it has received considerably less attention in 3D point clouds. Benefiting from current LiDAR devices, large-scale point clouds are becoming increasingly common. Most human-made objects have flat surfaces. Line segments that occur where pairs of planes intersect give important information regarding the geometric content of point clouds, which is especially useful for automatic building reconstruction and segmentation. This paper proposes a novel method that is capable of accurately extracting plane intersection line segments from large-scale raw scan points. The 3D line-support region, namely, a point set near a straight linear structure, is extracted simultaneously. The 3D line-support region is fitted by our Line-Segment-Half-Planes (LSHP) structure, which provides a geometric constraint for a line segment, making the line segment more reliable and accurate. We demonstrate our method on the point clouds of large-scale, complex, real-world scenes acquired by LiDAR devices. We also demonstrate the application of 3D line-support regions and their LSHP structures on urban scene abstraction.

  2. The 3D geometry of regional-scale dolerite saucer complexes and their feeders in the Secunda Complex, Karoo Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coetzee, André; Kisters, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Dolerites in the Karoo Basin of South Africa commonly represent kilometre-scale, interconnected saucer-shaped structures that consist of inner sills, bounded by inclined sheets connected to stratigraphically higher outer sills. Based on information from over 3000 boreholes and mining operations extending over an area of ca. 500 km2 and covering a > 3 km vertical section from Karoo strata into underlying basement rocks, this paper presents the results of a 3D modelling exercise that describes the geometry and spatial relationships of a regional-scale saucer complex, locally referred to as the number 8 sill, from the Secunda (coal mine) Complex in the northern parts of the Karoo Basin. The composite number 8 sill complex consists of three main dolerite saucers (dolerites A to C). These dolerite saucers are hosted by the Karoo Supergroup and the connectivity and geometry of the saucers support a lateral, sill-feeding-sill relationship between dolerite saucers A, B and C. The saucers are underlain and fed by a shallowly-dipping sheet (dolerite D) in the basement rocks below the Karoo sequence. The 3D geometric strata model agrees well with experimental results of saucer formation from underlying feeders in sedimentary basins, but demonstrates a more intricate relationship where a single feeder can give rise to several split level saucers in one regionally extensive saucer complex. More localised dome- or ridge-shape protrusions are common in the flat lying sill parts of the regional-scale saucers. We suggest a mode of emplacement for these kilometre-scale dome- and ridge structures having formed as a result of lobate magma flow processes. Magma lobes, propagating in different directions ahead of the main magma sheet, undergo successive episodes of lobe arrest and inflation. The inflation of lobes initiates failure of the overlying strata and the formation of curved faults. Magma exploiting these faults transgresses the stratigraphy and coalesces to form a ring

  3. Multi-scale 3D characterization of long period stacking ordered structure in Mg-Zn-Gd cast alloys.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Satoru; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Matsumura, Syo

    2014-11-01

    Magnesium alloys containing rare earth elements are attractive as lightweight structural materials due to their low density, high-specific strength and recycling efficiency. Mg-Zn-Gd system is one of promising systems because of their high creep-resistant property[1]. It is reported that the coherent precipitation formation of the 14H long period stacking ordered structure (LPSO) in Mg-Zn-Gd system at temperatures higher than 623 K[2,3]. In this study, the 14H LPSO phase formed in Mg-Zn-Gd alloys were investigated by multi-scale characterization with X-ray computer tomography (X-CT), focused ion beam (FIB) tomography and aberration-corrected STEM observation for further understanding of the LPSO formation mechanism.The Mg89.5 Zn4.5 Gd6 alloy ingots were cast using high-frequency induction heating in argon atmosphere. The specimens were aged at 753 K for 24 h in air. The aged specimen were cut and polished mechanically for microstructural analysis. The micrometer resolution X-CT observation was performed by conventional scaner (Bruker SKY- SCAN1172) at 80 kV. The FIB tomography and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were carried out by a dual beam FIB-SEM system (Hitachi MI-4000L) with silicon drift detector (SDD) (Oxford X-Max(N)). The electron acceleration voltages were used with 3 kV for SEM observation and 10 kV for EDX spectroscopy. The 3D reconstruction from image series was performed by Avizo Fire 8.0 software (FEI). TEM/STEM observations were also performed by transmission electron microscopes (JEOL JEM 2100, JEM-ARM 200F) at the acceleration voltage of 200 keV.The LPSO phase was observed clearly in SEM image of the Mg89.5Zn4.5Gd6 alloy at 753 K for 2h (Fig.1 (a)). The atomic structure of LPSO phase observed as white gray region of SEM image was also confirmed as 14H LPSO structure by using selected electron diffraction patterns and high-resolution STEM observations. The elemental composition of LPSO phase was determined as Mg97Zn1Gd2 by EDS analyses

  4. Large scale cluster computing workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Dane Skow; Alan Silverman

    2002-12-23

    Recent revolutions in computer hardware and software technologies have paved the way for the large-scale deployment of clusters of commodity computers to address problems heretofore the domain of tightly coupled SMP processors. Near term projects within High Energy Physics and other computing communities will deploy clusters of scale 1000s of processors and be used by 100s to 1000s of independent users. This will expand the reach in both dimensions by an order of magnitude from the current successful production facilities. The goals of this workshop were: (1) to determine what tools exist which can scale up to the cluster sizes foreseen for the next generation of HENP experiments (several thousand nodes) and by implication to identify areas where some investment of money or effort is likely to be needed. (2) To compare and record experimences gained with such tools. (3) To produce a practical guide to all stages of planning, installing, building and operating a large computing cluster in HENP. (4) To identify and connect groups with similar interest within HENP and the larger clustering community.

  5. Large-eddy simulations of 3D Taylor-Green vortex: comparison of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics, Lattice Boltzmann and Finite Volume methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajzer, A.; Pozorski, J.; Szewc, K.

    2014-08-01

    In the paper we present Large-eddy simulation (LES) results of 3D Taylor- Green vortex obtained by the three different computational approaches: Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) and Finite Volume Method (FVM). The Smagorinsky model was chosen as a subgrid-scale closure in LES for all considered methods and a selection of spatial resolutions have been investigated. The SPH and LBM computations have been carried out with the use of the in-house codes executed on GPU and compared, for validation purposes, with the FVM results obtained using the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM. A comparative study in terms of one-point statistics and turbulent energy spectra shows a good agreement of LES results for all methods. An analysis of the GPU code efficiency and implementation difficulties has been made. It is shown that both SPH and LBM may offer a significant advantage over mesh-based CFD methods.

  6. Fabrication of 10 nm-scale complex 3D nanopatterns with multiple shapes and components by secondary sputtering phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hwan-Jin; Jeong, Hyeon Su; Kim, Yun Ho; Jung, Woo-Bin; Kim, Jeong Yeon; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2014-02-25

    We introduce an advanced ultrahigh-resolution (∼ 15 nm) patterning technique that enables the fabrication of various 3D high aspect ratio multicomponents/shaped nanostructures. This methodology utilizes the repetitive secondary sputtering phenomenon under etching plasma conditions and prepatterned fabrication control. The secondary sputtering phenomenon repetitively generates an angular distribution of target particles during ion-bombardment. This method, advanced repetitive secondary sputtering lithography, provides many strategies to fabricate complex continuous patterns and multilayer/material patterns with 10 nm-scale resolution. To demonstrate the versatility of this method, we show induced vertical alignment of liquid crystals (LCs) on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) grid patterns without any alignment layers. The ITO grid pattern fabricated in this method is found to have not only an alignment capability but also electrode properties without electrical or optical damage.

  7. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods. PMID:26725519

  8. Mixed-scale channel networks including Kingfisher-beak-shaped 3D microfunnels for efficient single particle entrapment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yunjeong; Lim, Yeongjin; Shin, Heungjoo

    2016-06-01

    Reproducible research results for nanofluidics and their applications require viable fabrication technologies to produce nanochannels integrated with microchannels that can guide fluid flow and analytes into/out of the nanochannels. We present the simple fabrication of mixed-scale polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel networks consisting of nanochannels and microchannels via a single molding process using a monolithic mixed-scale carbon mold. The monolithic carbon mold is fabricated by pyrolyzing a polymer mold patterned by photolithography. During pyrolysis, the polymer mold shrinks by ~90%, which enables nanosized carbon molds to be produced without a complex nanofabrication process. Because of the good adhesion between the polymer mold and the Si substrate, non-uniform volume reduction occurs during pyrolysis resulting in the formation of curved carbon mold side walls. These curved side walls and the relatively low surface energy of the mold provide efficient demolding of the PDMS channel networks. In addition, the trigonal prismatic shape of the polymer is converted into to a Kingfisher-beak-shaped carbon structure due to the non-uniform volume reduction. The transformation of this mold architecture produces a PDMS Kingfisher-beak-shaped 3D microfunnel that connects the microchannel and the nanochannel smoothly. The smooth reduction in the cross-sectional area of the 3D microfunnels enables efficient single microparticle trapping at the nanochannel entrance; this is beneficial for studies of cell transfection.Reproducible research results for nanofluidics and their applications require viable fabrication technologies to produce nanochannels integrated with microchannels that can guide fluid flow and analytes into/out of the nanochannels. We present the simple fabrication of mixed-scale polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) channel networks consisting of nanochannels and microchannels via a single molding process using a monolithic mixed-scale carbon mold. The monolithic

  9. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J.; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods.

  10. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J.; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods. PMID:26725519

  11. Evaluation of the scale dependent dynamic SGS model in the open source code caffa3d.MBRi in wall-bounded flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Martin; Usera, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    The Scale Dependent Dynamic Model (SDDM) has been widely validated in large-eddy simulations using pseudo-spectral codes [1][2][3]. The scale dependency, particularly the potential law, has been proved also in a priori studies [4][5]. To the authors' knowledge there have been only few attempts to use the SDDM in finite difference (FD) and finite volume (FV) codes [6][7], finding some improvements with the dynamic procedures (scale independent or scale dependent approach), but not showing the behavior of the scale-dependence parameter when using the SDDM. The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the SDDM in the open source code caffa3d.MBRi, an updated version of the code presented in [8]. caffa3d.MBRi is a FV code, second-order accurate, parallelized with MPI, in which the domain is divided in unstructured blocks of structured grids. To accomplish this, 2 cases are considered: flow between flat plates and flow over a rough surface with the presence of a model wind turbine, taking for this case the experimental data presented in [9]. In both cases the standard Smagorinsky Model (SM), the Scale Independent Dynamic Model (SIDM) and the SDDM are tested. As presented in [6][7] slight improvements are obtained with the SDDM. Nevertheless, the behavior of the scale-dependence parameter supports the generalization of the dynamic procedure proposed in the SDDM, particularly taking into account that no explicit filter is used (the implicit filter is unknown). [1] F. Porté-Agel, C. Meneveau, M.B. Parlange. "A scale-dependent dynamic model for large-eddy simulation: application to a neutral atmospheric boundary layer". Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2000, 415, 261-284. [2] E. Bou-Zeid, C. Meneveau, M. Parlante. "A scale-dependent Lagrangian dynamic model for large eddy simulation of complex turbulent flows". Physics of Fluids, 2005, 17, 025105 (18p). [3] R. Stoll, F. Porté-Agel. "Dynamic subgrid-scale models for momentum and scalar fluxes in large-eddy simulations of

  12. US National Large-scale City Orthoimage Standard Initiative

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, G.; Song, C.; Benjamin, S.; Schickler, W.

    2003-01-01

    The early procedures and algorithms for National digital orthophoto generation in National Digital Orthophoto Program (NDOP) were based on earlier USGS mapping operations, such as field control, aerotriangulation (derived in the early 1920's), the quarter-quadrangle-centered (3.75 minutes of longitude and latitude in geographic extent), 1:40,000 aerial photographs, and 2.5 D digital elevation models. However, large-scale city orthophotos using early procedures have disclosed many shortcomings, e.g., ghost image, occlusion, shadow. Thus, to provide the technical base (algorithms, procedure) and experience needed for city large-scale digital orthophoto creation is essential for the near future national large-scale digital orthophoto deployment and the revision of the Standards for National Large-scale City Digital Orthophoto in National Digital Orthophoto Program (NDOP). This paper will report our initial research results as follows: (1) High-precision 3D city DSM generation through LIDAR data processing, (2) Spatial objects/features extraction through surface material information and high-accuracy 3D DSM data, (3) 3D city model development, (4) Algorithm development for generation of DTM-based orthophoto, and DBM-based orthophoto, (5) True orthophoto generation by merging DBM-based orthophoto and DTM-based orthophoto, and (6) Automatic mosaic by optimizing and combining imagery from many perspectives.

  13. Large Scale Nanolaminate Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Miles, R; Chang, K

    2005-11-30

    This work concerns the development of a technology that uses Nanolaminate foils to form light-weight, deformable mirrors that are scalable over a wide range of mirror sizes. While MEMS-based deformable mirrors and spatial light modulators have considerably reduced the cost and increased the capabilities of adaptive optic systems, there has not been a way to utilize the advantages of lithography and batch-fabrication to produce large-scale deformable mirrors. This technology is made scalable by using fabrication techniques and lithography that are not limited to the sizes of conventional MEMS devices. Like many MEMS devices, these mirrors use parallel plate electrostatic actuators. This technology replicates that functionality by suspending a horizontal piece of nanolaminate foil over an electrode by electroplated nickel posts. This actuator is attached, with another post, to another nanolaminate foil that acts as the mirror surface. Most MEMS devices are produced with integrated circuit lithography techniques that are capable of very small line widths, but are not scalable to large sizes. This technology is very tolerant of lithography errors and can use coarser, printed circuit board lithography techniques that can be scaled to very large sizes. These mirrors use small, lithographically defined actuators and thin nanolaminate foils allowing them to produce deformations over a large area while minimizing weight. This paper will describe a staged program to develop this technology. First-principles models were developed to determine design parameters. Three stages of fabrication will be described starting with a 3 x 3 device using conventional metal foils and epoxy to a 10-across all-metal device with nanolaminate mirror surfaces.

  14. Detecting and Analyzing Corrosion Spots on the Hull of Large Marine Vessels Using Colored 3d LIDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aijazi, A. K.; Malaterre, L.; Tazir, M. L.; Trassoudaine, L.; Checchin, P.

    2016-06-01

    This work presents a new method that automatically detects and analyzes surface defects such as corrosion spots of different shapes and sizes, on large ship hulls. In the proposed method several scans from different positions and viewing angles around the ship are registered together to form a complete 3D point cloud. The R, G, B values associated with each scan, obtained with the help of an integrated camera are converted into HSV space to separate out the illumination invariant color component from the intensity. Using this color component, different surface defects such as corrosion spots of different shapes and sizes are automatically detected, within a selected zone, using two different methods depending upon the level of corrosion/defects. The first method relies on a histogram based distribution whereas the second on adaptive thresholds. The detected corrosion spots are then analyzed and quantified to help better plan and estimate the cost of repair and maintenance. Results are evaluated on real data using different standard evaluation metrics to demonstrate the efficacy as well as the technical strength of the proposed method.

  15. Global well-posedness to the 3-D incompressible inhomogeneous Navier-Stokes equations with a class of large velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Cuili; Zhang, Ting

    2015-09-01

    In this article, we consider the global well-posedness to the 3-D incompressible inhomogeneous Navier-Stokes equations with a class of large velocity. More precisely, assuming a 0 ∈ B˙ q , 1 /3 q ( R 3 ) and u 0 = ( u0 h , u0 3 ) ∈ B˙ p , 1 - 1 + /3 p ( R 3 ) for p, q ∈ (1, 6) with sup ( /1 p , /1 q ) ≤ /1 3 + inf ( /1 p , /1 q ) , we prove that if C a↑0↑ B˙q1/3 q α (↑u0 3↑ B˙ p , 1 - 1 + /3 p/μ + 1 ) ≤ 1 , /C μ (↑u0 h↑ B˙ p , 1 - 1 + /3 p + ↑u03↑ B˙ p , 1 - 1 + /3 p 1 - α ↑u0h↑ B˙ p , 1 - 1 + /3 p α) ≤ 1 , then the system has a unique global solution a ∈ C ˜ ( [ 0 , ∞ ) ; B˙ q , 1 /3 q ( R 3 ) ) , u ∈ C ˜ ( [ 0 , ∞ ) ; B˙ p , 1 - 1 + /3 p ( R 3 ) ) ∩ L 1 ( R + ; B˙ p , 1 1 + /3 p ( R 3 ) ) . It improves the recent result of M. Paicu and P. Zhang [J. Funct. Anal. 262, 3556-3584 (2012)], where the exponent form of the initial smallness condition is replaced by a polynomial form.

  16. Multi-scale 3D X-ray Imaging Capabilities at the Advanced Photon Source - Current status and future direction (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCarlo, F.; Xiao, X.; Khan, F.; Glowacki, A.; Schwarz, N.; Jacobsen, C.

    2013-12-01

    In x-ray computed μ-tomography (μ-XCT), a thin scintillator screen is coupled to a visible light lens and camera system to obtain micrometer-scale transmission imaging of specimens as large as a few millimeters. Recent advances in detector technology allow collecting these images at unprecedented frame rates. For a high x-ray flux density synchrotron facility like the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the detector exposure time ranges from hundreds of milliseconds to hundreds of picoseconds, making possible to acquire a full 3D micrometer-resolution dataset in less than one second. The micron resolution limitation of parallel x-ray beam projection systems can be overcame by Transmission X-ray Microscopes (TXM) where part of the image magnification is done in x-ray regime using x-ray optics like capillary condensers and Fresnel zone plates. These systems, when installed on a synchrotron x-ray source, can generate 2D images with up to 20 nm resolution with second exposure time and collect a full 3D nano-resolution dataset in few minutes. μ-XCT and TXM systems available at the x-ray imaging beamlines of the APS are routinely used in material science and geoscience applications where high-resolution and fast 3D imaging are instrumental in extracting in situ four-dimensional dynamic information. In this presentation we describe the computational challenges associated with μ-XCT and TXM systems and present the framework and infrastructure developed at the APS to allow for routine multi-scale data integration between the two systems.

  17. Multi-scale 3D X-ray Imaging Capabilities at the Advanced Photon Source - Current status and future direction (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCarlo, F.; Xiao, X.; Khan, F.; Glowacki, A.; Schwarz, N.; Jacobsen, C.

    2011-12-01

    In x-ray computed μ-tomography (μ-XCT), a thin scintillator screen is coupled to a visible light lens and camera system to obtain micrometer-scale transmission imaging of specimens as large as a few millimeters. Recent advances in detector technology allow collecting these images at unprecedented frame rates. For a high x-ray flux density synchrotron facility like the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the detector exposure time ranges from hundreds of milliseconds to hundreds of picoseconds, making possible to acquire a full 3D micrometer-resolution dataset in less than one second. The micron resolution limitation of parallel x-ray beam projection systems can be overcame by Transmission X-ray Microscopes (TXM) where part of the image magnification is done in x-ray regime using x-ray optics like capillary condensers and Fresnel zone plates. These systems, when installed on a synchrotron x-ray source, can generate 2D images with up to 20 nm resolution with second exposure time and collect a full 3D nano-resolution dataset in few minutes. μ-XCT and TXM systems available at the x-ray imaging beamlines of the APS are routinely used in material science and geoscience applications where high-resolution and fast 3D imaging are instrumental in extracting in situ four-dimensional dynamic information. In this presentation we describe the computational challenges associated with μ-XCT and TXM systems and present the framework and infrastructure developed at the APS to allow for routine multi-scale data integration between the two systems.

  18. Rapid, simple and inexpensive production of custom 3D printed equipment for large-volume fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Adam L; Hilton, Stephen T; Andreae, Laura C

    2015-10-30

    The cost of 3D printing has reduced dramatically over the last few years and is now within reach of many scientific laboratories. This work presents an example of how 3D printing can be applied to the development of custom laboratory equipment that is specifically adapted for use with the novel brain tissue clearing technique, CLARITY. A simple, freely available online software tool was used, along with consumer-grade equipment, to produce a brain slicing chamber and a combined antibody staining and imaging chamber. Using standard 3D printers we were able to produce research-grade parts in an iterative manner at a fraction of the cost of commercial equipment. 3D printing provides a reproducible, flexible, simple and cost-effective method for researchers to produce the equipment needed to quickly adopt new methods.

  19. Rapid, simple and inexpensive production of custom 3D printed equipment for large-volume fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, Adam L.; Hilton, Stephen T.; Andreae, Laura C.

    2015-01-01

    The cost of 3D printing has reduced dramatically over the last few years and is now within reach of many scientific laboratories. This work presents an example of how 3D printing can be applied to the development of custom laboratory equipment that is specifically adapted for use with the novel brain tissue clearing technique, CLARITY. A simple, freely available online software tool was used, along with consumer-grade equipment, to produce a brain slicing chamber and a combined antibody staining and imaging chamber. Using standard 3D printers we were able to produce research-grade parts in an iterative manner at a fraction of the cost of commercial equipment. 3D printing provides a reproducible, flexible, simple and cost-effective method for researchers to produce the equipment needed to quickly adopt new methods. PMID:25797056

  20. Rapid, simple and inexpensive production of custom 3D printed equipment for large-volume fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Adam L; Hilton, Stephen T; Andreae, Laura C

    2015-10-30

    The cost of 3D printing has reduced dramatically over the last few years and is now within reach of many scientific laboratories. This work presents an example of how 3D printing can be applied to the development of custom laboratory equipment that is specifically adapted for use with the novel brain tissue clearing technique, CLARITY. A simple, freely available online software tool was used, along with consumer-grade equipment, to produce a brain slicing chamber and a combined antibody staining and imaging chamber. Using standard 3D printers we were able to produce research-grade parts in an iterative manner at a fraction of the cost of commercial equipment. 3D printing provides a reproducible, flexible, simple and cost-effective method for researchers to produce the equipment needed to quickly adopt new methods. PMID:25797056

  1. Regional-scale geomechanical impact assessment of underground coal gasification by coupled 3D thermo-mechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Christopher; Kempka, Thomas; Kapusta, Krzysztof; Stańczyk, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    Underground coal gasification (UCG) has the potential to increase the world-wide coal reserves by utilization of coal deposits not mineable by conventional methods. The UCG process involves combusting coal in situ to produce a high-calorific synthesis gas, which can be applied for electricity generation or chemical feedstock production. Apart from its high economic potentials, UCG may induce site-specific environmental impacts such as fault reactivation, induced seismicity and ground subsidence, potentially inducing groundwater pollution. Changes overburden hydraulic conductivity resulting from thermo-mechanical effects may introduce migration pathways for UCG contaminants. Due to the financial efforts associated with UCG field trials, numerical modeling has been an important methodology to study coupled processes considering UCG performance. Almost all previous UCG studies applied 1D or 2D models for that purpose, that do not allow to predict the performance of a commercial-scale UCG operation. Considering our previous findings, demonstrating that far-field models can be run at a higher computational efficiency by using temperature-independent thermo-mechanical parameters, representative coupled simulations based on complex 3D regional-scale models were employed in the present study. For that purpose, a coupled thermo-mechanical 3D model has been developed to investigate the environmental impacts of UCG based on a regional-scale of the Polish Wieczorek mine located in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin. The model size is 10 km × 10 km × 5 km with ten dipping lithological layers, a double fault and 25 UCG reactors. Six different numerical simulation scenarios were investigated, considering the transpressive stress regime present in that part of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin. Our simulation results demonstrate that the minimum distance between the UCG reactors is about the six-fold of the coal seam thickness to avoid hydraulic communication between the single UCG

  2. Gigaflop speed algorithm for the direct solution of large block-tridiagonal systems in 3-D physics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.V.; Fry, A.R.; Gruber, R.; Roy, A.

    1989-03-01

    In the discretization of the 3-D partial differential equations of many physics problems, it is found that the resultant system of linear equations can be represented by a block tridiagonal matrix. Depending on the substructure of the blocks, one can devise many algorithms for the solution of these systems. For plasma physics problems of interest to the authors, several interesting matrix problems arise that should be useful in other applications as well. In one case, where the blocks are dense, it was found that by using a multitasked cyclic reduction procedure, it was possible to reach gigaflop rates on a Cray-2 for the direct solve of these large linear systems. The recently built code PAMS (parallelized matrix solver) embodies this technique and uses fast vendor-supplied routines and obtains this good performance. Manipulations within the blocks are done by these highly optimized linear algebra subroutines that exploit vectorization as well as overlap of the functional units within each CPU. In unitasking mode, speeds well above 340 Mflops have been measured. The cyclic reduction method multitasks quite well with overlap factors in the range of three to four. In multitasking mode, average speeds of 1.1 gigaflops have been measured for the entire PAMS algorithm. In addition to the presentation of the PAMS algorithm, it is shown how related systems having banded blocks may be treated efficiently by multitasked cyclic reduction in the Cray-2 multiprocessor environment. The PAMS method is intended for multiprocessors and would not be a method of choice on a uniprocessor. Furthermore, this method's advantage was found to be critically dependent on the hardware, software, and charging algorithm installed on any given multiprocessor system.

  3. Revealing plot scale heterogeneity in soil moisture dynamics under contrasting vegetation assemblages using 3D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Jonathan; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Bradford, John; Soulsby, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is a fundamental component of the water cycle that influences many hydrological processes, such as flooding, solute transport, biogeochemical processes, and land-atmosphere interactions. The relationship between vegetation and soil moisture is complex and reciprocal. Soil moisture may affect vegetation distribution due to its function as the primary source of water, in turn the structure of vegetation canopies regulate water partitioning into interception, throughfall and steam flow. Such spatial differences in inputs, together with complex patterns of water uptake from distributed root networks can create marked heterogeneity in soil moisture dynamics at small scales. Traditional methods of monitoring soil moisture have revolved around limited point measurements, but improved geophysical techniques have facilitated a trend towards more spatially distributed measurements to help understand this heterogeneity. Here, we present a study using 3D ERT surveys in a 3.2km upland catchment in the Scottish Highlands where increasing afforestation (for climate change adaptation, biofuels and conservation) has the potential to increase interception losses and reduce soil moisture storage. The study combined 3D surveys, traditional point measurements and laboratory analysis of soil cores to assess the plot scale soil moisture dynamics in podzolic soils under forest stands of 15m high Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and adjacent non-forest plots dominated by heather (Calluna vulgaris) shrubs (<0.5m high). These dominant species are typical of forest and non-forest vegetation communities the Scottish Highlands. Results showed differences in the soil moisture dynamics under the different vegetation types, with heterogeneous patterns in the forested site mainly correlated with canopy cover and mirroring interception losses. Temporal variability in the forested site was greater, probably due to the interception, and increased evapotranspiration losses relative to the

  4. Large-Scale, Three–Dimensional, Free–Standing, and Mesoporous Metal Oxide Networks for High–Performance Photocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Hua; Li, Xinshi; Hu, Chao; Zhang, Xuan; Li, Junfang; Yan, Yan; Xi, Guangcheng

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous nanostructures represent a unique class of photocatalysts with many applications, including splitting of water, degradation of organic contaminants, and reduction of carbon dioxide. In this work, we report a general Lewis acid catalytic template route for the high–yield producing single– and multi–component large–scale three–dimensional (3D) mesoporous metal oxide networks. The large-scale 3D mesoporous metal oxide networks possess large macroscopic scale (millimeter–sized) and mesoporous nanostructure with huge pore volume and large surface exposure area. This method also can be used for the synthesis of large–scale 3D macro/mesoporous hierarchical porous materials and noble metal nanoparticles loaded 3D mesoporous networks. Photocatalytic degradation of Azo dyes demonstrated that the large–scale 3D mesoporous metal oxide networks enable high photocatalytic activity. The present synthetic method can serve as the new design concept for functional 3D mesoporous nanomaterials. PMID:23857595

  5. Development of a lab-scale, high-resolution, tube-generated X-ray computed-tomography system for three-dimensional (3D) materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Mertens, J.C.E. Williams, J.J. Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2014-06-01

    The design and construction of a modular high resolution X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system is highlighted in this paper. The design approach is detailed for meeting a specified set of instrument performance goals tailored towards experimental versatility and high resolution imaging. The XCT tool is unique in the detector and X-ray source design configuration, enabling control in the balance between detection efficiency and spatial resolution. The system package is also unique: The sample manipulation approach implemented enables a wide gamut of in situ experimentation to analyze structure evolution under applied stimulus, by optimizing scan conditions through a high degree of controllability. The component selection and design process is detailed: Incorporated components are specified, custom designs are shared, and the approach for their integration into a fully functional XCT scanner is provided. Custom designs discussed include the dual-target X-ray source cradle which maintains position and trajectory of the beam between the two X-ray target configurations with respect to a scintillator mounting and positioning assembly and the imaging sensor, as well as a novel large-format X-ray detector with enhanced adaptability. The instrument is discussed from an operational point of view, including the details of data acquisition and processing implemented for 3D imaging via micro-CT. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated on a silica-glass particle/hydroxyl-terminated-polybutadiene (HTPB) matrix binder PBX simulant. Post-scan data processing, specifically segmentation of the sample's relevant microstructure from the 3D reconstruction, is provided to demonstrate the utility of the instrument. - Highlights: • Custom built X-ray tomography system for microstructural characterization • Detector design for maximizing polychromatic X-ray detection efficiency • X-ray design offered for maximizing X-ray flux with respect to imaging resolution • Novel lab-scale

  6. Application of a roughness-length representation to parameterize energy loss in 3-D numerical simulations of large rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandbach, S. D.; Lane, S. N.; Hardy, R. J.; Amsler, M. L.; Ashworth, P. J.; Best, J. L.; Nicholas, A. P.; Orfeo, O.; Parsons, D. R.; Reesink, A. J. H.; Szupiany, R. N.

    2012-12-01

    Recent technological advances in remote sensing have enabled investigation of the morphodynamics and hydrodynamics of large rivers. However, measuring topography and flow in these very large rivers is time consuming and thus often constrains the spatial resolution and reach-length scales that can be monitored. Similar constraints exist for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of large rivers, requiring maximization of mesh- or grid-cell dimensions and implying a reduction in the representation of bedform-roughness elements that are of the order of a model grid cell or less, even if they are represented in available topographic data. These "subgrid" elements must be parameterized, and this paper applies and considers the impact of roughness-length treatments that include the effect of bed roughness due to "unmeasured" topography. CFD predictions were found to be sensitive to the roughness-length specification. Model optimization was based on acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements and estimates of the water surface slope for a variety of roughness lengths. This proved difficult as the metrics used to assess optimal model performance diverged due to the effects of large bedforms that are not well parameterized in roughness-length treatments. However, the general spatial flow patterns are effectively predicted by the model. Changes in roughness length were shown to have a major impact upon flow routing at the channel scale. The results also indicate an absence of secondary flow circulation cells in the reached studied, and suggest simpler two-dimensional models may have great utility in the investigation of flow within large rivers.

  7. Do fault-related folds follow the same scaling law as their associated faults? A study using 3D seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitcher, Eleanor; Imber, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Fractal distributions are largely agreed to follow a power-law distribution. Power-law scaling relationships describe the size distribution of fault lengths or displacements. Being able to identify these scaling properties provides a powerful tool for predicting the numbers of geological structures, such as small-scale faults in sedimentary basins that are below the resolution of seismic reflection data. The aim of this study is to determine whether fault-related folds follow the same power law scaling properties, or if they follow a different scaling law. We use TrapTester to interpret a 3D seismic volume from the Gulf of Mexico to construct fault planes and cut-off lines along selected horizons in the vicinity of fault upper tip lines. Fault-related folds are particularly well developed above steeply plunging tip lines, but are discontinuous along the strike of the fault plane. Folding is less well developed on horizons that intersect, or lie close to, the locus of maximum throw (bullseye) of the fault plane. We then measured fold amplitudes and fault throws across these same horizons using a one-dimensional multi-line sampling approach. Graphs of fault throw and fold amplitude vs. distance parallel to fault strike show that folds occur where there is no resolvable fault throw, and that fault throw and fold amplitudes show an approximately inverse relationship. Close to the locus of maximum throw, there is largely just faulting, whilst at the upper tip line folding predominates. By plotting cumulative frequency against throw for the fault and fold data we can investigate whether the data follow a power law, log normal or exponential distribution. Plotting the data on log vs. log (power law), linear vs. log (log normal) and log vs. linear (exponential) axes allow us to establish which displays the best "straight-line fit". We observed that the fault throw data satisfied a straight-line on a log vs. log graph - implying a power law distribution - and also returned

  8. Production of Lightning NO(x) and its Vertical Distribution Calculated from 3-D Cloud-scale Chemical Transport Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Lesley; Pickering, Kenneth; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Allen, Dale; DeCaria, Alex; Ridley, Brian; Lin, Ruei-Fong; Lang, Steve; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    A 3-D cloud scale chemical transport model that includes a parameterized source of lightning NO(x), based on observed flash rates has been used to simulate six midlatitude and subtropical thunderstorms observed during four field projects. Production per intracloud (P(sub IC) and cloud-to-ground (P(sub CG)) flash is estimated by assuming various values of P(sub IC) and P(sub CG) for each storm and determining which production scenario yields NO(x) mixing ratios that compare most favorably with in-cloud aircraft observations. We obtain a mean P(sub CG) value of 500 moles NO (7 kg N) per flash. The results of this analysis also suggest that on average, P(sub IC) may be nearly equal to P(sub CG), which is contrary to the common assumption that intracloud flashes are significantly less productive of NO than are cloud-to-ground flashes. This study also presents vertical profiles of the mass of lightning NO(x), after convection based on 3-D cloud-scale model simulations. The results suggest that following convection, a large percentage of lightning NO(x), remains in the middle and upper troposphere where it originated, while only a small percentage is found near the surface. The results of this work differ from profiles calculated from 2-D cloud-scale model simulations with a simpler lightning parameterization that were peaked near the surface and in the upper troposphere (referred to as a "C-shaped" profile). The new model results (a backward C-shaped profile) suggest that chemical transport models that assume a C-shaped vertical profile of lightning NO(x) mass may place too much mass neat the surface and too little in the middle troposphere.

  9. The Best of Both Worlds: 3D X-ray Microscopy with Ultra-high Resolution and a Large Field of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Gelb, J.; Yang, Y.; Guan, Y.; Wu, W.; Chen, J.; Tian, Y.

    2011-09-01

    3D visualizations of complex structures within various samples have been achieved with high spatial resolution by X-ray computed nanotomography (nano-CT). While high spatial resolution generally comes at the expense of field of view (FOV). Here we proposed an approach that stitched several 3D volumes together into a single large volume to significantly increase the size of the FOV while preserving resolution. Combining this with nano-CT, 18-μm FOV with sub-60-nm resolution has been achieved for non-destructive 3D visualization of clustered yeasts that were too large for a single scan. It shows high promise for imaging other large samples in the future.

  10. 3D fine scale PZT skeletons of 1-3 ceramic polymer composites formed by ink-jet prototyping process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguera, R.; Dossou-Yovo, C.; Lejeune, M.; Chartier, T.

    2005-06-01

    Different investigations have been carried out to optimize an ink-jet printing technique, devoted to the fabrication of 3D fine scale PZT parts, by adjustment of the fluid properties of the ceramic suspensions and by controlling the ejection and impact phenomena. A 10 vol% PZT loaded suspension characterized by a Newtonian behavior, corresponding to a viscosity of 10mPa.s and to a ratio Re/We1/2 of 5.98 has been selected. The ejection and impact phenomena strongly depend on the driving parameters of the printing head, in particular the formation of the droplet, with satellite or not, as well as its velocity and volume which are function of the pulse amplitude. Moreover, the conditions of ejection (droplet velocity and volume) control the characteristics of the deposit (definition, spreading, thickness uniformity). Sintered PZT pillar array corresponding to the skeleton of 1-3 ceramic polymer composite for imaging probes has been achieved by ink-jet printing with a definition equal to 50μ m.

  11. Prescribed 3-D Direct Writing of Suspended Micron/Sub-micron Scale Fiber Structures via a Robotic Dispensing System

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hanwen; Cambron, Scott D.; Keynton, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    A 3-axis dispensing system is utilized to control the initiating and terminating fiber positions and trajectory via the dispensing software. The polymer fiber length and orientation is defined by the spatial positioning of the dispensing system 3-axis stages. The fiber diameter is defined by the prescribed dispense time of the dispensing system valve, the feed rate (the speed at which the stage traverses from an initiating to a terminating position), the gauge diameter of the dispensing tip, the viscosity and surface tension of the polymer solution, and the programmed drawing length. The stage feed rate affects the polymer solution’s evaporation rate and capillary breakup of the filaments. The dispensing system consists of a pneumatic valve controller, a droplet-dispensing valve and a dispensing tip. Characterization of the direct write process to determine the optimum combination of factors leads to repeatedly acquiring the desired range of fiber diameters. The advantage of this robotic dispensing system is the ease of obtaining a precise range of micron/sub-micron fibers onto a desired, programmed location via automated process control. Here, the discussed self-assembled micron/sub-micron scale 3D structures have been employed to fabricate suspended structures to create micron/sub-micron fluidic devices and bioengineered scaffolds. PMID:26132732

  12. Large-Scale Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Nicol; H. R. Ammerlahn; M. E. Goldsby; M. M. Johnson; D. E. Rhodes; A. S. Yoshimura

    2000-12-01

    Large enterprises are ever more dependent on their Large-Scale Information Systems (LSLS), computer systems that are distinguished architecturally by distributed components--data sources, networks, computing engines, simulations, human-in-the-loop control and remote access stations. These systems provide such capabilities as workflow, data fusion and distributed database access. The Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) contains many examples of LSIS components, a fact that motivates this research. However, most LSIS in use grew up from collections of separate subsystems that were not designed to be components of an integrated system. For this reason, they are often difficult to analyze and control. The problem is made more difficult by the size of a typical system, its diversity of information sources, and the institutional complexities associated with its geographic distribution across the enterprise. Moreover, there is no integrated approach for analyzing or managing such systems. Indeed, integrated development of LSIS is an active area of academic research. This work developed such an approach by simulating the various components of the LSIS and allowing the simulated components to interact with real LSIS subsystems. This research demonstrated two benefits. First, applying it to a particular LSIS provided a thorough understanding of the interfaces between the system's components. Second, it demonstrated how more rapid and detailed answers could be obtained to questions significant to the enterprise by interacting with the relevant LSIS subsystems through simulated components designed with those questions in mind. In a final, added phase of the project, investigations were made on extending this research to wireless communication networks in support of telemetry applications.

  13. Distribution probability of large-scale landslides in central Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timilsina, Manita; Bhandary, Netra P.; Dahal, Ranjan Kumar; Yatabe, Ryuichi

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale landslides in the Himalaya are defined as huge, deep-seated landslide masses that occurred in the geological past. They are widely distributed in the Nepal Himalaya. The steep topography and high local relief provide high potential for such failures, whereas the dynamic geology and adverse climatic conditions play a key role in the occurrence and reactivation of such landslides. The major geoscientific problems related with such large-scale landslides are 1) difficulties in their identification and delineation, 2) sources of small-scale failures, and 3) reactivation. Only a few scientific publications have been published concerning large-scale landslides in Nepal. In this context, the identification and quantification of large-scale landslides and their potential distribution are crucial. Therefore, this study explores the distribution of large-scale landslides in the Lesser Himalaya. It provides simple guidelines to identify large-scale landslides based on their typical characteristics and using a 3D schematic diagram. Based on the spatial distribution of landslides, geomorphological/geological parameters and logistic regression, an equation of large-scale landslide distribution is also derived. The equation is validated by applying it to another area. For the new area, the area under the receiver operating curve of the landslide distribution probability in the new area is 0.699, and a distribution probability value could explain > 65% of existing landslides. Therefore, the regression equation can be applied to areas of the Lesser Himalaya of central Nepal with similar geological and geomorphological conditions.

  14. Scale dependent parameterization of soil hydraulic conductivity in 3D simulation of hydrological processes in a forested headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhufeng; Bogena, Heye; Kollet, Stefan; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-05-01

    In distributed hydrological modelling one often faces the problem that input data need to be aggregated to match the model resolution. However, aggregated data may be too coarse for the parametrization of the processes represented. This dilemma can be circumvented by the adjustment of certain model parameters. For instance, the reduction of local hydraulic gradients due to spatial aggregation can be partially compensated by increasing soil hydraulic conductivity. In this study, we employed the information entropy concept for the scale dependent parameterization of soil hydraulic conductivity. The loss of information content of terrain curvature as consequence of spatial aggregation was used to determine an amplification factor for soil hydraulic conductivity to compensate the resulting retardation of water flow. To test the usefulness of this approach, continuous 3D hydrological simulations were conducted with different spatial resolutions in the highly instrumented Wüstebach catchment, Germany. Our results indicated that the introduction of an amplification factor can effectively improve model performances both in terms of soil moisture and runoff simulation. However, comparing simulated soil moisture pattern with observation indicated that uniform application of an amplification factor can lead to local overcorrection of soil hydraulic conductivity. This problem could be circumvented by applying the amplification factor only to model grid cells that suffer from high information loss. To this end, we tested two schemes to define appropriate location-specific correction factors. Both schemes led to improved model performance both in terms of soil water content and runoff simulation. Thus, we anticipate that our proposed scaling approach is useful for the application of next-generation hyper-resolution global land surface models.

  15. Large Scale, High Resolution, Mantle Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geenen, T.; Berg, A. V.; Spakman, W.

    2007-12-01

    To model the geodynamic evolution of plate convergence, subduction and collision and to allow for a connection to various types of observational data, geophysical, geodetical and geological, we developed a 4D (space-time) numerical mantle convection code. The model is based on a spherical 3D Eulerian fem model, with quadratic elements, on top of which we constructed a 3D Lagrangian particle in cell(PIC) method. We use the PIC method to transport material properties and to incorporate a viscoelastic rheology. Since capturing small scale processes associated with localization phenomena require a high resolution, we spend a considerable effort on implementing solvers suitable to solve for models with over 100 million degrees of freedom. We implemented Additive Schwartz type ILU based methods in combination with a Krylov solver, GMRES. However we found that for problems with over 500 thousend degrees of freedom the convergence of the solver degraded severely. This observation is known from the literature [Saad, 2003] and results from the local character of the ILU preconditioner resulting in a poor approximation of the inverse of A for large A. The size of A for which ILU is no longer usable depends on the condition of A and on the amount of fill in allowed for the ILU preconditioner. We found that for our problems with over 5×105 degrees of freedom convergence became to slow to solve the system within an acceptable amount of walltime, one minute, even when allowing for considerable amount of fill in. We also implemented MUMPS and found good scaling results for problems up to 107 degrees of freedom for up to 32 CPU¡¯s. For problems with over 100 million degrees of freedom we implemented Algebraic Multigrid type methods (AMG) from the ML library [Sala, 2006]. Since multigrid methods are most effective for single parameter problems, we rebuild our model to use the SIMPLE method in the Stokes solver [Patankar, 1980]. We present scaling results from these solvers for 3D

  16. Large Scale Magnetostrictive Valve Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A.; Holleman, Elizabeth; Eddleman, David

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's Valves, Actuators and Ducts Design and Development Branch developed a large scale magnetostrictive valve actuator. The potential advantages of this technology are faster, more efficient valve actuators that consume less power and provide precise position control and deliver higher flow rates than conventional solenoid valves. Magnetostrictive materials change dimensions when a magnetic field is applied; this property is referred to as magnetostriction. Magnetostriction is caused by the alignment of the magnetic domains in the material s crystalline structure and the applied magnetic field lines. Typically, the material changes shape by elongating in the axial direction and constricting in the radial direction, resulting in no net change in volume. All hardware and testing is complete. This paper will discuss: the potential applications of the technology; overview of the as built actuator design; discuss problems that were uncovered during the development testing; review test data and evaluate weaknesses of the design; and discuss areas for improvement for future work. This actuator holds promises of a low power, high load, proportionally controlled actuator for valves requiring 440 to 1500 newtons load.

  17. Coupling ANIMO and MT3DMS for 3D regional-scale modeling of nutrient transport in soil and groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, G.; Del Val Alonso, L.; Groenendijk, P.; Griffioen, J.

    2012-12-01

    We developed an on-line coupling between the 1D/quasi-2D nutrient transport model ANIMO and the 3D groundwater transport model code MT3DMS. ANIMO is a detailed, process-oriented model code for the simulation of nitrate leaching to groundwater, N- and P-loads on surface waters and emissions of greenhouse gasses. It is the leading nutrient fate and transport code in the Netherlands where it is used primarily for the evaluation of fertilization related legislation. In addition, the code is applied frequently in international research projects. MT3DMS is probably the most commonly used groundwater solute transport package worldwide. The on-line model coupling ANIMO-MT3DMS combines the state-of-the-art descriptions of the biogeochemical cycles in ANIMO with the advantages of using a 3D approach for the transport through the saturated domain. These advantages include accounting for regional lateral transport, considering groundwater-surface water interactions more explicitly, and the possibility of using MODFLOW to obtain the flow fields. An additional merit of the on-line coupling concept is that it preserves feedbacks between the saturated and unsaturated zone. We tested ANIMO-MT3DMS by simulating nutrient transport for the period 1970-2007 in a Dutch agricultural polder catchment covering an area of 118 km2. The transient groundwater flow field had a temporal resolution of one day and was calculated with MODFLOW-MetaSWAP. The horizontal resolution of the model grid was 100x100m and consisted of 25 layers of varying thickness. To keep computation times manageable, we prepared MT3DMS for parallel computing, which in itself is a relevant development for a large community of groundwater transport modelers. For the parameterization of the soil, we applied a standard classification approach, representing the area by 60 units with unique combinations of soil type, land use and geohydrological setting. For the geochemical parameterization of the deeper subsurface, however, we

  18. Large N matrix models for 3d {N} = 2 theories: twisted index, free energy and black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Morteza; Zaffaroni, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    We provide general formulae for the topologically twisted index of a general three-dimensional {N} ≥ 2 gauge theory with an M-theory or massive type IIA dual in the large N limit. The index is defined as the supersymmetric path integral of the theory on S 2 × S 1 in the presence of background magnetic fluxes for the R- and global symmetries and it is conjectured to reproduce the entropy of magnetically charged static BPS AdS4 black holes. For a class of theories with an M-theory dual, we show that the logarithm of the index scales indeed as N 3/2 (and N 5/3 in the massive type IIA case). We find an intriguing relation with the (apparently unrelated) large N limit of the partition function on S 3. We also provide a universal formula for extracting the index from the large N partition function on S 3 and its derivatives and point out its analogy with the attractor mechanism for AdS black holes.

  19. A study of MLFMA for large-scale scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastriter, Michael Larkin

    This research is centered in computational electromagnetics with a focus on solving large-scale problems accurately in a timely fashion using first principle physics. Error control of the translation operator in 3-D is shown. A parallel implementation of the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) was studied as far as parallel efficiency and scaling. The large-scale scattering program (LSSP), based on the ScaleME library, was used to solve ultra-large-scale problems including a 200lambda sphere with 20 million unknowns. As these large-scale problems were solved, techniques were developed to accurately estimate the memory requirements. Careful memory management is needed in order to solve these massive problems. The study of MLFMA in large-scale problems revealed significant errors that stemmed from inconsistencies in constants used by different parts of the algorithm. These were fixed to produce the most accurate data possible for large-scale surface scattering problems. Data was calculated on a missile-like target using both high frequency methods and MLFMA. This data was compared and analyzed to determine possible strategies to increase data acquisition speed and accuracy through multiple computation method hybridization.

  20. A neural model of 3D shape-from-texture: multiple-scale filtering, boundary grouping, and surface filling-in.

    PubMed

    Grossberg, Stephen; Kuhlmann, Levin; Mingolla, Ennio

    2007-03-01

    A neural model is presented of how cortical areas V1, V2, and V4 interact to convert a textured 2D image into a representation of curved 3D shape. Two basic problems are solved to achieve this: (1) Patterns of spatially discrete 2D texture elements are transformed into a spatially smooth surface representation of 3D shape. (2) Changes in the statistical properties of texture elements across space induce the perceived 3D shape of this surface representation. This is achieved in the model through multiple-scale filtering of a 2D image, followed by a cooperative-competitive grouping network that coherently binds texture elements into boundary webs at the appropriate depths using a scale-to-depth map and a subsequent depth competition stage. These boundary webs then gate filling-in of surface lightness signals in order to form a smooth 3D surface percept. The model quantitatively simulates challenging psychophysical data about perception of prolate ellipsoids [Todd, J., & Akerstrom, R. (1987). Perception of three-dimensional form from patterns of optical texture. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 13(2), 242-255]. In particular, the model represents a high degree of 3D curvature for a certain class of images, all of whose texture elements have the same degree of optical compression, in accordance with percepts of human observers. Simulations of 3D percepts of an elliptical cylinder, a slanted plane, and a photo of a golf ball are also presented.

  1. 3D Reconstruction of a Fluvial Sediment Slug from Source to Sink: reach-scale modeling of the Dart River, NZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasington, J.; Cook, S.; Cox, S.; James, J.; Lehane, N.; McColl, S. T.; Quincey, D. J.; Williams, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Following heavy rainfall on 4/1/14, a debris flow at Slip Stream (44.59 S 168.34 E) introduced >106 m3 of sediment to the Dart River valley floor in NZ Southern Alps. Runout over an existing fan dammed the Dart River causing a sudden drop in discharge downstream. This broad dam was breached quickly; however the temporary loss of conveyance impounded a 3 km lake with a volume of 6 x 106 m3 and depths that exceed 10 m. Quantifying the impact of this large sediment pulse on the Dart River is urgently needed to assess potential sedimentation downstream and will also provide an ideal vehicle to test theories of bed wave migration in large, extensively braided rivers. Recent advances in geomatics offer the opportunity to study these impacts directly through the production of high-resolution DEMs. These 3D snapshots can then be compared through time to quantify the morphodynamic response of the channel as it adjusts to the change in sediment supply. In this study we describe the methods and results of a novel survey strategy designed to capture of the complex morphology of the Dart River along a remote 40 km reach, from the upstream landslide source to its distal sediment sink in Lake Wakatipu. The scale of this system presents major logistical and methodological challenges, and hitherto would have conventionally be addressed with airborne laser scanning, bringing with it significant deployment constraints and costs. By contrast, we present sub-metre 3D reconstructions of the system (Figure 1), derived from highly redundant aerial photography shot with a non-metric camera from a helicopter survey that extended over an 80 km2 area. Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry was used to solve simultaneously camera position, pose and derive a 3D point cloud based on over 4000 images. Reconstructions were found to exhibit significant systematic error resulting from the implicit estimation of the internal camera orientation parameters, and we show how these effects can be minimized

  2. Web-based 3D digital pathology framework for large-mapping data scanned by FF-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, ChiaKai; Tsai, Chien-Chung; Chien, Meng-Ting; Li, Yu-I.; Shun, Chia-Tung; Huang, Sheng-Lung

    2015-03-01

    Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) is a high resolution instrument in 3 dimensional (3D) space, including lateral and longitudinal direction. With FF-OCT, we can perform 3D scanning for excised biopsy or cell culture sample to obtain cellular information. In this work, we have set up a high resolution FF-OCT scanning instrument that can perform cellular resolution tomography scanning of skin tissue for histopathology study. In a scan range of 1cm(x), 1cm(y), 106μm(z), for example, digital data occupies 253 GB capacity. Copying these materials is time consuming, not to mention efficient browsing and analyzing of these data. To solve the problem of information delivery, we have established a network service to browse and analyze the huge volume data.

  3. A new 3D nickel(II) framework composed of large rings: Ionothermal synthesis and crystal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Ling; Choi, Eun-Young; Kwon, Young-Uk

    2008-11-15

    Ionothermal reaction between Ni{sup 2+} and 1,3,5-benzentricarboxylic acid (H{sub 3}BTC) with [AMI]Cl (AMI=1-amyl-3-methylimidazolium) as the reaction medium produced a novel 3D mixed-ligand metal-organic framework [AMI][Ni{sub 3}(BTC){sub 2}(OAc)(MI){sub 3}] (1) (MI=1-methylimidazole) with [AMI]{sup +} incorporated in the framework. The framework is formed by connecting 2D planes, made up of 32- and 48-membered rings, through 1D chains composed of 32-membered rings. The two BTC{sup 3-} ligands in 1 show the same connectivity mode with two bidentate and one {mu}{sub 2} bridging carboxylic groups. This is a new connectivity mode to the already existing 17 in the Ni-BTC system. The role of MI and [AMI]Cl in the structure formation is discussed. - Graphical Abstract: A novel 3D framework [AMI][Ni{sub 3}(BTC){sub 2}(OAc)(MI){sub 3}] is obtained in ionothermal system with [AMI]{sup +} incorporating in the cavities as structure directing template and BTC{sup 3-} showing a new coordination fashion. The 3D framework is constructed by 2D layers linked with 1D double chains. The title compound has the middle thermal stability at ca. 280 deg. C.

  4. 3D crustal-scale heat-flow regimes at a developing active margin (Taranaki Basin, New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, K. F.; Funnell, R. H.; Nicol, A.; Fohrmann, M.; Bland, K. J.; King, P. R.

    2013-04-01

    The Taranaki Basin in the west of New Zealand's North Island has evolved from a rifted Mesozoic Gondwana margin to a basin straddling the Neogene convergent Australian-Pacific plate margin. However, given its proximity to the modern subduction front, Taranaki Basin is surprisingly cold when compared to other convergent margins. To investigate the effects of active margin evolution on the thermal regime of the Taranaki Basin we developed a 3D crustal-scale forward model using the petroleum industry-standard basin-modelling software Petromod™. The crustal structure inherited from Mesozoic Gondwana margin breakup and processes related to modern Hikurangi convergent margin initiation are identified to be the main controls on the thermal regime of the Taranaki Basin. Present-day surface heat flow across Taranaki on average is 59 mW/m2, but varies by as much as 30 mW/m2 due to the difference in crustal heat generation between mafic and felsic basement terranes alone. In addition, changes in mantle heat advection, tectonic subsidence, crustal thickening and basin inversion, together with related sedimentary processes result in variability of up to 10 mW/m2. Modelling suggests that increased heating of the upper crust due to additional mantle heat advection following the onset of subduction is an ongoing process and heating has only recently begun to reach the surface, explaining the relatively low surface heat flow. We propose that the depth of the subducted slab and related mantle convection processes control the thermal and structural regimes in the Taranaki Basin. The thermal effects of the subduction initiation process are modified and overprinted by the thickness, structure and composition of the lithosphere.

  5. The ATLAS3D Project - XXX. Star formation histories and stellar population scaling relations of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, Richard M.; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Cappellari, Michele; Crocker, Alison F.; Davies, Roger L.; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2015-04-01

    We present the stellar population content of early-type galaxies from the ATLAS3D survey. Using spectra integrated within apertures covering up to one effective radius, we apply two methods: one based on measuring line-strength indices and applying single stellar population (SSP) models to derive SSP-equivalent values of stellar age, metallicity, and alpha enhancement; and one based on spectral fitting to derive non-parametric star formation histories, mass-weighted average values of age, metallicity, and half-mass formation time-scales. Using homogeneously derived effective radii and dynamically determined galaxy masses, we present the distribution of stellar population parameters on the Mass Plane (MJAM, σe, R^maj_e), showing that at fixed mass, compact early-type galaxies are on average older, more metal-rich, and more alpha-enhanced than their larger counterparts. From non-parametric star formation histories, we find that the duration of star formation is systematically more extended in lower mass objects. Assuming that our sample represents most of the stellar content of today's local Universe, approximately 50 per cent of all stars formed within the first 2 Gyr following the big bang. Most of these stars reside today in the most massive galaxies (>1010.5 M⊙), which themselves formed 90 per cent of their stars by z ˜ 2. The lower mass objects, in contrast, have formed barely half their stars in this time interval. Stellar population properties are independent of environment over two orders of magnitude in local density, varying only with galaxy mass. In the highest density regions of our volume (dominated by the Virgo cluster), galaxies are older, alpha-enhanced, and have shorter star formation histories with respect to lower density regions.

  6. Large-scale structure non-Gaussianities with modal methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittfull, Marcel

    2016-10-01

    Relying on a separable modal expansion of the bispectrum, the implementation of a fast estimator for the full bispectrum of a 3d particle distribution is presented. The computational cost of accurate bispectrum estimation is negligible relative to simulation evolution, so the bispectrum can be used as a standard diagnostic whenever the power spectrum is evaluated. As an application, the time evolution of gravitational and primordial dark matter bispectra was measured in a large suite of N-body simulations. The bispectrum shape changes characteristically when the cosmic web becomes dominated by filaments and halos, therefore providing a quantitative probe of 3d structure formation. Our measured bispectra are determined by ~ 50 coefficients, which can be used as fitting formulae in the nonlinear regime and for non-Gaussian initial conditions. We also compare the measured bispectra with predictions from the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS).

  7. BigNeuron: Large-scale 3D Neuron Reconstruction from Optical Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hanchuan; Hawrylycz, Michael; Roskams, Jane; Hill, Sean; Spruston, Nelson; Meijering, Erik; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the structure of single neurons is critical for understanding how they function within neural circuits. BigNeuron is a new community effort that combines modern bioimaging informatics, recent leaps in labeling and microscopy, and the widely recognized need for openness and standardization to provide a community resource for automated reconstruction of dendritic and axonal morphology of single neurons. PMID:26182412

  8. BigNeuron: Large-Scale 3D Neuron Reconstruction from Optical Microscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hanchuan; Hawrylycz, Michael; Roskams, Jane; Hill, Sean; Spruston, Nelson; Meijering, Erik; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2015-07-15

    Understanding the structure of single neurons is critical for understanding how they function within neural circuits. BigNeuron is a new community effort that combines modern bioimaging informatics, recent leaps in labeling and microscopy, and the widely recognized need for openness and standardization to provide a community resource for automated reconstruction of dendritic and axonal morphology of single neurons.

  9. Bayesian 3D X-ray computed tomography image reconstruction with a scaled Gaussian mixture prior model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li; Gac, Nicolas; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2015-01-13

    In order to improve quality of 3D X-ray tomography reconstruction for Non Destructive Testing (NDT), we investigate in this paper hierarchical Bayesian methods. In NDT, useful prior information on the volume like the limited number of materials or the presence of homogeneous area can be included in the iterative reconstruction algorithms. In hierarchical Bayesian methods, not only the volume is estimated thanks to the prior model of the volume but also the hyper parameters of this prior. This additional complexity in the reconstruction methods when applied to large volumes (from 512{sup 3} to 8192{sup 3} voxels) results in an increasing computational cost. To reduce it, the hierarchical Bayesian methods investigated in this paper lead to an algorithm acceleration by Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA) [1] and hardware acceleration thanks to projection and back-projection operators paralleled on many core processors like GPU [2]. In this paper, we will consider a Student-t prior on the gradient of the image implemented in a hierarchical way [3, 4, 1]. Operators H (forward or projection) and H{sup t} (adjoint or back-projection) implanted in multi-GPU [2] have been used in this study. Different methods will be evalued on synthetic volume 'Shepp and Logan' in terms of quality and time of reconstruction. We used several simple regularizations of order 1 and order 2. Other prior models also exists [5]. Sometimes for a discrete image, we can do the segmentation and reconstruction at the same time, then the reconstruction can be done with less projections.

  10. Characterization of a subwavelength-scale 3D void structure using the FDTD-based confocal laser scanning microscopic image mapping technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyongsik; Chon, James W; Gu, Min; Lee, Byoungho

    2007-08-20

    In this paper, a simple confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) image mapping technique based on the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) calculation has been proposed and evaluated for characterization of a subwavelength-scale three-dimensional (3D) void structure fabricated inside polymer matrix. The FDTD simulation method adopts a focused Gaussian beam incident wave, Berenger's perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary condition, and the angular spectrum analysis method. Through the well matched simulation and experimental results of the xz-scanned 3D void structure, we first characterize the exact position and the topological shape factor of the subwavelength-scale void structure, which was fabricated by a tightly focused ultrashort pulse laser. The proposed CLSM image mapping technique based on the FDTD can be widely applied from the 3D near-field microscopic imaging, optical trapping, and evanescent wave phenomenon to the state-of-the-art bio- and nanophotonics.

  11. Real-Time 3D Fluoroscopy-Guided Large Core Needle Biopsy of Renal Masses: A Critical Early Evaluation According to the IDEAL Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeze, Stephanie G. C.; Huisman, Merel; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Diest, Paul J. van; Ruud Bosch, J. L. H.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den

    2012-06-15

    Introduction: Three-dimensional (3D) real-time fluoroscopy cone beam CT is a promising new technique for image-guided biopsy of solid tumors. We evaluated the technical feasibility, diagnostic accuracy, and complications of this technique for guidance of large-core needle biopsy in patients with suspicious renal masses. Methods: Thirteen patients with 13 suspicious renal masses underwent large-core needle biopsy under 3D real-time fluoroscopy cone beam CT guidance. Imaging acquisition and subsequent 3D reconstruction was done by a mobile flat-panel detector (FD) C-arm system to plan the needle path. Large-core needle biopsies were taken by the interventional radiologist. Technical success, accuracy, and safety were evaluated according to the Innovation, Development, Exploration, Assessment, Long-term study (IDEAL) recommendations. Results: Median tumor size was 2.6 (range, 1.0-14.0) cm. In ten (77%) patients, the histological diagnosis corresponded to the imaging findings: five were malignancies, five benign lesions. Technical feasibility was 77% (10/13); in three patients biopsy results were inconclusive. The lesion size of these three patients was <2.5 cm. One patient developed a minor complication. Median follow-up was 16.0 (range, 6.4-19.8) months. Conclusions: 3D real-time fluoroscopy cone beam CT-guided biopsy of renal masses is feasible and safe. However, these first results suggest that diagnostic accuracy may be limited in patients with renal masses <2.5 cm.

  12. Age and gestural differences in the ease of rotating a virtual 3D image on a large, multi-touch screen.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chao-Jen; Chen, Li-Chieh

    2013-04-01

    Providing a natural mapping between multi-touch gestures and manipulations of digital content is important for user-friendly interfaces. Although there are some guidelines for 2D digital content available in the literature, a guideline for manipulation of 3D content has yet to be developed. In this research, two sets of gestures were developed for experiments in the ease of manipulating 3D content on a touchscreen. As there typically are large differences between age groups in the ease of learning new interfaces, we compared a group of adults with a group of children. Each person carried out three tasks linked to rotating the digital model of a green turtle to inspect major characteristics of its body. Task completion time, subjective evaluations, and gesture changing frequency were measured. Results showed that using the conventional gestures for 2D object rotation was not appropriate in the 3D environment. Gestures that required multiple touch points hampered the real-time visibility of rotational effects on a large screen. While the cumulative effects of 3D rotations became complicated after intensive operations, simpler gestures facilitated the mapping between 2D control movements and 3D content displays. For rotation in Cartesian coordinates, moving one fingertip horizontally or vertically on a 2D touchscreen corresponded to the rotation angles of two axes for 3D content, while the relative movement between two fingertips was used to control the rotation angleof the third axis. Based on behavior analysis, adults and children differed in the diversity of gesture types and in the touch points with respect to the object's contours. Offering a robust mechanism for gestural inputs is necessary for universal control of such a system.

  13. Approximate registration of point clouds with large scale differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, D.; Schindler, K.

    2013-10-01

    3D reconstruction of objects is a basic task in many fields, including surveying, engineering, entertainment and cultural heritage. The task is nowadays often accomplished with a laser scanner, which produces dense point clouds, but lacks accurate colour information, and lacks per-point accuracy measures. An obvious solution is to combine laser scanning with photogrammetric recording. In that context, the problem arises to register the two datasets, which feature large scale, translation and rotation differences. The absence of approximate registration parameters (3D translation, 3D rotation and scale) precludes the use of fine-registration methods such as ICP. Here, we present a method to register realistic photogrammetric and laser point clouds in a fully automated fashion. The proposed method decomposes the registration into a sequence of simpler steps: first, two rotation angles are determined by finding dominant surface normal directions, then the remaining parameters are found with RANSAC followed by ICP and scale refinement. These two steps are carried out at low resolution, before computing a precise final registration at higher resolution.

  14. Central South Atlantic kinematics: a 3D ocean basin-scale model of the Walvis Ridge and Rio Grande Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, D. E.; Hall, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    Prior to the breakup of western Gondwana, ca. 130 Ma, the Tristan da Cuhna mantle plume produced the eastern South American Parana, and western African Etendeka, flood basalts. As the South Atlantic basin opened, the ridge-centered plume produced seaward extending hotspot tracks: Rio Grande Rise on the South American Plate, and Walvis Ridge on the African Plate. Several ocean floor edifices on the hotspot trends appear to produce lower than expected amplitude free air gravity anomalies, suggesting that they are composed of lower density material. We have constructed a 3D gravity model of the South Atlantic basin to examine variations in crustal density associated with the hot spot trends. The model, which encompasses a region that extends from 46°S to 10 °S and from 20°E to 60°W, comprises the following layers: water, sediment, crust, and upper mantle. Variable density sediment and upper mantle layers are incorporated to estimate density changes related to sediment thickness and compaction, and upper mantle temperatures, respectively. The initial Moho horizon is estimated from isostatic equilibrium calculations; however the isostatic effect is scaled away from the seafloor spreading center to simulate the active spreading center. Three open-file grids were used to generate the model: satellite-derived free air gravity, global topography, and sediment thickness of the world. Inverting the model for crustal density reveals a distribution of low-density areas: along the coasts, the seafloor spreading axis, and along the Rio Grande Rise and Walvis Ridge hotspot trends. Coastal and spreading axis low density areas are thought to be related to continental crust and high temperature upper mantle. Hotspot track low density areas might be related to variable densities within the volcanic edifices, variations in their crustal thickness, or upper mantle densities beneath them. Detailed 2D models approximate reasonable density and geometry limits along select transects

  15. Mapping the entire universe: a goal for gigapixel arrays, 3D spectro-imagers, and large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, John; Kilston, Steven

    2002-11-01

    Visual-wavelength focal plane mosaics with 10 to 100 gigapixels may become available within the next several decades. Silicon sensor read-outs may also enable the reliable detection of individual visual wavelength photons in the near future. Such solid-state photon-counting mosaics, fed by integral-field spectrographs (IFSs) which simultaneously record the spectrum of every image element, may enable astronomers to chart the 3D structure of the entire visible Universe, and trace its physical and chemical evolution from soon after the birth of the first stars to the present. We explore the requirements of a 'cosmic atlas' sensitive to objects having 0.1 times the luminosity of the Milky Way. The proposed cosmic survey has a spatial resolution of about 0.1", a spectral resolution of R ≍ 102 to 103, and cover the wavelength range from the near-UV to the near-IR.

  16. Identification and characterization of individual fractures in 3D networks of microtomography - a first step towards multi-scale analysis of reservoir fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Liu, K.

    2015-12-01

    Fractures provide significant conduits for fluid flow in tight (low porosity) reservoirs. Hydraulic fracturing is often used to create fractures and thus to increase permeability and enhance hydrocarbon recovery. Although such technique is commonly used in the petroleum and geothermal industry, the relationships between reservoir rock, stress and fracture formation are not well understood partly because the three-dimensional (3D) geometry of subsurface fractures is difficult to image directly at the resolutions required. Microtomography enables the observation of 3D internal structures (both pores and fractures) of rocks at micro-scale. Fractures at micro-scale show similarity with those at macro-scale and can be described by power-laws based on previous two-dimensional (2D) studies of fractures. Aiming to establish the scaling law of fractures in 3D space, we characterize fractures in microtomographic images in this study. In our workflow the first crucial step is to identify individual fractures in the 3D network. Starting from 2D, percolation theory is used to detect the connectivity of fractures, and a modified moving window method is used to detect the strike of a fracture - by changing the placement of the moving window following the intersection of the fracture and the boundary until the end point of the fracture is found. The 3D topology of a fracture is determined by the analysis of the connectivity of fractures in 2D slices. Once individual fractures are identified and registered, the characterization of fractures can then be achievable. Direct characterization parameters include the position of each fracture, the size (in voxels), orientation, and dimensions in three principal orientations. Derivative parameters include the density of fractures, the density of intersections, and the statistics of the direct parameters. This technical progress promises further development of the multi-scale analysis of reservoir fractures.

  17. Handy Compton camera using 3D position-sensitive scintillators coupled with large-area monolithic MPPC arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujita, T.; Takeuchi, K.; Kato, T.; Nakamori, T.; Ohsuka, S.; Nakamura, S.; Hirayanagi, M.; Adachi, S.; Uchiyama, T.; Yamamoto, K.

    2013-12-01

    The release of radioactive isotopes (mainly 137Cs, 134Cs and 131I) from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant remains a serious problem in Japan. To help identify radiation hotspots and ensure effective decontamination operation, we are developing a novel Compton camera weighting only 1 kg and measuring just ∼10 cm2 in size. Despite its compactness, the camera realizes a wide 180° field of vision with a sensitivity about 50 times superior to other cameras being tested in Fukushima. We expect that a hotspot producing a 5 μSv/h dose at a distance of 3 m can be imaged every 10 s, with angular resolution better than 10° (FWHM). The 3D position-sensitive scintillators and thin monolithic MPPC arrays are the key technologies developed here. By measuring the pulse-height ratio of MPPC-arrays coupled at both ends of a Ce:GAGG scintillator block, the depth of interaction (DOI) is obtained for incident gamma rays as well as the usual 2D positions, with accuracy better than 2 mm. By using two identical 10 mm cubic Ce:GAGG scintillators as a scatterer and an absorber, we confirmed that the 3D configuration works well as a high-resolution gamma camera, and also works as spectrometer achieving typical energy resolution of 9.8% (FWHM) for 662 keV gamma rays. We present the current status of the prototype camera (weighting 1.5 kg and measuring 8.5×14×16 cm3 in size) being fabricated by Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. Although the camera still operates in non-DOI mode, angular resolution as high as 14° (FWHM) was achieved with an integration time of 30 s for the assumed hotspot described above.

  18. Geostatistical modelling with 3D+T data: soil moisture, temperature, and electrical conductivity at the field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasch, Caley K.; Hengl, Tomislav; Gräler, Benedikt; Meyer, Hanna; Magney, Troy; Brown, David J.

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic soil data collected using automated sensor networks can facilitate our understanding of soil processes, but highly dimensional data may be difficult to analyze in a manner that incorporates correlation in properties through 3-dimensions and time (3D+T). We demonstrate two approaches to making continuous predictions of dynamic soil properties from fixed point observations. For this analysis, we used the Cook Farm data set, which includes hourly measurements of soil volumetric water content, temperature, and electrical conductivity at 42 points and five depths, collected over five years. We compare performance of two modeling frameworks. In the first framework we used random forest algorithms to fit a 3D+T regression model to make predictions of all three soil variables from 2- and 3-dimensional, temporal, and spatio-temporal covariates. In the second framework we developed a 3D+T kriging model after detrending the observations for depth-dependent seasonal effects. The results show that both models accurately predicted soil temperature, but the kriging model outperformed the regression model according to cross-validation; it explained 37%, 96%, and 16% of the variability in water content, temperature, and electrical conductivity respectively versus 34%, 93%, and 4% explained by the random forest model. The full random forest regression model had high goodness-of-fit for all variables, which was reduced in cross-validation. Temporal model components (i.e. day of the year) explained most of the variability in observations. The seamless predictions of 3D+T data produced from this analysis can assist in understanding soil processes and how they change through a season, under different land management scenarios, and how they relate to other environmental processes.

  19. Engineering Multi-scale Electrospun Structure for Integration into Architected 3-D Nanofibers for Cimex Annihilation: Fabrication and Mechanism Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shan; Zhang, Linxi; Liu, Ying; Rafailovich, Miriam; Garcia CenterPolymers at Engineered Interfaces Team

    In this study, engineered electrospun scaffolds with fibers oriented with designed curvature in three dimensions (3D) including the looped structure were developed based on the principle of electrostatic repulsion. Here we illustrate that 3D electrospun recycled polystyrene fibers could closely mimic the unique architectures of multi-direction and multi-layer nano-spiderweb. In contrast to virgin PS, the recycled PS (Dart Styrofoam) are known to contain zinc stearate which acts as a surfactant resulting in higher electrical charge and larger fiber curvature, hence, lower modulus. The surfactant, which is known to decrease the surface tension, may have also been effective at decreasing the confinement of the PS, where chain stretching was shown to occur, in response to the high surface tension at the air interface. Three dimensional flexible architecture with complex structures are shown to be necessary in order to block the motion of Cimex lectularius. Here we show how an engineered electrospun network of surfactant modified polymer fibers with calculated dimensions can be used to immobilize the insects. The mechanical response of the fibers has to be specifically tailored so that it is elastically deformed, without fracturing or flowing. Carefully controlling and tailoring the electrospinning parameters we can now utilize architected 3D nanofiber to create an environmental-friendly Cimex immobilization device which can lead to annihilation solution for all the other harmful insects.

  20. SHAPES - Spatial, High-Accuracy, Position-Encoding Sensor for multi-point, 3-D position measurement of large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerheim, N. M

    1987-01-01

    An electro-optical position sensor for precise simultaneous measurement of the 3-D positions of multiple points on large space structures is described. The sensor data rate is sufficient for most control purposes. Range is determined by time-of-flight correlation of short laser pulses returned from retroreflector targets using a streak tube/CCD detector. Angular position is determined from target image locations on a second CCD. Experimental verification of dynamic ranging to multiple targets is discussed.

  1. Rational Design of Prevascularized Large 3D Tissue Constructs Using Computational Simulations and Biofabrication of Geometrically Controlled Microvessels.

    PubMed

    Arrigoni, Chiara; Bongio, Matilde; Talò, Giuseppe; Bersini, Simone; Enomoto, Junko; Fukuda, Junji; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-07-01

    A major challenge in the development of clinically relevant 3D tissue constructs is the formation of vascular networks for oxygenation, nutrient supply, and waste removal. To this end, this study implements a multimodal approach for the promotion of vessel-like structures formation in stiff fibrin hydrogels. Computational simulations have been performed to identify the easiest microchanneled configuration assuring normoxic conditions throughout thick cylindrical hydrogels (8 mm height, 6 mm ∅), showing that in our configuration a minimum of three microchannels (600 μm ∅), placed in a non-planar disposition, is required. Using small hydrogel bricks with oxygen distribution equal to the microchanneled configuration, this study demonstrates that among different culture conditions, co-culture of mesenchymal and endothelial cells supplemented with ANG-1 and VEGF leads to the most developed vascular network. Microchanneled hydrogels have been then cultured in the same conditions both statically and in a bioreactor for 7 d. Unexpectedly, the combination between shear forces and normoxic conditions is unable to promote microvascular networks formation in three-channeled hydrogels. Differently, application of either shear forces or normoxic conditions alone results in microvessels outgrowth. These results suggest that to induce angiogenesis in engineered constructs, complex interactions between several biochemical and biophysical parameters have to be modulated.

  2. 3D PDF - a means of public access to geological 3D - objects, using the example of GTA3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaby, Mark-Fabian; Reimann, Rüdiger

    2013-04-01

    In geology, 3D modeling has become very important. In the past, two-dimensional data such as isolines, drilling profiles, or cross-sections based on those, were used to illustrate the subsurface geology, whereas now, we can create complex digital 3D models. These models are produced with special software, such as GOCAD ®. The models can be viewed, only through the software used to create them, or through viewers available for free. The platform-independent PDF (Portable Document Format), enforced by Adobe, has found a wide distribution. This format has constantly evolved over time. Meanwhile, it is possible to display CAD data in an Adobe 3D PDF file with the free Adobe Reader (version 7). In a 3D PDF, a 3D model is freely rotatable and can be assembled from a plurality of objects, which can thus be viewed from all directions on their own. In addition, it is possible to create moveable cross-sections (profiles), and to assign transparency to the objects. Based on industry-standard CAD software, 3D PDFs can be generated from a large number of formats, or even be exported directly from this software. In geoinformatics, different approaches to creating 3D PDFs exist. The intent of the Authority for Mining, Energy and Geology to allow free access to the models of the Geotectonic Atlas (GTA3D), could not be realized with standard software solutions. A specially designed code converts the 3D objects to VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language). VRML is one of the few formats that allow using image files (maps) as textures, and to represent colors and shapes correctly. The files were merged in Acrobat X Pro, and a 3D PDF was generated subsequently. A topographic map, a display of geographic directions and horizontal and vertical scales help to facilitate the use.

  3. Automating large-scale reactor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kisner, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper conveys a philosophy for developing automated large-scale control systems that behave in an integrated, intelligent, flexible manner. Methods for operating large-scale systems under varying degrees of equipment degradation are discussed, and a design approach that separates the effort into phases is suggested. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Chemical Characteristics at Micrometric Scale by Combining 2D SEM-EDX Data and 3D X-Ray CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Hapca, Simona; Baveye, Philippe C.; Wilson, Clare; Lark, Richard Murray; Otten, Wilfred

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a significant need to improve our understanding of the factors that control a number of critical soil processes by integrating physical, chemical and biological measurements on soils at microscopic scales to help produce 3D maps of the related properties. Because of technological limitations, most chemical and biological measurements can be carried out only on exposed soil surfaces or 2-dimensional cuts through soil samples. Methods need to be developed to produce 3D maps of soil properties based on spatial sequences of 2D maps. In this general context, the objective of the research described here was to develop a method to generate 3D maps of soil chemical properties at the microscale by combining 2D SEM-EDX data with 3D X-ray computed tomography images. A statistical approach using the regression tree method and ordinary kriging applied to the residuals was developed and applied to predict the 3D spatial distribution of carbon, silicon, iron, and oxygen at the microscale. The spatial correlation between the X-ray grayscale intensities and the chemical maps made it possible to use a regression-tree model as an initial step to predict the 3D chemical composition. For chemical elements, e.g., iron, that are sparsely distributed in a soil sample, the regression-tree model provides a good prediction, explaining as much as 90% of the variability in some of the data. However, for chemical elements that are more homogenously distributed, such as carbon, silicon, or oxygen, the additional kriging of the regression tree residuals improved significantly the prediction with an increase in the R2 value from 0.221 to 0.324 for carbon, 0.312 to 0.423 for silicon, and 0.218 to 0.374 for oxygen, respectively. The present research develops for the first time an integrated experimental and theoretical framework, which combines geostatistical methods with imaging techniques to unveil the 3-D chemical structure of soil at very fine scales. The methodology presented

  5. MTF characterization in 2D and 3D for a high resolution, large field of view flat panel imager for cone beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Jainil; Mann, Steve D.; Tornai, Martin P.; Richmond, Michelle; Zentai, George

    2014-03-01

    The 2D and 3D modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of a custom made, large 40x30cm2 area, 600- micron CsI-TFT based flat panel imager having 127-micron pixellation, along with the micro-fiber scintillator structure, were characterized in detail using various techniques. The larger area detector yields a reconstructed FOV of 25cm diameter with an 80cm SID in CT mode. The MTFs were determined with 1x1 (intrinsic) binning. The 2D MTFs were determined using a 50.8 micron tungsten wire and a solid lead edge, and the 3D MTF was measured using a custom made phantom consisting of three nearly orthogonal 50.8 micron tungsten wires suspended in an acrylic cubic frame. The 2D projection data was reconstructed using an iterative OSC algorithm using 16 subsets and 5 iterations. As additional verification of the resolution, along with scatter, the Catphan® phantom was also imaged and reconstructed with identical parameters. The measured 2D MTF was ~4% using the wire technique and ~1% using the edge technique at the 3.94 lp/mm Nyquist cut-off frequency. The average 3D MTF measured along the wires was ~8% at the Nyquist. At 50% MTF, the resolutions were 1.2 and 2.1 lp/mm in 2D and 3D, respectively. In the Catphan® phantom, the 1.7 lp/mm bars were easily observed. Lastly, the 3D MTF measured on the three wires has an observed 5.9% RMSD, indicating that the resolution of the imaging system is uniform and spatially independent. This high performance detector is integrated into a dedicated breast SPECT-CT imaging system.

  6. Is the universe homogeneous on large scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xingfen; Chu, Yaoquan

    Wether the distribution of matter in the universe is homogeneous or fractal on large scale is vastly debated in observational cosmology recently. Pietronero and his co-workers have strongly advocated that the fractal behaviour in the galaxy distribution extends to the largest scale observed (≍1000h-1Mpc) with the fractal dimension D ≍ 2. Most cosmologists who hold the standard model, however, insist that the universe be homogeneous on large scale. The answer of whether the universe is homogeneous or not on large scale should wait for the new results of next generation galaxy redshift surveys.

  7. A dosimetric comparison of 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy with an SIB for large and small breast volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, Andrea; Atyeo, John; Cox, Jennifer; Rinks, Marianne; Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian

    2014-07-01

    Radiation therapy to the breast is a complex task, with many different techniques that can be employed to ensure adequate dose target coverage while minimizing doses to the organs at risk. This study compares the dose planning outcomes of 3 radiation treatment modalities, 3 dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and static tomotherapy, for left-sided whole-breast radiation treatment with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Overall, 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer were separated into 2 cohorts, small and large, based on breast volume. Dose plans were produced for each patient using 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy. All patients were prescribed a dose of 45 Gy in 20 fractions to the breast with an SIB of 56 Gy in 20 fractions to the tumor bed and normalized so that D{sub 98%} > 95% of the prescription dose. Dosimetric comparisons were made between the 3 modalities and the interaction of patient size. All 3 modalities offered adequate planning target volume (PTV) coverage with D{sub 98%} > 95% and D{sub 2%} < 107%. Static tomotherapy offered significantly improved (p = 0.006) dose homogeneity to the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.079 ± 0.011) and breast minus the SIB volume (Breast{sub SIB}) (p < 0.001, 0.15 ± 0.03) compared with the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.085 ± 0.008, 0.088 ± 0.12) and Breast{sub SIB} (0.22 ± 0.05, 0.23 ± 0.03) for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively. Static tomotherapy also offered statistically significant reductions (p < 0.001) in doses to the ipsilateral lung mean dose of 6.79 ± 2.11 Gy compared with 7.75 ± 2.54 Gy and 8.29 ± 2.76 Gy for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively, and significantly (p < 0.001) reduced heart doses (mean = 2.83 ± 1.26 Gy) compared to both IMRT and 3D-CRT (mean = 3.70 ± 1.44 Gy and 3.91 ± 1.58 Gy). Static tomotherapy is the dosimetrically superior modality for the whole breast with an SIB compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT. IMRT is superior to 3D

  8. Large-scale assembly of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongta

    This study reports a simple, roll-to-roll compatible coating technology for producing three-dimensional highly ordered colloidal crystal-polymer composites, colloidal crystals, and macroporous polymer membranes. A vertically beveled doctor blade is utilized to shear align silica microsphere-monomer suspensions to form large-area composites in a single step. The polymer matrix and the silica microspheres can be selectively removed to create colloidal crystals and self-standing macroporous polymer membranes. The thickness of the shear-aligned crystal is correlated with the viscosity of the colloidal suspension and the coating speed, and the correlations can be qualitatively explained by adapting the mechanisms developed for conventional doctor blade coating. Five important research topics related to the application of large-scale three-dimensional highly ordered macroporous films by doctor blade coating are covered in this study. The first topic describes the invention in large area and low cost color reflective displays. This invention is inspired by the heat pipe technology. The self-standing macroporous polymer films exhibit brilliant colors which originate from the Bragg diffractive of visible light form the three-dimensional highly ordered air cavities. The colors can be easily changed by tuning the size of the air cavities to cover the whole visible spectrum. When the air cavities are filled with a solvent which has the same refractive index as that of the polymer, the macroporous polymer films become completely transparent due to the index matching. When the solvent trapped in the cavities is evaporated by in-situ heating, the sample color changes back to brilliant color. This process is highly reversible and reproducible for thousands of cycles. The second topic reports the achievement of rapid and reversible vapor detection by using 3-D macroporous photonic crystals. Capillary condensation of a condensable vapor in the interconnected macropores leads to the

  9. Innovations in 3D printing: a 3D overview from optics to organs.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Carl; van Langeveld, Mark C; Donoso, Larry A

    2014-02-01

    3D printing is a method of manufacturing in which materials, such as plastic or metal, are deposited onto one another in layers to produce a three dimensional object, such as a pair of eye glasses or other 3D objects. This process contrasts with traditional ink-based printers which produce a two dimensional object (ink on paper). To date, 3D printing has primarily been used in engineering to create engineering prototypes. However, recent advances in printing materials have now enabled 3D printers to make objects that are comparable with traditionally manufactured items. In contrast with conventional printers, 3D printing has the potential to enable mass customisation of goods on a large scale and has relevance in medicine including ophthalmology. 3D printing has already been proved viable in several medical applications including the manufacture of eyeglasses, custom prosthetic devices and dental implants. In this review, we discuss the potential for 3D printing to revolutionise manufacturing in the same way as the printing press revolutionised conventional printing. The applications and limitations of 3D printing are discussed; the production process is demonstrated by producing a set of eyeglass frames from 3D blueprints. PMID:24288392

  10. Innovations in 3D printing: a 3D overview from optics to organs.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Carl; van Langeveld, Mark C; Donoso, Larry A

    2014-02-01

    3D printing is a method of manufacturing in which materials, such as plastic or metal, are deposited onto one another in layers to produce a three dimensional object, such as a pair of eye glasses or other 3D objects. This process contrasts with traditional ink-based printers which produce a two dimensional object (ink on paper). To date, 3D printing has primarily been used in engineering to create engineering prototypes. However, recent advances in printing materials have now enabled 3D printers to make objects that are comparable with traditionally manufactured items. In contrast with conventional printers, 3D printing has the potential to enable mass customisation of goods on a large scale and has relevance in medicine including ophthalmology. 3D printing has already been proved viable in several medical applications including the manufacture of eyeglasses, custom prosthetic devices and dental implants. In this review, we discuss the potential for 3D printing to revolutionise manufacturing in the same way as the printing press revolutionised conventional printing. The applications and limitations of 3D printing are discussed; the production process is demonstrated by producing a set of eyeglass frames from 3D blueprints.

  11. Large Area 2D and 3D Colloidal Photonic Crystals Fabricated by a Roll-to-Roll Langmuir-Blodgett Method.

    PubMed

    Parchine, Mikhail; McGrath, Joe; Bardosova, Maria; Pemble, Martyn E

    2016-06-14

    We present our results on the fabrication of large area colloidal photonic crystals on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film using a roll-to-roll Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) colloidal photonic crystals from silica nanospheres (250 and 550 nm diameter) with a total area of up to 340 cm(2) have been fabricated in a continuous manner compatible with high volume manufacturing. In addition, the antireflective properties and structural integrity of the films have been enhanced via the use of a second roll-to-roll process, employing a slot-die coating of an optical adhesive over the photonic crystal films. Scanning electron microscopy images, atomic force microscopy images, and UV-vis optical transmission and reflection spectra of the fabricated photonic crystals are analyzed. This analysis confirms the high quality of the 2D and 3D photonic crystals fabricated by the roll-to-roll LB technique. Potential device applications of the large area 2D and 3D colloidal photonic crystals on flexible PET film are briefly reviewed. PMID:27218474

  12. Large Area 2D and 3D Colloidal Photonic Crystals Fabricated by a Roll-to-Roll Langmuir-Blodgett Method.

    PubMed

    Parchine, Mikhail; McGrath, Joe; Bardosova, Maria; Pemble, Martyn E

    2016-06-14

    We present our results on the fabrication of large area colloidal photonic crystals on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film using a roll-to-roll Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) colloidal photonic crystals from silica nanospheres (250 and 550 nm diameter) with a total area of up to 340 cm(2) have been fabricated in a continuous manner compatible with high volume manufacturing. In addition, the antireflective properties and structural integrity of the films have been enhanced via the use of a second roll-to-roll process, employing a slot-die coating of an optical adhesive over the photonic crystal films. Scanning electron microscopy images, atomic force microscopy images, and UV-vis optical transmission and reflection spectra of the fabricated photonic crystals are analyzed. This analysis confirms the high quality of the 2D and 3D photonic crystals fabricated by the roll-to-roll LB technique. Potential device applications of the large area 2D and 3D colloidal photonic crystals on flexible PET film are briefly reviewed.

  13. Parallel tree code for large N-body simulation: Dynamic load balance and data distribution on a CRAY T3D system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becciani, U.; Ansaloni, R.; Antonuccio-Delogu, V.; Erbacci, G.; Gambera, M.; Pagliaro, A.

    1997-10-01

    N-body algorithms for long-range unscreened interactions like gravity belong to a class of highly irregular problems whose optimal solution is a challenging task for present-day massively parallel computers. In this paper we describe a strategy for optimal memory and work distribution which we have applied to our parallel implementation of the Barnes & Hut (1986) recursive tree scheme on a Cray T3D using the CRAFT programming environment. We have performed a series of tests to find an optimal data distribution in the T3D memory, and to identify a strategy for the Dynamic Load Balance in order to obtain good performances when running large simulations (more than 10 million particles). The results of tests show that the step duration depends on two main factors: the data locality and the T3D network contention. Increasing data locality we are able to minimize the step duration if the closest bodies (direct interaction) tend to be located in the same PE local memory (contiguous block subdivision, high granularity), whereas the tree properties have a fine grain distribution. In a very large simulation, due to network contention, an unbalanced load arises. To remedy this we have devised an automatic work redistribution mechanism which provided a good Dynamic Load Balance at the price of an insignificant overhead.

  14. The psychology of the 3D experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicke, Sophie H.; Ellis, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    With 3D televisions expected to reach 50% home saturation as early as 2016, understanding the psychological mechanisms underlying the user response to 3D technology is critical for content providers, educators and academics. Unfortunately, research examining the effects of 3D technology has not kept pace with the technology's rapid adoption, resulting in large-scale use of a technology about which very little is actually known. Recognizing this need for new research, we conducted a series of studies measuring and comparing many of the variables and processes underlying both 2D and 3D media experiences. In our first study, we found narratives within primetime dramas had the power to shift viewer attitudes in both 2D and 3D settings. However, we found no difference in persuasive power between 2D and 3D content. We contend this lack of effect was the result of poor conversion quality and the unique demands of 3D production. In our second study, we found 3D technology significantly increased enjoyment when viewing sports content, yet offered no added enjoyment when viewing a movie trailer. The enhanced enjoyment of the sports content was shown to be the result of heightened emotional arousal and attention in the 3D condition. We believe the lack of effect found for the movie trailer may be genre-related. In our final study, we found 3D technology significantly enhanced enjoyment of two video games from different genres. The added enjoyment was found to be the result of an increased sense of presence.

  15. Towards Perceptual Interface for Visualization Navigation of Large Data Sets Using Gesture Recognition with Bezier Curves and Registered 3-D Data

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, M C; Tsap, L V; Goldgof, D B

    2003-03-20

    This paper presents a gesture recognition system for visualization navigation. Scientists are interested in developing interactive settings for exploring large data sets in an intuitive environment. The input consists of registered 3-D data. A geometric method using Bezier curves is used for the trajectory analysis and classification of gestures. The hand gesture speed is incorporated into the algorithm to enable correct recognition from trajectories with variations in hand speed. The method is robust and reliable: correct hand identification rate is 99.9% (from 1641 frames), modes of hand movements are correct 95.6% of the time, recognition rate (given the right mode) is 97.9%. An application to gesture-controlled visualization of 3D bioinformatics data is also presented.

  16. Scalable WIM: effective exploration in large-scale astrophysical environments.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinggang; Fu, Chi-Wing; Hanson, Andrew J

    2006-01-01

    Navigating through large-scale virtual environments such as simulations of the astrophysical Universe is difficult. The huge spatial range of astronomical models and the dominance of empty space make it hard for users to travel across cosmological scales effectively, and the problem of wayfinding further impedes the user's ability to acquire reliable spatial knowledge of astronomical contexts. We introduce a new technique called the scalable world-in-miniature (WIM) map as a unifying interface to facilitate travel and wayfinding in a virtual environment spanning gigantic spatial scales: Power-law spatial scaling enables rapid and accurate transitions among widely separated regions; logarithmically mapped miniature spaces offer a global overview mode when the full context is too large; 3D landmarks represented in the WIM are enhanced by scale, positional, and directional cues to augment spatial context awareness; a series of navigation models are incorporated into the scalable WIM to improve the performance of travel tasks posed by the unique characteristics of virtual cosmic exploration. The scalable WIM user interface supports an improved physical navigation experience and assists pragmatic cognitive understanding of a visualization context that incorporates the features of large-scale astronomy.

  17. Travel time calculation in regular 3D grid in local and regional scale using fast marching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    Local and regional 3D seismic velocity models of crust and sediments are very important for numerous technics like mantle and core tomography, localization of local and regional events and others. Most of those techniques require calculation of wave travel time through the 3D model. This can be achieved using multiple approaches from simple ray tracing to advanced full waveform calculation. In this study simple and efficient implementation of fast marching method is presented. This method provides more information than ray tracing and is much less complicated than methods like full waveform being the perfect compromise. Presented code is written in C++, well commented and is easy to modify for different types of studies. Additionally performance is widely discussed including possibilities of multithreading and massive parallelism like GPU. Source code will be published in 2016 as it is part of the PhD thesis. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work via NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  18. 3D Online Submicron Scale Observation of Mixed Metal Powder's Microstructure Evolution in High Temperature and Microwave Compound Fields

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Hu, Xiao-fang; Xiao, Yu; Xiao, Ti-qiao

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the influence on the mechanical properties caused by microstructure evolution of metal powder in extreme environment, 3D real-time observation of the microstructure evolution of Al-Ti mixed powder in high temperature and microwave compound fields was realized by using synchrotron radiation computerized topography (SR-CT) technique; the spatial resolution was enhanced to 0.37 μm/pixel through the designed equipment and the introduction of excellent reconstruction method for the first time. The process of microstructure evolution during sintering was clearly distinguished from 2D and 3D reconstructed images. Typical sintering parameters such as sintering neck size, porosity, and particle size of the sample were presented for quantitative analysis of the influence on the mechanical properties and the sintering kinetics during microwave sintering. The neck size-time curve was obtained and the neck growth exponent was 7.3, which indicated that surface diffusion was the main diffusion mechanism; the reason was the eddy current loss induced by the external microwave fields providing an additional driving force for mass diffusion on the particle surface. From the reconstructed images and the curve of porosity and average particle size versus temperature, it was believed that the presence of liquid phase aluminum accelerated the densification and particle growth. PMID:24737986

  19. Multi-scale Characterization of the Energy Landscape of Proteins with Application to the C3d/Efb-C Complex

    PubMed Central

    Haspel, Nurit; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Lambris, John; Kavraki, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel multi-level methodology to explore and characterize the low energy landscape and the thermodynamics of proteins. Traditional conformational search methods typically explore only a small portion of the conformational space of proteins and are hard to apply to large proteins due to the large amount of calculations required. In our multi-scale approach, we first provide an initial characterization of the equilibrium state ensemble of a protein using an efficient computational conformational sampling method. We then enrich the obtained ensemble by performing short Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations on selected conformations from the ensembles as starting points. To facilitate the analysis of the results we project the resulting conformations on a low-dimensional landscape to efficiently focus on important interactions and examine low energy regions. This methodology provides a more extensive sampling of the low energy landscape than an MD simulation starting from a single crystal structure as it explores multiple trajectories of the protein. This enables us to obtain a broader view of the dynamics of proteins and it can help in understanding complex binding, improving docking results and more. In this work we apply the methodology to provide an extensive characterization of the bound complexes of the C3d fragment of human Complement component C3 and one of its powerful bacterial inhibitors, the inhibitory domain of Staphylococcus aureus extra-cellular fibrinogen-binding domain (Efb-C) and two of its mutants. We characterize several important interactions along the binding interface and define low free energy regions in the three complexes. PMID:19899169

  20. Correlation between Optic Nerve Parameters Obtained Using 3D Nonmydriatic Retinal Camera and Optical Coherence Tomography: Interobserver Agreement on the Disc Damage Likelihood Scale.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae Wook; Cho, Soon Young; Kang, Kui Dong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To compare stereometric parameters obtained by three-dimensional (3D) optic disc photography and optical coherence tomography (OCT) and assess interobserver agreement on the disc damage likelihood scale (DDLS). Methods. This retrospective study included 190 eyes from 190 patients classified as normal, glaucoma suspect, or glaucomatous. Residents at different levels of training completed the DDLS for each patient before and after attending a training module. 3D optic disc photography and OCT were performed on each eye, and correlations between the DDLS and various parameters obtained by each device were calculated. Results. We found moderate agreement (weighted kappa value, 0.59 ± 0.03) between DDLS scores obtained by 3D optic disc photography and the glaucoma specialist. The weighted kappa values for agreement and interobserver concordance increased among residents after the training module. Interobserver concordance was the poorest at DDLS stages 5 and 6. The DDLS scored by the glaucoma specialist had the highest predictability value (0.941). Conclusions. The DDLS obtained by 3D optic disc photography is a useful diagnostic tool for glaucoma. A supervised teaching program increased trainee interobserver agreement on the DDLS. DDLS stages 5 and 6 showed the poorest interobserver agreement, suggesting that caution is required when recording these stages.

  1. Correlation between Optic Nerve Parameters Obtained Using 3D Nonmydriatic Retinal Camera and Optical Coherence Tomography: Interobserver Agreement on the Disc Damage Likelihood Scale.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae Wook; Cho, Soon Young; Kang, Kui Dong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To compare stereometric parameters obtained by three-dimensional (3D) optic disc photography and optical coherence tomography (OCT) and assess interobserver agreement on the disc damage likelihood scale (DDLS). Methods. This retrospective study included 190 eyes from 190 patients classified as normal, glaucoma suspect, or glaucomatous. Residents at different levels of training completed the DDLS for each patient before and after attending a training module. 3D optic disc photography and OCT were performed on each eye, and correlations between the DDLS and various parameters obtained by each device were calculated. Results. We found moderate agreement (weighted kappa value, 0.59 ± 0.03) between DDLS scores obtained by 3D optic disc photography and the glaucoma specialist. The weighted kappa values for agreement and interobserver concordance increased among residents after the training module. Interobserver concordance was the poorest at DDLS stages 5 and 6. The DDLS scored by the glaucoma specialist had the highest predictability value (0.941). Conclusions. The DDLS obtained by 3D optic disc photography is a useful diagnostic tool for glaucoma. A supervised teaching program increased trainee interobserver agreement on the DDLS. DDLS stages 5 and 6 showed the poorest interobserver agreement, suggesting that caution is required when recording these stages. PMID:24804081

  2. Moduli thermalization and finite temperature effects in "big" divisor large volume D3/ D7 Swiss-cheese compactification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Pramod

    2011-01-01

    In the context of Type IIB compactified on a large volume Swiss-Cheese orientifold in the presence of a mobile space-time filling D3-brane and stacks of fluxed D7-branes wrapping the "big" divisor Σ B of a Swiss-Cheese Calabi Yau in WCP 4[1, 1, 1, 6, 9], we explore various implications of moduli dynamics and discuss their couplings and decay into MSSM (-like) matter fields early in the history of universe to reach thermal equilibrium. Like finite temperature effects in O'KKLT, we observe that the local minimum of zero-temperature effective scalar potential is stable against any finite temperature corrections (up to two-loops) in large volume scenarios as well. Also we find that moduli are heavy enough to avoid any cosmological moduli problem.

  3. Survey on large scale system control methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercadal, Mathieu

    1987-01-01

    The problem inherent to large scale systems such as power network, communication network and economic or ecological systems were studied. The increase in size and flexibility of future spacecraft has put those dynamical systems into the category of large scale systems, and tools specific to the class of large systems are being sought to design control systems that can guarantee more stability and better performance. Among several survey papers, reference was found to a thorough investigation on decentralized control methods. Especially helpful was the classification made of the different existing approaches to deal with large scale systems. A very similar classification is used, even though the papers surveyed are somehow different from the ones reviewed in other papers. Special attention is brought to the applicability of the existing methods to controlling large mechanical systems like large space structures. Some recent developments are added to this survey.

  4. Large-scale instabilities of helical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Alexandre; Alexakis, Alexandros; Brachet, Marc-Étienne

    2016-10-01

    Large-scale hydrodynamic instabilities of periodic helical flows of a given wave number K are investigated using three-dimensional Floquet numerical computations. In the Floquet formalism the unstable field is expanded in modes of different spacial periodicity. This allows us (i) to clearly distinguish large from small scale instabilities and (ii) to study modes of wave number q of arbitrarily large-scale separation q ≪K . Different flows are examined including flows that exhibit small-scale turbulence. The growth rate σ of the most unstable mode is measured as a function of the scale separation q /K ≪1 and the Reynolds number Re. It is shown that the growth rate follows the scaling σ ∝q if an AKA effect [Frisch et al., Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena 28, 382 (1987), 10.1016/0167-2789(87)90026-1] is present or a negative eddy viscosity scaling σ ∝q2 in its absence. This holds both for the Re≪1 regime where previously derived asymptotic results are verified but also for Re=O (1 ) that is beyond their range of validity. Furthermore, for values of Re above a critical value ReSc beyond which small-scale instabilities are present, the growth rate becomes independent of q and the energy of the perturbation at large scales decreases with scale separation. The nonlinear behavior of these large-scale instabilities is also examined in the nonlinear regime where the largest scales of the system are found to be the most dominant energetically. These results are interpreted by low-order models.

  5. 3D MnO2-graphene composites with large areal capacitance for high-performance asymmetric supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Teng; Wang, Fuxin; Yu, Minghao; Xie, Shilei; Liang, Chaolun; Li, Cheng; Xiao, Fangming; Tang, Renheng; Wu, Qixiu; Lu, Xihong; Tong, Yexiang

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we reported an effective and simple strategy to prepare large areal mass loading of MnO2 on porous graphene gel/Ni foam (denoted as MnO2/G-gel/NF) for supercapacitors (SCs). The MnO2/G-gel/NF (MnO2 mass: 13.6 mg cm-2) delivered a large areal capacitance of 3.18 F cm-2 (234.2 F g-1) and good rate capability. The prominent electrochemical properties of MnO2/G-gel/NF are attributed to the enhanced conductivities and improved accessible area for ions in electrolytes. Moreover, an asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) based on MnO2/G-gel/NF (MnO2 mass: 6.1 mg cm-2) as the positive electrode and G-gel/NF as the negative electrode achieved a remarkable energy density of 0.72 mW h cm-3. Additionally, the fabricated ASC device also exhibited excellent cycling stability, with less than 1.5% decay after 10 000 cycles. The ability to effectively develop SC electrodes with high mass loading should open up new opportunities for SCs with high areal capacitance and high energy density.In this paper, we reported an effective and simple strategy to prepare large areal mass loading of MnO2 on porous graphene gel/Ni foam (denoted as MnO2/G-gel/NF) for supercapacitors (SCs). The MnO2/G-gel/NF (MnO2 mass: 13.6 mg cm-2) delivered a large areal capacitance of 3.18 F cm-2 (234.2 F g-1) and good rate capability. The prominent electrochemical properties of MnO2/G-gel/NF are attributed to the enhanced conductivities and improved accessible area for ions in electrolytes. Moreover, an asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) based on MnO2/G-gel/NF (MnO2 mass: 6.1 mg cm-2) as the positive electrode and G-gel/NF as the negative electrode achieved a remarkable energy density of 0.72 mW h cm-3. Additionally, the fabricated ASC device also exhibited excellent cycling stability, with less than 1.5% decay after 10 000 cycles. The ability to effectively develop SC electrodes with high mass loading should open up new opportunities for SCs with high areal capacitance and high energy density. Electronic

  6. 3d xy scaling of the resistivity and the effect of disorder in YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooldridge, Ian; Howson, Mark A.; Gauzzi, Andrea; Pavuna, Davor; Walker, Daron J. C.

    1994-12-01

    We present measurements for the resistivity of ‘c’ axis oriented YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ (YBCO) films grown on (100) SrTiO 3 substrates by both Laser Ablation and ion beam sputtering. The effect of the magnetic field on the resistivity is investigated with the field parallel to the ‘c’ axis. The zero field transition widths vary from 1K to 4K in different films. However the data exhibits 3d XY critical scaling having introduced an ‘effective’ magnetic field, characteristic of the length scale of the disorder in the film.

  7. Evaluating Unmanned Aerial Platforms for Cultural Heritage Large Scale Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgopoulos, A.; Oikonomou, C.; Adamopoulos, E.; Stathopoulou, E. K.

    2016-06-01

    When it comes to large scale mapping of limited areas especially for cultural heritage sites, things become critical. Optical and non-optical sensors are developed to such sizes and weights that can be lifted by such platforms, like e.g. LiDAR units. At the same time there is an increase in emphasis on solutions that enable users to get access to 3D information faster and cheaper. Considering the multitude of platforms, cameras and the advancement of algorithms in conjunction with the increase of available computing power this challenge should and indeed is further investigated. In this paper a short review of the UAS technologies today is attempted. A discussion follows as to their applicability and advantages, depending on their specifications, which vary immensely. The on-board cameras available are also compared and evaluated for large scale mapping. Furthermore a thorough analysis, review and experimentation with different software implementations of Structure from Motion and Multiple View Stereo algorithms, able to process such dense and mostly unordered sequence of digital images is also conducted and presented. As test data set, we use a rich optical and thermal data set from both fixed wing and multi-rotor platforms over an archaeological excavation with adverse height variations and using different cameras. Dense 3D point clouds, digital terrain models and orthophotos have been produced and evaluated for their radiometric as well as metric qualities.

  8. Large-scale regions of antimatter

    SciTech Connect

    Grobov, A. V. Rubin, S. G.

    2015-07-15

    Amodified mechanism of the formation of large-scale antimatter regions is proposed. Antimatter appears owing to fluctuations of a complex scalar field that carries a baryon charge in the inflation era.

  9. Dynamic 3D printed titanium copy prosthesis: a novel design for large chest wall resection and reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Aragón, Javier; Pérez Méndez, Itzell

    2016-06-01

    Due to high rates of complications, chest wall resection and reconstruction is a high risk procedure when large size of resection is required. Many different prosthetic materials have been used with similar results. Recently, thanks to the new advances in technology, personalized reconstruction have been possible with specific custom-made prosthesis. Nevertheless, they all generate certain amount of stiffness in thoracic motion because of his rigidity. In this report, we present a forward step in prosthesis design based on tridimensional titanium-printed technology. An exact copy of the resected chest wall was made, even endowing simulated sternochondral articulations, to achieve the most exact adaptation and best functional results, with a view to minimize postoperative complications. This novel design, may constitute an important step towards the improvement of the functional postoperative outcomes compared to the other prosthesis, on the hope, to reduce postoperative complications. PMID:27293863

  10. Dynamic 3D printed titanium copy prosthesis: a novel design for large chest wall resection and reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Méndez, Itzell

    2016-01-01

    Due to high rates of complications, chest wall resection and reconstruction is a high risk procedure when large size of resection is required. Many different prosthetic materials have been used with similar results. Recently, thanks to the new advances in technology, personalized reconstruction have been possible with specific custom-made prosthesis. Nevertheless, they all generate certain amount of stiffness in thoracic motion because of his rigidity. In this report, we present a forward step in prosthesis design based on tridimensional titanium-printed technology. An exact copy of the resected chest wall was made, even endowing simulated sternochondral articulations, to achieve the most exact adaptation and best functional results, with a view to minimize postoperative complications. This novel design, may constitute an important step towards the improvement of the functional postoperative outcomes compared to the other prosthesis, on the hope, to reduce postoperative complications. PMID:27293863

  11. Scaling the 3-D Mohr circle and quantification of paleostress during fluid pressure fluctuation - Application to understand gold mineralization in quartz veins of Gadag (southern India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Sivaji; Mamtani, Manish A.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, orientations of 157 quartz veins occurring in metabasalts of the Gadag region (Dharwar craton, southern India) are used to plot the 3-D Mohr stress circle, which provides information about relative stress/fluid pressure (Pf) conditions, as well as stress state during Pf fluctuation. To scale the 3-D Mohr circle, vein orientation data are integrated with (a) available estimates from fluid inclusions of highest recorded Pf (390 MPa) and lowest recorded Pf (50 MPa) and (b) intrinsic rupture criterion that empirically quantify rock properties. Based on the scaled 3-D Mohr circle, the absolute magnitudes of the three principal stresses are quantified for high and low Pf. Of 157 veins investigated here, 14 veins are identified as having favourable orientation for dilation at high as well as low Pf. These 14 veins have a mean strike of 150°, which is similar to the orientation of the gold-bearing quartz lodes reported in the region. The effective normal stress (σ‧n = σn-Pf) prevalent during dilation of fracture/fabric anisotropy with 150° strike is calculated to be -11.5 MPa at high Pf, and -1.0 MPa at low Pf. Thus, it is interpreted that in the Gadag region, a change in σ‧n of 10.5 MPa prevailed during Pf fluctuation and associated separation of gold from the fluid.

  12. 3D-model of complex km-scale fold structures using laserscanning images: The Achensee region, western Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortner, H.; Gruber, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Northern Calcareous Alps (NCA) are a fold-and-thrust belt built by Permomesozoic rocks. It was affected by Early Jurassic rifting prior to Late Creatceous stacking of thrust sheets. The inversion of Jurassic basins resulted in complex fold structures. One of the enigmatic areas is the Achensee region, where a major kilometric W-E trending anticline-syncline system (Montschein-anticline, Karwendel-syncline) is offset to the north east of lake Achensee (Guffert-anticline, Thiersee syncline). The anticlines and synclines west and east of the transfer zone are recumbent, but no thrust is visible. In the transfer zone, the axis of the anticline curves to a N-S orientation (Unnutz anticline), whereas the syncline evolves to a thrust with 5km offset in E-W cross section (Achental thrust) that superimposes Triassic on Cretaceous rocks. The 3D-model in this low-budget project was constructed to understand the kinematic evolution of the fold and thrust system. Input data were: (1) a tectonic map with a dense network of orientation data, (2) a map of the trace of bedding mapped from 1m resolution laserscanning images, (3) a DEM with approximately 30m resolution.(1) and (2) were prepared in a GIS system, and then imported into the Midland Valleys Move software. Our intention was to create a data-oriented model, to prevent any model-induced bias. Thrust planes were constructed using the intersection lines with the DEM. Bedding in folds was modelled by extruding the intersection lines with the DEM parallel to the fold axis. In both cases errors were introduced into the model as the DEM has not enough resolution. Orientation data are displayed as discs in 3D space. The 3D-model shows that the Achental thrust cuts progressively into deeper structural levels of the Unnutz anticline to the south, therefore the thrust dips shallower to the south than the fold axis. Therefore the Achental thrust superimposes pre-existing folds onto the footwall toward the north, as established

  13. Unification and large-scale structure.

    PubMed Central

    Laing, R A

    1995-01-01

    The hypothesis of relativistic flow on parsec scales, coupled with the symmetrical (and therefore subrelativistic) outer structure of extended radio sources, requires that jets decelerate on scales observable with the Very Large Array. The consequences of this idea for the appearances of FRI and FRII radio sources are explored. PMID:11607609

  14. Finite element simulation and analytical modeling of 3D multi scale diffusion in nanocomposites with permeable stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, A.; Maffezzoli, A.

    2016-01-01

    This work is aimed to study the mass transport in 3D nanocomposites, characterized by the presence of permeable lamellar stacks, by means of finite element (FE) analysis. To this purpose, a geometric model was developed, based on a random distribution of non-interpenetrating stacks, each one made of regularly spaced platelets, which are considered representative of an intercalated nanocomposite. The morphological features of the stacks are the number of lamellae and the thickness of lamellar galleries, which determine the thickness, and therefore the aspect ratio. FE simulation results showed the relevance of diffusion within stack, and therefore the unsuitableness of the assumption of stack impermeability. The diffusion behavior of nanocomposites made of permeable stacks was modeled by considering the probability of collision of diffusing particles on the stack surface. For a random orientation of stacks, the developed analytical model showed an excellent agreement with the FE simulation results. It was shown that other analytical models found in literature are not able to capture the dependence of diffusivity on the morphology of intercalated nanocomposites. The developed analytical model allowed estimating the error arising from the assumption of impermeable stacks in the estimation of nanofiller aspect ratio from experimental diffusivity data.

  15. A 3-D view of field-scale fault-zone cementation from geologically ground-truthed electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, H.; Spinelli, G. A.; Mozley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Fault-zones are an important control on fluid flow, affecting groundwater supply, hydrocarbon/contaminant migration, and waste/carbon storage. However, current models of fault seal are inadequate, primarily focusing on juxtaposition and entrainment effects, despite the recognition that fault-zone cementation is common and can dramatically reduce permeability. We map the 3D cementation patterns of the variably cemented Loma Blanca fault from the land surface to ~40 m depth, using electrical resistivity and induced polarization (IP). The carbonate-cemented fault zone is a region of anomalously low normalized chargeability, relative to the surrounding host material. Zones of low-normalized chargeability immediately under the exposed cement provide the first ground-truth that a cemented fault yields an observable IP anomaly. Low-normalized chargeability extends down from the surface exposure, surrounded by zones of high-normalized chargeability, at an orientation consistent with normal faults in the region; this likely indicates cementation of the fault zone at depth, which could be confirmed by drilling and coring. Our observations are consistent with: 1) the expectation that carbonate cement in a sandstone should lower normalized chargeability by reducing pore-surface area and bridging gaps in the pore space, and 2) laboratory experiments confirming that calcite precipitation within a column of glass beads decreases polarization magnitude. The ability to characterize spatial variations in the degree of fault-zone cementation with resistivity and IP has exciting implications for improving predictive models of the hydrogeologic impacts of cementation within faults.

  16. Colorful holographic display of 3D object based on scaled diffraction by using non-uniform fast Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chenliang; Xia, Jun; Lei, Wei

    2015-03-01

    We proposed a new method to calculate the color computer generated hologram of three-dimensional object in holographic display. The three-dimensional object is composed of several tilted planes which are tilted from the hologram. The diffraction from each tilted plane to the hologram plane is calculated based on the coordinate rotation in Fourier spectrum domains. We used the nonuniform fast Fourier transformation (NUFFT) to calculate the nonuniform sampled Fourier spectrum on the tilted plane after coordinate rotation. By using the NUFFT, the diffraction calculation from tilted plane to the hologram plane with variable sampling rates can be achieved, which overcomes the sampling restriction of FFT in the conventional angular spectrum based method. The holograms of red, green and blue component of the polygon-based object are calculated separately by using our NUFFT based method. Then the color hologram is synthesized by placing the red, green and blue component hologram in sequence. The chromatic aberration caused by the wavelength difference can be solved effectively by restricting the sampling rate of the object in the calculation of each wavelength component. The computer simulation shows the feasibility of our method in calculating the color hologram of polygon-based object. The 3D object can be displayed in color with adjustable size and no chromatic aberration in holographic display system, which can be considered as an important application in the colorful holographic three-dimensional display.

  17. Integrating depth functions and hyper-scale terrain analysis for 3D soil organic carbon modeling in agricultural fields at regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Lopez, L.; van Wesemael, B.; Stevens, A.; Doetterl, S.; Van Oost, K.; Behrens, T.; Schmidt, K.

    2012-04-01

    different depth functions, ii. The use of different machine learning approaches for modeling the parameters of the fitted depth functions using the ConMap features and iii. The influence of different spatial scales on the SOC profile distribution variability. Keywords: 3D modeling, Digital soil mapping, Depth functions, Terrain analysis. Reference Behrens, T., K. Schmidt, K., Zhu, A.X. Scholten, T. 2010. The ConMap approach for terrain-based digital soil mapping. European Journal of Soil Science, v. 61, p.133-143.

  18. Scaling and super-universality in the coarsening dynamics of the 3D random field Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron, Camille; Chamon, Claudio; Cugliandolo, Leticia F.; Picco, Marco

    2008-05-01

    We study the coarsening dynamics of the three-dimensional random field Ising model using Monte Carlo numerical simulations. We test the dynamic scaling and super-scaling properties of global and local two-time observables. We treat in parallel the three-dimensional Edward-Anderson spin glass and we recall results on Lennard-Jones mixtures and colloidal suspensions to highlight the common and different out of equilibrium properties of these glassy systems.

  19. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eimer, Joseph; Ali, A.; Amiri, M.; Appel, J. W.; Araujo, D.; Bennett, C. L.; Boone, F.; Chan, M.; Cho, H.; Chuss, D. T.; Colazo, F.; Crowe, E.; Denis, K.; Dünner, R.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Gothe, D.; Halpern, M.; Harrington, K.; Hilton, G.; Hinshaw, G. F.; Huang, C.; Irwin, K.; Jones, G.; Karakla, J.; Kogut, A. J.; Larson, D.; Limon, M.; Lowry, L.; Marriage, T.; Mehrle, N.; Miller, A. D.; Miller, N.; Moseley, S. H.; Novak, G.; Reintsema, C.; Rostem, K.; Stevenson, T.; Towner, D.; U-Yen, K.; Wagner, E.; Watts, D.; Wollack, E.; Xu, Z.; Zeng, L.

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an array of telescopes designed to search for the signature of inflation in the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). By combining the strategy of targeting large scales (>2 deg) with novel front-end polarization modulation and novel detectors at multiple frequencies, CLASS will pioneer a new frontier in ground-based CMB polarization surveys. In this talk, I give an overview of the CLASS instrument, survey, and outlook on setting important new limits on the energy scale of inflation.

  20. ARPACK: Solving large scale eigenvalue problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehoucq, Rich; Maschhoff, Kristi; Sorensen, Danny; Yang, Chao

    2013-11-01

    ARPACK is a collection of Fortran77 subroutines designed to solve large scale eigenvalue problems. The package is designed to compute a few eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors of a general n by n matrix A. It is most appropriate for large sparse or structured matrices A where structured means that a matrix-vector product w

  1. Evaluating Large-Scale Interactive Radio Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Charles; Naidoo, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the challenges involved in conducting evaluations of interactive radio programmes in South Africa with large numbers of schools, teachers, and learners. It focuses on the role such large-scale evaluation has played during the South African radio learning programme's development stage, as well as during its subsequent…

  2. MRCK_3D contact detonation algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Rougier, Esteban; Munjiza, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale Combined Finite-Discrete Element Methods (FEM-DEM) and Discrete Element Methods (DEM) simulations involving contact of a large number of separate bod ies need an efficient, robust and flexible contact detection algorithm. In this work the MRCK-3D search algorithm is outlined and its main CPU perfonnances are evaluated. One of the most important aspects of this newly developed search algorithm is that it is applicable to systems consisting of many bodies of different shapes and sizes.

  3. Large-scale motions in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, V.C.; Coyne, G.V.

    1988-01-01

    The present conference on the large-scale motions of the universe discusses topics on the problems of two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures, large-scale velocity fields, the motion of the local group, small-scale microwave fluctuations, ab initio and phenomenological theories, and properties of galaxies at high and low Z. Attention is given to the Pisces-Perseus supercluster, large-scale structure and motion traced by galaxy clusters, distances to galaxies in the field, the origin of the local flow of galaxies, the peculiar velocity field predicted by the distribution of IRAS galaxies, the effects of reionization on microwave background anisotropies, the theoretical implications of cosmological dipoles, and n-body simulations of universe dominated by cold dark matter.

  4. Large-scale nanophotonic phased array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Timurdogan, Erman; Yaacobi, Ami; Hosseini, Ehsan Shah; Watts, Michael R

    2013-01-10

    Electromagnetic phased arrays at radio frequencies are well known and have enabled applications ranging from communications to radar, broadcasting and astronomy. The ability to generate arbitrary radiation patterns with large-scale phased arrays has long been pursued. Although it is extremely expensive and cumbersome to deploy large-scale radiofrequency phased arrays, optical phased arrays have a unique advantage in that the much shorter optical wavelength holds promise for large-scale integration. However, the short optical wavelength also imposes stringent requirements on fabrication. As a consequence, although optical phased arrays have been studied with various platforms and recently with chip-scale nanophotonics, all of the demonstrations so far are restricted to one-dimensional or small-scale two-dimensional arrays. Here we report the demonstration of a large-scale two-dimensional nanophotonic phased array (NPA), in which 64 × 64 (4,096) optical nanoantennas are densely integrated on a silicon chip within a footprint of 576 μm × 576 μm with all of the nanoantennas precisely balanced in power and aligned in phase to generate a designed, sophisticated radiation pattern in the far field. We also show that active phase tunability can be realized in the proposed NPA by demonstrating dynamic beam steering and shaping with an 8 × 8 array. This work demonstrates that a robust design, together with state-of-the-art complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, allows large-scale NPAs to be implemented on compact and inexpensive nanophotonic chips. In turn, this enables arbitrary radiation pattern generation using NPAs and therefore extends the functionalities of phased arrays beyond conventional beam focusing and steering, opening up possibilities for large-scale deployment in applications such as communication, laser detection and ranging, three-dimensional holography and biomedical sciences, to name just a few.

  5. In-situ 3D high-spatial resolution aquifer characterization with hydraulic parameter distribution at decameter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, R.; Brauchler, R.; Hu, L.; Qiu, P.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, a major challenge in aquifer characterization is the determination of hydraulic parameters with high-spatial resolution. Since the mid-90's, various working groups have developed numerical evaluation approaches for hydraulic tomography: the inversion of hydraulic tests that have been recorded using tomographic arrangements. The practical application is often associated with long test times, complex evaluations, and prolonged computation times. In our study, a hydraulic tomographical data set consisted of 450 drawdown curves produced by a series of short term pumping tests conducted over 4 working days. Data was collected by two scientists without a technical staff. The tests were performed at the test site "Stegemühle", Göttingen, Germany in a confined sand and gravel aquifer with a thickness of 2-3 m. For the inversion, an approach has been used, which is based on the transformation of the groundwater flow equation into a form of Eikonal equation (Vasco et al., 2000). Utilizing this approach, the hydraulic data can be inverted using an Eikonal solver e.g. SIRT. This Eikonal solver is considerably computationally efficient and allows hundreds of draw down curves to be inverted on a standard laptop within minutes. Following the methodology described in Brauchler et al. 2013, 3D distribution of diffusivity and specific storage were directly reconstructed, and subsequently their product: the hydraulic conductivity. This study exemplifies that the required data can be recorded and analyzed efficiently in the field, which is a vital precondition for the in-situ field aquifer characterization with hydraulic tomography. Literature Vasco, D.W., Keers, H., Karasaki, K. (2000) Estimation of reservoir properties using transient pressure data: An asymptotic approach. Water Resour. Res. 36(12), 3447-3465 Brauchler, R., Hu, R., Hu, L., Jimenéz, S., Bayer, P., Ptak, T. (2013) Rapid field application of hydraulic tomography for resolving aquifer heterogeneity in

  6. Large scale simulations of the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, S.; Petersson, A.; Rodgers, A.; Sjogreen, B.; McCandless, K.

    2006-12-01

    As part of a multi-institutional simulation effort, we present large scale computations of the ground motion during the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake using a new finite difference code called WPP. The material data base for northern California provided by USGS together with the rupture model by Song et al. is demonstrated to lead to a reasonable match with historical data. In our simulations, the computational domain covered 550 km by 250 km of northern California down to 40 km depth, so a 125 m grid size corresponds to about 2.2 Billion grid points. To accommodate these large grids, the simulations were run on 512-1024 processors on one of the supercomputers at Lawrence Livermore National Lab. A wavelet compression algorithm enabled storage of time-dependent volumetric data. Nevertheless, the first 45 seconds of the earthquake still generated 1.2 TByte of disk space and the 3-D post processing was done in parallel.

  7. Slow, large scales from fast, small ones in dispersive wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Leslie; Waleffe, Fabian

    2000-11-01

    Dispersive wave turbulence in systems of geophysical interest (beta-plane, rotating, stratified and rotating-stratified flows) has been simulated with random, isotropic small scale forcing and hyper-viscosity. This can be thought of as a Langevin model of the small space-time scales only with potential implications for climate modeling. In all cases, slow, coherent large scales are generated after long times of 2nd order in the nonlinear time scale. These slow, large scales ultimately dominate the flows. Beta-plane and rotating flow results were reported earlier [PoF 11, 1608]. In stratified flows, the energy accumulates in a 1D vertically sheared flow at selected large scales. As the rotation rate is increased, a progressive transition toward generation of all large scale vortical zero modes (quasi-geostrophic 3D flow) is observed. For yet higher rotation rate, energy accumulates primarily in a 2D quasi-geostrophic flow (cyclonic vortices) at all large scales.

  8. Local D3/D7 μ-SPLIT SUSY, 125 GeV Higgs and Large Volume Ricci-Flat Swiss-Cheese Metrics:. a Brief Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Aalok

    In this paper, we review briefly recent progress made in realizing local(ized around a mobile spacetime filling D3-brane in) D3/D7 μ-split Supersymmetry in (the large volume limit of Type IIB) String Theory (compactified on Swiss-Cheese Calabi-Yau orientifolds) as well as obtaining a 125 GeV (light) Higgs in the same setup. We also discuss obtaining the geometric Kähler potential (and hence the Ricci-flat metric) for the Swiss-Cheese Calabi-Yau in the large volume limit using the Donaldson's algorithm and intuition from GLSM-based calculations — we present new results for Swiss-Cheese Calabi-Yau (used in the setup) metrics at points finitely away from the "big" divisor.

  9. 3D seismic interpretation of subsurface eruptive centers in a Permian large igneous province, Tazhong Uplift, central Tarim Basin, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiangfeng; Zhu, Wenbin; Guan, Da; Zhu, Beibei; Yuan, Liansheng; Xiang, Xuemei; Su, Jinbao; He, Jingwen; Wu, Xinhui

    2015-12-01

    A 1445-km2 high-resolution 3D seismic reflection dataset is used to analyze the Permian large igneous province in the subsurface of the Tazhong area in the central Tarim Basin in northwestern China. Constrained by the synthetic seismograms of four wells, the top and base of the igneous rocks were identified in the seismic data. Seven large volcanic craters, each >10 km2 in area, have been discovered via the application of coherency and amplitude attributes. The thickness and volume of the igneous rocks were obtained by time-depth transformation. In the study area, all of the igneous rocks, with thicknesses from 120 to 1133 m, were formed by eruptions in the Early Permian. These events produced huge erupted volumes (178 km3) and multiple closely spaced volcanic edifices (<13 km). These features suggest that the study area may be the part of the eruptive center of the Permian igneous rocks in the Tarim Basin.

  10. A Coupled fcGCM-GCE Modeling System: A 3D Cloud Resolving Model and a Regional Scale Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud-resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single-column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage, and the use of a CRM will allow for better and ore sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA satellite and field campaign cloud related datasets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM), and it has started production runs with two years results (1998 and 1999). Also, at Goddard, we have implemented several Goddard microphysical schemes (21CE, several 31CE), Goddard radiation (including explicity calculated cloud optical properties), and Goddard Land Information (LIS, that includes the CLM and NOAH land surface models) into a next generation regional scale model, WRF. In this talk, I will present: (1) A Brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes (microphysical and land processes), (2) The Goddard MMF and the major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF), and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs), (3) A discussion on the Goddard WRF version (its developments and applications), and (4) The characteristics of the four-dimensional cloud data

  11. Improving and validating 3D models for the leaf energy balance in canopy-scale problems with complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, B.; Stoll, R., II; Miller, N. E.; Pardyjak, E.; Mahaffee, W.

    2014-12-01

    Plants cover the majority of Earth's land surface, and thus play a critical role in the surface energy balance. Within individual plant communities, the leaf energy balance is a fundamental component of most biophysical processes. Absorbed radiation drives the energy balance and provides the means by which plants produce food. Available energy is partitioned into sensible and latent heat fluxes to determine surface temperature, which strongly influences rates of metabolic activity and growth. The energy balance of an individual leaf is coupled with other leaves in the community through longwave radiation emission and advection through the air. This complex coupling can make scaling models from leaves to whole-canopies difficult, specifically in canopies with complex, heterogeneous geometries. We present a new three-dimensional canopy model that simultaneously resolves sub-tree to whole-canopy scales. The model provides spatially explicit predictions of net radiation exchange, boundary-layer and stomatal conductances, evapotranspiration rates, and ultimately leaf surface temperature. The radiation model includes complex physics such as anisotropic emission and scattering. Radiation calculations are accelerated by leveraging graphics processing unit (GPU) technology, which allows canopy-scale problems to be performed on a standard desktop workstation. Since validating the three-dimensional distribution of leaf temperature can be extremely challenging, we used several independent measurement techniques to quantify errors in measured and modeled values. When compared with measured leaf temperatures, the model gave a mean error of about 2°C, which was close to the estimated measurement uncertainty.

  12. Numerically modelling the large scale coronal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Mayukh; Nandi, Dibyendu

    2016-07-01

    The solar corona spews out vast amounts of magnetized plasma into the heliosphere which has a direct impact on the Earth's magnetosphere. Thus it is important that we develop an understanding of the dynamics of the solar corona. With our present technology it has not been possible to generate 3D magnetic maps of the solar corona; this warrants the use of numerical simulations to study the coronal magnetic field. A very popular method of doing this, is to extrapolate the photospheric magnetic field using NLFF or PFSS codes. However the extrapolations at different time intervals are completely independent of each other and do not capture the temporal evolution of magnetic fields. On the other hand full MHD simulations of the global coronal field, apart from being computationally very expensive would be physically less transparent, owing to the large number of free parameters that are typically used in such codes. This brings us to the Magneto-frictional model which is relatively simpler and computationally more economic. We have developed a Magnetofrictional Model, in 3D spherical polar co-ordinates to study the large scale global coronal field. Here we present studies of changing connectivities between active regions, in response to photospheric motions.

  13. Large-scale simulations of reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, Katharina; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Hamilton, Andrew J.S.; /JILA, Boulder

    2005-11-01

    We use cosmological simulations to explore the large-scale effects of reionization. Since reionization is a process that involves a large dynamic range--from galaxies to rare bright quasars--we need to be able to cover a significant volume of the universe in our simulation without losing the important small scale effects from galaxies. Here we have taken an approach that uses clumping factors derived from small scale simulations to approximate the radiative transfer on the sub-cell scales. Using this technique, we can cover a simulation size up to 1280h{sup -1} Mpc with 10h{sup -1} Mpc cells. This allows us to construct synthetic spectra of quasars similar to observed spectra of SDSS quasars at high redshifts and compare them to the observational data. These spectra can then be analyzed for HII region sizes, the presence of the Gunn-Peterson trough, and the Lyman-{alpha} forest.

  14. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  15. Insights and questions raised from a multi-tracer plot-scale sprinkler experiment with time-lapse 3D GPR in a structured forested soil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackisch, Conrad; Sprenger, Matthias; Allroggen, Niklas; van Schaik, Loes; Weiler, Markus; Zehe, Erwin

    2014-05-01

    Stable isotopes appear as ideal tracer commonly applied in preferential flow analyses. At the same time, central assumptions about signature mixing and propagation are founded on effective parameters merging advective and diffusive flow domains. However, in structured soils conditions are often far from well-mixed and some established assumptions may need to be reconsidered. We conducted a multi-tracer sprinkler experiment at a forested hillslope in the Attert Basin in Luxembourg with prevailing geogenic and biogenic preferential flow structures. At plot scale of 1x1 m2 we sprinkled two plots with 50 mm and one plot with 30 mm Brilliant Blue and Bromide enriched water for 1 hour. The experiments were accompanied by a high resolution 3D time-lapse GPR (Ground-Penetrating Radar) survey scanning 3x3 m2 before, directly after sprinkling and before excavation one day after sprinkling. Soil moisture was monitored with a TDR tube probe. Soil profiles were excavated and recorded for dye flow paths and for one medium resolution Bromide profile. In addition one core for pore water stable isotope analysis was taken before the sprinkling as reference and at each plot after sprinkling. We present the results with focus on the found evidence of preferential flow and the signals of the different tracers - especially the stable isotopes. While all other methods clearly show that only minor proportions of the soil took part in the infiltration process and that the sprinkler water has largely advectively propagated to the saprolite layer at about 80-100 cm depth, the stable isotopes signals from the cores indicate more intense interaction between the soil matrix and macropores, especially in the top 50 cm. This leads to the question of how the isotope signal could mix well, when most of the pore-water did not directly interact with the infiltration-water. Further questions arise to the use of tracers in general, due to the known limitations of excavation itself and rather coarse

  16. Large Scale Shape Optimization for Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, Volkan; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Xiao, Li-Ling; Ko, Kwok; /SLAC

    2011-12-06

    We present a shape optimization method for designing accelerator cavities with large scale computations. The objective is to find the best accelerator cavity shape with the desired spectral response, such as with the specified frequencies of resonant modes, field profiles, and external Q values. The forward problem is the large scale Maxwell equation in the frequency domain. The design parameters are the CAD parameters defining the cavity shape. We develop scalable algorithms with a discrete adjoint approach and use the quasi-Newton method to solve the nonlinear optimization problem. Two realistic accelerator cavity design examples are presented.

  17. A versatile pipeline for the multi-scale digital reconstruction and quantitative analysis of 3D tissue architecture

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Navarrete, Hernán; Segovia-Miranda, Fabián; Klukowski, Piotr; Meyer, Kirstin; Nonaka, Hidenori; Marsico, Giovanni; Chernykh, Mikhail; Kalaidzidis, Alexander; Zerial, Marino; Kalaidzidis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    A prerequisite for the systems biology analysis of tissues is an accurate digital three-dimensional reconstruction of tissue structure based on images of markers covering multiple scales. Here, we designed a flexible pipeline for the multi-scale reconstruction and quantitative morphological analysis of tissue architecture from microscopy images. Our pipeline includes newly developed algorithms that address specific challenges of thick dense tissue reconstruction. Our implementation allows for a flexible workflow, scalable to high-throughput analysis and applicable to various mammalian tissues. We applied it to the analysis of liver tissue and extracted quantitative parameters of sinusoids, bile canaliculi and cell shapes, recognizing different liver cell types with high accuracy. Using our platform, we uncovered an unexpected zonation pattern of hepatocytes with different size, nuclei and DNA content, thus revealing new features of liver tissue organization. The pipeline also proved effective to analyse lung and kidney tissue, demonstrating its generality and robustness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11214.001 PMID:26673893

  18. What causes the large extensions of red supergiant atmospheres?. Comparisons of interferometric observations with 1D hydrostatic, 3D convection, and 1D pulsating model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo-Torres, B.; Wittkowski, M.; Chiavassa, A.; Scholz, M.; Freytag, B.; Marcaide, J. M.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Wood, P. R.; Abellan, F. J.

    2015-03-01

    Aims: This research has two main goals. First, we present the atmospheric structure and the fundamental parameters of three red supergiants (RSGs), increasing the sample of RSGs observed by near-infrared spectro-interferometry. Additionally, we test possible mechanisms that may explain the large observed atmospheric extensions of RSGs. Methods: We carried out spectro-interferometric observations of the RSGs V602 Car, HD 95687, and HD 183589 in the near-infrared K-band (1.92-2.47 μm) with the VLTI/AMBER instrument at medium spectral resolution (R ~ 1500). To categorize and comprehend the extended atmospheres, we compared our observational results to predictions by available hydrostatic PHOENIX, available 3D convection, and new 1D self-excited pulsation models of RSGs. Results: Our near-infrared flux spectra of V602 Car, HD 95687, and HD 183589 are well reproduced by the PHOENIX model atmospheres. The continuum visibility values are consistent with a limb-darkened disk as predicted by the PHOENIX models, allowing us to determine the angular diameter and the fundamental parameters of our sources. Nonetheless, in the case of V602 Car and HD 95686, the PHOENIX model visibilities do not predict the large observed extensions of molecular layers, most remarkably in the CO bands. Likewise, the 3D convection models and the 1D pulsation models with typical parameters of RSGs lead to compact atmospheric structures as well, which are similar to the structure of the hydrostatic PHOENIX models. They can also not explain the observed decreases in the visibilities and thus the large atmospheric molecular extensions. The full sample of our RSGs indicates increasing observed atmospheric extensions with increasing luminosity and decreasing surface gravity, and no correlation with effective temperature or variability amplitude. Conclusions: The location of our RSG sources in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is confirmed to be consistent with the red limits of recent evolutionary tracks

  19. Quarantine control of Hessian fly (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) in exported hay: a new treatment for large-size, polypropylene fabric-wrapped bales and a 3-d fumigation for compressed standard bales.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Victoria Y; Miller, Gina T

    2003-08-01

    Hessian fly puparia (37,167), Mayetiola destructor (Say), did not survive a large-scale commercial test (three freight containers) of a new quarantine treatment using compression (32 kg/cm2) and hydrogen phosphide fumigation (61 g/28.2 m3) for large-size, polypropylene fabric-wrapped bales of hay exported to Japan. Mean +/- SEM temperatures in the large-size bales in different locations in the freight containers ranged from 18.0 +/- 0.9 to 26.0 +/- 1.3 degrees C during the 7-d test conducted in a heated building at 20.1 +/- 1.1 degrees C. Highest concentrations of hydrogen phosphide in most locations in the freight containers were observed after 3 d of fumigation and ranged from 366.7 +/- 96.1 to 425.0 +/- 162.7 ppm (mean +/- SEM) and throughout the 7 d of fumigation ranged from 253.6 +/- 59.9 to 407.1 +/- 76.5 ppm (mean +/- SEM). Hydrogen phosphide residues after fumigation and aeration were <10 ppb and were below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency tolerance of 0.1 ppm in animal feeds. The results of the test fulfills regulatory agency testing requirements and confirms the efficacy of the treatment to control Hessian fly in large-size, polypropylene fabric-wrapped bales of hay. Hessian fly puparia (2,160) did not survive a large-scale commercial test of compression (105 kg/cm2) and a 3-d hydrogen phosphide (60 g/28.3 m3) fumigation for standard bales.

  20. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  1. Large-scale neuromorphic computing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furber, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Neuromorphic computing covers a diverse range of approaches to information processing all of which demonstrate some degree of neurobiological inspiration that differentiates them from mainstream conventional computing systems. The philosophy behind neuromorphic computing has its origins in the seminal work carried out by Carver Mead at Caltech in the late 1980s. This early work influenced others to carry developments forward, and advances in VLSI technology supported steady growth in the scale and capability of neuromorphic devices. Recently, a number of large-scale neuromorphic projects have emerged, taking the approach to unprecedented scales and capabilities. These large-scale projects are associated with major new funding initiatives for brain-related research, creating a sense that the time and circumstances are right for progress in our understanding of information processing in the brain. In this review we present a brief history of neuromorphic engineering then focus on some of the principal current large-scale projects, their main features, how their approaches are complementary and distinct, their advantages and drawbacks, and highlight the sorts of capabilities that each can deliver to neural modellers.

  2. Large-scale neuromorphic computing systems.

    PubMed

    Furber, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Neuromorphic computing covers a diverse range of approaches to information processing all of which demonstrate some degree of neurobiological inspiration that differentiates them from mainstream conventional computing systems. The philosophy behind neuromorphic computing has its origins in the seminal work carried out by Carver Mead at Caltech in the late 1980s. This early work influenced others to carry developments forward, and advances in VLSI technology supported steady growth in the scale and capability of neuromorphic devices. Recently, a number of large-scale neuromorphic projects have emerged, taking the approach to unprecedented scales and capabilities. These large-scale projects are associated with major new funding initiatives for brain-related research, creating a sense that the time and circumstances are right for progress in our understanding of information processing in the brain. In this review we present a brief history of neuromorphic engineering then focus on some of the principal current large-scale projects, their main features, how their approaches are complementary and distinct, their advantages and drawbacks, and highlight the sorts of capabilities that each can deliver to neural modellers. PMID:27529195

  3. Sensitivity analysis for large-scale problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Whitworth, Sandra L.

    1987-01-01

    The development of efficient techniques for calculating sensitivity derivatives is studied. The objective is to present a computational procedure for calculating sensitivity derivatives as part of performing structural reanalysis for large-scale problems. The scope is limited to framed type structures. Both linear static analysis and free-vibration eigenvalue problems are considered.

  4. A Large Scale Computer Terminal Output Controller.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Paul Thomas

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a large scale computer terminal output controller which supervises the transfer of information from a Control Data 6400 Computer to a PLATO IV data network. It discusses the cost considerations leading to the selection of educational television channels rather than telephone lines for…

  5. Management of large-scale technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two major themes are addressed in this assessment of the management of large-scale NASA programs: (1) how a high technology agency was a decade marked by a rapid expansion of funds and manpower in the first half and almost as rapid contraction in the second; and (2) how NASA combined central planning and control with decentralized project execution.

  6. Experimental Simulations of Large-Scale Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, Kevin R.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes research on the effects of target porosity on the mechanics of impact cratering. Impact experiments conducted on a centrifuge provide direct simulations of large-scale cratering on porous asteroids. The experiments show that large craters in porous materials form mostly by compaction, with essentially no deposition of material into the ejecta blanket that is a signature of cratering in less-porous materials. The ratio of ejecta mass to crater mass is shown to decrease with increasing crater size or target porosity. These results are consistent with the observation that large closely-packed craters on asteroid Mathilde appear to have formed without degradation to earlier craters.

  7. Large-scale Advanced Propfan (LAP) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerser, D. A.; Ludemann, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    The propfan is an advanced propeller concept which maintains the high efficiencies traditionally associated with conventional propellers at the higher aircraft cruise speeds associated with jet transports. The large-scale advanced propfan (LAP) program extends the research done on 2 ft diameter propfan models to a 9 ft diameter article. The program includes design, fabrication, and testing of both an eight bladed, 9 ft diameter propfan, designated SR-7L, and a 2 ft diameter aeroelastically scaled model, SR-7A. The LAP program is complemented by the propfan test assessment (PTA) program, which takes the large-scale propfan and mates it with a gas generator and gearbox to form a propfan propulsion system and then flight tests this system on the wing of a Gulfstream 2 testbed aircraft.

  8. 3D Numerical Experiments of Lithospheric Transtension Reveal Complex Crustal-Scale Flow and Strain Partitioning in Transdomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, P. F.; Mondy, L. S.; Duclaux, G.; Teyssier, C. P.; Whitney, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    We have used Underworld to perform a series of numerical experiments involving a 256 x 256 x 128 km domain, at a grid resolution of 1.33 km. The kinematic boundary conditions simulate a lithospheric-scale pull-apart setting. We compare the structural and thermal evolution of a model involving a crust of thickness 40 km (TMoho=540ºC) with a model with a crust of thickness 60 km (TMoho=830ºC). We show that in the thick, hot crust model the flow in the pull-apart region is strongly partitioned between the strong upper crust and the weak lower crust. The weak, deep crust flows toward the pull-apart region to isostatically compensate the stretching and thinning of the upper crust. In contrast, the velocity field in the upper crust remains parallel to the imposed direction of extension. In the pull-apart region a transdome, made of two parallel foliation folds (or sub-domes), forms. In the dome, fabrics evolve from strong vertical flattening in between the two sub-domes, to shallow dipping constriction roughly parallel to the direction of extension in the upper part of the transdome.

  9. Study of 3-D Dynamic Roughness Effects on Flow Over a NACA 0012 Airfoil Using Large Eddy Simulations at Low Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guda, Venkata Subba Sai Satish

    There have been several advancements in the aerospace industry in areas of design such as aerodynamics, designs, controls and propulsion; all aimed at one common goal i.e. increasing efficiency --range and scope of operation with lesser fuel consumption. Several methods of flow control have been tried. Some were successful, some failed and many were termed as impractical. The low Reynolds number regime of 104 - 105 is a very interesting range. Flow physics in this range are quite different than those of higher Reynolds number range. Mid and high altitude UAV's, MAV's, sailplanes, jet engine fan blades, inboard helicopter rotor blades and wind turbine rotors are some of the aerodynamic applications that fall in this range. The current study deals with using dynamic roughness as a means of flow control over a NACA 0012 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers. Dynamic 3-D surface roughness elements on an airfoil placed near the leading edge aim at increasing the efficiency by suppressing the effects of leading edge separation like leading edge stall by delaying or totally eliminating flow separation. A numerical study of the above method has been carried out by means of a Large Eddy Simulation, a mathematical model for turbulence in Computational Fluid Dynamics, owing to the highly unsteady nature of the flow. A user defined function has been developed for the 3-D dynamic roughness element motion. Results from simulations have been compared to those from experimental PIV data. Large eddy simulations have relatively well captured the leading edge stall. For the clean cases, i.e. with the DR not actuated, the LES was able to reproduce experimental results in a reasonable fashion. However DR simulation results show that it fails to reattach the flow and suppress flow separation compared to experiments. Several novel techniques of grid design and hump creation are introduced through this study.

  10. Integration of a calcined bovine bone and BMSC-sheet 3D scaffold and the promotion of bone regeneration in large defects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yihan; Ming, Leiguo; Luo, Hailang; Liu, Wenjia; Zhang, Yongjie; Liu, Hongchen; Jin, Yan

    2013-12-01

    Reconstruction of large area bone defect with mechanical integrity to the skeleton is important for patient's rehabilitation. However with the limitation of scaffold material and suitable seed cell sources, the best treating strategy remains to be identified though various tissue engineering methods were reported. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of applying calcined bovine bone (CBB) which was coated by allograft bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC)-sheet as a 3D scaffold material in bone repairing tissue engineering. The new scaffold material was implanted into osteoporosis rat cranial bone defects and repairing critical size bone defects (8 mm diameter). Data showed that CBB-BMSC-sheet combination had a stronger potential in osteogenic differentiation and mineralized formation both in vitro and in vivo than CBB-BMSC combination. In in vitro study BMSC-sheet had a more feasible characteristic upon bone repairing including richer ECM, larger mineralized area and stronger ALP activity in addition with a significant higher mRNA expression of osteogenic maker such as BMP-2, b-FGF, Col 1a1, OSX and Runx-2 than the control group. In in vivo study 3D reconstruction of micro CT, HE staining and bone strength results showed that newly formed bone in CBB-BMSC-sheet group was significant higher than that in CBB-BMSC group at 4, 8 and 12 weeks after transplantation in the aspect of area and volume. What was more, results indicated that allograft BMSC-sheet had survivaled in the scaffold material and participated in the newly formed bone which had the same thickness with surrounding autologous bone tissues after transplantation. Results of our study demonstrated that CBB-BMSC-sheet combination was a promising strategy in healing of large area bone defect in osteoporosis.

  11. Towards global scale coastal flood hazard in Delta Cities with 30-meter SRTM and 3D_i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsemius, Hessel; Verhoeven, Govert; Van Leeuwen, Elgard; Van der Klis, Hanneke; Van Wesenbeeck, Bregje; Cumiskey, Lydia; Verlaan, Martin; Muis, Sanne; Ward, Philip; Kwadijk, Jaap

    2015-04-01

    Most attempts to globally simulate inundation at the land-coast interface rely on maximum flood level GIS-based flood spreading models. These are generally not mass conservative, do not account for the genesis of tidal and surges in time, and do not include channel geometry and surface roughness. Furthermore, these methods cannot be used to study the impact of hazard reducing intervention measures that increase roughness at the land-coast interface. These measures include breakwaters and coastal ecosystems, such as mangrove forests and shell fish and coral reefs. Recently, new datasets and models are becoming available that allow us to greatly improve simulation of inundation in global deltas in a rapid and computationally feasible way. In this poster we demonstrate the feasibility of modelling all global deltas with strongly urbanised areas explicitly using these datasets and models. This will allow initiatives such as the 100 resilient cities (Rockefeller foundation) and the 'making cities resilient' campaign (UNISDR) to tackle the issue of coastal flood risk efficiently. We propose to use the following materials: A subgrid enabling 1D-2D model code Outputs from a global tidal and storm surge model Open topographical data We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by modelling the Mississippi delta with: a) a lidar derived topography dataset (www.gis.ms.gov/); and b) the recently released 30 meter elevation dataset from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. We use the new 3Di subgrid code to rapidly schematise the vast delta area with a quadtree mesh. We force the model at the boundaries with water level estimates during the Katrina cyclone. We invite scientists working on global scale inundation modelling to visit our poster in order to discuss possibilities and limitations of the proposed methods related to model codes, data quality and calibration.

  12. Scalable parallel distance field construction for large-scale applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hongfeng; Xie, Jinrong; Ma, Kwan -Liu; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-10-01

    Computing distance fields is fundamental to many scientific and engineering applications. Distance fields can be used to direct analysis and reduce data. In this paper, we present a highly scalable method for computing 3D distance fields on massively parallel distributed-memory machines. Anew distributed spatial data structure, named parallel distance tree, is introduced to manage the level sets of data and facilitate surface tracking overtime, resulting in significantly reduced computation and communication costs for calculating the distance to the surface of interest from any spatial locations. Our method supports several data types and distance metrics from real-world applications. We demonstrate its efficiency and scalability on state-of-the-art supercomputers using both large-scale volume datasets and surface models. We also demonstrate in-situ distance field computation on dynamic turbulent flame surfaces for a petascale combustion simulation. In conclusion, our work greatly extends the usability of distance fields for demanding applications.

  13. Scalable Parallel Distance Field Construction for Large-Scale Applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongfeng; Xie, Jinrong; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline H

    2015-10-01

    Computing distance fields is fundamental to many scientific and engineering applications. Distance fields can be used to direct analysis and reduce data. In this paper, we present a highly scalable method for computing 3D distance fields on massively parallel distributed-memory machines. A new distributed spatial data structure, named parallel distance tree, is introduced to manage the level sets of data and facilitate surface tracking over time, resulting in significantly reduced computation and communication costs for calculating the distance to the surface of interest from any spatial locations. Our method supports several data types and distance metrics from real-world applications. We demonstrate its efficiency and scalability on state-of-the-art supercomputers using both large-scale volume datasets and surface models. We also demonstrate in-situ distance field computation on dynamic turbulent flame surfaces for a petascale combustion simulation. Our work greatly extends the usability of distance fields for demanding applications. PMID:26357251

  14. Statistics of Caustics in Large-Scale Structure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldbrugge, Job L.; Hidding, Johan; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-10-01

    The cosmic web is a complex spatial pattern of walls, filaments, cluster nodes and underdense void regions. It emerged through gravitational amplification from the Gaussian primordial density field. Here we infer analytical expressions for the spatial statistics of caustics in the evolving large-scale mass distribution. In our analysis, following the quasi-linear Zel'dovich formalism and confined to the 1D and 2D situation, we compute number density and correlation properties of caustics in cosmic density fields that evolve from Gaussian primordial conditions. The analysis can be straightforwardly extended to the 3D situation. We moreover, are currently extending the approach to the non-linear regime of structure formation by including higher order Lagrangian approximations and Lagrangian effective field theory.

  15. Lightweight computational steering of very large scale molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Beazley, D.M.; Lomdahl, P.S.

    1996-09-01

    We present a computational steering approach for controlling, analyzing, and visualizing very large scale molecular dynamics simulations involving tens to hundreds of millions of atoms. Our approach relies on extensible scripting languages and an easy to use tool for building extensions and modules. The system is extremely easy to modify, works with existing C code, is memory efficient, and can be used from inexpensive workstations and networks. We demonstrate how we have used this system to manipulate data from production MD simulations involving as many as 104 million atoms running on the CM-5 and Cray T3D. We also show how this approach can be used to build systems that integrate common scripting languages (including Tcl/Tk, Perl, and Python), simulation code, user extensions, and commercial data analysis packages.

  16. Scalable Parallel Distance Field Construction for Large-Scale Applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongfeng; Xie, Jinrong; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline H

    2015-10-01

    Computing distance fields is fundamental to many scientific and engineering applications. Distance fields can be used to direct analysis and reduce data. In this paper, we present a highly scalable method for computing 3D distance fields on massively parallel distributed-memory machines. A new distributed spatial data structure, named parallel distance tree, is introduced to manage the level sets of data and facilitate surface tracking over time, resulting in significantly reduced computation and communication costs for calculating the distance to the surface of interest from any spatial locations. Our method supports several data types and distance metrics from real-world applications. We demonstrate its efficiency and scalability on state-of-the-art supercomputers using both large-scale volume datasets and surface models. We also demonstrate in-situ distance field computation on dynamic turbulent flame surfaces for a petascale combustion simulation. Our work greatly extends the usability of distance fields for demanding applications.

  17. Preliminary 3-D site-scale studies of radioactive colloid transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moridis, G. J.; Hu, Q.; Wu, Y.-S.; Bodvarsson, G. S.

    2003-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is actively investigating the technical feasibility of permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a repository to be situated in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. In this study we investigate, by means of numerical simulation, the transport of radioactive colloids under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table. The site hydrology and the effects of the spatial distribution of hydraulic and transport properties in the Yucca Mountain subsurface are considered. The study of migration and retardation of colloids accounts for the complex processes in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, and includes advection, diffusion, hydrodynamic dispersion, kinetic colloid filtration, colloid straining, and radioactive decay. The results of the study indicate that the most important factors affecting colloid transport are the subsurface geology and site hydrology, i.e., the presence of faults (they dominate and control transport), fractures (the main migration pathways), and the relative distribution of zeolitic and vitric tuffs. The transport of colloids is strongly influenced by their size (as it affects diffusion into the matrix, straining at hydrogeologic unit interfaces, and transport velocity) and by the parameters of the kinetic-filtration model used for the simulations. Arrival times at the water table decrease with an increasing colloid size because of smaller diffusion, increased straining, and higher transport velocities. The importance of diffusion as a retardation mechanism increases with a decreasing colloid size, but appears to be minimal in large colloids.

  18. Preliminary 3-D site-scale studies of radioactive colloid transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Moridis, G J; Hu, Q; Wu, Y-S; Bodvarsson, G S

    2003-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is actively investigating the technical feasibility of permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a repository to be situated in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. In this study we investigate, by means of numerical simulation, the transport of radioactive colloids under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table. The site hydrology and the effects of the spatial distribution of hydraulic and transport properties in the Yucca Mountain subsurface are considered. The study of migration and retardation of colloids accounts for the complex processes in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, and includes advection, diffusion, hydrodynamic dispersion, kinetic colloid filtration, colloid straining, and radioactive decay. The results of the study indicate that the most important factors affecting colloid transport are the subsurface geology and site hydrology, i.e., the presence of faults (they dominate and control transport), fractures (the main migration pathways), and the relative distribution of zeolitic and vitric tuffs. The transport of colloids is strongly influenced by their size (as it affects diffusion into the matrix, straining at hydrogeologic unit interfaces, and transport velocity) and by the parameters of the kinetic-filtration model used for the simulations. Arrival times at the water table decrease with an increasing colloid size because of smaller diffusion, increased straining, and higher transport velocities. The importance of diffusion as a retardation mechanism increases with a decreasing colloid size, but appears to be minimal in large colloids. PMID:12504362

  19. Major structural features of the northern North Sea and adjacent areas of the continent according to lithosphere-scale 3D density and thermal modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maystrenko, Y. P.; Olesen, O.; Ebbing, J.

    2013-12-01

    In order to analyse the regional configuration of the crystalline crust within the northern North Sea and adjacent areas of the continent, a lithosphere-scale 3D structural model has been constructed in the frame of the Crustal Onshore-Offshore Project (COOP project). Construction of the 3D model has been done by use of recently published/released structural data. For upper part of the model, all available data were merged into the following layers: sea water, the Cenozoic, the Upper Cretaceous, the Lower Cretaceous, the Jurassic, the Triassic, the Upper Permian (Zechstein) salt, Upper Permian clastics/carbonates and, finally, the Lower Permian-pre-Permian sedimentary rocks. Configuration of the crystalline crust and the Moho topography have been constrained by the published interpretations of deep seismic lines. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary has been compiled from previously published data. To evaluate the deep structure of the crystalline crust, a 3D density modelling has been carried out by use of the software IGMAS+ (the Interactive Gravity and Magnetic Application System). According to the 3D density modeling, the crystalline crust of the study area consists of several layers. Within the upper crystalline crust, gabbro to anorthositic rocks have been included into the 3D model along the western coast of Norway. In addition, a low-density (2627 kg/m3) upper crustal layer is modelled beneath the Horda Platform. The next upper crustal layer is characterized by regional distribution and has a density of 2670 kg/m3. The modelled middle crust of the study area contains four layers with similar densities around 2700 kg/m3. The lower crust consists of three layers. The deepest crustal layer is the high-density lower crustal layer (3060 kg/m3) which corresponds to the high-velocity layer. This layer thickens strongly beneath the Norwegian-Danish Basin and the eastern part of the East-Shetland platform. In addition to this high-density lower crustal layer, the

  20. Deep structure of the northern North Sea and adjacent areas according to regional-scale 3D density and thermal modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maystrenko, Yuriy P.; Olesen, Odleiv; Ebbing, Jörg

    2013-04-01

    To analyse the regional configuration of the crystalline crust within the northern North Sea and adjacent areas of the continent, a lithosphere-scale 3D structural model has been constructed in the frame of the Crustal Onshore-Offshore Project (COOP project). Construction of the 3D model has been carried out using recently published/released data. For upper part of the model, all available data were merged into the following layers: sea water, the Cenozoic, the Upper Cretaceous, the Lower Cretaceous, the Jurassic, the Triassic, the Upper Permian (Zechstein) salt, Upper Permian clastics/carbonates and, finally, the Lower Permian-pre-Permian sedimentary rocks. Configuration of the crystalline crust and the Moho topography have been constrained by the published interpretations of deep seismic lines. The lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary has been compiled from previously published data. To evaluate the internal structure of the crystalline crust, a 3D density modelling has been carried out by use of the software IGMAS+ (the Interactive Gravity and Magnetic Application System). According to the 3D density modeling, the crystalline crust of the study area consists of several layers. Within the upper crystalline crust, gabbro to anorthositic rocks have been included into the 3D model along the western coast of Norway. In addition, a low-density (2627 kg/m3) upper crustal layer is modelled beneath the Horda Platform. The next upper crustal layer is characterized by regional distribution and has a density of 2670 kg/m3. The modelled middle crust of the study area contains four layers with similar densities around 2700 kg/m3. The lower crust consists of three layers. The deepest crustal layer is the high-density lower crustal layer (3060 kg/m3) which corresponds to the high-velocity layer. This layer thickens strongly beneath the Norwegian-Danish Basin and the eastern part of the East-Shetland platform. The obtained Moho is strongly uplifted beneath the Central and Viking

  1. Backscatter in Large-Scale Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadiga, Balu

    2009-11-01

    Downgradient mixing of potential-voriticity and its variants are commonly employed to model the effects of unresolved geostrophic turbulence on resolved scales. This is motivated by the (inviscid and unforced) particle-wise conservation of potential-vorticity and the mean forward or down-scale cascade of potential enstrophy in geostrophic turubulence. By examining the statistical distribution of the transfer of potential enstrophy from mean or filtered motions to eddy or sub-filter motions, we find that the mean forward cascade results from the forward-scatter being only slightly greater than the backscatter. Downgradient mixing ideas, do not recognize such equitable mean-eddy or large scale-small scale interactions and consequently model only the mean effect of forward cascade; the importance of capturing the effects of backscatter---the forcing of resolved scales by unresolved scales---are only beginning to be recognized. While recent attempts to model the effects of backscatter on resolved scales have taken a stochastic approach, our analysis suggests that these effects are amenable to being modeled deterministically.

  2. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterisation of Western Bredasdorp Basin, Southern Offshore of South Africa: Insights from a 3d Crust-Scale Basin Model - (Phase 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonibare, W. A.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Sippel, J.; Mikeš, D.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, construction of 3D geological models and their subsequent upscaling for reservoir simulation has become an important tool within the oil industry for managing hydrocarbon reservoirs and increasing recovery rate. Incorporating petroleum system elements (i.e. source, reservoir and trap) into these models is a relatively new concept that seems very promising to play/prospect risk assessment and reservoir characterisation alike. However, yet to be fully integrated into this multi-disciplinary modelling approach are the qualitative and quantitative impacts of crust-scale basin dynamics on the observed basin-fill architecture and geometries. The focus of this study i.e. Western Bredasdorp Basin constitutes the extreme western section of the larger Bredasdorp sub-basin, which is the westernmost depocentre of the four southern Africa offshore sub-basins (others being Pletmos, Gamtoos and Algoa). These basins, which appear to be initiated by volcanically influenced continental rifting and break-up related to passive margin evolution (during the Mid-Late Jurassic to latest Valanginian), remain previously unstudied for crust-scale basin margin evolution, and particularly in terms of relating deep crustal processes to depo-system reconstruction and petroleum system evolution. Seismic interpretation of 42 2D seismic-reflection profiles forms the basis for maps of 6 stratigraphic horizons which record the syn-rift to post-rift (i.e. early drift and late drift to present-day seafloor) successions. In addition to this established seismic markers, high quality seismic profiles have shown evidence for a pre-rift sequence (i.e. older than Late Jurassic >130 Ma). The first goal of this study is the construction of a 3D gravity-constrained, crust-scale basin model from integration of seismics, well data and cores. This basin model is constructed using GMS (in-house GFZ Geo-Modelling Software) while testing its consistency with the gravity field is performed using IGMAS

  3. Alignment of continuous video onto 3D point clouds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenyi; Nister, David; Hsu, Steve

    2005-08-01

    We propose a general framework for aligning continuous (oblique) video onto 3D sensor data. We align a point cloud computed from the video onto the point cloud directly obtained from a 3D sensor. This is in contrast to existing techniques where the 2D images are aligned to a 3D model derived from the 3D sensor data. Using point clouds enables the alignment for scenes full of objects that are difficult to model; for example, trees. To compute 3D point clouds from video, motion stereo is used along with a state-of-the-art algorithm for camera pose estimation. Our experiments with real data demonstrate the advantages of the proposed registration algorithm for texturing models in large-scale semiurban environments. The capability to align video before a 3D model is built from the 3D sensor data offers new practical opportunities for 3D modeling. We introduce a novel modeling-through-registration approach that fuses 3D information from both the 3D sensor and the video. Initial experiments with real data illustrate the potential of the proposed approach.

  4. Scale up of large ALON windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Lee M.; Balasubramanian, Sreeram; Kashalikar, Uday; Foti, Robyn; Sastri, Suri

    2013-06-01

    Aluminum Oxynitride (ALON® Optical Ceramic) combines broadband transparency with excellent mechanical properties. ALON's cubic structure means that it is transparent in its polycrystalline form, allowing it to be manufactured by conventional powder processing techniques. Surmet has established a robust manufacturing process, beginning with synthesis of ALON® powder, continuing through forming/heat treatment of blanks, and ending with optical fabrication of ALON® windows. Surmet has made significant progress in our production capability in recent years. Additional scale up of Surmet's manufacturing capability, for larger sizes and higher quantities, is currently underway. ALON® transparent armor represents the state of the art in protection against armor piercing threats, offering a factor of two in weight and thickness savings over conventional glass laminates. Tiled and monolithic windows have been successfully produced and tested against a range of threats. Large ALON® window are also of interest to a range of visible to Mid-Wave Infra-Red (MWIR) sensor applications. These applications often have stressing imaging requirements which in turn require that these large windows have optical characteristics including excellent homogeneity of index of refraction and very low stress birefringence. Surmet is currently scaling up its production facility to be able to make and deliver ALON® monolithic windows as large as ~19x36-in. Additionally, Surmet has plans to scale up to windows ~3ftx3ft in size in the coming years. Recent results with scale up and characterization of the resulting blanks will be presented.

  5. Galaxy alignment on large and small scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, X.; Lin, W. P.; Dong, X.; Wang, Y. O.; Dutton, A.; Macciò, A.

    2016-10-01

    Galaxies are not randomly distributed across the universe but showing different kinds of alignment on different scales. On small scales satellite galaxies have a tendency to distribute along the major axis of the central galaxy, with dependence on galaxy properties that both red satellites and centrals have stronger alignment than their blue counterparts. On large scales, it is found that the major axes of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) have correlation up to 30Mpc/h. Using hydro-dynamical simulation with star formation, we investigate the origin of galaxy alignment on different scales. It is found that most red satellite galaxies stay in the inner region of dark matter halo inside which the shape of central galaxy is well aligned with the dark matter distribution. Red centrals have stronger alignment than blue ones as they live in massive haloes and the central galaxy-halo alignment increases with halo mass. On large scales, the alignment of LRGs is also from the galaxy-halo shape correlation, but with some extent of mis-alignment. The massive haloes have stronger alignment than haloes in filament which connect massive haloes. This is contrary to the naive expectation that cosmic filament is the cause of halo alignment.

  6. Rheological variations across an active rift system -- results from lithosphere-scale 3D gravity and thermal models of the Kenya Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeßen, Christian; Sippel, Judith; Cacace, Mauro; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Fishwick, Stewart; Heine, Christian; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2015-04-01

    Due to its tectono-volcanic activity and economic (geothermal and petroleum) potential, the eastern branch of the East African Rift System (EARS) is one of the best studied extensional systems worldwide and an important natural laboratory for the development of geodynamic concepts on rifting and nascent continental break-up. The Kenya Rift, an integral part of the eastern branch of the EARS, has formed in the area of weak Proterozoic crust of the Mozambique mobile belt adjacent to the rheologically stronger Archean Tanzania craton. To assess the variations in lithospheric strength between different tectonic domains and their influence on the tectonic evolution of the region, we developed a set of structural, density, thermal and rheological 3D models. For these models we integrated multi-disciplinary information, such as published geological field data, sediment thicknesses, well information, existing structural models, seismic refraction and reflection data, seismic tomography, gravity and heat-flow data. Our main approach focused on combined 3D isostatic and gravity modelling. The resulting lithosphere-scale 3D density model provides new insights into the depth distribution of the crust-mantle boundary and thickness variations of different crustal density domains. The latter further facilitate interpretations of variations of lithologies and related physical rock properties. By considering lithology-dependent heat production and thermal conductivity, we calculate the conductive thermal field across the region of the greater Kenya Rift. Finally, the assessed variations in lithology and temperature allow deriving differences in the integrated strength of the lithosphere across the different tectonic domains.

  7. Large-Scale PV Integration Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Diao, Ruisheng; Ma, Jian; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin; Hafen, Ryan P.; Jin, Chunlian; Kirkham, Harold; Shlatz, Eugene; Frantzis, Lisa; McClive, Timothy; Karlson, Gregory; Acharya, Dhruv; Ellis, Abraham; Stein, Joshua; Hansen, Clifford; Chadliev, Vladimir; Smart, Michael; Salgo, Richard; Sorensen, Rahn; Allen, Barbara; Idelchik, Boris

    2011-07-29

    This research effort evaluates the impact of large-scale photovoltaic (PV) and distributed generation (DG) output on NV Energy’s electric grid system in southern Nevada. It analyzes the ability of NV Energy’s generation to accommodate increasing amounts of utility-scale PV and DG, and the resulting cost of integrating variable renewable resources. The study was jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy and NV Energy, and conducted by a project team comprised of industry experts and research scientists from Navigant Consulting Inc., Sandia National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and NV Energy.

  8. Realtime infiltration process monitoring in macroporous soil - a plot-scale experiment accompanied by high-resolution time-lapse 3D GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackisch, Conrad; Allroggen, Niklas

    2016-04-01

    Infiltration and quick vertical redistribution of event water through rapid subsurface flow in soil structures is one of the key issues in hydrology. Although the importance of preferential flow is broadly recognised, our theories, observation techniques and modelling approaches lose grounds when the assumption of well-mixed states in REVs collapses. To characterise the combination of advective and diffusive flow is especially challenging. We have shown in earlier studies that a combination of TDR monitoring, dye- and salt-tracer recovery and time-lapse 3D GPR in irrigation experiments provides means to characterise infiltration dynamics at the plot- and hillslope-scale also in highly structured soils. We pinpointed that the spatial and temporal resolution requires special attention and improvement - particularly owing to the facts of high velocity (10‑3 ms‑1) of advective flow and small scale (10‑2 m) of the respective flow structures. We present insights from a novel technique of continuous high-resolution time-lapse 3D GPR measurements during and after a plot-scale (1 m x 1 m) irrigation experiment. Continuous TDR soil moisture measurements, dye tracer excavation and salt-tracer samples are used as qualitative and quantitative references. While classical infiltration experiments either look at spatial patterns or temporal dynamics at singular gauges, we highlight the advantage of combining both to achieve a more complete image of the infiltration process. Although operating at the limits of the techniques this setup enables non-invasive observation of preferential flow processes in the field and allows to explore and characterise macropore matrix exchange.

  9. Measurements and ALE3D Simulations for Violence in a Scaled Thermal Explosion Experiment with LX-10 and AerMet 100 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Yoh, J J; deHaven, M R; Strand, O T

    2005-06-03

    We completed a Scaled Thermal Explosion Experiment (STEX) and performed ALE3D simulations for the HMX-based explosive, LX-10, confined in an AerMet 100 (iron-cobalt-nickel alloy) vessel. The explosive was heated at 1 C/h until cookoff at 182 C using a controlled temperature profile. During the explosion, the expansion of the tube and fragment velocities were measured with strain gauges, Photonic-Doppler-Velocimeters (PDVs), and micropower radar units. These results were combined to produce a single curve describing 15 cm of tube wall motion. A majority of the metal fragments were captured and cataloged. A fragment size distribution was constructed, and a typical fragment had a length scale of 2 cm. Based on these results, the explosion was considered to be a violent deflagration. ALE3D models for chemical, thermal, and mechanical behavior were developed for the heating and explosive processes. A four-step chemical kinetics model is employed for the HMX while a one-step model is used for the Viton. A pressure-dependent deflagration model is employed during the expansion. The mechanical behavior of the solid constituents is represented by a Steinberg-Guinan model while polynomial and gamma-law expressions are used for the equation of state of the solid and gas species, respectively. A gamma-law model is employed for the air in gaps, and a mixed material model is used for the interface between air and explosive. A Johnson-Cook model with an empirical rule for failure strain is used to describe fracture behavior. Parameters for the kinetics model were specified using measurements of the One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX), while measurements for burn rate were employed to determine parameters in the burn front model. The ALE3D models provide good predictions for the thermal behavior and time to explosion, but the predicted wall expansion curve is higher than the measured curve. Possible contributions to this discrepancy include inaccuracies in the chemical models

  10. Extending a Mobile Device with Low-Cost 3d Modeling and Building-Scale Mapping Capabilities, for Application in Architecture and Archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona, M.; Clini, P.; Dellacasa, A.; Falzone, P.; La Camera, A.; Quattrini, R.; Sommariva, E.; Stephens, J.

    2015-02-01

    One of the most challenging problem in architecture is the automated construction of 3D (and 4D) digital models of cultural objects with the aim of implementing open data repositories, scientifically authenticated and responding to well accepted standards of validation, evaluation, preservation, publication, updating and dissemination. The realization of such an ambitious objective requires the adoption of special technological instruments. In this paper we plan to use portable devices (i.e. smartphones, tablets or PDAs eventually extended to wearable ones), extended with a small plug-in, for automatically extracting 3D models of single objects and building-scale mapping of the surrounding environment. At the same time, the device will provide the capability of inserting notes and observations. Where the instrument cannot be directly applied, for example for exploring the top of a complex building, we consider mounting our device, or using equivalent existing equipment, on a drone, in a modular approach for obtaining data de-facto interchangeable. The approach based on the expansion packs has the advantage of anticipating (or even promoting) future extensions of new mobile devices, when the spectrum of possible applications justify the corresponding increased costs. In order to experiment and verify this approach we plan to test it in two specific scenarios of the cultural heritage domain in which such devices seem particularly promising: Strada Nuova in Genoa and Palazzo Ducale in Urbino, both located in Italy.

  11. Deriving Macropore and Preferential Flow Parameters from Tracer and Time-lapse 3D GPR Experiments at the Plot-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackisch, Conrad; Allroggen, Niklas; Tronicke, Jens; Zehe, Erwin

    2014-05-01

    "Hydrology - a science in which all processes are preferential" (Uhlenbrook, 2006) - as such preferential flow is known and discussed in hydrology since almost three decades. At the same time, preferential flow remains problematic as explicit descriptions are hard to define and upscale and implicit descriptions remain rather case sensitive. Moreover, our techniques to monitor preferential flow and especially flow structures are very limited. We conducted three multi-tracer plot-scale (1m x 1m) sprinkler experiments at a forested hillslope in the Attert Basin in Luxembourg with prevailing geogenic and biogenic preferential flow structures. It was accompanied by a 3D time-lapse GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar) survey covering an area of 3m x 3m. We present the results with special emphasis on the derivation of macropore parameters for further modelling. To do so, we developed an automated analysis of images from excavated Brilliant Blue stained profiles. Additionally, we analyse our time-lapse GPR data with respect to temporal changes and derive 3D strutural information of the preferential flow patterns. Superior to tracers, this high resolution subsurface imaging technique is non-invasive, repeatable and therefore helps to disentangle the dye stained patterns towards process observation. The results of the image analyses and the GPR surveys are compared and referenced to soil moisture monitoring, sampled Bromide profiles and stable isotope signatures. We further discuss implications for joint development of model concepts and observation methods.

  12. Fractals and cosmological large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Xiaochun; Schramm, David N.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of galaxy-galaxy and cluster-cluster correlations as well as other large-scale structure can be fit with a 'limited' fractal with dimension D of about 1.2. This is not a 'pure' fractal out to the horizon: the distribution shifts from power law to random behavior at some large scale. If the observed patterns and structures are formed through an aggregation growth process, the fractal dimension D can serve as an interesting constraint on the properties of the stochastic motion responsible for limiting the fractal structure. In particular, it is found that the observed fractal should have grown from two-dimensional sheetlike objects such as pancakes, domain walls, or string wakes. This result is generic and does not depend on the details of the growth process.

  13. Condition Monitoring of Large-Scale Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the research conducted for the NASA Ames Research Center under grant NAG2-1182 (Condition-Based Monitoring of Large-Scale Facilities). The information includes copies of view graphs presented at NASA Ames in the final Workshop (held during December of 1998), as well as a copy of a technical report provided to the COTR (Dr. Anne Patterson-Hine) subsequent to the workshop. The material describes the experimental design, collection of data, and analysis results associated with monitoring the health of large-scale facilities. In addition to this material, a copy of the Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory data fusion visual programming tool kit was also provided to NASA Ames researchers.

  14. Large-scale fibre-array multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Cheremiskin, I V; Chekhlova, T K

    2001-05-31

    The possibility of creating a fibre multiplexer/demultiplexer with large-scale multiplexing without any basic restrictions on the number of channels and the spectral spacing between them is shown. The operating capacity of a fibre multiplexer based on a four-fibre array ensuring a spectral spacing of 0.7 pm ({approx} 10 GHz) between channels is demonstrated. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. Large scale processes in the solar nebula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, A. P.

    Most proposed chondrule formation mechanisms involve processes occurring inside the solar nebula, so the large scale (roughly 1 to 10 AU) structure of the nebula is of general interest for any chrondrule-forming mechanism. Chondrules and Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) might also have been formed as a direct result of the large scale structure of the nebula, such as passage of material through high temperature regions. While recent nebula models do predict the existence of relatively hot regions, the maximum temperatures in the inner planet region may not be high enough to account for chondrule or CAI thermal processing, unless the disk mass is considerably greater than the minimum mass necessary to restore the planets to solar composition. Furthermore, it does not seem to be possible to achieve both rapid heating and rapid cooling of grain assemblages in such a large scale furnace. However, if the accretion flow onto the nebula surface is clumpy, as suggested by observations of variability in young stars, then clump-disk impacts might be energetic enough to launch shock waves which could propagate through the nebula to the midplane, thermally processing any grain aggregates they encounter, and leaving behind a trail of chondrules.

  16. Geometric algorithms for electromagnetic modeling of large scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingenot, James

    With the rapid increase in the speed and complexity of integrated circuit designs, 3D full wave and time domain simulation of chip, package, and board systems becomes more and more important for the engineering of modern designs. Much effort has been applied to the problem of electromagnetic (EM) simulation of such systems in recent years. Major advances in boundary element EM simulations have led to O(n log n) simulations using iterative methods and advanced Fast. Fourier Transform (FFT), Multi-Level Fast Multi-pole Methods (MLFMM), and low-rank matrix compression techniques. These advances have been augmented with an explosion of multi-core and distributed computing technologies, however, realization of the full scale of these capabilities has been hindered by cumbersome and inefficient geometric processing. Anecdotal evidence from industry suggests that users may spend around 80% of turn-around time manipulating the geometric model and mesh. This dissertation addresses this problem by developing fast and efficient data structures and algorithms for 3D modeling of chips, packages, and boards. The methods proposed here harness the regular, layered 2D nature of the models (often referred to as "2.5D") to optimize these systems for large geometries. First, an architecture is developed for efficient storage and manipulation of 2.5D models. The architecture gives special attention to native representation of structures across various input models and special issues particular to 3D modeling. The 2.5D structure is then used to optimize the mesh systems First, circuit/EM co-simulation techniques are extended to provide electrical connectivity between objects. This concept is used to connect independently meshed layers, allowing simple and efficient 2D mesh algorithms to be used in creating a 3D mesh. Here, adaptive meshing is used to ensure that the mesh accurately models the physical unknowns (current and charge). Utilizing the regularized nature of 2.5D objects and

  17. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  18. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  19. 3D {ital XY} Scaling of the Irreversibility Line of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.R.; Loram, J.W.; Johnson, J.D.; Hodby, J.W.; Changkang, C.

    1997-09-01

    We find experimentally that the irreversibility line, H{sub irr}(T) , and the reversible magnetization of twinned YBa{sub 2}Cu {sub 3}O{sub 7} crystals both show 3D XY scaling, which suggests a common origin for both quantities. Analysis of this result and of a correlation between the condensation energy and H{sub irr}(T) of oxygen deficient YBa{sub 2}Cu {sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} for 0{lt}{delta}{lt}0.6 , implies that H{sub irr}(T) is strongly influenced by critical fluctuations. It is possible that these values of H{sub irr}(T) and the recently discovered vortex melting line, H{sub m}(T) , both correspond to an upper critical field line which has been suppressed by thermodynamic fluctuations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Characterisation of small-scale heating events in the solar atmosphere from 3D MHD simulations and their potential role in coronal heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberreiter, M.; Guerreiro, N.; Hansteen, V. H.; Schmutz, W. K.

    2015-12-01

    The physical mechanism that heats the solar corona is one of the still open science questions in solar physics. One of the proposed mechanism for coronal heating are nanoflares. To investigate their role in coronal heating we study the properties of the small-scale heating events in the solar atmosphere using 3D MHD simulations. We present a method to identify and track these heating events in time which allows us to study their life time, energy, and spectral signatures. These spectal signatures will be compared with available spectrosopic observations obtained with IRIS and SUMER. Ultimately, these results will be important for the coordinated scientific exploitation of SPICE and EUI along with other instruments onboard Solar Orbiter to address the coronal heating problem.

  1. Characterization of small-scale heating events in the solar atmosphere from 3D-MHD simulations and their potential role in coronal heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerreiro, Nuno; Haberreiter, Margit; Hansteen, Viggo; Schmutz, Werner

    2016-04-01

    Aiming at better understanding the mechanism(s) responsible for the coronal heating and the ubiquitous redshifts observed in the lower transition region we focus on analyzing the properties of small-scale heating events (SSHEs) in the solar atmosphere. We present a comprehensive method to follow SSHEs over time in 3D-MHD simulations of the solar atmosphere. Applying the method we are able to better understand the properties of the SSHEs and how the plasma in their vicinity respond to them. We present results for the lifetime, energy and spectral signatures of the SSHEs. Ultimately, these results will be important for the coordinated scientific exploration of SPICE and EUI along with other interments on board solar orbiter. ​

  2. Detection and characterization of small-scale heating events in the solar atmosphere from 3D-MHD simulations and their potential role in coronal heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerreiro, Nuno; Haberreiter, Margit; Schmutz, Werner; Hansteen, Viggo

    2016-07-01

    Aiming at better understanding the mechanism(s) responsible for the coronal heating we focus on analyzing the properties of the magnetically generated small-scale heating events (SSHEs) in the solar atmosphere. We present a comprehensive method to detect and follow SSHEs over time in 3D-MHD simulations of the solar atmosphere. Applying the method we are able to better understand the properties of the SSHEs and how the plasma in their vicinity respond to them. We study the lifetime, energy and spectral signatures and show that the energy flux dissipated by them is enough to heat the corona. Ultimately, these results will be important for the coordinated scientific exploration of SPICE and EUI along with other instruments on board solar orbiter.

  3. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  4. Impact of soil structure heterogeneity on the degradation of organic pollutants at the centimeter scale : 3D Modeling using graph based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair Yemini, Francis; Chenu, Claire; Monga, Olivier; Vieuble Gonond, Laure; Juarez, Sabrina; Pihneiro, Marc; otten, Wilfred; Garnier, Patricia

    2014-05-01

    Contaminant degradation by microorganisms is very variable in soils because of the very heterogeneous spatial relationship of contaminant/degraders. Repacked Soil columns were carried out to study the degradation of 2,4D pesticide labelled with C14 for different scenarios of microorganisms and pesticide initial location. Measurements of global C14-CO2 emission and C14 distribution in the soil column showed that the initial location play a crucial rule on the dissipation of the pollutant. Experiments were simulated using a 3D model able to model microbial degradation and substrate diffusion between aggregates by considering explicitly the 3D structure of soil from CT images. The initial version of the model (Monga et al., 2008) was improved in order to simulate diffusion in samples of large size. Partial differential equations were implemented using freefem++ solver. The model simulates properly the dynamics of 2,4D in the column for the different initial situations. CT images of the same soil but using undisturbed structure instead of repacked aggregates were also carried out. Significant differences of the simulated results were observed between the repacked and the undisturbed soil. The conclusion of our work is that the heterogeneity of the soil structure and location of pollutants and decomposers has a very strong influence on the dissipation of pollutants.

  5. Effects of Heterogeneities in Strength and Initial Shear Stress on Large Ruptures in a Fast Multi-cycle Earthquake Simulator (RSQSim) and DYNA3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J.; Richards-Dinger, K.; Dieterich, J.; Oglesby, D.

    2008-12-01

    RSQSim is a fast earthquake simulator that produces long (~ 106 event and ~ 104 year) synthetic seismicity catalogs in complex fault systems. It treats the interseismic and nucleation phases of the seismic cycle quasi-statically with an approximate version of rate- and state-dependent friction. The ruptures themselves are quasi-dynamic with slip speeds determined by shear impedance considerations. Validation of coseismic final slip (and therefore stress change) distributions is important for the generation of long catalogs because subsequent events in such simulators need to inherit the proper stress fields. Also, the heterogeneous evolved stress states from long simulations in complex fault systems (resulting from complex large ruptures, ongoing smaller seismicity, and stress interactions within the fault system) may be useful as more realistic inputs to dynamic rupture modelling. If the time evolution of ruptures in RSQSim is also realistic, they may be useful as kinematic sources for seismic hazard ground motion calculations. As part of an effort to validate the quasi-dynamic ruptures in RSQSim, we compare rupture propagation on a variable-strength planar fault in RSQSim to that on a similar fault in DYNA3D (a fully dynamic finite element model employing slip-weakening friction) for single, large, artificially nucleated ruptures. Previous work has shown that on homogeneous planar faults the RSQSim results agreed quantitatively very well with those of DYNA3D. For this comparison, our asperity model consists of multiple rectangular zones of increased normal stress of varying size, location, and amplitude. The heterogeneities produce complex ruptures - the rupture front tends to wrap itself around the barriers and create a burst of energy once it propagates across a barrier. Both codes allow rupture propagation over significant zones of negative stress drop in these asperity regions. Rupture durations, average rupture propagation speeds, and overall slip pattern

  6. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  7. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  8. The rift to break-up evolution of the Gulf of Aden: Insights from 3D numerical lithospheric-scale modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, Sascha; Autin, Julia

    2013-11-01

    The Gulf of Aden provides an ideal setting to study oblique rifting since numerous structural data are available onshore and offshore. Recent surveys showed that the spatio-temporal evolution of the Gulf of Aden rift system is dominated by three fault orientations: displacement-orthogonal (WSW), rift-parallel (WNW) and an intermediate E-W trend. The oldest parts of the rift that are exposed onshore feature displacement-orthogonal and intermediate directions, whereas the subsequently active necking zone involves mainly rift-parallel faults. The final rift phase recorded at the distal margin is characterised by displacement-orthogonal and intermediate fault orientations. We investigate the evolution of the Gulf of Aden from rift initiation to break-up by means of 3D numerical experiments on lithospheric scale. We apply the finite element model SLIM3D which includes realistic, elasto-visco-plastic rheology and a free surface. Despite recent advances, 3D numerical experiments still require relatively coarse resolution so that individual faults are poorly resolved. We address this issue by proposing a simple post-processing method that uses the surface stress-tensor to evaluate stress regime (extensional, strike-slip, compressional) and preferred fault azimuth. The described method is applicable to any geodynamic model and easy to introduce. Our model reproduces the observed fault pattern of the Gulf of Aden and illustrates how multiple fault directions arise from the interaction of local and far-field tectonic stresses in an evolving rift system. The numerical simulations robustly feature intermediate faults during the initial rift phase, followed by rift-parallel normal faulting at the rift flanks and strike-slip faults in the central part of the rift system. Upon break-up, displacement-orthogonal as well as intermediate faults occur. This study corroborates and extends findings from previous analogue experiments of oblique rifting on lithospheric scale and allows new

  9. Challenges in large scale distributed computing: bioinformatics.

    SciTech Connect

    Disz, T.; Kubal, M.; Olson, R.; Overbeek, R.; Stevens, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago; The Fellowship for the Interpretation of Genomes

    2005-01-01

    The amount of genomic data available for study is increasing at a rate similar to that of Moore's law. This deluge of data is challenging bioinformaticians to develop newer, faster and better algorithms for analysis and examination of this data. The growing availability of large scale computing grids coupled with high-performance networking is challenging computer scientists to develop better, faster methods of exploiting parallelism in these biological computations and deploying them across computing grids. In this paper, we describe two computations that are required to be run frequently and which require large amounts of computing resource to complete in a reasonable time. The data for these computations are very large and the sequential computational time can exceed thousands of hours. We show the importance and relevance of these computations, the nature of the data and parallelism and we show how we are meeting the challenge of efficiently distributing and managing these computations in the SEED project.

  10. Supporting large-scale computational science

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R

    1998-10-01

    A study has been carried out to determine the feasibility of using commercial database management systems (DBMSs) to support large-scale computational science. Conventional wisdom in the past has been that DBMSs are too slow for such data. Several events over the past few years have muddied the clarity of this mindset: 1. 2. 3. 4. Several commercial DBMS systems have demonstrated storage and ad-hoc quer access to Terabyte data sets. Several large-scale science teams, such as EOSDIS [NAS91], high energy physics [MM97] and human genome [Kin93] have adopted (or make frequent use of) commercial DBMS systems as the central part of their data management scheme. Several major DBMS vendors have introduced their first object-relational products (ORDBMSs), which have the potential to support large, array-oriented data. In some cases, performance is a moot issue. This is true in particular if the performance of legacy applications is not reduced while new, albeit slow, capabilities are added to the system. The basic assessment is still that DBMSs do not scale to large computational data. However, many of the reasons have changed, and there is an expiration date attached to that prognosis. This document expands on this conclusion, identifies the advantages and disadvantages of various commercial approaches, and describes the studies carried out in exploring this area. The document is meant to be brief, technical and informative, rather than a motivational pitch. The conclusions within are very likely to become outdated within the next 5-7 years, as market forces will have a significant impact on the state of the art in scientific data management over the next decade.

  11. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Kathleen; Marriange, Tobias; Aamir, Ali; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Brewer, Michael; Chan, Manwei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Denis, Kevin; Moseley, Samuel H.; Rostem, Karwan; Wollack, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a four telescope array designed to characterize relic primordial gravitational waves from in ation and the optical depth to reionization through a measurement of the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the largest angular scales. The frequencies of the four CLASS telescopes, one at 38 GHz, two at 93 GHz, and one dichroic system at 145/217 GHz, are chosen to avoid spectral regions of high atmospheric emission and span the minimum of the polarized Galactic foregrounds: synchrotron emission at lower frequencies and dust emission at higher frequencies. Low-noise transition edge sensor detectors and a rapid front-end polarization modulator provide a unique combination of high sensitivity, stability, and control of systematics. The CLASS site, at 5200 m in the Chilean Atacama desert, allows for daily mapping of up to 70% of the sky and enables the characterization of CMB polarization at the largest angular scales. Using this combination of a broad frequency range, large sky coverage, control over systematics, and high sensitivity, CLASS will observe the reionization and recombination peaks of the CMB E- and B-mode power spectra. CLASS will make a cosmic variance limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization and will measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, down to a level of 0.01 (95% C.L.).

  12. Time domain topology optimization of 3D nanophotonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elesin, Y.; Lazarov, B. S.; Jensen, J. S.; Sigmund, O.

    2014-02-01

    We present an efficient parallel topology optimization framework for design of large scale 3D nanophotonic devices. The code shows excellent scalability and is demonstrated for optimization of broadband frequency splitter, waveguide intersection, photonic crystal-based waveguide and nanowire-based waveguide. The obtained results are compared to simplified 2D studies and we demonstrate that 3D topology optimization may lead to significant performance improvements.

  13. Large-scale quasi-geostrophic magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Balk, Alexander M.

    2014-12-01

    We consider the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of a shallow fluid layer on a rapidly rotating planet or star. The presence of a background toroidal magnetic field is assumed, and the 'shallow water' beta-plane approximation is used. We derive a single equation for the slow large length scale dynamics. The range of validity of this equation fits the MHD of the lighter fluid at the top of Earth's outer core. The form of this equation is similar to the quasi-geostrophic (Q-G) equation (for usual ocean or atmosphere), but the parameters are essentially different. Our equation also implies the inverse cascade; but contrary to the usual Q-G situation, the energy cascades to smaller length scales, while the enstrophy cascades to the larger scales. We find the Kolmogorov-type spectrum for the inverse cascade. The spectrum indicates the energy accumulation in larger scales. In addition to the energy and enstrophy, the obtained equation possesses an extra (adiabatic-type) invariant. Its presence implies energy accumulation in the 30° sector around zonal direction. With some special energy input, the extra invariant can lead to the accumulation of energy in zonal magnetic field; this happens if the input of the extra invariant is small, while the energy input is considerable.

  14. Precision Measurement of Large Scale Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to develop and to start to apply new precision methods for measuring the power spectrum and redshift distortions from the anticipated new generation of large redshift surveys. A highlight of work completed during the award period was the application of the new methods developed by the PI to measure the real space power spectrum and redshift distortions of the IRAS PSCz survey, published in January 2000. New features of the measurement include: (1) measurement of power over an unprecedentedly broad range of scales, 4.5 decades in wavenumber, from 0.01 to 300 h/Mpc; (2) at linear scales, not one but three power spectra are measured, the galaxy-galaxy, galaxy-velocity, and velocity-velocity power spectra; (3) at linear scales each of the three power spectra is decorrelated within itself, and disentangled from the other two power spectra (the situation is analogous to disentangling scalar and tensor modes in the Cosmic Microwave Background); and (4) at nonlinear scales the measurement extracts not only the real space power spectrum, but also the full line-of-sight pairwise velocity distribution in redshift space.

  15. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriage, Tobias; Ali, A.; Amiri, M.; Appel, J. W.; Araujo, D.; Bennett, C. L.; Boone, F.; Chan, M.; Cho, H.; Chuss, D. T.; Colazo, F.; Crowe, E.; Denis, K.; Dünner, R.; Eimer, J.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Gothe, D.; Halpern, M.; Harrington, K.; Hilton, G.; Hinshaw, G. F.; Huang, C.; Irwin, K.; Jones, G.; Karakla, J.; Kogut, A. J.; Larson, D.; Limon, M.; Lowry, L.; Mehrle, N.; Miller, A. D.; Miller, N.; Moseley, S. H.; Novak, G.; Reintsema, C.; Rostem, K.; Stevenson, T.; Towner, D.; U-Yen, K.; Wagner, E.; Watts, D.; Wollack, E.; Xu, Z.; Zeng, L.

    2014-01-01

    Some of the most compelling inflation models predict a background of primordial gravitational waves (PGW) detectable by their imprint of a curl-like "B-mode" pattern in the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is a novel array of telescopes to measure the B-mode signature of the PGW. By targeting the largest angular scales (>2°) with a multifrequency array, novel polarization modulation and detectors optimized for both control of systematics and sensitivity, CLASS sets itself apart in the field of CMB polarization surveys and opens an exciting new discovery space for the PGW and inflation. This poster presents an overview of the CLASS project.

  16. The XMM Large Scale Structure Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Marguerite

    2005-10-01

    We propose to complete, by an additional 5 deg2, the XMM-LSS Survey region overlying the Spitzer/SWIRE field. This field already has CFHTLS and Integral coverage, and will encompass about 10 deg2. The resulting multi-wavelength medium-depth survey, which complements XMM and Chandra deep surveys, will provide a unique view of large-scale structure over a wide range of redshift, and will show active galaxies in the full range of environments. The complete coverage by optical and IR surveys provides high-quality photometric redshifts, so that cosmological results can quickly be extracted. In the spirit of a Legacy survey, we will make the raw X-ray data immediately public. Multi-band catalogues and images will also be made available on short time scales.

  17. A 3D Time-Shared NOESY Experiment Designed to Provide Optimal Resolution for Accurate Assignment of NMR Distance Restraints in Large Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Subrata H; Harden, Bradley J

    2014-01-01

    Structure determination of proteins by solution NMR has become an established method, but challenges increase steeply with the size of proteins. Notably spectral crowding and signal overlap impair the analysis of cross-peaks in NOESY spectra that provide distance restraints for structural models. An optimal spectral resolution can alleviate overlap but requires prohibitively long experimental time with existing methods. Here we present a time-shared 3D experiment optimized for large proteins that provides 15N and 13C dispersed NOESY spectra in a single measurement. NOESY correlations appear in the detected dimension and hence benefit from the highest resolution achievable of all dimensions without increase in experimental time. By design, this experiment is inherently optimal for non-uniform sampling acquisition when compared to current alternatives. Thus, 15N and 13C dispersed NOESY spectra with ultra-high resolution in all dimensions were acquired in parallel within about 4 days instead of 80 days for a 52 kDa monomeric protein at a concentration of 350 μM. PMID:25381567

  18. Structural and chemical basis for enhanced affinity and potency for a large series of estrogen receptor ligands: 2D and 3D QSAR studies.

    PubMed

    Salum, Lívia de B; Polikarpov, Igor; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2007-09-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is an important drug target for the development of novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of breast cancer. Progress towards the design of more potent and selective ER modulators requires the optimization of multiple ligand-receptor interactions. Comparative molecular field analyses (CoMFA) and hologram quantitative structure-activity relationships (HQSAR) were conducted on a large set of ERalpha modulators. Two training sets containing either 127 or 69 compounds were used to generate QSAR models for in vitro binding affinity and potency, respectively. Significant correlation coefficients (affinity models, CoMFA, r(2)=0.93 and q(2)=0.79; HQSAR, r(2)=0.92 and q(2)=0.71; potency models, CoMFA, r(2)=0.94 and q(2)=0.72; HQSAR, r(2)=0.92 and q(2)=0.74) were obtained, indicating the potential of the models for untested compounds. The generated models were validated using external test sets, and the predicted values were in good agreement with the experimental results. The final QSAR models as well as the information gathered from 3D contour maps should be useful for the design of novel ERalpha modulators having improved affinity and potency.

  19. Large-scale brightenings associated with flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandrini, Cristina H.; Machado, Marcos E.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that large-scale brightenings (LSBs) associated with solar flares, similar to the 'giant arches' discovered by Svestka et al. (1982) in images obtained by the SSM HXIS hours after the onset of two-ribbon flares, can also occur in association with confined flares in complex active regions. For these events, a clear link between the LSB and the underlying flare is clearly evident from the active-region magnetic field topology. The implications of these findings are discussed within the framework of the interacting loops of flares and the giant arch phenomenology.

  20. Large scale phononic metamaterials for seismic isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Aravantinos-Zafiris, N.; Sigalas, M. M.

    2015-08-14

    In this work, we numerically examine structures that could be characterized as large scale phononic metamaterials. These novel structures could have band gaps in the frequency spectrum of seismic waves when their dimensions are chosen appropriately, thus raising the belief that they could be serious candidates for seismic isolation structures. Different and easy to fabricate structures were examined made from construction materials such as concrete and steel. The well-known finite difference time domain method is used in our calculations in order to calculate the band structures of the proposed metamaterials.

  1. Large-scale dynamics and global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Held, I.M. )

    1993-02-01

    Predictions of future climate change raise a variety of issues in large-scale atmospheric and oceanic dynamics. Several of these are reviewed in this essay, including the sensitivity of the circulation of the Atlantic Ocean to increasing freshwater input at high latitudes; the possibility of greenhouse cooling in the southern oceans; the sensitivity of monsoonal circulations to differential warming of the two hemispheres; the response of midlatitude storms to changing temperature gradients and increasing water vapor in the atmosphere; and the possible importance of positive feedback between the mean winds and eddy-induced heating in the polar stratosphere.

  2. Neutrinos and large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2015-07-15

    I review the use of cosmological large-scale structure to measure properties of neutrinos and other relic populations of light relativistic particles. With experiments to measure the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave anisotropies and the clustering of matter at low redshift, we now have securely measured a relativistic background with density appropriate to the cosmic neutrino background. Our limits on the mass of the neutrino continue to shrink. Experiments coming in the next decade will greatly improve the available precision on searches for the energy density of novel relativistic backgrounds and the mass of neutrinos.

  3. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  4. Large scale study of tooth enamel

    SciTech Connect

    Bodart, F.; Deconninck, G.; Martin, M.Th.

    1981-04-01

    Human tooth enamel contains traces of foreign elements. The presence of these elements is related to the history and the environment of the human body and can be considered as the signature of perturbations which occur during the growth of a tooth. A map of the distribution of these traces on a large scale sample of the population will constitute a reference for further investigations of environmental effects. One hundred eighty samples of teeth were first analysed using PIXE, backscattering and nuclear reaction techniques. The results were analysed using statistical methods. Correlations between O, F, Na, P, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and Sr were observed and cluster analysis was in progress. The techniques described in the present work have been developed in order to establish a method for the exploration of very large samples of the Belgian population.

  5. Large-scale impacts of herbivores on the structural diversity of African savannas.

    PubMed

    Asner, Gregory P; Levick, Shaun R; Kennedy-Bowdoin, Ty; Knapp, David E; Emerson, Ruth; Jacobson, James; Colgan, Matthew S; Martin, Roberta E

    2009-03-24

    African savannas are undergoing management intensification, and decision makers are increasingly challenged to balance the needs of large herbivore populations with the maintenance of vegetation and ecosystem diversity. Ensuring the sustainability of Africa's natural protected areas requires information on the efficacy of management decisions at large spatial scales, but often neither experimental treatments nor large-scale responses are available for analysis. Using a new airborne remote sensing system, we mapped the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of vegetation at a spatial resolution of 56 cm throughout 1640 ha of savanna after 6-, 22-, 35-, and 41-year exclusions of herbivores, as well as in unprotected areas, across Kruger National Park in South Africa. Areas in which herbivores were excluded over the short term (6 years) contained 38%-80% less bare ground compared with those that were exposed to mammalian herbivory. In the longer-term (> 22 years), the 3-D structure of woody vegetation differed significantly between protected and accessible landscapes, with up to 11-fold greater woody canopy cover in the areas without herbivores. Our maps revealed 2 scales of ecosystem response to herbivore consumption, one broadly mediated by geologic substrate and the other mediated by hillslope-scale variation in soil nutrient availability and moisture conditions. Our results are the first to quantitatively illustrate the extent to which herbivores can affect the 3-D structural diversity of vegetation across large savanna landscapes.

  6. Scaled 3D modeling of poly-phase tectonic deformation: A new analogue material for basement rock, with controlled variable strength.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwland, D. A.; Koekoek, G.; van Mechelen, D.; Papo, M.

    2003-04-01

    A common process in tectonic faulting is that of poly-phase deformation. A majority of neo-tectonic structures is controlled by reactivated pre-existing faults in the underlying basement. A reliable interpretation of such neo-tectonic structures is only possible if the process of the poly-phase deformation can be described and understood in terms of the geomechanics. We have developed an analogue modelling approach to poly-phase deformation. The aim of the project was to construct analogue models with reliable scaling of strength, length, geometry and kinematics of poly-phase tectonic deformation in 3D. The natural process generally involves a faulted basement sequence of relatively strong rocks and a younger cover sequence of weaker rocks. The main problem here has always been to find a material to model the strong basement rocks. A good basement analogue needs to be strong enough to support fault reactivation without braking itself, however, it should brake when the stress conditions require. For example, compression perpendicular to a steep basement fault should break the basement. The weak cover can be modelled with dry sand, which is essentially cohesionless, but for the stronger basement a good analogue was not available (wooden blocks often used in analogue models are too strong). The orientation and geometry of faults and fault patterns is controlled by the internal friction angle (f) of the deformed rock. For the majority of brittle rocks f is of the order of 30o, for the sand that is used for analogue modelling f=32o. In order to model the basement rock a brittle material was needed that must be stronger that dry sand, strong enough to remain intact during fault reactivation, but weak enough to break when a fault is too steep to be reactivated in horizontal compression conditions. In the analogue modelling lab of the VU (TecLab) we have recently succeeded in forming such a basement material. The material can be made at any required strength to make

  7. Electromagnetic coupling and array packing induce exchange of dominance on complex modes in 3D periodic arrays of spheres with large permittivity

    DOE PAGES

    Campione, Salvatore; Capolino, Filippo

    2016-01-25

    In this study, we investigate the effect on wave propagation of array packing and electromagnetic coupling between spheres in a three-dimensional (3D) lattice of microspheres with large permittivity that exhibit strong magnetic polarizability. We report on the complex wavenumber of Bloch waves in the lattice when each sphere is assumed to possess both electric and magnetic dipoles and full electromagnetic coupling is accounted for. While for small material-filling fractions we always determine one dominant mode with low attenuation constant, the same does not happen for large filling fractions, when electromagnetic coupling is included. In the latter case we peculiarly observemore » two dominant modes with low attenuation constant, dominant in different frequency ranges. The filling fraction threshold for which two dominant modes appear varies for different metamaterial constituents, as proven by considering spheres made by either titanium dioxide or lead telluride. As further confirmation of our findings, we retrieve the complex propagation constant of the dominant mode(s) via a field fitting procedure employing two sets of waves (direct and reflected) pertaining to two distinct modes, strengthening the presence of the two distinct dominant modes for increasing filling fractions. However, given that one mode only, with transverse polarization, at any given frequency, is dominant and able to propagate inside the lattice, we are able to accurately treat the metamaterial that is known to exhibit artificial magnetism as a homogeneous material with effective parameters, such as the refractive index. Results clearly show that the account of both electric and magnetic scattering processes in evaluating all electromagnetic intersphere couplings is essential for a proper description of the electromagnetic propagation in lattices.« less

  8. Large-Scale Stratospheric Transport Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, R. Alan

    2001-01-01

    The paper discusses the following: 1. The Brewer-Dobson circulation: tropical upwelling. 2. Mixing into polar vortices. 3. The latitudinal structure of "age" in the stratosphere. 4. The subtropical "tracer edges". 5. Transport in the lower troposphere. 6. Tracer modeling during SOLVE. 7. 3D modeling of "mean age". 8. Models and measurements II.

  9. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  10. Territorial Polymers and Large Scale Genome Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosberg, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    Chromatin fiber in interphase nucleus represents effectively a very long polymer packed in a restricted volume. Although polymer models of chromatin organization were considered, most of them disregard the fact that DNA has to stay not too entangled in order to function properly. One polymer model with no entanglements is the melt of unknotted unconcatenated rings. Extensive simulations indicate that rings in the melt at large length (monomer numbers) N approach the compact state, with gyration radius scaling as N^1/3, suggesting every ring being compact and segregated from the surrounding rings. The segregation is consistent with the known phenomenon of chromosome territories. Surface exponent β (describing the number of contacts between neighboring rings scaling as N^β) appears only slightly below unity, β 0.95. This suggests that the loop factor (probability to meet for two monomers linear distance s apart) should decay as s^-γ, where γ= 2 - β is slightly above one. The later result is consistent with HiC data on real human interphase chromosomes, and does not contradict to the older FISH data. The dynamics of rings in the melt indicates that the motion of one ring remains subdiffusive on the time scale well above the stress relaxation time.

  11. Introducing Large-Scale Innovation in Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Riviou, Katherina; Cherouvis, Stephanos; Chelioti, Eleni; Bogner, Franz X.

    2016-08-01

    Education reform initiatives tend to promise higher effectiveness in classrooms especially when emphasis is given to e-learning and digital resources. Practical changes in classroom realities or school organization, however, are lacking. A major European initiative entitled Open Discovery Space (ODS) examined the challenge of modernizing school education via a large-scale implementation of an open-scale methodology in using technology-supported innovation. The present paper describes this innovation scheme which involved schools and teachers all over Europe, embedded technology-enhanced learning into wider school environments and provided training to teachers. Our implementation scheme consisted of three phases: (1) stimulating interest, (2) incorporating the innovation into school settings and (3) accelerating the implementation of the innovation. The scheme's impact was monitored for a school year using five indicators: leadership and vision building, ICT in the curriculum, development of ICT culture, professional development support, and school resources and infrastructure. Based on about 400 schools, our study produced four results: (1) The growth in digital maturity was substantial, even for previously high scoring schools. This was even more important for indicators such as vision and leadership" and "professional development." (2) The evolution of networking is presented graphically, showing the gradual growth of connections achieved. (3) These communities became core nodes, involving numerous teachers in sharing educational content and experiences: One out of three registered users (36 %) has shared his/her educational resources in at least one community. (4) Satisfaction scores ranged from 76 % (offer of useful support through teacher academies) to 87 % (good environment to exchange best practices). Initiatives such as ODS add substantial value to schools on a large scale.

  12. Extra-large crystal emulsion detectors for future large-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariga, T.; Ariga, A.; Kuwabara, K.; Morishima, K.; Moto, M.; Nishio, A.; Scampoli, P.; Vladymyrov, M.

    2016-03-01

    Photographic emulsion is a particle tracking device which features the best spatial resolution among particle detectors. For certain applications, for example muon radiography, large-scale detectors are required. Therefore, a huge surface has to be analyzed by means of automated optical microscopes. An improvement of the readout speed is then a crucial point to make these applications possible and the availability of a new type of photographic emulsions featuring crystals of larger size is a way to pursue this program. This would allow a lower magnification for the microscopes, a consequent larger field of view resulting in a faster data analysis. In this framework, we developed new kinds of emulsion detectors with a crystal size of 600-1000 nm, namely 3-5 times larger than conventional ones, allowing a 25 times faster data readout. The new photographic emulsions have shown a sufficient sensitivity and a good signal to noise ratio. The proposed development opens the way to future large-scale applications of the technology, e.g. 3D imaging of glacier bedrocks or future neutrino experiments.

  13. Scaling relations between bone volume and bone structure as found using 3D µCT images of the trabecular bone taken from different skeletal sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeth, Christoph; Müller, Dirk; Sidorenko, Irina; Monetti, Roberto; Eckstein, Felix; Matsuura, Maiko; Lochmüller, Eva-Maria; Zysset, Philippe K.; Bauer, Jan

    2010-03-01

    According to Wolff's law bone remodels in response to the mechanical stresses it experiences so as to produce a minimal-weight structure that is adapted to its applied stresses. Here, we investigate the relations between bone volume and structure for the trabecular bone using 3D μCT images taken from different skeletal sites in vitro, namely from the distal radii (96 specimens), thoracic (73 specimens) and lumbar vertebrae (78 specimens). We determine the local structure of the trabecular network by calculating isotropic and anisotropic scaling indices (α, αz). These measures have been proven to be able to discriminate rod- from sheet-like structures and to quantify the alignment of structures with respect to a preferential direction as given by the direction of the external force. Comparing global structure measures derived from the scaling indices (mean, standard deviation) with the bone mass (BV/TV) we find that all correlations obey very accurately power laws with scaling exponents of 0.14, 0.12, 0.15 (<α>~), -0.2, -017, -0.17 (σ(αz)), 0.09, 0.05, 0.07 (<~αz>~) and -0.20, -0.11 ,-0.13 (σ(αz)) distal radius, thoracic vertebra and lumbar vertebra respectively. Thus, these relations turn out to be site-independent, albeit the mechanical stresses to which the bones of the forearm and the spine are exposed, are quite different. The similar alignment might not be in agreement with a universal validity of Wolff's law. On the other hand, such universal power law relations may allow to develop additional diagnostic means to better assess healthy and osteoporotic bone.

  14. Preliminary 3-D finite element analyses of the triggering mechanism of an occasional reactivation of a large landslide in stiff clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lollino, Piernicola; Fazio, Nunzio Luciano; Vennari, Carmela; Parise, Mario

    2015-04-01

    In December 2013 a large landslide occurred along a clay slope located at the south-western outskirts of the Montescaglioso village (Basilicata, Southern Italy) as a consequence of intense and prolonged rainfalls that presumably caused a significant increment of the pore water pressures in the slope. The slope is formed of stiff clays belonging to the formation of the Subappennine Blue Clays, which are over-consolidated and characterized by medium plasticity. According to aerial photos dating back to 1950s, the slope was already affected by previous landslide processes, so that the examined landslide process can be classified as an occasional reactivation according to the well-known classification of Cruden & Varnes (1996). Also, during the last decades several man-made actions in the area resulted in strong changes in the original water surface network that could have played some role in the slope reactivation. Based on displacement data, obtained from a monitoring system installed few days after the phenomenon, and still in function, at present the landslide does not show relevant signs of activity. Preliminary 2-D and 3-D finite element analyses have been carried out to investigate the factors that controlled the mechanism of reactivation of the landslide. The numerical model has been setup based on the available topographical, geological and geomorphological information, the geotechnical properties of the involved soils and the information concerning the piezometric regime in the slope. The results indicate that the mobilized shear strength of the clays ranges between the typical post-peak and residual values for this type of material and confirmed that the strong increment of the pore water pressures in the slope induced by the exceptional rainfalls occurred in the previous days can be identified as the main triggering factor of the reactivation.

  15. Quiescent Galaxies in the 3D-HST Survey: Spectroscopic Confirmation of a Large Number of Galaxies with Relatively Old Stellar Populations at Z approx. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tease, Katherine Whitaker; VanDokkum, Pieter G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Skelton, Rosalind; Franx, Marijn; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundgren, Britt F.; Nelson, Erica J.; Patel, Shannon G.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent galaxies at zeta approximately 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 less than z less than 2.2 from the 3D-HST grism survey. In addition to H(Beta) (lambda 4861 Angstroms), we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G band (lambda 4304 Angstroms), Mg I (lambda 5175 Angstroms), and Na i (lambda 5894 Angstroms). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was approximately 3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3(+0.1/-0.3) Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80% of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6(+0.5/-0.4) Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9(+0.2/-0.1) Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O III] and Hß emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with L(sub OIII) = 1.7 +/- 0.3 × 10(exp 40 erg s-1, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  16. Quiescent Galaxies in the 3D-HST Survey: Spectroscopic Confirmation of a Large Number of Galaxies With Relatively Old Stellar Populations at z Approx. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tease, Katherine Whitaker; vanDokkum, Pieter G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind; Franx, Marijin; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundgren, Britt F.; Nelson, Erica J.; Patel, Shannon G.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent galaxies at z approx. 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 < z < 2.2 from the 3D-HST grism survey. In addition to H (4861 ),we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G band (4304 ),Mgi (5175 ), and Na i (5894 ). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was approx. 3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3+0.10.3 Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80 of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6+0.50.4 Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9+0.20.1 Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O iii] and H emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with LOiii = 1.7+/- 0.3 x 10(exp 40) erg/s, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  17. QUIESCENT GALAXIES IN THE 3D-HST SURVEY: SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF A LARGE NUMBER OF GALAXIES WITH RELATIVELY OLD STELLAR POPULATIONS AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Skelton, Rosalind; Nelson, Erica J.; Brammer, Gabriel; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon G.; Kriek, Mariska; Lundgren, Britt F.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-06-20

    Quiescent galaxies at z {approx} 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 < z < 2.2 from the 3D-HST grism survey. In addition to H{beta} ({lambda}4861 A), we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G band ({lambda}4304 A), Mg I ({lambda}5175 A), and Na I ({lambda}5894 A). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was {approx}3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3{sup +0.1}{sub -0.3} Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80% of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6{sup +0.5}{sub -0.4} Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9{sup +0.2}{sub -0.1} Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O III] and H{beta} emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with L{sub OIII}=1.7{+-}0.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  18. An elastic/viscoelastic finite element analysis method for crustal deformation using a 3-D island-scale high-fidelity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimura, Tsuyoshi; Agata, Ryoichiro; Hori, Takane; Hirahara, Kazuro; Hashimoto, Chihiro; Hori, Muneo; Fukahata, Yukitoshi

    2016-07-01

    As a result of the accumulation of high-resolution observation data, 3-D high-fidelity crustal structure data for large domains are becoming available. However, it has been difficult to use such data to perform elastic/viscoelastic crustal deformation analyses in large domains with quality assurance of the numerical simulation that guarantees convergence of the numerical solution with respect to the discretization size because the costs of analysis are significantly high. This paper proposes a method of constructing a high-fidelity crustal structure finite element (FE) model using high-fidelity crustal structure data and fast FE analysis to reduce the costs of analysis (based on automatic FE model generation for parallel computation, OpenMP/MPI hybrid parallel computation on distributed memory computers, a geometric multigrid, variable preconditioning and multiple precision arithmetic). Using the proposed methods, we construct 10 billion degree-of-freedom high-fidelity crustal structure FE models for the entire Japan, and conduct elastic/viscoelastic crustal deformation analysis using this model with enough high accuracy of the numerical simulation.

  19. Distributed 3D Information Visualization - Towards Integration of the Dynamic 3D Graphics and Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vucinic, Dean; Deen, Danny; Oanta, Emil; Batarilo, Zvonimir; Lacor, Chris

    This paper focuses on visualization and manipulation of graphical content in distributed network environments. The developed graphical middleware and 3D desktop prototypes were specialized for situational awareness. This research was done in the LArge Scale COllaborative decision support Technology (LASCOT) project, which explored and combined software technologies to support human-centred decision support system for crisis management (earthquake, tsunami, flooding, airplane or oil-tanker incidents, chemical, radio-active or other pollutants spreading, etc.). The performed state-of-the-art review did not identify any publicly available large scale distributed application of this kind. Existing proprietary solutions rely on the conventional technologies and 2D representations. Our challenge was to apply the "latest" available technologies, such Java3D, X3D and SOAP, compatible with average computer graphics hardware. The selected technologies are integrated and we demonstrate: the flow of data, which originates from heterogeneous data sources; interoperability across different operating systems and 3D visual representations to enhance the end-users interactions.

  20. Large-Scale Spinning of Silver Nanofibers as Flexible and Reliable Conductors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya; Bai, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Ming; Liao, Suiyang; Yu, Zongfu; Wang, Yaping; Wu, Hui

    2016-09-14

    Conducting metal nanowires can be assembled into thin films for flexible electronics and optoelectronics applications including transparent electrodes, nanocircuits, and electronic skin, however, the junction resistances and low aspect ratios still limit its performance. Herein we report high-quality silver nanofibers (AgNFs) synthesized by a gas-assistant solution spinning method. Compared with traditional Ag nanowires that usually have lengths below 100 μm, AgNFs are infinitely long and can be easily assembled into large-scale 2D and 3D flexible conductors with fused junctions between nanofibers. The AgNF networks showed high transparency, low sheet resistance (e. g, 6 Ω sq(-1) at ∼97% transparency), and high flexibility as transparent electrodes, whereas the 3D AgNF sponge could be used as a deformable and robust 3D conductor.

  1. Large-Scale Spinning of Silver Nanofibers as Flexible and Reliable Conductors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya; Bai, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Ming; Liao, Suiyang; Yu, Zongfu; Wang, Yaping; Wu, Hui

    2016-09-14

    Conducting metal nanowires can be assembled into thin films for flexible electronics and optoelectronics applications including transparent electrodes, nanocircuits, and electronic skin, however, the junction resistances and low aspect ratios still limit its performance. Herein we report high-quality silver nanofibers (AgNFs) synthesized by a gas-assistant solution spinning method. Compared with traditional Ag nanowires that usually have lengths below 100 μm, AgNFs are infinitely long and can be easily assembled into large-scale 2D and 3D flexible conductors with fused junctions between nanofibers. The AgNF networks showed high transparency, low sheet resistance (e. g, 6 Ω sq(-1) at ∼97% transparency), and high flexibility as transparent electrodes, whereas the 3D AgNF sponge could be used as a deformable and robust 3D conductor. PMID:27548808

  2. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  3. Towards 3D multi-scale teleseismic and gravity data inversion using hybrid DSM/SPECFEM technique : application to the Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roland; Monteiller, Vadim; Chevrot, Sébastien; Wang, Yi; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Dufréchou, Grégory

    2015-04-01

    We describe here a method of inversion applied to seismic data sets constrained by gravity data at the regional scale. This will allow us to obtain robust models of P and S wave velocities but also of density, providing key constraints on the composition and thermal state of the lithosphere. Our approach relies on teleseimic waves, which illuminate the medium from below. We have developped a hybrid method in which a wave propagation method at the global scale (DSM/Direct solution method) is coupled with a spectral element method at the regional scale (Monteiller et al. 2013). With the spectral element method, we are able to model the 3D wave propagation effects in a computational domain of 400km long x 400km wide and 200 km deep, for an incident teleseismic wavefront introduced at the boundaries of this domain with periods as short as 2 s. The DSM global method allows to compute this incident field for a spherical Earth model. We use a multi-scale joint inversion of both gravity and seismic waveform data, accounting for the long wavelengths of the gravity field taken from a global model. In terms of inversion technique, we have validated an adjoint method for the inversion of seismic waveforms. An optimized BFGS inversion technique is used to minimize the difference between observed and computed full waveforms. The gradient of the misfit function gives the direction over which the model must be perturbed to minimize this difference. At each step of the inversion procedure we choose an optimal step length that accelerates the minimization. This is the crucial ingredient that allows us to build an efficient iterative full waveform inversion. We have extended this method by incorporating gravity data provided by the BGI/Bureau Gravimétrique International into the inversion. If the waveforms allow us to constrain the seismic velocities, they are less sensitive to the structure in density, which gives independent and crucial information to constrain the nature of rocks

  4. Engineering management of large scale systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Serita; Gill, Tepper L.; Paul, Arthur S.

    1989-01-01

    The organization of high technology and engineering problem solving, has given rise to an emerging concept. Reasoning principles for integrating traditional engineering problem solving with system theory, management sciences, behavioral decision theory, and planning and design approaches can be incorporated into a methodological approach to solving problems with a long range perspective. Long range planning has a great potential to improve productivity by using a systematic and organized approach. Thus, efficiency and cost effectiveness are the driving forces in promoting the organization of engineering problems. Aspects of systems engineering that provide an understanding of management of large scale systems are broadly covered here. Due to the focus and application of research, other significant factors (e.g., human behavior, decision making, etc.) are not emphasized but are considered.

  5. Batteries for Large Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Soloveichik, Grigorii L.

    2011-07-15

    In recent years, with the deployment of renewable energy sources, advances in electrified transportation, and development in smart grids, the markets for large-scale stationary energy storage have grown rapidly. Electrochemical energy storage methods are strong candidate solutions due to their high energy density, flexibility, and scalability. This review provides an overview of mature and emerging technologies for secondary and redox flow batteries. New developments in the chemistry of secondary and flow batteries as well as regenerative fuel cells are also considered. Advantages and disadvantages of current and prospective electrochemical energy storage options are discussed. The most promising technologies in the short term are high-temperature sodium batteries with β”-alumina electrolyte, lithium-ion batteries, and flow batteries. Regenerative fuel cells and lithium metal batteries with high energy density require further research to become practical.

  6. Large-scale databases of proper names.

    PubMed

    Conley, P; Burgess, C; Hage, D

    1999-05-01

    Few tools for research in proper names have been available--specifically, there is no large-scale corpus of proper names. Two corpora of proper names were constructed, one based on U.S. phone book listings, the other derived from a database of Usenet text. Name frequencies from both corpora were compared with human subjects' reaction times (RTs) to the proper names in a naming task. Regression analysis showed that the Usenet frequencies contributed to predictions of human RT, whereas phone book frequencies did not. In addition, semantic neighborhood density measures derived from the HAL corpus were compared with the subjects' RTs and found to be a better predictor of RT than was frequency in either corpus. These new corpora are freely available on line for download. Potentials for these corpora range from using the names as stimuli in experiments to using the corpus data in software applications. PMID:10495803

  7. Large Scale Quantum Simulations of Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattoyev, Farrukh J.; Horowitz, Charles J.; Schuetrumpf, Bastian

    2016-03-01

    Complex and exotic nuclear geometries collectively referred to as ``nuclear pasta'' are expected to naturally exist in the crust of neutron stars and in supernovae matter. Using a set of self-consistent microscopic nuclear energy density functionals we present the first results of large scale quantum simulations of pasta phases at baryon densities 0 . 03 < ρ < 0 . 10 fm-3, proton fractions 0 . 05

  8. Large scale water lens for solar concentration.

    PubMed

    Mondol, A S; Vogel, B; Bastian, G

    2015-06-01

    Properties of large scale water lenses for solar concentration were investigated. These lenses were built from readily available materials, normal tap water and hyper-elastic linear low density polyethylene foil. Exposed to sunlight, the focal lengths and light intensities in the focal spot were measured and calculated. Their optical properties were modeled with a raytracing software based on the lens shape. We have achieved a good match of experimental and theoretical data by considering wavelength dependent concentration factor, absorption and focal length. The change in light concentration as a function of water volume was examined via the resulting load on the foil and the corresponding change of shape. The latter was extracted from images and modeled by a finite element simulation. PMID:26072893

  9. Large scale structures in transitional pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellström, Leo; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram; Smits, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We present a dual-plane snapshot POD analysis of transitional pipe flow at a Reynolds number of 3440, based on the pipe diameter. The time-resolved high-speed PIV data were simultaneously acquired in two planes, a cross-stream plane (2D-3C) and a streamwise plane (2D-2C) on the pipe centerline. The two light sheets were orthogonally polarized, allowing particles situated in each plane to be viewed independently. In the snapshot POD analysis, the modal energy is based on the cross-stream plane, while the POD modes are calculated using the dual-plane data. We present results on the emergence and decay of the energetic large scale motions during transition to turbulence, and compare these motions to those observed in fully developed turbulent flow. Supported under ONR Grant N00014-13-1-0174 and ERC Grant No. 277472.

  10. The challenge of large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, S. A.

    1996-03-01

    The tasks that I have assumed for myself in this presentation include three separate parts. The first, appropriate to the particular setting of this meeting, is to review the basic work of the founding of this field; the appropriateness comes from the fact that W. G. Tifft made immense contributions that are not often realized by the astronomical community. The second task is to outline the general tone of the observational evidence for large scale structures. (Here, in particular, I cannot claim to be complete. I beg forgiveness from any workers who are left out by my oversight for lack of space and time.) The third task is to point out some of the major aspects of the field that may represent the clues by which some brilliant sleuth will ultimately figure out how galaxies formed.

  11. Grid sensitivity capability for large scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Wallerstein, David V.

    1989-01-01

    The considerations and the resultant approach used to implement design sensitivity capability for grids into a large scale, general purpose finite element system (MSC/NASTRAN) are presented. The design variables are grid perturbations with a rather general linking capability. Moreover, shape and sizing variables may be linked together. The design is general enough to facilitate geometric modeling techniques for generating design variable linking schemes in an easy and straightforward manner. Test cases have been run and validated by comparison with the overall finite difference method. The linking of a design sensitivity capability for shape variables in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful, automated tool to carry out practical optimization design of real life, complicated structures.

  12. Large-Scale Astrophysical Visualization on Smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becciani, U.; Massimino, P.; Costa, A.; Gheller, C.; Grillo, A.; Krokos, M.; Petta, C.

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays digital sky surveys and long-duration, high-resolution numerical simulations using high performance computing and grid systems produce multidimensional astrophysical datasets in the order of several Petabytes. Sharing visualizations of such datasets within communities and collaborating research groups is of paramount importance for disseminating results and advancing astrophysical research. Moreover educational and public outreach programs can benefit greatly from novel ways of presenting these datasets by promoting understanding of complex astrophysical processes, e.g., formation of stars and galaxies. We have previously developed VisIVO Server, a grid-enabled platform for high-performance large-scale astrophysical visualization. This article reviews the latest developments on VisIVO Web, a custom designed web portal wrapped around VisIVO Server, then introduces VisIVO Smartphone, a gateway connecting VisIVO Web and data repositories for mobile astrophysical visualization. We discuss current work and summarize future developments.

  13. Large scale water lens for solar concentration.

    PubMed

    Mondol, A S; Vogel, B; Bastian, G

    2015-06-01

    Properties of large scale water lenses for solar concentration were investigated. These lenses were built from readily available materials, normal tap water and hyper-elastic linear low density polyethylene foil. Exposed to sunlight, the focal lengths and light intensities in the focal spot were measured and calculated. Their optical properties were modeled with a raytracing software based on the lens shape. We have achieved a good match of experimental and theoretical data by considering wavelength dependent concentration factor, absorption and focal length. The change in light concentration as a function of water volume was examined via the resulting load on the foil and the corresponding change of shape. The latter was extracted from images and modeled by a finite element simulation.

  14. Large-scale sequential quadratic programming algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Eldersveld, S.K.

    1992-09-01

    The problem addressed is the general nonlinear programming problem: finding a local minimizer for a nonlinear function subject to a mixture of nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. The methods studied are in the class of sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithms, which have previously proved successful for problems of moderate size. Our goal is to devise an SQP algorithm that is applicable to large-scale optimization problems, using sparse data structures and storing less curvature information but maintaining the property of superlinear convergence. The main features are: 1. The use of a quasi-Newton approximation to the reduced Hessian of the Lagrangian function. Only an estimate of the reduced Hessian matrix is required by our algorithm. The impact of not having available the full Hessian approximation is studied and alternative estimates are constructed. 2. The use of a transformation matrix Q. This allows the QP gradient to be computed easily when only the reduced Hessian approximation is maintained. 3. The use of a reduced-gradient form of the basis for the null space of the working set. This choice of basis is more practical than an orthogonal null-space basis for large-scale problems. The continuity condition for this choice is proven. 4. The use of incomplete solutions of quadratic programming subproblems. Certain iterates generated by an active-set method for the QP subproblem are used in place of the QP minimizer to define the search direction for the nonlinear problem. An implementation of the new algorithm has been obtained by modifying the code MINOS. Results and comparisons with MINOS and NPSOL are given for the new algorithm on a set of 92 test problems.

  15. Supporting large-scale computational science

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R., LLNL

    1998-02-19

    Business needs have driven the development of commercial database systems since their inception. As a result, there has been a strong focus on supporting many users, minimizing the potential corruption or loss of data, and maximizing performance metrics like transactions per second, or TPC-C and TPC-D results. It turns out that these optimizations have little to do with the needs of the scientific community, and in particular have little impact on improving the management and use of large-scale high-dimensional data. At the same time, there is an unanswered need in the scientific community for many of the benefits offered by a robust DBMS. For example, tying an ad-hoc query language such as SQL together with a visualization toolkit would be a powerful enhancement to current capabilities. Unfortunately, there has been little emphasis or discussion in the VLDB community on this mismatch over the last decade. The goal of the paper is to identify the specific issues that need to be resolved before large-scale scientific applications can make use of DBMS products. This topic is addressed in the context of an evaluation of commercial DBMS technology applied to the exploration of data generated by the Department of Energy`s Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The paper describes the data being generated for ASCI as well as current capabilities for interacting with and exploring this data. The attraction of applying standard DBMS technology to this domain is discussed, as well as the technical and business issues that currently make this an infeasible solution.

  16. Three-dimensional distribution of the ISM in the Milky Way Galaxy. IV. 3D molecular fraction and Galactic-scale H I-to-H2 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofue, Yoshiaki; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the volume-density molecular fraction, defined by f_mol^ρ =ρ _H_2/(ρ _{H I}+ρ _H_2), is studied in the Milky Way Galaxy. The molecular front appears at galacto-centric distance of R ˜ 8 kpc, where the galactic-scale phase transition from atomic to molecular hydrogen occurs with f_mol^ρ dropping from ˜0.8 to 0.2 within a radial interval as narrow as ˜0.5 kpc. The f_mol^ρ front is much sharper than that of the surface density molecular fraction. The f_mol^ρ front also appears in the direction vertical to the galactic plane with a full width of the high-f_mol^ρ disk to be ˜100 pc. The radial and vertical f_mol^ρ profiles, particularly the front behavior, are fitted by theoretical curves calculated using the observed density profile and assumed radiation field and metallicity with exponential gradients. The molecular fraction was found to be enhanced along spiral arms at radii R ˜ 6 to 10 kpc, such as the Perseus arm. This implies that the molecular clouds are produced from H I in the arms and are dissociated in the interarm regions in the transition region around the molecular front. We also show that there is a threshold value of mean H I density, over which H I is transformed into molecular gas.

  17. 3D micro-scale deformations of wood in bending: synchrotron radiation muCT data analyzed with digital volume correlation.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, F; Mooser, R; Arnold, M; Hack, E; Wyss, P

    2008-12-01

    A micro-scale three-point-bending experiment with a wood specimen was carried out and monitored by synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography. The full three-dimensional wood structure of the 1.57x3.42x0.75mm(3) specimen was reconstructed at cellular level in different loading states. Furthermore, the full three-dimensional deformation field of the loaded wood specimen was determined by digital volume correlation, applied to the reconstructed data at successive loading states. Results from two selected regions within the wood specimen are presented as continuous displacement and strain fields in both 2D and 3D. The applied combination of synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography and digital volume correlation for the deformation analysis of wood under bending stress is a novel application in wood material science. The method offers the potential for the simultaneous observation of structural changes and quantified deformations during in situ micro-mechanical experiments. Moreover, the high spatial resolution allows studying the influence of anatomical features on the fracture behaviour of wood. Possible applications of this method range from bio-mechanical observations in fresh plant tissue to fracture mechanics aspects in structural timber. PMID:18804168

  18. 3D micro-scale deformations of wood in bending: synchrotron radiation muCT data analyzed with digital volume correlation.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, F; Mooser, R; Arnold, M; Hack, E; Wyss, P

    2008-12-01

    A micro-scale three-point-bending experiment with a wood specimen was carried out and monitored by synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography. The full three-dimensional wood structure of the 1.57x3.42x0.75mm(3) specimen was reconstructed at cellular level in different loading states. Furthermore, the full three-dimensional deformation field of the loaded wood specimen was determined by digital volume correlation, applied to the reconstructed data at successive loading states. Results from two selected regions within the wood specimen are presented as continuous displacement and strain fields in both 2D and 3D. The applied combination of synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography and digital volume correlation for the deformation analysis of wood under bending stress is a novel application in wood material science. The method offers the potential for the simultaneous observation of structural changes and quantified deformations during in situ micro-mechanical experiments. Moreover, the high spatial resolution allows studying the influence of anatomical features on the fracture behaviour of wood. Possible applications of this method range from bio-mechanical observations in fresh plant tissue to fracture mechanics aspects in structural timber.

  19. Integration of 3D scale-based pseudo-enhancement correction and partial volume image segmentation for improving electronic colon cleansing in CT colonograpy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Lihong; Zhu, Hongbin; Han, Hao; Song, Bowen; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-01-01

    Orally administered tagging agents are usually used in CT colonography (CTC) to differentiate residual bowel content from native colonic structures. However, the high-density contrast agents tend to introduce pseudo-enhancement (PE) effect on neighboring soft tissues and elevate their observed CT attenuation value toward that of the tagged materials (TMs), which may result in an excessive electronic colon cleansing (ECC) since the pseudo-enhanced soft tissues are incorrectly identified as TMs. To address this issue, we integrated a 3D scale-based PE correction into our previous ECC pipeline based on the maximum a posteriori expectation-maximization partial volume (PV) segmentation. The newly proposed ECC scheme takes into account both the PE and PV effects that commonly appear in CTC images. We evaluated the new scheme on 40 patient CTC scans, both qualitatively through display of segmentation results, and quantitatively through radiologists' blind scoring (human observer) and computer-aided detection (CAD) of colon polyps (computer observer). Performance of the presented algorithm has shown consistent improvements over our previous ECC pipeline, especially for the detection of small polyps submerged in the contrast agents. The CAD results of polyp detection showed that 4 more submerged polyps were detected for our new ECC scheme over the previous one.

  20. Pore-scale modeling of Capillary Penetration of Wetting Liquid into 3D Fibrous Media: A Critical Examination of Equivalent Capillary Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palakurthi, Nikhil Kumar; Ghia, Urmila; Comer, Ken

    2013-11-01

    Capillary penetration of liquid through fibrous porous media is important in many applications such as printing, drug delivery patches, sanitary wipes, and performance fabrics. Historically, capillary transport (with a distinct liquid propagating front) in porous media is modeled using capillary-bundle theory. However, it is not clear if the capillary model (Washburn equation) describes the fluid transport in porous media accurately, as it assumes uniformity of pore sizes in the porous medium. The present work investigates the limitations of the applicability of the capillary model by studying liquid penetration through virtual fibrous media with uniform and non-uniform pore-sizes. For the non-uniform-pore fibrous medium, the effective capillary radius of the fibrous medium was estimated from the pore-size distribution curve. Liquid penetration into the 3D virtual fibrous medium at micro-scale was simulated using OpenFOAM, and the numerical results were compared with the Washburn-equation capillary-model predictions. Preliminary results show that the Washburn equation over-predicts the height rise in the early stages (purely inertial and visco-inertial stages) of capillary transport.

  1. Large-Scale Statistics for Cu Electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauschildt, M.; Gall, M.; Hernandez, R.

    2009-06-01

    Even after the successful introduction of Cu-based metallization, the electromigration failure risk has remained one of the important reliability concerns for advanced process technologies. The observation of strong bimodality for the electron up-flow direction in dual-inlaid Cu interconnects has added complexity, but is now widely accepted. The failure voids can occur both within the via ("early" mode) or within the trench ("late" mode). More recently, bimodality has been reported also in down-flow electromigration, leading to very short lifetimes due to small, slit-shaped voids under vias. For a more thorough investigation of these early failure phenomena, specific test structures were designed based on the Wheatstone Bridge technique. The use of these structures enabled an increase of the tested sample size close to 675000, allowing a direct analysis of electromigration failure mechanisms at the single-digit ppm regime. Results indicate that down-flow electromigration exhibits bimodality at very small percentage levels, not readily identifiable with standard testing methods. The activation energy for the down-flow early failure mechanism was determined to be 0.83±0.02 eV. Within the small error bounds of this large-scale statistical experiment, this value is deemed to be significantly lower than the usually reported activation energy of 0.90 eV for electromigration-induced diffusion along Cu/SiCN interfaces. Due to the advantages of the Wheatstone Bridge technique, we were also able to expand the experimental temperature range down to 150° C, coming quite close to typical operating conditions up to 125° C. As a result of the lowered activation energy, we conclude that the down-flow early failure mode may control the chip lifetime at operating conditions. The slit-like character of the early failure void morphology also raises concerns about the validity of the Blech-effect for this mechanism. A very small amount of Cu depletion may cause failure even before a

  2. CLASS: The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Ali, Aamir; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Araujo, Derek; Bennett, Charles L.; Boone, Fletcher; Chan, Manwei; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Chuss, David T.; Colazo, Felipe; Crowe, Erik; Denis, Kevin; Dunner, Rolando; Eimer, Joseph; Gothe, Dominik; Halpern, Mark; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Nathan; Moseley, Samuel; Rostem, Karwan; Stevenson, Thomas; Towner, Deborah; U-Yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) is an experiment to measure the signature of a gravitational wave background from inflation in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). CLASS is a multi-frequency array of four telescopes operating from a high-altitude site in the Atacama Desert in Chile. CLASS will survey 70% of the sky in four frequency bands centered at 38, 93, 148, and 217 GHz, which are chosen to straddle the Galactic-foreground minimum while avoiding strong atmospheric emission lines. This broad frequency coverage ensures that CLASS can distinguish Galactic emission from the CMB. The sky fraction of the CLASS survey will allow the full shape of the primordial B-mode power spectrum to be characterized, including the signal from reionization at low-length. Its unique combination of large sky coverage, control of systematic errors, and high sensitivity will allow CLASS to measure or place upper limits on the tensor-to-scalar ratio at a level of r = 0:01 and make a cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to the surface of last scattering, tau. (c) (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  3. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  4. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-05-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  5. Large-Scale Spacecraft Fire Safety Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Olson, Sandra; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T'ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam J.; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Jomaas, Grunde

    2014-01-01

    An international collaborative program is underway to address open issues in spacecraft fire safety. Because of limited access to long-term low-gravity conditions and the small volume generally allotted for these experiments, there have been relatively few experiments that directly study spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample sizes and environment conditions typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. The major constraint has been the size of the sample, with prior experiments limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. This lack of experimental data forces spacecraft designers to base their designs and safety precautions on 1-g understanding of flame spread, fire detection, and suppression. However, low-gravity combustion research has demonstrated substantial differences in flame behavior in low-gravity. This, combined with the differences caused by the confined spacecraft environment, necessitates practical scale spacecraft fire safety research to mitigate risks for future space missions. To address this issue, a large-scale spacecraft fire experiment is under development by NASA and an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status, and concept of this collaborative international project (Saffire). The project plan is to conduct fire safety experiments on three sequential flights of an unmanned ISS re-supply spacecraft (the Orbital Cygnus vehicle) after they have completed their delivery of cargo to the ISS and have begun their return journeys to earth. On two flights (Saffire-1 and Saffire-3), the experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter-scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. On one of the flights (Saffire-2), 9 smaller (5 x 30 cm) samples will be tested to evaluate NASAs material flammability screening tests

  6. Demonstration of a Novel, Integrated, Multi-Scale Procedure for High-Resolution 3D Reservoir Characterization and Improved CO2-EOR/Sequestration Management, SACROC Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Scott R. Reeves

    2007-09-30

    The primary goal of this project was to demonstrate a new and novel approach for high resolution, 3D reservoir characterization that can enable better management of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects and, looking to the future, carbon sequestration projects. The approach adopted has been the subject of previous research by the DOE and others, and relies primarily upon data-mining and advanced pattern recognition approaches. This approach honors all reservoir characterization data collected, but accepts that our understanding of how these measurements relate to the information of most interest, such as how porosity and permeability vary over a reservoir volume, is imperfect. Ideally the data needed for such an approach includes surface seismic to provide the greatest amount of data over the entire reservoir volume of interest, crosswell seismic to fill the resolution gap between surface seismic and wellbore-scale measurements, geophysical well logs to provide the vertical resolution sought, and core data to provide the tie to the information of most interest. These data are combined via a series of one or more relational models to enable, in its most successful application, the prediction of porosity and permeability on a vertical resolution similar to logs at each surface seismic trace location. In this project, the procedure was applied to the giant (and highly complex) SACROC unit of the Permian basin in West Texas, one of the world's largest CO{sub 2}-EOR projects and a potentially world-class geologic sequestration site. Due to operational scheduling considerations on the part of the operator of the field, the crosswell data was not obtained during the period of project performance (it is currently being collected however as part of another DOE project). This compromised the utility of the surface seismic data for the project due to the resolution gap between it and the geophysical well logs. An alternative approach was adopted that utilized a

  7. Lensfree diffractive tomography for the imaging of 3D cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Momey, F.; Berdeu, A.; Bordy, T.; Dinten, J.-M.; Marcel, F. Kermarrec; Picollet-D’hahan, N.; Gidrol, X.; Allier, C.

    2016-01-01

    New microscopes are needed to help realize the full potential of 3D organoid culture studies. In order to image large volumes of 3D organoid cultures while preserving the ability to catch every single cell, we propose a new imaging platform based on lensfree microscopy. We have built a lensfree diffractive tomography setup performing multi-angle acquisitions of 3D organoid culture embedded in Matrigel and developed a dedicated 3D holographic reconstruction algorithm based on the Fourier diffraction theorem. With this new imaging platform, we have been able to reconstruct a 3D volume as large as 21.5 mm3 of a 3D organoid culture of prostatic RWPE1 cells showing the ability of these cells to assemble in 3D intricate cellular network at the mesoscopic scale. Importantly, comparisons with 2D images show that it is possible to resolve single cells isolated from the main cellular structure with our lensfree diffractive tomography setup. PMID:27231600

  8. Lensfree diffractive tomography for the imaging of 3D cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Momey, F; Berdeu, A; Bordy, T; Dinten, J-M; Marcel, F Kermarrec; Picollet-D'hahan, N; Gidrol, X; Allier, C

    2016-03-01

    New microscopes are needed to help realize the full potential of 3D organoid culture studies. In order to image large volumes of 3D organoid cultures while preserving the ability to catch every single cell, we propose a new imaging platform based on lensfree microscopy. We have built a lensfree diffractive tomography setup performing multi-angle acquisitions of 3D organoid culture embedded in Matrigel and developed a dedicated 3D holographic reconstruction algorithm based on the Fourier diffraction theorem. With this new imaging platform, we have been able to reconstruct a 3D volume as large as 21.5 mm (3) of a 3D organoid culture of prostatic RWPE1 cells showing the ability of these cells to assemble in 3D intricate cellular network at the mesoscopic scale. Importantly, comparisons with 2D images show that it is possible to resolve single cells isolated from the main cellular structure with our lensfree diffractive tomography setup. PMID:27231600

  9. The EISCAT_3D Science Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjulin, A.; Mann, I.; McCrea, I.; Aikio, A. T.

    2013-05-01

    EISCAT_3D will be a world-leading international research infrastructure using the incoherent scatter technique to study the atmosphere in the Fenno-Scandinavian Arctic and to investigate how the Earth's atmosphere is coupled to space. The EISCAT_3D phased-array multistatic radar system will be operated by EISCAT Scientific Association and thus be an integral part of an organisation that has successfully been running incoherent scatter radars for more than thirty years. The baseline design of the radar system contains a core site with transmitting and receiving capabilities located close to the intersection of the Swedish, Norwegian and Finnish borders and five receiving sites located within 50 to 250 km from the core. The EISCAT_3D project is currently in its Preparatory Phase and can smoothly transit into implementation in 2014, provided sufficient funding. Construction can start 2016 and first operations in 2018. The EISCAT_3D Science Case is prepared as part of the Preparatory Phase. It is regularly updated with annual new releases, and it aims at being a common document for the whole future EISCAT_3D user community. The areas covered by the Science Case are atmospheric physics and global change; space and plasma physics; solar system research; space weather and service applications; and radar techniques, new methods for coding and analysis. Two of the aims for EISCAT_3D are to understand the ways natural variability in the upper atmosphere, imposed by the Sun-Earth system, can influence the middle and lower atmosphere, and to improve the predictivity of atmospheric models by providing higher resolution observations to replace the current parametrised input. Observations by EISCAT_3D will also be used to monitor the direct effects from the Sun on the ionosphere-atmosphere system and those caused by solar wind magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction. In addition, EISCAT_3D will be used for remote sensing the large-scale behaviour of the magnetosphere from its

  10. Population generation for large-scale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, Andrew C.; King, Gary; Morrison, Clayton; Galstyan, Aram; Cohen, Paul

    2005-05-01

    Computer simulation is used to research phenomena ranging from the structure of the space-time continuum to population genetics and future combat.1-3 Multi-agent simulations in particular are now commonplace in many fields.4, 5 By modeling populations whose complex behavior emerges from individual interactions, these simulations help to answer questions about effects where closed form solutions are difficult to solve or impossible to derive.6 To be useful, simulations must accurately model the relevant aspects of the underlying domain. In multi-agent simulation, this means that the modeling must include both the agents and their relationships. Typically, each agent can be modeled as a set of attributes drawn from various distributions (e.g., height, morale, intelligence and so forth). Though these can interact - for example, agent height is related to agent weight - they are usually independent. Modeling relations between agents, on the other hand, adds a new layer of complexity, and tools from graph theory and social network analysis are finding increasing application.7, 8 Recognizing the role and proper use of these techniques, however, remains the subject of ongoing research. We recently encountered these complexities while building large scale social simulations.9-11 One of these, the Hats Simulator, is designed to be a lightweight proxy for intelligence analysis problems. Hats models a "society in a box" consisting of many simple agents, called hats. Hats gets its name from the classic spaghetti western, in which the heroes and villains are known by the color of the hats they wear. The Hats society also has its heroes and villains, but the challenge is to identify which color hat they should be wearing based on how they behave. There are three types of hats: benign hats, known terrorists, and covert terrorists. Covert terrorists look just like benign hats but act like terrorists. Population structure can make covert hat identification significantly more

  11. Scalable parallel distance field construction for large-scale applications

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Hongfeng; Xie, Jinrong; Ma, Kwan -Liu; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-10-01

    Computing distance fields is fundamental to many scientific and engineering applications. Distance fields can be used to direct analysis and reduce data. In this paper, we present a highly scalable method for computing 3D distance fields on massively parallel distributed-memory machines. Anew distributed spatial data structure, named parallel distance tree, is introduced to manage the level sets of data and facilitate surface tracking overtime, resulting in significantly reduced computation and communication costs for calculating the distance to the surface of interest from any spatial locations. Our method supports several data types and distance metrics from real-world applications. We demonstrate itsmore » efficiency and scalability on state-of-the-art supercomputers using both large-scale volume datasets and surface models. We also demonstrate in-situ distance field co