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Sample records for 3d local earthquake

  1. 3-D P Wave Velocity Structure of Marmara Region Using Local Earthquake Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Işık, S. E.; Gurbuz, C.

    2014-12-01

    The 3D P wave velocity model of upper and lower crust of the Marmara Region between 40.200- 41.200N and 26.500- 30.500E is obtained by tomographic inversion (Simulps) of 47034 P wave arrivals of local earthquakes recorded at 90 land stations between October 2009 and December 2012 and 30 OBO stations and 14162 shot arrivals recorded at 35 OBO stations (Seismarmara Survey, 2001). We first obtained a 1D minimum model with Velest code in order to obtain an initial model for 3D inversion with 648 well located earthquakes located within the study area. After several 3D inversion trials we decided to create a more adequate initial model for 3D inversion. Choosing the initial model we estimated the 3D P wave velocity model representing the whole region both for land and sea. The results are tested by making Checkerboard , Restoring Resolution and Characteristic Tests, and the reliable areas of the resulting model is defined in terms of RDE, DWS, SF and Hit count distributions. By taking cross sections from the resulting model we observed the vertical velocity change along profiles crossing both land and sea. All the profiles crossing the basins showed that the high velocities of lower crust make extensions towards the basin area which looks like the force that gives a shape to the basins. These extensions of lower crust towards the basins appeared with an average velocity of 6.3 km/s which might be the result of the deformation due the shearing in the region. It is also interpreted that the development of these high velocities coincide with the development of the basins. Thus, both the basins and the high velocity zones around them might be resulted from the entrance of the NAF into the Marmara Sea and at the same time a shear regime was dominated due to the resistance of the northern Marmara Region (Yılmaz, 2010). The seismicity is observed between 5 km and 15 km after the 3D location of the earthquakes. The locations of the earthquakes improved and the seismogenic zone

  2. 3D Visualization of Recent Sumatra Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Atul; Kilb, Debi

    2005-04-01

    Scientists and visualization experts at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography have created an interactive three-dimensional visualization of the 28 March 2005 magnitude 8.7 earthquake in Sumatra. The visualization shows the earthquake's hypocenter and aftershocks recorded until 29 March 2005, and compares it with the location of the 26 December 2004 magnitude 9 event and the consequent seismicity in that region. The 3D visualization was created using the Fledermaus software developed by Interactive Visualization Systems (http://www.ivs.unb.ca/) and stored as a ``scene'' file. To view this visualization, viewers need to download and install the free viewer program iView3D (http://www.ivs3d.com/products/iview3d).

  3. Density structure and geometry of the Costa Rican subduction zone from 3-D gravity modeling and local earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lücke, O. H.; Arroyo, I. G.

    2015-10-01

    The eastern part of the oceanic Cocos Plate presents a heterogeneous crustal structure due to diverse origins and ages as well as plate-hot spot interactions which originated the Cocos Ridge, a structure that converges with the Caribbean Plate in southeastern Costa Rica. The complex structure of the oceanic plate directly influences the dynamics and geometry of the subduction zone along the Middle American Trench. In this paper an integrated interpretation of the slab geometry in Costa Rica is presented based on 3-D density modeling of combined satellite and surface gravity data, constrained by available geophysical and geological data and seismological information obtained from local networks. The results show the continuation of steep subduction geometry from the Nicaraguan margin into northwestern Costa Rica, followed by a moderate dipping slab under the Central Cordillera toward the end of the Central American Volcanic Arc. Contrary to commonly assumed, to the southeast end of the volcanic arc, our preferred model shows a steep, coherent slab that extends up to the landward projection of the Panama Fracture Zone. Overall, a gradual change in the depth of the intraplate seismicity is observed, reaching 220 km in the northwestern part, and becoming progressively shallower toward the southeast, where it reaches a maximum depth of 75 km. The changes in the terminal depth of the observed seismicity correlate with the increased density in the modeled slab. The absence of intermediate depth (> 75 km) intraplate seismicity in the southeastern section and the higher densities for the subducted slab in this area, support a model in which dehydration reactions in the subducted slab cease at a shallower depth, originating an anhydrous and thus aseismic slab.

  4. 3-D P-wave velocity structure and seismicity in Central Costa Rica from Local Earthquake Tomography using an amphibic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo, I.; Husen, S.; Flueh, E.; Alvarado, G. E.

    2008-12-01

    The Central Pacific sector of the erosional margin in Costa Rica shows a high seismicity rate, coincident with the subduction of rough-relief ocean floor, and generates earthquakes up to Mw 7. Precise earthquake locations and detailed knowledge of the 3-D velocity structure provide key insights into the dynamics of subduction zones. To this end, we performed a 3-D Local Earthquake Tomography using P-wave traveltimes from 595 selected events recorded by a seismological network of off- and onshore stations, deployed for 6 months in the area. The results reflect the complexity associated to subduction of bathymetric highs and the transition from normal to thickened oceanic crust (Cocos Ridge). The slab is imaged as a high-velocity anomaly with a band of low velocities (LVB) on top enclosing the intraslab events deeper than ~30 km. Below the margin slope, the LVB is locally thickened by at least two seamounts. We observe an abrupt, eastward widening of the LVB, preceded by a low-velocity anomaly under the continental shelf, which we interpret as a big seamount. The thickening coincides with an inverted basin at the inner forearc and a low-velocity anomaly under it. The latter appears in a sector where blocks of inner forearc are uplifted, possibly by underplating of eroded material against the base of the crust. The anomaly promotes seismicity by high-friction with the upper plate, and could be linked to a Mw 6.4 earthquake in 2004. In the west part of the area, the interplate seismicity forms a cluster beneath the continental shelf. Its updip limit coincides with the 150° C isotherm and an increase in Vp along the plate boundary. This further supports a proposed model in which the seismicity onset along the plate interface is mainly due to a decrease in the abundance of the fluids released by subducted sediments. Higher seismicity rates locally concur with seamounts present at the seismogenic zone, while seamounts under the margin slope may shallow the onset of

  5. Density structure and geometry of the Costa Rican subduction zone from 3-D gravity modeling and local earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lücke, O. H.; Arroyo, I. G.

    2015-07-01

    The eastern part of the oceanic Cocos Plate presents a heterogeneous crustal structure due to diverse origins and ages as well as plate-hot spot interactions which originated the Cocos Ridge, a structure that converges with the Caribbean Plate in southeastern Costa Rica. The complex structure of the oceanic plate directly influences the dynamics and geometry of the subduction zone along the Middle American Trench. In this paper an integrated interpretation of the slab geometry is presented based on three-dimensional density modeling of combined satellite and surface gravity data, constrained by available geophysical and geological data and seismological information obtained from local networks. The results show the continuation of steep subduction geometry from the Nicaraguan margin into Northwestern Costa Rica, followed by a moderate dipping slab under the Central Cordillera toward the end of the Central American Volcanic Arc. To the southeast end of the volcanic arc, our preferred model shows a steep, coherent slab that extends up to the landward projection of the Panama Fracture Zone. Overall, a gradual change in the depth of the intraplate seismicity is observed, reaching 220 km in the northwestern part, and becoming progressively shallower toward the southeast, where it reaches a terminal depth of 75 km. The changes in the terminal depth of the observed seismicity correlate with the increased density in the modeled slab. The absence of intermediate depth intraplate seismicity in the southeastern section and the higher densities for the subducted slab in this area, support a model in which dehydration reactions in the subducted slab cease at a shallower depth, originating an anhydrous and thus aseismic slab.

  6. Probabilistic earthquake location and 3-D velocity models in routine earthquake location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, A.; Husen, S.

    2003-12-01

    Earthquake monitoring agencies, such as local networks or CTBTO, are faced with the dilemma of providing routine earthquake locations in near real-time with high precision and meaningful uncertainty information. Traditionally, routine earthquake locations are obtained from linearized inversion using layered seismic velocity models. This approach is fast and simple. However, uncertainties derived from a linear approximation to a set of non-linear equations can be imprecise, unreliable, or even misleading. In addition, 1-D velocity models are a poor approximation to real Earth structure in tectonically complex regions. In this paper, we discuss the routine location of earthquakes in near real-time with high precision using non-linear, probabilistic location methods and 3-D velocity models. The combination of non-linear, global search algorithms with probabilistic earthquake location provides a fast and reliable tool for earthquake location that can be used with any kind of velocity model. The probabilistic solution to the earthquake location includes a complete description of location uncertainties, which may be irregular and multimodal. We present applications of this approach to determine seismicity in Switzerland and in Yellowstone National Park, WY. Comparing our earthquake locations to earthquake locations obtained using linearized inversion and 1-D velocity models clearly demonstrates the advantages of probabilistic earthquake location and 3-D velocity models. For example, the more complete and reliable uncertainty information of non-linear, probabilistic earthquake location greatly facilitates the identification of poorly constrained hypocenters. Such events are often not identified in linearized earthquake location, since the location uncertainties are determined with a simplified, localized and approximate Gaussian statistic.

  7. Local Diagnosis of Reconnection in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Karimabadi, H.; Daughton, W. S.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate (I,II) an approach to find reconnection sites in 3D where there is no flux function for guidance, and where local observational signatures for the ``violation of frozen flux'' are under developed, if not non-existent. We use 2D and 3D PIC simulations of asymmetric guide field reconnection to test our observational hierarchy of single spacecraft kinetic diagnostics - all possible with present state of the art instrumentation. The proliferation of turbulent, electron inertial scale layers in the realistic 3D case demonstrates that electron demagnetization, while necessary, is not sufficient to identify reconnection sites. An excellent local, observable, single spacecraft proxy is demonstrated for the size of the theoretical frozen flux violation. Since even frozen flux violations need not imply reconnection is at hand, a new calibrated dimensionless method is used to determine the importance of such violations. This measure is available in 2D and 3D to help differentiate reconnection layers from weaker frozen flux violating layers. We discuss the possibility that this technique can be implemented on MMS. A technique to highlight flow geometries conducive to reconnection in 3D simulations is also suggested, that may also be implementable with the MMS flotilla. We use local analysis with multiple necessary, but theoretically independent electron kinetic conditions to help reduce the probability of misidentification of any given layer as a reconnection site. Since these local conditions are all necessary for the site, but none is known to be sufficient, the multiple tests help to greatly reduce false positive identifications. The selectivity of the results of this approach using PIC simulations of 3D asymmetric guide field reconnection will be shown using varying numbers of simultaneous conditions. Scudder, J.D., H. Karimabadi, W. Daughton and V. Roytershteyn I, II, submitted Phys. Plasma., 2014

  8. 3D Dynamic Earthquake Fracture Simulation (Test Case)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkusuz Öztürk, Yasemin; Meral Özel, Nurcan; Ando, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    A 3D dynamic earthquake fracture simulation is being developed for the fault structures which are non-planar to understand heterogeneous stress states in the Marmara Sea. Locating in a seismic gap, a large earthquake is expected in the center of the Sea of Marmara. Concerning the fact that more than 14 million inhabitants of İstanbul, located very closely to the Marmara Sea, the importance of the analysis of the Central Marmara Sea is extremely high. A few 3D dynamic earthquake fracture studies have been already done in the Sea of Marmara for pure right lateral strike-slip stress regimes (Oglesby and Mai, 2012; Aochi and Ulrich, 2015). In this study, a 3D dynamic earthquake fracture model with heterogeneous stress patches from the TPV5, a SCEC code validation case, is adapted. In this test model, the fault and the ground surfaces are gridded by a scalene triangulation technique using GMSH program. For a grid size changing between 0.616 km and 1.050 km the number of elements for the fault surface is 1984 and for the ground surface is 1216. When these results are compared with Kaneko's results for TPV5 from SPECFEM3D, reliable findings could be observed for the first 6.5 seconds (stations on the fault) although a stability problem is encountered after this time threshold. To solve this problem grid sizes are made smaller, so the number of elements increase 7986 for the fault surface and 4867 for the ground surface. On the other hand, computational problems arise in that case, since the computation time is directly proportional to the number of total elements and the required memory also increases with the square of that. Therefore, it is expected that this method can be adapted for less coarse grid cases, regarding the main difficulty coming from the necessity of an effective supercomputer and run time limitations. The main objective of this research is to obtain 3D dynamic earthquake rupture scenarios, concerning not only planar and non-planar faults but also

  9. Testing the USGS 3D San Francisco Bay Area Seismic Velocity Model using Observations of 0.5 to 2 s Surface Waves from Local and Regional Earthquakes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocher, T. M.; Frankel, A. D.; Oppenheimer, D. H.; Fletcher, J. B.; Luetgert, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    USGS 3D seismic velocity model. For the past year, long period motions have also been recorded by the NetQuakes project which is installing a large number (hundreds) of small, relatively inexpensive seismographs in 1 to 2 story homes and businesses. The instruments have an 18-bit resolution recorder and ± 3 g internal tri-axial MEMS accelerometers. NetQuakes instruments have successfully recorded long period motions from the January 9, 2010 M6.5 quake in the Gorda Plate near the Mendocino Triple Junction, the largest earthquake in northern California since June 17, 2005.

  10. Visualizing Earthquakes in '3D' using the IRIS Earthquake Browser (IEB) Website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welti, R.; McQuillan, P. J.; Weertman, B. R.

    2012-12-01

    The distribution of earthquakes is often easier to interpret in 3D, but most 3D visualization tools require the installation of specialized software and some practice in their use. To reduce this barrier for students and the general public, a pseudo-3D seismicity viewer has been developed which runs in a web browser as part of the IRIS Earthquake Browser (IEB). IEB is an interactive map for viewing earthquake epicenters all over the world, and is composed of a Google map, HTML, JavaScript and a fast earthquake hypocenter web service. The web service accesses seismic data at IRIS from the early 1960s until present. Users can change the region, the number of events, and the depth and magnitude ranges to display. Earthquakes may also be viewed as a table, or exported to various formats. Predefined regions can be selected and zoomed to, and bookmarks generally preserve whatever region and settings are in effect when bookmarked, allowing the easy sharing of particular "scenarios" with other users. Plate boundaries can be added to the display. The 3DV viewer displays events for the currently-selected IEB region in a separate window. They can be rotated and zoomed, with a fast response for plots of up to several thousand events. Rotation can be done manually by dragging or automatically at a set rate, and tectonic plate boundaries turned on or off. 3DV uses a geographical projection algorithm provided by Gary Pavils and collaborators. It is written in HTML5, and is based on CanvasMol by Branislav Ulicny.; A region SE of Fiji, selected in IRIS Earthquake Browser. ; The same region as viewed in 3D Viewer.

  11. Local earthquake tomography of Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckett, Richard; Baptie, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Scotland is a relatively aseismic region for the use of local earthquake tomography, but 40 yr of earthquakes recorded by a good and growing network make it possible. A careful selection is made from the earthquakes located by the British Geological Survey (BGS) over the last four decades to provide a data set maximising arrival time accuracy and ray path coverage of Scotland. A large number of 1-D velocity models with different layer geometries are considered and differentiated by employing quarry blasts as ground-truth events. Then, SIMULPS14 is used to produce a robust 3-D tomographic P-wave velocity model for Scotland. In areas of high resolution the model shows good agreement with previously published interpretations of seismic refraction and reflection experiments. However, the model shows relatively little lateral variation in seismic velocity except at shallow depths, where sedimentary basins such as the Midland Valley are apparent. At greater depths, higher velocities in the northwest parts of the model suggest that the thickness of crust increases towards the south and east. This observation is also in agreement with previous studies. Quarry blasts used as ground truth events and relocated with the preferred 3-D model are shown to be markedly more accurate than when located with the existing BGS 1-D velocity model.

  12. Dynamic 3D simulations of earthquakes on en echelon faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.; Day, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    One of the mysteries of earthquake mechanics is why earthquakes stop. This process determines the difference between small and devastating ruptures. One possibility is that fault geometry controls earthquake size. We test this hypothesis using a numerical algorithm that simulates spontaneous rupture propagation in a three-dimensional medium and apply our knowledge to two California fault zones. We find that the size difference between the 1934 and 1966 Parkfield, California, earthquakes may be the product of a stepover at the southern end of the 1934 earthquake and show how the 1992 Landers, California, earthquake followed physically reasonable expectations when it jumped across en echelon faults to become a large event. If there are no linking structures, such as transfer faults, then strike-slip earthquakes are unlikely to propagate through stepovers >5 km wide. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Single-earthquake Location Using 3-D Vp and Vs Model - Applications in the Central USA and Taiwan Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, J.; Chen, H.; Kim, K.; Pujol, J.; Chiu, S.; Withers, M.

    2003-12-01

    Traditional local earthquake location using a horizontally layered homogeneous velocity model is always limited in its resolution and reliability due to the existence of frequently overlooked 3- dimensional complexity of the real earth. Simultaneous earthquake relocation during a traditional 3-D seismic tomography has only applied to a limited set of selected earthquakes that more than 50% of earthquakes in a catalog are basically ignored. A new earthquake location program has been developed to locate every local earthquake using the best available 3-D Vp and Vs model for a region. Many modern seismic networks have provided excellent spatial coverage of seismic stations to record high-resolution earthquake data to allow the determination of high-resolution 3-D Vp and Vs velocity model for the region. Once Vp and Vs information for all 3-D grid points are available, travel time from each grid point to all seismic stations can be calculated using any available 3-D ray tracing techniques and be stored in computer files for later usage. Travel times from a trial hypocenter to the recording stations can be interpolated simply from those of the adjacent 8 grid points available in computer files without the very time consuming 3-D ray tracing. Iterations continue until the hypocenter adjustments are less than the given criteria and the travel time residual, or the difference between the observed and the calculated travel times, is a minimum. Therefore, any earthquake, no matter how small or how big it is, will be efficiently and reliably located using the 3-D velocity model. This new location program has been applied to the New Madrid seismic zone of the central USA and in various seismic zones in Taiwan region. Preliminary results in these two regions indicate that earthquake hypocenters can be reliably relocated in spite of the very significant lateral structural variations. This location program can also be applied in routine earthquake location for any seismic network

  14. R3D Align: global pairwise alignment of RNA 3D structures using local superpositions

    PubMed Central

    Rahrig, Ryan R.; Leontis, Neocles B.; Zirbel, Craig L.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Comparing 3D structures of homologous RNA molecules yields information about sequence and structural variability. To compare large RNA 3D structures, accurate automatic comparison tools are needed. In this article, we introduce a new algorithm and web server to align large homologous RNA structures nucleotide by nucleotide using local superpositions that accommodate the flexibility of RNA molecules. Local alignments are merged to form a global alignment by employing a maximum clique algorithm on a specially defined graph that we call the ‘local alignment’ graph. Results: The algorithm is implemented in a program suite and web server called ‘R3D Align’. The R3D Align alignment of homologous 3D structures of 5S, 16S and 23S rRNA was compared to a high-quality hand alignment. A full comparison of the 16S alignment with the other state-of-the-art methods is also provided. The R3D Align program suite includes new diagnostic tools for the structural evaluation of RNA alignments. The R3D Align alignments were compared to those produced by other programs and were found to be the most accurate, in comparison with a high quality hand-crafted alignment and in conjunction with a series of other diagnostics presented. The number of aligned base pairs as well as measures of geometric similarity are used to evaluate the accuracy of the alignments. Availability: R3D Align is freely available through a web server http://rna.bgsu.edu/R3DAlign. The MATLAB source code of the program suite is also freely available for download at that location. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: r-rahrig@onu.edu PMID:20929913

  15. Assessing the benefit of 3D a priori models for earthquake location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmann, F. J.; Manzanares, A.; Peters, K.; Kahle, R. L.; Lange, D.; Saul, J.; Nooshiri, N.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquake location in 1D Earth models is a routine procedure. Particularly in environments such as subduction zones where the network geometry is biased and lateral velocity variations are large, the use of a 1D model can lead to strongly biased solutions. This is well-known and it is therefore usually preferred to use three-dimensional models, e.g. from local earthquake tomography. Efficient codes for earthquake location in 3D models are available for routine use, for example NonLinLoc. However, tomographic studies are time-consuming to carry out, and a sufficient number of data might not always be available. However, in many cases, information about the three-dimensional velocity structure is available in the form of refraction surveys or other constraints such as gravity or receiver functions based models. Failing that, global or regional scale crustal models could be employed. However, it is not obvious that models derived using different types of data lead to better location results than an optimised 1D velocity model. On the other hand, correct interpretation of seismicity patterns often requires comparison and exaxt positioning in pre-existing velocity models. In this presentation we draw on examples from the Chilean and Sumatran margins as well as a mid-ocean ridge environments, using both data and synthetic examples to investigate under what conditions the use of a priori 3D models is expected to result in improved location results and modifies interpretation. Furthermore, we introduce MATLAB tools that facilitate the creation of three-dimensional models suitable for earthquake location from refraction profiles, CRUST1 and SLAB1.0 and other model types.

  16. Haiti 2010 Earthquake: A 3D Deformation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Gopika; Minet, Christian; Eineder, Michael; Parizzi, Alessandro; Yague-Martinez, Nestor

    2012-01-01

    On January 12, 2010 at 2153 GMT, a magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck the region of Haiti with its hypocenter at a distance of 25 km from the capital city of Port-au- Prince. This disaster killed about 316,000, injured 300,000 and displaced another 1.3 million people around Port-au-Prince. The earthquake occurred along the Enriquillo- Plantain Garden fault zone, which is one of the two main strike-slip faults inferred to accommodate about 7-10 mm yr-1 relative motion between the Caribbean and the North American Plates. In order to analyse the deformation caused by the earthquake, TerraSAR-X and ALOS-PALSAR data, was processed using Differential Interferometry and Incoherent cross-correlation methods.

  17. Assessing a 3D smoothed seismicity model of induced earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechar, Jeremy; Király, Eszter; Gischig, Valentin; Wiemer, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    As more energy exploration and extraction efforts cause earthquakes, it becomes increasingly important to control induced seismicity. Risk management schemes must be improved and should ultimately be based on near-real-time forecasting systems. With this goal in mind, we propose a test bench to evaluate models of induced seismicity based on metrics developed by the CSEP community. To illustrate the test bench, we consider a model based on the so-called seismogenic index and a rate decay; to produce three-dimensional forecasts, we smooth past earthquakes in space and time. We explore four variants of this model using the Basel 2006 and Soultz-sous-Forêts 2004 datasets to make short-term forecasts, test their consistency, and rank the model variants. Our results suggest that such a smoothed seismicity model is useful for forecasting induced seismicity within three days, and giving more weight to recent events improves forecast performance. Moreover, the location of the largest induced earthquake is forecast well by this model. Despite the good spatial performance, the model does not estimate the seismicity rate well: it frequently overestimates during stimulation and during the early post-stimulation period, and it systematically underestimates around shut-in. In this presentation, we also describe a robust estimate of information gain, a modification that can also benefit forecast experiments involving tectonic earthquakes.

  18. 3-D target-based distributed smart camera network localization.

    PubMed

    Kassebaum, John; Bulusu, Nirupama; Feng, Wu-Chi

    2010-10-01

    For distributed smart camera networks to perform vision-based tasks such as subject recognition and tracking, every camera's position and orientation relative to a single 3-D coordinate frame must be accurately determined. In this paper, we present a new camera network localization solution that requires successively showing a 3-D feature point-rich target to all cameras, then using the known geometry of a 3-D target, cameras estimate and decompose projection matrices to compute their position and orientation relative to the coordinatization of the 3-D target's feature points. As each 3-D target position establishes a distinct coordinate frame, cameras that view more than one 3-D target position compute translations and rotations relating different positions' coordinate frames and share the transform data with neighbors to facilitate realignment of all cameras to a single coordinate frame. Compared to other localization solutions that use opportunistically found visual data, our solution is more suitable to battery-powered, processing-constrained camera networks because it requires communication only to determine simultaneous target viewings and for passing transform data. Additionally, our solution requires only pairwise view overlaps of sufficient size to see the 3-D target and detect its feature points, while also giving camera positions in meaningful units. We evaluate our algorithm in both real and simulated smart camera networks. In the real network, position error is less than 1 ('') when the 3-D target's feature points fill only 2.9% of the frame area. PMID:20679031

  19. Fast and precise 3D fluorophore localization by gradient fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongqiang; Xu, Jianquan; Jin, Jingyi; Gao, Ying; Lan, Li; Liu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Astigmatism imaging is widely used to encode the 3D position of fluorophore in single-particle tracking and super-resolution localization microscopy. Here, we present a fast and precise localization algorithm based on gradient fitting to decode the 3D subpixel position of the fluorophore. This algorithm determines the center of the emitter by finding the position with the best-fit gradient direction distribution to the measured point spread function (PSF), and can retrieve the 3D subpixel position of the emitter in a single iteration. Through numerical simulation and experiments with mammalian cells, we demonstrate that our algorithm yields comparable localization precision to the traditional iterative Gaussian function fitting (GF) based method, while exhibits over two orders-of-magnitude faster execution speed. Our algorithm is a promising online reconstruction method for 3D super-resolution microscopy.

  20. FR3D: finding local and composite recurrent structural motifs in RNA 3D structures.

    PubMed

    Sarver, Michael; Zirbel, Craig L; Stombaugh, Jesse; Mokdad, Ali; Leontis, Neocles B

    2008-01-01

    New methods are described for finding recurrent three-dimensional (3D) motifs in RNA atomic-resolution structures. Recurrent RNA 3D motifs are sets of RNA nucleotides with similar spatial arrangements. They can be local or composite. Local motifs comprise nucleotides that occur in the same hairpin or internal loop. Composite motifs comprise nucleotides belonging to three or more different RNA strand segments or molecules. We use a base-centered approach to construct efficient, yet exhaustive search procedures using geometric, symbolic, or mixed representations of RNA structure that we implement in a suite of MATLAB programs, "Find RNA 3D" (FR3D). The first modules of FR3D preprocess structure files to classify base-pair and -stacking interactions. Each base is represented geometrically by the position of its glycosidic nitrogen in 3D space and by the rotation matrix that describes its orientation with respect to a common frame. Base-pairing and base-stacking interactions are calculated from the base geometries and are represented symbolically according to the Leontis/Westhof basepairing classification, extended to include base-stacking. These data are stored and used to organize motif searches. For geometric searches, the user supplies the 3D structure of a query motif which FR3D uses to find and score geometrically similar candidate motifs, without regard to the sequential position of their nucleotides in the RNA chain or the identity of their bases. To score and rank candidate motifs, FR3D calculates a geometric discrepancy by rigidly rotating candidates to align optimally with the query motif and then comparing the relative orientations of the corresponding bases in the query and candidate motifs. Given the growing size of the RNA structure database, it is impossible to explicitly compute the discrepancy for all conceivable candidate motifs, even for motifs with less than ten nucleotides. The screening algorithm that we describe finds all candidate motifs whose

  1. FR3D: finding local and composite recurrent structural motifs in RNA 3D structures

    PubMed Central

    Sarver, Michael; Stombaugh, Jesse; Mokdad, Ali; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2010-01-01

    New methods are described for finding recurrent three-dimensional (3D) motifs in RNA atomic-resolution structures. Recurrent RNA 3D motifs are sets of RNA nucleotides with similar spatial arrangements. They can be local or composite. Local motifs comprise nucleotides that occur in the same hairpin or internal loop. Composite motifs comprise nucleotides belonging to three or more different RNA strand segments or molecules. We use a base-centered approach to construct efficient, yet exhaustive search procedures using geometric, symbolic, or mixed representations of RNA structure that we implement in a suite of MATLAB programs, “Find RNA 3D” (FR3D). The first modules of FR3D preprocess structure files to classify base-pair and -stacking interactions. Each base is represented geometrically by the position of its glycosidic nitrogen in 3D space and by the rotation matrix that describes its orientation with respect to a common frame. Base-pairing and base-stacking interactions are calculated from the base geometries and are represented symbolically according to the Leontis/Westhof basepairing classification, extended to include base-stacking. These data are stored and used to organize motif searches. For geometric searches, the user supplies the 3D structure of a query motif which FR3D uses to find and score geometrically similar candidate motifs, without regard to the sequential position of their nucleotides in the RNA chain or the identity of their bases. To score and rank candidate motifs, FR3D calculates a geometric discrepancy by rigidly rotating candidates to align optimally with the query motif and then comparing the relative orientations of the corresponding bases in the query and candidate motifs. Given the growing size of the RNA structure database, it is impossible to explicitly compute the discrepancy for all conceivable candidate motifs, even for motifs with less than ten nucleotides. The screening algorithm that we describe finds all candidate motifs

  2. Measurement of the mobility edge for 3D Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeghini, Giulia; Landini, Manuele; Castilho, Patricia; Roy, Sanjukta; Spagnolli, Giacomo; Trenkwalder, Andreas; Fattori, Marco; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    An outstanding problem of Anderson localization (AL) in 3D systems is the determination of the mobility edge, i.e. the energy threshold that separates localized and extended states. In our experiment we use a Bose-Einstein condensate of 39 K atoms and study its transport properties in a disordered optical potential. By tuning the inter-particle interactions to zero via magnetic Feshbach resonances, we study the single-particle phenomenon of AL. A novel technique to measure and control the atomic energy distribution allows us to measure for the first time the position of the localization threshold as a function of the disorder strength. We also study how the addition of finite repulsive or attractive interactions breaks the localized regime and triggers subdiffusive expansion of the atoms. In the future, similar experiments might also probe the existence of many-body localization in 3D.

  3. The 1999 Izmit, Turkey, earthquake: A 3D dynamic stress transfer model of intraearthquake triggering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.; Dolan, J.F.; Hartleb, R.; Day, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Before the August 1999 Izmit (Kocaeli), Turkey, earthquake, theoretical studies of earthquake ruptures and geological observations had provided estimates of how far an earthquake might jump to get to a neighboring fault. Both numerical simulations and geological observations suggested that 5 km might be the upper limit if there were no transfer faults. The Izmit earthquake appears to have followed these expectations. It did not jump across any step-over wider than 5 km and was instead stopped by a narrower step-over at its eastern end and possibly by a stress shadow caused by a historic large earthquake at its western end. Our 3D spontaneous rupture simulations of the 1999 Izmit earthquake provide two new insights: (1) the west- to east-striking fault segments of this part of the North Anatolian fault are oriented so as to be low-stress faults and (2) the easternmost segment involved in the August 1999 rupture may be dipping. An interesting feature of the Izmit earthquake is that a 5-km-long gap in surface rupture and an adjacent 25° restraining bend in the fault zone did not stop the earthquake. The latter observation is a warning that significant fault bends in strike-slip faults may not arrest future earthquakes.

  4. Joint inversion of 3D crustal structure with ambient noise and earthquake body wave travel time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Ni, S.; Chong, J.; Wang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Surface wave tomography based on the noise correlation function of seismic ambient noise has been widely used in studies of crustal and mantle structure . However, the periods of surface wave dispersions in the ambient noise tomography are typically less than 40 s, which limits its resolution on the lower crust. Travel times of earthquake body waves, such as Sg and SmS, could provide additional constraints to the crustal structure, especially to the lower crust due to the ray paths of SmS traveling through the lower crust twice. Here, we proposed a joint inversion method for 3D crustal structure with ambient noise and earthquake body wave travel time data, with the goal of providing better constraints and resolutions on the whole crust. We constructed the linear equations for joint inversion of crustal S velocity structure with the surface wave dispersion and body wave travel time data, and solved the equations with LSQR algorithm. Different weighting and damping factors, together with smoothing constraints, are adopted for surface wave dispersion and body wave travel time data to fit both dataset simultaneously. Synthetics experiments showed that the joint inversion could resolve the crust structure better than sole tomography of ambient noise or body wave travel time. We conducted the joint inversion around the Yangtze block in the eastern China. Rayleigh wave dispersions are extracted from the seismic ambient noise tomography by Zheng et al (2011) in this area. The body waves (e.g., Sg, SmS, Sn) are coherent to be identified and their travel times are measured with accuracy from high quality waveforms of some recent local earthquakes in this area. In order to minimize the travel time uncertainties, the focal depth and epicenter of these local earthquakes were resolved by depth phases and temporary aftershock observations. The result from joint inversion suggests that the crustal velocity structure, especially the lower crust, was well improved, which not only

  5. Modeling Recent Large Earthquakes Using the 3-D Global Wave Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjörleifsdóttir, V.; Kanamori, H.; Tromp, J.

    2003-04-01

    We use the spectral-element method (SEM) to accurately compute waveforms at periods of 40 s and longer for three recent large earthquakes using 3D Earth models and finite source models. The M_w~7.6, Jan~26, 2001, Bhuj, India event had a small rupture area and is well modeled at long periods with a point source. We use this event as a calibration event to investigate the effects of 3-D Earth models on the waveforms. The M_w~7.9, Nov~11, 2001, Kunlun, China, event exhibits a large directivity (an asymmetry in the radiation pattern) even at periods longer than 200~s. We used the source time function determined by Kikuchi and Yamanaka (2001) and the overall pattern of slip distribution determined by Lin et al. to guide the wave-form modeling. The large directivity is consistent with a long fault, at least 300 km, and an average rupture speed of 3±0.3~km/s. The directivity at long periods is not sensitive to variations in the rupture speed along strike as long as the average rupture speed is constant. Thus, local variations in rupture speed cannot be ruled out. The rupture speed is a key parameter for estimating the fracture energy of earthquakes. The M_w~8.1, March~25, 1998, event near the Balleny Islands on the Antarctic Plate exhibits large directivity in long period surface waves, similar to the Kunlun event. Many slip models have been obtained from body waves for this earthquake (Kuge et al. (1999), Nettles et al. (1999), Antolik et al. (2000), Henry et al. (2000) and Tsuboi et al. (2000)). We used the slip model from Henry et al. to compute SEM waveforms for this event. The synthetic waveforms show a good fit to the data at periods from 40-200~s, but the amplitude and directivity at longer periods are significantly smaller than observed. Henry et al. suggest that this event comprised two subevents with one triggering the other at a distance of 100 km. To explain the observed directivity however, a significant amount of slip is required between the two subevents

  6. Structural response to 3D simulated earthquake motions in San Bernardino Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.; Frankel, A.

    1994-01-01

    Structural repsonse to one- and three-dimensional (3D) simulated motions in San Bernardino Valley from a hypothetical earthquake along the San Andreas fault with moment magnitude 6.5 and rupture length of 30km is investigated. The results show that the ground motions and the structural response vary dramatically with the type of simulation and the location. -from Authors

  7. Localization of liver tumors in freehand 3D laparoscopic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahin, O.; Martens, V.; Besirevic, A.; Kleemann, M.; Schlaefer, A.

    2012-02-01

    The aim of minimally invasive laparoscopic liver interventions is to completely resect or ablate tumors while minimizing the trauma caused by the operation. However, restrictions such as limited field of view and reduced depth perception can hinder the surgeon's capabilities to precisely localize the tumor. Typically, preoperative data is acquired to find the tumor(s) and plan the surgery. Nevertheless, determining the precise position of the tumor is required, not only before but also during the operation. The standard use of ultrasound in hepatic surgery is to explore the liver and identify tumors. Meanwhile, the surgeon mentally builds a 3D context to localize tumors. This work aims to upgrade the use of ultrasound in laparoscopic liver surgery. We propose an approach to segment and localize tumors intra-operatively in 3D ultrasound. We reconstruct a 3D laparoscopic ultrasound volume containing a tumor. The 3D image is then preprocessed and semi-automatically segmented using a level set algorithm. During the surgery, for each subsequent reconstructed volume, a fast update of the tumor position is accomplished via registration using the previously segmented and localized tumor as a prior knowledge. The approach was tested on a liver phantom with artificial tumors. The tumors were localized in approximately two seconds with a mean error of less than 0.5 mm. The strengths of this technique are that it can be performed intra-operatively, it helps the surgeon to accurately determine the location, shape and volume of the tumor, and it is repeatable throughout the operation.

  8. 3-D Simulations of Megathrust Earthquakes - Application to the 2003 M8.3 Tokachi-Oki Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, E. A.; Frankel, A. D.; Vidale, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical modeling of megathrust earthquakes is an important tool for seismic hazard assessment, particularly in subduction systems where recordings of great earthquakes are sparse or non-existent. Here, we produce broadband synthetic seismograms for the 2003 M8.3 Tokachi-Oki, Japan earthquake. At long periods (> 1 sec), synthetic waveforms are produced using numerical simulations with the 3D Japan Integrated Velocity Structure Model (Koketsu et al., 2008). For comparison, these 3D numerical simulations were carried out using both (1) a finite difference method and (2) the finite element code, SPECFEM3D. The 3D simulations were used to validate a compound rupture model, in which slip on the fault consisted of multiple M7 high stress drop asperities superimposed on a background slip distribution with longer rise times. At short periods (< 1 sec), we used a summation of stochastic seismograms from point sources, and combined the short and long period synthetics using a matched filter. We compared the broadband synthetics to actual waveform data and the observed response spectral accelerations from the Tokachi-Oki event. We found that the synthetic response spectra are sensitive to the coherence of the rupture front. This work serves to validate this methodology for predicting ground motions for future M8-9 megathrust events in Cascadia.

  9. 3-D model-based tracking for UAV indoor localization.

    PubMed

    Teulière, Céline; Marchand, Eric; Eck, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel model-based tracking approach for 3-D localization. One main difficulty of standard model-based approach lies in the presence of low-level ambiguities between different edges. In this paper, given a 3-D model of the edges of the environment, we derive a multiple hypotheses tracker which retrieves the potential poses of the camera from the observations in the image. We also show how these candidate poses can be integrated into a particle filtering framework to guide the particle set toward the peaks of the distribution. Motivated by the UAV indoor localization problem where GPS signal is not available, we validate the algorithm on real image sequences from UAV flights. PMID:25099967

  10. Mapping 3D fault geometry in earthquakes using high-resolution topography: Examples from the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah (Mexico) and 2013 Balochistan (Pakistan) earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu; Walker, Richard T.; Elliott, John R.; Parsons, Barry

    2016-04-01

    Fault dips are usually measured from outcrops in the field or inferred through geodetic or seismological modeling. Here we apply the classic structural geology approach of calculating dip from a fault's 3-D surface trace using recent, high-resolution topography. A test study applied to the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake shows very good agreement between our results and those previously determined from field measurements. To obtain a reliable estimate, a fault segment ≥120 m long with a topographic variation ≥15 m is suggested. We then applied this method to the 2013 Balochistan earthquake, getting dips similar to previous estimates. Our dip estimates show a switch from north to south dipping at the southern end of the main trace, which appears to be a response to local extension within a stepover. We suggest that this previously unidentified geometrical complexity may act as the endpoint of earthquake ruptures for the southern end of the Hoshab fault.

  11. Saliency detection for videos using 3D FFT local spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Zhiling; AlRegib, Ghassan

    2015-03-01

    Bottom-up spatio-temporal saliency detection identifies perceptually important regions of interest in video sequences. The center-surround model proves to be useful for visual saliency detection. In this work, we explore using 3D FFT local spectra as features for saliency detection within the center-surround framework. We develop a spectral location based decomposition scheme to divide a 3D FFT cube into two components, one related to temporal changes and the other related to spatial changes. Temporal saliency and spatial saliency are detected separately using features derived from each spectral component through a simple center-surround comparison method. The two detection results are then combined to yield a saliency map. We apply the same detection algorithm to different color channels (YIQ) and incorporate the results into the final saliency determination. The proposed technique is tested with the public CRCNS database. Both visual and numerical evaluations verify the promising performance of our technique.

  12. Joint earthquake source inversions using seismo-geodesy and 3-D earth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, J.; Ferreira, A. M. G.; Funning, G. J.

    2014-08-01

    A joint earthquake source inversion technique is presented that uses InSAR and long-period teleseismic data, and, for the first time, takes 3-D Earth structure into account when modelling seismic surface and body waves. Ten average source parameters (Moment, latitude, longitude, depth, strike, dip, rake, length, width and slip) are estimated; hence, the technique is potentially useful for rapid source inversions of moderate magnitude earthquakes using multiple data sets. Unwrapped interferograms and long-period seismic data are jointly inverted for the location, fault geometry and seismic moment, using a hybrid downhill Powell-Monte Carlo algorithm. While the InSAR data are modelled assuming a rectangular dislocation in a homogeneous half-space, seismic data are modelled using the spectral element method for a 3-D earth model. The effect of noise and lateral heterogeneity on the inversions is investigated by carrying out realistic synthetic tests for various earthquakes with different faulting mechanisms and magnitude (Mw 6.0-6.6). Synthetic tests highlight the improvement in the constraint of fault geometry (strike, dip and rake) and moment when InSAR and seismic data are combined. Tests comparing the effect of using a 1-D or 3-D earth model show that long-period surface waves are more sensitive than long-period body waves to the change in earth model. Incorrect source parameters, particularly incorrect fault dip angles, can compensate for systematic errors in the assumed Earth structure, leading to an acceptable data fit despite large discrepancies in source parameters. Three real earthquakes are also investigated: Eureka Valley, California (1993 May 17, Mw 6.0), Aiquile, Bolivia (1998 February 22, Mw 6.6) and Zarand, Iran (2005 May 22, Mw 6.5). These events are located in different tectonic environments and show large discrepancies between InSAR and seismically determined source models. Despite the 40-50 km discrepancies in location between previous geodetic and

  13. Earthquake source tensor inversion with the gCAP method and 3D Green's functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Zhu, L.; Ross, Z.

    2013-12-01

    We develop and apply a method to invert earthquake seismograms for source properties using a general tensor representation and 3D Green's functions. The method employs (i) a general representation of earthquake potency/moment tensors with double couple (DC), compensated linear vector dipole (CLVD), and isotropic (ISO) components, and (ii) a corresponding generalized CAP (gCap) scheme where the continuous wave trains are broken into Pnl and surface waves (Zhu & Ben-Zion, 2013). For comparison, we also use the waveform inversion method of Zheng & Chen (2012) and Ammon et al. (1998). Sets of 3D Green's functions are calculated on a grid of 1 km3 using the 3-D community velocity model CVM-4 (Kohler et al. 2003). A bootstrap technique is adopted to establish robustness of the inversion results using the gCap method (Ross & Ben-Zion, 2013). Synthetic tests with 1-D and 3-D waveform calculations show that the source tensor inversion procedure is reasonably reliable and robust. As initial application, the method is used to investigate source properties of the March 11, 2013, Mw=4.7 earthquake on the San Jacinto fault using recordings of ~45 stations up to ~0.2Hz. Both the best fitting and most probable solutions include ISO component of ~1% and CLVD component of ~0%. The obtained ISO component, while small, is found to be a non-negligible positive value that can have significant implications for the physics of the failure process. Work on using higher frequency data for this and other earthquakes is in progress.

  14. Interactive 3D Visualization of Humboldt Bay Bridge Earthquake Simulation With High Definition Stereo Output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, P. B.; Nayak, A.; Yan, J.; Elgamal, A.

    2006-12-01

    This visualization project involves the study of the Humboldt Bay Middle Channel Bridge, a Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research (PEER) testbed site, subjected to an earthquake simulated by the Department of Structural Engineering, UCSD. The numerical simulation and data generation was carried out using the OpenSees finite element analysis platform, and GiD was employed for the mesh generation in preprocessing. In collaboration with the Scripps Visualization Center, the data was transformed into a virtual 3D world that a viewer could rotate around, zoom into, pan about, step through each timestep or examine in true stereo. The data consists of the static mesh of the bridge-foundation-ground elements, material indices for each type of element, the displacement amount of each element nodes over time, and the shear stress levels for each ground element over time. The Coin3D C++ Open Inventor API was used to parse the data and to render the bridge system in full 3D at 1130 individual time steps to show how the bridge structure and the surrounding soil elements interact during the full course of an earthquake. The results can be viewed interactively while using the program, saved as images and processed into animated movies, in resolutions as high as High Definition (1920x1080), or in stereo modes such as red-blue anaglyph.

  15. Equivalent Body Force Finite Elements Method and 3-D Earth Model Applied In 2004 Sumatra Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, W.; Cheng, H.; Shi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The 26 December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake with moment magnitude (Mw) of 9.1 to 9.3 is the first great earthquake recorded by digital broadband, high-dynamic-range seismometers and global positioning system (GPS) equipment, which recorded many high-quality geophysical data sets. The spherical curvature is not negligible in far field especially for large event and the real Earth is laterally inhomogeneity and the analytical results still are difficult to explain the geodetic measurements. We use equivalent body force finite elements method Zhang et al. (2015) and mesh the whole earth, to compute global co-seismic displacements using four fault slip models of the 2004 Sumatra earthquake provided by different authors. Comparisons of calculated co-seismic displacements and GPS show that the confidences are well in near field for four models, and the confidences are according to different models. In the whole four models, the Chlieh model (Chlieh et al., 2007) is the best as this slip model not only accord well with near field data but also far field data. And then we use the best slip model, Chlieh model to explore influence of three dimensional lateral earth structure on both layered spherically symmetric (PREM) and real 3-D heterogeneous earth model (Crust 1.0 model and GyPSuM). Results show that the effects of 3-D heterogeneous earth model are not negligible and decrease concomitantly with increasing distance from the epicenter. The relative effects of 3-D crust model are 23% and 40% for horizontal and vertical displacements, respectively. The effects of the 3-D mantle model are much smaller than that of 3-D crust model but with wider impacting area.

  16. Analysis of the rupture process of the 1995 Kobe earthquake using a 3D velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yujia; Koketsu, Kazuki; Ohno, Taichi

    2013-12-01

    A notable feature of the 1995 Kobe (Hyogo-ken Nanbu) earthquake is that violent ground motions occurred in a narrow zone. Previous studies have shown that the origin of such motions can be explained by the 3D velocity structure in this zone. This indicates not only that the 3D velocity structure significantly affects strong ground motions, but also that we should consider its effects in order to determine accurately the rupture process of the earthquake. Therefore, we have performed a joint source inversion of strong-motion, geodetic, and teleseismic data, where 3D Green's functions were calculated for strong-motion and geodetic data in the Osaka basin. Our source model estimates the total seismic moment to be about 2.1 × 1019 N m and the maximum slip reaches 2.9 m near the hypocenter. Although the locations of large slips are similar to those reported by Yoshida et al. (1996), there are quantitative differences between our results and their results due to the differences between the 3D and 1D Green's functions. We have also confirmed that our source model realized a better fit to the strong motion observations, and a similar fit as Yoshida et al. (1996) to the observed static displacements.

  17. Dynamic earthquake rupture modelled with an unstructured 3-D spectral element method applied to the 2011 M9 Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez, P.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Dalguer, L. A.; Somala, S. N.; Nissen-Meyer, T.

    2014-08-01

    An important goal of computational seismology is to simulate dynamic earthquake rupture and strong ground motion in realistic models that include crustal heterogeneities and complex fault geometries. To accomplish this, we incorporate dynamic rupture modelling capabilities in a spectral element solver on unstructured meshes, the 3-D open source code SPECFEM3D, and employ state-of-the-art software for the generation of unstructured meshes of hexahedral elements. These tools provide high flexibility in representing fault systems with complex geometries, including faults with branches and non-planar faults. The domain size is extended with progressive mesh coarsening to maintain an accurate resolution of the static field. Our implementation of dynamic rupture does not affect the parallel scalability of the code. We verify our implementation by comparing our results to those of two finite element codes on benchmark problems including branched faults. Finally, we present a preliminary dynamic rupture model of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake including a non-planar plate interface with heterogeneous frictional properties and initial stresses. Our simulation reproduces qualitatively the depth-dependent frequency content of the source and the large slip close to the trench observed for this earthquake.

  18. Resolution improvement by 3D particle averaging in localization microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Broeken, Jordi; Johnson, Hannah; Lidke, Diane S.; Liu, Sheng; Nieuwenhuizen, Robert P.J.; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Lidke, Keith A.; Rieger, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by recent developments in localization microscopy that applied averaging of identical particles in 2D for increasing the resolution even further, we discuss considerations for alignment (registration) methods for particles in general and for 3D in particular. We detail that traditional techniques for particle registration from cryo electron microscopy based on cross-correlation are not suitable, as the underlying image formation process is fundamentally different. We argue that only localizations, i.e. a set of coordinates with associated uncertainties, are recorded and not a continuous intensity distribution. We present a method that owes to this fact and that is inspired by the field of statistical pattern recognition. In particular we suggest to use an adapted version of the Bhattacharyya distance as a merit function for registration. We evaluate the method in simulations and demonstrate it on three-dimensional super-resolution data of Alexa 647 labelled to the Nup133 protein in the nuclear pore complex of Hela cells. From the simulations we find suggestions that for successful registration the localization uncertainty must be smaller than the distance between labeling sites on a particle. These suggestions are supported by theoretical considerations concerning the attainable resolution in localization microscopy and its scaling behavior as a function of labeling density and localization precision. PMID:25866640

  19. 3-D velocity heterogeneity in earthquake swarm area of NW Bohemia/Vogtland (German-Czech border region)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Sima; Bauer, Klaus; Korn, Michael

    2014-05-01

    3-D Vp and Vp/Vs structure of the geodynamically active NW Bohemia/Vogtland area, located at the border region between Germany and Czech republic, has been determined from local earthquake tomography using 543 earthquakes which have been recorded during 2000 to 2010. This region is known for the occurrence of earthquake swarms that are supposed to be triggered by fluid upwelling in the crust, although fluid behaviour and migration paths in the subsurface of NW Bohemia is still poorly known. The events used in this study were selected based on a minimum 12 P and S phase observations and an azimuthal gap less than 160º. This data set is employed to derive a minimum 1-D velocity model and to relocate the hypocenters. The minimum 1-D velocity model is then used as an initial model in non-linear inversion to derive 3-D P-velocity and Vp/Vs ratio. Using synthetic tests, it can be shown that a high resolution is obtained in the central part of the studied region with the given source and receiver configuration. Two branches of high Vp/Vs ratio anomalies have been detected above the swarm quakes' focal zone. These anomalies support the existence of two main fluid passages toward Bad Brambach and Bublak moffette. Another interesting result is a high Vp/Vs line-like anomaly along Mariánské Lázně fault where most of the swarm quakes occur, which could be due to a fluid saturated area around the cracked zone of the fault plain. Hypocenters in the swarm region are located in a low Vp and Vp/Vs anomaly. The correlation between the detected Vp and Vp/Vs anomalies and the location of earthquake swarm suggests a model in which CO2 as part of magmatic fluids exist in a vast area beneath NW Bohemia and frequently migrate up to the surface.

  20. A hierarchical Bayesian approach for earthquake location and data uncertainty estimation in 3D heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroucau, Pierre; Custódio, Susana

    2015-04-01

    Solving inverse problems requires an estimate of data uncertainties. This usually takes the form of a data covariance matrix, which determines the shape of the model posterior distribution. Those uncertainties are yet not always known precisely and it is common practice to simply set them to a fixed, reasonable value. In the case of earthquake location, the hypocentral parameters (longitude, latitude, depth and origin time) are typically inverted for using seismic phase arrival times. But quantitative data variance estimates are rarely provided. Instead, arrival time catalogs usually associate phase picks with a quality factor, which is subsequently interpreted more or less arbitrarily in terms of data uncertainty in the location procedure. Here, we present a hierarchical Bayesian algorithm for earthquake location in 3D heterogeneous media, in which not only the earthquake hypocentral parameters, but also the P- and S-wave arrival time uncertainties, are inverted for, hence allowing more realistic posterior model covariance estimates. Forward modeling is achieved by means of the Fast Marching Method (FMM), an eikonal solver which has the ability to take interfaces into account, so direct, reflected and refracted phases can be used in the inversion. We illustrate the ability of our algorithm to retrieve earthquake hypocentral parameters as well as data uncertainties through synthetic examples and using a subset of arrival time catalogs for mainland Portugal and its Atlantic margin.

  1. A Hierarchical Bayesian Approcah for Earthquake Location and Data Uncertainty Estimation in 3D Heterogeneous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroucau, P.; Custodio, S.

    2014-12-01

    Solving inverse problems requires an estimate of data uncertainties. This usually takes the form of a data covariance matrix, which determines the shape of the model posterior distribution. Those uncertainties are yet not always known precisely and it is common practice to simply set them to a fixed, reasonable value. In the case of earthquake location, the hypocentral parameters (longitude, latitude, depth and origin time) are typically inverted for using seismic phase arrival times. But quantitative data variance estimates are rarely provided. Instead, arrival time catalogs usually associate phase picks with a quality factor, which is subsequently interpreted more or less arbitrarily in terms of data uncertainty in the location procedure. Here, we present a hierarchical Bayesian algorithm for earthquake location in 3D heterogeneous media, in which not only the earthquake hypocentral parameters, but also the P- and S-wave arrival time uncertainties, are inverted for, hence allowing more realistic posterior model covariance estimates. Forward modeling is achieved by means of the Fast Marching Method (FMM), an eikonal solver which has the ability to take interfaces into account, so direct, reflected and refracted phases can be used in the inversion. We illustrate the ability of our algorithm to retrieve earthquake hypocentral parameters as well as data uncertainties through synthetic examples and using a subset of arrival time catalogs for mainland Portugal and its Atlantic margin.

  2. A Retrospective Research for 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan Earthquake by 3-D PI Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Chen, C.; Tiampo, K.; Rundle, J.; Klein, W.

    2007-12-01

    The PI (Pattern Informatics) method was proposed by Tiampo et al., 2002, for the identification of future seismicity in California after 1999. A plausible result was published in Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, suppl., 2002. Chen et al. modified the calculation of the original PI method to de-emphasize the effect of current events, and applied the modified PI method to make a retrospective analysis for the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan. In the case study of the Chi-Chi sequence, the main shock and most of the aftershocks were located in and around the ß¡±hot spot ßÆØ region produced by the modified PI method. Tiampo et al. (2007) applied the Thirumalai- Mountain metric to three earthquake catalogs, California, Spain and eastern Canada, which belong to different tectonic environments. Under specific spatial-temporal resolutions, effectively ergodic behaviors of seismic rate all exist in these regions. Ongoing research for Taiwan suggests that, once depth factor is considered in seismic event distribution, a similar effectively ergodicity also exists in the seismicity data. It motivates us to improve the original PI method to a 3-D version on order to consider the depth effect in a very condensed, high seismicity region. In this study, we used 3-D PI method to make a retrospective forecast of the 1999 M=7.3 Chi-Chi earthquake. The CWB (Central Weather Bureau) catalogue was used. An effectively ergodic period chosen from inverse TM metric-time plot was used as the forecast period. The main shock and several large aftershocks, which magnitudes are ß « 6.0, are well located in or near hotspots in this 3-D PI forecast. In a relative operating characteristic test (Jolliffe and Stephenson, 2003), the performance of PI forecast is also better than relative intensity (RI).

  3. 3-D ground motion modeling for M7 dynamic rupture earthquake scenarios on the Wasatch fault, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roten, D.; Olsen, K. B.; Cruz Atienza, V. M.; Pechmann, J. C.; Magistrale, H. W.

    2009-12-01

    The Salt Lake City segment of the Wasatch fault (WFSLC), located on the eastern edge of the Salt Lake Basin (SLB), is capable of producing M7 earthquakes and represents a serious seismic hazard to Salt Lake City, Utah. We simulate a series of rupture scenarios on the WFSLC to quantify the ground motion expected from such M7 events and to assess the importance of amplification effects from basin focusing and source directivity. We use the newly revised Wasatch Front community velocity model for our simulations, which is tested by simulating records of three local Mw 3.3-3.7 earthquakes in the frequency band 0.5 to 1.0 Hz. The M7 earthquake scenarios make use of a detailed 3-D model geometry of the WFSLC that we developed based on geological observations. To obtain a suite of realistic source representations for M7 WFSLC simulations we perform spontaneous-rupture simulations on a planar 43 km by 23 km fault with the staggered-grid split-node finite-difference (FD) method. We estimate the initial distribution of shear stress using models that assume depth-dependent normal stress for a dipping, normal fault as well as simpler models which use constant (depth-independent) normal stress. The slip rate histories from the spontaneous rupture scenarios are projected onto the irregular dipping geometry of the WFSLC and used to simulate 0-1 Hz wave propagation in the SLB area using a 4th-order, staggered-grid visco-elastic FD method. We find that peak ground velocities tend to be larger on the low-velocity sediments on the hanging wall side of the fault than on outcropping rock on the footwall side, confirming results of previous studies on normal faulting earthquakes. The simulated ground motions reveal strong along-strike directivity effects for ruptures nucleating towards the ends of the WFSLC. The 0-1 Hz FD simulations are combined with local scattering operators to obtain broadband (0-10 Hz) synthetics and maps of average peak ground motions. Finally we use broadband

  4. Structural control on the Tohoku earthquake rupture process investigated by 3D FEM, tsunami and geodetic data

    PubMed Central

    Romano, F.; Trasatti, E.; Lorito, S.; Piromallo, C.; Piatanesi, A.; Ito, Y.; Zhao, D.; Hirata, K.; Lanucara, P.; Cocco, M.

    2014-01-01

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw = 9.1) highlighted previously unobserved features for megathrust events, such as the large slip in a relatively limited area and the shallow rupture propagation. We use a Finite Element Model (FEM), taking into account the 3D geometrical and structural complexities up to the trench zone, and perform a joint inversion of tsunami and geodetic data to retrieve the earthquake slip distribution. We obtain a close spatial correlation between the main deep slip patch and the local seismic velocity anomalies, and large shallow slip extending also to the North coherently with a seismically observed low-frequency radiation. These observations suggest that the friction controlled the rupture, initially confining the deeper rupture and then driving its propagation up to the trench, where it spreads laterally. These findings are relevant to earthquake and tsunami hazard assessment because they may help to detect regions likely prone to rupture along the megathrust, and to constrain the probability of high slip near the trench. Our estimate of ~40 m slip value around the JFAST (Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project) drilling zone contributes to constrain the dynamic shear stress and friction coefficient of the fault obtained by temperature measurements to ~0.68 MPa and ~0.10, respectively. PMID:25005351

  5. Structural control on the Tohoku earthquake rupture process investigated by 3D FEM, tsunami and geodetic data.

    PubMed

    Romano, F; Trasatti, E; Lorito, S; Piromallo, C; Piatanesi, A; Ito, Y; Zhao, D; Hirata, K; Lanucara, P; Cocco, M

    2014-01-01

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw = 9.1) highlighted previously unobserved features for megathrust events, such as the large slip in a relatively limited area and the shallow rupture propagation. We use a Finite Element Model (FEM), taking into account the 3D geometrical and structural complexities up to the trench zone, and perform a joint inversion of tsunami and geodetic data to retrieve the earthquake slip distribution. We obtain a close spatial correlation between the main deep slip patch and the local seismic velocity anomalies, and large shallow slip extending also to the North coherently with a seismically observed low-frequency radiation. These observations suggest that the friction controlled the rupture, initially confining the deeper rupture and then driving its propagation up to the trench, where it spreads laterally. These findings are relevant to earthquake and tsunami hazard assessment because they may help to detect regions likely prone to rupture along the megathrust, and to constrain the probability of high slip near the trench. Our estimate of ~40 m slip value around the JFAST (Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project) drilling zone contributes to constrain the dynamic shear stress and friction coefficient of the fault obtained by temperature measurements to ~0.68 MPa and ~0.10, respectively. PMID:25005351

  6. 3D deformation of Japan, before and after the earthquake in March 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Y.; Kato, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Geographical Survey Institute of Japan (GSI) has about 1300 GPS stations (GEONET) in Japan for more than 15 years observing Japanese inland crustal deformations, and the GEONET has enabled us to watch how Japan is continuously deforming at a rate of a few cm/year. However, most Japanese do not know these facts because it is not easy to understand figures of time series or vector arrows of the GPS data. We developed a way to make 3D animations of Japanese crustal deformation using the GEONET GPS data, which make it easy even for kids to understand Japanese inland motions. From the animation, we can easily understand that Japan is overall shrinking by the compressing force from the Pacific plate and Philippine Sea plate. The Tohoku area is shrinking at rate of around 2cm/yr, that is about 20m over 1000 years. After the March 11, 2011 earthquake, the Tohoku area has expanded more than 5m. If M9 quakes are occurring every 1000 years in this area, the elastic component of the Tohoku region deformation is only 25%. Also people can note that the Nankai area in southwest Japan is shrinking much more significantly. People can expect future M8 class earthquakes in this area without having special scientific knowledge. Recognition of these motions will help the Japanese people to prepare for natural disaster such as big earthquakes and tsunamis. In this talk, a detailed method of creating grid files from GPS data using GMT will be explained. Japanese crustal deformation after the earthquake in March 2011. Horizontal scale is exaggerated by 20000. The reference frame is ITRF2005.

  7. Physics-Based 3-D Simulation for Earthquake Generation Cycles at Plate Interfaces in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Chihiro; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Matsu'ura, Mitsuhiro

    2014-08-01

    The generation of interplate earthquakes can be regarded as a process of tectonic stress accumulation and release, driven by relative plate motion. We completed a physics-based simulation system for earthquake generation cycles at plate interfaces in the Japan region, where the Pacific plate is descending beneath the North American and Philippine Sea plates, and the Philippine Sea plate is descending beneath the North American and Eurasian plates. The system is composed of a quasi-static tectonic loading model and a dynamic rupture propagation model, developed on a realistic 3-D plate interface model. The driving force of the system is relative plate motion. In the quasi-static tectonic loading model, mechanical interaction at plate interfaces is rationally represented by the increase of tangential displacement discontinuity (fault slip) across them on the basis of dislocation theory for an elastic surface layer overlying Maxwell-type viscoelastic half-space. In the dynamic rupture propagation model, stress changes due to fault slip motion on non-planar plate interfaces are evaluated with the boundary integral equation method. The progress of seismic (dynamic) or aseismic (quasi-static) fault slip on plate interfaces is governed by a slip- and time-dependent fault constitutive law. As an example, we numerically simulated earthquake generation cycles at the source region of the 1968 Tokachi-oki earthquake on the North American-Pacific plate interface. From the numerical simulation, we can see that postseismic stress relaxation in the asthenosphere accelerates stress accumulation in the source region. When the stress state of the source region is close to a critical level, dynamic rupture is rapidly accelerated and develops over the whole source region. When the stress state is much lower than the critical level, the rupture is not accelerated. This means that the stress state realized by interseismic tectonic loading essentially controls the subsequent dynamic

  8. Using 3D Wavefield Modeling in Modeling in Interpreting Historical Macroseismic Observations - The Luroy Earthquake of 31 Aug. 1819.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husebye, E. S.; Kebeasy, T. R.

    2004-12-01

    The Luroy earthquake of August 31, 1819 with MS around 6.0 is, by many colleagues, rated as the largest in NW Europe in historical times (pre-1900) and even up to present. Local shaking manifestations were most spectacular with rock and mud avalanches, mast-high waves in nearby Rana fjord and even liquefaction was reported. Most surprisingly, at epicentral distances exceeding 100 km except for Stockholm 800 km away, very few macroseismic observations are available. Another peculiarity was the lack of any significant housing damage even in the Luroy parish itself. In a recent paper, we postulated that the earthquake was of moderate size, reestimated at MS = 5.1, but of shallow depth between 5 - 10 km causing the intense local shaking. In this article, we add a new dimension to the many of Luroy earthquake studies namely simulating the seismic wavefield response of Luroy itself and adjacent areas characterized by steep topographic relief. We use a 3D finite difference scheme and compute ground motion for a point source. We used a shear waves source with a focal depth of 5 km. Water covered areas are replaced by crystalline crust due to the dearth of dense bathymetric data. Main results are that the topography of the Luroy, close to the mountain peak at 685 meter, cause wavefield amplification by a factor of 20 and even stronger. Further away in the Rana fjord and surrounding areas, we also got strong amplification in particular where the relief is sharpest thus explaining triggering of avalanches in a quantitative manner. In other words, macroseismic observations would be biased upward due to the topographic focusing effects and unless properly corrected for also will increase the final earthquake magnitude estimate. We take these results to strongly support our claim that the historic Luroy earthquake was of moderate size of MS = 5.1 and not at MS = 6.0 class as claimed by many colleagues. Finally, downscaling of maximum earthquake magnitude would also lower the

  9. Seismicity patterns along the Ecuadorian subduction zone: new constraints from earthquake location in a 3-D a priori velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Yvonne; Segovia, Monica; Vaca, Sandro; Theunissen, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    To improve earthquake location, we create a 3-D a priori P-wave velocity model (3-DVM) that approximates the large velocity variations of the Ecuadorian subduction system. The 3-DVM is constructed from the integration of geophysical and geological data that depend on the structural geometry and velocity properties of the crust and the upper mantle. In addition, specific station selection is carried out to compensate for the high station density on the Andean Chain. 3-D synthetic experiments are then designed to evaluate the network capacity to recover the event position using only P arrivals and the MAXI technique. Three synthetic earthquake location experiments are proposed: (1) noise-free and (2) noisy arrivals used in the 3-DVM, and (3) noise-free arrivals used in a 1-DVM. Synthetic results indicate that, under the best conditions (exact arrival data set and 3-DVM), the spatiotemporal configuration of the Ecuadorian network can accurately locate 70 per cent of events in the frontal part of the subduction zone (average azimuthal gap is 289° ± 44°). Noisy P arrivals (up to ± 0.3 s) can accurately located 50 per cent of earthquakes. Processing earthquake location within a 1-DVM almost never allows accurate hypocentre position for offshore earthquakes (15 per cent), which highlights the role of using a 3-DVM in subduction zone. For the application to real data, the seismicity distribution from the 3-D-MAXI catalogue is also compared to the determinations obtained in a 1-D-layered VM. In addition to good-quality location uncertainties, the clustering and the depth distribution confirm the 3-D-MAXI catalogue reliability. The pattern of the seismicity distribution (a 13 yr record during the inter-seismic period of the seismic cycle) is compared to the pattern of rupture zone and asperity of the Mw = 7.9 1942 and the Mw = 7.7 1958 events (the Mw = 8.8 1906 asperity patch is not defined). We observe that the nucleation of 1942, 1958 and 1906 events coincides with

  10. 3D Simulation of the Entire Process of Earthquake Generation at Subduction-Zone Plate Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsu'Ura, M.; Hashimoto, C.; Fukuyama, E.

    2003-12-01

    In general, the entire process of earthquake generation consists of tectonic loading due to relative plate motion, quasi-static rupture nucleation, dynamic rupture propagation and stop, and restoration of fault strength. This process can be completely described by a coupled nonlinear system, which consists of an elastic/viscoelastic slip-response function that relates fault slip to shear stress change and a fault constitutive law that prescribes change in shear strength with fault slip and contact time. The shear stress and the shear strength are related with each other through boundary conditions on the fault. The driving force of this system is observed relative plate motion. The system to describe the earthquake generation cycle is conceptually quite simple. The complexity in practical modelling mainly comes from complexity in structure of the real earth. As a product of Crustal Activity Modelling Program (CAMP), which is one of the three main programs composing the Solid Earth Simulator project (1998-2003) promoted by MEXT, we have completed a physics-based predictive simulation model for the entire process of earthquake generation cycles in and around Japan, where the four plates of Pacific, North American, Philippine Sea and Eurasian are interacting with each other in a very complicated way. The total simulation system consists of a crust-mantle structure model, a tectonic loading model and a dynamic rupture model. First, we constructed a realistic 3D standard model of plate interfaces in and around Japan by applying an inversion technique to ISC hypocenter distribution data, and computed viscoelastic slip-response functions for this structure model. Second, we introduced the slip- and time-dependent fault constitutive law with an inherent strength-restoration mechanism as a basic equation governing the entire process of earthquake generation. Third, combining all these elements, we developed a simulation model for quasi-static stress accumulation due to

  11. Velocity and Density Models Incorporating the Cascadia Subduction Zone for 3D Earthquake Ground Motion Simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, William J.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In support of earthquake hazards and ground motion studies in the Pacific Northwest, three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity (3D Vp and Vs) and density (3D rho) models incorporating the Cascadia subduction zone have been developed for the region encompassed from about 40.2?N to 50?N latitude, and from about -122?W to -129?W longitude. The model volume includes elevations from 0 km to 60 km (elevation is opposite of depth in model coordinates). Stephenson and Frankel (2003) presented preliminary ground motion simulations valid up to 0.1 Hz using an earlier version of these models. The version of the model volume described here includes more structural and geophysical detail, particularly in the Puget Lowland as required for scenario earthquake simulations in the development of the Seattle Urban Hazards Maps (Frankel and others, 2007). Olsen and others (in press) used the model volume discussed here to perform a Cascadia simulation up to 0.5 Hz using a Sumatra-Andaman Islands rupture history. As research from the EarthScope Program (http://www.earthscope.org) is published, a wealth of important detail can be added to these model volumes, particularly to depths of the upper-mantle. However, at the time of development for this model version, no EarthScope-specific results were incorporated. This report is intended to be a reference for colleagues and associates who have used or are planning to use this preliminary model in their research. To this end, it is intended that these models will be considered a beginning template for a community velocity model of the Cascadia region as more data and results become available.

  12. Coseismic deformation due to the 2011 Tohoku earthquake: influence of 3-D plate structure around Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashima, A.; Freed, A. M.; Becker, T. W.; Sato, H.; Okaya, D. A.; Suito, H.; Hatanaka, Y.; Matsubara, M.; Takeda, T.; Ishiyama, T.; Iwasaki, T.

    2013-12-01

    Beneath the Japan islands, the Pacific plate descends from the east and the Philippine sea plate descends from the south, causing interaction of two slabs at depth. The 2011 M9 Tohoku earthquake in northern Japan had a source region with a length of ~500 km and a width of ~200 km and forced broad lithospheric and mantle regions in the region to deform. Here, we investigate the effects of slab geometry and 3D heterogeneity on the inversion of inferred coseismic slip and the resulting broad coseismic deformation throughout the region. We construct a 3-D finite element model (FEM) to generate Green's functions for use in a coseismic inversion study that allows considering the influence of complex slab geometry as well as heterogeneities in elastic structure on inferred slip. We utilize the large, land-based Japan GPS array as well as seafloor geodetic constraints in the inversion. We are particularly interested in how coseismic seafloor constraints influence inversion results. Our FEM considers a region of 4500 km x 4900 km x 670 km, incorporating the Pacific and the Philippine sea slabs by interpolating models for the Tohoku region and the Nankai trough, as well as the Kuril, Ryukyu and Izu-Bonin arcs. The model region is divided into about 500,000 tetrahedral elements with average dimension ranging from 20-100 km. We also test the role of gravity on coseismic results, with initial results suggesting that gravitational loading is not an important factor because of the shallow dip of the upper Pacific slab.Our long-term objective is to study the influence of the Tohoku earthquake on evolution of stresses throughout Japan due to both coseismic and postseismic processes, the latter including afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation. An accurate accounting of coseismic slip is very important to such an endeavor.

  13. Dynamic earthquake rupture simulations on nonplanar faults embedded in 3D geometrically complex, heterogeneous elastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duru, Kenneth; Dunham, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic propagation of shear ruptures on a frictional interface in an elastic solid is a useful idealization of natural earthquakes. The conditions relating discontinuities in particle velocities across fault zones and tractions acting on the fault are often expressed as nonlinear friction laws. The corresponding initial boundary value problems are both numerically and computationally challenging. In addition, seismic waves generated by earthquake ruptures must be propagated for many wavelengths away from the fault. Therefore, reliable and efficient numerical simulations require both provably stable and high order accurate numerical methods. We present a high order accurate finite difference method for: a) enforcing nonlinear friction laws, in a consistent and provably stable manner, suitable for efficient explicit time integration; b) dynamic propagation of earthquake ruptures along nonplanar faults; and c) accurate propagation of seismic waves in heterogeneous media with free surface topography. We solve the first order form of the 3D elastic wave equation on a boundary-conforming curvilinear mesh, in terms of particle velocities and stresses that are collocated in space and time, using summation-by-parts (SBP) finite difference operators in space. Boundary and interface conditions are imposed weakly using penalties. By deriving semi-discrete energy estimates analogous to the continuous energy estimates we prove numerical stability. The finite difference stencils used in this paper are sixth order accurate in the interior and third order accurate close to the boundaries. However, the method is applicable to any spatial operator with a diagonal norm satisfying the SBP property. Time stepping is performed with a 4th order accurate explicit low storage Runge-Kutta scheme, thus yielding a globally fourth order accurate method in both space and time. We show numerical simulations on band limited self-similar fractal faults revealing the complexity of rupture dynamics

  14. Geodynamic background of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake based on 3D visco-elastic numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Zhu, Bojing; Yang, Xiaolin; Shi, Yaolin

    2016-03-01

    The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Mw7.9) occurred in the Longmen Shan fault zone. The stress change and crustal deformation during the accumulation period is computed using 3D finite element modelling assuming visco-elastic rheology. Our results support that the eastward movement of the Tibetan Plateau resulting from the India-Eurasia collision is obstructed at the Longmen Shan fault zone by the strong Yangtze craton. In response, the Tibetan ductile crust thickens and accumulates at the contact between the Tibetan Plateau and the Sichuan Basin. This process implies a strong uplift with the rate of about 1.8 mm/a of the upper crust and induces a stress concentration nearly at the bottom of the Longmen Shan fault zone. We believe that the stress concentration in the Longmen Shan fault zone provides a very important geodynamic background of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. Using numerical experiments we find that the key factor controlling this stress concentration process is the large viscosity contrast in the middle and lower crusts between the Tibetan Plateau and the Sichuan Basin. The results show that large viscosity contrast in the middle and lower crusts accelerates the stress concentration in the Longmen Shan fault zone. Fast moving lower crustal flow accelerates this stress accumulation process. During the inter-seismic period, spatially the maximum stress accumulation rate of the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau is located nearly at the bottom of the brittle upper crust of the Longmen Shan fault zone. The spatial distribution of the stress accumulation along the strike of the Longmen Shan fault zone is as follows: the normal stress decreases while the shear stress increases from southwest to northeast along the Longmen Shan fault zone. This stress distribution explains the thrust motion in the SW and strike-slip motion in the NE during the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake.

  15. Dynamic earthquake rupture simulation on nonplanar faults embedded in 3D geometrically complex, heterogeneous Earth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duru, K.; Dunham, E. M.; Bydlon, S. A.; Radhakrishnan, H.

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic propagation of shear ruptures on a frictional interface is a useful idealization of a natural earthquake.The conditions relating slip rate and fault shear strength are often expressed as nonlinear friction laws.The corresponding initial boundary value problems are both numerically and computationally challenging.In addition, seismic waves generated by earthquake ruptures must be propagated, far away from fault zones, to seismic stations and remote areas.Therefore, reliable and efficient numerical simulations require both provably stable and high order accurate numerical methods.We present a numerical method for:a) enforcing nonlinear friction laws, in a consistent and provably stable manner, suitable for efficient explicit time integration;b) dynamic propagation of earthquake ruptures along rough faults; c) accurate propagation of seismic waves in heterogeneous media with free surface topography.We solve the first order form of the 3D elastic wave equation on a boundary-conforming curvilinear mesh, in terms of particle velocities and stresses that are collocated in space and time, using summation-by-parts finite differences in space. The finite difference stencils are 6th order accurate in the interior and 3rd order accurate close to the boundaries. Boundary and interface conditions are imposed weakly using penalties. By deriving semi-discrete energy estimates analogous to the continuous energy estimates we prove numerical stability. Time stepping is performed with a 4th order accurate explicit low storage Runge-Kutta scheme. We have performed extensive numerical experiments using a slip-weakening friction law on non-planar faults, including recent SCEC benchmark problems. We also show simulations on fractal faults revealing the complexity of rupture dynamics on rough faults. We are presently extending our method to rate-and-state friction laws and off-fault plasticity.

  16. P and S automatic picks for 3D earthquake tomography in NE Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovisa, L.; Bragato, P.; Gentili, S.

    2006-12-01

    Earthquake tomography is useful to study structural and geological features of the crust. In particular, it uses P and S arrival times for reconstructing weaves velocity fields and locating earthquakes hypocenters. However, tomography needs a large effort to provide a high number of manual picks. On the other side, many automatic picking methods have been proposed, but they are usually applied to preliminary elaboration of the data (fast alert and automatic bulletin generation); they are generally considered not reliable for tomography. In this work, we present and discuss the results of Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs tomographies obtained using automatic picks generated by the system TAPNEI (Gentili and Bragato 2006), applied in the NE Italy. Preliminarily, in order to estimate the error in comparison with the unknown true arrival times, an analysis on the picking quality is done. The tests have been performed using two dataset: the first is made up by 240 earthquakes automatically picked by TAPNEI; the second counts in the same earthquakes but manually picked (OGS database). The grid and the software used to perform tomography (Sim28, Michelini and Mc Evilly, 1991) are the same in the two cases. Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs fields of the two tomographies and their differences are shown on vertical sections. In addiction, the differences in earthquakes locations are studied; in particular, the quality of the accuracy of the localizations has been analyzed by estimating the distance of the hypocenter distributions with respect to the manual locations. The analysis include also a qualitative comparison with an independent tomography (Gentile et al., 2000) performed using Simulps (Evans et al, 1994) on a set of 224 earthquakes accurately selected and manually relocated. The quality of the pickings and the comparison with the tomography obtained by manual data suggest that earthquake tomography with automatic data can provide reliable results. We suggest the use of such data when a large

  17. Selectivity of seismic electric signal (SES) of the 2000 Izu earthquake swarm: a 3D FEM numerical simulation model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinghua; Lin, Yufeng

    2010-01-01

    Although seismic electric signal (SES) has been used for short-term prediction of earthquakes, selectivity of SES still remains as one of the mysterious features. As a case study, we made a numerical simulation based on a 3D finite element method (FEM) on the selectivity of SES observed in the case of the 2000 Izu earthquake swarm. Our numerical results indicated that the existence of conductive channel under Niijima island could explain the reported SES selectivity. PMID:20228625

  18. Selectivity of seismic electric signal (SES) of the 2000 Izu earthquake swarm: a 3D FEM numerical simulation model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qinghua; Lin, Yufeng

    2010-01-01

    Although seismic electric signal (SES) has been used for short-term prediction of earthquakes, selectivity of SES still remains as one of the mysterious features. As a case study, we made a numerical simulation based on a 3D finite element method (FEM) on the selectivity of SES observed in the case of the 2000 Izu earthquake swarm. Our numerical results indicated that the existence of conductive channel under Niijima island could explain the reported SES selectivity. PMID:20228625

  19. "Stereo Compton cameras" for the 3-D localization of radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, K.; Kataoka, J.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujita, T.; Kishimoto, A.; Ohsuka, S.; Nakamura, S.; Adachi, S.; Hirayanagi, M.; Uchiyama, T.; Ishikawa, Y.; Kato, T.

    2014-11-01

    The Compton camera is a viable and convenient tool used to visualize the distribution of radioactive isotopes that emit gamma rays. After the nuclear disaster in Fukushima in 2011, there is a particularly urgent need to develop "gamma cameras", which can visualize the distribution of such radioisotopes. In response, we propose a portable Compton camera, which comprises 3-D position-sensitive GAGG scintillators coupled with thin monolithic MPPC arrays. The pulse-height ratio of two MPPC-arrays allocated at both ends of the scintillator block determines the depth of interaction (DOI), which dramatically improves the position resolution of the scintillation detectors. We report on the detailed optimization of the detector design, based on Geant4 simulation. The results indicate that detection efficiency reaches up to 0.54%, or more than 10 times that of other cameras being tested in Fukushima, along with a moderate angular resolution of 8.1° (FWHM). By applying the triangular surveying method, we also propose a new concept for the stereo measurement of gamma rays by using two Compton cameras, thus enabling the 3-D positional measurement of radioactive isotopes for the first time. From one point source simulation data, we ensured that the source position and the distance to the same could be determined typically to within 2 meters' accuracy and we also confirmed that more than two sources are clearly separated by the event selection from two point sources of simulation data.

  20. Application of 3D WebGIS and real-time technique in earthquake information publishing and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Boren; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Mao; Huang, Jing

    2015-06-01

    In hazard management, earthquake researchers have utilized GIS to ease the process of managing disasters. Researchers use WebGIS to assess hazards and seismic risk. Although they can provide a visual analysis platform based on GIS technology, they lack a general description in the extensibility of WebGIS for processing dynamic data, especially real-time data. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for real-time 3D visual earthquake information publishing model based on WebGIS and digital globe to improve the ability of processing real-time data in systems based on WebGIS. On the basis of the model, we implement a real-time 3D earthquake information publishing system—EqMap3D. The system can not only publish real-time earthquake information but also display these data and their background geoscience information in a 3D scene. It provides a powerful tool for display, analysis, and decision-making for researchers and administrators. It also facilitates better communication between researchers engaged in geosciences and the interested public.

  1. Near field 3D displacement of El Mayor-Cupapah Earthquake: A hybrid approach. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa-Corona, A.; Limon, F. J.; Nissen, E.; Glennie, C. L.; Krishnan, A.; Oskin, M. E.; Arrowsmith, R.; Leprince, S.; Saripalli, S.; Arregui, S. M.; Borsa, A. A.; Kreylos, O.; Banesh, D.; Fletcher, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The surface rupture produced on April 4th of 2010 by the M 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake is an ideal target to be analyzed by remote sensing techniques. It produced over 100 km of scarps, with vertical and horizontal slip on the order of 2 to 3 m in scarcely vegetated, rugged terrain underlain by mostly igneous rocks. A 3D displacement field (DF) was calculated by matching pre- to post-event airborne LiDAR point clouds through the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, which first segments the point clouds into discrete windows, and for each, iteratively converges on a rigid body transformation comprising a translation and a rotation that best aligns the pre- to post-event point clouds. After testing different window sizes, we used a square window 100m a side. The El Mayor-Cucapah LiDAR data sets present special challenges for the ICP technique. The point clouds differ considerably in point density, by ~1:700. This, and the lower precision of the pre-earthquake data, limit the accuracy of the DF results. Despite these issues, the vertical and East-West (E-W) components of the DF from ICP very clearly delineate the trace of the surface rupture, showing east-side down dextral-normal motion in agreement with field measurements and the focal mechanism reported for this event. A systematic error in the LiDAR instrument used for the pre-event survey caused severe distortion of the North-South (N-S) component of the LiDAR returns. After reprocessing the source pre-event point cloud in various ways to correct for the systematic error, a more plausible pattern for the N-S component was obtained for the DF. To have another perspective for the horizontal DF, a subpixel correlation analysis of optical satellite images (SPOT 2.5 m panchromatic images) before and after the earthquake, was performed using the COSI-Corr software. We combined the N-S component from this analysis with the E-W and vertical components of the ICP results, and present the analysis of the resulting

  2. Websim3d: A Web-based System for Generation, Storage and Dissemination of Earthquake Ground Motion Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, K. B.

    2003-12-01

    Synthetic time histories from large-scale 3D ground motion simulations generally constitute large 'data' sets which typically require 100's of Mbytes or Gbytes of storage capacity. For the same reason, getting access to a researchers simulation output, for example for an earthquake engineer to perform site analysis, or a seismologist to perform seismic hazard analysis, can be a tedious procedure. To circumvent this problem we have developed a web-based ``community model'' (websim3D) for the generation, storage, and dissemination of ground motion simulation results. Websim3D allows user-friendly and fast access to view and download such simulation results for an earthquake-prone area. The user selects an earthquake scenario from a map of the region, which brings up a map of the area where simulation data is available. Now, by clicking on an arbitrary site location, synthetic seismograms and/or soil parameters for the site can be displayed at fixed or variable scaling and/or downloaded. Websim3D relies on PHP scripts for the dynamic plots of synthetic seismograms and soil profiles. Although not limited to a specific area, we illustrate the community model for simulation results from the Los Angeles basin, Wellington (New Zealand), and Mexico.

  3. Geofencing-Based Localization for 3d Data Acquisition Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, M.; Kamio, T.; Yasojima, H.; Kobayashi, T.

    2016-06-01

    Users require navigation for many location-based applications using moving sensors, such as autonomous robot control, mapping route navigation and mobile infrastructure inspection. In indoor environments, indoor positioning systems using GNSSs can provide seamless indoor-outdoor positioning and navigation services. However, instabilities in sensor position data acquisition remain, because the indoor environment is more complex than the outdoor environment. On the other hand, simultaneous localization and mapping processing is better than indoor positioning for measurement accuracy and sensor cost. However, it is not easy to estimate position data from a single viewpoint directly. Based on these technical issues, we focus on geofencing techniques to improve position data acquisition. In this research, we propose a methodology to estimate more stable position or location data using unstable position data based on geofencing in indoor environments. We verify our methodology through experiments in indoor environments.

  4. Local tsunamis and earthquake source parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter establishes the relationship among earthquake source parameters and the generation, propagation, and run-up of local tsunamis. In general terms, displacement of the seafloor during the earthquake rupture is modeled using the elastic dislocation theory for which the displacement field is dependent on the slip distribution, fault geometry, and the elastic response and properties of the medium. Specifically, nonlinear long-wave theory governs the propagation and run-up of tsunamis. A parametric study is devised to examine the relative importance of individual earthquake source parameters on local tsunamis, because the physics that describes tsunamis from generation through run-up is complex. Analysis of the source parameters of various tsunamigenic earthquakes have indicated that the details of the earthquake source, namely, nonuniform distribution of slip along the fault plane, have a significant effect on the local tsunami run-up. Numerical methods have been developed to address the realistic bathymetric and shoreline conditions. The accuracy of determining the run-up on shore is directly dependent on the source parameters of the earthquake, which provide the initial conditions used for the hydrodynamic models.

  5. Effect of 3-D viscoelastic structure on post-seismic relaxation from the 2004 M = 9.2 Sumatra earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.; Banerjee, P.; Grijalva, K.; Nagarajan, B.; Burgmann, R.

    2008-01-01

    The 2004 M=9.2 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake profoundly altered the state of stress in a large volume surrounding the ???1400 km long rupture. Induced mantle flow fields and coupled surface deformation are sensitive to the 3-D rheology structure. To predict the post-seismic motions from this earthquake, relaxation of a 3-D spherical viscoelastic earth model is simulated using the theory of coupled normal modes. The quasi-static deformation basis set and solution on the 3-D model is constructed using: a spherically stratified viscoelastic earth model with a linear stress-strain relation; an aspherical perturbation in viscoelastic structure; a 'static'mode basis set consisting of Earth's spheroidal and toroidal free oscillations; a "viscoelastic" mode basis set; and interaction kernels that describe the coupling among viscoelastic and static modes. Application to the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake illustrates the profound modification of the post-seismic flow field at depth by a slab structure and similarly large effects on the near-field post-seismic deformation field at Earth's surface. Comparison with post-seismic GPS observations illustrates the extent to which viscoelastic relaxation contributes to the regional post-seismic deformation. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2008 RAS.

  6. 3D Finite-Difference Modeling of Strong Ground Motion in the Upper Rhine Graben - 1356 Basel Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprsal, I.; Faeh, D.; Giardini, D.

    2002-12-01

    The disastrous Basel earthquake of October 18, 1356 (I0=X, M ≈ 6.9), appeared in, today seismically modest, Basel region (Upper Rhine Graben). The lack of strong ground motion seismic data can be effectively supplied by numerical modeling. We applied the 3D finite differences (FD) to predict ground motions which can be used for microzonation and hazard assessment studies. The FD method is formulated for topography models on irregular rectangular grids. It is a 3D explicit FD formulation of the hyperbolic partial differential equation (PDE). Elastodynamic PDE is solved in the time domain. The Hooke's isotropic inhomogeneous medium contains discontinuities and a topographic free surface. The 3D elastic FD modeling is applied on a newly established P and S-wave velocities structure model. This complex structure contains main interfaces and gradients inside some layers. It is adjacent to the earth surface and includes topography (Kind, Faeh and Giardini, 2002, A 3D Reference Model for the Area of Basel, in prep.). The first attempt was done for a double-couple point source and relatively simple source function. Numerical tests are planned for several finite-extent source histories because the 1356 Basel earthquake source features have not been well determined, yet. The presumed finite-extent source is adjacent to the free surface. The results are compared to the macroseismic information of the Basel area.

  7. Fast and Precise 3D Fluorophore Localization based on Gradient Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongqiang; Xu, Jianquan; Jin, Jingyi; Gao, Ying; Lan, Li; Liu, Yang

    2015-09-01

    Astigmatism imaging approach has been widely used to encode the fluorophore’s 3D position in single-particle tracking and super-resolution localization microscopy. Here, we present a new high-speed localization algorithm based on gradient fitting to precisely decode the 3D subpixel position of the fluorophore. This algebraic algorithm determines the center of the fluorescent emitter by finding the position with the best-fit gradient direction distribution to the measured point spread function (PSF), and can retrieve the 3D subpixel position of the fluorophore in a single iteration. Through numerical simulation and experiments with mammalian cells, we demonstrate that our algorithm yields comparable localization precision to the traditional iterative Gaussian function fitting (GF) based method, while exhibits over two orders-of-magnitude faster execution speed. Our algorithm is a promising high-speed analyzing method for 3D particle tracking and super-resolution localization microscopy.

  8. Fast and Precise 3D Fluorophore Localization based on Gradient Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongqiang; Xu, Jianquan; Jin, Jingyi; Gao, Ying; Lan, Li; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Astigmatism imaging approach has been widely used to encode the fluorophore’s 3D position in single-particle tracking and super-resolution localization microscopy. Here, we present a new high-speed localization algorithm based on gradient fitting to precisely decode the 3D subpixel position of the fluorophore. This algebraic algorithm determines the center of the fluorescent emitter by finding the position with the best-fit gradient direction distribution to the measured point spread function (PSF), and can retrieve the 3D subpixel position of the fluorophore in a single iteration. Through numerical simulation and experiments with mammalian cells, we demonstrate that our algorithm yields comparable localization precision to the traditional iterative Gaussian function fitting (GF) based method, while exhibits over two orders-of-magnitude faster execution speed. Our algorithm is a promising high-speed analyzing method for 3D particle tracking and super-resolution localization microscopy. PMID:26390959

  9. Depth to the Juan De Fuca slab beneath the Cascadia subduction margin - a 3-D model for sorting earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Blair, J. Luke; Oppenheimer, David H.; Walter, Stephen R.

    2004-01-01

    We present an updated model of the Juan de Fuca slab beneath southern British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and northern California, and use this model to separate earthquakes occurring above and below the slab surface. The model is based on depth contours previously published by Fluck and others (1997). Our model attempts to rectify a number of shortcomings in the original model and update it with new work. The most significant improvements include (1) a gridded slab surface in geo-referenced (ArcGIS) format, (2) continuation of the slab surface to its full northern and southern edges, (3) extension of the slab surface from 50-km depth down to 110-km beneath the Cascade arc volcanoes, and (4) revision of the slab shape based on new seismic-reflection and seismic-refraction studies. We have used this surface to sort earthquakes and present some general observations and interpretations of seismicity patterns revealed by our analysis. For example, deep earthquakes within the Juan de Fuca Plate beneath western Washington define a linear trend that may mark a tear within the subducting plate Also earthquakes associated with the northern stands of the San Andreas Fault abruptly terminate at the inferred southern boundary of the Juan de Fuca slab. In addition, we provide files of earthquakes above and below the slab surface and a 3-D animation or fly-through showing a shaded-relief map with plate boundaries, the slab surface, and hypocenters for use as a visualization tool.

  10. 3D Seismic Velocity Structure in the Rupture Area of the 2010 Maule Mw=8.8 Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. P.; Rietbrock, A.; Ryder, I. M.; Nippress, S.; Haberland, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    The 2010 Mw=8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake is one of the largest subduction zone earthquakes ever recorded. Up to now numerous co-seismic and some post-seismic slip models have been published based entirely on seismological, geodetic, or tsunami run-up heights, or combinations of these data. Most of these models use a simplified megathrust geometry derived mainly from global earthquake catalogues, and also simplified models of seismic parameters (e.g. shear modulus). By using arrival times for a vast number of aftershocks that have been recorded on a temporary seismic array, we present a new model for the slab geometry based on earthquake locations together with a new 3D seismic velocity model of the region, for both vp and vp/vs. We analyzed 3552 aftershocks that occurred between 18 March and 24 May 2011, recorded by the International Maule Aftershock Dataset (IMAD) seismic network. Event selection from a catalogue of automatically-determined events was based on 20 or more arrival times, from which at least 10 are S-wave observations. In total over 170,000 arrival times (~125,000 and 45,000 P and S wave arrival times respectively) are used for the tomographic reconstructions. Initially, events were relocated in a 2D velocity model based on a previously published model for the southern end of the rupture area (Haberland et al., 2009). Afterwards a staggered inversion scheme is implemented, starting with a 2D inversion followed by a coarse 3D and a subsequent fine 3D inversion. Based on our preliminary inversions we conclude that aftershock seismicity is mainly concentrated between 20 and 35 km depth along the subduction interface. A second band of seismicity between 40 and 50 km depth is also observed. Low seismic velocities and an increased vp/vs ratio characterize the marine forearc. The obtained velocity model will be discussed.

  11. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  12. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  13. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  14. IRIS Earthquake Browser with Integration to the GEON IDV for 3-D Visualization of Hypocenters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weertman, B. R.

    2007-12-01

    We present a new generation of web based earthquake query tool - the IRIS Earthquake Browser (IEB). The IEB combines the DMC's large set of earthquake catalogs (provided by USGS/NEIC, ISC and the ANF) with the popular Google Maps web interface. With the IEB you can quickly and easily find earthquakes in any region of the globe. Using Google's detailed satellite images, earthquakes can be easily co-located with natural geographic features such as volcanoes as well as man made features such as commercial mines. A set of controls allow earthquakes to be filtered by time, magnitude, and depth range as well as catalog name, contributor name and magnitude type. Displayed events can be easily exported in NetCDF format into the GEON Integrated Data Viewer (IDV) where hypocenters may be visualized in three dimensions. Looking "under the hood", the IEB is based on AJAX technology and utilizes REST style web services hosted at the IRIS DMC. The IEB is part of a broader effort at the DMC aimed at making our data holdings available via web services. The IEB is useful both educationally and as a research tool.

  15. Dynamic rupture modeling of the 2011 M9 Tohoku earthquake with an unstructured 3D spectral element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez, P.; Ampuero, J. P.; Dalguer, L. A.; Nissen-Meyer, T.

    2011-12-01

    On March 11th 2011, a Mw 9 earthquake stroke Japan causing 28000 victims and triggering a devastating tsunami that caused severe damage along the Japanese coast. The exceptional amount of data recorded by this earthquake, with thousands of sensors located all over Japan, provides a great opportunity for seismologist and engineers to investigate in detail the rupture process in order to better understand the physics of this type of earthquakes and their associated effects, like tsunamis. Here we investigate, by means of dynamic rupture simulations, a plausible mechanism to explain key observations about the rupture process of the 2011 M9 Tohoku earthquake, including the spatial complementarity between high and low frequency aspects of slip (e.g, Simons et al, Science 2011, Meng et al, GRL 2011). To model the dynamic rupture of this event, we use a realistic non-planar fault geometry of the megathrust interface, using the unstructured 3D spectral element open source code SPECFEM3D-SESAME, in which we recently implemented the dynamic fault boundary conditions. This implementation follows the principles introduced by Ampuero (2002) and Kaneko et al. (2008) and involves encapsulated modules plugged into the code. Our current implementation provides the possibility of modeling dynamic rupture for multiple, non-planar faults governed by slip-weakening friction. We successfully verified the code in several SCEC benchmarks, including a 3D problem with branched faults, as well as modeling the rupture of subduction megathrust with a splay fault, finding results comparable to published results. Our first set of simulations is aimed at testing if the diversity of rupture phenomena during the 2011 M9 Tohoku earthquake (see Ampuero et al in this session) can be overall reproduced by assuming the most basic friction law, linear slip-weakening friction, but prescribing a spatially heterogeneous distribution of the critical slip weakening distance Dc and initial fault stresses. Our

  16. Complex earthquake rupture and local tsunamis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    In contrast to far-field tsunami amplitudes that are fairly well predicted by the seismic moment of subduction zone earthquakes, there exists significant variation in the scaling of local tsunami amplitude with respect to seismic moment. From a global catalog of tsunami runup observations this variability is greatest for the most frequently occuring tsunamigenic subduction zone earthquakes in the magnitude range of 7 < Mw < 8.5. Variability in local tsunami runup scaling can be ascribed to tsunami source parameters that are independent of seismic moment: variations in the water depth in the source region, the combination of higher slip and lower shear modulus at shallow depth, and rupture complexity in the form of heterogeneous slip distribution patterns. The focus of this study is on the effect that rupture complexity has on the local tsunami wave field. A wide range of slip distribution patterns are generated using a stochastic, self-affine source model that is consistent with the falloff of far-field seismic displacement spectra at high frequencies. The synthetic slip distributions generated by the stochastic source model are discretized and the vertical displacement fields from point source elastic dislocation expressions are superimposed to compute the coseismic vertical displacement field. For shallow subduction zone earthquakes it is demonstrated that self-affine irregularities of the slip distribution result in significant variations in local tsunami amplitude. The effects of rupture complexity are less pronounced for earthquakes at greater depth or along faults with steep dip angles. For a test region along the Pacific coast of central Mexico, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude is calculated for a large number (N = 100) of synthetic slip distribution patterns, all with identical seismic moment (Mw = 8.1). Analysis of the results indicates that for earthquakes of a fixed location, geometry, and seismic moment, peak nearshore tsunami amplitude can vary by a

  17. Image-based indoor localization system based on 3D SfM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guoyu; Kambhamettu, Chandra

    2013-12-01

    Indoor localization is an important research topic for both of the robot and signal processing communities. In recent years, image-based localization is also employed in indoor environment for the easy availability of the necessary equipment. After capturing an image and sending it to an image database, the best matching image is returned with the navigation information. By allowing further camera pose estimation, the image-based localization system with the use of Structure-from-Motion reconstruction model can achieve higher accuracy than the methods of searching through a 2D image database. However, this emerging technique is still only on the use of outdoor environment. In this paper, we introduce the 3D SfM model based image-based localization system into the indoor localization task. We capture images of the indoor environment and reconstruct the 3D model. On the localization task, we simply use the images captured by a mobile to match the 3D reconstructed model to localize the image. In this process, we use the visual words and the approximate nearest neighbor methods to accelerate the process of nding the query feature's correspondences. Within the visual words, we conduct linear search in detecting the correspondences. From the experiments, we nd that the image-based localization method based on 3D SfM model gives good localization result based on both accuracy and speed.

  18. 3-D crustal velocity model for Lithuania and its application to local event studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskaya, Elena; Budraitis, Mantas; Janutyte, Ilma; Motuza, Gediminas; Lazauskiene, Jurga; Passeq-Working Group

    2010-05-01

    PASSEQ 2006-2008 project (PASsive Seismic Experiment in TESZ) aimed at studying the lithosphere-asthenosphere system around the TransEuropean Suture Zone (TESZ)- the transition between old Proterozoic platform of north and east Europe and younger Phanerozoic platform in central and western Europe. The experiment was a seismic array research aiming to retrieve the structure of the crust and Earth's mantle down to the mantle transition zone, including mapping of upper mantle seismic velocity variations and discontinuities (Moho, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, mantle transition zone) using all available techniques. During the experiment 26 seismic stations (including four broadband stations) were installed in Lithuania. One of the main targets of PASSEQ deployment in Lithuania was identification and characterization of the local seismic activity. The PASSEQ stations in Lithuania were in operation since June, 2006 till January, 2008. During this period a number of local seismic events was recorded and preliminary event location was made using the LocSat algorithm and 1-D velocity model. This standard procedure is not enough precise for Lithuania, however, because the thickness of the crust varies significantly in the region (from 45 to 55 km). In order to improve event location, we separated the events into several groups and located each group separately using a VELEST algorithms and own 1-D velocity model for each group. We also compiled a 3-D seismic velocity of the crust down to a depth of 60 km. The model, consisting of four major layers (sediments, upper crust, middle crust, lower crust and uppermost mantle) was interpolated from 2-D velocity models along previous wide-angle reflection and refraction profiles into a regular grid. The quality of the approximation was analysed using comparison of travel times of P-waves recorded along previous controlled source profiles and synthetic travel times calculated using the 3-D velocity model. The model was converted

  19. Automatic loop closure detection using multiple cameras for 3D indoor localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kua, John; Corso, Nicholas; Zakhor, Avideh

    2012-03-01

    Automated 3D modeling of building interiors is useful in applications such as virtual reality and environment mapping. We have developed a human operated backpack data acquisition system equipped with a variety of sensors such as cameras, laser scanners, and orientation measurement sensors to generate 3D models of building interiors, including uneven surfaces and stairwells. An important intermediate step in any 3D modeling system, including ours, is accurate 6 degrees of freedom localization over time. In this paper, we propose two approaches to improve localization accuracy over our previously proposed methods. First, we develop an adaptive localization algorithm which takes advantage of the environment's floor planarity whenever possible. Secondly, we show that by including all the loop closures resulting from two cameras facing away from each other, it is possible to reduce localization error in scenarios where parts of the acquisition path is retraced. We experimentally characterize the performance gains due to both schemes.

  20. Modeling of Localized Neutral Particle Sources in 3D Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V; Rognlien, T D; Fenstermacher, M E; Borchardt, M; Mutzke, A; Riemann, J; Schneider, R; Owen, L W

    2002-05-23

    A new edge plasma code BoRiS [1] has a fully 3D fluid plasma model. We supplement BoRiS with a 3D fluid neutral model including equations for parallel momentum and collisional perpendicular diffusion. This makes BoRiS an integrated plasma-neutral model suitable for a variety of applications. We present modeling results for a localized gas source in the geometry of the NCSX stellarator.

  1. 3D Dynamic Rupture Simulations Across Interacting Faults: the Mw7.0, 2010, Haiti Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douilly, R.; Aochi, H.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.; Aagaard, B.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanisms controlling rupture propagation between fault segments during an earthquake are key to the hazard posed by fault systems. Rupture initiation on a fault segment sometimes transfers to a larger fault, resulting in a significant event (e.g.i, 2002 M7.9Denali and 2010 M7.1 Darfield earthquakes). In other cases rupture is constrained to the initial segment and does not transfer to nearby faults, resulting in events of moderate magnitude. This is the case of the 1989 M6.9 Loma Prieta and 2010 M7.0 Haiti earthquakes which initiated on reverse faults abutting against a major strike-slip plate boundary fault but did not propagate onto it. Here we investigatethe rupture dynamics of the Haiti earthquake, seeking to understand why rupture propagated across two segments of the Léogâne fault but did not propagate to the adjacenent Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault, the major 200 km long plate boundary fault cutting through southern Haiti. We use a Finite Element Model to simulate the nucleation and propagation of rupture on the Léogâne fault, varying friction and background stress to determine the parameter set that best explains the observed earthquake sequence. The best-fit simulation is in remarkable agreement with several finite fault inversions and predicts ground displacement in very good agreement with geodetic and geological observations. The two slip patches inferred from finite-fault inversions are explained by the successive rupture of two fault segments oriented favorably with respect to the rupture propagation, while the geometry of the Enriquillo fault did not allow shear stress to reach failure. Although our simulation results replicate well the ground deformation consistent with the geodetic surface observation but convolving the ground motion with the soil amplification from the microzonation study will correctly account for the heterogeneity of the PGA throughout the rupture area.

  2. Rapid Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) Inversion in 3D Earth Structure Model for Earthquakes in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Lee, E.; Jordan, T. H.; Maechling, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    Accurate and rapid CMT inversion is important for seismic hazard analysis. We have developed an algorithm for very rapid CMT inversions in a 3D Earth structure model and applied it on small to medium-sized earthquakes recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN). Our CMT inversion algorithm is an integral component of the scattering-integral (SI) method for full-3D waveform tomography (F3DT). In the SI method for F3DT, the sensitivity (Fréchet) kernels are constructed through the temporal convolution between the earthquake wavefield (EWF) and the receiver Green tensor (RGT), which is the wavefield generated by 3 orthogonal unit impulsive body forces acting at the receiver location. The RGTs are also the partial derivatives of the waveform with respect to the moment tensors. In this study, our RGTs are computed in a 3D seismic structure model for Southern California (CVM4SI1) using the finite-difference method, which allows us to account for 3D path effects in our source inversion. We used three component broadband waveforms below 0.2 Hz. An automated waveform-picking algorithm based on continuous wavelet transform is applied on observed waveforms to pick P, S and surface waves. A multi-scale grid-searching algorithm is then applied on the picked waveforms to find the optimal strike, dip and rake values that minimize the amplitude misfit and maximize the correlation coefficient. In general, our CMT solutions agree with solutions inverted using other methods and provide better fit to the observed waveforms.

  3. Rapid Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) Inversion in 3D Earth Structure Model for Earthquakes in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, D.; Lee, E.; Chen, P.; Jordan, T. H.; Maechling, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate and rapid CMT inversion is important for seismic hazard analysis. We have developed an algorithm for very rapid CMT inversions in a 3D Earth structure model and applied it on small to medium-sized earthquakes recorded by the Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN). Our CMT inversion algorithm is an integral component of the scattering-integral (SI) method for full-3D waveform tomography (F3DT). In the SI method for F3DT, the sensitivity (Fréchet) kernels are constructed through the temporal convolution between the earthquake wavefield (EWF) from the source and the receiver Green tensor (RGT) from the receiver. In this study, our RGTs were computed in a 3D seismic structure model for Southern California (CVM4SI1) using the finite-difference method, which allows us to account for 3D path effects in our source inversion. By storing the RGTs, synthetic seismograms for any source in our modeling volume could be generated rapidly by applying the reciprocity principle. An automated waveform-picking algorithm based on continuous wavelet transform is applied on observed waveforms to pick P, S and surface waves. A grid-searching algorithm is then applied on the picked waveforms to find an optimal focal mechanism that minimizes the amplitude misfit and maximize the weighted correlation coefficient. The grid-search result is then used as the initial solution in a gradient-based optimization algorithm that minimizes the L2 norm of the generalized seismological data functionals (GSDF), which quantifies waveform differences between observed and synthetic seismograms using frequencies-dependent phase-delay and amplitude anomalies. In general, our CMT solutions agree with solutions inverted using other methods and provide better fit to the observed waveforms.

  4. Assessing earthquake source models using 3-D forward modelling of long-period seismic data: application to the SCARDEC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Ana Mg; Vallee, Martin; Charlety, Jean

    2010-05-01

    Accurate earthquake point source parameters (e.g. seismic moment, depth and focal mechanism) provide key first-order information for detailed studies of the earthquake source process and for improved seismic and tsunami hazard evaluation. In order to objectively assess the quality of seismic source models, it is important to go beyond classical resolution checks. In particular, it is desirable to apply sophisticated modelling techniques to quantify inaccuracies due to simplified theoretical formulations and/or Earth structure employed to build the source models. Moreover, it is important to verify how well the models explain data not used in their construction. In this study we assess the quality of the SCARDEC method (see joint abstracts), which is a new automated technique that retrieves simultaneously the seismic moment, focal mechanism, depth and source time functions of large earthquakes. Because the SCARDEC method is based on body-wave deconvolution using ray methods in a 1D Earth model, we test how well SCARDEC source parameters explain long-period seismic data (surface waves and normal modes). We calculate theoretical seismograms using two forward modelling techniques (full ray theory and spectral element method) to simulate the long-period seismic wavefield for the 3D Earth model S20RTS combined with the crust model CRUST2.0, and for two point source models: (i) the SCARDEC model; and (ii) the Global CMT model. We compare the synthetic seismograms with real broadband data from the FDSN for the major subduction earthquakes of the last 20 years. We show that SCARDEC source parameters explain long-period surface waves as well as Global CMT solutions. This can be explained by the fact that most of the differences between SCARDEC and Global CMT solutions are linked to correlated variations of the seismic moment and dip of the earthquakes, and it is theoretically known that for shallow earthquakes it is difficult to accurately resolve these two parameters using

  5. Preliminary result of teleseismic double-difference relocation of earthquakes in the Molucca collision zone with a 3D velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono, Sutiyono, Handayani, Titi; Nugroho, Hendro

    2015-04-01

    We have relocated hypocenters of earthquakes occurring in the Molucca collision zone and surrounding region taken from the BMKG catalog using teleseismic double-difference relocation algorithm (teletomoDD). We used P-wave arrival times of local, regional, and teleseismic events recorded at 304 recording stations. Over 7,000 earthquakes were recorded by the BMKG seismographicnetworkin the study region from April, 2009 toJune, 2014. We used a 3D regional-global nested velocity modelresulting fromprevious global tomographystudy. In this study, the3D seismic velocity model was appliedto theIndonesian region, whilethe1D seismicvelocity model (ak135)wasused for regions outside of Indonesia. Our relocation results show a better improvement in travel-time RMS residuals comparedto those of the BMKG catalog.Ourresultsalso show that relocation shifts were dominated intheeast-west direction, whichmaybeinfluenced by theexistingvelocity anomaly related to the reversed V-shaped slabbeneaththestudy region. Our eventrelocation results refine the geometry of slabs beneath the Halmahera and Sangihe arcs.

  6. Preliminary result of teleseismic double-difference relocation of earthquakes in the Molucca collision zone with a 3D velocity model

    SciTech Connect

    Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash E-mail: h.a.shiddiqi@gmail.com; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono,; Sutiyono,; Handayani, Titi; Nugroho, Hendro

    2015-04-24

    We have relocated hypocenters of earthquakes occurring in the Molucca collision zone and surrounding region taken from the BMKG catalog using teleseismic double-difference relocation algorithm (teletomoDD). We used P-wave arrival times of local, regional, and teleseismic events recorded at 304 recording stations. Over 7,000 earthquakes were recorded by the BMKG seismographicnetworkin the study region from April, 2009 toJune, 2014. We used a 3D regional-global nested velocity modelresulting fromprevious global tomographystudy. In this study, the3D seismic velocity model was appliedto theIndonesian region, whilethe1D seismicvelocity model (ak135)wasused for regions outside of Indonesia. Our relocation results show a better improvement in travel-time RMS residuals comparedto those of the BMKG catalog.Ourresultsalso show that relocation shifts were dominated intheeast-west direction, whichmaybeinfluenced by theexistingvelocity anomaly related to the reversed V-shaped slabbeneaththestudy region. Our eventrelocation results refine the geometry of slabs beneath the Halmahera and Sangihe arcs.

  7. A Multiscale Constraints Method Localization of 3D Facial Feature Points

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-an; Zhang, Yongxin; Li, Zhanli; Li, Huilin

    2015-01-01

    It is an important task to locate facial feature points due to the widespread application of 3D human face models in medical fields. In this paper, we propose a 3D facial feature point localization method that combines the relative angle histograms with multiscale constraints. Firstly, the relative angle histogram of each vertex in a 3D point distribution model is calculated; then the cluster set of the facial feature points is determined using the cluster algorithm. Finally, the feature points are located precisely according to multiscale integral features. The experimental results show that the feature point localization accuracy of this algorithm is better than that of the localization method using the relative angle histograms. PMID:26539244

  8. Local 3D matrix confinement determines division axis through cell shape

    PubMed Central

    He, Lijuan; Chen, Weitong; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Jimenez, Angela; Wong, Bin Sheng; San, Angela; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wirtz, Denis

    2016-01-01

    How the division axis is determined in mammalian cells embedded in three-dimensional (3D) matrices remains elusive, despite that many types of cells divide in 3D environments. Cells on two-dimensional (2D) substrates typically round up completely to divide. Here, we show that in 3D collagen matrices, mammalian cells such as HT1080 human fibrosarcoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibit division modes distinct from their Counterparts on 2D substrates, with a markedly higher fraction of cells remaining highly elongated through mitosis in 3D matrices. The long axis of elongated mitotic cells accurately predicts the division axis, independently of matrix density and cell-matrix interactions. This 3D-specific elongated division mode is determined by the local confinement produced by the matrix and the ability of cells to protrude and locally remodel the matrix via β1 integrin. Elongated division is readily recapitulated using collagen-coated microfabricated channels. Cells depleted of β1 integrin still divide in the elongated mode in microchannels, suggesting that 3D confinement is sufficient to induce the elongated cell-division phenotype. PMID:26515603

  9. Study of the tsunamigenic rupture process of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake using a 3D Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Fabrizio; Trasatti, Elisa; Lorito, Stefano; Piromallo, Claudia; Piatanesi, Alessio; Cocco, Massimo; Murphy, Shane; Tonini, Roberto; Volpe, Manuela; Brizuela, Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    The study of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake revealed some new aspects in the rupture process of a megathrust event. Indeed, despite its magnitude Mw 9.0, this earthquake was characterized by a spatially limited rupture area and, contrary to the common view that the shallow portion of the subduction interface mainly experiences aseismic slip, the seismic rupture propagated onto the Japan trench with very large slip (> 50 m). Starting from slip distributions obtained by joint inversion of tsunami and geodetic data, we discuss the sensitivity of the tsunami impact predictions to the complexity of the modelling strategy. We use numerical tools ranging from a homogeneous half-space dislocation model (considering only vertical sea-floor displacement and tsunami propagation in the linear shallow-water approximation) to the more complex 3D-FEM model (with heterogeneous elastic parameters derived from 3D seismic tomography), including horizontal displacement and non-hydrostatic dispersive tsunami modeling. This research is funded by the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 603839 (Project ASTARTE - Assessment, Strategy and Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe)

  10. Shallow subsurface control on earthquake damage patterns: first results from a 3D geological voxel model study (Tokyo Lowland, Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafleu, Jan; Busschers, Freek; Tanabe, Susumu

    2016-04-01

    The Tokyo Lowland is situated in a Neogene sedimentary basin near the triple junction of the North American, Pacific, and Philippine tectonic plates. The basin is filled with Neogene and Quaternary sediments up to a thickness of 3 km. In the upper 70 m of the basin, thick sequences of soft Holocene sediments occur which are assumed to have played a key role in the spatial variation of damage intensity during the 1923 Kanto earthquake (Magnitude 7.9 to 8.3). Historical records show this earthquake destroyed large parts of the Tokyo urban area which in that time was largely made up by wooden houses. Although the epicentre was 70 km to the southwest of Tokyo, severe damage occurred north of the city centre, presumably due to ground motion amplification in the soft Holocene sediments in the shallow subsurface. In order to assess the presumed relation between the damage pattern of the 1923 earthquake and the occurrence of soft Holocene sediments in the shallow subsurface, we constructed a 3D geological voxel model of the central part of the Tokyo Lowland. The model was constructed using a methodology originally developed for the lowlands of the Netherlands. The modelling workflow basically consists of three steps. First, some 10,000 borehole descriptions (gathered for geomechanical purposes), were subdivided into geological units that have uniform sediment characteristics, using both lithological and geomechanical (N-value) criteria. Second, 2D bounding surfaces were constructed, representing tops and bases of the geological units. These surfaces were used to place each voxel (100 by 100 by 1 m) within the correct geological unit. The N-values and lithological units in the borehole descriptions were subsequently used to perform a 3D stochastic interpolation of N-value and lithological class within each geological unit. Using a vertical voxel stack analysis, we were able to create a map showing the accumulated thickness of soft muds in the Holocene succession. A

  11. Framework for quantitative evaluation of 3D vessel segmentation approaches using vascular phantoms in conjunction with 3D landmark localization and registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörz, Stefan; Hoegen, Philipp; Liao, Wei; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Rohr, Karl

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a framework for quantitative evaluation of 3D vessel segmentation approaches using vascular phantoms. Phantoms are designed using a CAD system and created with a 3D printer, and comprise realistic shapes including branches and pathologies such as abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). To transfer ground truth information to the 3D image coordinate system, we use a landmark-based registration scheme utilizing fiducial markers integrated in the phantom design. For accurate 3D localization of the markers we developed a novel 3D parametric intensity model that is directly fitted to the markers in the images. We also performed a quantitative evaluation of different vessel segmentation approaches for a phantom of an AAA.

  12. 3-D P- and S-wave velocity structure and low-frequency earthquake locations in the Parkfield, California region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiangfang; Thurber, Clifford H.; Shelly, David R.; Harrington, Rebecca M.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Bennington, Ninfa L.; Peterson, Dana; Guo, Bin; McClement, Kara

    2016-09-01

    To refine the 3-D seismic velocity model in the greater Parkfield, California region, a new data set including regular earthquakes, shots, quarry blasts and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) was assembled. Hundreds of traces of each LFE family at two temporary arrays were stacked with time-frequency domain phase weighted stacking method to improve signal-to-noise ratio. We extend our model resolution to lower crustal depth with LFE data. Our result images not only previously identified features but also low velocity zones (LVZs) in the area around the LFEs and the lower crust beneath the southern Rinconada Fault. The former LVZ is consistent with high fluid pressure that can account for several aspects of LFE behaviour. The latter LVZ is consistent with a high conductivity zone in magnetotelluric studies. A new Vs model was developed with S picks that were obtained with a new autopicker. At shallow depth, the low Vs areas underlie the strongest shaking areas in the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. We relocate LFE families and analyse the location uncertainties with the NonLinLoc and tomoDD codes. The two methods yield similar results.

  13. Explosion-Earthquake Discrimination at Local Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, C. T.; Baker, G. E.; Sheehan, A. F.; Harder, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Event discrimination research has largely focused on regional distances over the last couple of decades. Most regional discriminants have not been thoroughly tested at local distances, and a recent investigation of P/S ratios from the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) found that they were less effective locally. As discrimination thresholds are reduced, local methods will need to be validated and the physical bases for their performance will need to be understood. We are assessing new and existing methods of source discrimination at 10 to 200 km distance. We use data from a temporary array deployed around the Bighorn Mountains in Wyoming and from nearby US Array stations. Small magnitude local earthquakes, coal mine explosions, and controlled borehole shots were recorded at over 200 broadband and short-period seismometers spaced at 5-35 km intervals across the tectonically complex area. We assess the local discrimination performance of the P/S amplitude ratio, the presence of the fundamental Rayleigh wave Rg, and the signature of scattered Rg in the coda. P/S amplitudes are used because earthquakes typically have higher S-wave energy relative to P than shallow explosions, but the separation of populations is not always effective at local distances. Site effects have a significant impact that may need to be accounted for, along with propagation effects. Specifically, relative P and S site amplifications at basin and mountain stations vary in such a way that they limit separation of the event populations. The Rg phase is only excited by near-surface events, so its presence indicates the likelihood of a man-made source since most earthquakes occur at too great a depth to excite Rg. We implement two methods for detecting Rg: one that uses the cross-correlation of the Hilbert transformed vertical and the radial seismograms, and one that scans a time-frequency representation for the signature of scattered Rg in the coda. These methods are effective in low signal

  14. Automated Identification and Localization of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in 3D Intravital Microscopy Data

    PubMed Central

    Khorshed, Reema A.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Duarte, Delfim; Scott, Mark K.; Akinduro, Olufolake A.; Rashidi, Narges M.; Spitaler, Martin; Lo Celso, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Summary Measuring three-dimensional (3D) localization of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) within the bone marrow microenvironment using intravital microscopy is a rapidly expanding research theme. This approach holds the key to understanding the detail of HSC-niche interactions, which are critical for appropriate stem cell function. Due to the complex tissue architecture of the bone marrow and to the progressive introduction of scattering and signal loss at increasing imaging depths, there is no ready-made software to handle efficient segmentation and unbiased analysis of the data. To address this, we developed an automated image analysis tool that simplifies and standardizes the biological interpretation of 3D HSC microenvironment images. The algorithm identifies HSCs and measures their localization relative to surrounding osteoblast cells and bone collagen. We demonstrate here the effectiveness, consistency, and accuracy of the proposed approach compared to current manual analysis and its wider applicability to analyze other 3D bone marrow components. PMID:26120058

  15. Assessing the quality of earthquake source models using 3-D forward modelling of long-period seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, A. M.; Vallée, M.; Lentas, K.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate earthquake point source parameters (e.g. seismic moment, depth and focal mechanism) provide key first-order information for detailed studies of the earthquake source process and for improved seismic and tsunami hazard evaluation. In order to objectively assess the quality of seismic source models, it is important to go beyond classical resolution/misfit checks. In particular, it is desirable to apply sophisticated modeling techniques to quantify uncertainties due to simplified theoretical formulations and/or Earth structure employed to build the source models. Moreover, it is important to verify how well the models explain data not used in their construction for a complete, quantitative assessment of the earthquake source models. In this study we compare the quality of the surface-wave Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) method with that of the SCARDEC method, which is a new automated body-wave technique for the fast simultaneous determination of the seismic moment, focal mechanism, depth and source time functions of large earthquakes. We focus on the major shallow subduction earthquakes of the last 20 years, for which there are some systematic differences between SCARDEC and CMT source parameters, notably in fault dip angle and moment magnitude. Because the SCARDEC method is based on body-wave deconvolution using ray methods in a 1D Earth model, we test how well SCARDEC source parameters explain long-period seismic data (surface waves and normal modes) compared to the CMT method. We calculate theoretical seismograms using two forward modelling techniques (full ray theory and spectral element method) to simulate the long-period seismic wavefield for the 3D Earth model S20RTS combined with the crust model CRUST2.0, and for two point source models: (i) the SCARDEC model; and (ii) the Global CMT model. We compare the synthetic seismograms with real broadband data from the FDSN for the major subduction earthquakes of the last 20 years. We show that SCARDEC source

  16. 3D Visualization of Earthquake Focal Mechanisms Using ArcScene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Labay, Keith A.; Haeussler, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to the default settings, there are several other options in 3DFM that can be adjusted. The appearance of the symbols can be changed by (1) creating rings around the fault planes that are colored based on magnitude, (2) showing only the fault planes instead of a sphere, (3) drawing a flat disc that identifies the primary nodal plane, (4) or by displaying the null, pressure, and tension axes. The size of the symbols can be changed by adjusting their diameter, scaling them based on the magnitude of the earthquake, or scaling them by the estimated size of the rupture patch based on earthquake magnitude. It is also possible to filter the data using any combination of the strike, dip, rake, magnitude, depth, null axis plunge, pressure axis plunge, tension axis plunge, or fault type values of the points. For a large dataset, these filters can be used to create different subsets of symbols. Symbols created by 3DFM are stored in graphics layers that appear in the ArcScene® table of contents. Multiple graphics layers can be created and saved to preserve the output from different symbol options.

  17. Bone segmentation and fracture detection in ultrasound using 3D local phase features.

    PubMed

    Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Abugharbieh, Rafeef; Hodgson, Antony; Rohling, Robert

    2008-01-01

    3D ultrasound (US) is increasingly considered as a viable alternative imaging modality in computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS) applications. Automatic bone segmentation from US images, however, remains a challenge due to speckle noise and various other artifacts inherent to US. In this paper, we present intensity invariant three dimensional (3D) local image phase features, obtained using 3D Log-Gabor filter banks, for extracting ridge-like features similar to those that occur at soft tissue/bone interfaces. Our contributions include the novel extension of 2D phase symmetry features to 3D and their use in automatic extraction of bone surfaces and fractured fragments in 3D US. We validate our technique using phantom, in vitro, and in vivo experiments. Qualitative and quantitative results demonstrate remarkably clear segmentations results of bone surfaces with a localization accuracy of better than 0.62 mm and mean errors in estimating fracture displacements below 0.65 mm, which will likely be of strong clinical utility. PMID:18979759

  18. Bayesian Estimation of 3D Non-planar Fault Geometry and Slip: An application to the 2011 Megathrust (Mw 9.1) Tohoku-Oki Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Rishabh; Jónsson, Sigurjón

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake faults are generally considered planar (or of other simple geometry) in earthquake source parameter estimations. However, simplistic fault geometries likely result in biases in estimated slip distributions and increased fault slip uncertainties. In case of large subduction zone earthquakes, these biases and uncertainties propagate into tsunami waveform modeling and other calculations related to postseismic studies, Coulomb failure stresses, etc. In this research, we parameterize 3D non-planar fault geometry for the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (Mw 9.1) and estimate these geometrical parameters along with fault slip parameters from onland and offshore GPS using Bayesian inference. This non-planar fault is formed using several 3rd degree polynomials in along-strike (X-Y plane) and along-dip (X-Z plane) directions that are tied together using a triangular mesh. The coefficients of these polynomials constitute the fault geometrical parameters. We use the trench and locations of past seismicity as a priori information to constrain these fault geometrical parameters and the Laplacian to characterize the fault slip smoothness. Hyper-parameters associated to these a priori constraints are estimated empirically and the posterior probability distribution of the model (fault geometry and slip) parameters is sampled using an adaptive Metropolis Hastings algorithm. The across-strike uncertainties in the fault geometry (effectively the local fault location) around high-slip patches increases from 6 km at 10km depth to about 35 km at 50km depth, whereas around low-slip patches the uncertainties are larger (from 7 km to 70 km). Uncertainties in reverse slip are found to be higher at high slip patches than at low slip patches. In addition, there appears to be high correlation between adjacent patches of high slip. Our results demonstrate that we can constrain complex non-planar fault geometry together with fault slip from GPS data using past seismicity as a priori

  19. Local-global alignment for finding 3D similarities in protein structures

    DOEpatents

    Zemla, Adam T.

    2011-09-20

    A method of finding 3D similarities in protein structures of a first molecule and a second molecule. The method comprises providing preselected information regarding the first molecule and the second molecule. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Longest Continuous Segments (LCS) analysis. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Global Distance Test (GDT) analysis. Comparing the first molecule and the second molecule using Local Global Alignment Scoring function (LGA_S) analysis. Verifying constructed alignment and repeating the steps to find the regions of 3D similarities in protein structures.

  20. High resolution earthquake source mechanisms in a subduction zone: 3-D waveform simulations of aftershocks from the 2010 Mw 8.8 Chile rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Stephen; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The earthquake rupture process is extremely heterogeneous. For subduction zone earthquakes in particular, it is vital to understand how structural variations in the overriding plate and downgoing slab may control slip style. The large-scale 3-D geometry of subduction plate boundaries is rapidly becoming well understood (e.g. Hayes et al., 2012); however, the nature of slip style along any finer-scale structures remains elusive. Regional earthquake moment tensor (RMT) inversion can shed light on faulting mechanisms. However, many traditional regional moment tensor inversions use simplified (1-D) Earth models (e.g. Agurto et al., 2012; Hayes et al., 2013) that only use the lowest frequency parts of the waveform, which may mask source complexity. As a result, we may have to take care when making small-scale interpretations about the causative fault and its slip style. This situation is compounded further by strong lateral variations in subsurface geology, as well as poor station coverage for recording offshore subduction earthquakes. A formal assessment of the resolving capability of RMT inversions in subduction zones is challenging and the application of 3-D waveform simulation techniques in highly heterogeneous media is needed. We generate 3-D waveform simulations of aftershocks from a large earthquake that struck Chile in 2010. The Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake is the sixth largest earthquake ever recorded. Following the earthquake, there was an international deployment of seismic stations in the rupture area, making this one of the best observed aftershock sequences to date. We therefore have a unique opportunity to compare recorded waveforms with simulated waveforms for many earthquakes, shedding light on the effect of 3-D heterogeneity on source imaging. We perform forward simulations using the spectral element wave propagation code, SPEFEM3D (e.g. Komatitsch et al., 2010) for a set of moderate-sized aftershocks (Mw 4.0-5.5). A detailed knowledge of velocity structure

  1. Improvement of 3d Monte Carlo Localization Using a Depth Camera and Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, S.; Hatakeyama, R.; Date, H.

    2015-05-01

    Effective and accurate localization method in three-dimensional indoor environments is a key requirement for indoor navigation and lifelong robotic assistance. So far, Monte Carlo Localization (MCL) has given one of the promising solutions for the indoor localization methods. Previous work of MCL has been mostly limited to 2D motion estimation in a planar map, and a few 3D MCL approaches have been recently proposed. However, their localization accuracy and efficiency still remain at an unsatisfactory level (a few hundreds millimetre error at up to a few FPS) or is not fully verified with the precise ground truth. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to improve an accuracy and efficiency of 6DOF motion estimation in 3D MCL for indoor localization. Firstly, a terrestrial laser scanner is used for creating a precise 3D mesh model as an environment map, and a professional-level depth camera is installed as an outer sensor. GPU scene simulation is also introduced to upgrade the speed of prediction phase in MCL. Moreover, for further improvement, GPGPU programming is implemented to realize further speed up of the likelihood estimation phase, and anisotropic particle propagation is introduced into MCL based on the observations from an inertia sensor. Improvements in the localization accuracy and efficiency are verified by the comparison with a previous MCL method. As a result, it was confirmed that GPGPU-based algorithm was effective in increasing the computational efficiency to 10-50 FPS when the number of particles remain below a few hundreds. On the other hand, inertia sensor-based algorithm reduced the localization error to a median of 47mm even with less number of particles. The results showed that our proposed 3D MCL method outperforms the previous one in accuracy and efficiency.

  2. Nodes Localization in 3D Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Multidimensional Scaling Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the recent years, there has been a huge advancement in wireless sensor computing technology. Today, wireless sensor network (WSN) has become a key technology for different types of smart environment. Nodes localization in WSN has arisen as a very challenging problem in the research community. Most of the applications for WSN are not useful without a priory known nodes positions. Adding GPS receivers to each node is an expensive solution and inapplicable for indoor environments. In this paper, we implemented and evaluated an algorithm based on multidimensional scaling (MDS) technique for three-dimensional (3D) nodes localization in WSN using improved heuristic method for distance calculation. Using extensive simulations we investigated our approach regarding various network parameters. We compared the results from the simulations with other approaches for 3D-WSN localization and showed that our approach outperforms other techniques in terms of accuracy.

  3. 3-D earthquake surface displacements from differencing pre- and post-event LiDAR point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, A. K.; Nissen, E.; Arrowsmith, R.; Saripalli, S.

    2012-12-01

    The explosion in aerial LiDAR surveying along active faults across the western United States and elsewhere provides a high-resolution topographic baseline against which to compare repeat LiDAR datasets collected after future earthquakes. We present a new method for determining 3-D coseismic surface displacements and rotations by differencing pre- and post-earthquake LiDAR point clouds using an adaptation of the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, a point set registration technique widely used in medical imaging, computer vision and graphics. There is no need for any gridding or smoothing of the LiDAR data and the method works well even with large mismatches in the density of the two point clouds. To explore the method's performance, we simulate pre- and post-event point clouds using real ("B4") LiDAR data on the southern San Andreas Fault perturbed with displacements of known magnitude. For input point clouds with ~2 points per square meter, we are able to reproduce displacements with a 50 m grid spacing and with horizontal and vertical accuracies of ~20 cm and ~4 cm. In the future, finer grids and improved precisions should be possible with higher shot densities and better survey geo-referencing. By capturing near-fault deformation in 3-D, LiDAR differencing with ICP will complement satellite-based techniques such as InSAR which map only certain components of the surface deformation and which often break down close to surface faulting or in areas of dense vegetation. It will be especially useful for mapping shallow fault slip and rupture zone deformation, helping inform paleoseismic studies and better constrain fault zone rheology. Because ICP can image rotations directly, the technique will also help resolve the detailed kinematics of distributed zones of faulting where block rotations may be common.

  4. 3D Travel Time Prediction for Earthquake Location - An Assessment of Methods and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begnaud, M. L.; Ballard, S.; Rowe, C. A.; Young, C. J.; Steck, L.; Hipp, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    We have selected several crustal and mantle 3D models to test for travel-time prediction in a global event location context. Included are the ak135, DoE Unified, Sun et al. (2004) and MITP08 models, among others. Using the recently published tesselated 3D global ray tracing algorithm of Ballard et al., we compare and contrast our travel-time predictions through these obtained models for a set of ~500 Ground Truth (GT) 5 or better events, most of which are chemical or nuclear explosions. We explore the degree of travel-time misfit that can be expected when integrating rays through a model using a different method, or different parameterization, from that which generated the model. For instance, we compare the effect of dynamic ray tracing vs. fixed rays through a mantle tomographic model that was generated by inverting travel-time residuals for pre-calculated, fixed rays in the 1D radial AK135 model. We examine the success of these models for not only teleseismic P arrivals but also Pn and Pg. We explore the geographic biases observed for each phase and the trade-offs encountered when models are integrated. We find that our GT travel times are best predicted through any model when the calculation is perfomed using methods as close as possible to those used in generation of the model, as expected. Such considerations as Earth ellipticity correction and fixed ray vs. dynamic ray tracing need to be applied appropriately for a fair evaluation. Models available to the community are thus of little practical use for global location unless their methods of derivation are also provided, although they may independently provide enlightening images of tectonic features. We conclude that towards our development of a seamless, global model and locator, existing models may best serve as starting models for a global inversion using a single, consistent ray tracing and travel-time calculation approach; thus we view our evaluation of available models as a search for the best starting

  5. Uniform Local Binary Pattern Based Texture-Edge Feature for 3D Human Behavior Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Yue; Wang, Guangchao; Fan, Chunxiao

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of 3D somatosensory technology, human behavior recognition has become an important research field. Human behavior feature analysis has evolved from traditional 2D features to 3D features. In order to improve the performance of human activity recognition, a human behavior recognition method is proposed, which is based on a hybrid texture-edge local pattern coding feature extraction and integration of RGB and depth videos information. The paper mainly focuses on background subtraction on RGB and depth video sequences of behaviors, extracting and integrating historical images of the behavior outlines, feature extraction and classification. The new method of 3D human behavior recognition has achieved the rapid and efficient recognition of behavior videos. A large number of experiments show that the proposed method has faster speed and higher recognition rate. The recognition method has good robustness for different environmental colors, lightings and other factors. Meanwhile, the feature of mixed texture-edge uniform local binary pattern can be used in most 3D behavior recognition. PMID:25942404

  6. Uniform Local Binary Pattern Based Texture-Edge Feature for 3D Human Behavior Recognition.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yue; Wang, Guangchao; Fan, Chunxiao

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of 3D somatosensory technology, human behavior recognition has become an important research field. Human behavior feature analysis has evolved from traditional 2D features to 3D features. In order to improve the performance of human activity recognition, a human behavior recognition method is proposed, which is based on a hybrid texture-edge local pattern coding feature extraction and integration of RGB and depth videos information. The paper mainly focuses on background subtraction on RGB and depth video sequences of behaviors, extracting and integrating historical images of the behavior outlines, feature extraction and classification. The new method of 3D human behavior recognition has achieved the rapid and efficient recognition of behavior videos. A large number of experiments show that the proposed method has faster speed and higher recognition rate. The recognition method has good robustness for different environmental colors, lightings and other factors. Meanwhile, the feature of mixed texture-edge uniform local binary pattern can be used in most 3D behavior recognition. PMID:25942404

  7. Zemmouri earthquake rupture zone (Mw 6.8, Algeria): Aftershocks sequence relocation and 3D velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayadi, A.; Dorbath, C.; Ousadou, F.; Maouche, S.; Chikh, M.; Bounif, M. A.; Meghraoui, M.

    2008-09-01

    We analyze the aftershocks sequence of the Zemmouri thrust faulting earthquake (21 May 2003, Mw 6.8) located east of Algiers in the Tell Atlas. The seismic sequence located during ˜2 months following the mainshock is made of more than 1500 earthquakes and extends NE-SW along a ˜60-km fault rupture zone crossing the coastline. The earthquake relocation was performed using handpicked P and S phases located with the tomoDD in a detailed 3D velocity structure of the epicentral area. Contrasts between velocity patches seem to correlate with contacts between granitic-volcanic basement rocks and the sedimentary formation of the eastern Mitidja basin. The aftershock sequence exhibits at least three seismic clouds and a well-defined SE-dipping main fault geometry that reflects the complex rupture. The distribution of seismic events presents a clear contrast between a dense SW zone and a NE zone with scattered aftershocks. We observe that the mainshock locates between the SW and NE seismic zones; it also lies at the NNS-SSE contact that separates a basement block to the east and sedimentary formations to the west. The aftershock distribution also suggests fault bifurcation at the SW end of the fault rupture, with a 20-km-long ˜N 100° trending seismic cluster, with a vertical fault geometry parallel to the coastline juxtaposed. Another aftershock cloud may correspond to 75° SE dipping fault. The fault geometry and related SW branches may illustrate the interference between pre-existing fault structures and the SW rupture propagation. The rupture zone, related kinematics, and velocity contrasts obtained from the aftershocks distribution are in agreement with the coastal uplift and reflect the characteristics of an active zone controlled by convergent movements at a plate boundary.

  8. 2D image classification for 3D anatomy localization: employing deep convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Bob D.; Wolterink, Jelmer M.; de Jong, Pim A.; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Localization of anatomical regions of interest (ROIs) is a preprocessing step in many medical image analysis tasks. While trivial for humans, it is complex for automatic methods. Classic machine learning approaches require the challenge of hand crafting features to describe differences between ROIs and background. Deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) alleviate this by automatically finding hierarchical feature representations from raw images. We employ this trait to detect anatomical ROIs in 2D image slices in order to localize them in 3D. In 100 low-dose non-contrast enhanced non-ECG synchronized screening chest CT scans, a reference standard was defined by manually delineating rectangular bounding boxes around three anatomical ROIs -- heart, aortic arch, and descending aorta. Every anatomical ROI was automatically identified using a combination of three CNNs, each analyzing one orthogonal image plane. While single CNNs predicted presence or absence of a specific ROI in the given plane, the combination of their results provided a 3D bounding box around it. Classification performance of each CNN, expressed in area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, was >=0.988. Additionally, the performance of ROI localization was evaluated. Median Dice scores for automatically determined bounding boxes around the heart, aortic arch, and descending aorta were 0.89, 0.70, and 0.85 respectively. The results demonstrate that accurate automatic 3D localization of anatomical structures by CNN-based 2D image classification is feasible.

  9. 3D imaging of crustal structure under the Piedmont province in central Virginia, from reflection RVSP processing of aftershock recordings from the August 23, 2011 Virginia earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiros, D. A.; Brown, L. D.; Cabolova, A.; Davenport, K. K.; Hole, J. A.; Mooney, W. D.

    2013-12-01

    Aftershocks from the magnitude Mw 5.8 August 23, 2011, central Virginia earthquake were recorded using an unusually dense array of seismometers in what has been termed an AIDA (Aftershock Imaging with Dense Arrays) deployment. Over 200 stations were deployed in the epicentral region of this event to a) more precisely determine hypocentral locations, b) more accurately define velocity structure in the aftershock zone, c) characterize propagation characteristics of the crust in the area, and d) image geologic structures in the hypocentral volume with reflection techniques using aftershocks as sources. The AIDA-Virginia experiment successfully recorded a large number of aftershocks from which local tomographic velocity estimates and accurate hypocentral locations were obtained. These results facilitated the use of aftershocks as sources for reflection imaging. In this study we demonstrate how earthquake sources recorded by surface arrays can be treated using the imaging techniques associated with Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP), in particular a variant known as Reverse VSP (RVSP). The central VSP processing algorithms used for this study are VSP normal moveout (VSPnmo) and VSP-to-Common Reflection Point (CRP). Applying these techniques to individual aftershocks from the Virginia experiment results in 3D reflection images of structural complexity in the immediate vicinity of the aftershocks. The most prominent feature observed on these 3D images is a strong moderately east-dipping reflector at a depth of approximately 6 to 8 km that directly underlies, and is continuous beneath, the more steeply dipping aftershock zone. We interpret this reflector as part of a complex imbricate thrust sequence associated with Paleozoic convergence during the Appalachian orogeny. Its apparent continuity beneath the fault zone implied by the aftershock's hypocenters suggests that this inferred fault zone has little or no cumulative offset, supporting the speculation that this event

  10. 3D Tomographic Imaging of the Crustal Velocity Structure beneath the Marmara Sea using Air-gun and Earthquake Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarancioglu, Adil; Kocaoglu, Argun H.; Ozalaybey, Serdar

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the local seismicity and obtain a detailed three-dimensional crustal velocity structure beneath the Marmara Sea in an area surrounding the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) by tomographic inversion using both controlled-source (air-gun) and earthquake data. The tomographic inversion is carried out by using the local earthquake tomography code SIMUL2000. Two sets of seismological data, collected in 2006 (EOSMARMARA experiment) and 2001 (SEISMARMARA experiment), are re-processed and used in this study. A total of 441 high quality earthquakes and 452 air-gun shots recorded by a total of 53 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) are selected for the simultaneous inversion for velocity and hypocentral parameters. The OBS location and time-drift errors are identified from air-gun shot records by a grid search method and required corrections are made on the travel time data. The initial (reference) velocity model and earthquake locations required for the three dimensional tomographic inversion are derived from the one-dimensional velocity model obtained by using the VELEST algorithm in which a subset of earthquakes are selected such that phase readings were made by at least five stations and maximum azimuthal gap was 180o. The inversion results are checked for initial model dependence and the effect of damping factor. The reliability of the results is also evaluated in terms of derivative-weighted-sum, resolution-diagonal-elements values and checkerboard tests. The hypocenter locations of the local earthquakes have been remarkably improved by the three-dimensional velocity model obtained from the tomographic inversion. The three-dimensional velocity model shows that the Tekirdag, Central and Cinarcik Basins are characterized generally by lower Vp (3.0 - 3.5 km/s) values and most of the earthquakes across these regions are located at the depths of 10 to 17 km, about 5 km deeper than those obtained from the one-dimensional reference

  11. Multi-Camera Sensor System for 3D Segmentation and Localization of Multiple Mobile Robots

    PubMed Central

    Losada, Cristina; Mazo, Manuel; Palazuelos, Sira; Pizarro, Daniel; Marrón, Marta

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a method for obtaining the motion segmentation and 3D localization of multiple mobile robots in an intelligent space using a multi-camera sensor system. The set of calibrated and synchronized cameras are placed in fixed positions within the environment (intelligent space). The proposed algorithm for motion segmentation and 3D localization is based on the minimization of an objective function. This function includes information from all the cameras, and it does not rely on previous knowledge or invasive landmarks on board the robots. The proposed objective function depends on three groups of variables: the segmentation boundaries, the motion parameters and the depth. For the objective function minimization, we use a greedy iterative algorithm with three steps that, after initialization of segmentation boundaries and depth, are repeated until convergence. PMID:22319297

  12. Multi-camera sensor system for 3D segmentation and localization of multiple mobile robots.

    PubMed

    Losada, Cristina; Mazo, Manuel; Palazuelos, Sira; Pizarro, Daniel; Marrón, Marta

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a method for obtaining the motion segmentation and 3D localization of multiple mobile robots in an intelligent space using a multi-camera sensor system. The set of calibrated and synchronized cameras are placed in fixed positions within the environment (intelligent space). The proposed algorithm for motion segmentation and 3D localization is based on the minimization of an objective function. This function includes information from all the cameras, and it does not rely on previous knowledge or invasive landmarks on board the robots. The proposed objective function depends on three groups of variables: the segmentation boundaries, the motion parameters and the depth. For the objective function minimization, we use a greedy iterative algorithm with three steps that, after initialization of segmentation boundaries and depth, are repeated until convergence. PMID:22319297

  13. Local Metric Learning in 2D/3D Deformable Registration With Application in the Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chen-Rui; Mageras, Gig; Pizer, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    In image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of disease sites subject to respiratory motion, soft tissue deformations can affect localization accuracy. We describe the application of a method of 2D/3D deformable registration to soft tissue localization in abdomen. The method, called registration efficiency and accuracy through learning a metric on shape (REALMS), is designed to support real-time IGRT. In a previously developed version of REALMS, the method interpolated 3D deformation parameters for any credible deformation in a deformation space using a single globally-trained Riemannian metric for each parameter. We propose a refinement of the method in which the metric is trained over a particular region of the deformation space, such that interpolation accuracy within that region is improved. We report on the application of the proposed algorithm to IGRT in abdominal disease sites, which is more challenging than in lung because of low intensity contrast and nonrespiratory deformation. We introduce a rigid translation vector to compensate for nonrespiratory deformation, and design a special region-of-interest around fiducial markers implanted near the tumor to produce a more reliable registration. Both synthetic data and actual data tests on abdominal datasets show that the localized approach achieves more accurate 2D/3D deformable registration than the global approach. PMID:24771575

  14. Simulation and testing of a multichannel system for 3D sound localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Edward Albert

    Three-dimensional (3D) audio involves the ability to localize sound anywhere in a three-dimensional space. 3D audio can be used to provide the listener with the perception of moving sounds and can provide a realistic listening experience for applications such as gaming, video conferencing, movies, and concerts. The purpose of this research is to simulate and test 3D audio by incorporating auditory localization techniques in a multi-channel speaker system. The objective is to develop an algorithm that can place an audio event in a desired location by calculating and controlling the gain factors of each speaker. A MATLAB simulation displays the location of the speakers and perceived sound, which is verified through experimentation. The scenario in which the listener is not equidistant from each of the speakers is also investigated and simulated. This research is envisioned to lead to a better understanding of human localization of sound, and will contribute to a more realistic listening experience.

  15. A universal approach for automatic organ segmentations on 3D CT images based on organ localization and 3D GrabCut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Ito, Takaaki; Zhou, Xinxin; Chen, Huayue; Hara, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a universal approach to automatic segmentation of different internal organ and tissue regions in three-dimensional (3D) computerized tomography (CT) scans. The proposed approach combines object localization, a probabilistic atlas, and 3D GrabCut techniques to achieve automatic and quick segmentation. The proposed method first detects a tight 3D bounding box that contains the target organ region in CT images and then estimates the prior of each pixel inside the bounding box belonging to the organ region or background based on a dynamically generated probabilistic atlas. Finally, the target organ region is separated from the background by using an improved 3D GrabCut algorithm. A machine-learning method is used to train a detector to localize the 3D bounding box of the target organ using template matching on a selected feature space. A content-based image retrieval method is used for online generation of a patient-specific probabilistic atlas for the target organ based on a database. A 3D GrabCut algorithm is used for final organ segmentation by iteratively estimating the CT number distributions of the target organ and backgrounds using a graph-cuts algorithm. We applied this approach to localize and segment twelve major organ and tissue regions independently based on a database that includes 1300 torso CT scans. In our experiments, we randomly selected numerous CT scans and manually input nine principal types of inner organ regions for performance evaluation. Preliminary results showed the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed approach for addressing automatic organ segmentation issues on CT images.

  16. Model fitting using RANSAC for surgical tool localization in 3-D ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Uhercík, Marián; Kybic, Jan; Liebgott, Hervé; Cachard, Christian

    2010-08-01

    Ultrasound guidance is used for many surgical interventions such as biopsy and electrode insertion. We present a method to localize a thin surgical tool such as a biopsy needle or a microelectrode in a 3-D ultrasound image. The proposed method starts with thresholding and model fitting using random sample consensus for robust localization of the axis. Subsequent local optimization refines its position. Two different tool image models are presented: one is simple and fast and the second uses learned a priori information about the tool's voxel intensities and the background. Finally, the tip of the tool is localized by finding an intensity drop along the axis. The simulation study shows that our algorithm can localize the tool at nearly real-time speed, even using a MATLAB implementation, with accuracy better than 1 mm. In an experimental comparison with several alternative localization methods, our method appears to be the fastest and the most robust one. We also show the results on real 3-D ultrasound data from a PVA cryogel phantom, turkey breast, and breast biopsy. PMID:20483680

  17. Relocations and 3-D Velocity Structure for Aftershocks of the 2000 W. Tottori (Japan) Earthquake and 2001 Gujarat (India) Earthquake, Using Waveform Cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enescu, B.; Mori, J.

    2004-12-01

    The newly developed double-difference tomography method (Zhang and Thurber,2003) makes use of both absolute and relative arrival times to produce an improved velocity model and highly accurate hypocenter locations. By using this technique, we relocate the aftershocks of the 2000 Western Tottori earthquake (Mw 6.7) and 2001 Gujarat (Mw 7.7) earthquake and obtain a 3D-velocity model of the aftershock region. The first data set consists of 1035 aftershocks recorded at 62 stations during a period of about a month following the mainshock (Shibutani et al.,2002). In order to get the best arrival times a cross-correlation analysis was used to align the waveforms. The epicentral distribution of the relocated events reveals clear earthquake lineations, some of them close to the mainshock, and an increased clustering. The aftershocks' depth distribution shows a mean shift of the hypocenters' centroid of about 580m; a clear upper cutoff of the seismic activity and some clustering can be also seen. The final P-wave velocity model shows higher-value anomalies in the vicinity of the mainshock's hypocenter, in good agreement with the results of Shibutani et al.(2004). The second data set consists of about 1300 earthquakes, recorded during one week of observations by a Japanese-Indian research team in the aftershock region of the Gujarat earthquake (Sato et al.,2001). Using the double-difference algorithm and waveform cross-correlations, we were able to identify a more clear alignment of hypocenters that define the mainshock's fault and an area of relatively few aftershocks in the region of the mainshock's hypocenter. Both studies demonstrate that the cross-correlation techniques applied for events with inter-event distances as large as 10km and cross correlation coefficients as low as 50% can produce more accurate locations than those determined from catalog phase data. We are going to discuss briefly the critical role of frequency filtering and of the time window used for cross

  18. Freehand photoacoustic tomography for 3D angiography using local gradient information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, Thomas; Wild, Esther; Maier-Hein, Klaus H.; Maier-Hein, Lena

    2016-03-01

    Photo-acoustic tomography (PAT) is capable of imaging optical absorption in depths beyond the diffusion limit. As blood is one of the main absorbers in tissue, one important application is the visualization of vasculature, which can provide important clues for diagnosing diseases like cancer. While the state-of-the-art work in photo-acoustic 3D angiography has focused on computed tomography systems involving complex setups, we propose an approach based on optically tracking a freehand linear ultrasound probe that can be smoothly integrated into the clinical workflow. To this end, we present a method for calibration of a PAT system using an N-wire phantom specifically designed for PAT and show how to use local gradient information in the 3D reconstructed volume to significantly enhance the signal. According to experiments performed with a tissue mimicking intra-lipid phantom, the signal-to-noise ratio, contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio measured in the full field of view of the linear probe can be improved by factors of 1.7+/-0.7, 14.6+/-5.8 and 2.8+/-1.2 respectively, when comparing the post envelope detection reconstructed 3D volume with the processed one. Qualitative validation performed in tissue mimicking gelatin phantoms further showed good agreement of the reconstructed vasculature with corresponding structures extracted from X-ray computed tomographies. As our method provides high contrast 3D images of the vasculature despite a low hardware complexity its potential for clinical application is high.

  19. Multilevel local refinement and multigrid methods for 3-D turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.; Liu, C.; Sung, C.H.; Huang, T.T.

    1996-12-31

    A numerical approach based on multigrid, multilevel local refinement, and preconditioning methods for solving incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is presented. 3-D turbulent flow around an underwater vehicle is computed. 3 multigrid levels and 2 local refinement grid levels are used. The global grid is 24 x 8 x 12. The first patch is 40 x 16 x 20 and the second patch is 72 x 32 x 36. 4th order artificial dissipation are used for numerical stability. The conservative artificial compressibility method are used for further improvement of convergence. To improve the accuracy of coarse/fine grid interface of local refinement, flux interpolation method for refined grid boundary is used. The numerical results are in good agreement with experimental data. The local refinement can improve the prediction accuracy significantly. The flux interpolation method for local refinement can keep conservation for a composite grid, therefore further modify the prediction accuracy.

  20. Local magnitude scale for earthquakes in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılıç, T.; Ottemöller, L.; Havskov, J.; Yanık, K.; Kılıçarslan, Ö.; Alver, F.; Özyazıcıoğlu, M.

    2016-06-01

    Based on the earthquake event data accumulated by the Turkish National Seismic Network between 2007 and 2013, the local magnitude (Richter, Ml) scale is calibrated for Turkey and the close neighborhood. A total of 137 earthquakes (Mw > 3.5) are used for the Ml inversion for the whole country. Three Ml scales, whole country, East, and West Turkey, are developed, and the scales also include the station correction terms. Since the scales for the two parts of the country are very similar, it is concluded that a single Ml scale is suitable for the whole country. Available data indicate the new scale to suffer from saturation beyond magnitude 6.5. For this data set, the horizontal amplitudes are on average larger than vertical amplitudes by a factor of 1.8. The recommendation made is to measure Ml amplitudes on the vertical channels and then add the logarithm scale factor to have a measure of maximum amplitude on the horizontal. The new Ml is compared to Mw from EMSC, and there is almost a 1:1 relationship, indicating that the new scale gives reliable magnitudes for Turkey.

  1. Automated localization of implanted seeds in 3D TRUS images used for prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Zhouping; Gardi, Lori; Downey, Donal B.; Fenster, Aaron

    2006-07-15

    An algorithm has been developed in this paper to localize implanted radioactive seeds in 3D ultrasound images for a dynamic intraoperative brachytherapy procedure. Segmentation of the seeds is difficult, due to their small size in relatively low quality of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images. In this paper, intraoperative seed segmentation in 3D TRUS images is achieved by performing a subtraction of the image before the needle has been inserted, and the image after the seeds have been implanted. The seeds are searched in a 'local' space determined by the needle position and orientation information, which are obtained from a needle segmentation algorithm. To test this approach, 3D TRUS images of the agar and chicken tissue phantoms were obtained. Within these phantoms, dummy seeds were implanted. The seed locations determined by the seed segmentation algorithm were compared with those obtained from a volumetric cone-beam flat-panel micro-CT scanner and human observers. Evaluation of the algorithm showed that the rms error in determining the seed locations using the seed segmentation algorithm was 0.98 mm in agar phantoms and 1.02 mm in chicken phantoms.

  2. Localizing Protein in 3D Neural Stem Cell Culture: a Hybrid Visualization Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Fai, Stephen; Bennett, Steffany A.L.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of 3-dimensional (3D) topography in influencing neural stem and progenitor cell (NPC) phenotype is widely acknowledged yet challenging to study. When dissociated from embryonic or post-natal brain, single NPCs will proliferate in suspension to form neurospheres. Daughter cells within these cultures spontaneously adopt distinct developmental lineages (neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes) over the course of expansion despite being exposed to the same extracellular milieu. This progression recapitulates many of the stages observed over the course of neurogenesis and gliogenesis in post-natal brain and is often used to study basic NPC biology within a controlled environment. Assessing the full impact of 3D topography and cellular positioning within these cultures on NPC fate is, however, difficult. To localize target proteins and identify NPC lineages by immunocytochemistry, free-floating neurospheres must be plated on a substrate or serially sectioned. This processing is required to ensure equivalent cell permeabilization and antibody access throughout the sphere. As a result, 2D epifluorescent images of cryosections or confocal reconstructions of 3D Z-stacks can only provide spatial information about cell position within discrete physical or digital 3D slices and do not visualize cellular position in the intact sphere. Here, to reiterate the topography of the neurosphere culture and permit spatial analysis of protein expression throughout the entire culture, we present a protocol for isolation, expansion, and serial sectioning of post-natal hippocampal neurospheres suitable for epifluorescent or confocal immunodetection of target proteins. Connexin29 (Cx29) is analyzed as an example. Next, using a hybrid of graphic editing and 3D modelling softwares rigorously applied to maintain biological detail, we describe how to re-assemble the 3D structural positioning of these images and digitally map labelled cells within the complete neurosphere. This

  3. Enhanced Optical Transmission Mediated by Localized Plasmons in Anisotropic, 3D Nanohole Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiun-Chan; Gao, Hanwei; Suh, Jae Yong; Zhou, Wei; Lee, Min Hyung; Odom, Teri W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes 3D nanohole arrays whose high optical transmission is mediated more by localized surface plasmon (LSP) excitations than by surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). First, LSPs on 3D hole arrays lead to optical transmission an order of magnitude higher than 2D planar hole arrays. Second, LSP-mediated transmission is broadband and more tunable than SPP-enhanced transmission which is restricted by Bragg coupling. Third, for the first time, two types of surface plasmons can be selectively excited and manipulated on the same plasmonic substrate. This new plasmonic substrate fabricated by high-throughput nanolithography techniques paves the way for cutting-edge optoelectronic and biomedical applications. PMID:20698633

  4. Global 3-D FDTD Maxwell's-Equations Modeling of Ionospheric Disturbances Associated with Earthquakes Using an Optimized Geodesic Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J. J.; Taflove, A.

    2005-12-01

    We report a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computational solution of Maxwell's equations [1] that models the possibility of detecting and characterizing ionospheric disturbances above seismic regions. Specifically, we study anomalies in Schumann resonance spectra in the extremely low frequency (ELF) range below 30 Hz as observed in Japan caused by a hypothetical cylindrical ionospheric disturbance above Taiwan. We consider excitation of the global Earth-ionosphere waveguide by lightning in three major thunderstorm regions of the world: Southeast Asia, South America (Amazon region), and Africa. Furthermore, we investigate varying geometries and characteristics of the ionospheric disturbance above Taiwan. The FDTD technique used in this study enables a direct, full-vector, three-dimensional (3-D) time-domain Maxwell's equations calculation of round-the-world ELF propagation accounting for arbitrary horizontal as well as vertical geometrical and electrical inhomogeneities and anisotropies of the excitation, ionosphere, lithosphere, and oceans. Our entire-Earth model grids the annular lithosphere-atmosphere volume within 100 km of sea level, and contains over 6,500,000 grid-points (63 km laterally between adjacent grid points, 5 km radial resolution). We use our recently developed spherical geodesic gridding technique having a spatial discretization best described as resembling the surface of a soccer ball [2]. The grid is comprised entirely of hexagonal cells except for a small fixed number of pentagonal cells needed for completion. Grid-cell areas and locations are optimized to yield a smoothly varying area difference between adjacent cells, thereby maximizing numerical convergence. We compare our calculated results with measured data prior to the Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan as reported by Hayakawa et. al. [3]. Acknowledgement This work was suggested by Dr. Masashi Hayakawa, University of Electro-Communications, Chofugaoka, Chofu Tokyo. References [1] A

  5. Local intersection volume: a new 3D descriptor applied to develop a 3D-QSAR pharmacophore model for benzodiazepine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Verli, Hugo; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Bicca de Alencastro, Ricardo; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2002-03-01

    In this work, we have developed a new descriptor, named local intersection volume (LIV), in order to compose a 3D-QSAR pharmacophore model for benzodiazepine receptor ligands. The LIV can be classified as a 3D local shape descriptor in contraposition to the global shape descriptors. We have selected from the literature 49 non-benzodiazepine compounds as a training data set and the model was obtained and evaluated by genetic algorithms (GA) and partial least-squares (PLS) methods using LIVs as descriptors. The LIV 3D-QSAR model has a good predictive capacity according the cross-validation test by "leave-one-out" procedure (Q(2)=0.72). The developed model was compared to a comprehensive and extensive SAR pharmacophore model, recently proposed by Cook and co-workers, for benzodiazepine receptor ligands [J. Med. Chem. 43 (2000) 71]. It showed a relevant correlation with the pharmacophore groups pointed out in that work. Our LIV 3D-QSAR model was also able to predict affinity values for a series of nine compounds (test data set) that was not included into the training data set. PMID:11900866

  6. 3D FDM Simulation of Seismic Wave Propagation for Nankai Trough Earthquake: Effects of Topography and Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoriki, M.; Furumura, T.; Maeda, T.

    2013-12-01

    We have studied the effect of topography and a seawater layer on the propagation of seismic wave propagation towards the realization of a high-resolution 3D FDM simulation of strong ground motions expected from future large subduction zone earthquakes along the Nankai Trough. Although most of the former studies on seismic wave propagation simulation did not consider a seawater layer in their simulation model, some of the recent studies claimed the importance of topography and a seawater layer on the simulation of strong ground motions (e.g., Petukhin et al., 2010; Nakamura, 2012; Maeda et al., 2013). In this study, we examined the effect of these two features on seismic wave propagation by introducing the high-resolution topography with a seawater layer over a wide frequency band. The area of 3D FDM simulation is 1200 km x 1000 km for horizontal directions and 200 km in depth, which covers entirely the area of southwestern Japan centered at 136E and 34.8N. This model was discretized with small grid interval of 0.5 km in horizontal direction and 0.25 km in depth. We used 2400 nodes of the K-computer, which is about 2.9% of its total resources, with a total memory of 1TB. We used a 3D velocity model of Koketsu et al. (2008) and an original source-rupture model from a recent study on the expansion of source-rupture area of the 1707 Hoei earthquake (Furumura et al., 2011). The result of simulation shows that the effect of a seawater layer on ground motion is small in almost all parts of Japan Island with a change of the seismic wave amplitude of less than +-20%. However, around the Northern Kanto area characterized by a belt-shaped anomalous zone, the amplitude of ground motion grows twice as large as that without seawater. This was possibly brought about from amplification of the amplitudes of surface waves generated on the Philippine Sea plate in the Suruga Trough located in the eastern end of the Nankai Trough. It is quite likely that the amplitude of surface wave

  7. 3-D inversion of airborne electromagnetic data parallelized and accelerated by local mesh and adaptive soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dikun; Oldenburg, Douglas W.; Haber, Eldad

    2014-03-01

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) methods are highly efficient tools for assessing the Earth's conductivity structures in a large area at low cost. However, the configuration of AEM measurements, which typically have widely distributed transmitter-receiver pairs, makes the rigorous modelling and interpretation extremely time-consuming in 3-D. Excessive overcomputing can occur when working on a large mesh covering the entire survey area and inverting all soundings in the data set. We propose two improvements. The first is to use a locally optimized mesh for each AEM sounding for the forward modelling and calculation of sensitivity. This dedicated local mesh is small with fine cells near the sounding location and coarse cells far away in accordance with EM diffusion and the geometric decay of the signals. Once the forward problem is solved on the local meshes, the sensitivity for the inversion on the global mesh is available through quick interpolation. Using local meshes for AEM forward modelling avoids unnecessary computing on fine cells on a global mesh that are far away from the sounding location. Since local meshes are highly independent, the forward modelling can be efficiently parallelized over an array of processors. The second improvement is random and dynamic down-sampling of the soundings. Each inversion iteration only uses a random subset of the soundings, and the subset is reselected for every iteration. The number of soundings in the random subset, determined by an adaptive algorithm, is tied to the degree of model regularization. This minimizes the overcomputing caused by working with redundant soundings. Our methods are compared against conventional methods and tested with a synthetic example. We also invert a field data set that was previously considered to be too large to be practically inverted in 3-D. These examples show that our methodology can dramatically reduce the processing time of 3-D inversion to a practical level without losing resolution

  8. A 3-D shear velocity model of the southern North American and Caribbean plates from ambient noise and earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaite, B.; Villaseñor, A.; Iglesias, A.; Herraiz, M.; Jiménez-Munt, I.

    2015-02-01

    We use group velocities from earthquake tomography together with group and phase velocities from ambient noise tomography (ANT) of Rayleigh waves to invert for the 3-D shear-wave velocity structure (5-70 km) of the Caribbean (CAR) and southern North American (NAM) plates. The lithospheric model proposed offers a complete image of the crust and uppermost-mantle with imprints of the tectonic evolution. One of the most striking features inferred is the main role of the Ouachita-Marathon-Sonora orogeny front on the crustal seismic structure of the NAM plate. A new imaged feature is the low crustal velocities along the USA-Mexico border. The model also shows a break of the east-west mantle velocity dichotomy of the NAM and CAR plates beneath the Isthmus of the Tehuantepec and the Yucatan Block. High upper-mantle velocities along the Mesoamerican Subduction Zone coincide with inactive volcanic areas while the lowest velocities correspond to active volcanic arcs and thin lithospheric mantle regions.

  9. Preliminary simulation of a M6.5 earthquake on the Seattle Fault using 3D finite-difference modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, William J.; Frankel, Arthur D.

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-difference simulation of a moderate-sized (M 6.5) thrust-faulting earthquake on the Seattle fault demonstrates the effects of the Seattle Basin on strong ground motion in the Puget lowland. The model area includes the cities of Seattle, Bremerton and Bellevue. We use a recently developed detailed 3D-velocity model of the Seattle Basin in these simulations. The model extended to 20-km depth and assumed rupture on a finite fault with random slip distribution. Preliminary results from simulations of frequencies 0.5 Hz and lower suggest amplification can occur at the surface of the Seattle Basin by the trapping of energy in the Quaternary sediments. Surface waves generated within the basin appear to contribute to amplification throughout the modeled region. Several factors apparently contribute to large ground motions in downtown Seattle: (1) radiation pattern and directivity from the rupture; (2) amplification and energy trapping within the Quaternary sediments; and (3) basin geometry and variation in depth of both Quaternary and Tertiary sediments

  10. Sound localization with head movement: implications for 3-d audio displays

    PubMed Central

    McAnally, Ken I.; Martin, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the accuracy of sound localization is improved if listeners are allowed to move their heads during signal presentation. This study describes the function relating localization accuracy to the extent of head movement in azimuth. Sounds that are difficult to localize were presented in the free field from sources at a wide range of azimuths and elevations. Sounds remained active until the participants' heads had rotated through windows ranging in width of 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, or 64° of azimuth. Error in determining sound-source elevation and the rate of front/back confusion were found to decrease with increases in azimuth window width. Error in determining sound-source lateral angle was not found to vary with azimuth window width. Implications for 3-d audio displays: the utility of a 3-d audio display for imparting spatial information is likely to be improved if operators are able to move their heads during signal presentation. Head movement may compensate in part for a paucity of spectral cues to sound-source location resulting from limitations in either the audio signals presented or the directional filters (i.e., head-related transfer functions) used to generate a display. However, head movements of a moderate size (i.e., through around 32° of azimuth) may be required to ensure that spatial information is conveyed with high accuracy. PMID:25161605

  11. Quantitative Assessment of Local Collagen Matrix Remodeling in 3-D Culture: The Role of Rho Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Areum; Lakshman, Neema; Petroll, W.Matthew

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively assess the role of Rho kinase in modulating the pattern and amount of local cell-induced collagen matrix remodeling. Human corneal fibroblasts were plated inside 100 μm thick fibrillar collagen matrices and cultured for 24 hours in media with or without the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632. Cells were then fixed and stained with phalloidin. Fluorescent (for f-actin) and reflected light (for collagen fibrils) 3-D optical section images were acquired using laser confocal microscopy. Fourier transform analysis was used to assess collagen fibril alignment, and 3-D cell morphology and local collagen density were measured using MetaMorph. Culture in serum-containing media induced significant global matrix contraction, which was inhibited by blocking Rho kinase (p < 0.001). Fibroblasts generally had a bipolar morphology and intracellular stress fibers. Collagen fibrils were compacted and aligned parallel to stress fibers and pseudopodia. When Rho kinase was inhibited, cells had a more cortical f-actin distribution and dendritic morphology. Both local collagen fibril density and alignment were significantly reduced (p<0.01). Overall, the data suggests that Rho kinase dependent contractile force generation leads to co-alignment of cells and collagen fibrils along the plane of greatest resistance, and that this process contributes to global matrix contraction. PMID:16978606

  12. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Simon L; Keyser, Ulrich F; Pagliara, Stefano

    2014-02-01

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local tracking accuracies in all three axial directions as well as the diffusivity parallel to the channel axis while we observed no significant flow but purely Brownian motion. Finally, the presented algorithm is suitable also for tracking of fluorescently labeled particles and particles driven by an external force, e.g., electrokinetic or dielectrophoretic forces. PMID:24593372

  13. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmer, Simon L.; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Pagliara, Stefano

    2014-02-01

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local tracking accuracies in all three axial directions as well as the diffusivity parallel to the channel axis while we observed no significant flow but purely Brownian motion. Finally, the presented algorithm is suitable also for tracking of fluorescently labeled particles and particles driven by an external force, e.g., electrokinetic or dielectrophoretic forces.

  14. Local characterization of hindered Brownian motion by using digital video microscopy and 3D particle tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Dettmer, Simon L.; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Pagliara, Stefano

    2014-02-15

    In this article we present methods for measuring hindered Brownian motion in the confinement of complex 3D geometries using digital video microscopy. Here we discuss essential features of automated 3D particle tracking as well as diffusion data analysis. By introducing local mean squared displacement-vs-time curves, we are able to simultaneously measure the spatial dependence of diffusion coefficients, tracking accuracies and drift velocities. Such local measurements allow a more detailed and appropriate description of strongly heterogeneous systems as opposed to global measurements. Finite size effects of the tracking region on measuring mean squared displacements are also discussed. The use of these methods was crucial for the measurement of the diffusive behavior of spherical polystyrene particles (505 nm diameter) in a microfluidic chip. The particles explored an array of parallel channels with different cross sections as well as the bulk reservoirs. For this experiment we present the measurement of local tracking accuracies in all three axial directions as well as the diffusivity parallel to the channel axis while we observed no significant flow but purely Brownian motion. Finally, the presented algorithm is suitable also for tracking of fluorescently labeled particles and particles driven by an external force, e.g., electrokinetic or dielectrophoretic forces.

  15. 3D quasi-dynamic modeling of earthquake cycles of the great Tohoku-oki earthquake by considering high-speed friction and thermal pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibazaki, B.; Tsutsumi, A.; Shimamoto, T.; Noda, H.

    2012-12-01

    Some observational studies [e.g. Hasegawa et al., 2011] suggested that the 2011 great Tohoku-oki Earthquake (Mw 9.0) released roughly all of the accumulated elastic strain on the plate interface owing to considerable weakening of the fault. Recent studies show that considerable weakening can occur at a high slip velocity because of thermal pressurization or thermal weakening processes [Noda and Lapusta, 2010; Di Toro et al., 2011]. Tsutsumi et al. [2011] examined the frictional properties of clay-rich fault materials under water-saturated conditions and found that velocity weakening or strengthening occurs at intermediate slip velocities and that dramatic weakening occurs at high slip velocities. This dramatic weakening at higher slip velocities is caused by pore-fluid pressurization via frictional heating or gouge weakening. In the present study, we investigate the generation mechanism of megathrust earthquakes along the Japan trench by performing 3D quasi-dynamic modeling with high-speed friction or thermal pressurization. We propose a rate- and state-dependent friction law with two state variables that exhibit weak velocity weakening or strengthening with a small critical displacement at low to intermediate velocities, but a strong velocity weakening with a large critical displacement at high slip velocities [Shibazaki et al., 2011]. We use this friction law for 3D quasi-dynamic modeling of a cycle of the great Tohoku-oki earthquake. We set several asperities where velocity weakening occurs at low to intermediate slip velocities. Outside of the asperities, velocity strengthening occurs at low to intermediate slip velocities. At high slip velocities, strong velocity weakening occurs both within and outside of the asperities. The rupture of asperities occurs at intervals of several tens of years, whereas megathrust events occur at much longer intervals (several hundred years). Megathrust slips occur even in regions where velocity strengthening occurs at low to

  16. Comparison of Phase-Based 3D Near-Field Source Localization Techniques for UHF RFID.

    PubMed

    Parr, Andreas; Miesen, Robert; Vossiek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present multiple techniques for phase-based narrowband backscatter tag localization in three-dimensional space with planar antenna arrays or synthetic apertures. Beamformer and MUSIC localization algorithms, known from near-field source localization and direction-of-arrival estimation, are applied to the 3D backscatter scenario and their performance in terms of localization accuracy is evaluated. We discuss the impact of different transceiver modes known from the literature, which evaluate different send and receive antenna path combinations for a single localization, as in multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems. Furthermore, we propose a new Singledimensional-MIMO (S-MIMO) transceiver mode, which is especially suited for use with mobile robot systems. Monte-Carlo simulations based on a realistic multipath error model ensure spatial correlation of the simulated signals, and serve to critically appraise the accuracies of the different localization approaches. A synthetic uniform rectangular array created by a robotic arm is used to evaluate selected localization techniques. We use an Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) setup to compare measurements with the theory and simulation. The results show how a mean localization accuracy of less than 30 cm can be reached in an indoor environment. Further simulations demonstrate how the distance between aperture and tag affects the localization accuracy and how the size and grid spacing of the rectangular array need to be adapted to improve the localization accuracy down to orders of magnitude in the centimeter range, and to maximize array efficiency in terms of localization accuracy per number of elements. PMID:27347976

  17. Comparison of Phase-Based 3D Near-Field Source Localization Techniques for UHF RFID

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Andreas; Miesen, Robert; Vossiek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present multiple techniques for phase-based narrowband backscatter tag localization in three-dimensional space with planar antenna arrays or synthetic apertures. Beamformer and MUSIC localization algorithms, known from near-field source localization and direction-of-arrival estimation, are applied to the 3D backscatter scenario and their performance in terms of localization accuracy is evaluated. We discuss the impact of different transceiver modes known from the literature, which evaluate different send and receive antenna path combinations for a single localization, as in multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems. Furthermore, we propose a new Singledimensional-MIMO (S-MIMO) transceiver mode, which is especially suited for use with mobile robot systems. Monte-Carlo simulations based on a realistic multipath error model ensure spatial correlation of the simulated signals, and serve to critically appraise the accuracies of the different localization approaches. A synthetic uniform rectangular array created by a robotic arm is used to evaluate selected localization techniques. We use an Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) setup to compare measurements with the theory and simulation. The results show how a mean localization accuracy of less than 30 cm can be reached in an indoor environment. Further simulations demonstrate how the distance between aperture and tag affects the localization accuracy and how the size and grid spacing of the rectangular array need to be adapted to improve the localization accuracy down to orders of magnitude in the centimeter range, and to maximize array efficiency in terms of localization accuracy per number of elements. PMID:27347976

  18. Can 3D light localization be reached in ‘white paint’?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, T.; Schertel, L.; Ackermann, M.; Aubry, G. J.; Aegerter, C. M.; Maret, G.

    2016-01-01

    When waves scatter multiple times in 3D random media, a disorder driven phase transition from diffusion to localization may occur (Anderson 1958 Phys. Rev. 109 1492-505 Abrahams et al 1979 Phys. Rev. Lett. 42 673-6). In ‘The question of classical localization: a theory of white paint?’ Anderson suggested the possibility to observe light localization in TiO2 samples (Anderson 1985 Phil. Mag. B 52 505-9). We recently claimed the observation of localization effects measuring photon time of flight (ToF) distributions (Störzer et al 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 063904) and evaluating transmission profiles (TPs) (Sperling et al 2013 Nat. Photonics 7 48-52) in such TiO2 samples. Here we present a careful study of the long time tail of ToF distributions and the long time behavior of the TP width for very thin samples and different turbidities that questions the localization interpretation. We further show new data that allow an alternative consistent explanation of these previous data by a fluorescence process. An adapted diffusion model including an appropriate exponential fluorescence decay accounts for the shape of the ToF distributions and the TP width. These observations question whether the strong localization regime can be reached with visible light scattering in polydisperse TiO2 samples, since the disorder parameter can hardly be increased any further in such a ‘white paint’ material.

  19. Recognizing Objects in 3D Point Clouds with Multi-Scale Local Features

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min; Guo, Yulan; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Yanxin; Lei, Yinjie

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing 3D objects from point clouds in the presence of significant clutter and occlusion is a highly challenging task. In this paper, we present a coarse-to-fine 3D object recognition algorithm. During the phase of offline training, each model is represented with a set of multi-scale local surface features. During the phase of online recognition, a set of keypoints are first detected from each scene. The local surfaces around these keypoints are further encoded with multi-scale feature descriptors. These scene features are then matched against all model features to generate recognition hypotheses, which include model hypotheses and pose hypotheses. Finally, these hypotheses are verified to produce recognition results. The proposed algorithm was tested on two standard datasets, with rigorous comparisons to the state-of-the-art algorithms. Experimental results show that our algorithm was fully automatic and highly effective. It was also very robust to occlusion and clutter. It achieved the best recognition performance on all of these datasets, showing its superiority compared to existing algorithms. PMID:25517694

  20. Recognizing objects in 3D point clouds with multi-scale local features.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min; Guo, Yulan; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Yanxin; Lei, Yinjie

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing 3D objects from point clouds in the presence of significant clutter and occlusion is a highly challenging task. In this paper, we present a coarse-to-fine 3D object recognition algorithm. During the phase of offline training, each model is represented with a set of multi-scale local surface features. During the phase of online recognition, a set of keypoints are first detected from each scene. The local surfaces around these keypoints are further encoded with multi-scale feature descriptors. These scene features are then matched against all model features to generate recognition hypotheses, which include model hypotheses and pose hypotheses. Finally, these hypotheses are verified to produce recognition results. The proposed algorithm was tested on two standard datasets, with rigorous comparisons to the state-of-the-art algorithms. Experimental results show that our algorithm was fully automatic and highly effective. It was also very robust to occlusion and clutter. It achieved the best recognition performance on all of these datasets, showing its superiority compared to existing algorithms. PMID:25517694

  1. TRAIL protein localization in human primary T cells by 3D microscopy using 3D interactive surface plot: a new method to visualize plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Gras, Christophe; Smith, Nikaïa; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Gandini, Mariana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-31

    The apoptotic ligand TNF-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL) is expressed on the membrane of immune cells during HIV infection. The intracellular stockade of TRAIL in human primary CD4(+) T cells is not known. Here we investigated whether primary CD4(+) T cells expressed TRAIL in their intracellular compartment and whether TRAIL is relocalized on the plasma membrane under HIV activation. We found that TRAIL protein was stocked in intracellular compartment in non activated CD4(+) T cells and that the total level of TRAIL protein was not increased under HIV-1 stimulation. However, TRAIL was massively relocalized on plasma membrane when cells were cultured with HIV. Using three dimensional (3D) microscopy we localized TRAIL protein in human T cells and developed a new method to visualize plasma membrane without the need of a membrane marker. This method used the 3D interactive surface plot and bright light acquired images. PMID:23085529

  2. 3D Faulting Numerical Model Related To 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake Based On DInSAR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldo, Raffaele; Tizzani, Pietro; Solaro, Giuseppe; Pepe, Susi; Lanari, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the surface displacements in the area affected by the April 6, 2009 L'Aquila earthquake (Central Italy) through an advanced 3D numerical modeling approach, by exploiting DInSAR deformation velocity maps based on ENVISAT (Ascending and Descending orbits) and COSMO-SkyMed data (Ascending orbit). We benefited from the available geological and geophysical information to investigate the impact of known buried structures on the modulation of the observed ground deformation field; in this context we implemented the a priori information in a Finite Element (FE) Environment considering a structural mechanical physical approach. The performed analysis demonstrate that the displacement pattern associated with the Mw 6.3 main-shock event is consistent with the activation of several fault segments of the Paganica fault. In particular, we analyzed the seismic events in a structural mechanical context under the plane stress mode approximation to solve for the retrieved displacements. We defined the sub-domain setting of the 3D FEM model using the information derived from the CROOP M-15 seismic line. We assumed stationarity and linear elasticity of the involved materials by considering a solution of classical equilibrium mechanical equations. We evolved our model through two stages: the model compacted under the weight of the rock successions (gravity loading) until it reached a stable equilibrium. At the second stage (co-seismic), where the stresses were released through a slip along the faults, by using an optimization procedure we retrieved: (i) the active seismogenic structures responsible for the observed ground deformation, (ii) the effects of the different mechanical constraints on the ground deformation pattern and (iii) the spatial distribution of the retrieved stress field. We evaluated the boundary setting best fit configuration responsible for the observed ground deformation. To this aim, we first generated several forward structural mechanical models

  3. Probing Local Mineralogy in 3D with Dual Energy X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelb, J.; Yun, S.; Doerr, D.; Hunter, L.; Johnson, B.; Merkle, A.; Fahey, K.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, 3D imaging of rock microstructures has become routine practice for determining pore-scale properties in the geosciences. X-Ray imaging techniques, such as X-Ray Microscopy (XRM), have demonstrated several unique capabilities: namely, the ability to characterize the same sample across a range of length scales and REVs (from millimeters to nanometers), and to perform these characterizations on the same sample over a range of times/treatments (e.g., to observe fluid transporting through the pore networks in a flow cell). While the XRM technique is a popular choice for structural (i.e., pore) characterization, historically it has provided little mineralogical information. This means that resulting simulations are either based on pore structure alone, or rely on correlative chemical mapping techniques for compositionally-sensitive models. Recent advancements in XRM techniques are now enabling compositional sensitivity for a variety of geological sample types. By collecting high-resolution 3D tomography data sets at two different source settings (energies), results may be mixed together to enhance the appearance (contrast) of specific materials. This approach is proving beneficial, for example, to mining applications to locate and identify precious metals, as well as for oil & gas applications to map local hydrophobicity. Here, we will introduce the technique of dual energy X-Ray microscopy, showing how it extends the capabilities of traditional XRM techniques, affording the same high resolution structural information while adding 3D compositional data. Application examples will be shown to illustrate its effectiveness at both the single to sub-micron length scale for mining applications as well as at the 150 nm length scale for shale rock analysis.

  4. Earthquake imprints on seafloor sediments in Northern Ireland, UK: 3D characterisation of Soft Sediment Deformation (SSD).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laborde, Marine; Homberg, Catherine; Schnyder, Johann; Raine, Rob; Smyth, Dermot

    2016-04-01

    The Penarth Group deposits (Rhaetian, Triassic-Jurassic boundary) in Northern Ireland are characteristic of lagoonal and shallow marine environments. Despite the likely absence of significant slopes, these formations are affected by episodic and intense re-sedimentation events, revealed by prominent soft sediment deformation. This study aims to characterise the origin and mechanisms of these deformation events that occurred before the lithification of the sediment, when it was only slightly indurated and still waterlogged. In this study we examine evidence from four on-shore cores and one outcrop within two separate basins c. 80 km apart (Larne Basin and Rathlin Basin). Facies correlations within the Westbury Formation and the Langport Formation (Cotham Member) between the five logged sections allow identification of at least two distinct periods of liquefaction within the Penarth Group. The soft sediment deformations observed in Northern Ireland are characterised by the presence of numerous centimetre- to decimetre-scale convolute bedding, slumps, isoclinally folded cross bedding, loading and diapirism. In core, small-scale normal syn-sedimentary faults, with offsets of a few millimetres to a few centimetres are responsible for the development of small grabens. Rose diagrams of fold axes and fault strikes in all studied sections show a NW-SE preferred orientation, indicating a strong tectonic control. Located on the foreshore, the outcrop at Waterloo allows 3D characterisation of the structures, of which the size and shape appear to be dependent on a variety of parameters such as particle size, the shear strength of the material and the thickness of the layer. We propose that deformation of seafloor deposits was generated by a succession of earthquakes within an extensional tectonic regime during the Early Mesozoic and we discuss the respective contribution of the above mentioned control parameters on the deformation of surface and subsurface sediments.

  5. Lateral inhomogeneity deduced from 3-D magnetotelluric modeling around the hypocentral area of the 1984 Western Nagano Prefecture earthquake, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaya, T.; Oshiman, N.

    2004-05-01

    Earthquake swarms have been observed since 1976 in the southeastern region of Mt. Ontake, where the 1984 Western Nagano Prefecture earthquake (M6.8) occurred. Most earthquake swarm activities show a dense distribu-tion in a narrow area and at shallow depths. We have carried out forward 3-D magnetotelluric modeling for the data set observed around the focal region of the earthquake swarms. An initial 3-D image was constructed based on previous 2-D magnetotelluric analysis results. The resistivity structure shows remarkable lateral inhomogeneity: a low resistivity zone is located at shallow depth around the center of the study area and the low resistivity zone is surrounded by a high resistive structure and its shape is about a 4-km cube. This feature agrees well with the distribution of the degree of water saturation deduced from seismic information. Hypocenters of recent seismicity are distributed around an area between the resistivity boundary and the relatively high-resistance region. This fact strongly suggests that earthquakes in the study area are triggered by fluid (water) in the crust.

  6. Local ISM 3D Distribution and Soft X-ray Background Inferences for Nearby Hot Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puspitarini, L.; Lallement, R.; Snowden, Steven L.; Vergely, J.-L.; Snowden, S.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interstellar medium (ISM) maps can be used to locate not only interstellar (IS) clouds, but also IS bubbles between the clouds that are blown by stellar winds and supernovae, and are filled by hot gas. To demonstrate this, and to derive a clearer picture of the local ISM, we compare our recent 3D IS dust distribution maps to the ROSAT diffuse Xray background maps after removal of heliospheric emission. In the Galactic plane, there is a good correspondence between the locations and extents of the mapped nearby cavities and the soft (0.25 keV) background emission distribution, showing that most of these nearby cavities contribute to this soft X-ray emission. Assuming a constant dust to gas ratio and homogeneous 106 K hot gas filling the cavities, we modeled in a simple way the 0.25 keV surface brightness along the Galactic plane as seen from the Sun, taking into account the absorption by the mapped clouds. The data-model comparison favors the existence of hot gas in the solar neighborhood, the so-called Local Bubble (LB). The inferred mean pressure in the local cavities is found to be approx.9,400/cu cm K, in agreement with previous studies, providing a validation test for the method. On the other hand, the model overestimates the emission from the huge cavities located in the third quadrant. Using CaII absorption data, we show that the dust to CaII ratio is very small in those regions, implying the presence of a large quantity of lower temperature (non-X-ray emitting) ionized gas and as a consequence a reduction of the volume filled by hot gas, explaining at least part of the discrepancy. In the meridian plane, the two main brightness enhancements coincide well with the LB's most elongated parts and chimneys connecting the LB to the halo, but no particular nearby cavity is found towards the enhancement in the direction of the bright North Polar Spur (NPS) at high latitude. We searched in the 3D maps for the source regions of the higher energy

  7. Discovery of previously unrecognised local faults in London, UK, using detailed 3D geological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldiss, Don; Haslam, Richard

    2013-04-01

    In parts of London, faulting introduces lateral heterogeneity to the local ground conditions, especially where construction works intercept the Palaeogene Lambeth Group. This brings difficulties to the compilation of a ground model that is fully consistent with the ground investigation data, and so to the design and construction of engineering works. However, because bedrock in the London area is rather uniform at outcrop, and is widely covered by Quaternary deposits, few faults are shown on the geological maps of the area. This paper discusses a successful resolution of this problem at a site in east central London, where tunnels for a new underground railway station are planned. A 3D geological model was used to provide an understanding of the local geological structure, in faulted Lambeth Group strata, that had not been possible by other commonly-used methods. This model includes seven previously unrecognised faults, with downthrows ranging from about 1 m to about 12 m. The model was constructed in the GSI3D geological modelling software using about 145 borehole records, including many legacy records, in an area of 850 m by 500 m. The basis of a GSI3D 3D geological model is a network of 2D cross-sections drawn by a geologist, generally connecting borehole positions (where the borehole records define the level of the geological units that are present), and outcrop and subcrop lines for those units (where shown by a geological map). When the lines tracing the base of each geological unit within the intersecting cross-sections are complete and mutually consistent, the software is used to generate TIN surfaces between those lines, so creating a 3D geological model. Even where a geological model is constructed as if no faults were present, changes in apparent dip between two data points within a single cross-section can indicate that a fault is present in that segment of the cross-section. If displacements of similar size with the same polarity are found in a series

  8. 3-D crustal velocity model for Lithuania and its application to local event studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budraitis, M.; Kozlovskaya, E.; Janutyte, I.; Motuza, G.

    2009-12-01

    PASSEQ 2006-2008 project (PASsive Seismic Experiment in TESZ) aimed at studying the lithosphere-asthenosphere system around the TransEuropean Suture Zone (TESZ)- the transition between old Proterozoic platform of north and east Europe and younger Phanerozoic platform in central and western Europe. The experiment was a seismic array research aiming to retrieve the structure of the crust and Earth's mantle down to the mantle transition zone, including mapping of upper mantle seismic velocity variations and discontinuities (Moho, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, mantle transition zone) using all available techniques. During the experiment 26 seismic stations (including four broadband stations) were installed in Lithuania and operated since June, 2006 till January, 2008. One of the main reasons of PASSEQ deployment in Lithuania is identification and characterisation of the local seismic activity. During the data acquisition period a number of local seismic events was identified and preliminary event location was made using LocSat and VELEST algorithms and 1-D velocity models. These standard procedures is not enough precise for Lithuania, however, because the thickness of the crust varies significantly in the region (from 45 to 55 km). Another problem was low quality of S-wave arrivals due to thick (up to 2 km) sediments in most part of Lithuania. In order to improve event location, we compiled a 3-D seismic velocity model of the crust down to a depth of 60 km. The model, consisting of four major layers (sediments, upper crust, middle crust, lower crust and uppermost mantle) was interpolated from 2-D velocity models along previous wide-angle reflection and refraction profiles into a regular grid. The quality of the approximation was analysed using comparison of travel times of P-waves recorded by controlled source experiments and calculated travel times through the 3-D velocity model. The model was converted into a density model using a special procedure, in which

  9. 3D maps of the local ISM from inversion of individual color excess measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallement, R.; Vergely, J.-L.; Valette, B.; Puspitarini, L.; Eyer, L.; Casagrande, L.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Three-dimensional (3D) maps of the Galactic interstellar matter (ISM) are a potential tool of wide use, but accurate and detailed maps are still lacking. One of the ways to construct the maps is to invert individual distance-limited ISM measurements, a method we have applied here to measurements of stellar color excess in the optical. Methods: We assembled color excess data together with the associated parallax or photometric distances to constitute a catalog of ≃23 000 sightlines for stars within 2.5 kpc. The photometric data are taken from Strömgren catalogs, the Geneva photometric database, and the Geneva-Copenhagen survey. We also included extinctions derived towards open clusters. We applied an inversion method based on a regularized Bayesian approach to this color excess dataset, a method previously used for mapping at closer distances. Results: We show the dust spatial distribution resulting from the inversion by means of planar cuts through the differential opacity 3D distribution, and by means of 2D maps of the integrated opacity from the Sun up to various distances. The mapping assigns locations to the nearby dense clouds and represents their distribution at the spatial resolution that is allowed by the dataset properties, i.e. ≃10 pc close to the Sun and increasing to ≃100 pc beyond 1 kpc. Biases toward nearby and/or weakly extincted stars make this dataset particularly appropriate to mapping the local and neighboring cavities and to locating faint, extended nearby clouds, which are both goals that are difficult or impossible with other mapping methods. The new maps reveal a ≃1 kpc wide empty region in the third quadrant in the continuation of the so-called CMa tunnel of the Local Cavity, a cavity that we identify as the Superbubble GSH238+00+09 detected in radio emission maps and that is found to be bounded by the Orion and Vela clouds. The maps also show an extended narrower tunnel in the opposite direction (l ≃ 70°) that also extends

  10. Localization of spots in FISH images of breast cancer using 3-D shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Les, T; Markiewicz, T; Osowski, S; Jesiotr, M; Kozlowski, W

    2016-06-01

    The fluorescence in situ (FISH) belongs to the most often used molecular cytogenetic techniques, applied in many areas of diagnosis and research. The analysis of FISH images relies on localization and counting the red and green spots in order to determine HER2 status of the breast cancer samples. The algorithm of spot localization presented in the paper is based on 3-D shape analysis of the image objects. The subsequent regions of the image are matched to the reference pattern and the results of this matching influence localization of spots. The paper compares different shapes of the reference pattern and their efficiency in spot localization. The numerical experiments have been performed on the basis of 12 cases (patients), each represented by three images. Few thousands of cells have been analysed. The quantitative analyses comparing different versions of algorithm are presented and compared to the expert results. The best version of the procedure provides the absolute relative difference to the expert results smaller than 3%. These results confirm high efficiency of the proposed approach to the spot identification. The proposed method of FISH image analysis improves the efficiency of detecting fluorescent signals in FISH images. The evaluation results are encouraging for further testing of the developed automatic system directed to application in medical practice. PMID:26694535

  11. Automated Foveola Localization in Retinal 3D-OCT Images Using Structural Support Vector Machine Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Ying; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Chen, Mei; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S.; Rehg, James M.

    2013-01-01

    We develop an automated method to determine the foveola location in macular 3D-OCT images in either healthy or pathological conditions. Structural Support Vector Machine (S-SVM) is trained to directly predict the location of the foveola, such that the score at the ground truth position is higher than that at any other position by a margin scaling with the associated localization loss. This S-SVM formulation directly minimizes the empirical risk of localization error, and makes efficient use of all available training data. It deals with the localization problem in a more principled way compared to the conventional binary classifier learning that uses zero-one loss and random sampling of negative examples. A total of 170 scans were collected for the experiment. Our method localized 95.1% of testing scans within the anatomical area of the foveola. Our experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively identify the location of the foveola, facilitating diagnosis around this important landmark. PMID:23285565

  12. A method of 3D object recognition and localization in a cloud of points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielicki, Jerzy; Sitnik, Robert

    2013-12-01

    The proposed method given in this article is prepared for analysis of data in the form of cloud of points directly from 3D measurements. It is designed for use in the end-user applications that can directly be integrated with 3D scanning software. The method utilizes locally calculated feature vectors (FVs) in point cloud data. Recognition is based on comparison of the analyzed scene with reference object library. A global descriptor in the form of a set of spatially distributed FVs is created for each reference model. During the detection process, correlation of subsets of reference FVs with FVs calculated in the scene is computed. Features utilized in the algorithm are based on parameters, which qualitatively estimate mean and Gaussian curvatures. Replacement of differentiation with averaging in the curvatures estimation makes the algorithm more resistant to discontinuities and poor quality of the input data. Utilization of the FV subsets allows to detect partially occluded and cluttered objects in the scene, while additional spatial information maintains false positive rate at a reasonably low level.

  13. Vertical Corner Feature Based Precise Vehicle Localization Using 3D LIDAR in Urban Area.

    PubMed

    Im, Jun-Hyuck; Im, Sung-Hyuck; Jee, Gyu-In

    2016-01-01

    Tall buildings are concentrated in urban areas. The outer walls of buildings are vertically erected to the ground and almost flat. Therefore, the vertical corners that meet the vertical planes are present everywhere in urban areas. These corners act as convenient landmarks, which can be extracted by using the light detection and ranging (LIDAR) sensor. A vertical corner feature based precise vehicle localization method is proposed in this paper and implemented using 3D LIDAR (Velodyne HDL-32E). The vehicle motion is predicted by accumulating the pose increment output from the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm based on the geometric relations between the scan data of the 3D LIDAR. The vertical corner is extracted using the proposed corner extraction method. The vehicle position is then corrected by matching the prebuilt corner map with the extracted corner. The experiment was carried out in the Gangnam area of Seoul, South Korea. In the experimental results, the maximum horizontal position error is about 0.46 m and the 2D Root Mean Square (RMS) horizontal error is about 0.138 m. PMID:27517936

  14. A formal classification of 3D medial axis points and their local geometry.

    PubMed

    Giblin, Peter; Kimia, Benjamin B

    2004-02-01

    This paper proposes a novel hypergraph skeletal representation for 3D shape based on a formal derivation of the generic structure of its medial axis. By classifying each skeletal point by its order of contact, we show that, generically, the medial axis consists of five types of points, which are then organized into sheets, curves, and points: 1) sheets (manifolds with boundary) which are the locus of bitangent spheres with regular tangency A1(2) (Ak(n) notation means n distinct k-fold tangencies of the sphere of contact, as explained in the text); two types of curves, 2) the intersection curve of three sheets and the locus of centers of tritangent spheres, A1(3), and 3) the boundary of sheets, which are the locus of centers of spheres whose radius equals the larger principal curvature, i.e., higher order contact A3 points; and two types of points, 4) centers of quad-tangent spheres, A1(4), and 5) centers of spheres with one regular tangency and one higher order tangency, A1A3. The geometry of the 3D medial axis thus consists of sheets (A1(2)) bounded by one type of curve (A3) on their free end, which corresponds to ridges on the surface, and attached to two other sheets at another type of curve (A1(3)), which support a generalized cylinder description. The A3 curves can only end in A1A3 points where they must meet an A1(3) curve. The A1(3) curves meet together in fours at an A1(4) point. This formal result leads to a compact representation for 3D shape, referred to as the medial axis hypergraph representation consisting of nodes (A1(4) and A1A3 points), links between pairs of nodes (A1(3) and A3 curves) and hyperlinks between groups of links (A1(2) sheets). The description of the local geometry at nodes by itself is sufficient to capture qualitative aspects of shapes, in analogy to 2D. We derive a pointwise reconstruction formula to reconstruct a surface from this medial axis hypergraph together with the radius function. Thus, this information completely

  15. 2D and 3D Visualizations of the Fault Areas, Initial Heights and Tsunami Simulations of Five Largest Historical Earthquakes in Mediterrenean Region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürleme, Beran; Tarık Meriç, Hakan; Ulutaş, Ergin; Anunziato, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is the simulation and visualization of the initial and maximum tsunami wave heights in 2D and 3D along the Mediterranean coasts inferred from the five largest earthquakes in history in this region. The earthquakes considered in the study are 21 July 365 Crete, 8 August 1303 Crete, 3 May 1481 Rhodes, 28 December Messina and 21 May 2003 Algeria. All these earthquakes spawned tsunamis and inflicted damage in coastal regions. The study was conducted to explain which could be the potential Tsunami consequences caused by similar earthquakes occurring in the region in the future. The methodology used for the calculation of tsunami wave heights from the earthquakes includes the determination of earthquake parameters, modeling of the initial wave height, simulation of the wave propagation and calculation of the maximum wave heights near coastal areas. The parameters of the earthquakes are based on previously published fault mechanism solutions and known tectonic features of the regions. Static dislocation algorithm for the initial wave height is used from the parameters of focal mechanism solutions. The study was conducted also to understand the reliability of the previously published focal mechanism solutions for the earthquakes by using the principal stress axis in the regions. The 2D and 3D visualized models of tsunamis from the earthquakes include isometric grid representing the sea surface for the purpose of a better understanding of the initial tsunami mechanism compared to 1D visualizations. In many studies, the earthquake locations, tectonic features of the regions, initial heights and tsunami simulations are shown on maps as bird's eye in 1D visualization. However these kinds of features are related in depths and bathymetric features. For that reason, our approaches will contribute to have better understanding where the uplift- subsidence of initial heights and crests-troughs of simulated wave heights and thus provide a better insight of the

  16. An optimal sensing strategy for recognition and localization of 3-D natural quadric objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan; Hahn, Hernsoo

    1991-01-01

    An optimal sensing strategy for an optical proximity sensor system engaged in the recognition and localization of 3-D natural quadric objects is presented. The optimal sensing strategy consists of the selection of an optimal beam orientation and the determination of an optimal probing plane that compose an optimal data collection operation known as an optimal probing. The decision of an optimal probing is based on the measure of discrimination power of a cluster of surfaces on a multiple interpretation image (MII), where the measure of discrimination power is defined in terms of a utility function computing the expected number of interpretations that can be pruned out by a probing. An object representation suitable for active sensing based on a surface description vector (SDV) distribution graph and hierarchical tables is presented. Experimental results are shown.

  17. 3D localization of electrophysiology catheters from a single x-ray cone-beam projection

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, Normand Polack, George G.; Sethi, Benu; Rowlands, John A.; Crystal, Eugene

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: X-ray images allow the visualization of percutaneous devices such as catheters in real time but inherently lack depth information. The provision of 3D localization of these devices from cone beam x-ray projections would be advantageous for interventions such as electrophysiology (EP), whereby the operator needs to return a device to the same anatomical locations during the procedure. A method to achieve real-time 3D single view localization (SVL) of an object of known geometry from a single x-ray image is presented. SVL exploits the change in the magnification of an object as its distance from the x-ray source is varied. The x-ray projection of an object of interest is compared to a synthetic x-ray projection of a model of said object as its pose is varied. Methods: SVL was tested with a 3 mm spherical marker and an electrophysiology catheter. The effect of x-ray acquisition parameters on SVL was investigated. An independent reference localization method was developed to compare results when imaging a catheter translated via a computer controlled three-axes stage. SVL was also performed on clinical fluoroscopy image sequences. A commercial navigation system was used in some clinical image sequences for comparison. Results: SVL estimates exhibited little change as x-ray acquisition parameters were varied. The reproducibility of catheter position estimates in phantoms denoted by the standard deviations, (σ{sub x}, σ{sub y}, σ{sub z}) = (0.099 mm,  0.093 mm,  2.2 mm), where x and y are parallel to the detector plane and z is the distance from the x-ray source. Position estimates (x, y, z) exhibited a 4% systematic error (underestimation) when compared to the reference method. The authors demonstrated that EP catheters can be tracked in clinical fluoroscopic images. Conclusions: It has been shown that EP catheters can be localized in real time in phantoms and clinical images at fluoroscopic exposure rates. Further work is required to characterize

  18. 3D seismic velocity structure in the rupture area of the 2014 M8.2 Iquique earthquake in Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woollam, Jack; Fuenzallida, Amaya; Garth, Tom; Rietbrock, Andreas; Ruiz, Sergio; Tavera, Hernando

    2016-04-01

    Seismic velocity tomography is one of the key tools in Earth sciences to image the physical properties of the subsurface. In recent years significant advances have been made to image the Chilean subductions zone, especially in the area of the 2010 M8.8 Maule earthquake (e.g. Hicks et al., 2014), providing much needed physical constraints for earthquakes source inversions and rupture models. In 2014 the M8.2 Iquique earthquake struck the northern part of the Chilean subduction zone in close proximity to the Peruvian boarder. The pre- and aftershock sequence of this major earthquake was recorded by a densified seismological network in Northern Chile and Southern Peru, which provides an excellent data set to study in depth the 3D velocity structure along the subduction megathrust. Based on an automatic event catalogue of nearly 10,000 events spanning the time period March to May 2014 we selected approximately 450 events for a staggered 3D inversion approach. Events are selected to guarantee an even ray coverage through the inversion volume. We only select events with a minimum GAP of 200 to improve depth estimates and therefore increase resolution in the marine forearc. Additionally, we investigate secondary arrivals between the P- and S-wave arrival to improve depth location. Up to now we have processed about 450 events, from which about 150 with at least 30 P- and S-wave observations have been selected for the subsequent 3D tomography. Overall the data quality is very high, which allows arrival time estimates better than 0.05s on average. We will show results from the 1D, 2D, and preliminary 3D inversions and discuss the results together with the obtained seismicity distribution.

  19. Location and moment tensor inversion of small earthquakes using 3D Green's functions in models with rugged topography: application to the Longmenshan fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Li; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Yang; Chen, Xiaofei; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    With dense seismic arrays and advanced imaging methods, regional three-dimensional (3D) Earth models have become more accurate. It is now increasingly feasible and advantageous to use a 3D Earth model to better locate earthquakes and invert their source mechanisms by fitting synthetics to observed waveforms. In this study, we develop an approach to determine both the earthquake location and source mechanism from waveform information. The observed waveforms are filtered in different frequency bands and separated into windows for the individual phases. Instead of picking the arrival times, the traveltime differences are measured by cross-correlation between synthetic waveforms based on the 3D Earth model and observed waveforms. The earthquake location is determined by minimizing the cross-correlation traveltime differences. We then fix the horizontal location of the earthquake and perform a grid search in depth to determine the source mechanism at each point by fitting the synthetic and observed waveforms. This new method is verified by a synthetic test with noise added to the synthetic waveforms and a realistic station distribution. We apply this method to a series of M W3.4-5.6 earthquakes in the Longmenshan fault (LMSF) zone, a region with rugged topography between the eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau and the western part of the Sichuan basin. The results show that our solutions result in improved waveform fits compared to the source parameters from the catalogs we used and the location can be better constrained than the amplitude-only approach. Furthermore, the source solutions with realistic topography provide a better fit to the observed waveforms than those without the topography, indicating the need to take the topography into account in regions with rugged topography.

  20. Intrafractional 3D localization using kilovoltage digital tomosynthesis for sliding-window intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Hunt, Margie; Pham, Hai; Tang, Grace; Mageras, Gig

    2015-09-01

    To implement novel imaging sequences integrated into intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and determine 3D positions for intrafractional patient motion monitoring and management.In one method, we converted a static gantry IMRT beam into a series of arcs in which dose index and multileaf collimator positions for all control points were unchanged, but gantry angles were modified to oscillate ± 3° around the original angle. Kilovoltage (kV) projections were acquired continuously throughout delivery and reconstructed to provide a series of 6° arc digital tomosynthesis (DTS) images which served to evaluate the in-plane positions of embedded-fiducials/vertebral-body. To obtain out-of-plane positions via triangulation, a 20° gantry rotation with beam hold-off was inserted during delivery to produce a pair of 6° DTS images separated by 14°. In a second method, the gantry remained stationary, but both kV source and detector moved over a 15° longitudinal arc using pitch and translational adjustment of the robotic arms. Evaluation of localization accuracy in an anthropomorphic Rando phantom during simulated intrafractional motion used programmed couch translations from customized scripts. Purpose-built software was used to reconstruct DTS images, register them to reference template images and calculate 3D fiducial positions.No significant dose difference (<0.5%) was found between the original and converted IMRT beams. For a typical hypofractionated spine treatment, 200 single DTS (6° arc) and 10 paired DTS (20° arc) images were acquired for each IMRT beam, providing in-plane and out-of-plane monitoring every 1.6 and 34.5 s, respectively. Mean ± standard deviation error in predicted position was -0.3 ± 0.2 mm, -0.1 ± 0.1 mm in-plane, and 0.2 ± 0.4 mm out-of-plane with rotational gantry, 0.8 ± 0.1 mm, -0.7 ± 0.3 mm in-plane and 1.1 ± 0.1 mm out-of-plane with translational source/detector.Acquiring 3D fiducial positions from kV-DTS during fixed gantry

  1. A 3D hp-Discontinuous Galerkin Method: Revisiting the M7.3 Landers Earthquake Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tago, J.; Cruz-Atienza, V. M.; Virieux, J.; Etienne, V.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.

    2011-12-01

    two benchmark problems of the SCEC/USGS Spontaneous Rupture Code Verification Project (Harris et al., 2009): TPV3 and TPV10, and we have compared our solutions with those from other well-established approaches. The second problem is selected because it deals with a 60 degrees-dipping normal fault reaching the free surface (FS), which requires an accurate solution of the fault traction vector (i.e. including the normal component) due to the dynamic feedback from reflected waves in the FS in both the fault strength and shear loading. To illustrate the capabilities of the approach handling non-planar faults in heterogeneous media we present 3D spontaneous rupture scenarios over the Landers-earthquake fault system and discuss the importance of the system geometry to understand the stress change associated with the final slip distribution determined by previous authors.

  2. A 3D interactive multi-object segmentation tool using local robust statistics driven active contours.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Kikinis, Ron; Bouix, Sylvain; Shenton, Martha; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2012-08-01

    Extracting anatomical and functional significant structures renders one of the important tasks for both the theoretical study of the medical image analysis, and the clinical and practical community. In the past, much work has been dedicated only to the algorithmic development. Nevertheless, for clinical end users, a well designed algorithm with an interactive software is necessary for an algorithm to be utilized in their daily work. Furthermore, the software would better be open sourced in order to be used and validated by not only the authors but also the entire community. Therefore, the contribution of the present work is twofolds: first, we propose a new robust statistics based conformal metric and the conformal area driven multiple active contour framework, to simultaneously extract multiple targets from MR and CT medical imagery in 3D. Second, an open source graphically interactive 3D segmentation tool based on the aforementioned contour evolution is implemented and is publicly available for end users on multiple platforms. In using this software for the segmentation task, the process is initiated by the user drawn strokes (seeds) in the target region in the image. Then, the local robust statistics are used to describe the object features, and such features are learned adaptively from the seeds under a non-parametric estimation scheme. Subsequently, several active contours evolve simultaneously with their interactions being motivated by the principles of action and reaction-this not only guarantees mutual exclusiveness among the contours, but also no longer relies upon the assumption that the multiple objects fill the entire image domain, which was tacitly or explicitly assumed in many previous works. In doing so, the contours interact and converge to equilibrium at the desired positions of the desired multiple objects. Furthermore, with the aim of not only validating the algorithm and the software, but also demonstrating how the tool is to be used, we provide

  3. Thrust faulting and 3D ground deformation of the 3 July 2015 Mw 6.4 Pishan, China earthquake from Sentinel-1A radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianbao; Shen, Zheng-Kang; Li, Tao; Chen, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Boosted by the launch of Sentinel-1A radar satellite from the European Space Agency (ESA), we now have the opportunity of fast, full and multiple coverage of the land based deformation field of earthquakes. Here we use the data to investigate a strong earthquake struck Pishan, western China on July 3, 2015. The earthquake fault is blind and no ground break features are found on-site, thus Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data give full play to its technical advantage for the recovery of coseismic deformation field. By using the Sentinel-1A radar data in the Interferometric Wide Swath mode, we obtain 3 tracks of InSAR data over the struck region, and resolve the 3D ground deformation generated by the earthquake. Then the Line-of-Sight (LOS) InSAR data are inverted for the slip-distribution of the seismogenic fault. The final model shows that the earthquake is completely blind with pure-thrust motion. The maximum slip is ~ 0.48 m at a depth of ~ 7 km, consistent with the depth estimate from seismic reflection data. In particular, the inverted model is also compatible with a south-dipping fault ramp among a group of fault interfaces detected by the seismic reflection profile over the region. The seismic moment obtained equals to a Mw 6.4 earthquake. The Pishan earthquake ruptured the frontal part of the thrust ramps under the Slik anticline, and unloaded the coulomb stress of them. However, it may have loaded stress to the back-thrust above the thrust ramps by ~ 1-4 bar, and promoted it for future failure. Moreover, the stress loading on the west side of the earthquake fault is much larger than that on the east side, indicating a higher risk for failure to the west of the Zepu fault.

  4. Clean localization super-resolution microscopy for 3D biological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Partha P.; Curthoys, Nikki M.; Hess, Samuel T.

    2016-01-01

    We propose clean localization microscopy (a variant of fPALM) using a molecule filtering technique. Localization imaging involves acquiring a large number of images containing single molecule signatures followed by one-to-one mapping to render a super-resolution image. In principle, this process can be repeated for other z-planes to construct a 3D image. But, single molecules observed from off-focal planes result in false representation of their presence in the focal plane, resulting in incorrect quantification and analysis. We overcome this with a single molecule filtering technique that imposes constraints on the diffraction limited spot size of single molecules in the image plane. Calibration with sub-diffraction size beads puts a natural cutoff on the actual diffraction-limited size of single molecules in the focal plane. This helps in distinguishing beads present in the focal plane from those in the off-focal planes thereby providing an estimate of the single molecules in the focal plane. We study the distribution of actin (labeled with a photoactivatable CAGE 552 dye) in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblast cells.

  5. Improved EEG source localization employing 3D sensing by "Flying Triangulation"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettl, Svenja; Rampp, Stefan; Fouladi-Movahed, Sarah; Dalal, Sarang S.; Willomitzer, Florian; Arold, Oliver; Stefan, Hermann; Häusler, Gerd

    2013-04-01

    With electroencephalography (EEG), a person's brain activity can be monitored over time and sources of activity localized. With this information, brain regions showing pathological activity, such as epileptic spikes, can be delineated. In cases of severe drug-resistant epilepsy, surgical resection of these brain regions may be the only treatment option. This requires a precise localization of the responsible seizure generators. They can be reconstructed from EEG data when the electrode positions are known. The standard method employs a "digitization pen" and has severe drawbacks: It is time consuming, the result is user-dependent, and the patient has to hold still. We present a novel method which overcomes these drawbacks. It is based on the optical "Flying Triangulation" (FlyTri) sensor which allows a motion-robust acquisition of precise 3D data. To compare the two methods, the electrode positions were determined with each method for a real-sized head model with EEG electrodes and their deviation to the ground-truth data calculated. The standard deviation for the current method was 3.39 mm while it was 0.98 mm for the new method. The influence of these results on the final EEG source localization was investigated by simulating EEG data. The digitization pen result deviates substantially from the true source location and time series. In contrast, the FlyTri result agrees with the original information. Our findings suggest that FlyTri might become a valuable tool in the field of medical brain research, because of its improved precision and contactless handling. Future applications might include co-registration of multimodal information.

  6. Automatic registration of optical imagery with 3d lidar data using local combined mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmehr, E. G.; Fraser, C. S.; Zhang, C.; Leach, J.

    2013-10-01

    Automatic registration of multi-sensor data is a basic step in data fusion for photogrammetric and remote sensing applications. The effectiveness of intensity-based methods such as Mutual Information (MI) for automated registration of multi-sensor image has been previously reported for medical and remote sensing applications. In this paper, a new multivariable MI approach that exploits complementary information of inherently registered LiDAR DSM and intensity data to improve the robustness of registering optical imagery and LiDAR point cloud, is presented. LiDAR DSM and intensity information has been utilised in measuring the similarity of LiDAR and optical imagery via the Combined MI. An effective histogramming technique is adopted to facilitate estimation of a 3D probability density function (pdf). In addition, a local similarity measure is introduced to decrease the complexity of optimisation at higher dimensions and computation cost. Therefore, the reliability of registration is improved due to the use of redundant observations of similarity. The performance of the proposed method for registration of satellite and aerial images with LiDAR data in urban and rural areas is experimentally evaluated and the results obtained are discussed.

  7. Plane Localization in 3-D Fetal Neurosonography for Longitudinal Analysis of the Developing Brain.

    PubMed

    Yaqub, Mohammad; Rueda, Sylvia; Kopuri, Anil; Melo, Pedro; Papageorghiou, A T; Sullivan, Peter B; McCormick, Kenneth; Noble, J Alison

    2016-07-01

    The parasagittal (PS) plane is a 2-D diagnostic plane used routinely in cranial ultrasonography of the neonatal brain. This paper develops a novel approach to find the PS plane in a 3-D fetal ultrasound scan to allow image-based biomarkers to be tracked from prebirth through the first weeks of postbirth life. We propose an accurate plane-finding solution based on regression forests (RF). The method initially localizes the fetal brain and its midline automatically. The midline on several axial slices is used to detect the midsagittal plane, which is used as a constraint in the proposed RF framework to detect the PS plane. The proposed learning algorithm guides the RF learning method in a novel way by: 1) using informative voxels and voxel informative strength as a weighting within the training stage objective function, and 2) introducing regularization of the RF by proposing a geometrical feature within the training stage. Results on clinical data indicate that the new automated method is more reproducible than manual plane finding obtained by two clinicians. PMID:26011873

  8. Indoor Localization Algorithms for an Ambulatory Human Operated 3D Mobile Mapping System

    SciTech Connect

    Corso, N; Zakhor, A

    2013-12-03

    Indoor localization and mapping is an important problem with many applications such as emergency response, architectural modeling, and historical preservation. In this paper, we develop an automatic, off-line pipeline for metrically accurate, GPS-denied, indoor 3D mobile mapping using a human-mounted backpack system consisting of a variety of sensors. There are three novel contributions in our proposed mapping approach. First, we present an algorithm which automatically detects loop closure constraints from an occupancy grid map. In doing so, we ensure that constraints are detected only in locations that are well conditioned for scan matching. Secondly, we address the problem of scan matching with poor initial condition by presenting an outlier-resistant, genetic scan matching algorithm that accurately matches scans despite a poor initial condition. Third, we present two metrics based on the amount and complexity of overlapping geometry in order to vet the estimated loop closure constraints. By doing so, we automatically prevent erroneous loop closures from degrading the accuracy of the reconstructed trajectory. The proposed algorithms are experimentally verified using both controlled and real-world data. The end-to-end system performance is evaluated using 100 surveyed control points in an office environment and obtains a mean accuracy of 10 cm. Experimental results are also shown on three additional datasets from real world environments including a 1500 meter trajectory in a warehouse sized retail shopping center.

  9. 3-D localization of gamma ray sources with coded apertures for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaissas, I.; Papadimitropoulos, C.; Karafasoulis, K.; Potiriadis, C.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Several small gamma cameras for radioguided surgery using CdTe or CdZnTe have parallel or pinhole collimators. Coded aperture imaging is a well-known method for gamma ray source directional identification, applied in astrophysics mainly. The increase in efficiency due to the substitution of the collimators by the coded masks renders the method attractive for gamma probes used in radioguided surgery. We have constructed and operationally verified a setup consisting of two CdTe gamma cameras with Modified Uniform Redundant Array (MURA) coded aperture masks of rank 7 and 19 and a video camera. The 3-D position of point-like radioactive sources is estimated via triangulation using decoded images acquired by the gamma cameras. We have also developed code for both fast and detailed simulations and we have verified the agreement between experimental results and simulations. In this paper we present a simulation study for the spatial localization of two point sources using coded aperture masks with rank 7 and 19.

  10. Full-3D waveform tomography of Southern California crustal structure by using earthquake recordings and ambient noise Green's functions based on adjoint and scattering-integral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E.; Chen, P.; Jordan, T. H.; Maechling, P. J.; Denolle, M.; Beroza, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    We apply a unified methodology for seismic waveform analysis and inversions to Southern California. To automate the waveform selection processes, we developed a semi-automatic seismic waveform analysis algorithm for full-wave earthquake source parameters and tomographic inversions. The algorithm is based on continuous wavelet transforms, a topological watershed method, and a set of user-adjustable criteria to select usable waveform windows for full-wave inversions. The algorithm takes advantages of time-frequency representations of seismograms and is able to separate seismic phases in both time and frequency domains. The selected wave packet pairs between observed and synthetic waveforms are then used for extracting frequency-dependent phase and amplitude misfit measurements, which are used in our seismic source and structural inversions. Our full-wave waveform tomography uses the 3D SCEC Community Velocity Model Version 4.0 as initial model, a staggered-grid finite-difference code to simulate seismic wave propagations. The sensitivity (Fréchet) kernels are calculated based on the scattering integral and adjoint methods to iteratively improve the model. We use both earthquake recordings and ambient noise Green's functions, stacking of station-to-station correlations of ambient seismic noise, in our full-3D waveform tomographic inversions. To reduce errors of earthquake sources, the epicenters and source parameters of earthquakes used in our tomographic inversion are inverted by our full-wave CMT inversion method. Our current model shows many features that relate to the geological structures at shallow depth and contrasting velocity values across faults. The velocity perturbations could up to 45% with respect to the initial model in some regions and relate to some structures that do not exist in the initial model, such as southern Great Valley. The earthquake waveform misfits reduce over 70% and the ambient noise Green's function group velocity delay time variance

  11. Locally adaptive 2D-3D registration using vascular structure model for liver catheterization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihye; Lee, Jeongjin; Chung, Jin Wook; Shin, Yeong-Gil

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional-three-dimensional (2D-3D) registration between intra-operative 2D digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and pre-operative 3D computed tomography angiography (CTA) can be used for roadmapping purposes. However, through the projection of 3D vessels, incorrect intersections and overlaps between vessels are produced because of the complex vascular structure, which makes it difficult to obtain the correct solution of 2D-3D registration. To overcome these problems, we propose a registration method that selects a suitable part of a 3D vascular structure for a given DSA image and finds the optimized solution to the partial 3D structure. The proposed algorithm can reduce the registration errors because it restricts the range of the 3D vascular structure for the registration by using only the relevant 3D vessels with the given DSA. To search for the appropriate 3D partial structure, we first construct a tree model of the 3D vascular structure and divide it into several subtrees in accordance with the connectivity. Then, the best matched subtree with the given DSA image is selected using the results from the coarse registration between each subtree and the vessels in the DSA image. Finally, a fine registration is conducted to minimize the difference between the selected subtree and the vessels of the DSA image. In experimental results obtained using 10 clinical datasets, the average distance errors in the case of the proposed method were 2.34±1.94mm. The proposed algorithm converges faster and produces more correct results than the conventional method in evaluations on patient datasets. PMID:26824922

  12. 3D P-wave velocity structure of the crust and relocation of earthquakes in the Lushan, China, source area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiangwei; Wang, Xiaona; Zhang, Wenbo

    2016-04-01

    Many researchers have investigated the Lushan source area with geological and geophysical approaches since the 2013 Lushan, China, earthquake happened. Compared with the previous tomographic studies, we have used a much large data set and an updated tomographic method to determine a small scale three-dimensional P wave velocity structure with spatial resolution less than 5km, which plays the important role for understanding the deep structure and the genetic mechanism beneath the Lushan area. The double difference seismic tomography method is applied to 50,711 absolute first arrival P wave arrival times and 7,294,691 high quality relative P arrival times of 5,285 events of Lushan seismic sequence to simultaneously determine the detailed crustal 3D P wave velocity structure and the hypocenter parameters in the Lushan seismic area. This method takes account of the path anomaly biases explicitly by making full use of valuable information of seismic wave propagation jointly with absolute and relative arrival time data. Our results show that the Lushan mainshock locates at 30.28N, 103.98E, with the depth of 16.38km. The front edge of aftershock in the northeast of mainshock present a spade with a steep dip angle, the aftershocks' extended length is about 12km. In the southwest of Lushan mainshock, the front edge of aftershock in low velocity zone slope gently, the aftershocks' extended length is about 23km. Our high-resolution tomographic model not only displays the general features contained in the previous models, but also reveals some new features. The Tianquan, Shuangshi and Daguan line lies in the transition zone between high velocity anomalies to the southeast and low velocity anomalies to the northwest at the ground surface. An obvious high-velocity anomaly is visible in Daxing area. With the depth increasing, Baoxing high velocity anomaly extends to Lingguan, while the southeast of the Tianquan, Shuangshi and Daguan line still shows low velocity. The high

  13. Efficient parallel seismic simulations including topography and 3-D material heterogeneities on locally refined composite grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, Anders; Rodgers, Arthur

    2010-05-01

    The finite difference method on a uniform Cartesian grid is a highly efficient and easy to implement technique for solving the elastic wave equation in seismic applications. However, the spacing in a uniform Cartesian grid is fixed throughout the computational domain, whereas the resolution requirements in realistic seismic simulations usually are higher near the surface than at depth. This can be seen from the well-known formula h ≤ L-P which relates the grid spacing h to the wave length L, and the required number of grid points per wavelength P for obtaining an accurate solution. The compressional and shear wave lengths in the earth generally increase with depth and are often a factor of ten larger below the Moho discontinuity (at about 30 km depth), than in sedimentary basins near the surface. A uniform grid must have a grid spacing based on the small wave lengths near the surface, which results in over-resolving the solution at depth. As a result, the number of points in a uniform grid is unnecessarily large. In the wave propagation project (WPP) code, we address the over-resolution-at-depth issue by generalizing our previously developed single grid finite difference scheme to work on a composite grid consisting of a set of structured rectangular grids of different spacings, with hanging nodes on the grid refinement interfaces. The computational domain in a regional seismic simulation often extends to depth 40-50 km. Hence, using a refinement ratio of two, we need about three grid refinements from the bottom of the computational domain to the surface, to keep the local grid size in approximate parity with the local wave lengths. The challenge of the composite grid approach is to find a stable and accurate method for coupling the solution across the grid refinement interface. Of particular importance is the treatment of the solution at the hanging nodes, i.e., the fine grid points which are located in between coarse grid points. WPP implements a new, energy

  14. The Donegal Sign Tree: A Local Legend Confirmed with Holographic Radar and 3-D Magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, T.; Cassidy, M.; Inagaki, M.; Windsor, C.; Capineri, L.; Falorni, P.; Bulleti, A.; Valentini, S.; Borgioli, G.; Ivashov, S.; Zhuravlev, A.; Razewig, V.; Vasiliev, I.; Bechtel, E.

    2009-05-01

    A tree at a crossroad in Historic Donegal, PA (founded 1722) bears unusual burls. Two are similar in size, and lie on opposite sides of the trunk at a height of six feet. Locals say that the tree engulfed an old road sign, and the geometry of the burls gives this appearance. However, the trunk between these two burls bears no welt where it sealed after swallowing the sign. In addition, there are other burls farther up the tree, which are not consistent with engulfed signs. Although the locals all know the legend of the swallowed sign, none ever actually saw the sign; not even an octogenarian who has lived at the crossroad his entire life, and recalls the tree as a child just as it is today. In order to test the veracity of the legend, this study performed subsurface imaging of the tree using holographic subsurface radar (Rascan), and 3-D measurements of the magnetic field about the tree using cesium vapor sensors. The Rascan system used is a continuous wave subsurface radar that operates at 5 discrete frequencies between 1.5 and 2.0 GHz. Reflections from subsurface objects are recorded as the phase difference pattern between an internal reference signal, and the reflected signal. Thus, it is a microwave analogy for optical holography. Rascan records reflections with two receiving antennae - parallel and perpendicular to the transmitter - so a single set of scans provides ten images; five frequencies at two polarizations. This ensures that an object at arbitrary depth will produce a strong phase difference in one of the images. As a consequence, elongate objects that are angled from the plane of scanning (e.g. a dipping sheet) produce "zebra stripes" of contrast values that vary cyclically with depth. The presence of stripes, and their relative positions in the different frequency images (the movement of which has been dubbed the "zebra shift") is useful for determining the relative depth of different portions of a dipping planar, or curved subsurface object. Rascan

  15. Combined global 2D-local 3D modeling of the industrial Czochralski silicon crystal growth process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, T.; Seebeck, J.; Friedrich, J.

    2013-04-01

    A global, axisymmetric thermal model of a Czochralski furnace is coupled to an external, local, 3D, time-dependent flow model of the melt via the inclusion of turbulent heat fluxes, extracted from the 3D melt model, into the 2D furnace model. Boundary conditions of the 3D model are updated using results from the 2D model. In the 3D model the boundary layers are resolved by aggressive mesh refinement towards the walls, and the Large Eddy Simulation approach is used to model the turbulent flow in the melt volume on a relatively coarse mesh to minimize calculation times. It is shown that by using this approach it is possible to reproduce fairly good results from Direct Numerical Simulations obtained on much finer meshes, as well as experimental results for interface shape and oxygen concentration in the case of growth of silicon crystals with 210 mm diameter for photovoltaics by the Czochralski method.

  16. 3D crustal structure and long-period ground motions from a M9.0 megathrust earthquake in the Pacific Northwest region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Kim B.; Stephenson, William J.; Geisselmeyer, Andreas

    2008-04-01

    We have developed a community velocity model for the Pacific Northwest region from northern California to southern Canada and carried out the first 3D simulation of a Mw 9.0 megathrust earthquake rupturing along the Cascadia subduction zone using a parallel supercomputer. A long-period (<0.5 Hz) source model was designed by mapping the inversion results for the December 26, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (Han et al., Science 313(5787):658-662, 2006) onto the Cascadia subduction zone. Representative peak ground velocities for the metropolitan centers of the region include 42 cm/s in the Seattle area and 8-20 cm/s in the Tacoma, Olympia, Vancouver, and Portland areas. Combined with an extended duration of the shaking up to 5 min, these long-period ground motions may inflict significant damage on the built environment, in particular on the highrises in downtown Seattle.

  17. 3D crustal structure and long-period ground motions from a M9.0 megathrust earthquake in the Pacific Northwest region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, K.B.; Stephenson, W.J.; Geisselmeyer, A.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a community velocity model for the Pacific Northwest region from northern California to southern Canada and carried out the first 3D simulation of a Mw 9.0 megathrust earthquake rupturing along the Cascadia subduction zone using a parallel supercomputer. A long-period (<0.5 Hz) source model was designed by mapping the inversion results for the December 26, 2004 Sumatra–Andaman earthquake (Han et al., Science 313(5787):658–662, 2006) onto the Cascadia subduction zone. Representative peak ground velocities for the metropolitan centers of the region include 42 cm/s in the Seattle area and 8–20 cm/s in the Tacoma, Olympia, Vancouver, and Portland areas. Combined with an extended duration of the shaking up to 5 min, these long-period ground motions may inflict significant damage on the built environment, in particular on the highrises in downtown Seattle.

  18. Applications of detailed 3D P-wave velocity crustal model in Poland for local, regional and global seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Grad, Marek

    2015-04-01

    The 3D P-wave seismic velocity model was obtained by combining data from multiple studies during past 50 years. Data sources included refraction seismology, reflection seismology, geological boreholes, vertical seismic profiling, magnetotellurics and gravimetry. Use of many data sources allowed creation of detailed 3D P-wave velocity model that reaches to depth of 60 km and includes 6-layers of sediments and 3-layers of the crust. Purpose of this study is to analyze how 3D model influences local (accuracy of location and source time estimation for local events), regional (identification of wide-angle seismic phases) and global (teleseismic tomography) seismic travel times. Additionally we compare results of forward seismic wave propagation with signals observed on short period and broadband stations. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work by NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  19. A Generalized Functional Model Based Method for Vibration-Based Damage Precise Localization in 3D Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaris, Christos S.; Sakellariou, John S.; Fassois, Spilios D.

    2015-07-01

    A Generalized Functional Model Based Method for vibration-based damage precise localization on structures consisting of 1D, 2D, or 3D elements is introduced. The method generalizes previous versions applicable to structures consisting of 1D elements, thus allowing for 2D and 3D elements as well. It is based on scalar (single sensor) or vector (multiple sensor) Functional Models which - in the inspection phase - incorporate the mathematical form of the specific structural topology. Precise localization is then based on coordinate estimation within this model structure, and confidence bounds are also obtained. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated through experiments on a 3D truss structure where damage corresponds to single bolt loosening. Both the scalar and vector versions of the method are shown to be effective even within a very limited, low frequency, bandwidth of 3-59 Hz. The improvement achieved through the use of multiple sensors is also demonstrated.

  20. A Bayesian approach to real-time 3D tumor localization via monoscopic x-ray imaging during treatment delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruijiang; Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Xing, Lei

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Monoscopic x-ray imaging with on-board kV devices is an attractive approach for real-time image guidance in modern radiation therapy such as VMAT or IMRT, but it falls short in providing reliable information along the direction of imaging x-ray. By effectively taking consideration of projection data at prior times and/or angles through a Bayesian formalism, the authors develop an algorithm for real-time and full 3D tumor localization with a single x-ray imager during treatment delivery. Methods: First, a prior probability density function is constructed using the 2D tumor locations on the projection images acquired during patient setup. Whenever an x-ray image is acquired during the treatment delivery, the corresponding 2D tumor location on the imager is used to update the likelihood function. The unresolved third dimension is obtained by maximizing the posterior probability distribution. The algorithm can also be used in a retrospective fashion when all the projection images during the treatment delivery are used for 3D localization purposes. The algorithm does not involve complex optimization of any model parameter and therefore can be used in a ''plug-and-play'' fashion. The authors validated the algorithm using (1) simulated 3D linear and elliptic motion and (2) 3D tumor motion trajectories of a lung and a pancreas patient reproduced by a physical phantom. Continuous kV images were acquired over a full gantry rotation with the Varian TrueBeam on-board imaging system. Three scenarios were considered: fluoroscopic setup, cone beam CT setup, and retrospective analysis. Results: For the simulation study, the RMS 3D localization error is 1.2 and 2.4 mm for the linear and elliptic motions, respectively. For the phantom experiments, the 3D localization error is < 1 mm on average and < 1.5 mm at 95th percentile in the lung and pancreas cases for all three scenarios. The difference in 3D localization error for different scenarios is small and is not

  1. Joint azimuth and elevation localization estimates in 3D synthetic aperture radar scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Matthew

    2015-05-01

    The location of point scatterers in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data is exploited in several modern analyzes including persistent scatter tracking, terrain deformation, and object identification. The changes in scatterers over time (pulse-to-pulse including vibration and movement, or pass-to-pass including direct follow on, time of day, and season), can be used to draw more information about the data collection. Multiple pass and multiple antenna SAR scenarios have extended these analyzes to location in three dimensions. Either multiple passes at different elevation angles may be .own or an antenna array with an elevation baseline performs a single pass. Parametric spectral estimation in each dimension allows sub-pixel localization of point scatterers in some cases additionally exploiting the multiple samples in each cross dimension. The accuracy of parametric estimation is increased when several azimuth passes or elevations (snapshots) are summed to mitigate measurement noise. Inherent range curvature across the aperture however limits the accuracy in the range dimension to that attained from a single pulse. Unlike the stationary case where radar returns may be averaged the movement necessary to create the synthetic aperture is only approximately (to pixel level accuracy) removed to form SAR images. In parametric estimation increased accuracy is attained when two dimensions are used to jointly estimate locations. This paper involves jointly estimating azimuth and elevation to attain increased accuracy 3D location estimates. In this way the full 2D array of azimuth and elevation samples is used to obtain the maximum possible accuracy. In addition the independent dimension collection geometry requires choosing which dimension azimuth or elevation attains the highest accuracy while joint estimation increases accuracy in both dimensions. When maximum parametric estimation accuracy in azimuth is selected the standard interferometric SAR scenario results. When

  2. Earthquakes in Action: Incorporating Multimedia, Internet Resources, Large-scale Seismic Data, and 3-D Visualizations into Innovative Activities and Research Projects for Today's High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith-Konter, B.; Jacobs, A.; Lawrence, K.; Kilb, D.

    2006-12-01

    The most effective means of communicating science to today's "high-tech" students is through the use of visually attractive and animated lessons, hands-on activities, and interactive Internet-based exercises. To address these needs, we have developed Earthquakes in Action, a summer high school enrichment course offered through the California State Summer School for Mathematics and Science (COSMOS) Program at the University of California, San Diego. The summer course consists of classroom lectures, lab experiments, and a final research project designed to foster geophysical innovations, technological inquiries, and effective scientific communication (http://topex.ucsd.edu/cosmos/earthquakes). Course content includes lessons on plate tectonics, seismic wave behavior, seismometer construction, fault characteristics, California seismicity, global seismic hazards, earthquake stress triggering, tsunami generation, and geodetic measurements of the Earth's crust. Students are introduced to these topics through lectures-made-fun using a range of multimedia, including computer animations, videos, and interactive 3-D visualizations. These lessons are further enforced through both hands-on lab experiments and computer-based exercises. Lab experiments included building hand-held seismometers, simulating the frictional behavior of faults using bricks and sandpaper, simulating tsunami generation in a mini-wave pool, and using the Internet to collect global earthquake data on a daily basis and map earthquake locations using a large classroom map. Students also use Internet resources like Google Earth and UNAVCO/EarthScope's Jules Verne Voyager Jr. interactive mapping tool to study Earth Science on a global scale. All computer-based exercises and experiments developed for Earthquakes in Action have been distributed to teachers participating in the 2006 Earthquake Education Workshop, hosted by the Visualization Center at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (http

  3. 3d-4f magnetic interaction with density functional theory plus u approach: local Coulomb correlation and exchange pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yachao; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Hong

    2013-12-12

    The 3d-4f exchange interaction plays an important role in many lanthanide based molecular magnetic materials such as single-molecule magnets and magnetic refrigerants. In this work, we study the 3d-4f magnetic exchange interactions in a series of Cu(II)-Gd(III) (3d(9)-4f(7)) dinuclear complexes based on the numerical atomic basis-norm-conserving pseudopotential method and density functional theory plus the Hubbard U correction approach (DFT+U). We obtain improved description of the 4f electrons by including the semicore 5s5p states in the valence part of the Gd-pseudopotential. The Hubbard U correction is employed to treat the strongly correlated Cu-3d and Gd-4f electrons, which significantly improve the agreement of the predicted exchange constants, J, with experiment, indicating the importance of accurate description of the local Coulomb correlation. The high efficiency of the DFT+U approach enables us to perform calculations with molecular crystals, which in general improve the agreement between theory and experiment, achieving a mean absolute error smaller than 2 cm(-1). In addition, through analyzing the physical effects of U, we identify two magnetic exchange pathways. One is ferromagnetic and involves an interaction between the Cu-3d, O-2p (bridge ligand), and the majority-spin Gd-5d orbitals. The other one is antiferromagnetic and involves Cu-3d, O-2p, and the empty minority-spin Gd-4f orbitals, which is suppressed by the planar Cu-O-O-Gd structure. This study demonstrates the accuracy of the DFT+U method for evaluating the 3d-4f exchange interactions, provides a better understanding of the exchange mechanism in the Cu(II)-Gd(III) complexes, and paves the way for exploiting the magnetic properties of the 3d-4f compounds containing lanthanides other than Gd. PMID:24274078

  4. Local Earthquake Detection in Marine Environments Using Seismic Signal Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. C.; Trehu, A. M.; Braunmiller, J.

    2010-12-01

    The amphibious Central Oregon Locked Zone Array (COLZA) of seismic stations was deployed from 2007-2009 to record earthquakes occurring in the seismogenic zone offshore central Oregon. This array included two year-long deployments of ocean bottom seismometers (OBS's) from the NSF OBSIP. In addition to local and distant earthquakes, the OBS array recorded thousands of impulsive local signals, which are not easily filtered out by a standard STA/LTA detection algorithm. Many of these signals are likely of biological origin (informally referred to as “fish bumps”). These signals have a wide range of amplitudes, can mask local earthquake phase arrivals, and make automatic detection difficult. We show that signal characteristics derived from 3-component seismic data at each station can be used to filter out event detections that are unlikely to be earthquake-generated. A decision-making algorithm, such as an artificial neural network, will be applied to the joint set of signal characteristics to identify possible local events and classify detections that are likely to be "bumps". Detecting low-magnitude local earthquake phases in the high-noise marine environment requires that a standard STA/LTA detector must have a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) threshold. Using an SNR threshold of 3 in the 1-5 Hz frequency band detects P-arrivals of local earthquakes of magnitude M = ~1.5, but flags hundreds of impulsive local “bumps” per day for each single OBS. Due to the random nature of the impulsive events, it is impractical to filter them out by comparing to neighboring stations. However, additional a priori information from detected waveforms may provide an effective means for distinguishing earthquakes from other events. For each detection, we determine 3 additional signal characteristics from the 3-component waveform data: the variance of the power cepstrum calculated from a portion of the signal spectrum, the rectilinearity of particle motion, and the

  5. Connecting earthquake source products to local tsunami warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melgar, D.; Allen, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Issuing warning of a tsunami in advance of its arrival to the coastlines immediately adjacent to large earthquakes remains a challenging problem. The heterogeneous development state of regional geophysical monitoring infrastructure across subduction zones worldwide means that a flexible approach to warning, capable of ingesting multiple data types and earthquake source products, is the most appealing. We will present results from the study of 3 recent large events that have been observed with diverse geophysical measurements; the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku-oki, the 2010 Mw8.8 Maule and 2014 Mw8.2 Iquique events. First, we will show that earthquake slip models derived from combination of land (GPS and strong motion) as well as off-shore (tide gauges, ocean-bottom pressure, and GPS buoy) can be coupled to tsunami propagation models to produce simulations that closely match the measured run-up at the local coastlines. Using these models as a baseline for validation we will demonstrate a methodology that takes advantage of simpler, but more readily available earthquake source products such as rapid point-source magnitude estimates from coastal GPS observations and regional moment tensors. We will show that while trading-off precision for speed, these simpler earthquake source models produce inundation forecasts reliable enough to be used for warning within minutes of earthquake onset. Most subduction zones around the world already have some geophysical infrastructure and are producing some form of real-time earthquake source product, our results strongly argue that by coupling these data products to tsunami propagation models local tsunami warning is possible at most subduction zones with already available infrastructure.

  6. 3-D or median map? Earthquake scenario ground-motion maps from physics-based models versus maps from ground-motion prediction equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, K.

    2015-12-01

    There are two common ways to create a ground-motion map for a hypothetical earthquake: using ground motion prediction equations (by far the more common of the two) and using 3-D physics-based modeling. The former is very familiar to engineers, the latter much less so, and the difference can present a problem because engineers tend to trust the familiar and distrust novelty. Maps for essentially the same hypothetical earthquake using the two different methods can look very different, while appearing to present the same information. Using one or the other can lead an engineer or disaster planner to very different estimates of damage and risk. The reasons have to do with depiction of variability, spatial correlation of shaking, the skewed distribution of real-world shaking, and the upward-curving relationship between shaking and damage. The scientists who develop the two kinds of map tend to specialize in one or the other and seem to defend their turf, which can aggravate the problem of clearly communicating with engineers.The USGS Science Application for Risk Reduction's (SAFRR) HayWired scenario has addressed the challenge of explaining to engineers the differences between the two maps, and why, in a disaster planning scenario, one might want to use the less-familiar 3-D map.

  7. Earthquake relocation using a 3D a-priori geological velocity model from the western Alps to Corsica: Implication for seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthoux, Nicole; Theunissen, Thomas; Beslier, Marie-Odile; Font, Yvonne; Thouvenot, François; Dessa, Jean-Xavier; Simon, Soazig; Courrioux, Gabriel; Guillen, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The region between the inner zones of the Alps and Corsica juxtaposes an overthickened crust to an oceanic domain, which makes difficult to ascertain the focal depth of seismic events using routine location codes and average 1D velocity models. The aim of this article is to show that, even with a rather lose monitoring network, accurate routine locations can be achieved by using realistic 3D modelling and advanced location techniques. Previous earthquake tomography studies cover the whole region with spatial resolutions of several tens of kilometres on land, but they fail to resolve the marine domain due to the absence of station coverage and sparse seismicity. To overcome these limitations, we first construct a 3D a-priori P and S velocity model integrating known geophysical and geological information. Significant progress has been achieved in the 3D numerical modelling of complex geological structures by the development of dedicated softwares (e.g. 3D GeoModeller), capable at once of elaborating a 3D structural model from geological and geophysical constraints and, possibly, of refining it by inversion processes (Calcagno et al., 2008). Then, we build an arrival-time catalogue of 1500 events recorded from 2000 to 2011. Hypocentres are then located in this model using a numerical code based on the maximum intersection method (Font et al., 2004), updated by Theunissen et al. (2012), as well as another 3D location technique, the NonLinLoc software (Lomax and Curtis, 2001). The reduction of arrival-time residuals and uncertainties (dh, dz) with respect to classical 1D locations demonstrates the improved accuracy allowed by our approach and confirms the coherence of the 3D geological model built and used in this study. Our results are also compared with previous works that benefitted from the installation of dense temporary networks surrounding the studied epicentre area. The resulting 3D location catalogue allows us to improve the regional seismic hazard assessment

  8. Is earthquake activity along the French Atlantic margin favoured by local rheological contrasts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazabraud, Yves; Béthoux, Nicole; Delouis, Bertrand

    2013-09-01

    The seismological study of recent seismic crises near Oleron Island confirms the coexistence of an extensional deformation and a transtensive regime in the Atlantic margin of France, which is different from the general western European stress field corresponding to a strike-slip regime. We argue that the switch of the principal stress axes σ1/σ2 in a NW-SE vertical plane is linked with the existence of crustal heterogeneities. Events of magnitude larger than 5 sometimes occur along the Atlantic margin of France, such as the 7 September 1972 (ML = 5.2) earthquake near Oleron island and the 30 September 2002 (ML = 5.7) Hennebont event in Brittany. To test the mechanism of local strain localization, we model the deformation of the hypocentral area of the Hennebont earthquake using a 3D thermo-mechanical finite element code. We conclude that the occurrence of moderate earthquakes located in limited parts of the Hercynian shear zones (as the often reactivated swarms near Oleron) could be due to local reactivation of pre-existing faults. These sporadic seismic ruptures are favoured by stress concentration due to rheological heterogeneities.

  9. Postseismic Displacement Following the Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake Detected by Continuous GPS Observation and the Effect of Viscoelastic Relaxation Using 3D- FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagi, T.; Hashimoto, M.; Hashizume, M.; Choosakul, N.; Takemoto, S.; Fukuda, Y.; Fujimori, K.; Satomura, M.; Wu, P.; Otsuka, Y.; Takiguchi, H.; Saito, S.; Maruyama, T.; Kato, T.

    2007-12-01

    We have studied postseismic displacement following the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of December 26, 2004 in Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries using continuous GPS observation. We will report the results of our GPS analysis from the beginning of 2001 to the end of October 2007. We have also constructed 3D-FEM to evaluate the effect of viscoelastic relaxation following the earthquake. We will also report this result. We used continuous GPS data from 6 sites operated by Chulalongkorn Univ. and Kyoto Univ. or JAMSTEC, 2 sites by Shizuoka Univ. and JAMSTEC, 3 sites by NICT in Thailand and Myanmar, 1 site by STE-Lab, Nagoya Univ., and IGS sites which are located in countries surrounding the Indian Ocean include Japan, China and Australia. Bernese 5.0 was used for the processing of 30 sec. sampling data to obtain static solutions. From our analysis, no significant motions were detected at each site until the day of the earthquake. Although postseismic displacements still have been detected at CHMI and SIS2 in northern Thailand, far from the epicenter, they seem to be decelerated. On the other hand, at SAMP and PHKT, close to the epicenter, where postseismic displacements also became smaller, but still may take a time to stop. An about 29 cm SW-ward motion was detected at PHKT from just after the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake to June 2007, which is larger than its coseismic displacement, about 26 cm. We have constructed 3D-FEM model to estimate how much viscoelastic relaxation affects postseismic displacements after the earthquake. We adopted a Maxwell viscoelastic body as well as Katagi et al. (2006), and modeled around the Andaman-Sea area using isoparametric hexahedral elements with 8 nodes (Zienkiewicz and Cheng, 1967). The Andaman-Sea is well known as a back arc basins, and its ocean floor is still spreading. Therefore, the mantle viscosity under the Sunda-plate may be smaller because of upwelling warm mantle. We are going to investigate and report the

  10. High precision Differential Earthquake Location in 3D models: Evidence for a rheological barrier controlling the microseismicity at the Irpinia fault zone in southern Apennines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Landro, Grazia; Amoroso, Ortensia; Alfredo Stabile, Tony; Matrullo, Emanuela; Lomax, Anthony; Zollo, Aldo

    2015-04-01

    A non-linear, global-search, probabilistic, double-difference earthquake location technique is illustrated. The main advantages of this method are the determination of comprehensive and complete solutions through the probability density function (PDF), the use of differential arrival-times as data, and the possibility to use a 3D velocity model both for absolute and relative locations, essential to obtain accurate differentials locations in structurally complex geological media. The joint use of this methodology and an accurate differential times data-set allowed us to carry out an high-resolution, earthquake location analysis, which helped to characterize the active fault geometries in the studied region. We investigated the recent micro-seismicity occurring at the Campanian-Lucanian Apennines, in the crustal volume embedding the fault system which generated the 1980, M 6.9 earthquake in Irpinia. In order to obtain highly accurate seismicity locations we applied the method to the P and S arrival time data set from 1312 events (M<3) that occurred from August 2005 to April 2011, and used the 3D P- and S-wave velocity models, optimized for the area under study. Both catalogue and cross-correlation first arrival-times have been used. The refined seismicity locations show that the events occur in a volume delimited by the faults activated during the 1980 Irpinia M 6.9 earthquake on sub-parallel, predominantly normal faults. Corresponding to a contact zone between different rheology rock formations (carbonate platform and basin residuals), we evidence an abrupt interruption of the seismicity across a SW-NE oriented structural discontinuity. This "barrier" appears to be located in the area bounded by the fault segments activated during the first (0 sec) and the second (20 sec) rupture episodes of the 80's Irpinia earthquake. We hypothesize that this geometrical barrier can have played a key role during the 1980 Irpinia event, and possibly controlled the delayed times of

  11. High-precision differential earthquake location in 3-D models: evidence for a rheological barrier controlling the microseismicity at the Irpinia fault zone in southern Apennines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Landro, Grazia; Amoroso, Ortensia; Stabile, Tony Alfredo; Matrullo, Emanuela; Lomax, Antony; Zollo, Aldo

    2015-12-01

    A non-linear, global-search, probabilistic, double-difference earthquake location technique is illustrated. The main advantages of this method are the determination of comprehensive and complete solutions through the probability density function (PDF), the use of differential arrival times as data and the possibility to use a 3-D velocity model both for absolute and double-difference locations, all of which help to obtain accurate differential locations in structurally complex geological media. The joint use of this methodology and an accurate differential time data set allowed us to carry out a high-resolution, earthquake location analysis, which helps to characterize the active fault geometries in the studied region. We investigated the recent microseismicity occurring at the Campanian-Lucanian Apennines in the crustal volume embedding the fault system that generated the 1980 MS 6.9 earthquake in Irpinia. In order to obtain highly accurate seismicity locations, we applied the method to the P and S arrival time data set from 1312 events (ML < 3.1) that occurred from August 2005 to April 2011 and used the 3-D P- and S-wave velocity models optimized for the area under study. Both manually refined and cross-correlation refined absolute arrival times have been used. The refined seismicity locations show that the events occur in a volume delimited by the faults activated during the 1980 MS 6.9 Irpinia earthquake on subparallel, predominantly normal faults. We find an abrupt interruption of the seismicity across an SW-NE oriented structural discontinuity corresponding to a contact zone between different rheology rock formations (carbonate platform and basin residuals). This `barrier' appears to be located in the area bounded by the fault segments activated during the first (0 s) and the second (18 s) rupture episodes of the 1980s Irpinia earthquake. We hypothesize that this geometrical barrier could have played a key role during the 1980 Irpinia event, and possibly

  12. A cut-&-paste strategy for the 3-D inversion of helicopter-borne electromagnetic data - II. Combining regional 1-D and local 3-D inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, A.; Scheunert, M.; Afanasjew, M.; Börner, R.-U.; Siemon, B.; Spitzer, K.

    2016-07-01

    As a standard procedure, multi-frequency helicopter-borne electromagnetic (HEM) data are inverted to conductivity-depth models using 1-D inversion methods, which may, however, fail in areas of strong lateral conductivity contrasts (so-called induction anomalies). Such areas require more realistic multi-dimensional modelling. Since the full 3-D inversion of an entire HEM data set is still extremely time consuming, our idea is to combine fast 1-D and accurate but numerically expensive 3-D inversion of HEM data in such a way that the full 3-D inversion is only carried out for those parts of a HEM survey which are affected by induction anomalies. For all other parts, a 1-D inversion method is sufficient. We present a newly developed algorithm for identification, selection, and extraction of induction anomalies in HEM data sets and show how the 3-D inversion model of the anomalous area is re-integrated into the quasi-1-D background. Our proposed method is demonstrated to work properly on a synthetic and a field HEM data set from the Cuxhaven tunnel valley in Germany. We show that our 1-D/3-D approach yields better results compared to 1-D inversions in areas where 3-D effects occur.

  13. 3D Dynamic Rupture Simulation Across a Complex Fault System: the Mw7.0, 2010, Haiti Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douilly, R.; Aochi, H.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquakes ruptures sometimes take place on a secondary fault and surprisingly do not activate an adjacent major one. The 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is a classic case where rupture occurred on a blind thrust while the adjacent San Andreas Fault was not triggered during the process. Similar to Loma Prieta, the Mw7.0, January 12 2010, Haiti earthquake also ruptured a secondary blind thrust, the Léogâne fault, adjacent to the main plate boundary, the Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault, which did not rupture during this event. Aftershock relocalizations delineate the Léogâne rupture with two north dipping segments with slightly different dip, where the easternmost segment had mostly dip-slip motion and the westernmost one had mostly strike-slip motion. In addition, an offshore south dipping structure inferred from the aftershocks to the west of the rupture zone coincides with the offshore Trois Baies reverse fault, a region of increase in Coulomb stress increase. In this study, we investigate the rupture dynamics of the Haiti earthquake in a complex fault system of multiple segments identified by the aftershock relocations. We suppose a background stress regime that is consistent with the type of motion of each fault and with the regional tectonic regime. We initiate a nucleation on the east segment of the Léogâne fault by defining a circular region with a 2 km radius where shear stress is slightly greater than the yield stress. By varying friction on faults and background stress, we find a range of plausible scenarios. In the absence of near-field seismic records of the event, we score the different models against the static deformation field derived from GPS and InSAR at the surface. All the plausible simulations show that the rupture propagates from the eastern to the western segment along the Léogâne fault, but not on the Enriquillo fault nor on the Trois Baies fault. The best-fit simulation shows a significant increase of shear stresses on the Trois Baies

  14. Upper-crust tomographic structure of the Central Apennines, Italy, from local earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesssandrini, Bruno; Filippi, Luisa; Borgia, Andrea

    2001-09-01

    We derived a three dimensional P and S waves velocity model of the first 9 km of crust in the Central Apennine from local earthquakes. The data set used for the tomographic inversion was recorded from three-component regional and local networks, which operated in the region from 1979 to 1998, and consists of 984 earthquakes. For these earthquakes we have at least eight phases, a gap smaller than 200°, and a total RMS residual smaller than 0.6 s, giving a total of 13190 P and 10257 S phases first arrivals. The inversion is performed using the SIMULPS12 code; this technique iterates the estimated velocity model parameters, defined at the nodes of a grid, relocating the earthquakes with an approximate 3-D ray tracing. A large positive P- and S-wave velocity anomaly is observed in correspondence to the main seismogenetic volume of the Central Apennines. A synthetic test demonstrates that this anomaly is not artificially produced by the substantially higher density of earthquakes within the seismic velocity anomaly. This anomaly corresponds to the carbonatic rocks that form the core of the fold-and-thrust Central Apennines belt. These rocks are underlain by ductile evaporite formations, which were justaposed during the tectonic evolution of the belt. We suggest that the evaporite layers effectively decouple the upper-crustal seismogenetic volume from the middle and lower crust. We conclude that the accumulation of seismic energy could be induced by gravitational tectonic processes, explaining the fact that most of the seismicity is confined above the evaporites.

  15. Local plate/rod descriptors of 3D trabecular bone micro-CT images from medial axis topologic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Peyrin, Francoise; Attali, Dominique; Chappard, Christine; Benhamou, Claude Laurent

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: Trabecular bone microarchitecture is made of a complex network of plate and rod structures evolving with age and disease. The purpose of this article is to propose a new 3D local analysis method for the quantitative assessment of parameters related to the geometry of trabecular bone microarchitecture. Methods: The method is based on the topologic classification of the medial axis of the 3D image into branches, rods, and plates. Thanks to the reversibility of the medial axis, the classification is next extended to the whole 3D image. Finally, the percentages of rods and plates as well as their mean thicknesses are calculated. The method was applied both to simulated test images and 3D micro-CT images of human trabecular bone. Results: The classification of simulated phantoms made of plates and rods shows that the maximum error in the quantitative percentages of plate and rods is less than 6% and smaller than with the structure model index (SMI). Micro-CT images of human femoral bone taken in osteoporosis and early or advanced osteoarthritis were analyzed. Despite the large physiological variability, the present method avoids the underestimation of rods observed with other local methods. The relative percentages of rods and plates were not significantly different between osteoarthritis and osteoporotic groups, whereas their absolute percentages were in relation to an increase of rod and plate thicknesses in advanced osteoarthritis with also higher relative and absolute number of nodes. Conclusions: The proposed method is model-independent, robust to surface irregularities, and enables geometrical characterization of not only skeletal structures but entire 3D images. Its application provided more accurate results than the standard SMI on simple simulated phantoms, but the discrepancy observed on the advanced osteoarthritis group raises questions that will require further investigations. The systematic use of such a local method in the characterization of

  16. Upper-crust Tomographic Structure of the Southern Korea Peninsula from Local Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Park, J. H.; Kang, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    We derived the three dimensional P wave velocity model for the uppermost 14 km of crust in the southern Korea peninsula using travel-time data from local earthquakes which are recorded by two nation-wide seismic networks operated by Korea Meteorological Administration and Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources. Earthquakes in the study occurred between 2001 and 2014. 19,935 P wave arrivals from 747 earthquakes observed by 184 seismic stations are selected for the 3-D tomographic inversion. In order to secure best possible data for tomography inversion, we applied a strict criteria during the selection of earthquakes and travel-times. The study area is parameterized by 10km×10km×4km grid for velocity inversion and 1km×1km×1km grid for travel time calculations. Checkerboard resolution test are used to demonstrate the ray coverage and the resolution for the given station-event configurations. The results indicate P-wave velocity model at shallow depths less than 2 km are not properly resolved mainly due to the insufficient ray coverage. The model at deeper depths greater than 14 km also suffered by lack of ray coverage. Thus, we limit our interpretations of the preliminary P wave velocity model to areas that are illuminated by enough rays. P wave velocity model indicates there are significant lateral velocity variations across the southern Korea peninsula. Most distinguished feature in the velocity model is the higher velocity anomaly beneath the southeastern Korea peninsula. The anomaly regions is distinguished by well-defined tectonic boundary. At 8 km depth, lower velocity anomaly is observed in Gyeonggi massif and high-mountain regions in the southern Korea peninsula. The 3-D velocity model is compared with geophysical and geological observations.

  17. Determination of focal mechanisms of intermediate-magnitude earthquakes in Mexico, based on Greens functions calculated for a 3D Earth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo Rodríguez Cardozo, Félix; Hjörleifsdóttir, Vala

    2015-04-01

    One important ingredient in the study of the complex active tectonics in Mexico is the analysis of earthquake focal mechanisms, or the seismic moment tensor. They can be determined trough the calculation of Green functions and subsequent inversion for moment-tensor parameters. However, this calculation is gets progressively more difficult as the magnitude of the earthquakes decreases. Large earthquakes excite waves of longer periods that interact weakly with laterally heterogeneities in the crust. For these earthquakes, using 1D velocity models to compute the Greens fucntions works well. The opposite occurs for smaller and intermediate sized events, where the relatively shorter periods excited interact strongly with lateral heterogeneities in the crust and upper mantle and requires more specific or regional 3D models. In this study, we calculate Greens functions for earthquakes in Mexico using a laterally heterogeneous seismic wave speed model, comprised of mantle model S362ANI (Kustowski et al 2008) and crustal model CRUST 2.0 (Bassin et al 1990). Subsequently, we invert the observed seismograms for the seismic moment tensor using a method developed by Liu et al (2004) an implemented by Óscar de La Vega (2014) for earthquakes in Mexico. By following a brute force approach, in which we include all observed Rayleigh and Love waves of the Mexican National Seismic Network (Servicio Sismológico Naciona, SSN), we obtain reliable focal mechanisms for events that excite a considerable amount of low frequency waves (Mw > 4.8). However, we are not able to consistently estimate focal mechanisms for smaller events using this method, due to high noise levels in many of the records. Excluding the noisy records, or noisy parts of the records manually, requires interactive edition of the data, using an efficient tool for the editing. Therefore, we developed a graphical user interface (GUI), based on python and the python library ObsPy, that allows the edition of observed and

  18. Lapse-time dependent coda-wave depth sensitivity to local velocity perturbations in 3-D heterogeneous elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Anne; Planès, Thomas; Hadziioannou, Céline; Campillo, Michel

    2016-07-01

    In the context of seismic monitoring, recent studies made successful use of seismic coda waves to locate medium changes on the horizontal plane. Locating the depth of the changes, however, remains a challenge. In this paper, we use 3-D wavefield simulations to address two problems: firstly, we evaluate the contribution of surface and body wave sensitivity to a change at depth. We introduce a thin layer with a perturbed velocity at different depths and measure the apparent relative velocity changes due to this layer at different times in the coda and for different degrees of heterogeneity of the model. We show that the depth sensitivity can be modelled as a linear combination of body- and surface-wave sensitivity. The lapse-time dependent sensitivity ratio of body waves and surface waves can be used to build 3-D sensitivity kernels for imaging purposes. Secondly, we compare the lapse-time behavior in the presence of a perturbation in horizontal and vertical slabs to address, for instance, the origin of the velocity changes detected after large earthquakes.

  19. 3D velocity structure of the outer forearc of the Colombia-Ecuador subduction zone; implications for the 1958 megathrust earthquake rupture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galve, A.; Charvis, P.; Garcia Cano, L.; Marcaillou, B.

    2013-12-01

    In 2005, we conducted an onshore-offshore 3D refraction and wide-angle reflection seismic experiment over the rupture zone of the 1958 subduction earthquake that occurred near the border between Colombia and Ecuador. This earthquake was part of a sequence of 3 large ruptures (1942, Mw=7.8; 1958, Mw=7.7; 1979, Mw=8.2), which successively broke from south to north the segments of the megathrust that had been ruptured in 1906 by a single, very large magnitude (8.8) earthquake. Using first arrival traveltime inversion, we constructed a well-defined Vp velocity model of the plate boundary and of the upper and lower plates, down to 25 km depth. The model reveals a 5-km thick, low velocity zone in the upper plate, located immediately above the interplate contact. Because similar low-velocity zones are commonly observed along margins made of oceanic or island-arc accreted terranes, we suggest that the low-velocity zone might result from the alteration and hydration of mafic and ultramafic rocks in the upper plate basement, rather than from hydrofracturing alone. Sediments underplated beneath the inner wedge might contribute to the low-velocity zone but it is unlikely that they are several kilometers thick. Nevertheless, fluids expelled by the compaction and dehydration of those underplated sediments possibly favor the alteration of the overlying rocks. The low-velocity zone is spatially coincident with the 1958 rupture area. Near the toe of the margin, the model shows a low velocity gradient in the outer wedge that we interpret as a zone of highly faulted and fractured rocks or of poorly consolidated sediments. This low velocity/low gradient region forms the oceanward limit of the rupture zones of both the 1958 and the 1979 earthquakes. We suggest that the two earthquake ruptures were arrested by the low velocity zone because its low rigidity contributed to dissipate most of the seismic energy and of the coseismic strain/stress. This might be the reason why the 1958

  20. Optical Coherence Tomography Noise Reduction Using Anisotropic Local Bivariate Gaussian Mixture Prior in 3D Complex Wavelet Domain

    PubMed Central

    Sonka, Milan; Abramoff, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, MMSE estimator is employed for noise-free 3D OCT data recovery in 3D complex wavelet domain. Since the proposed distribution for noise-free data plays a key role in the performance of MMSE estimator, a priori distribution for the pdf of noise-free 3D complex wavelet coefficients is proposed which is able to model the main statistical properties of wavelets. We model the coefficients with a mixture of two bivariate Gaussian pdfs with local parameters which are able to capture the heavy-tailed property and inter- and intrascale dependencies of coefficients. In addition, based on the special structure of OCT images, we use an anisotropic windowing procedure for local parameters estimation that results in visual quality improvement. On this base, several OCT despeckling algorithms are obtained based on using Gaussian/two-sided Rayleigh noise distribution and homomorphic/nonhomomorphic model. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm, we use 156 selected ROIs from 650 × 512 × 128 OCT dataset in the presence of wet AMD pathology. Our simulations show that the best MMSE estimator using local bivariate mixture prior is for the nonhomomorphic model in the presence of Gaussian noise which results in an improvement of 7.8 ± 1.7 in CNR. PMID:24222760

  1. Three-dimensional (3D) coseismic deformation map produced by the 2014 South Napa Earthquake estimated and modeled by SAR and GPS data integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polcari, Marco; Albano, Matteo; Fernández, José; Palano, Mimmo; Samsonov, Sergey; Stramondo, Salvatore; Zerbini, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    In this work we present a 3D map of coseismic displacements due to the 2014 Mw 6.0 South Napa earthquake, California, obtained by integrating displacement information data from SAR Interferometry (InSAR), Multiple Aperture Interferometry (MAI), Pixel Offset Tracking (POT) and GPS data acquired by both permanent stations and campaigns sites. This seismic event produced significant surface deformation along the 3D components causing several damages to vineyards, roads and houses. The remote sensing results, i.e. InSAR, MAI and POT, were obtained from the pair of SAR images provided by the Sentinel-1 satellite, launched on April 3rd, 2014. They were acquired on August 7th and 31st along descending orbits with an incidence angle of about 23°. The GPS dataset includes measurements from 32 stations belonging to the Bay Area Regional Deformation Network (BARDN), 301 continuous stations available from the UNAVCO and the CDDIS archives, and 13 additional campaign sites from Barnhart et al, 2014 [1]. These data constrain the horizontal and vertical displacement components proving to be helpful for the adopted integration method. We exploit the Bayes theory to search for the 3D coseismic displacement components. In particular, for each point, we construct an energy function and solve the problem to find a global minimum. Experimental results are consistent with a strike-slip fault mechanism with an approximately NW-SE fault plane. Indeed, the 3D displacement map shows a strong North-South (NS) component, peaking at about 15 cm, a few kilometers far from the epicenter. The East-West (EW) displacement component reaches its maximum (~10 cm) south of the city of Napa, whereas the vertical one (UP) is smaller, although a subsidence in the order of 8 cm on the east side of the fault can be observed. A source modelling was performed by inverting the estimated displacement components. The best fitting model is given by a ~N330° E-oriented and ~70° dipping fault with a prevailing

  2. Rupture Processes of the Mw8.3 Sea of Okhotsk Earthquake and Aftershock Sequences from 3-D Back Projection Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, P. R.; Hung, S. H.; Meng, L.

    2014-12-01

    On May 24, 2013, the largest deep earthquake ever recorded in history occurred on the southern tip of the Kamchatka Island, where the Pacific Plate subducts underneath the Okhotsk Plate. Previous 2D beamforming back projection (BP) of P- coda waves suggests the mainshock ruptured bilaterally along a horizontal fault plane determined by the global centroid moment tensor solution. On the other hand, the multiple point source inversion of P and SH waveforms argued that the earthquake comprises a sequence of 6 subevents not located on a single plane but actually distributed in a zone that extends 64 km horizontally and 35 km in depth. We then apply a three-dimensional MUSIC BP approach to resolve the rupture processes of the manishock and two large aftershocks (M6.7) with no a priori setup of preferential orientations of the planar rupture. The maximum pseudo-spectrum of high-frequency P wave in a sequence of time windows recorded by the densely-distributed stations from US and EU Array are used to image 3-D temporal and spatial rupture distribution. The resulting image confirms that the nearly N-S striking but two antiparallel rupture stages. The first subhorizontal rupture initially propagates toward the NNE direction, while at 18 s later it directs reversely to the SSW and concurrently shifts downward to 35 km deeper lasting for about 20 s. The rupture lengths in the first NNE-ward and second SSW-ward stage are about 30 km and 85 km; the estimated rupture velocities are 3 km/s and 4.25 km/s, respectively. Synthetic experiments are undertaken to assess the capability of the 3D MUSIC BP for the recovery of spatio-temporal rupture processes. Besides, high frequency BP images based on the EU-Array data show two M6.7 aftershocks are more likely to rupture on the vertical fault planes.

  3. Connecting Global Measures of 3D Magnetic Reconnection to Local Kinetic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Daughton, William Scott

    2015-07-16

    After giving the motivation for the work, slides present the topic under the following headings: Description of LAPD experiment; Actual simulation setup; Simple kinetic theory of ined-tied tearing; Diagnostics to characterizing 3D reconnection; Example #1 - short-tied system; and Example #2 - long line-tied system. Colorful simulations are shown for quasipotential vs field line exponentiation, field line integrated Ohms Law, and correlation with agyrotopy & energy conversion for example #1; and evolution of current density for largest case, field exponentiation vs quasi-potential, and time evolution of magnetic field lines for example #2. To satisfy line-tied boundary conditions, there is need for superposition of oblique modes--the simple two-mode approximation works surprisingly well. For force-free layers with bg >1, the fastest growing periodic modes are oblique with kxλ ~0.5. This implies a minimum length of Ly > 2πλbg. There are strong correlations between σ → Ξ → A0e (observable with spacecraft). Electron pressure tensor is the dominant non-ideal term.

  4. High-content 3D multicolor super-resolution localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Pedro M; Almada, Pedro; Henriques, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Super-resolution (SR) methodologies permit the visualization of cellular structures at near-molecular scale (1-30 nm), enabling novel mechanistic analysis of key events in cell biology not resolvable by conventional fluorescence imaging (∼300-nm resolution). When this level of detail is combined with computing power and fast and reliable analysis software, high-content screenings using SR becomes a practical option to address multiple biological questions. The importance of combining these powerful analytical techniques cannot be ignored, as they can address phenotypic changes on the molecular scale and in a statistically robust manner. In this work, we suggest an easy-to-implement protocol that can be applied to set up a high-content 3D SR experiment with user-friendly and freely available software. The protocol can be divided into two main parts: chamber and sample preparation, where a protocol to set up a direct STORM (dSTORM) sample is presented; and a second part where a protocol for image acquisition and analysis is described. We intend to take the reader step-by-step through the experimental process highlighting possible experimental bottlenecks and possible improvements based on recent developments in the field. PMID:25640426

  5. 3D source localization of interictal spikes in epilepsy patients with MRI lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lei; Worrell, Gregory A.; Lagerlund, Terrence D.; He, Bin

    2006-08-01

    The present study aims to accurately localize epileptogenic regions which are responsible for epileptic activities in epilepsy patients by means of a new subspace source localization approach, i.e. first principle vectors (FINE), using scalp EEG recordings. Computer simulations were first performed to assess source localization accuracy of FINE in the clinical electrode set-up. The source localization results from FINE were compared with the results from a classic subspace source localization approach, i.e. MUSIC, and their differences were tested statistically using the paired t-test. Other factors influencing the source localization accuracy were assessed statistically by ANOVA. The interictal epileptiform spike data from three adult epilepsy patients with medically intractable partial epilepsy and well-defined symptomatic MRI lesions were then studied using both FINE and MUSIC. The comparison between the electrical sources estimated by the subspace source localization approaches and MRI lesions was made through the coregistration between the EEG recordings and MRI scans. The accuracy of estimations made by FINE and MUSIC was also evaluated and compared by R2 statistic, which was used to indicate the goodness-of-fit of the estimated sources to the scalp EEG recordings. The three-concentric-spheres head volume conductor model was built for each patient with three spheres of different radii which takes the individual head size and skull thickness into consideration. The results from computer simulations indicate that the improvement of source spatial resolvability and localization accuracy of FINE as compared with MUSIC is significant when simulated sources are closely spaced, deep, or signal-to-noise ratio is low in a clinical electrode set-up. The interictal electrical generators estimated by FINE and MUSIC are in concordance with the patients' structural abnormality, i.e. MRI lesions, in all three patients. The higher R2 values achieved by FINE than MUSIC

  6. Automatic organ localizations on 3D CT images by using majority-voting of multiple 2D detections based on local binary patterns and Haar-like features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Yamaguchi, Shoutarou; Zhou, Xinxin; Chen, Huayue; Hara, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes an approach to accomplish the fast and automatic localization of the different inner organ regions on 3D CT scans. The proposed approach combines object detections and the majority voting technique to achieve the robust and quick organ localization. The basic idea of proposed method is to detect a number of 2D partial appearances of a 3D target region on CT images from multiple body directions, on multiple image scales, by using multiple feature spaces, and vote all the 2D detecting results back to the 3D image space to statistically decide one 3D bounding rectangle of the target organ. Ensemble learning was used to train the multiple 2D detectors based on template matching on local binary patterns and Haar-like feature spaces. A collaborative voting was used to decide the corner coordinates of the 3D bounding rectangle of the target organ region based on the coordinate histograms from detection results in three body directions. Since the architecture of the proposed method (multiple independent detections connected to a majority voting) naturally fits the parallel computing paradigm and multi-core CPU hardware, the proposed algorithm was easy to achieve a high computational efficiently for the organ localizations on a whole body CT scan by using general-purpose computers. We applied this approach to localization of 12 kinds of major organ regions independently on 1,300 torso CT scans. In our experiments, we randomly selected 300 CT scans (with human indicated organ and tissue locations) for training, and then, applied the proposed approach with the training results to localize each of the target regions on the other 1,000 CT scans for the performance testing. The experimental results showed the possibility of the proposed approach to automatically locate different kinds of organs on the whole body CT scans.

  7. Seismically Inferred Rupture Process of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake by Using Data-Validated 3D and 2.5D Green's Tensor Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, T.; Takenaka, H.; Hara, T.; Nakamura, T.; Aoki, T.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze "seismic" rupture process of the March 11, 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (GCMT Mw9.1) by using a non-linear multi-time-window waveform inversion method. We incorporate the effect of the near-source laterally heterogeneous structure on the synthetic Green's tensor waveforms; otherwise the analysis may result in erroneous solutions [1]. To increase the resolution we use teleseismic and strong-motion seismograms jointly because the one-sided distribution of strong-motion station may cause reduced resolution near the trench axis [2]. We use a 2.5D FDM [3] for teleseismic P-waves and a full 3D FDM that incorporates topography, oceanic water layer, 3D heterogeneity and attenuation for strong-motions [4]. We apply multi-GPU acceleration by using the TSUBAME supercomputer in Tokyo Institute of Technology [5]. We "validated" the Green's tensor waveforms with a point-source moment tensor inversion analysis for a small (Mw5.8) shallow event: we confirm the observed waveforms are reproduced well with the synthetics.The inferred slip distribution using the 2.5D and 3D Green's functions has large slips (max. 37 m) near the hypocenter and small slips near the trench (figure). Also an isolated slip region is identified close to Fukushima prefecture. These features are similar to those obtained by our preliminary study [4]. The land-ward large slips and trench-ward small slips have also been reported by [2]. It is remarkable that we confirmed these features by using data-validated Green's functions. On the other hand very large slips are inferred close to the trench when we apply "1D" Green's functions that do not incorporate the lateral heterogeneity. Our result suggests the trench-ward large deformation that caused large tsunamis did not radiate strong seismic waves. Very slow slips (e.g., the tsunami earthquake), delayed slips and anelastic deformation are among the candidates of the physical processes of the deformation.[1] Okamoto and Takenaka, EPS, 61, e17-e20, 2009

  8. Applicability of 3D Monte Carlo simulations for local values calculations in a PWR core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Franck; Cochet, Bertrand; Jinaphanh, Alexis; Jacquet, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    As technical support of the French Nuclear Safety Authority, IRSN has been developing the MORET Monte Carlo code for many years in the framework of criticality safety assessment and is now working to extend its application to reactor physics. For that purpose, beside the validation for criticality safety (more than 2000 benchmarks from the ICSBEP Handbook have been modeled and analyzed), a complementary validation phase for reactor physics has been started, with benchmarks from IRPHEP Handbook and others. In particular, to evaluate the applicability of MORET and other Monte Carlo codes for local flux or power density calculations in large power reactors, it has been decided to contribute to the "Monte Carlo Performance Benchmark" (hosted by OECD/NEA). The aim of this benchmark is to monitor, in forthcoming decades, the performance progress of detailed Monte Carlo full core calculations. More precisely, it measures their advancement towards achieving high statistical accuracy in reasonable computation time for local power at fuel pellet level. A full PWR reactor core is modeled to compute local power densities for more than 6 million fuel regions. This paper presents results obtained at IRSN for this benchmark with MORET and comparisons with MCNP. The number of fuel elements is so large that source convergence as well as statistical convergence issues could cause large errors in local tallies, especially in peripheral zones. Various sampling or tracking methods have been implemented in MORET, and their operational effects on such a complex case have been studied. Beyond convergence issues, to compute local values in so many fuel regions could cause prohibitive slowing down of neutron tracking. To avoid this, energy grid unification and tallies preparation before tracking have been implemented, tested and proved to be successful. In this particular case, IRSN obtained promising results with MORET compared to MCNP, in terms of local power densities, standard

  9. Global localization of 3D anatomical structures by pre-filtered Hough forests and discrete optimization.

    PubMed

    Donner, René; Menze, Bjoern H; Bischof, Horst; Langs, Georg

    2013-12-01

    The accurate localization of anatomical landmarks is a challenging task, often solved by domain specific approaches. We propose a method for the automatic localization of landmarks in complex, repetitive anatomical structures. The key idea is to combine three steps: (1) a classifier for pre-filtering anatomical landmark positions that (2) are refined through a Hough regression model, together with (3) a parts-based model of the global landmark topology to select the final landmark positions. During training landmarks are annotated in a set of example volumes. A classifier learns local landmark appearance, and Hough regressors are trained to aggregate neighborhood information to a precise landmark coordinate position. A non-parametric geometric model encodes the spatial relationships between the landmarks and derives a topology which connects mutually predictive landmarks. During the global search we classify all voxels in the query volume, and perform regression-based agglomeration of landmark probabilities to highly accurate and specific candidate points at potential landmark locations. We encode the candidates' weights together with the conformity of the connecting edges to the learnt geometric model in a Markov Random Field (MRF). By solving the corresponding discrete optimization problem, the most probable location for each model landmark is found in the query volume. We show that this approach is able to consistently localize the model landmarks despite the complex and repetitive character of the anatomical structures on three challenging data sets (hand radiographs, hand CTs, and whole body CTs), with a median localization error of 0.80 mm, 1.19 mm and 2.71 mm, respectively. PMID:23664450

  10. 3D P-Wave Velocity Structure of the Crust and Relocation of Earthquakes in 21 the Lushan Source Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.; Wang, X.; Zhang, W.

    2014-12-01

    The double difference seismic tomography method is applied to the absolute first arrival P wave arrival times and high quality relative P arrival times of the Lushan seismic sequence to determine the detailed crustal 3D P wave velocity structure and the hypocenter parameters in the Lushan seismic area. The results show that the Lushan mainshock locates at 30.28 N, 103.98 E, with the depth of 16.38 km. The leading edge of aftershock in the northeast of mainshock present a spade with a steep dip angle, the aftershocks' extended length is about 12 km. In the southwest of the Lushan mainshock, the leading edge of aftershock in low velocity zone slope gently, the aftershocks' extended length is about 23 km. The P wave velocity structure of the Lushan seismic area shows obviously lateral heterogeneity. The P wave velocity anomalies represent close relationship with topographic relief and geological structure. In Baoxing area the complex rocks correspond obvious high-velocity anomalies extending down to 15 km depth,while the Cenozoic rocks are correlated with low-velocity anomalies. Our high-resolution tomographic model not only displays the general features contained in the previous models, but also reveals some new features. An obvious high-velocity anomaly is visible in Daxing area. The high-velocity anomalies beneath Baoxing and Daxing connect each other in 10 km depth, which makes the contrast between high and low velocity anomalies more sharp. Above 20 km depth the velocity structure in southwest and northeast segment of the mainshock shows a big difference: low-velocity anomalies are dominated the southwest segment, while high-velocity anomalies rule the northeast segment. The Lushan mainshock locates at the leading edge of a low-velocity anomaly surrounded by the Baoxing and Daxing high-velocity anomalies. The Lushan aftershocks in southwest are distributed in low-velocity anomalies or the transition belt: the footwall represents low-velocity anomalies, while

  11. 3D growth rates from tomographic images: local measurements for a better understanding of snow metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flin, F.; Calonne, N.; Denis, R.; Caneill, R.; Bernard, L.; Anne, D.; Philip, A.; Roulle, J.; Rolland du Roscoat, S.; Geindreau, C.

    2015-12-01

    Once deposited on the ground, snow forms a complex porous material whose microstructure constantly transforms over time. These evolutions, which strongly impact the physical and mechanical properties of snow (e.g. Srivastava et al, 2010; Calonne et al, 2014) need to be considered in details for an accurate snowpack modeling. However, some of the physical mechanisms involved in metamorphism are still poorly understood.To address this problem, several investigations combining X-ray tomography and 3D micro-modeling have been carried out (e.g. Flin et al, 2003; Kämpfer and Plapp, 2009; Pinzer et al, 2012) but precise comparisons between experimentation and modeling remain difficult. One of the difficulties comes from the lack of high resolution time-lapse series for experiments occurring with very well-defined boundary conditions, and from which precise measurements of the interfacial growth rates can be done.Thanks to a recently developed cryogenic cell (Calonne et al, 2015), we conducted in situ time-lapse tomographic experiments on several snow and ice samples under various conditions (isothermal metamorphism at -7°C, temperature gradient metamorphism at -2°C under a TG of 18 K/m, air cavity migration in a single crystal at -4°C under a TG of 50 K/m). The non-destructive nature of X-ray microtomography yielded series of 8 micron resolution images that were acquired with a 2 to 12 h time step. An image analysis method was then developed to estimate the normal growth rates on each point of the ice-air interface and applied to the series obtained.The analysis of the results and their comparison to those of existing models (e.g. Flin et al, 2003; Flin and Brzoska, 2008) give interesting outlooks for the understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in snow metamorphism. References:Calonne, N., et al (2015), Geophys. Res. Lett., 42, 3911-3918.Calonne, N., et al (2014), The Cryosphere, 8, 2255-2274.Flin, F. and J.-B. Brzoska (2008), Ann. Glaciol., 49, 17-21.Flin

  12. Assessing a novel approach for predicting local 3D protein structures from sequence.

    PubMed

    Benros, Cristina; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Etchebest, Catherine; Hazout, Serge

    2006-03-01

    We developed a novel approach for predicting local protein structure from sequence. It relies on the Hybrid Protein Model (HPM), an unsupervised clustering method we previously developed. This model learns three-dimensional protein fragments encoded into a structural alphabet of 16 protein blocks (PBs). Here, we focused on 11-residue fragments encoded as a series of seven PBs and used HPM to cluster them according to their local similarities. We thus built a library of 120 overlapping prototypes (mean fragments from each cluster), with good three-dimensional local approximation, i.e., a mean accuracy of 1.61 A Calpha root-mean-square distance. Our prediction method is intended to optimize the exploitation of the sequence-structure relations deduced from this library of long protein fragments. This was achieved by setting up a system of 120 experts, each defined by logistic regression to optimize the discrimination from sequence of a given prototype relative to the others. For a target sequence window, the experts computed probabilities of sequence-structure compatibility for the prototypes and ranked them, proposing the top scorers as structural candidates. Predictions were defined as successful when a prototype <2.5 A from the true local structure was found among those proposed. Our strategy yielded a prediction rate of 51.2% for an average of 4.2 candidates per sequence window. We also proposed a confidence index to estimate prediction quality. Our approach predicts from sequence alone and will thus provide valuable information for proteins without structural homologs. Candidates will also contribute to global structure prediction by fragment assembly. PMID:16385557

  13. Decoding 3-D Reach and Grasp Kinematics from High-Frequency Local Field Potentials in Primate Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jun; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos; Donoghue, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Intracortical microelectrode array recordings generate a variety of neural signals with potential application as control signals in neural interface systems. Previous studies have focused on single and multiunit activity, as well as low frequency local field potentials (LFPs), but have not explored higher frequency (>200 Hz) LFPs. In addition, the potential to decode three dimensional (3-D) reach and grasp kinematics based on LFPs has not been demonstrated. Here, we use mutual information and decoding analyses to probe the information content about 3-D reaching and grasping of 7 different LFP frequency bands in the range of 0.3 Hz – 400 Hz. LFPs were recorded via 96-microelectrode arrays in primary motor cortex (M1) of two monkeys performing free reaching to grasp moving objects. Mutual information analyses revealed that higher frequency bands (e.g. 100 – 200 Hz and 200 – 400 Hz) carried the most information about the examined kinematics. Furthermore, Kalman filter decoding revealed that broadband high frequency LFPs, likely reflecting multiunit activity, provided the best decoding performance as well as substantial accuracy in reconstructing reach kinematics, grasp aperture and aperture velocity. These results indicate that LFPs, especially high frequency bands, could be useful signals for neural interfaces controlling 3-D reach and grasp kinematics. PMID:20403782

  14. Mechanical Simulation of the Localized Deformation in the Aluminum Foams: A Three-dimensional (3D) Structure Based Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Zhu; Enyu, Guo; Wenqian, Zhou; Sansan, Shuai; Tao, Jing; Hongliang, Hou; Yanjin, Xu

    2015-06-01

    Metal-foam materials have been used increasingly in industry for their low-density, high-toughness and high impact resistance properties. Understanding the macro-scale mechanical properties of these materials is essential to evaluate their actual performance and thus to optimize the structures and properties accordingly. Synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomographytechnique is a promising method to study 3D structures at small length scales, which provides high spatial resolution and allows the researchers to observe the change of structures/features in situ without destroying the original objects. In this work, the real 3D structure of closed-cell aluminum foam was obtained by using synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography. The reconstructed 3D model of the foam was further utilized as input for the subsequent mechanical study to investigate the localized deformation behaviors and evolution process of the foam under longitudinal quasi-static uniaxial compressive loading. By analyzing the simulated results, it is demonstrated that the deformation bands always initiate and propagate along the cell walls which are finally folded upon loading. And the large spherical cells are more susceptible to yielding, as well as to the stress concentration than the cells with other shapes. This finding is consistent with the experimental results.

  15. Utility of 3D SPACE T2-weighted volumetric sequence in the localization of spinal dural arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Kannath, Santhosh Kumar; Alampath, Praveen; Enakshy Rajan, Jayadevan; Thomas, Bejoy; Sankara Sarma, P; Tirur Raman, Kapilamoorthy

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of a heavily T2-weighted volumetric MRI sequence (3D sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip-angle evolutions [SPACE]) in the feeder localization of spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF). METHODS Patients who were diagnosed with SDAVF and who had 3D SPACE source images available for review were identified from a retrospective review of medical records. A total of 16 patients were identified, and MR images were analyzed separately by 2 blinded observers. The accuracy of the observation and interobserver agreement were measured by Kendall's tau and kappa statistics. RESULTS The site of fistula was accurately predicted by Observers 1 and 2 in 81% and 88% of cases, respectively, which improved to 94% when the level was considered within 1 vertebral level. The observer agreement with gold-standard angiography and interobserver agreement were found to be highly significant (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS The 3D SPACE MRI sequence is valuable in the precise detection of the site of SDAVF. It may help to tailor digital subtraction angiography and thereby reduce the radiation exposure, contrast load, and study time. PMID:26943253

  16. New 3D parallel GILD electromagnetic modeling and nonlinear inversion using global magnetic integral and local differential equation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, G.; Li, J.; Majer, E.; Zuo, D.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes a new 3D parallel GILD electromagnetic (EM) modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm. The algorithm consists of: (a) a new magnetic integral equation instead of the electric integral equation to solve the electromagnetic forward modeling and inverse problem; (b) a collocation finite element method for solving the magnetic integral and a Galerkin finite element method for the magnetic differential equations; (c) a nonlinear regularizing optimization method to make the inversion stable and of high resolution; and (d) a new parallel 3D modeling and inversion using a global integral and local differential domain decomposition technique (GILD). The new 3D nonlinear electromagnetic inversion has been tested with synthetic data and field data. The authors obtained very good imaging for the synthetic data and reasonable subsurface EM imaging for the field data. The parallel algorithm has high parallel efficiency over 90% and can be a parallel solver for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic modeling and inversion. The parallel GILD algorithm can be extended to develop a high resolution and large scale seismic and hydrology modeling and inversion in the massively parallel computer.

  17. Robust 3D object localization and pose estimation for random bin picking with the 3DMaMa algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skotheim, Øystein; Thielemann, Jens T.; Berge, Asbjørn; Sommerfelt, Arne

    2010-02-01

    Enabling robots to automatically locate and pick up randomly placed and oriented objects from a bin is an important challenge in factory automation, replacing tedious and heavy manual labor. A system should be able to recognize and locate objects with a predefined shape and estimate the position with the precision necessary for a gripping robot to pick it up. We describe a system that consists of a structured light instrument for capturing 3D data and a robust approach for object location and pose estimation. The method does not depend on segmentation of range images, but instead searches through pairs of 2D manifolds to localize candidates for object match. This leads to an algorithm that is not very sensitive to scene complexity or the number of objects in the scene. Furthermore, the strategy for candidate search is easily reconfigurable to arbitrary objects. Experiments reported in this paper show the utility of the method on a general random bin picking problem, in this paper exemplified by localization of car parts with random position and orientation. Full pose estimation is done in less than 380 ms per image. We believe that the method is applicable for a wide range of industrial automation problems where precise localization of 3D objects in a scene is needed.

  18. STRUCTURE IN THE 3D GALAXY DISTRIBUTION. II. VOIDS AND WATERSHEDS OF LOCAL MAXIMA AND MINIMA

    SciTech Connect

    Way, M. J.; Gazis, P. R.; Scargle, Jeffrey D. E-mail: PGazis@sbcglobal.net

    2015-01-20

    The major uncertainties in studies of the multi-scale structure of the universe arise not from observational errors but from the variety of legitimate definitions and detection methods for individual structures. To facilitate the study of these methodological dependencies, we have carried out 12 different analyses defining structures in various ways. This has been done in a purely geometrical way by utilizing the HOP algorithm as a unique parameter-free method of assigning groups of galaxies to local density maxima or minima. From three density estimation techniques (smoothing kernels, Bayesian blocks, and self-organizing maps) applied to three data sets (the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, the Millennium simulation, and randomly distributed points) we tabulate information that can be used to construct catalogs of structures connected to local density maxima and minima. We also introduce a void finder that utilizes a method to assemble Delaunay tetrahedra into connected structures and characterizes regions empty of galaxies in the source catalog.

  19. Nonrigid motion correction in 3D using autofocusing with localized linear translations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Joseph Y; Alley, Marcus T; Cunningham, Charles H; Vasanawala, Shreyas S; Pauly, John M; Lustig, Michael

    2012-12-01

    MR scans are sensitive to motion effects due to the scan duration. To properly suppress artifacts from nonrigid body motion, complex models with elements such as translation, rotation, shear, and scaling have been incorporated into the reconstruction pipeline. However, these techniques are computationally intensive and difficult to implement for online reconstruction. On a sufficiently small spatial scale, the different types of motion can be well approximated as simple linear translations. This formulation allows for a practical autofocusing algorithm that locally minimizes a given motion metric--more specifically, the proposed localized gradient-entropy metric. To reduce the vast search space for an optimal solution, possible motion paths are limited to the motion measured from multichannel navigator data. The novel navigation strategy is based on the so-called "Butterfly" navigators, which are modifications of the spin-warp sequence that provides intrinsic translational motion information with negligible overhead. With a 32-channel abdominal coil, sufficient number of motion measurements were found to approximate possible linear motion paths for every image voxel. The correction scheme was applied to free-breathing abdominal patient studies. In these scans, a reduction in artifacts from complex, nonrigid motion was observed. PMID:22307933

  20. Action Enhances Acoustic Cues for 3-D Target Localization by Echolocating Bats.

    PubMed

    Wohlgemuth, Melville J; Kothari, Ninad B; Moss, Cynthia F

    2016-09-01

    Under natural conditions, animals encounter a barrage of sensory information from which they must select and interpret biologically relevant signals. Active sensing can facilitate this process by engaging motor systems in the sampling of sensory information. The echolocating bat serves as an excellent model to investigate the coupling between action and sensing because it adaptively controls both the acoustic signals used to probe the environment and movements to receive echoes at the auditory periphery. We report here that the echolocating bat controls the features of its sonar vocalizations in tandem with the positioning of the outer ears to maximize acoustic cues for target detection and localization. The bat's adaptive control of sonar vocalizations and ear positioning occurs on a millisecond timescale to capture spatial information from arriving echoes, as well as on a longer timescale to track target movement. Our results demonstrate that purposeful control over sonar sound production and reception can serve to improve acoustic cues for localization tasks. This finding also highlights the general importance of movement to sensory processing across animal species. Finally, our discoveries point to important parallels between spatial perception by echolocation and vision. PMID:27608186

  1. Tools to Perform Local Dense 3D Reconstruction of Shallow Water Seabed.

    PubMed

    Avanthey, Loïca; Beaudoin, Laurent; Gademer, Antoine; Roux, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Tasks such as distinguishing or identifying individual objects of interest require the production of dense local clouds at the scale of these individual objects of interest. Due to the physical and dynamic properties of an underwater environment, the usual dense matching algorithms must be rethought in order to be adaptive. These properties also imply that the scene must be observed at close range. Classic robotized acquisition systems are oversized for local studies in shallow water while the systematic acquisition of data is not guaranteed with divers. We address these two major issues through a multidisciplinary approach. To efficiently acquire on-demand stereoscopic pairs using simple logistics in small areas of shallow water, we devised an agile light-weight dedicated system which is easy to reproduce. To densely match two views in a reliable way, we devised a reconstruction algorithm that automatically accounts for the dynamics, variability and light absorption of the underwater environment. Field experiments in the Mediterranean Sea were used to assess the results. PMID:27196913

  2. "SP-G", a putative new surfactant protein--tissue localization and 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Felix; Schicht, Martin; Paulsen, Friedrich; Ngueya, Ivan; Bräuer, Lars; Brandt, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP) are well known from human lung. These proteins assist the formation of a monolayer of surface-active phospholipids at the liquid-air interface of the alveolar lining, play a major role in lowering the surface tension of interfaces, and have functions in innate and adaptive immune defense. During recent years it became obvious that SPs are also part of other tissues and fluids such as tear fluid, gingiva, saliva, the nasolacrimal system, and kidney. Recently, a putative new surfactant protein (SFTA2 or SP-G) was identified, which has no sequence or structural identity to the already know surfactant proteins. In this work, computational chemistry and molecular-biological methods were combined to localize and characterize SP-G. With the help of a protein structure model, specific antibodies were obtained which allowed the detection of SP-G not only on mRNA but also on protein level. The localization of this protein in different human tissues, sequence based prediction tools for posttranslational modifications and molecular dynamic simulations reveal that SP-G has physicochemical properties similar to the already known surfactant proteins B and C. This includes also the possibility of interactions with lipid systems and with that, a potential surface-regulatory feature of SP-G. In conclusion, the results indicate SP-G as a new surfactant protein which represents an until now unknown surfactant protein class. PMID:23094088

  3. Tools to Perform Local Dense 3D Reconstruction of Shallow Water Seabed ‡

    PubMed Central

    Avanthey, Loïca; Beaudoin, Laurent; Gademer, Antoine; Roux, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Tasks such as distinguishing or identifying individual objects of interest require the production of dense local clouds at the scale of these individual objects of interest. Due to the physical and dynamic properties of an underwater environment, the usual dense matching algorithms must be rethought in order to be adaptive. These properties also imply that the scene must be observed at close range. Classic robotized acquisition systems are oversized for local studies in shallow water while the systematic acquisition of data is not guaranteed with divers. We address these two major issues through a multidisciplinary approach. To efficiently acquire on-demand stereoscopic pairs using simple logistics in small areas of shallow water, we devised an agile light-weight dedicated system which is easy to reproduce. To densely match two views in a reliable way, we devised a reconstruction algorithm that automatically accounts for the dynamics, variability and light absorption of the underwater environment. Field experiments in the Mediterranean Sea were used to assess the results. PMID:27196913

  4. A novel method of target recognition based on 3D-color-space locally adaptive regression kernels model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiaqi; Han, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lianfa

    2015-10-01

    Locally adaptive regression kernels model can describe the edge shape of images accurately and graphic trend of images integrally, but it did not consider images' color information while the color is an important element of an image. Therefore, we present a novel method of target recognition based on 3-D-color-space locally adaptive regression kernels model. Different from the general additional color information, this method directly calculate the local similarity features of 3-D data from the color image. The proposed method uses a few examples of an object as a query to detect generic objects with incompact, complex and changeable shapes. Our method involves three phases: First, calculating the novel color-space descriptors from the RGB color space of query image which measure the likeness of a voxel to its surroundings. Salient features which include spatial- dimensional and color -dimensional information are extracted from said descriptors, and simplifying them to construct a non-similar local structure feature set of the object class by principal components analysis (PCA). Second, we compare the salient features with analogous features from the target image. This comparison is done using a matrix generalization of the cosine similarity measure. Then the similar structures in the target image are obtained using local similarity structure statistical matching. Finally, we use the method of non-maxima suppression in the similarity image to extract the object position and mark the object in the test image. Experimental results demonstrate that our approach is effective and accurate in improving the ability to identify targets.

  5. A high-resolution 3D seismic velocity model of the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake rupture zone using land & OBS networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. P.; Rietbrock, A.; Ryder, I. M.; Miller, M.; Lee, C.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of seismic properties along a subduction megathrust can shed light on the composition and structure of rocks along the fault. By comparing seismic velocity structure with models of interseismic locking, co-seismic slip and afterslip, we can begin to understand how physical properties may affect fault dynamics throughout the subduction seismic cycle. The Maule earthquake, which hit the coast of central Chile in 2010, is the 6th largest earthquake ever recorded, rupturing a 500 x 80 km area of the Chilean megathrust. Published models demonstrate a complex bilateral rupture, with most co-seismic slip occurring to the north of the mainshock epicentre, although significant slip likely stopped short of the trench and the continental Moho. Here, we show a new high-resolution 3D velocity model (vp and vp/vs ratio) of the central Chilean margin Our velocity model is based on manually picked P- and S-wave arrival times from 670 aftershocks recorded by the International Maule Aftershock Deployment (IMAD) network. Seismic properties of the marine forearc are poorly understood in subduction zones, but by incorporating picks from two ocean-bottom seismometer (OBS) networks, we can resolve the velocity structure of the megathrust as far as the trench. In total, the catalogue used for the tomographic inversion yields a total of ~50,000 high quality P- and S-wave picks. We analyse the quality of our model by analysis of the resolution matrix and by testing characteristic models. The 3D velocity model shows the main structures associated within a subduction forearc: the marine forearc basin (vp < 6.0 km/s), continental mantle (vp > 7.5 km/s), and subducting oceanic crust (vp ~ 7.7 km/s). The plate interface is well defined by relocated aftershock seismicity. P-wave velocities along the megathrust range from 6.5 km/s beneath the marine forearc to 7.7 km/s at the intersection of the megathrust with the continental Moho. We infer several high vp anomalies within the South

  6. Local Evaluation of a Fusion System for 3-D Tomographic Image Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamallem, Abdellah; Valet, Lionel; Coquin, Didier

    2010-11-01

    Information fusion has been studied in various domains of computer sciences and engineering, and these techniques have increasingly been used. Such systems aim to build new interesting information from much information. Over time, fusion systems have become complex systems integrating information extraction, representations, combinations and interpretations. The performance evaluation of such systems has become a real problem. The choices of methods and parameter values have a significant impact on the quality of the results. A global evaluation of the fused results does not allow the end-users to adjust the numerous parameters. We propose a local approach to evaluate the mission completeness of the fusion system subparts. In this article, we focus on the formulation of the mission of extraction subparts and we measure their degree of achievement. We aim at showing the end-users which subparts do not completely achieve the functionality they were designed for.

  7. Anderson localization of matter waves in 3D anisotropic disordered potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piraud, Marie

    2016-05-01

    We study quantum transport and Anderson localization of matterwaves in 3 dimensional correlated disorder, focusing on the effects of the anisotropy. Indeed, understanding the anisotropy effects is fundamental for experiments with ultracold atoms as well as for several other systems, such as electrons in MOSFETs, light in biological medium, liquid crystals. A major challenge is to understand whether the anisotropy of the diffusion tensor is altered by the interference terms at the origin of Anderson localization. In particular, its anisotropy at the mobility edge remains to be investigated. So far, all theoretical analysis have assumed - more or less implicitly - that the anisotropy of the diffusion tensor is preserved by interference effects, and have focussed on the vanishing of diffusion as a whole. In this talk, I will start by presenting the usual description of matterwave transport in disordered medium. I will then present our method to go beyond the standard self-consistent theory, which includes in particular the full anisotropic structure of the spectral function. It thus avoids the infrared divergence of the usual self-consistent theory and, most importantly, does not make any assumption on the anisotropy of the renormalized diffusion tensor when including quantum interference terms. Using a generic model of disorder with elongated correlations, we find that the diffusion tensor is strongly affected by the quantum interference terms and that the anisotropy strongly diminishes in the vicinity of the mobility edge. Our work paves the way to further investigation with speckle potentials, which are directly relevant to ultracold-atom experiments. It will permit comparison with previous predictions for the mobility edge and shed new light on ongoing experiments in the field of ultracold atoms.

  8. Towards a magnetic localization system for 3-D tracking of tongue movements in speech-language therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chihwen; Huo, Xueliang; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new magnetic localization system based on a compact triangular sensor setup and three different optimization algorithms, intended for tracking tongue motion in the 3-D oral space. A small permanent magnet, secured on the tongue by tissue adhesives, will be used as a tracer. The magnetic field variations due to tongue motion are detected by a 3-D magneto-inductive sensor array outside the mouth and wirelessly transmitted to a computer. The position and rotation angles of the tracer are reconstructed based on sensor outputs and magnetic dipole equation using DIRECT, Powell, and Nelder-Mead optimization algorithms. Localization accuracy and processing time of the three algorithms are compared using one data set collected in which source-sensor distance was changed from 40 to 150 mm. Powell algorithm showed the best performance with 0.92 mm accuracy in position and 0.7(o) in orientation. The average processing time was 43.9 ms/sample, which can satisfy real time tracking up to approximately 20 Hz. PMID:19964478

  9. A High-Resolution 3D Separated-Local-Field Experiment by Means of Magic-Angle Turning

    PubMed

    Hu; Alderman; Pugmire; Grant

    1997-05-01

    A 3D separated-local-field (SLF) experiment based on the 2D PHORMAT technique is described. In the 3D experiment, the conventional 2D SLF powder pattern for each chemically inequivalent carbon is separated according to their different isotropic chemical shifts. The dipolar coupling constant of a C-H pair, hence the bond distance, and the relative orientation of the chemical-shift tensor to the C-H vector can all be determined for the protonated carbons with a single measurement. As the sample turns at only about 30 Hz in a MAT experiment, the SLF patterns obtained approach those of a stationary sample, and an accuracy in the measurement similar to that obtained on a stationary sample is expected. The technique is demonstrated on 2,6-dimethoxynaphthalene, where the 13 C-1 H separated-local-field powder patterns for the six chemically inequivalent carbons are clearly identified and measured. The observed dipolar coupling for the methoxy carbon is effectively reduced by the fast rotation of the group about its C3 symmetry axis. The average angle between the C-H bond direction and the C3 rotation axis in the OCH3 group is found to be about 66°. PMID:9252281

  10. Estimation of aortic valve leaflets from 3D CT images using local shape dictionaries and linear coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liang; Martin, Caitlin; Wang, Qian; Sun, Wei; Duncan, James

    2016-03-01

    Aortic valve (AV) disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The preferred treatment modality for severe AV disease is surgical resection and replacement of the native valve with either a mechanical or tissue prosthetic. In order to develop effective and long-lasting treatment methods, computational analyses, e.g., structural finite element (FE) and computational fluid dynamic simulations, are very effective for studying valve biomechanics. These computational analyses are based on mesh models of the aortic valve, which are usually constructed from 3D CT images though many hours of manual annotation, and therefore an automatic valve shape reconstruction method is desired. In this paper, we present a method for estimating the aortic valve shape from 3D cardiac CT images, which is represented by triangle meshes. We propose a pipeline for aortic valve shape estimation which includes novel algorithms for building local shape dictionaries and for building landmark detectors and curve detectors using local shape dictionaries. The method is evaluated on real patient image dataset using a leave-one-out approach and achieves an average accuracy of 0.69 mm. The work will facilitate automatic patient-specific computational modeling of the aortic valve.

  11. 3D-printed hierarchical scaffold for localized isoniazid/rifampin drug delivery and osteoarticular tuberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Li, Kun; Zhu, Yufang; Zhang, Jianhua; Ye, Xiaojian

    2015-04-01

    After surgical treatment of osteoarticular tuberculosis (TB), it is necessary to fill the surgical defect with an implant, which combines the merits of osseous regeneration and local multi-drug therapy so as to avoid drug resistance and side effects. In this study, a 3D-printed macro/meso-porous composite scaffold is fabricated. High dosages of isoniazid (INH)/rifampin (RFP) anti-TB drugs are loaded into chemically modified mesoporous bioactive ceramics in advance, which are then bound with poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) through a 3D printing procedure. The composite scaffolds show greatly prolonged drug release time compared to commercial calcium phosphate scaffolds either in vitro or in vivo. In addition, the drug concentrations on the periphery tissues of defect are maintained above INH/RFP minimal inhibitory concentrations even up to 12 weeks post-surgery, while they are extremely low in blood. Examinations of certain serum enzymes suggest no harm to hepatic or renal functions. Micro-CT evaluations and histology results also indicate partly degradation of the composite scaffolds and new bone growth in the cavity. These results suggest promising applications of our hierarchical composite scaffold in bone regeneration and local anti-TB therapy after osteoarticular TB debridement surgery. PMID:25653217

  12. New local potential useful for genome annotation and 3D modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Cohen, Fred E.

    2003-07-17

    A new potential energy function representing the conformational preferences of sequentially local regions of a protein backbone is presented. This potential is derived from secondary structure probabilities such as those produced by neural network-based prediction methods. The potential is applied to the problem of remote homolog identification, in combination with a distance dependent inter-residue potential and position-based scoring matrices. This fold recognition jury is implemented in a Java application called JThread. These methods are benchmarked on several test sets, including one released entirely after development and parameterization of JThread. In benchmark tests to identify known folds structurally similar (but not identical) to the native structure of a sequence, JThread performs significantly better than PSI-BLAST, with 10 percent more structures correctly identified as the most likely structural match in a fold library, and 20 percent more structures correctly narrowed down to a set of five possible candidates. JThread also significantly improves the average sequence alignment accuracy, from 53 percent to 62 percent of residues correctly aligned. Reliable fold assignments and alignments are identified, making the method useful for genome annotation. JThread is applied to predicted open reading frames (ORFs) from the genomes of Mycoplasma genitalium and Drosophila melanogaster, identifying 20 new structural annotations in the former and 801 in the latter.

  13. SU-D-9A-06: 3D Localization of Neurovascular Bundles Through MR-TRUS Registration in Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X; Rossi, P; Ogunleye, T; Jani, A; Curran, W; Liu, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common complication of prostate-cancer radiotherapy (RT) and the major mechanism is radiation-induced neurovascular bundle (NVB) damage. However, the localization of the NVB remains challenging. This study's purpose is to accurately localize 3D NVB by integrating MR and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images through MR-TRUS fusion. Methods: T1 and T2-weighted MR prostate images were acquired using a Philips 1.5T MR scanner and a pelvic phase-array coil. The 3D TRUS images were captured with a clinical scanner and a 7.5 MHz biplane probe. The TRUS probe was attached to a stepper; the B-mode images were captured from the prostate base to apex at a 1-mm step and the Doppler images were acquired in a 5-mm step. The registration method modeled the prostate tissue as an elastic material, and jointly estimated the boundary condition (surface deformation) and the volumetric deformations under elastic constraint. This technique was validated with a clinical study of 7 patients undergoing RT treatment for prostate cancer. The accuracy of our approach was assessed through the locations of landmarks, as well as previous ultrasound Doppler images of patients. Results: MR-TRUS registration was successfully performed for all patients. The mean displacement of the landmarks between the post-registration MR and TRUS images was 1.37±0.42 mm, which demonstrated the precision of the registration based on the biomechanical model; and the NVB volume Dice Overlap Coefficient was 92.1±3.2%, which demonstrated the accuracy of the NVB localization. Conclusion: We have developed a novel approach to improve 3D NVB localization through MR-TRUS fusion for prostate RT, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with ultrasound Doppler data. This technique could be a useful tool as we try to spare the NVB in prostate RT, monitor NBV response to RT, and potentially improve post-RT potency outcomes.

  14. 3D maps of the local interstellar medium: searching for the imprints of past events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallement, R.

    2015-01-01

    Inversion of interstellar (IS) gas or dust absorbing columns measured along the path to stars distributed in distance and direction allows reconstructing the distribution of interstellar matter (ISM) in three dimensions. A low resolution IS dust map based on reddening measurements towards 23,000 nearby stars is used to illustrate the potential of the more detailed maps that are expected within the next several years. The map reveals the location of the main IS cloud complexes up to distances on the order of 600 to 1200 pc depending on directions. Owing to target selection biases towards weakly reddened, brighter stars, the map is especially revealing in terms of regions devoid of IS matter. It traces the Local Bubble and its neighboring cavities, including a conspicuous, giant, >=1000 pc long cavity in the third quadrant located beyond the so-called βMa tunnel. This cavity is bordered by the main constituents of the Gould belt, the well-known and still unexplained rotating and expanding ring of clouds and young stars, inclined by ~ 20° to the galactic plane. Comparing the dust distribution with X-ray emission maps and IS gas observations shows that the giant cavity contains a large fraction of warm, fully ionized and dust-poor gas in addition to million K, X-ray bright gas. This set of structures must reflect the main events that occurred in the past; today however even the formation of the Gould belt is still a matter of controversy. It has been suggested recently that the Cretaceus-Tertiary (KT) mass extinction is potentially due to a gamma-ray burst (GRB) that occurred in the massive globular cluster (GC) 47 Tuc during its close encounter with the Sun ~70 Myrs ago. Such a hypothesis is based on computations of the cluster and Sun trajectories and the frequency of short GRBs in GC's. Given the mass, speed and size of 47 Tuc, wherever it crossed the Galactic plane it must have produced at the crossing site significant dynamical effects on the disk stars and IS

  15. Modified fibrin hydrogel matrices: both, 3D-scaffolds and local and controlled release systems to stimulate angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hall, Heike

    2007-01-01

    Sufficient blood perfusion is essential for all tissues to guarantee nutrient- and gas exchange. As many diseases are induced by the reduction of blood perfusion such that these tissues gradually loose their ability to function properly, therapeutic angiogenesis aims to increase blood flow in ischemic tissues by stimulating the patient's endogenous capacity to develop new blood vessels. These studies include application of angiogenesis stimulating (growth) factors and adhesion sequences as well as local gene therapy. One approach is to rationally design 3D-fibrin hydrogel matrices that provide specific adhesion sequences such as a receptor for alpha v beta 3-integrin expressed on angiogenic endothelial cells and that, in addition, are able to store and release angiogenic growth factors such as VEGF-A(165) and bFGF that target cell type-specific responses. Moreover, these matrices can be modified to release complexed plasmid DNA that transfect surrounding cells and improve angiogenesis. During wound healing, cells infiltrate into the scaffold and degrade it, thereby releasing entrapped growth factors or complexed plasmid DNA, and with the speed of tissue regeneration the scaffold is completely removed when tissue healing is achieved. The long-term aim is to develop biomimetic 3D-matrices for applications in a biomaterials context that can be applied directly at the site of injury by minimal invasive surgery. 3D-fibrin matrices constitute a scaffold and release system for single or combined therapeutic biomolecules and may therefore be able to contribute to the patients' endogenous healing response resulting in the functional recovery of a diseased tissue or organ. PMID:18220797

  16. 3D displacements maps of the L'Aquila earthquake by applying SISTEM method to GPS and ENVISAT and ALOS DInSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmino, Francesco; Anzidei, Marco; Briole, Pierre; de Michele, Marcello; Elias, Panagiotis; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Spata, Alessandro

    2010-05-01

    We present an application of the novel SISTEM (Simultaneous and Integrated Strain Tensor Estimation from geodetic and satellite deformation Measurements) approach [Guglielmino et al., 2009] to obtain a 3D estimation of the ground deformation pattern produced by the April 6, 2009, Mw 6.3 L'Aquila earthquake, the most destructive in the Abruzzo region since the huge 1703 earthquake [Boschi et al., 2000; Chiarabba et al., 2005]. The focal mechanism of the main shock is of normal faulting with NE-SW oriented T-axis [INGV, 2009]. Most of the aftershocks, located by the INGV seismic network, are in the depth range 5÷15 km, depicting a SW dipping fault plane [INGV, 2009]. Field observations [EMERGEO working group, 2009] have identified surface ground cracks with centimeter to decimeters throws over a wide belt running along the Paganica Fault. A closely spaced GPS (Global Positioning System) network was set up in this sector of the Apennines after 1999 [Anzidei et al., 2005] and more than 10 Continuous GPS (CGPS) stations have been operating in this region over the last years. On March 30 2008, INGV installed five GPS receivers on selected benchmarks of the Central Apennine Geodetic Network (CaGeoNet) bordering the L'Aquila basin in order to detect the eventual ground movements during the seismic sequence. These stations were crucial to resolve the near-field co-seismic deformation pattern properly, allowing direct observation of the details of co-seismic displacement related to the main shock. Thanks to the ESA Earth Watching project, which made Envisat data quickly available after their acquisition, we performed a DInSAR (Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) analysis of ascending and descending images sampling the date of the earthquake. In particular, we analyze the descending pair for the interval 27/04/2008 - 12/04/2009 (tbline = 350 days; Bperp = 44m) and the ascending pair for the interval 11/03/2009 - 15/04/2009 (tbline = 35 days; Bperp = 227m

  17. 3D displacements maps of the L'Aquila earthquake by applying SISTEM method to GPS and ENVISAT and ALOS DInSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmino, Francesco; Anzidei, Marco; Briole, Pierre; de Michele, Marcello; Elias, Panagiotis; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Spata, Alessandro

    2010-05-01

    We present an application of the novel SISTEM (Simultaneous and Integrated Strain Tensor Estimation from geodetic and satellite deformation Measurements) approach [Guglielmino et al., 2009] to obtain a 3D estimation of the ground deformation pattern produced by the April 6, 2009, Mw 6.3 L'Aquila earthquake, the most destructive in the Abruzzo region since the huge 1703 earthquake [Boschi et al., 2000; Chiarabba et al., 2005]. The focal mechanism of the main shock is of normal faulting with NE-SW oriented T-axis [INGV, 2009]. Most of the aftershocks, located by the INGV seismic network, are in the depth range 5÷15 km, depicting a SW dipping fault plane [INGV, 2009]. Field observations [EMERGEO working group, 2009] have identified surface ground cracks with centimeter to decimeters throws over a wide belt running along the Paganica Fault. A closely spaced GPS (Global Positioning System) network was set up in this sector of the Apennines after 1999 [Anzidei et al., 2005] and more than 10 Continuous GPS (CGPS) stations have been operating in this region over the last years. On March 30 2008, INGV installed five GPS receivers on selected benchmarks of the Central Apennine Geodetic Network (CaGeoNet) bordering the L'Aquila basin in order to detect the eventual ground movements during the seismic sequence. These stations were crucial to resolve the near-field co-seismic deformation pattern properly, allowing direct observation of the details of co-seismic displacement related to the main shock. Thanks to the ESA Earth Watching project, which made Envisat data quickly available after their acquisition, we performed a DInSAR (Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) analysis of ascending and descending images sampling the date of the earthquake. In particular, we analyze the descending pair for the interval 27/04/2008 - 12/04/2009 (tbline = 350 days; Bperp = 44m) and the ascending pair for the interval 11/03/2009 - 15/04/2009 (tbline = 35 days; Bperp = 227m

  18. A 3-D shear velocity model of the southern North America and the Caribbean plates from ambient noise and earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaite, B.; Villaseñor, A.; Iglesias, A.; Herraiz, M.; Jiménez-Munt, I.

    2014-10-01

    We use group velocities from earthquake tomography together with group and phase velocities from ambient noise tomography (ANT) of Rayleigh-waves to invert for the 3-D shear-wave velocity structure (5-70 km) of the Caribbean (CAR) and southern North American (NAM) plates. The lithospheric model proposed offers a complete image of the crust and uppermost-mantle with imprints of the tectonic evolution. One of the most striking features inferred is the main role of the Ouachita-Marathon-Sonora orogeny front on the crustal seismic structure of NAM plate. A new imaged feature is the low crustal velocities along USA-Mexico border. The model also shows a break of the E-W mantle velocity dichotomy of the NAM and CAR plates beneath the Isthmus of Tehuantepec and Yucatan Block. High upper-mantle velocities along the Mesoamerican Subduction Zone coincide with inactive volcanic areas while the lowest velocities correspond to active volcanic arcs and thin lithospheric mantle regions.

  19. Accurate quantification of local changes for carotid arteries in 3D ultrasound images using convex optimization-based deformable registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jieyu; Qiu, Wu; Yuan, Jing; Fenster, Aaron; Chiu, Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Registration of longitudinally acquired 3D ultrasound (US) images plays an important role in monitoring and quantifying progression/regression of carotid atherosclerosis. We introduce an image-based non-rigid registration algorithm to align the baseline 3D carotid US with longitudinal images acquired over several follow-up time points. This algorithm minimizes the sum of absolute intensity differences (SAD) under a variational optical-flow perspective within a multi-scale optimization framework to capture local and global deformations. Outer wall and lumen were segmented manually on each image, and the performance of the registration algorithm was quantified by Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and mean absolute distance (MAD) of the outer wall and lumen surfaces after registration. In this study, images for 5 subjects were registered initially by rigid registration, followed by the proposed algorithm. Mean DSC generated by the proposed algorithm was 79:3+/-3:8% for lumen and 85:9+/-4:0% for outer wall, compared to 73:9+/-3:4% and 84:7+/-3:2% generated by rigid registration. Mean MAD of 0:46+/-0:08mm and 0:52+/-0:13mm were generated for lumen and outer wall respectively by the proposed algorithm, compared to 0:55+/-0:08mm and 0:54+/-0:11mm generated by rigid registration. The mean registration time of our method per image pair was 143+/-23s.

  20. Self-Localization of a Multi-Fisheye Camera Based Augmented Reality System in Textureless 3d Building Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, S.; Leitloff, J.; Wursthorn, S.; Hinz, S.

    2013-10-01

    Georeferenced images help planners to compare and document the progress of underground construction sites. As underground positioning can not rely on GPS/GNSS, we introduce a solely vision based localization method, that makes use of a textureless 3D CAD model of the construction site. In our analysis-by-synthesis approach, depth and normal fisheye images are rendered from presampled positions and gradient orientations are extracted to build a high dimensional synthetic feature space. Acquired camera images are then matched to those features by using a robust distance metric and fast nearest neighbor search. In this manner, initial poses can be obtained on a laptop in real-time using concurrent processing and the graphics processing unit.

  1. MRI data driven partial volume effects correction in PET imaging using 3D local multi-resolution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pogam, Adrien; Lamare, Frederic; Hatt, Mathieu; Fernandez, Philippe; Le Rest, Catherine Cheze; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2013-02-01

    PET partial volume effects (PVE) resulting from the limited resolution of PET scanners is still a quantitative issue that PET/MRI scanners do not solve by themselves. A recently proposed voxel-based locally adaptive 3D multi-resolution PVE correction based on the mutual analysis of wavelet decompositions was applied on 12 clinical 18F-FLT PET/T1 MRI images of glial tumors, and compared to a PET only voxel-wise iterative deconvolution approach. Quantitative and qualitative results demonstrated the interest of exploiting PET/MRI information with higher uptake increases (19±8% vs. 11±7%, p=0.02), as well as more convincing visual restoration of details within tumors with respect to deconvolution of the PET uptake only. Further studies are now required to demonstrate the accuracy of this restoration with histopathological validation of the uptake in tumors.

  2. About Non-Line-Of-Sight Satellite Detection and Exclusion in a 3D Map-Aided Localization Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Peyraud, Sébastien; Bétaille, David; Renault, Stéphane; Ortiz, Miguel; Mougel, Florian; Meizel, Dominique; Peyret, François

    2013-01-01

    Reliable GPS positioning in city environment is a key issue actually, signals are prone to multipath, with poor satellite geometry in many streets. Using a 3D urban model to forecast satellite visibility in urban contexts in order to improve GPS localization is the main topic of the present article. A virtual image processing that detects and eliminates possible faulty measurements is the core of this method. This image is generated using the position estimated a priori by the navigation process itself, under road constraints. This position is then updated by measurements to line-of-sight satellites only. This closed-loop real-time processing has shown very first promising full-scale test results. PMID:23344379

  3. About Non-Line-Of-Sight satellite detection and exclusion in a 3D map-aided localization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Peyraud, Sébastien; Bétaille, David; Renault, Stéphane; Ortiz, Miguel; Mougel, Florian; Meizel, Dominique; Peyret, François

    2013-01-01

    Reliable GPS positioning in city environment is a key issue: actually, signals are prone to multipath, with poor satellite geometry in many streets. Using a 3D urban model to forecast satellite visibility in urban contexts in order to improve GPS localization is the main topic of the present article. A virtual image processing that detects and eliminates possible faulty measurements is the core of this method. This image is generated using the position estimated a priori by the navigation process itself, under road constraints. This position is then updated by measurements to line-of-sight satellites only. This closed-loop real-time processing has shown very first promising full-scale test results. PMID:23344379

  4. Local existence and Gevrey regularity of 3-D Navier-Stokes equations with ℓp initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Animikh

    We obtain local existence and Gevrey regularity of 3-D periodic Navier-Stokes equations in case the sequence of Fourier coefficients of the initial data is in ℓp (p<3/2). The ℓp norm of the sequence of Fourier coefficients of the solution and its analogous Gevrey norm remains bounded on a time interval whose length depends only on the size of the body force and the ℓp norm of the Fourier coefficient sequence of the initial data. The control on the Gevrey norm produces explicit estimates on the analyticity radius of the solution as in Foias and Temam (J. Funct. Anal. 87 (1989) 359-369). The results provide an alternate approach in estimating the space-analyticity radius of solutions to Navier-Stokes equations than the one presented by Grujić and Kukavica (J. Funct. Anal. 152 (1998) 447-466).

  5. Automatic segmentation of solitary pulmonary nodules based on local intensity structure analysis and 3D neighborhood features in 3D chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Honma, Hirotoshi; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Natori, Hiroshi; Mori, Kensaku

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) segmentation method based on local intensity structure analysis and neighborhood feature analysis in chest CT images. Automated segmentation of SPNs is desirable for a chest computer-aided detection/diagnosis (CAS) system since a SPN may indicate early stage of lung cancer. Due to the similar intensities of SPNs and other chest structures such as blood vessels, many false positives (FPs) are generated by nodule detection methods. To reduce such FPs, we introduce two features that analyze the relation between each segmented nodule candidate and it neighborhood region. The proposed method utilizes a blob-like structure enhancement (BSE) filter based on Hessian analysis to augment the blob-like structures as initial nodule candidates. Then a fine segmentation is performed to segment much more accurate region of each nodule candidate. FP reduction is mainly addressed by investigating two neighborhood features based on volume ratio and eigenvector of Hessian that are calculates from the neighborhood region of each nodule candidate. We evaluated the proposed method by using 40 chest CT images, include 20 standard-dose CT images that we randomly chosen from a local database and 20 low-dose CT images that were randomly chosen from a public database: LIDC. The experimental results revealed that the average TP rate of proposed method was 93.6% with 12.3 FPs/case.

  6. An investigation of matching symmetry in the human pinnae with possible implications for 3D ear recognition and sound localization.

    PubMed

    Claes, Peter; Reijniers, Jonas; Shriver, Mark D; Snyders, Jonatan; Suetens, Paul; Nielandt, Joachim; De Tré, Guy; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The human external ears, or pinnae, have an intriguing shape and, like most parts of the human external body, bilateral symmetry is observed between left and right. It is a well-known part of our auditory sensory system and mediates the spatial localization of incoming sounds in 3D from monaural cues due to its shape-specific filtering as well as binaural cues due to the paired bilateral locations of the left and right ears. Another less broadly appreciated aspect of the human pinna shape is its uniqueness from one individual to another, which is on the level of what is seen in fingerprints and facial features. This makes pinnae very useful in human identification, which is of great interest in biometrics and forensics. Anatomically, the type of symmetry observed is known as matching symmetry, with structures present as separate mirror copies on both sides of the body, and in this work we report the first such investigation of the human pinna in 3D. Within the framework of geometric morphometrics, we started by partitioning ear shape, represented in a spatially dense way, into patterns of symmetry and asymmetry, following a two-factor anova design. Matching symmetry was measured in all substructures of the pinna anatomy. However, substructures that 'stick out' such as the helix, tragus, and lobule also contained a fair degree of asymmetry. In contrast, substructures such as the conchae, antitragus, and antihelix expressed relatively stronger degrees of symmetric variation in relation to their levels of asymmetry. Insights gained from this study were injected into an accompanying identification setup exploiting matching symmetry where improved performance is demonstrated. Finally, possible implications of the results in the context of ear recognition as well as sound localization are discussed. PMID:25382291

  7. The 3-D surface deformation, coseismic fault slip and after-slip of the 2010 Mw6.9 Yushu earthquake, Tibet, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guohong; Shan, Xinjian; Feng, Guangcai

    2016-07-01

    Using SAR interferometry on C band Envisat descending track and L band ALOS ascending track SAR images, respectively, we firstly obtain two coseismic deformation fields and one postseismic deformation of the 2010 Yushu earthquake, Tibet, China. In the meanwhile, we also obtain the azimuthal coseismic deformation of the Yushu event by Multi Aperture Interferometry (MAI) technique. With the 3 components of one-dimensional coseismic InSAR measurements, we resolve the complete 3-dimensional deformation of the 2010 Yushu event, which shows conformity and complexity to left lateral slip mechanism. The horizontal deformation is basically consistent with a sinistral slip event; whereas the vertical displacement does show certain level of complexity, which we argue is indicative of local fault geometry variation. Based on the InSAR data and elastic dislocation assumption, we invert for coseismic fault slip and early after-slip of the Yushu event. Our inversion results show major coseismic left lateral strike slip with only minor thrust component. The after-slip model fills most of the slip gaps left by the coseismic fault slip and finds a complementary slip distribution to the coseismic fault slip, which is a good indicator that future earthquake potential on the Yushu segment has been significantly reduced.

  8. Earthquake!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markle, Sandra

    1987-01-01

    A learning unit about earthquakes includes activities for primary grade students, including making inferences and defining operationally. Task cards are included for independent study on earthquake maps and earthquake measuring. (CB)

  9. Earthquakes

    MedlinePlus

    An earthquake happens when two blocks of the earth suddenly slip past one another. Earthquakes strike suddenly, violently, and without warning at any time of the day or night. If an earthquake occurs in a ...

  10. Earthquakes

    MedlinePlus

    An earthquake happens when two blocks of the earth suddenly slip past one another. Earthquakes strike suddenly, violently, and without warning at any time of the day or night. If an earthquake occurs in a populated area, it may cause ...

  11. Using Averaging-Based Factorization to Compare Seismic Hazard Models Derived from 3D Earthquake Simulations with NGA Ground Motion Prediction Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Jordan, T. H.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic hazard models based on empirical ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) employ a model-based factorization to account for source, propagation, and path effects. An alternative is to simulate these effects directly using earthquake source models combined with three-dimensional (3D) models of Earth structure. We have developed an averaging-based factorization (ABF) scheme that facilitates the geographically explicit comparison of these two types of seismic hazard models. For any fault source k with epicentral position x, slip spatial and temporal distribution f, and moment magnitude m, we calculate the excitation functions G(s, k, x, m, f) for sites s in a geographical region R, such as 5% damped spectral acceleration at a particular period. Through a sequence of weighted-averaging and normalization operations following a certain hierarchy over f, m, x, k, and s, we uniquely factorize G(s, k, x, m, f) into six components: A, B(s), C(s, k), D(s, k, x), E(s, k, x, m), and F(s, k, x, m, f). Factors for a target model can be divided by those of a reference model to obtain six corresponding factor ratios, or residual factors: a, b(s), c(s, k), d(s, k, x), e(s, k, x, m), and f(s, k, x, m, f). We show that these residual factors characterize differences in basin effects primarily through b(s), distance scaling primarily through c(s, k), and source directivity primarily through d(s, k, x). We illustrate the ABF scheme by comparing CyberShake Hazard Model (CSHM) for the Los Angeles region (Graves et. al. 2010) with the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) GMPEs modified according to the directivity relations of Spudich and Chiou (2008). Relative to CSHM, all NGA models underestimate the directivity and basin effects. In particular, the NGA models do not account for the coupling between source directivity and basin excitation that substantially enhance the low-frequency seismic hazards in the sedimentary basins of the Los Angeles region. Assuming Cyber

  12. LLNL-Earth3D

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  13. Orientation-weighted local Minkowski functionals in 3D for quantitative assessment of trabecular bone structure in the hip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Bitterling, H.; Weber, C.; Kuhn, V.; Eckstein, F.; Reiser, M.

    2007-03-01

    Fragility fractures or pathologic fractures of the hip, i.e. fractures with no apparent trauma, represent the worst complication in osteoporosis with a mortality close to 25% during the first post-traumatic year. Over 90% of hip fractures result from falls from standing height. A substantial number of femoral fractures are initiated in the femoral neck or the trochanteric regions which contain an internal architecture of trabeculae that are functionally highly specialized to withstand the complex pattern of external and internal forces associated with human gait. Prediction of the mechanical strength of bone tissue can be achieved by dedicated texture analysis of data obtained by high resolution imaging modalities, e.g. computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance tomography (MRI). Since in the case of the proximal femur, the connectivity, regional distribution and - most of all - the preferred orientation of individual trabeculae change considerably within narrow spatial limits, it seems most reasonable to evaluate the femoral bone structure on an orientation-weighted, local scale. In past studies, we could demonstrate the advantages of topological analysis of bone structure using the Minkowski Functionals in 3D on a global and on a local scale. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that the prediction of the mechanical competence of the proximal femur by a new algorithm considering orientational changes of topological properties in the trabecular architecture is feasible and better suited than conventional methods based on the measurement of the mineral density of bone tissue (BMD).

  14. Local structures around 3d metal dopants in topological insulator Bi2Se3 studied by EXAFS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Wei, Xinyuan; Wang, Jiajia; Pan, Hong; Ji, Fuhao; Xi, Fuchun; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Tiandou; Zhang, Shuo; Jiang, Zheng; Wen, Wen; Huang, Yuying; Ye, Mao; Yang, Zhongqin; Qiao, Shan

    2014-09-01

    Transition-metal-doped Bi2Se3 crystals, X0.05Bi2Se3 (X =Cr, Co, Ni, and Cu), are prepared and studied by powder x-ray diffraction and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements to get the local structures around the dopants. Cr atoms substitute Bi atoms and Co atoms may substitute Bi atoms or form Co3Se4 (C2/m) clusters. Cu is also found taking the Bi substitutional site, which differs from the reported superconductor phase of Cu-doped Bi2Se3, suggesting the dependence of site occupancy of Cu in Bi2Se3 on the process of sample growing. For Ni0.05Bi2Se3, Ni atoms form Ni3Se4 (C2/m) clusters. The nearest neighbors of X (X =Cr, Co, and Cu) are Se atoms, and the X-Se bond lengths are extracted from EXAFS as 2.50 Å for Cr-Se, 2.40 Å for Co-Se, and 2.38 Å for Cu-Se, which show the direct evidences of dramatic structural relaxations around 3d dopants. The bond information of local structures around dopants is valuable for subsequent theoretical studies, and can hardly be obtained from other techniques.

  15. In vivo 3D analysis of systemic effects after local heavy-ion beam irradiation in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Kento; Hashimoto, Chika; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Itoh, Kazusa; Yasuda, Takako; Ohta, Kousaku; Oonishi, Hisako; Igarashi, Kento; Suzuki, Michiyo; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Nishimaki, Toshiyuki; Katsumura, Takafumi; Oota, Hiroki; Ogawa, Motoyuki; Oga, Atsunori; Ikemoto, Kenzo; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is widely used in cancer treatment. In addition to inducing effects in the irradiated area, irradiation may induce effects on tissues close to and distant from the irradiated area. Japanese medaka, Oryzias latipes, is a small teleost fish and a model organism for evaluating the environmental effects of radiation. In this study, we applied low-energy carbon-ion (26.7 MeV/u) irradiation to adult medaka to a depth of approximately 2.2 mm from the body surface using an irradiation system at the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology. We histologically evaluated the systemic alterations induced by irradiation using serial sections of the whole body, and conducted a heart rate analysis. Tissues from the irradiated side showed signs of serious injury that corresponded with the radiation dose. A 3D reconstruction analysis of the kidney sections showed reductions in the kidney volume and blood cell mass along the irradiated area, reflecting the precise localization of the injuries caused by carbon-beam irradiation. Capillary aneurysms were observed in the gill in both ventrally and dorsally irradiated fish, suggesting systemic irradiation effects. The present study provides an in vivo model for further investigation of the effects of irradiation beyond the locally irradiated area. PMID:27345436

  16. In vivo 3D analysis of systemic effects after local heavy-ion beam irradiation in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Kento; Hashimoto, Chika; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Itoh, Kazusa; Yasuda, Takako; Ohta, Kousaku; Oonishi, Hisako; Igarashi, Kento; Suzuki, Michiyo; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Nishimaki, Toshiyuki; Katsumura, Takafumi; Oota, Hiroki; Ogawa, Motoyuki; Oga, Atsunori; Ikemoto, Kenzo; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is widely used in cancer treatment. In addition to inducing effects in the irradiated area, irradiation may induce effects on tissues close to and distant from the irradiated area. Japanese medaka, Oryzias latipes, is a small teleost fish and a model organism for evaluating the environmental effects of radiation. In this study, we applied low-energy carbon-ion (26.7 MeV/u) irradiation to adult medaka to a depth of approximately 2.2 mm from the body surface using an irradiation system at the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology. We histologically evaluated the systemic alterations induced by irradiation using serial sections of the whole body, and conducted a heart rate analysis. Tissues from the irradiated side showed signs of serious injury that corresponded with the radiation dose. A 3D reconstruction analysis of the kidney sections showed reductions in the kidney volume and blood cell mass along the irradiated area, reflecting the precise localization of the injuries caused by carbon-beam irradiation. Capillary aneurysms were observed in the gill in both ventrally and dorsally irradiated fish, suggesting systemic irradiation effects. The present study provides an in vivo model for further investigation of the effects of irradiation beyond the locally irradiated area. PMID:27345436

  17. Earthquakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Edward J.

    1977-01-01

    Presents an analysis of the causes of earthquakes. Topics discussed include (1) geological and seismological factors that determine the effect of a particular earthquake on a given structure; (2) description of some large earthquakes such as the San Francisco quake; and (3) prediction of earthquakes. (HM)

  18. Earthquakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pakiser, Louis C.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in earthquakes with an introduction to the subject. Following a section presenting an historical look at the world's major earthquakes, the booklet discusses earthquake-prone geographic areas, the nature and workings of earthquakes, earthquake…

  19. Automatic localization of target vertebrae in spine surgery using fast CT-to-fluoroscopy (3D-2D) image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Y.; Schafer, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Kleinszig, G.; Graumann, R.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-02-01

    Localization of target vertebrae is an essential step in minimally invasive spine surgery, with conventional methods relying on "level counting" - i.e., manual counting of vertebrae under fluoroscopy starting from readily identifiable anatomy (e.g., the sacrum). The approach requires an undesirable level of radiation, time, and is prone to counting errors due to the similar appearance of vertebrae in projection images; wrong-level surgery occurs in 1 of every ~3000 cases. This paper proposes a method to automatically localize target vertebrae in x-ray projections using 3D-2D registration between preoperative CT (in which vertebrae are preoperatively labeled) and intraoperative fluoroscopy. The registration uses an intensity-based approach with a gradient-based similarity metric and the CMA-ES algorithm for optimization. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) and a robust similarity metric are computed on GPU to accelerate the process. Evaluation in clinical CT data included 5,000 PA and LAT projections randomly perturbed to simulate human variability in setup of mobile intraoperative C-arm. The method demonstrated 100% success for PA view (projection error: 0.42mm) and 99.8% success for LAT view (projection error: 0.37mm). Initial implementation on GPU provided automatic target localization within about 3 sec, with further improvement underway via multi-GPU. The ability to automatically label vertebrae in fluoroscopy promises to streamline surgical workflow, improve patient safety, and reduce wrong-site surgeries, especially in large patients for whom manual methods are time consuming and error prone.

  20. Locating Local Earthquakes Using Single 3-Component Broadband Seismological Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. B.; Mitra, S.

    2015-12-01

    We devised a technique to locate local earthquakes using single 3-component broadband seismograph and analyze the factors governing the accuracy of our result. The need for devising such a technique arises in regions of sparse seismic network. In state-of-the-art location algorithms, a minimum of three station recordings are required for obtaining well resolved locations. However, the problem arises when an event is recorded by less than three stations. This may be because of the following reasons: (a) down time of stations in a sparse network; (b) geographically isolated regions with limited logistic support to setup large network; (c) regions of insufficient economy for financing multi-station network and (d) poor signal-to-noise ratio for smaller events at most stations, except the one in its closest vicinity. Our technique provides a workable solution to the above problematic scenarios. However, our methodology is strongly dependent on the velocity model of the region. Our method uses a three step processing: (a) ascertain the back-azimuth of the event from the P-wave particle motion recorded on the horizontal components; (b) estimate the hypocentral distance using the S-P time; and (c) ascertain the emergent angle from the vertical and radial components. Once this is obtained, one can ray-trace through the 1-D velocity model to estimate the hypocentral location. We test our method on synthetic data, which produces results with 99% precision. With observed data, the accuracy of our results are very encouraging. The precision of our results depend on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and choice of the right band-pass filter to isolate the P-wave signal. We used our method on minor aftershocks (3 < mb < 4) of the 2011 Sikkim earthquake using data from the Sikkim Himalayan network. Location of these events highlight the transverse strike-slip structure within the Indian plate, which was observed from source mechanism study of the mainshock and larger aftershocks.

  1. Determination of Rectification Corrections for Semi Gantry Crane Rail Axes in the Local 3D Coordinate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipiak, Daria; Kamiński, Waldemar

    2015-02-01

    Electronic tacheometers are currently the standard instruments used in geodetic work, including also geodetic engineering measurements. The main advantage connected with this equipment is among others high accuracy of the measurement and thus high accuracy of the final determinations represented for example by the points' coordinates. One of many applications of the tacheometers is the measurement of crane rail axes. This measurement is based on polar method and it allows to get the spatial coordinates of points in 3D local system. The standard technology of measurement of crane rail axes and development of its calculations' results is well-known and widely presented in the subject literature. At the same time new methods of observations results evaluation are developing. Some new proposals for the development of measurement results were already presented in (Kamiński, 2013). This paper is a generalisation of the paper quoted above. The authors developed the concept which was presented there by a proposal for determining rectification corrections for semi gantry crane rail axes. To carried out the task, the parametric method with conditions on parameters was used. Moreover the practical tests on simulated measurement results were conducted. The results obtained from alignment confirmed the theoretical assumptions. Despite the fact that analyses were carried out only on the simulated data, it is already possible to say that presented method for determination of rectification corrections for crane rail axes can be used for development of the observations from real measurement.

  2. P-wave Local Earthquake Tomography in the Central Alborz Mountains, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafanejad, A.; Hosein Shomali, Z.

    2010-12-01

    The Alborz Mountain ranges in the southern margin of the Caspian Sea, as a part of the Alpine- Himalayan orogenic belt is an arc of parallel synclines and anticlines. Among the major tectonic and geological features of the Alborz Mountains are the Damavand quaternary volcano, and active and seismic faults like the Mosha, and North Tehran faults. In this study, the first 3D P-wave velocity model of the upper crust in the Central Alborz Mountains is obtained using a local travel-time earthquake tomography method. A data set of 895 earthquakes recorded on a local 19 station short-period network between 1996 and 2006 provided by the Iranian Seismological Centre (ISC) is used in this inversion. The result of tomography shows considerable velocity anomalies in this region. These anomalies show remarkable features in the vicinity of the Mosha and North Tehran faults, as well as in the Damavand volcanic area. In depth of 15 kilometer a low velocity region is observed parallel to the above two mentioned faults. This can be caused by the crushed rocks along these two faults. In the place of splitting North Tehran fault from the Mosha fault, a very noticeable low velocity anomaly represents intense fracturing in rocks. In the Damavand volcanic area and in the northern side of the summit an anomalous high velocity body found to the depth of 20 kilometer. According to its considerable correlation with the position of the old Damavand cone, it is related to the older and crystallized magma chamber of the Damavand volcano. A low velocity anomaly exactly beneath the present cone to the depth of seven kilometer, with another low velocity anomaly in depth of 10 to 20 kilometer constitutes the present magma chamber of the Damavand volcano.

  3. A microwave imaging-based 3D localization algorithm for an in-body RF source as in wireless capsule endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Rohit; Balasingham, Ilangko

    2015-08-01

    A microwave imaging-based technique for 3D localization of an in-body RF source is presented. Such a technique can be useful for localization of an RF source as in wireless capsule endoscopes for positioning of any abnormality in the gastrointestinal tract. Microwave imaging is used to determine the dielectric properties (relative permittivity and conductivity) of the tissues that are required for a precise localization. A 2D microwave imaging algorithm is used for determination of the dielectric properties. Calibration method is developed for removing any error due to the used 2D imaging algorithm on the imaging data of a 3D body. The developed method is tested on a simple 3D heterogeneous phantom through finite-difference-time-domain simulations. Additive white Gaussian noise at the signal-to-noise ratio of 30 dB is added to the simulated data to make them more realistic. The developed calibration method improves the imaging and the localization accuracy. Statistics on the localization accuracy are generated by randomly placing the RF source at various positions inside the small intestine of the phantom. The cumulative distribution function of the localization error is plotted. In 90% of the cases, the localization accuracy was found within 1.67 cm, showing the capability of the developed method for 3D localization. PMID:26737194

  4. The Mw 5.9 February 2014 Cephalonia earthquake (Greece): 3D deformation field and source modeling from multiple SAR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merryman Boncori, John Peter; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Pezzo, Giuseppe; Tolomei, Cristiano; Atzori, Simone; Ganas, Athanassios; Karastathis, Vassilios; Salvi, Stefano; Kontoes, Charalampos; Antonioli, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    On Jan. 26, 2014 at 13:55 UTC an Mw 6.0 earthquake struck the island of Cephalonia, Greece, followed five hours later by an Mw 5.3 aftershock, and by an Mw 5.9 event on Feb. 3, 2014 (National Observatory of Athens, Institute of Geodynamics), causing extensive structural damages and inducing widespread environmental effects. We measured the 3D coseismic deformation field of the Feb. 3, 2014 event, by applying Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR), Intensity cross-correlation and Spectral Diversity (also known as Multi Aperture Interferometry) to descending passes of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) COSMO-SkyMed satellites and ascending passes of the German Space Agency (DLR) TanDEM-X satellite. These techniques allowed the observation of four independent displacement components (descending and ascending radar line-of-sight and azimuth), each of which was measured with two different techniques, resulting in an increased spatial coverage, robustness and sensitivity to all Cartesian displacement components. Our SAR measurements were found to be in very good agreement with those from available continuous Global Positioning System (cGPS) stations. We modeled the seismic source of the Feb. 3, 2014 earthquake with a joint inversion of the eight SAR displacement maps, using the analytical solutions for dislocation in an elastic half-space. Firstly, we considered a model based on a single-fault plane and carried out a non-linear inversion to estimate its geometric and kinematic source parameters, assuming a uniform slip. Subsequently, we performed a linear inversion to retrieve the slip distribution, adopting a damped and Non-Negative Least Squares approach. Slip values were computed on a variable-size mesh, which maximizes the model resolution matrix. We find the majority of the observed surface deformation to be explained by a 20 km long ~N-S oriented and west-dipping fault running parallel to the east coast of the Paliki peninsula, with a main right

  5. 3-D Deformation Field Of The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah (Mexico) Earthquake From Matching Before To After Aerial Lidar Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa-Corona, A.; Nissen, E.; Arrowsmith, R.; Krishnan, A. K.; Saripalli, S.; Oskin, M. E.; Arregui, S. M.; Limon, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    The Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake (EMCE) of 4 April 2010 generated a ~110 km long, NW-SE trending rupture, with normal and right-lateral slip in the order of 2-3m in the Sierra Cucapah, the northern half, where the surface rupture has the most outstanding expression. Vertical and horizontal surface displacements produced by the EMCE have been addressed separately by other authors with a variety of aerial and satellite remote sensing techniques. Slip variation along fault and post-seismic scarp erosion and diffusion have been estimated in other studies using terrestrial LiDAR (TLS) on segments of the rupture. To complement these other studies, we computed the 3D deformation field by comparing pre- to post-event point clouds from aerial LiDAR surveys. The pre-event LiDAR with lower point density (0.013-0.033 pts m-2) required filtering and post-processing before comparing with the denser (9-18 pts m-2) more accurate post event dataset. The 3-dimensional surface displacement field was determined using an adaptation of the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, implemented in the open source Point Cloud Library (PCL). The LiDAR datasets are first split into a grid of windows, and for each one, ICP iteratively converges on the rigid body transformation (comprising a translation and a rotation) that best aligns the pre- to post-event points. Testing on synthetic datasets perturbed with displacements of known magnitude showed that windows with dimensions of 100-200m gave the best results for datasets with these densities. Here we present the deformation field with detailed displacements in segments of the surface rupture where its expression was recognized by ICP from the point cloud matching, mainly the scarcely vegetated Sierra Cucapah with the Borrego and Paso Superior fault segments the most outstanding, where we are able to compare our results with values measured in the field and results from TLS reported in other works. EMC simulated displacement field for a

  6. Crustal Structure of Northeastern Sicily, South Italy, From Tomographic Inversion of Local Earthquake Arrival-times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orecchio, B.; Aloisi, M.; Barberi, G.; Neri, G.

    After integrating the databases of the local and national seismic networks relative to lithospheric seismicity that occurred in and around Northeastern Sicily bet ween 1978 and 2001, we selected 932 events for 3D local tomography of P- and S-wave velocity. A dataset of 10241 P and 5597 S arrival times was inverted for Vp, Vs and hypocenter distributions using the SIMULPS12 algorithm. Analysis of the Derivative Weight Sum and Spread Function detected a rather good level of constraint of velocity at nodes of a grid with horizontal and vertical spacing of 10 and 6 km respectively, spanning the upper 30 Km beneath the area including Central and Northeastern Sicily, Southern Calabria and the Southeasternmost Tyrrhenian Sea. Standard deviation of arrival-time residuals after 3D inversion was about 20% lower than obtained by locating the same earthquakes using the minimum 1D model. Four main spatial domains can be distinguished in the obtained velocity structure: i) a high-velocity domain corresponding to Tyrrhenian structural units; ii) low-velocity domain corresponding to Sicilian units; iii) a domain corresponding to the Calabrian Arc characterized by positive velocity anomalies at shallow depth (nodes in the range 0-12 Km) and by negative velocity ones below (18-30 Km); iv) positive anomalies at deep nodes (18-30 Km) and negative anomalies above, in the area including the Etna volcano and the Ionian coast of Sicily near the volcanic edifice. Velocity distributions were analyzed jointly with the geophysical and geological information available in the literature in order to improve our knowledge of the crustal structure in the study area. Furthermore, comparisons were made with the most recent regional geodynamic models and led us to state that the crustal features evidenced in the present investigation match well with the model assuming gravity- induced southeastward roll-back of an Ionian lithospheric slab subducting beneath the Tyrrhenian sea.

  7. LOTOS code for local earthquake tomographic inversion: benchmarks for testing tomographic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, I. Yu.

    2009-04-01

    We present the LOTOS-07 code for performing local earthquake tomographic (LET) inversion, which is freely available at www.ivan-art.com/science/LOTOS_07. The initial data for the code are the arrival times from local seismicity and coordinates of the stations. It does not require any information about the sources. The calculations start from absolute location of sources and estimates of an optimal 1D velocity model. Then the sources are relocated simultaneously with the 3D velocity distribution during iterative coupled tomographic inversions. The code allows results to be compared based on node or cell parameterizations. Both Vp-Vs and Vp - Vp/Vs inversion schemes can be performed by the LOTOS code. The working ability of the LOTOS code is illustrated with different real and synthetic datasets. Some of the tests are used to disprove existing stereotypes of LET schemes such as using trade-off curves for evaluation of damping parameters and GAP criterion for selection of events. We also present a series of synthetic datasets with unknown sources and velocity models (www.ivan-art.com/science/benchmark) that can be used as blind benchmarks for testing different tomographic algorithms. We encourage other users of tomography algorithms to join the program on creating benchmarks that can be used to check existing codes. The program codes and testing datasets will be freely distributed during the poster presentation.

  8. Earthquakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, Paul J.; Roper, Jere Gerard

    1974-01-01

    Describes the causes and effects of earthquakes, defines the meaning of magnitude (measured on the Richter Magnitude Scale) and intensity (measured on a modified Mercalli Intensity Scale) and discusses earthquake prediction and control. (JR)

  9. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. comprehensive earthquake management plan: Local Emergency Squads training manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The training objectives are: Describe the Local Emergency Squad's goals and responsibilities during the damage assessment process and relate its importance to the protection and recovery of plant personnel following an earthquake.

  10. Local and systemic activation of the whole complement cascade in human leukocytoclastic cutaneous vasculitis; C3d,g and terminal complement complex as sensitive markers.

    PubMed Central

    Dauchel, H; Joly, P; Delpech, A; Thomine, E; Sauger, F; Le Loet, X; Lauret, P; Tron, F; Fontaine, M; Ripoche, J

    1993-01-01

    We have studied complement activation both in plasma samples and in lesional skin from patients with leukocytoclastic cutaneous vasculitis (LCV). Enzyme immunoassay (EIA) quantification of the complement activation markers, C3d,g and the terminal complement complex (TCC) in plasma, showed that their levels were significantly increased in 66% and 55% of the patients, respectively (n = 29) compared with healthy controls, whereas the standard measurements of C3, factor B, C1q, C4 and C2 were generally within normal range. Elevations of C3d,g and TCC levels in plasma were significantly correlated. Importantly, a significant correlation was found between the severity of the vasculitis and both C3d,g and TCC plasma levels. Immunofluorescence studies of skin biopsy specimens demonstrated simultaneous presence of perivascular dermal deposits of C3d,g and TCC in lesional skin from 96% and 80% respectively of the patients (n = 25). There was a significant correlation between the intensity of the deposits of both markers. Clusterin, a TCC inhibitory protein, was always found at the same sites of perivascular TCC deposits. Immunofluorescence studies at the epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ) revealed in each case deposits of C3d,g which were accompanied by TCC deposits in 52% of the biopsy specimens. These data demonstrate that there is a local and systemic activation of the whole complement cascade in human LCV. The presence of both C3d,g and clusterin-associated TCC perivascular deposits suggests an intervention of a regulatory mechanism of local complement activation in LCV. Finally, measurement of plasma C3d,g and TCC appears to be a sensitive indicator of systemic complement activation and disease severity in LCV. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8485913

  11. 3D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    1998-09-23

    E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output.

  12. Integrated WiFi/PDR/Smartphone Using an Unscented Kalman Filter Algorithm for 3D Indoor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoliang; Meng, Xiaolin; Wang, Yunjia; Zhang, Yanzhe; Tian, Peng; Yang, Huachao

    2015-01-01

    Because of the high calculation cost and poor performance of a traditional planar map when dealing with complicated indoor geographic information, a WiFi fingerprint indoor positioning system cannot be widely employed on a smartphone platform. By making full use of the hardware sensors embedded in the smartphone, this study proposes an integrated approach to a three-dimensional (3D) indoor positioning system. First, an improved K-means clustering method is adopted to reduce the fingerprint database retrieval time and enhance positioning efficiency. Next, with the mobile phone’s acceleration sensor, a new step counting method based on auto-correlation analysis is proposed to achieve cell phone inertial navigation positioning. Furthermore, the integration of WiFi positioning with Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) obtains higher positional accuracy with the help of the Unscented Kalman Filter algorithm. Finally, a hybrid 3D positioning system based on Unity 3D, which can carry out real-time positioning for targets in 3D scenes, is designed for the fluent operation of mobile terminals. PMID:26404314

  13. A visual probe localization and calibration system for cost-effective computer-aided 3D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ali, Aziah; Logeswaran, Rajasvaran

    2007-08-01

    The 3D ultrasound systems produce much better reproductions than 2D ultrasound, but their prohibitively high cost deprives many less affluent organization this benefit. This paper proposes using the conventional 2D ultrasound equipment readily available in most hospitals, along with a single conventional digital camera, to construct 3D ultrasound images. The proposed system applies computer vision to extract position information of the ultrasound probe while the scanning takes place. The probe, calibrated in order to calculate the offset of the ultrasound scan from the position of the marker attached to it, is used to scan a number of geometrical objects. Using the proposed system, the 3D volumes of the objects were successfully reconstructed. The system was tested in clinical situations where human body parts were scanned. The results presented, and confirmed by medical staff, are very encouraging for cost-effective implementation of computer-aided 3D ultrasound using a simple setup with 2D ultrasound equipment and a conventional digital camera. PMID:17126314

  14. Integrated WiFi/PDR/Smartphone Using an Unscented Kalman Filter Algorithm for 3D Indoor Localization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoliang; Meng, Xiaolin; Wang, Yunjia; Zhang, Yanzhe; Tian, Peng; Yang, Huachao

    2015-01-01

    Because of the high calculation cost and poor performance of a traditional planar map when dealing with complicated indoor geographic information, a WiFi fingerprint indoor positioning system cannot be widely employed on a smartphone platform. By making full use of the hardware sensors embedded in the smartphone, this study proposes an integrated approach to a three-dimensional (3D) indoor positioning system. First, an improved K-means clustering method is adopted to reduce the fingerprint database retrieval time and enhance positioning efficiency. Next, with the mobile phone's acceleration sensor, a new step counting method based on auto-correlation analysis is proposed to achieve cell phone inertial navigation positioning. Furthermore, the integration of WiFi positioning with Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) obtains higher positional accuracy with the help of the Unscented Kalman Filter algorithm. Finally, a hybrid 3D positioning system based on Unity 3D, which can carry out real-time positioning for targets in 3D scenes, is designed for the fluent operation of mobile terminals. PMID:26404314

  15. Faulting of local earthquakes in the Valley of Mexico Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, D. I.; Quintanar, L.; Jimenez, Z.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we determine focal mechanisms and source parameters of relevant earthquakes (M > 2 occurred in the Valley of Mexico Basin during the past ten years. Data delineates four seismic zones: the first is located north of the Basin, the second in the Chichinautzin mountains range, the third in the Eastern part of Basin and the fourth in the area surrounding the volcano Popocatepetl; here earthquakes are associated with volcanic activity. Source mechanisms were obtained using a method of waveform modeling and joint inversion of polarities and amplitudes of P and S phases. Our results show mechanisms mainly of normal type, consistent with the faulting found across the Trans Mexican volcanic belt. Likewise, from the spectral analysis of signals, we observe an overestimation of the magnitude reported by the Mexican Seismological Service for the earthquakes analyzed. During July 2012, there was an earthquake swarm in the eastern part of Valley of Mexico damaging some constructions in the epicentral area. Our preliminary analysis indicates that most earthquakes of the swarm occurred at shallow depth (<1 km), which could be correlated with the surface cracks observed in the zone. The seismicity, as well the subsidence and faults in the area, is a factor that contributes significantly to increase seismic hazard in the area and should be considered by civil authorities.

  16. QUANTIFYING UNCERTAINTIES IN GROUND MOTION SIMULATIONS FOR SCENARIO EARTHQUAKES ON THE HAYWARD-RODGERS CREEK FAULT SYSTEM USING THE USGS 3D VELOCITY MODEL AND REALISTIC PSEUDODYNAMIC RUPTURE MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Xie, X

    2008-01-09

    This project seeks to compute ground motions for large (M>6.5) scenario earthquakes on the Hayward Fault using realistic pseudodynamic ruptures, the USGS three-dimensional (3D) velocity model and anelastic finite difference simulations on parallel computers. We will attempt to bound ground motions by performing simulations with suites of stochastic rupture models for a given scenario on a given fault segment. The outcome of this effort will provide the average, spread and range of ground motions that can be expected from likely large earthquake scenarios. The resulting ground motions will be based on first-principles calculations and include the effects of slip heterogeneity, fault geometry and directivity, however, they will be band-limited to relatively low-frequency (< 1 Hz).

  17. Localized compressional velocity decrease precursory to the kalapana, hawaii, earthquake.

    PubMed

    Johnston, A C

    1978-02-24

    A delay in the arrival times of compressional or P waves of 0.15 to 0.2 second from deep distant earthquakes has been detected at the closest seismograph station to the 20 November 1975 earthquake at Kalapana, Hawaii (surface-wave magnitude MS = 7.2). This delay appeared approximately 3.5 years prior to the quake, and travel times returned to normal several months before it. The P-wave arrival times at other nearby stations remained constant during this period, an indication that the decreased velocity implied by the delay in travel time was associated with this normal-faulting earthquake and was confined to distances less than 20 kilometers from the epicenter. PMID:17757587

  18. Impact of grain size evolution on the localization of deformation: 3D numerical simulations of mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozel, Antoine; Golabek, Gregor; Tackley, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Thermodynamically consistent models of single phase grain size evolution have been proposed in the past years [Austin and Evans (2007), Ricard and Bercovici (2009), Rozel et al. (2011), Rozel (2012)]. In a recently updated version [Bercovici and Ricard (2012), PEPI], the mechanics of two-phase grain aggregates has been formulated following the same physical approach. Several non-linear mechanisms such as dynamic recrystallization or Zener pinning are now available in a single non-equilibrium formulation of grain size distributions evolution. The self-consistent generation of localized plate boundaries is predicted in [Bercovici and Ricard (2012), EPSL] using this model, but it has not been tested in a dynamically consistent way. We propose the first set of three-dimensional numerical simulations of mantle convection incorporating this formalism using the finite volume code StagYY [Tackley (2008)]. First, we detail how the model is numerically implemented. Pressure and velocity fields are solved on a staggered grid using a SIMPLER-like method. Multigrid W-cycles and extra coarse-grid relaxations are employed to enhance the convergence of Stokes and continuity equations. The grain size is stored on a large number of tracers advected through the computational domain, which prevent numerical diffusion and allows a high resolution in the shear zones developing in the lithosphere. We also describe the physical formalism itself and propose the set of free parameters of the model. Normal growth, dynamic recrystallization and phase transitions all have a strong effect on the average grain size. We use a visco-plastic rheology in which the viscous strain rate is obtained by summation of dislocation, diffusion and grain boundary sliding creep. Second, we describe the 3D grain size distribution in the mantle and in the lithosphere. We characterize in which conditions plate margins can form, mainly investigating grain growth, recrystallization and rheology related parameters

  19. 3D non-rigid registration using surface and local salient features for transrectal ultrasound image-guided prostate biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Akbari, Hamed; Halig, Luma; Fei, Baowei

    2011-03-01

    We present a 3D non-rigid registration algorithm for the potential use in combining PET/CT and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images for targeted prostate biopsy. Our registration is a hybrid approach that simultaneously optimizes the similarities from point-based registration and volume matching methods. The 3D registration is obtained by minimizing the distances of corresponding points at the surface and within the prostate and by maximizing the overlap ratio of the bladder neck on both images. The hybrid approach not only capture deformation at the prostate surface and internal landmarks but also the deformation at the bladder neck regions. The registration uses a soft assignment and deterministic annealing process. The correspondences are iteratively established in a fuzzy-to-deterministic approach. B-splines are used to generate a smooth non-rigid spatial transformation. In this study, we tested our registration with pre- and postbiopsy TRUS images of the same patients. Registration accuracy is evaluated using manual defined anatomic landmarks, i.e. calcification. The root-mean-squared (RMS) of the difference image between the reference and floating images was decreased by 62.6+/-9.1% after registration. The mean target registration error (TRE) was 0.88+/-0.16 mm, i.e. less than 3 voxels with a voxel size of 0.38×0.38×0.38 mm3 for all five patients. The experimental results demonstrate the robustness and accuracy of the 3D non-rigid registration algorithm.

  20. From local earthquakes tomography to Moho topography beneath the Western Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potin, Bertrand; Valette, Bernard; Thouvenot, François; Monteiller, Vadim

    2015-04-01

    The Western Alps are the result of the collision between the European margin and the Apulian margin, which started about 35 Ma ago. Nowadays, the lithosphere beneath the Western Alps consists of the subduction of the European plate underneath the Apulian plate. Such geometry implies a complex Moho discontinuity. Over the past 25 years, several dense seismic networks settled in France, Italy and Switzerland have permitted to locate more than 45,000 local earthquakes. In this study, we used 335 stations spread over a 200,000 km2 area, and about 35,000 events that have been located with at least 5 stations and 7 P and S-waves picks. The resulting dataset is formed of more than 820,000 data. Most of the Western Alps earthquakes occurred within the first 10 km beneath surface, nevertheless a large part of P and S-waves are refracted waves on the Moho discontinuity. In order to build up the Moho topography of the western Alps, we used at first this data set to perform a crust and upper mantle tomography based on travel-times analysis. Our model consists of a set of V P and V P/V S values given at each node of a three-dimensional, regularly spaced grid, which constitutes the inversion grid. Transition between crust and mantle is modeled by a continuous change in velocity, as we do not introduce any a priori information on the Moho interface. Earthquake locations and site-effect residuals at each station are also determined in the process. The forward computation of travel times in the 3D model is performed by integrating slowness along the rays, which are determined by the Podvin-Lecomte algorithm (basically a finite difference resolution of eikonal equation). Inversion is carried out using a non-linear least-squares approach based on a stochastic description of data and model. The smoothing and damping parameters are adjusted by means of L-curves analysis. The Moho discontinuity is obtained by matching an isovelocity surface of this tomography model with information on

  1. Accuracy of x-ray image-based 3D localization from two C-arm views: a comparison between an ideal system and a real device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Strobel, Norbert; Yatziv, Liron; Gilson, Wesley; Meyer, Bernhard; Hornegger, Joachim; Lewin, Jonathan; Wacker, Frank

    2009-02-01

    arm X-ray imaging devices are commonly used for minimally invasive cardiovascular or other interventional procedures. Calibrated state-of-the-art systems can, however, not only be used for 2D imaging but also for three-dimensional reconstruction either using tomographic techniques or even stereotactic approaches. To evaluate the accuracy of X-ray object localization from two views, a simulation study assuming an ideal imaging geometry was carried out first. This was backed up with a phantom experiment involving a real C-arm angiography system. Both studies were based on a phantom comprising five point objects. These point objects were projected onto a flat-panel detector under different C-arm view positions. The resulting 2D positions were perturbed by adding Gaussian noise to simulate 2D point localization errors. In the next step, 3D point positions were triangulated from two views. A 3D error was computed by taking differences between the reconstructed 3D positions using the perturbed 2D positions and the initial 3D positions of the five points. This experiment was repeated for various C-arm angulations involving angular differences ranging from 15° to 165°. The smallest 3D reconstruction error was achieved, as expected, by views that were 90° degrees apart. In this case, the simulation study yielded a 3D error of 0.82 mm +/- 0.24 mm (mean +/- standard deviation) for 2D noise with a standard deviation of 1.232 mm (4 detector pixels). The experimental result for this view configuration obtained on an AXIOM Artis C-arm (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany) system was 0.98 mm +/- 0.29 mm, respectively. These results show that state-of-the-art C-arm systems can localize instruments with millimeter accuracy, and that they can accomplish this almost as well as an idealized theoretical counterpart. High stereotactic localization accuracy, good patient access, and CT-like 3D imaging capabilities render state-of-the-art C-arm systems ideal devices for X

  2. Real-time motion- and B0-correction for LASER-localized spiral-accelerated 3D-MRSI of the brain at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Bogner, Wolfgang; Hess, Aaron T; Gagoski, Borjan; Tisdall, M. Dylan; van der Kouwe, Andre J.W.; Trattnig, Siegfried; Rosen, Bruce; Andronesi, Ovidiu C

    2013-01-01

    The full potential of magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is often limited by localization artifacts, motion-related artifacts, scanner instabilities, and long measurement times. Localized adiabatic selective refocusing (LASER) provides accurate B1-insensitive spatial excitation even at high magnetic fields. Spiral encoding accelerates MRSI acquisition, and thus, enables 3D-coverage without compromising spatial resolution. Real-time position-and shim/frequency-tracking using MR navigators correct motion- and scanner instability-related artifacts. Each of these three advanced MRI techniques provides superior MRSI data compared to commonly used methods. In this work, we integrated in a single pulse sequence these three promising approaches. Real-time correction of motion, shim, and frequency-drifts using volumetric dual-contrast echo planar imaging-based navigators were implemented in an MRSI sequence that uses low-power gradient modulated short-echo time LASER localization and time efficient spiral readouts, in order to provide fast and robust 3D-MRSI in the human brain at 3T. The proposed sequence was demonstrated to be insensitive to motion- and scanner drift-related degradations of MRSI data in both phantoms and volunteers. Motion and scanner drift artifacts were eliminated and excellent spectral quality was recovered in the presence of strong movement. Our results confirm the expected benefits of combining a spiral 3D-LASER-MRSI sequence with real-time correction. The new sequence provides accurate, fast, and robust 3D metabolic imaging of the human brain at 3T. This will further facilitate the use of 3D-MRSI for neuroscience and clinical applications. PMID:24201013

  3. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, not 3D conformal, is the preferred technique for treating locally advanced lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Joe Y.

    2015-01-01

    When used to treat lung cancer, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can deliver higher dose to the targets and spare more critical organs in lung cancer than can 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). However, tumor-motion management and optimized radiotherapy planning based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scanning are crucial to maximize the benefit of IMRT and to eliminate or minimize potential uncertainties. This article summarizes these strategies and reviews published findings supporting the safety and efficacy of IMRT for lung cancer. PMID:25771415

  4. Dual anode contact geometries for x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy and 3D localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. W.; Garson, A. B., III; Li, Q.; Lee, K.; Groza, M.; Buliga, V.; Burger, A.; Krawczynski, H.

    2009-08-01

    We report on the continued development and testing of unique types of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors. Using large volume (10×20×20 mm3) CZT crystals, we contact various "dual anode" detector designs. We incorporate a segmented cathode with five regions so that the charge on all seven contacts can be used to determine the energy and the 3-D interaction location of detected X-ray and gamma-ray photons. We describe the status of the detector development program, emphasize strengths and weaknesses of the different contact configurations, and discuss possible applications of Dual Anode Detectors in radiation detection applications.

  5. Seismic velocity structure of the central Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, from local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherburn, Steven; Bannister, Stephen; Bibby, Hugh

    2003-03-01

    The 3-D distribution of P-wave velocity (Vp) and the P-wave/S-wave velocity ratio (Vp/Vs) are derived for the crust in the central Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand, by tomographic inversion of P- and S-wave arrival time data from local earthquakes. Resolution in the seismogenic mid-crust (4-6 km) is good, but poorer above and below these depths. The 3-D velocity model has several Vp anomalies as large as ±5% in the mid-lower crust (4-10 km) and more than ±10% in the upper crust (0-4 km). The model achieves a 55% reduction in data variance from an initial 1-D model. Young caldera structures, Okataina, Rotorua, and Reporoa, are characterised by low Vp anomalies at a depth of about 4 km and these coincide with large negative residual gravity anomalies. We attribute these anomalies to large volumes of low Vp, low-density, volcaniclastic sediments that have filled these caldera collapse structures. Although there are no Vp anomalies which suggest the presence of molten or semi-molten magma beneath the TVZ, a large, high Vp anomaly of more than +15% and a high Vp/Vs anomaly are observed coincident with a diorite pluton beneath the Ngatamariki geothermal field. However, Vp anomalies cannot be seen beneath the largest geothermal fields, Waimangu, Waiotapu, and Reporoa, and, consequently, if such anomalies exist, they must be below the resolution of our data. A prominent Vp contrast of 5-10% occurs at a depth of about 6 km beneath the boundary between the Taupo-Reporoa Depression and the Taupo Fault Belt (TFB), coincident with the eastern limit of the seismic activity beneath the TFB. We interpret this velocity contrast as being caused by the presence of extensive, non-molten, intrusives beneath the Taupo-Reporoa Depression. We suggest that the high-velocity material beneath the Taupo-Reporoa Depression is isolated from regional extension in the TVZ, and from the resulting faulting and seismicity, which occurs preferentially within the weaker material of the TFB. We

  6. Earthquake!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Hildo

    2000-01-01

    Examines the types of damage experienced by California State University at Northridge during the 1994 earthquake and what lessons were learned in handling this emergency are discussed. The problem of loose asbestos is addressed. (GR)

  7. Estimating the similarity of earthquake focal mechanisms from waveform cross-correlation in regions of minimal local azimuthal station coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilb, D. L.; Martynov, V.; Bowen, J.; Vernon, F.; Eakins, J.

    2002-12-01

    In the Xinjiang province of China, ~2000 earthquakes were recorded by the Tien Shan network during 1997-1999 that exhibit a clear spatial progression of seismicity. This progression, which is confined to a 50 km diameter region, is undetectable in other data catalogs, both global (e.g., REB, PDE, CMT) and local (KIS). The two largest earthquakes in this sequence were the M6.1 August 2, 1998, and the M6.2 August 27, 1998, earthquakes. According to the Harvard moment tensor solutions, both events ruptured faults that trend parallel to the geologic structures in the region (~N55W). However, the August 27 event was a vertical strike slip event while the August 2 event ruptured a dipping fault and had a normal component of slip. These slip directions are counter to what we expect for this fold-and-thrust-belt, which typically has earthquakes with thrust mechanisms. Often seismological researchers make the assumption that aftershocks have the same focal mechanism as their associated mainshocks and/or assume all aftershock fault planes are similarly oriented. We test this assumption by examining the similarity of aftershock mechanisms from the August 2nd and 27th mainshocks. It is difficult to determine focal mechanisms from inversions of full seismic waveforms because the velocity model in the Tien Shan region is so complicated a 3D velocity model would be required. Also, the azimuthal station coverage is poor. Alternative, it impossible to determine accurate focal mechanisms from first motion data because the closest seismic stations have weak and complicated first arrivals. Our approach more easily determines the similarity of earthquake focal mechanisms using waveform cross-correlation. In this way information from the full waveform is utilized, and there is no need to make estimates of the complicated velocity structure. In general, we find there is minimal correlation between pairs of event waveforms (filter 1-8 Hz) within each aftershock sequence. For example, at

  8. A comparison of needle tip localization accuracy using 2D and 3D trans-rectal ultrasound for high-dose-rate prostate cancer brachytherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Hoover, Douglas A.; Surry, Kathleen; Edirisinghe, Chandima; Montreuil, Jacques; D'Souza, David; Fenster, Aaron; Wong, Eugene

    2016-03-01

    Background: High-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) is a prostate cancer treatment option involving the insertion of hollow needles into the gland through the perineum to deliver a radioactive source. Conventional needle imaging involves indexing a trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe in the superior/inferior (S/I) direction, using the axial transducer to produce an image set for organ segmentation. These images have limited resolution in the needle insertion direction (S/I), so the sagittal transducer is used to identify needle tips, requiring a manual registration with the axial view. This registration introduces a source of uncertainty in the final segmentations and subsequent treatment plan. Our lab has developed a device enabling 3D-TRUS guided insertions with high S/I spatial resolution, eliminating the need to align axial and sagittal views. Purpose: To compare HDR-BT needle tip localization accuracy between 2D and 3D-TRUS. Methods: 5 prostate cancer patients underwent conventional 2D TRUS guided HDR-BT, during which 3D images were also acquired for post-operative registration and segmentation. Needle end-length measurements were taken, providing a gold standard for insertion depths. Results: 73 needles were analyzed from all 5 patients. Needle tip position differences between imaging techniques was found to be largest in the S/I direction with mean+/-SD of -2.5+/-4.0 mm. End-length measurements indicated that 3D TRUS provided statistically significantly lower mean+/-SD insertion depth error of -0.2+/-3.4 mm versus 2.3+/-3.7 mm with 2D guidance (p < .001). Conclusions: 3D TRUS may provide more accurate HDR-BT needle localization than conventional 2D TRUS guidance for the majority of HDR-BT needles.

  9. A Procedure for Rapid Localized Earthquake Hazard Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holliday, J. R.; Rundle, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    In this presentation, we introduce various ground shaking and building response models. We then discuss the forecasting capabilities of different models submitted to the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP) and show how they can be used as inputs for these models. Finally, we discuss how outputs from such multi- tiered calculations would prove invaluable for real-time and scenario-based hazard assessment and for cost-benefit analysis of possible mitigation actions.

  10. Non-local effects by homogenization or 3D-1D dimension reduction in elastic materials reinforced by stiff fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paroni, Roberto; Sili, Ali

    2016-02-01

    We first consider an elastic thin heterogeneous cylinder of radius of order ε: the interior of the cylinder is occupied by a stiff material (fiber) that is surrounded by a soft material (matrix). By assuming that the elasticity tensor of the fiber does not scale with ε and that of the matrix scales with ε2, we prove that the one dimensional model is a nonlocal system. We then consider a reference configuration domain filled out by periodically distributed rods similar to those described above. We prove that the homogenized model is a second order nonlocal problem. In particular, we show that the homogenization problem is directly connected to the 3D-1D dimensional reduction problem.

  11. Highly-accelerated quantitative 2D and 3D localized spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) and sensitivity encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2013-12-01

    Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with chemical shift imaging (CSI) provides valuable metabolic information for research and clinical studies, but is often limited by long scan times. Recently, spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) was shown to provide compartment-averaged spectra resolved in one spatial dimension with many-fold reductions in scan-time. This was achieved using a small subset of the CSI phase-encoding steps from central image k-space that maximized the signal-to-noise ratio. Here, SLAM is extended to two- and three-dimensions (2D, 3D). In addition, SLAM is combined with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) parallel imaging techniques, enabling the replacement of even more CSI phase-encoding steps to further accelerate scan-speed. A modified SLAM reconstruction algorithm is introduced that significantly reduces the effects of signal nonuniformity within compartments. Finally, main-field inhomogeneity corrections are provided, analogous to CSI. These methods are all tested on brain proton MRS data from a total of 24 patients with brain tumors, and in a human cardiac phosphorus 3D SLAM study at 3T. Acceleration factors of up to 120-fold versus CSI are demonstrated, including speed-up factors of 5-fold relative to already-accelerated SENSE CSI. Brain metabolites are quantified in SLAM and SENSE SLAM spectra and found to be indistinguishable from CSI measures from the same compartments. The modified reconstruction algorithm demonstrated immunity to maladjusted segmentation and errors from signal heterogeneity in brain data. In conclusion, SLAM demonstrates the potential to supplant CSI in studies requiring compartment-average spectra or large volume coverage, by dramatically reducing scan-time while providing essentially the same quantitative results.

  12. Highly-accelerated quantitative 2D and 3D localized spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) and sensitivity encoding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Gabr, Refaat E.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) with chemical shift imaging (CSI) provides valuable metabolic information for research and clinical studies, but is often limited by long scan times. Recently, spectroscopy with linear algebraic modeling (SLAM) was shown to provide compartment-averaged spectra resolved in one spatial dimension with many-fold reductions in scan-time. This was achieved using a small subset of the CSI phase-encoding steps from central image k-space that maximized the signal-to-noise ratio. Here, SLAM is extended to two- and three-dimensions (2D, 3D). In addition, SLAM is combined with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) parallel imaging techniques, enabling the replacement of even more CSI phase-encoding steps to further accelerate scan-speed. A modified SLAM reconstruction algorithm is introduced that significantly reduces the effects of signal nonuniformity within compartments. Finally, main-field inhomogeneity corrections are provided, analogous to CSI. These methods are all tested on brain proton MRS data from a total of 24 patients with brain tumors, and in a human cardiac phosphorus 3D SLAM study at 3T. Acceleration factors of up to 120-fold versus CSI are demonstrated, including speed-up factors of 5-fold relative to already-accelerated SENSE CSI. Brain metabolites are quantified in SLAM and SENSE SLAM spectra and found to be indistinguishable from CSI measures from the same compartments. The modified reconstruction algorithm demonstrated immunity to maladjusted segmentation and errors from signal heterogeneity in brain data. In conclusion, SLAM demonstrates the potential to supplant CSI in studies requiring compartment-average spectra or large volume coverage, by dramatically reducing scan-time while providing essentially the same quantitative results. PMID:24188921

  13. Rapid tsunami models and earthquake source parameters: Far-field and local applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.

    2005-01-01

    Rapid tsunami models have recently been developed to forecast far-field tsunami amplitudes from initial earthquake information (magnitude and hypocenter). Earthquake source parameters that directly affect tsunami generation as used in rapid tsunami models are examined, with particular attention to local versus far-field application of those models. First, validity of the assumption that the focal mechanism and type of faulting for tsunamigenic earthquakes is similar in a given region can be evaluated by measuring the seismic consistency of past events. Second, the assumption that slip occurs uniformly over an area of rupture will most often underestimate the amplitude and leading-wave steepness of the local tsunami. Third, sometimes large magnitude earthquakes will exhibit a high degree of spatial heterogeneity such that tsunami sources will be composed of distinct sub-events that can cause constructive and destructive interference in the wavefield away from the source. Using a stochastic source model, it is demonstrated that local tsunami amplitudes vary by as much as a factor of two or more, depending on the local bathymetry. If other earthquake source parameters such as focal depth or shear modulus are varied in addition to the slip distribution patterns, even greater uncertainty in local tsunami amplitude is expected for earthquakes of similar magnitude. Because of the short amount of time available to issue local warnings and because of the high degree of uncertainty associated with local, model-based forecasts as suggested by this study, direct wave height observations and a strong public education and preparedness program are critical for those regions near suspected tsunami sources.

  14. Local three-dimensional earthquake tomography by trans-dimensional Monte Carlo sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piana Agostinetti, Nicola; Giacomuzzi, Genny; Malinverno, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Local earthquake tomography is a non-linear and non-unique inverse problem that uses event arrival times to solve for the spatial distribution of elastic properties. The typical approach is to apply iterative linearization and derive a preferred solution, but such solutions are biased by a number of subjective choices: the starting model that is iteratively adjusted, the degree of regularization used to obtain a smooth solution, and the assumed noise level in the arrival time data. These subjective choices also affect the estimation of the uncertainties in the inverted parameters. The method presented here is developed in a Bayesian framework where a priori information and measurements are combined to define a posterior probability density of the parameters of interest: elastic properties in a subsurface 3-D model, hypocentre coordinates and noise level in the data. We apply a trans-dimensional Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm that asymptotically samples the posterior distribution of the investigated parameters. This approach allows us to overcome the issues raised above. First, starting a number of sampling chains from random samples of the prior probability distribution lessens the dependence of the solution from the starting point. Secondly, the number of elastic parameters in the 3-D subsurface model is one of the unknowns in the inversion, and the parsimony of Bayesian inference ensures that the degree of detail in the solution is controlled by the information in the data, given realistic assumptions for the error statistics. Finally, the noise level in the data, which controls the uncertainties of the solution, is also one of the inverted parameters, providing a first-order estimate of the data errors. We apply our method to both synthetic and field arrival time data. The synthetic data inversion successfully recovers velocity anomalies, hypocentre coordinates and the level of noise in the data. The Bayesian inversion of field measurements gives results

  15. Sedimentary basin effects in Seattle, Washington: Ground-motion observations and 3D simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur; Stephenson, William; Carver, David

    2009-01-01

    Seismograms of local earthquakes recorded in Seattle exhibit surface waves in the Seattle basin and basin-edge focusing of S waves. Spectral ratios of Swaves and later arrivals at 1 Hz for stiff-soil sites in the Seattle basin show a dependence on the direction to the earthquake, with earthquakes to the south and southwest producing higher average amplification. Earthquakes to the southwest typically produce larger basin surface waves relative to S waves than earthquakes to the north and northwest, probably because of the velocity contrast across the Seattle fault along the southern margin of the Seattle basin. S to P conversions are observed for some events and are likely converted at the bottom of the Seattle basin. We model five earthquakes, including the M 6.8 Nisqually earthquake, using 3D finite-difference simulations accurate up to 1 Hz. The simulations reproduce the observed dependence of amplification on the direction to the earthquake. The simulations generally match the timing and character of basin surface waves observed for many events. The 3D simulation for the Nisqually earth-quake produces focusing of S waves along the southern margin of the Seattle basin near the area in west Seattle that experienced increased chimney damage from the earthquake, similar to the results of the higher-frequency 2D simulation reported by Stephenson et al. (2006). Waveforms from the 3D simulations show reasonable agreement with the data at low frequencies (0.2-0.4 Hz) for the Nisqually earthquake and an M 4.8 deep earthquake west of Seattle.

  16. Seismicity and the state of stress from investigations of local earthquakes in the Kumaon Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, V. K.; Chander, R.; Sarkar, I.; Khattri, K. N.; Sinvhal, H.

    1985-10-01

    Results of investigations of local earthquakes in the region of the Main Central Thrust (MCT) in the Kumaon Himalaya, between and adjacent to the valleys of the Bhagirathi and Yamuna rivers, are presented. Records of over 250 earthquakes were analysed and the following facts emerged: (1) Earthquakes in the Himalayas occur in specific areas and belts. One such belt has been identified in the region under investigation, hypocentral estimates being more reliable for earthquakes occurring in the middle segment approximately 70 km long of this belt, crossing the Yamuna river between the villages of Barkot and Syanachatti. (2) All but a few epicentres in this middle segment, lie to the southwest of the surface trace of the MCT in a zone with a width of 10-30 km. (3) Most of the earthquakes in this segment occur at depths of less than 10 km below the ground surface, the maximum estimated depth being 32 km. Using observations of first motion for a composite focal mechanism solution, the nodal planes were observed to be near vertical and the compression axis near horizontal and normal to the local strike of the seismic belt and of the MCT. We conclude that although the Main Central Thrust itself is not seismically active in this region, there is considerable activity immediately to the southwest of it. Furthermore, the mode of faulting as inferred from the records of these earthquakes, is strike slip.

  17. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  18. Studying local earthquakes in the area Baltic-Bothnia Megashear using the data of the POLENET/LAPNET temporary array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoltseva, Olga; Kozlovskaya, Elena

    2016-07-01

    Earthquakes in areas within continental plates are still not completely understood, and progress on understanding intraplate seismicity is slow due to a short history of instrumental seismology and sparse regional seismic networks in seismically non-active areas. However, knowledge about position and depth of seismogenic structures in such areas is necessary in order to estimate seismic hazard for such critical facilities such as nuclear power plants and nuclear waste deposits. In the present paper we address the problem of seismicity in the intraplate area of northern Fennoscandia using the information on local events recorded by the POLENET/LAPNET (Polar Earth Observing Network) temporary seismic array during the International Polar Year 2007-2009. We relocate the seismic events using the program HYPOELLIPS (a computer program for determining local earthquake hypocentral parameters) and grid search method. We use the first arrivals of P waves of local events in order to calculate a 3-D tomographic P wave velocity model of the uppermost crust (down to 20 km) for a selected region inside the study area and show that the velocity heterogeneities in the upper crust correlate well with known tectonic units. We compare the position of the velocity heterogeneities with the seismogenic structures delineated by epicentres of relocated events and demonstrate that these structures generally do not correlate with the crustal units formed as a result of crustal evolution in the Archaean and Palaeoproterozoic. On the contrary, they correlate well with the postglacial faults located in the area of the Baltic-Bothnia Megashear (BBMS). Hypocentres of local events have depths down to 30 km. We also obtain the focal mechanism of a selected event with good data quality. The focal mechanism is of oblique type with strike-slip prevailing. Our results demonstrate that the Baltic-Bothnia Megashear is an important large-scale, reactivated tectonic structure that has to be taken into

  19. Novel Vertical 3D Structure of TaOx-based RRAM with Self-localized Switching Region by Sidewall Electrode Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Muxi; Cai, Yimao; Wang, Zongwei; Fang, Yichen; Liu, Yefan; Yu, Zhizhen; Pan, Yue; Zhang, Zhenxing; Tan, Jing; Yang, Xue; Li, Ming; Huang, Ru

    2016-02-01

    A novel vertical 3D RRAM structure with greatly improved reliability behavior is proposed and experimentally demonstrated through basically compatible process featuring self-localized switching region by sidewall electrode oxidation. Compared with the conventional structure, due to the effective confinement of the switching region, the newly-proposed structure shows about two orders higher endurance (>108 without verification operation) and better retention (>180h@150 °C), as well as high uniformity. Corresponding model is put forward, on the base of which thorough theoretical analysis and calculations are conducted as well, demonstrating that, resulting from the physically-isolated switching from neighboring cells, the proposed structure exhibits dramatically improved reliability due to effective suppression of thermal effects and oxygen vacancies diffusion interference, indicating that this novel structure is very promising for future high density 3D RRAM application.

  20. Novel Vertical 3D Structure of TaOx-based RRAM with Self-localized Switching Region by Sidewall Electrode Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Muxi; Cai, Yimao; Wang, Zongwei; Fang, Yichen; Liu, Yefan; Yu, Zhizhen; Pan, Yue; Zhang, Zhenxing; Tan, Jing; Yang, Xue; Li, Ming; Huang, Ru

    2016-01-01

    A novel vertical 3D RRAM structure with greatly improved reliability behavior is proposed and experimentally demonstrated through basically compatible process featuring self-localized switching region by sidewall electrode oxidation. Compared with the conventional structure, due to the effective confinement of the switching region, the newly-proposed structure shows about two orders higher endurance (>108 without verification operation) and better retention (>180h@150 °C), as well as high uniformity. Corresponding model is put forward, on the base of which thorough theoretical analysis and calculations are conducted as well, demonstrating that, resulting from the physically-isolated switching from neighboring cells, the proposed structure exhibits dramatically improved reliability due to effective suppression of thermal effects and oxygen vacancies diffusion interference, indicating that this novel structure is very promising for future high density 3D RRAM application. PMID:26884054

  1. Local Genome Topology Can Exhibit an Incompletely Rewired 3D-Folding State during Somatic Cell Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Beagan, Jonathan A; Gilgenast, Thomas G; Kim, Jesi; Plona, Zachary; Norton, Heidi K; Hu, Gui; Hsu, Sarah C; Shields, Emily J; Lyu, Xiaowen; Apostolou, Effie; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Corces, Victor G; Dekker, Job; Phillips-Cremins, Jennifer E

    2016-05-01

    Pluripotent genomes are folded in a topological hierarchy that reorganizes during differentiation. The extent to which chromatin architecture is reconfigured during somatic cell reprogramming is poorly understood. Here we integrate fine-resolution architecture maps with epigenetic marks and gene expression in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), neural progenitor cells (NPCs), and NPC-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We find that most pluripotency genes reconnect to target enhancers during reprogramming. Unexpectedly, some NPC interactions around pluripotency genes persist in our iPSC clone. Pluripotency genes engaged in both "fully-reprogrammed" and "persistent-NPC" interactions exhibit over/undershooting of target expression levels in iPSCs. Additionally, we identify a subset of "poorly reprogrammed" interactions that do not reconnect in iPSCs and display only partially recovered, ESC-specific CTCF occupancy. 2i/LIF can abrogate persistent-NPC interactions, recover poorly reprogrammed interactions, reinstate CTCF occupancy, and restore expression levels. Our results demonstrate that iPSC genomes can exhibit imperfectly rewired 3D-folding linked to inaccurately reprogrammed gene expression. PMID:27152443

  2. A new method for detecting colonic polyps based on local intensity structure analysis from 3D abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Nakada, Yuichi; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mori, Kensaku; Suenaga, Yasuhito; Takayama, Tetsuji; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Natori, Hiroshi; Nawano, Shigeru

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a new method for detecting colonic polyps from abdominal CT images based on Hessian matrix analysis. Recently, virtual colonoscopy (VC) has widely received attention as a new and less-invasive colon diagnostic method. A physician diagnoses the inside of the colon using a virtual colonoscopy system. However, since the colon has many haustra and its shape is long and convoluted, a physician has to change viewpoints and viewing directions of the virtual camera many times while diagnosing. Lesions behind haustra may be overlooked. Thus this paper proposes an automated colonic polyp detection method from 3D abdominal CT images. Colonic polyps are located on the colonic wall, and their CT values are higher than colonic lumen regions. In addition, CT values inside polyps tend to gradually increase from outward to inward (blob-like structure). We employ a blob structure enhancement filter based on the eigenvalues of a Hessian matrix to detect polyps with the above blob-shaped characteristics. For reducing FPs, we eliminate polyp candidate regions in which the maximum output value of the blob structure enhancement filter is smaller than given threshold values. Also small regions are removed from candidates. We applied the proposed method to 23 cases of abdominal CT images. Overall, 74.4% of the polyps were detected with 3.8 FPs per case.

  3. Reorienting in Virtual 3D Environments: Do Adult Humans Use Principal Axes, Medial Axes or Local Geometry?

    PubMed Central

    Ambosta, Althea H.; Reichert, James F.; Kelly, Debbie M.

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown that animals, including humans, use the geometric properties of environments to orient. It has been proposed that orientation is accomplished primarily by encoding the principal axes (i.e., global geometry) of an environment. However, recent research has shown that animals use local information such as wall length and corner angles as well as local shape parameters (i.e., medial axes) to orient. The goal of the current study was to determine whether adult humans reorient according to global geometry based on principal axes or whether reliance is on local geometry such as wall length and sense information or medial axes. Using a virtual environment task, participants were trained to select a response box located at one of two geometrically identical corners within a featureless rectangular-shaped environment. Participants were subsequently tested in a transformed L-shaped environment that allowed for a dissociation of strategies based on principal axes, medial axes and local geometry. Results showed that participants relied primarily on a medial axes strategy to reorient in the L-shaped test environment. Importantly, the search behaviour of participants could not be explained by a principal axes-based strategy. PMID:24223869

  4. Local near instantaneously dynamically triggered aftershocks of large earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenyuan; Shearer, Peter M

    2016-09-01

    Aftershocks are often triggered by static- and/or dynamic-stress changes caused by mainshocks. The relative importance of the two triggering mechanisms is controversial at near-to-intermediate distances. We detected and located 48 previously unidentified large early aftershocks triggered by earthquakes with magnitudes between ≥7 and 8 within a few fault lengths (approximately 300 kilometers), during times that high-amplitude surface waves arrive from the mainshock (less than 200 seconds). The observations indicate that near-to-intermediate-field dynamic triggering commonly exists and fundamentally promotes aftershock occurrence. The mainshocks and their nearby early aftershocks are located at major subduction zones and continental boundaries, and mainshocks with all types of faulting-mechanisms (normal, reverse, and strike-slip) can trigger early aftershocks. PMID:27609887

  5. A time series generalized functional model based method for vibration-based damage precise localization in structures consisting of 1D, 2D, and 3D elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaris, C. S.; Sakellariou, J. S.; Fassois, S. D.

    2016-06-01

    This study focuses on the problem of vibration-based damage precise localization via data-based, time series type, methods for structures consisting of 1D, 2D, or 3D elements. A Generalized Functional Model Based method is postulated based on an expanded Vector-dependent Functionally Pooled ARX (VFP-ARX) model form, capable of accounting for an arbitrary structural topology. The FP model's operating parameter vector elements are properly constrained to reflect any given topology. Damage localization is based on operating parameter vector estimation within the specified topology, so that the location estimate and its uncertainty bounds are statistically optimal. The method's effectiveness is experimentally demonstrated through damage precise localization on a laboratory spatial truss structure using various damage scenarios and a single pair of random excitation - vibration response signals in a low and limited frequency bandwidth.

  6. A new 3D parallel high resolution electromagnetic nonlinear inversion based on new global magnetic integral and local differential decomposition (GILD)

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, G.; Li, J.

    1997-05-01

    A new 3D electromagnetic modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm is presented based on global integral and local differential equations decomposition (GILD). The GILD parallel nonlinear inversion algorithm consists of five parts: (1) the domain is decomposed into subdomain SI and subdomain SII; (2) a new global magnetic integral equation in SI and the local magnetic differential equations IN SII will be used together to obtain the magnetic field in the modeling step; (3) the new global magnetic integral Jacobian equation in SI and the local magnetic differential Jacobian equations in SII will be used together to update the electric conductivity and permittivity from the magnetic field data in the inversion step; (4) the subdomain SII can naturally and uniformly be decomposed into 2{sup n} smaller sub-cubic-domains; the sparse matrix in each sub-cubic-domain can be eliminated separately, in parallel; (5) a new parallel multiple hierarchy substructure algorithm will be used to solve the smaller full matrices in SI, in parallel. The applications of the new 3D parallel GILD EM modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm and software are: (1) to create high resolution controlled-source electric conductivity and permittivity imaging for interpreting electromagnetic field data acquired from cross hole, surface to borehole, surface to surface, single hole, and multiple holes; (2) to create the magnetotelluric high resolution imaging from the surface impedance and field data. The new GILD parallel nonlinear inversion will be a 3D/2.5D powerful imaging tool for the oil geophysical exploration and environmental remediation and monitoring.

  7. Importance of macroseismic data from moderate local earthquakes for seismic microzoning effects distribution during the 2003 Bardo, Tunisia, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacem, J.; Hfaiedh, M.

    2012-04-01

    The area considered in this study is located in Northern Tunisia. Being part of the western Mediterranean region, the geodynamic evolution of Northern Tunisia is closely related to the convergence between the African and the European tectonic plates. Numerous Quaternary fold, reverse and strike slip faults and historical earthquake indicate that the seismic hazard of Tunisia is considerable and a better strategy for seismic risk evaluation needs to be developed. In fact, the recent Quaternary activity in Tunisia has been proved and described by numerous authors. This activity sometimes affects Holocene to historic deposits. In particular, evidence of damage can be seen in several sites where constructions dating back to the Roman epoch have been affected. The large number of sites showing Holocene to Historic tectonic deformations cannot be explained by the relatively weak magnitude (M< 5), which characterizes the seismicity of Tunisia. These results suggest that Tunisia is characterized either by relatively important seismicity during the recent quaternary period or by a very shallow seismicity. The second hypothesis is supported by the recent macroseismicity data where several surface effects are observed in many examples of moderate earthquakes. To verify the results of seismic microzoning and to improve techniques, the macroseismic data of past strongly expressed earthquakes is an important key reference. The macroseismic and accelerometric data of the 2003 Bardo, Tunisia, earthquake in the epicentral region are collected and compiled to produce the most reliable and detailed isoseismal map. The area enclosed in the isoseismal with IV EMS degree is not symmetric with respect to the isoseismal with higher degree (V EMS). From this point of view, we can affirm that the attenuation was stronger on the western part than on the eastern one. Moreover, due to very local site effects, we found sporadic small areas with intensity up to IV EMS degree randomly distributed

  8. Improved robustness study of a shock ignited target, with DUED code including non-local electron transport and 3D laser ray-tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atzeni, Stefano; Marocchino, Alberto; Schiavi, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    Accurate descriptions of laser power coupling to the plasma and electron energy transport are crucial for designing shock-ignition targets and assessing their robustness (in particular with regard to laser and positioning errors). To this purpose, the 2D DUED laser fusion code has been improved with the inclusion of a 3D laser ray-tracing scheme and a model for non-local electron transport. 2D simulations with the upgraded code are presented; the dependence of the fusion yield vs target displacement is studied. Two different irradiation configurations are considered.

  9. Fully Automatic Localization and Segmentation of 3D Vertebral Bodies from CT/MR Images via a Learning-Based Method

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chengwen; Belavý, Daniel L.; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Bansmann, Martin; Felsenberg, Dieter; Zheng, Guoyan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problems of fully automatic localization and segmentation of 3D vertebral bodies from CT/MR images. We propose a learning-based, unified random forest regression and classification framework to tackle these two problems. More specifically, in the first stage, the localization of 3D vertebral bodies is solved with random forest regression where we aggregate the votes from a set of randomly sampled image patches to get a probability map of the center of a target vertebral body in a given image. The resultant probability map is then further regularized by Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to eliminate potential ambiguity caused by the neighboring vertebral bodies. The output from the first stage allows us to define a region of interest (ROI) for the segmentation step, where we use random forest classification to estimate the likelihood of a voxel in the ROI being foreground or background. The estimated likelihood is combined with the prior probability, which is learned from a set of training data, to get the posterior probability of the voxel. The segmentation of the target vertebral body is then done by a binary thresholding of the estimated probability. We evaluated the present approach on two openly available datasets: 1) 3D T2-weighted spine MR images from 23 patients and 2) 3D spine CT images from 10 patients. Taking manual segmentation as the ground truth (each MR image contains at least 7 vertebral bodies from T11 to L5 and each CT image contains 5 vertebral bodies from L1 to L5), we evaluated the present approach with leave-one-out experiments. Specifically, for the T2-weighted MR images, we achieved for localization a mean error of 1.6 mm, and for segmentation a mean Dice metric of 88.7% and a mean surface distance of 1.5 mm, respectively. For the CT images we achieved for localization a mean error of 1.9 mm, and for segmentation a mean Dice metric of 91.0% and a mean surface distance of 0.9 mm, respectively. PMID:26599505

  10. Fully Automatic Localization and Segmentation of 3D Vertebral Bodies from CT/MR Images via a Learning-Based Method.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chengwen; Belavý, Daniel L; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Bansmann, Martin; Felsenberg, Dieter; Zheng, Guoyan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problems of fully automatic localization and segmentation of 3D vertebral bodies from CT/MR images. We propose a learning-based, unified random forest regression and classification framework to tackle these two problems. More specifically, in the first stage, the localization of 3D vertebral bodies is solved with random forest regression where we aggregate the votes from a set of randomly sampled image patches to get a probability map of the center of a target vertebral body in a given image. The resultant probability map is then further regularized by Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to eliminate potential ambiguity caused by the neighboring vertebral bodies. The output from the first stage allows us to define a region of interest (ROI) for the segmentation step, where we use random forest classification to estimate the likelihood of a voxel in the ROI being foreground or background. The estimated likelihood is combined with the prior probability, which is learned from a set of training data, to get the posterior probability of the voxel. The segmentation of the target vertebral body is then done by a binary thresholding of the estimated probability. We evaluated the present approach on two openly available datasets: 1) 3D T2-weighted spine MR images from 23 patients and 2) 3D spine CT images from 10 patients. Taking manual segmentation as the ground truth (each MR image contains at least 7 vertebral bodies from T11 to L5 and each CT image contains 5 vertebral bodies from L1 to L5), we evaluated the present approach with leave-one-out experiments. Specifically, for the T2-weighted MR images, we achieved for localization a mean error of 1.6 mm, and for segmentation a mean Dice metric of 88.7% and a mean surface distance of 1.5 mm, respectively. For the CT images we achieved for localization a mean error of 1.9 mm, and for segmentation a mean Dice metric of 91.0% and a mean surface distance of 0.9 mm, respectively. PMID:26599505

  11. Toroidal mode number estimation of the edge-localized modes using the KSTAR 3-D electron cyclotron emission imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Yun, G. S. Lee, J. E.; Kim, M.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Park, Y. S.; Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.

    2014-06-15

    A new and more accurate technique is presented for determining the toroidal mode number n of edge-localized modes (ELMs) using two independent electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The technique involves the measurement of the poloidal spacing between adjacent ELM filaments, and of the pitch angle α{sub *} of filaments at the plasma outboard midplane. Equilibrium reconstruction verifies that α{sub *} is nearly constant and thus well-defined at the midplane edge. Estimates of n obtained using two ECEI systems agree well with n measured by the conventional technique employing an array of Mirnov coils.

  12. Toroidal mode number estimation of the edge-localized modes using the KSTAR 3-D electron cyclotron emission imaging system.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Yun, G S; Lee, J E; Kim, M; Choi, M J; Lee, W; Park, H K; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Sabbagh, S A; Park, Y S; Lee, S G; Bak, J G

    2014-06-01

    A new and more accurate technique is presented for determining the toroidal mode number n of edge-localized modes (ELMs) using two independent electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The technique involves the measurement of the poloidal spacing between adjacent ELM filaments, and of the pitch angle α* of filaments at the plasma outboard midplane. Equilibrium reconstruction verifies that α* is nearly constant and thus well-defined at the midplane edge. Estimates of n obtained using two ECEI systems agree well with n measured by the conventional technique employing an array of Mirnov coils. PMID:24985817

  13. Crustal Structure Beneath Pleasant Valley, Nevada from Local and Regional Earthquake Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant, L. B.; Nabelek, J.; Braunmiller, J.

    2011-12-01

    In 1915 the Pleasant Valley fault in the Basin and Range Province of northern Nevada ruptured in a Mw~7 earthquake, one of the largest normal faulting earthquakes in U.S. history. We are currently operating a densely spaced linear array of broadband three-component seismometers across the Pleasant Valley fault to investigate the structure and the geometry of the fault zone. Here, we present a local crustal velocity model derived from P and S wave travel times of local and regional earthquakes recorded by the Pleasant Valley array. Regional events in northern California, eastern Nevada and Utah that occurred in line with the array are well recorded and provide constraints on upper mantle velocities. Many local seismic events were also observed. Only a few of these events were detected by the ANSS network, reflecting the limited detection capability in sparsely instrumented northern Nevada. The local event set includes earthquakes, mining blasts and sonic booms from nearby jet airplane flights. A subset of these events was located using Hypoinverse. Their travel time curves are used to estimate crustal structure and velocity in the Pleasant Valley region. This is an EarthScope FlexArray project.

  14. 3D He-3 diffusion MRI as a local in vivo morphometric tool to evaluate emphysematous rat lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Minard, Kevin R.; Laicher, Gernot J.; Timchalk, Charles

    2008-08-21

    In this work, we validate 3He magnetic resonance imaging as a non-invasive morphometric tool to assess emphysematous disease state on a local level. Emphysema was induced intratracheally in rats with 25U/100g body weight of porcine pancreatic elastase dissolved in 200 μL saline. Rats were then paired with saline-dosed controls. Nine three-dimensional 3He diffusion-weighted images were acquired at one-, two-, or three-weeks post-dose, after which the lungs were harvested and prepared for histological analysis. Recently introduced indices sensitive to the heterogeneity of the airspace size distribution were calculated. These indices, D1 and D2, were derived from the moments of the mean equivalent airway diameters. Averaged over the entire lung, it is shown that the 3He diffusivity (Dave) and anisotropy (Dan) both correlate with histology (R = 0.85, p < 0.0001 and R = 0.88, p < 0.0001, respectively). By matching small (0.046 cm2) regions in 3He images with corresponding regions in histological slices, Dave and Dan each correlate significantly with both D1 and D2 (R = 0.93, p < 0.0001). It is concluded that 3He MRI is a viable non-invasive morphometric tool for localized in vivo emphysema assessment.

  15. Development of a locally mass flux conservative computer code for calculating 3-D viscous flow in turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walitt, L.

    1982-01-01

    The VANS successive approximation numerical method was extended to the computation of three dimensional, viscous, transonic flows in turbomachines. A cross-sectional computer code, which conserves mass flux at each point of the cross-sectional surface of computation was developed. In the VANS numerical method, the cross-sectional computation follows a blade-to-blade calculation. Numerical calculations were made for an axial annular turbine cascade and a transonic, centrifugal impeller with splitter vanes. The subsonic turbine cascade computation was generated in blade-to-blade surface to evaluate the accuracy of the blade-to-blade mode of marching. Calculated blade pressures at the hub, mid, and tip radii of the cascade agreed with corresponding measurements. The transonic impeller computation was conducted to test the newly developed locally mass flux conservative cross-sectional computer code. Both blade-to-blade and cross sectional modes of calculation were implemented for this problem. A triplet point shock structure was computed in the inducer region of the impeller. In addition, time-averaged shroud static pressures generally agreed with measured shroud pressures. It is concluded that the blade-to-blade computation produces a useful engineering flow field in regions of subsonic relative flow; and cross-sectional computation, with a locally mass flux conservative continuity equation, is required to compute the shock waves in regions of supersonic relative flow.

  16. A comparison study of atlas-based 3D cardiac MRI segmentation: global versus global and local transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daryanani, Aditya; Dangi, Shusil; Ben-Zikri, Yehuda Kfir; Linte, Cristian A.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a standard-of-care imaging modality for cardiac function assessment and guidance of cardiac interventions thanks to its high image quality and lack of exposure to ionizing radiation. Cardiac health parameters such as left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, myocardial mass, thickness, and strain can be assessed by segmenting the heart from cardiac MRI images. Furthermore, the segmented pre-operative anatomical heart models can be used to precisely identify regions of interest to be treated during minimally invasive therapy. Hence, the use of accurate and computationally efficient segmentation techniques is critical, especially for intra-procedural guidance applications that rely on the peri-operative segmentation of subject-specific datasets without delaying the procedure workflow. Atlas-based segmentation incorporates prior knowledge of the anatomy of interest from expertly annotated image datasets. Typically, the ground truth atlas label is propagated to a test image using a combination of global and local registration. The high computational cost of non-rigid registration motivated us to obtain an initial segmentation using global transformations based on an atlas of the left ventricle from a population of patient MRI images and refine it using well developed technique based on graph cuts. Here we quantitatively compare the segmentations obtained from the global and global plus local atlases and refined using graph cut-based techniques with the expert segmentations according to several similarity metrics, including Dice correlation coefficient, Jaccard coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and Mean absolute distance error.

  17. 3D-localization microscopy and tracking of FoF1-ATP synthases in living bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renz, Anja; Renz, Marc; Klütsch, Diana; Deckers-Hebestreit, Gabriele; Börsch, Michael

    2015-03-01

    FoF1-ATP synthases are membrane-embedded protein machines that catalyze the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate. Using photoactivation-based localization microscopy (PALM) in TIR-illumination as well as structured illumination microscopy (SIM), we explore the spatial distribution and track single FoF1-ATP synthases in living E. coli cells under physiological conditions at different temperatures. For quantitative diffusion analysis by mean-squared-displacement measurements, the limited size of the observation area in the membrane with its significant membrane curvature has to be considered. Therefore, we applied a 'sliding observation window' approach (M. Renz et al., Proc. SPIE 8225, 2012) and obtained the one-dimensional diffusion coefficient of FoF1-ATP synthase diffusing on the long axis in living E. coli cells.

  18. Results and DVH analysis of late rectal bleeding in patients treated with 3D-CRT or IMRT for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Someya, Masanori; Hori, Masakazu; Tateoka, Kunihiko; Nakata, Kensei; Takagi, Masaru; Saito, Masato; Hirokawa, Naoki; Hareyama, Masato; Sakata, Koh-ichi

    2015-01-01

    In patients undergoing radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer, dose–volume histograms and clinical variables were examined to search for correlations between radiation treatment planning parameters and late rectal bleeding. We analyzed 129 patients with localized prostate cancer who were managed from 2002 to 2010 at our institution. They were treated with 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT, 70 Gy/35 fractions, 55 patients) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, 76 Gy/38 fractions, 74 patients). All radiation treatment plans were retrospectively reconstructed, dose–volume histograms of the rectum were generated, and the doses delivered to the rectum were calculated. Time to rectal bleeding ranged from 9–53 months, with a median of 18.7 months. Of the 129 patients, 33 patients had Grade 1 bleeding and were treated with steroid suppositories, while 25 patients with Grade 2 bleeding received argon plasma laser coagulation therapy (APC). Three patients with Grade 3 bleeding required both APC and blood transfusion. The 5-year incidence rate of Grade 2 or 3 rectal bleeding was 21.8% for the 3D-CRT group and 21.6% for the IMRT group. Univariate analysis showed significant differences in the average values from V65 to V10 between Grades 0–1 and Grades 2–3. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that patients with V65 ≥ 17% had a significantly increased risk (P = 0.032) of Grade 2 or 3 rectal bleeding. Of the 28 patients of Grade 2 or 3 rectal bleeding, 17 patients (60.7%) were cured by a single session of APC, while the other 11 patients required two sessions. Thus, none of the patients had any further rectal bleeding after the second APC session. PMID:25212601

  19. The double-helix point spread function enables precise and accurate measurement of 3D single-molecule localization and orientation

    PubMed Central

    Backlund, Mikael P.; Lew, Matthew D.; Backer, Adam S.; Sahl, Steffen J.; Grover, Ginni; Agrawal, Anurag; Piestun, Rafael; Moerner, W. E.

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule-based super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has recently been developed to surpass the diffraction limit by roughly an order of magnitude. These methods depend on the ability to precisely and accurately measure the position of a single-molecule emitter, typically by fitting its emission pattern to a symmetric estimator (e.g. centroid or 2D Gaussian). However, single-molecule emission patterns are not isotropic, and depend highly on the orientation of the molecule’s transition dipole moment, as well as its z-position. Failure to account for this fact can result in localization errors on the order of tens of nm for in-focus images, and ~50–200 nm for molecules at modest defocus. The latter range becomes especially important for three-dimensional (3D) single-molecule super-resolution techniques, which typically employ depths-of-field of up to ~2 μm. To address this issue we report the simultaneous measurement of precise and accurate 3D single-molecule position and 3D dipole orientation using the Double-Helix Point Spread Function (DH-PSF) microscope. We are thus able to significantly improve dipole-induced position errors, reducing standard deviations in lateral localization from ~2x worse than photon-limited precision (48 nm vs. 25 nm) to within 5 nm of photon-limited precision. Furthermore, by averaging many estimations of orientation we are able to improve from a lateral standard deviation of 116 nm (~4x worse than the precision, 28 nm) to 34 nm (within 6 nm). PMID:24817798

  20. 2D and 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography imaging of earthquake related ground deformations at the Ancient Roman Forum and Isis Temple of Baelo Claudia (Cádiz, South Spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Pablo G.

    2010-05-01

    The ancient roman city of Baelo Claudia has been subject of several papers on earthquake environmental effects (EEE) and well as earthquake archaeological effects (EAE). During the field training course on archaeoseismology and palaeoseismology conducted in September 2009 (INQUA-IGCP567 Workshop) held at Baelo Claudia, four Electric Resistivity Tomography (ERT) profiles were carried out, by the teams of the Salamanca University (Spain), RWTH Aachen University (Germany) and the Geological Survey of Spain (IGME). ERT surveys were developed in the eastern side of the ancient roman Forum across the unexcavated sector of the archaeological site heading on the 1st Century AD Isis Temple. Each ERT profile was constituted by a 48 multielectrode array with spacing of 2 m resulting in a total length of investigation of around 384 m. ERT lines were separated 10 m each other resulting in a total research area of 3840 m2 to a mean investigation depth of 16 m. The selected survey configurations were Pole-Dipole and Wenner in order to get detailed information about lateral resistivity contrasts, but with a reasonable depth of investigation. The resulting 2D resistivity pseudosections clearly display deformations of the buried roman pavements which propagated in depth within the pre-roman clayey substratum of the Bolonia Bay area.. 3D modelling of the 2D pseudosections indicates that the observed deformations are related to near-surface landsliding, being possible to calculate the minimum volume of mobilized material. ERT 3D imaging allow to refine previous GPR surveys conducted at this same area and to get a subsurface picture of ground deformations caused by repeated earthquakes during the 1st and 3rd Centuries AD. Preliminary calculated volume for the mobilized materials affecting the foundations of the Isis Temple and Forum clearly points to a minimum ESI-07 VIII Intensity validating previous research in the zone. This study has been supported by the Spanish Research Projects

  1. Accurate and Fully Automatic Hippocampus Segmentation Using Subject-Specific 3D Optimal Local Maps Into a Hybrid Active Contour Model

    PubMed Central

    Gkontra, Polyxeni; Daras, Petros; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the structural integrity of the hippocampus (HC) is an essential step toward prevention, diagnosis, and follow-up of various brain disorders due to the implication of the structural changes of the HC in those disorders. In this respect, the development of automatic segmentation methods that can accurately, reliably, and reproducibly segment the HC has attracted considerable attention over the past decades. This paper presents an innovative 3-D fully automatic method to be used on top of the multiatlas concept for the HC segmentation. The method is based on a subject-specific set of 3-D optimal local maps (OLMs) that locally control the influence of each energy term of a hybrid active contour model (ACM). The complete set of the OLMs for a set of training images is defined simultaneously via an optimization scheme. At the same time, the optimal ACM parameters are also calculated. Therefore, heuristic parameter fine-tuning is not required. Training OLMs are subsequently combined, by applying an extended multiatlas concept, to produce the OLMs that are anatomically more suitable to the test image. The proposed algorithm was tested on three different and publicly available data sets. Its accuracy was compared with that of state-of-the-art methods demonstrating the efficacy and robustness of the proposed method. PMID:27170866

  2. Accurate and Fully Automatic Hippocampus Segmentation Using Subject-Specific 3D Optimal Local Maps Into a Hybrid Active Contour Model.

    PubMed

    Zarpalas, Dimitrios; Gkontra, Polyxeni; Daras, Petros; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the structural integrity of the hippocampus (HC) is an essential step toward prevention, diagnosis, and follow-up of various brain disorders due to the implication of the structural changes of the HC in those disorders. In this respect, the development of automatic segmentation methods that can accurately, reliably, and reproducibly segment the HC has attracted considerable attention over the past decades. This paper presents an innovative 3-D fully automatic method to be used on top of the multiatlas concept for the HC segmentation. The method is based on a subject-specific set of 3-D optimal local maps (OLMs) that locally control the influence of each energy term of a hybrid active contour model (ACM). The complete set of the OLMs for a set of training images is defined simultaneously via an optimization scheme. At the same time, the optimal ACM parameters are also calculated. Therefore, heuristic parameter fine-tuning is not required. Training OLMs are subsequently combined, by applying an extended multiatlas concept, to produce the OLMs that are anatomically more suitable to the test image. The proposed algorithm was tested on three different and publicly available data sets. Its accuracy was compared with that of state-of-the-art methods demonstrating the efficacy and robustness of the proposed method. PMID:27170866

  3. Localization of Metal Electrodes in the Intact Rat Brain Using Registration of 3D Microcomputed Tomography Images to a Magnetic Resonance Histology Atlas1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Jana Schaich; Vu, Mai-Anh; Badea, Cristian; Badea, Alexandra; Johnson, G. Allan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Simultaneous neural recordings taken from multiple areas of the rodent brain are garnering growing interest because of the insight they can provide about spatially distributed neural circuitry. The promise of such recordings has inspired great progress in methods for surgically implanting large numbers of metal electrodes into intact rodent brains. However, methods for localizing the precise location of these electrodes have remained severely lacking. Traditional histological techniques that require slicing and staining of physical brain tissue are cumbersome and become increasingly impractical as the number of implanted electrodes increases. Here we solve these problems by describing a method that registers 3D computed tomography (CT) images of intact rat brains implanted with metal electrode bundles to a magnetic resonance imaging histology (MRH) atlas. Our method allows accurate visualization of each electrode bundle’s trajectory and location without removing the electrodes from the brain or surgically implanting external markers. In addition, unlike physical brain slices, once the 3D images of the electrode bundles and the MRH atlas are registered, it is possible to verify electrode placements from many angles by “reslicing” the images along different planes of view. Furthermore, our method can be fully automated and easily scaled to applications with large numbers of specimens. Our digital imaging approach to efficiently localizing metal electrodes offers a substantial addition to currently available methods, which, in turn, may help accelerate the rate at which insights are gleaned from rodent network neuroscience. PMID:26322331

  4. Automatic abdominal lymph node detection method based on local intensity structure analysis from 3D x-ray CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mizuno, Shinji; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Goto, Hidemi; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Masaaki; Nawano, Shigeru; Mori, Kensaku

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an automated method of abdominal lymph node detection to aid the preoperative diagnosis of abdominal cancer surgery. In abdominal cancer surgery, surgeons must resect not only tumors and metastases but also lymph nodes that might have a metastasis. This procedure is called lymphadenectomy or lymph node dissection. Insufficient lymphadenectomy carries a high risk for relapse. However, excessive resection decreases a patient's quality of life. Therefore, it is important to identify the location and the structure of lymph nodes to make a suitable surgical plan. The proposed method consists of candidate lymph node detection and false positive reduction. Candidate lymph nodes are detected using a multi-scale blob-like enhancement filter based on local intensity structure analysis. To reduce false positives, the proposed method uses a classifier based on support vector machine with the texture and shape information. The experimental results reveal that it detects 70.5% of the lymph nodes with 13.0 false positives per case.

  5. Towards 3D charge localization by a method derived from atomic force microscopy: the electrostatic force distance curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve-Faure, C.; Boudou, L.; Makasheva, K.; Teyssedre, G.

    2014-11-01

    Charges injection and accumulation in the dielectric remains a critical issue, mainly because these phenomena are involved in a great number of failure mechanisms in cables or electronic components. Achieving a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to charge injection, transport and trapping under electrical stress and of the relevant interface phenomena is a high priority. The classical methods used for space charge density profile measurements have a limited spatial resolution, which prevents them being used for investigating thin dielectric layers or interface processes. Thus, techniques derived from atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been investigated more and more for this kind of application, but so far they have been limited by their lack of in-depth sensitivity. In this paper a new method for space charge probing is described, the electrostatic force distance curve (EFDC), which is based on electrostatic force measurements using AFM. A comparison with the results obtained using kelvin force microscopy (KFM) allowed us to highlight the fact that EFDC is sensitive to charges localized in the third-dimension.

  6. Nanostructured exchange coupled hard/soft composites: From the local magnetization profile to an extended 3d simple model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russier, V.; Younsi, K.; Bessais, L.

    2012-03-01

    In nanocomposite magnetic materials the exchange coupling between phases plays a central role in the determination of the extrinsic magnetic properties of the material: coercive field,remanence magnetization. Exchange coupling is therefore of crucial importance in composite systems made of magnetically hard and soft grains or in partially crystallized media including nanosized crystallites in a soft matrix. It has been shown also to be a key point in the control of stratified hard/soft media coercive field in the research for optimized recording media. A signature of the exchange coupling due to the nanostructure is generally obtained on the magnetization curve M(H) with a plateau characteristic of the domain wall compression at the hard/soft interface ending at the depinning of the wall inside the hard phase. This compression/depinning behavior is clearly evidenced through one dimensional description of the interface, which is rigorously possible only in stratified media. Starting from a local description of the hard/soft interface in a model for nanocomposite system we show that one can extend this kind of behavior for system of hard crystallites embedded in a soft matrix.

  7. Local D3/D7 μ-SPLIT SUSY, 125 GeV Higgs and Large Volume Ricci-Flat Swiss-Cheese Metrics:. a Brief Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Aalok

    In this paper, we review briefly recent progress made in realizing local(ized around a mobile spacetime filling D3-brane in) D3/D7 μ-split Supersymmetry in (the large volume limit of Type IIB) String Theory (compactified on Swiss-Cheese Calabi-Yau orientifolds) as well as obtaining a 125 GeV (light) Higgs in the same setup. We also discuss obtaining the geometric Kähler potential (and hence the Ricci-flat metric) for the Swiss-Cheese Calabi-Yau in the large volume limit using the Donaldson's algorithm and intuition from GLSM-based calculations — we present new results for Swiss-Cheese Calabi-Yau (used in the setup) metrics at points finitely away from the "big" divisor.

  8. Inversion for rupture properties based upon 3-D directivity effect and application to deep earthquakes in the Sea of Okhotsk region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sunyoung; Ishii, Miaki

    2015-11-01

    Rupture properties, such as rupture direction, length, propagation speed and source duration, provide important insights into earthquake mechanisms. One approach to estimate these properties is to investigate the body-wave duration that depends upon the relative location of the station with respect to the rupture direction. Under the assumption that the propagation is unilateral, the duration can be expressed as a function of the dip and azimuth of the rupture. Examination of duration measurements with respect to both the take-off angle and the azimuth is crucial to obtain robust estimates of rupture parameters, especially for nearly vertical rupture propagation. Moreover, limited data coverage, such as using only teleseismic data, can bias the source duration estimate for dipping ruptures, and this bias can map into estimates of other source properties such as rupture extent and rupture speed. Based upon this framework, we introduce an inversion scheme that uses the duration measurements to obtain four parameters: the source duration, a measure of the rupture extent and speed, and dip and azimuth of the rupture propagation. The method is applied to two deep-focus events in the Sea of Okhotsk region, an Mw 7.7 event that occurred on 2012 August 14 and an Mw 8.3 event from 2013 May 24. The source durations are 26 ± 1 and 37 ± 1 s, and rupture speeds are 49 ± 4 per cent and 26 ± 3 per cent of shear wave speed for the Mw 7.7 and 8.3 events, respectively. The azimuths of the two ruptures are parallel to the trench, but are in opposite directions. The dips of the Mw 7.7 and 8.3 events are constrained to be 48° ± 8° downdip and 19° ± 8° updip, respectively. The fit to the data is significantly poorer for the Mw 8.3 event than the Mw 7.7 event, suggesting that the unilateral rupture may not be a good assumption. The analysis is expanded into a multi-episode model, and a secondary episode is determined for the Mw 8.3 event in the southeast direction. The two

  9. FEM analysis of deformation localization mechanisms in a 3-D fractured medium under rotating compressive stress orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strijker, Geertje; Beekman, Fred; Bertotti, Giovanni; Luthi, Stefan M.

    2013-05-01

    Stress distributions and deformation patterns in a medium with a pre-existing fracture set are analyzed as a function of the remote compressive stress orientation (σH) using finite element models with increasingly complex fracture configurations. Slip along the fractures causes deformation localization at the tips as wing cracks or shear zones. The deformation intensity is proportional to the amount of slip, attaining a peak value for α = 45° (α: angle between the fracture strike and σH) and slip is linearly proportional with fracture length. Wing cracks develop for high deformation intensities for 30° < α < 60°, whereas primary plastic shear zones develop for low deformation intensities. Additionally, two types of secondary shear zones develop for α < 30° and α > 60°, with constant angles of 135° and - 60° with σH, respectively. Mechanical interaction between fractures in a fracture zone, quantified as change in slip compared to an isolated fracture, decreases with increasing fracture separation. Fracture underlap elongates the fracture length and therefore increases the amount of slip, while fracture overlap exhibits the opposite effect. Fracture slip decreases with an increasing amount of directly adjacent fractures. Mechanical interaction becomes negligible for fracture configurations with spacing-to-length and spacing-to-overlap ratios exceeding 0.5 and that in this case fractures are decoupled. Independent of the pre-existing fracture configuration, the development of a secondary systematic fracture set driven by a remote stress rotation is dominated by σH; development of wing cracks or shear zones is restricted to the fracture tips. Blocks with tapered geometries are present in models with a variable fracture strike, where the maximum principal stress (σ1, applying the geological convention that compressive stresses are positive) trajectories consistently deviate from σH; the presence of two systematic σ1 trajectory orientations suggests

  10. Validation of hip joint center localization methods during gait analysis using 3D EOS imaging in typically developing and cerebral palsy children.

    PubMed

    Assi, Ayman; Sauret, Christophe; Massaad, Abir; Bakouny, Ziad; Pillet, Hélène; Skalli, Wafa; Ghanem, Ismat

    2016-07-01

    Localization of the hip joint center (HJC) is essential in computation of gait data. EOS low dose biplanar X-rays have been shown to be a good reference in evaluating various methods of HJC localization in adults. The aim is to evaluate predictive and functional techniques for HJC localization in typically developing (TD) and cerebral palsy (CP) children, using EOS as an image based reference. Eleven TD and 17 CP children underwent 3D gait analysis. Six HJC localization methods were evaluated in each group bilaterally: 3 predictive (Plug in Gait, Bell and Harrington) and 3 functional methods based on the star arc technique (symmetrical center of rotation estimate, center transformation technique and geometrical sphere fitting). All children then underwent EOS low dose biplanar radiographs. Pelvis, lower limbs and their corresponding external markers were reconstructed in 3D. The center of the femoral head was considered as the reference (HJCEOS). Euclidean distances between HJCs estimated by each of the 6 methods and the HJCEOS were calculated; distances were shown to be lower in predictive compared to functional methods (p<0.0001). Contrarily to findings in adults, functional methods were shown to be less accurate than predictive methods in TD and CP children, which could be mainly due to the shorter thigh segment in children. Harrington method was shown to be the most accurate in the prediction of HJC (mean error≈18mm, SD=9mm) and quasi-equivalent to the Bell method. The bias for each method was quantified, allowing its correction for an improved HJC estimation. PMID:27477704

  11. Joint Inversion of Earthquake Source Parameters with local and teleseismic body waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Ni, S.; Wang, Z.

    2011-12-01

    In the classical source parameter inversion algorithm of CAP (Cut and Paste method, by Zhao and Helmberger), waveform data at near distances (typically less than 500km) are partitioned into Pnl and surface waves to account for uncertainties in the crustal models and different amplitude weight of body and surface waves. The classical CAP algorithms have proven effective for resolving source parameters (focal mechanisms, depth and moment) for earthquakes well recorded on relatively dense seismic network. However for regions covered with sparse stations, it is challenging to achieve precise source parameters . In this case, a moderate earthquake of ~M6 is usually recorded on only one or two local stations with epicentral distances less than 500 km. Fortunately, an earthquake of ~M6 can be well recorded on global seismic networks. Since the ray paths for teleseismic and local body waves sample different portions of the focal sphere, combination of teleseismic and local body wave data helps constrain source parameters better. Here we present a new CAP mothod (CAPjoint), which emploits both teleseismic body waveforms (P and SH waves) and local waveforms (Pnl, Rayleigh and Love waves) to determine source parameters. For an earthquake in Nevada that is well recorded with dense local network (USArray stations), we compare the results from CAPjoint with those from the traditional CAP method involving only of local waveforms , and explore the efficiency with bootstraping statistics to prove the results derived by CAPjoint are stable and reliable. Even with one local station included in joint inversion, accuracy of source parameters such as moment and strike can be much better improved.

  12. Shear Wave Splitting from Local Earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Arroucau, P.; Vlahovic, G.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we investigate crustal anisotropy in the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), by analyzing shear wave splitting from local earthquake data. The NMSZ is centrally located in the United States, spanning portions of western Tennessee, northeastern Arkansas, and southeastern Missouri. The NMSZ is also the location in which three of the largest known earthquakes took place in North America, occurring in 1811-1812. Although many seismic studies have been performed in this region, there is no consensus about which driving mechanism could satisfy both the current observations, as well as the historically observed seismicity. Therefore, it is important to continue investigating the NMSZ, to gain a better understanding of its seismicity, and the possible mechanisms that drive it. The automated technique developed by Savage et al. (2010) is used to perform the shear wave splitting measurements at 120 seismic stations within the NMSZ. The Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) at the University of Memphis provided data for 1151 earthquakes spanning the years 2003-2011. The initial event selection was reduced to 245 earthquakes ranging in magnitude from 2.0 to 4.6, which fell within the shear wave window of one or more of the stations. The results of this study provide information about orientation of microcracks in the upper portion of the crust; future work will include analysis for temporal and spatial variations in order to assess the state of stress in the region.

  13. Finding the Shadows: Local Variations in the Stress Field due to Large Magnitude Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latimer, C.; Tiampo, K.; Rundle, J.

    2009-05-01

    Stress shadows, regions of static stress decrease associated with large magnitude earthquake have typically been described through several characteristics or parameters such as location, duration, and size. These features can provide information about the physics of the earthquake itself, as static stress changes are dependent on the following parameters: the regional stress orientations, the coefficient of friction, as well as the depth of interest (King et al, 1994). Areas of stress decrease, associated with a decrease in the seismicity rate, while potentially stable in nature, have been difficult to identify in regions of high rates of background seismicity (Felzer and Brodsky, 2005; Hardebeck et al., 1998). In order to obtain information about these stress shadows, we can determine their characteristics by using the Pattern Informatics (PI) method (Tiampo et al., 2002; Tiampo et al., 2006). The PI method is an objective measure of seismicity rate changes that can be used to locate areas of increases and/or decreases relative to the regional background rate. The latter defines the stress shadows for the earthquake of interest, as seismicity rate changes and stress changes are related (Dieterich et al., 1992; Tiampo et al., 2006). Using the data from the PI method, we can invert for the parameters of the modeled half-space using a genetic algorithm inversion technique. Stress changes will be calculated using coulomb stress change theory (King et al., 1994) and the Coulomb 3 program is used as the forward model (Lin and Stein, 2004; Toda et al., 2005). Changes in the regional stress orientation (using PI results from before and after the earthquake) are of the greatest interest as it is the main factor controlling the pattern of the coulomb stress changes resulting from any given earthquake. Changes in the orientation can lead to conclusions about the local stress field around the earthquake and fault. The depth of interest and the coefficient of friction both

  14. Western Hellenic subduction and Cephalonia Transform: local earthquakes and plate transport and strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachpazi, M.; Hirn, A.; Clément, C.; Haslinger, F.; Laigle, M.; Kissling, E.; Charvis, P.; Hello, Y.; Lépine, J.-C.; Sapin, M.; Ansorge, J.

    2000-04-01

    Focal parameters of local earthquakes in the region of the Ionian Islands of western Greece are constrained with a temporary dense array of three-component seismographs operated jointly offshore and onshore. Seismic deformation is documented to be confined to the east of the N20°E-striking steep continental slope west of Cephalonia island, the right-lateral Cephalonia Transform Fault, CTF, inferred from large earthquakes. The pre-Apulian continental material appears to be only deforming east of the transform fault, where it is in upper plate position to the Hellenic subduction. East of the transform fault, the transmission velocity tomography from local earthquakes, compared in depth-section with a previous marine reflection profile, provides evidence in support of a shallow landward dipping boundary around 12 km deep under the Ionian Islands along which they may override the lower plate. On either side of this interface local earthquakes occur with different focal mechanisms, in support with its interpretation as the interplate. Under Cephalonia island, reverse-faulting deforms the upper plate along NW-SE structures, which may also be affected by left-lateral bookshelf-faulting. Small earthquakes show normal faulting along the western coast of Cephalonia and its extension 20 km SSW, the trace of the CTF as inferred from the occurrence of the large strike-slip earthquakes. Another group of normal-fault earthquakes locates in the lower plate from under Cephalonia to Zante, just outboard of a possible change of interplate dip suggested from reflection seismics landward under the islands. These normal-fault earthquakes appear to coincide in position with that of the load imposed by the upper plate transported over them, rather than occurring in an outer rise, outboard the plate boundary and trench, as observed in other subductions and attributed to the control by the flexural bending of the lower plate under the pull of the sinking slab. Interpretation has to

  15. Improved Detection of Local Earthquakes in the Vienna Basin (Austria), using Subspace Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apoloner, Maria-Theresia; Caffagni, Enrico; Bokelmann, Götz

    2016-04-01

    The Vienna Basin in Eastern Austria is densely populated and highly-developed; it is also a region of low to moderate seismicity, yet the seismological network coverage is relatively sparse. This demands improving our capability of earthquake detection by testing new methods, enlarging the existing local earthquake catalogue. This contributes to imaging tectonic fault zones for better understanding seismic hazard, also through improved earthquake statistics (b-value, magnitude of completeness). Detection of low-magnitude earthquakes or events for which the highest amplitudes slightly exceed the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), may be possible by using standard methods like the short-term over long-term average (STA/LTA). However, due to sparse network coverage and high background noise, such a technique may not detect all potentially recoverable events. Yet, earthquakes originating from the same source region and relatively close to each other, should be characterized by similarity in seismic waveforms, at a given station. Therefore, waveform similarity can be exploited by using specific techniques such as correlation-template based (also known as matched filtering) or subspace detection methods (based on the subspace theory). Matching techniques basically require a reference or template event, usually characterized by high waveform coherence in the array receivers, and high SNR, which is cross-correlated with the continuous data. Instead, subspace detection methods overcome in principle the necessity of defining template events as single events, but use a subspace extracted from multiple events. This approach theoretically should be more robust in detecting signals that exhibit a strong variability (e.g. because of source or magnitude). In this study we scan the continuous data recorded in the Vienna Basin with a subspace detector to identify additional events. This will allow us to estimate the increase of the seismicity rate in the local earthquake catalogue

  16. In Situ Investigation of the 3D Mechanical Microstructure at Nanoscale: Nano-CT Imaging Method of Local Small Region in Large Scale Sample

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Hu, Xiao-fang; Qu, Hong-yan; Kang, Dan; Xiao, Ti-qiao

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the local micro-/nanoscale region in a large scale sample, an image reconstruction method for nanometer computed tomography (nano-CT) was proposed in this paper. In the algorithm, wavelets were used to localize the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm because of its space-frequency localization property. After the implementation of the algorithm, two simulation local reconstruction experiments were performed to confirm its effectiveness. Three evaluation criteria were used in the experiments to judge the quality of the reconstructed images. The experimental results showed that the algorithm proposed in this paper performed best because (1) the quality of its results had improved 20%–30% compared to the results of FBP and 10%–30% compared to the results of another wavelet algorithm; (2) the new algorithm was stable under different circumstances. Besides, an actual reconstruction experiment was performed using real projection data that had been collected in a CT experiment. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) images of the sample were reconstructed. The microstructure of the sample could be clearly observed in the reconstructed images. Since much attention has been directed towards the nano-CT technique to investigate the microstructure of materials, this new wavelet-based local tomography algorithm could be considered as a meaningful effort. PMID:24723829

  17. In situ investigation of the 3D mechanical microstructure at nanoscale: nano-CT imaging method of local small region in large scale sample.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bo; Xu, Feng; Hu, Xiao-fang; Qu, Hong-yan; Kang, Dan; Xiao, Ti-qiao

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the local micro-/nanoscale region in a large scale sample, an image reconstruction method for nanometer computed tomography (nano-CT) was proposed in this paper. In the algorithm, wavelets were used to localize the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm because of its space-frequency localization property. After the implementation of the algorithm, two simulation local reconstruction experiments were performed to confirm its effectiveness. Three evaluation criteria were used in the experiments to judge the quality of the reconstructed images. The experimental results showed that the algorithm proposed in this paper performed best because (1) the quality of its results had improved 20%-30% compared to the results of FBP and 10%-30% compared to the results of another wavelet algorithm; (2) the new algorithm was stable under different circumstances. Besides, an actual reconstruction experiment was performed using real projection data that had been collected in a CT experiment. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) images of the sample were reconstructed. The microstructure of the sample could be clearly observed in the reconstructed images. Since much attention has been directed towards the nano-CT technique to investigate the microstructure of materials, this new wavelet-based local tomography algorithm could be considered as a meaningful effort. PMID:24723829

  18. Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Cowen, A R; Denney, J P

    1994-04-01

    On January 25, 1 week after the most devastating earthquake in Los Angeles history, the Southern California Hospital Council released the following status report: 928 patients evacuated from damaged hospitals. 805 beds available (136 critical, 669 noncritical). 7,757 patients treated/released from EDs. 1,496 patients treated/admitted to hospitals. 61 dead. 9,309 casualties. Where do we go from here? We are still waiting for the "big one." We'll do our best to be ready when Mother Nature shakes, rattles and rolls. The efforts of Los Angeles City Fire Chief Donald O. Manning cannot be overstated. He maintained department command of this major disaster and is directly responsible for implementing the fire department's Disaster Preparedness Division in 1987. Through the chief's leadership and ability to forecast consequences, the city of Los Angeles was better prepared than ever to cope with this horrendous earthquake. We also pay tribute to the men and women who are out there each day, where "the rubber meets the road." PMID:10133439

  19. Earthquake swarms and local crustal spreading along major strike-slip faults in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, C.S.; Hill, D.P.

    1978-01-01

    Earthquake swarms in California are often localized to areas within dextral offsets in the linear trend in active fault strands, suggesting a relation between earthquake swarms and local crustal spreading. Local crustal spereading is required by the geometry of dextral offsets when, as in the San Andreas system, faults have dominantly strike-slip motion with right-lateral displacement. Three clear examples of this relation occur in the Imperial Valley, Coso Hot Springs, and the Danville region, all in California. The first two of these areas are known for their Holocene volcanism and geothermal potential, which is consistent with crustal spreading and magmatic intrusion. The third example, however, shows no evidence for volcanism or geothermal activity at the surface. ?? 1978 Birkha??user Verlag.

  20. Preliminary results of local earthquake tomography around Bali, Lombok, and Sumbawa regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, Andri Dian; Kusnandar, Ridwan; Puspito, Nanang T.; Sakti, Artadi Pria; Yudistira, Tedi

    2015-04-01

    Bali, Sumbawa, and Lombok regions are located in active tectonic influence by Indo-Australia plate subducts beneath Sunda plate in southern part and local back-arc thrust in northern part the region. Some active volcanoes also lie from eastern part of Java, Bali, Lombok and Sumbawa regions. Previous studies have conducted subsurface seismic velocity imaging using regional and global earthquake data around the region. In this study, we used P-arrival time from local earthquake networks compiled by MCGA, Indonesia within time periods of 2009 up to 2013 to determine seismic velocity structure and simultaneously hypocenter adjustment by applying seismic tomography inversion method. For the tomographic inversion procedure, we started from 1-D initial velocity structure. We evaluated the resolution of tomography inversion results through checkerboard test and calculating derivative weigh sum. The preliminary results of tomography inversion show fairly clearly high seismic velocity subducting Indo-Australian and low velocity anomaly around volcano regions. The relocated hypocenters seem to cluster around the local fault system such as back-arc thrust fault in northern part of the region and around local fault in Sumbawa regions. Our local earthquake tomography results demonstrated consistent with previous studies and improved the resolution. For future works, we will determine S-wave velocity structure using S-wave arrival time to enhance our understanding of geological processes and for much better interpretation.

  1. Preliminary results of local earthquake tomography around Bali, Lombok, and Sumbawa regions

    SciTech Connect

    Nugraha, Andri Dian Puspito, Nanang T; Yudistira, Tedi; Kusnandar, Ridwan; Sakti, Artadi Pria

    2015-04-24

    Bali, Sumbawa, and Lombok regions are located in active tectonic influence by Indo-Australia plate subducts beneath Sunda plate in southern part and local back-arc thrust in northern part the region. Some active volcanoes also lie from eastern part of Java, Bali, Lombok and Sumbawa regions. Previous studies have conducted subsurface seismic velocity imaging using regional and global earthquake data around the region. In this study, we used P-arrival time from local earthquake networks compiled by MCGA, Indonesia within time periods of 2009 up to 2013 to determine seismic velocity structure and simultaneously hypocenter adjustment by applying seismic tomography inversion method. For the tomographic inversion procedure, we started from 1-D initial velocity structure. We evaluated the resolution of tomography inversion results through checkerboard test and calculating derivative weigh sum. The preliminary results of tomography inversion show fairly clearly high seismic velocity subducting Indo-Australian and low velocity anomaly around volcano regions. The relocated hypocenters seem to cluster around the local fault system such as back-arc thrust fault in northern part of the region and around local fault in Sumbawa regions. Our local earthquake tomography results demonstrated consistent with previous studies and improved the resolution. For future works, we will determine S-wave velocity structure using S-wave arrival time to enhance our understanding of geological processes and for much better interpretation.

  2. Clustering and interpretation of local earthquake tomography models in the southern Dead Sea basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Klaus; Braeuer, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The Dead Sea transform (DST) marks the boundary between the Arabian and the African plates. Ongoing left-lateral relative plate motion and strike-slip deformation started in the Early Miocene (20 MA) and produced a total shift of 107 km until presence. The Dead Sea basin (DSB) located in the central part of the DST is one of the largest pull-apart basins in the world. It was formed from step-over of different fault strands at a major segment boundary of the transform fault system. The basin development was accompanied by deposition of clastics and evaporites and subsequent salt diapirism. Ongoing deformation within the basin and activity of the boundary faults are indicated by increased seismicity. The internal architecture of the DSB and the crustal structure around the DST were subject of several large scientific projects carried out since 2000. Here we report on a local earthquake tomography study from the southern DSB. In 2006-2008, a dense seismic network consisting of 65 stations was operated for 18 months in the southern part of the DSB and surrounding regions. Altogether 530 well-constrained seismic events with 13,970 P- and 12,760 S-wave arrival times were used for a travel time inversion for Vp, Vp/Vs velocity structure and seismicity distribution. The work flow included 1D inversion, 2.5D and 3D tomography, and resolution analysis. We demonstrate a possible strategy how several tomographic models such as Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs can be integrated for a combined lithological interpretation. We analyzed the tomographic models derived by 2.5D inversion using neural network clustering techniques. The method allows us to identify major lithologies by their petrophysical signatures. Remapping the clusters into the subsurface reveals the distribution of basin sediments, prebasin sedimentary rocks, and crystalline basement. The DSB shows an asymmetric structure with thickness variation from 5 km in the west to 13 km in the east. Most importantly, a well-defined body

  3. TOUGH2Viewer: A post-processing tool for interactive 3D visualization of locally refined unstructured grids for TOUGH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonduá, S.; Berry, P.; Bortolotti, V.; Cormio, C.

    2012-09-01

    Within the MAC-GEO research project, funded by Regione Toscana and addressed to the exploitation of high enthalpy geothermal systems, the authors worked on the utilization and customization of the open source numerical simulator TOUGH2, as implemented in the code dedicated to model calibration iTOUGH2. TOUGH2 is one of the most used numerical simulation software for non-isothermal flow of multicomponent, multiphase fluids in one, two and three-dimensional porous and fractured media. Lacking an official Graphical User Interface tool for post-processing operations, several commercial and academic software have been developed to manage and display TOUGH2 input and output data files. Almost all of these tools seem to have limits to visualizing parameter values of the numerical model, work only with a predefined binary version of TOUGH2, and only a few of them can manage locally refined unstructured grids (i.e. Voronoi grids). To overcome these limitations, the authors have developed and tested a dedicated software application (called TOUGH2Viewer) for reading and managing TOUGH2 output files, written in Java and able to provide an interactive 3D view of the numerical model. Several functionalities have been implemented for block query and searching, contour mapping and 3D surface mapping of TOUGH2 primary variables (i.e. pressure, temperature, etc.). TOUGH2Viewer is also able to display 2D and 3D views of mass and heat flow between blocks, for each time step in which the simulation proceeds. The application described in this paper is under development to improve its functionalities; nevertheless the current software release is a valid support tool for post-processing that significantly improves the possibility to inspect the simulated data coming from TOUGH2.

  4. Local ISM 3D distribution and soft X-ray background. Inferences on nearby hot gas and the North Polar Spur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitarini, L.; Lallement, R.; Vergely, J.-L.; Snowden, S. L.

    2014-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interstellar medium (ISM) maps can be used to locate not only interstellar (IS) clouds, but also IS bubbles between the clouds that are blown by stellar winds and supernovae, and that are filled by hot gas. To demonstrate this and to derive a clearer picture of the local ISM, we compare our recent 3D maps of the IS dust distribution to the ROSAT diffuse X-ray background maps after removing heliospheric emission. In the Galactic plane, there is a good correspondence between the locations and extents of the mapped nearby cavities and the soft (0.25 keV) background emission distribution, showing that most of these nearby cavities contribute to this soft X-ray emission. Assuming a constant dust-to-gas ratio and homogeneous 106 K hot gas filling the cavities, we modeled the 0.25 keV surface brightness in a simple way along the Galactic plane as seen from the Sun, taking the absorption by the mapped clouds into account. The data-model comparison favors the existence of hot gas in the solar neighborhood, the so-called Local Bubble (LB). The inferred average mean pressure in the local cavities is found to be on the order of 10 000 cm-3 K, in agreement with previous studies, providing a validation test for the method. On the other hand, the model overestimates the emission from the huge cavities located in the third quadrant. Using CaII absorption data, we show that the dust-to-CaII ratio is very low in this region, implying there is a large quantity of lower temperature (non-X-ray emitting) ionized gas and, as a consequence, a reduction in the volume filled by hot gas, explaining at least part of the discrepancy. In the meridian plane, the main two brightness enhancements coincide well with the LB's most elongated parts and chimneys connecting the LB to the halo, but no particular nearby cavity is found towards the enhancement in the direction of the bright North Polar Spur (NPS) at high latitude. We searched in the 3D maps for the source regions of

  5. Two-way regulation between cells and aligned collagen fibrils: local 3D matrix formation and accelerated neural differentiation of human decidua parietalis placental stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Zhu, Bofan; Strakova, Zuzana; Wang, Rong

    2014-08-01

    It has been well established that an aligned matrix provides structural and signaling cues to guide cell polarization and cell fate decision. However, the modulation role of cells in matrix remodeling and the feedforward effect on stem cell differentiation have not been studied extensively. In this study, we report on the concerted changes of human decidua parietalis placental stem cells (hdpPSCs) and the highly ordered collagen fibril matrix in response to cell-matrix interaction. With high-resolution imaging, we found the hdpPSCs interacted with the matrix by deforming the cell shape, harvesting the nearby collagen fibrils, and reorganizing the fibrils around the cell body to transform a 2D matrix to a localized 3D matrix. Such a unique 3D matrix prompted high expression of β-1 integrin around the cell body that mediates and facilitates the stem cell differentiation toward neural cells. The study offers insights into the coordinated, dynamic changes at the cell-matrix interface and elucidates cell modulation of its matrix to establish structural and biochemical cues for effective cell growth and differentiation. PMID:25003322

  6. Problem-dependent 3-d Inversion of P-wave Arrivals From Local Events Recorded During The Svekalapko Deep Seismic Experiment In Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskaya, E.; Hjelt, S.-E.; Yliniemi, J.; Korhonen, J.; Elo, S.; Svekalapko Seismic Tomography Working Group

    The SVEKALAPKO temporary seismic array was originally designed for studying the lithospheric structure beneath the southern Finland by means of teleseismic events. In addition, the high quality recordings of local seismic events (earthquakes and quarry blasts) registered by the SVEKALAPKO array contain a lot of information about the structure of the upper lithosphere beneath the southern Finland. However, the traditional local event tomography of SVEKALAPKO data cannot result in the ve- locity model valid for proper geological interpretation. The main reasons for this is the lack of the space resolution, which results in strong non-uniqueness of the to- mographic inversion. This problem can be treated by introducing various kinds of a-priori information into the inversion algorithm. The a-priori information available for the SVEKALAPKO study area includes not only the information from previous control source seismic experiments, but also potential fields data and petrophysical data. Usage of such a non-homogeneous a-priori information required a problem- dependent algorithm of seismic data inversion, which was developed on the base of non-probabilistic uncertainty measures. An example of this algorithm application to SVEKALAPKO local seismic event data is presented.

  7. OREGANO_VE: a new parallelised 3D solver for the general (non-)linear Maxwell visco-elastic problem: validation and application to the calculation of surface deformation in the earthquake cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Tadashi; Houseman, Gregory; Hamling, Ian; Postek, Elek

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a new parallelized 3-D numerical code, OREGANO_VE, for the solution of the general visco-elastic problem in a rectangular block domain. The mechanical equilibrium equation is solved using the finite element method for a (non-)linear Maxwell visco-elastic rheology. Time-dependent displacement and/or traction boundary conditions can be applied. Matrix assembly is based on a tetrahedral element defined by 4 vertex nodes and 6 nodes located at the midpoints of the edges, and within which displacement is described by a quadratic interpolation function. For evaluating viscoelastic relaxation, an explicit time-stepping algorithm (Zienkiewicz and Cormeau, Int. J. Num. Meth. Eng., 8, 821-845, 1974) is employed. We test the accurate implementation of the OREGANO_VE by comparing numerical and analytic (or semi-analytic half-space) solutions to different problems in a range of applications: (1) equilibration of stress in a constant density layer after gravity is switched on at t = 0 tests the implementation of spatially variable viscosity and non-Newtonian viscosity; (2) displacement of the welded interface between two blocks of differing viscosity tests the implementation of viscosity discontinuities, (3) displacement of the upper surface of a layer under applied normal load tests the implementation of time-dependent surface tractions (4) visco-elastic response to dyke intrusion (compared with the solution in a half-space) tests the implementation of all aspects. In each case, the accuracy of the code is validated subject to use of a sufficiently small time step, providing assurance that the OREGANO_VE code can be applied to a range of visco-elastic relaxation processes in three dimensions, including post-seismic deformation and post-glacial uplift. The OREGANO_VE code includes a capability for representation of prescribed fault slip on an internal fault. The surface displacement associated with large earthquakes can be detected by some geodetic observations

  8. A novel vector potential formulation of 3D Navier-Stokes equations with through-flow boundaries by a local meshless method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. L.; Tsai, C. H.; Wu, C. S.

    2015-11-01

    An alternative vector potential formulation is used to solve the Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations in 3D incompressible viscous flow problems with and without through-flow boundaries. Difficulties of the vector potential formulation include the implementation of boundary conditions for through-flow boundaries and the numerical treatment of fourth-order partial differential equations. The advantages on the other hand are the automatic satisfaction of the continuity equation; and pressure is decoupled from the velocity. The objective of this paper is to introduce the appropriate gauge and boundary conditions on the vector potential formulation by a localized meshless method. To handle the divergence-free property, a Coulomb gauge condition is enforced on the vector potential to ensure its existence and uniqueness mathematically. We further improve the algorithm to through-flow problems for the boundary conditions of vector potential by introducing the concept of Stokes' theorem. Based on this innovation, there is no need to include an additional variable to tackle the through-flow fields. This process will greatly simplify the imposition of boundary conditions by the vector potential approach. Under certain conditions, the coupled fourth-order partial differential equations can be easily solved by using this meshless local differential quadrature (LDQ) method. Due to the LDQ capability to deal with the high order differential equations, this algorithm is very attractive to solve this fourth-order vector potential formulation for the N-S equations as comparing to the conventional numerical schemes such as finite element or finite difference methods. The proposed vector potential formulation is simpler and has improved accuracy and efficiency compared to other pressure-free or pressure-coupled algorithms. This investigation can be regarded as the first complete study to obtain the N-S solutions by vector potential formulation through a LDQ method. Two classic 3D benchmark

  9. 3D Crustal Structure and 3D-b-value in AbuDabbab Seismogenic Source, Northern Red Sea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Arifi, Nassir; El Kherpy, Sami; Koulakov, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    Abu Dabbab seismogenic source region is of unique seismic activity located on the Egyptian Red Sea coast. It's known as earthquake Cannons where the earthquakes are accompanied by a sound of distinct rumbling similar to the sound of a distant quarry blast which is heard by humans for several generations. Seismic activity of Abu Dabbab becomes very well determined after establishing of the Egyptian National Seismic Network 1997. Joint earthquake tomography inversion of local and regional data has been performed in order to image the crustal heterogeneity and the origin of the cannons earthquakes. Most previous studies suggested that this activity is of magmatic origin. We found the seismicity forms an arc shaped cluster that surrounds an aseismic block. This aseismic block has high velocities and a low Vp/Vs ratio. The origin of this seismic activity is probably due an active fault below the non-deformed block of Precambrian Igneous rock reaching a depth of ~10 km. Spatial mapping of the frequency magnitude distribution of the earthquakes and 3D-b-value indicate a strong variation moreover high b-value (1.4) at depth downward the rigid block. The Combined interpretation of the seismic imaging and 3D b-value in addition to the seismological and the geophysical observations revealed the tectonic origin of the earthquake activity in this area which is related strongly to the evolution of the crust in the Red Sea and its tectonic activity. KEYWARD:Three dimensional Crustal Structure - Seismic activity -Three-D b-value- Red Sea tectonics- Tectonic activity

  10. Correlation and Characterization of 3D Morphological Dependent Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectra of Single Silver Nanoparticles Using Dark-field Optical Microscopy and Spectroscopy and AFM

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yujun; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Huang, Tao; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; Xu, Xiao-Hong Nancy

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a new and effective methodology to correlate optical and AFM images of single Ag nanoparticles (NPs), allowing us to study 3D-morphological dependent localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectra of individual Ag NPs. We fabricated arrays of distinctive microwindows on glass coverslips using photo-lithography method, and created well-isolated individual Ag NPs with a wide variety of shapes and morphologies on the glass coverslips using a modified nanosphere lithography method (NSL). Using distinctive geometries of microwindows, we located individual Ag NPs of interest in their optical and AFM images, enabling us to correlate and characterize the LSPR spectra and 3D morphologies of the same single NPs using dark-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy (DFOMS) and AFM, respectively. We found that LSPR spectra of single Ag NPs, with nearly equal volume [(8.6 ± 0.4) × 103 nm3], cross-section [(2.2 ± 0.2) × 102 nm3], and height (39.6 ± 3.6 nm), highly depend on their shapes, showing the red shift of peak wavelength to 629 nm (quasi trapezoidal cylindrical NP) from that of 506 nm (quasi circular cylindrical NP). LSPR spectra of single Ag NPs simulated using discrete dipole approximation (DDA) agree well with those measured experimentally when their shapes and morphologies can be accuractely described in both methods, but differ when they are not. Furthermore, we found location-dependent LSPR spectra on and around a single NP, offering a unique opportunity to characterize multi-mode plasmonic NPs at nanometer resolution for better understanding their plasmonic optical properties and for rational design of single NP optics. PMID:20190865

  11. Adaptive-optics SLO imaging combined with widefield OCT and SLO enables precise 3D localization of fluorescent cells in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Miller, Eric B.; Goswami, Mayank; Wang, Xinlei; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Lee, Sang-Hyuck; Kim, Dae Yu; Flannery, John G.; Werner, John S.; Burns, Marie E.; Pugh, Edward N.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) has recently been used to achieve exquisite subcellular resolution imaging of the mouse retina. Wavefront sensing-based AO typically restricts the field of view to a few degrees of visual angle. As a consequence the relationship between AO-SLO data and larger scale retinal structures and cellular patterns can be difficult to assess. The retinal vasculature affords a large-scale 3D map on which cells and structures can be located during in vivo imaging. Phase-variance OCT (pv-OCT) can efficiently image the vasculature with near-infrared light in a label-free manner, allowing 3D vascular reconstruction with high precision. We combined widefield pv-OCT and SLO imaging with AO-SLO reflection and fluorescence imaging to localize two types of fluorescent cells within the retinal layers: GFP-expressing microglia, the resident macrophages of the retina, and GFP-expressing cone photoreceptor cells. We describe in detail a reflective afocal AO-SLO retinal imaging system designed for high resolution retinal imaging in mice. The optical performance of this instrument is compared to other state-of-the-art AO-based mouse retinal imaging systems. The spatial and temporal resolution of the new AO instrumentation was characterized with angiography of retinal capillaries, including blood-flow velocity analysis. Depth-resolved AO-SLO fluorescent images of microglia and cone photoreceptors are visualized in parallel with 469 nm and 663 nm reflectance images of the microvasculature and other structures. Additional applications of the new instrumentation are discussed. PMID:26114038

  12. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  13. Robust method to detect and locate local earthquakes by means of amplitude measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Puy Papí Isaba, María; Brückl, Ewald

    2016-04-01

    In this study we present a robust new method to detect and locate medium and low magnitude local earthquakes. This method is based on an empirical model of the ground motion obtained from amplitude data of earthquakes in the area of interest, which were located using traditional methods. The first step of our method is the computation of maximum resultant ground velocities in sliding time windows covering the whole period of interest. In the second step, these maximum resultant ground velocities are back-projected to every point of a grid covering the whole area of interest while applying the empirical amplitude - distance relations. We refer to these back-projected ground velocities as pseudo-magnitudes. The number of operating seismic stations in the local network equals the number of pseudo-magnitudes at each grid-point. Our method introduces the new idea of selecting the minimum pseudo-magnitude at each grid-point for further analysis instead of searching for a minimum of the L2 or L1 norm. In case no detectable earthquake occurred, the spatial distribution of the minimum pseudo-magnitudes constrains the magnitude of weak earthquakes hidden in the ambient noise. In the case of a detectable local earthquake, the spatial distribution of the minimum pseudo-magnitudes shows a significant maximum at the grid-point nearest to the actual epicenter. The application of our method is restricted to the area confined by the convex hull of the seismic station network. Additionally, one must ensure that there are no dead traces involved in the processing. Compared to methods based on L2 and even L1 norms, our new method is almost wholly insensitive to outliers (data from locally disturbed seismic stations). A further advantage is the fast determination of the epicenter and magnitude of a seismic event located within a seismic network. This is possible due to the method of obtaining and storing a back-projected matrix, independent of the registered amplitude, for each seismic

  14. Local deformations around volcanoes associated with the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, T.; Fujita, E.

    2013-01-01

    An Mw 9.0 great earthquake struck northeast Japan on 11 March 2011, causing crustal deformation of 1 to 2 m in volcanic areas. We applied synthetic aperture radar interferometry using Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar on the ALOS satellite to investigate local deformation around volcanoes associated with the earthquake. We estimated the fault-slip distribution along the trough based on obtained interferograms and crustal deformation from GEONET, and the estimated fault model explained the observed coseismic deformations well. The residual suggested local deformation around the Akita-Komagatake, Kurikoma, Zao, Azuma, and Nasu volcanoes. Their deformations were obtained from independent synthetic aperture radar pairs. Additionally, deformations in the Kurikoma, Zao, and Azuma volcanoes were confirmed by GEONET data (no GEONET stations are located in the deformation areas of other volcanoes). These facts indicate that the obtained local deformations must be actual deformations, rather than noise. Our hypothesis is that coseismic extensional deformation concentrates in the soft medium under a volcano (e.g., magma and its surrounding rock) and that this deformation has caused local deformation with subsidence. To validate this hypothesis, we carried out numerical experiments using the finite element method for a soft medium under a volcano. Distributions of observed local deformations stretch in the direction of the minor principal axis of strain, and such distributions were obtained in this experiment, indicating that the hypothesis is plausible. Conceivably, such a concentration of coseismic deformation in a magma chamber may induce a volcanic eruption.

  15. Studying local earthquakes in the northern Fennoscandian Shield using the data of the POLENET/LAPNET temporary array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoltseva, O. A.; Kozlovskaya, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquakes within areas inside continental plates are still not completely understood and the progress in understanding intraplate seismicity is slow due to short history of instrumental seismology and sparse regional seismic networks in seismically non-active areas. However, knowledge about position and depth of seismogenic structures in such areas is necessary, in order to estimate seismic hazard for such critical facilities as nuclear power plants and nuclear waste deposits. In the present paper we address the problem of seismicity in the intraplate area of northern Fennoscandia using the information on local events recorded by the POLENET/LAPNET temporary seismic array during the International Polar Year 2007-2009. We relocate the seismic events by the program HYPOELLIPS and grid search method. We use the first arrivals of P-waves of local events in order to calculate a 3-D tomographic P-wave velocity model of the uppermost crust (down to 20 km) for selected region inside the study area and show that the velocity heterogeneities in the upper crust correlate well with known tectonic units. We compare position of the velocity heterogeneities with the seismogenic structures delineated by epicentres of relocated events and demonstrate that these structures generally do not correlate with the crustal units formed as a result of crustal evolution in Archean and Paleoproterozoic. On the contrary, they correlate well with the post-glacial faults located in the area of the Baltic-Bothnia Megashear (BBMS). Hypocentres of local events have depths down to 30 km. We also obtain focal mechanisms of two selected events with good data quality. Both focal mechanisms are of strike-slip type in which shift prevails over uplift. Our results demonstrate that Baltic-Bothnia Megashear is an important large-scale, reactivated tectonic structure that has to be taken into account in estimating seismic hazard in northern Fennoscandia.

  16. Deep low-frequency earthquakes in tremor localize to the plate interface in multiple subduction zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.R.; Beroza, G.C.; Ide, S.; Ohta, K.; Shelly, D.R.; Schwartz, S.Y.; Rabbel, W.; Thorwart, M.; Kao, H.

    2009-01-01

    Deep tremor under Shikoku, Japan, consists primarily, and perhaps entirely, of swarms of low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) that occur as shear slip on the plate interface. Although tremor is observed at other plate boundaries, the lack of cataloged low-frequency earthquakes has precluded a similar conclusion about tremor in those locales. We use a network autocorrelation approach to detect and locate LFEs within tremor recorded at three subduction zones characterized by different thermal structures and levels of interplate seismicity: southwest Japan, northern Cascadia, and Costa Rica. In each case we find that LFEs are the primary constituent of tremor and that they locate on the deep continuation of the plate boundary. This suggests that tremor in these regions shares a common mechanism and that temperature is not the primary control on such activity. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Scaling relations of moment magnitude, local magnitude, and duration magnitude for earthquakes originated in northeast India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Dipok K.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we aim to improve the scaling between the moment magnitude ( M W), local magnitude ( M L), and the duration magnitude ( M D) for 162 earthquakes in Shillong-Mikir plateau and its adjoining region of northeast India by extending the M W estimates to lower magnitude earthquakes using spectral analysis of P-waves from vertical component seismograms. The M W- M L and M W- M D relationships are determined by linear regression analysis. It is found that, M W values can be considered consistent with M L and M D, within 0.1 and 0.2 magnitude units respectively, in 90 % of the cases. The scaling relationships investigated comply well with similar relationships in other regions in the world and in other seismogenic areas in the northeast India region.

  18. The 9/21 earthquake in Taiwan: a local government disaster rescue system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yungnane

    2010-01-01

    This paper employs a three-element model to examine how the disaster rescue system of the government of Nantou County in Middle Taiwan functioned following the earthquake of 21 September 1999. The three elements are information gathering, local government mobilisation, and inter-organisational cooperation. The paper finds that the Nantou County government needs to address many problems associated with these three elements. Disaster information, for example, was not processed instantly because of the destruction of the electricity and telephone systems in the earthquake. Insufficient information caused ineffectiveness in the realms of mobilisation and inter-organisational cooperation. As for mobilisation, while the Nantou County magistrate successfully used specific information to encourage flows of huge resources in the county, he did not successfully mobilise human resources there. With regard to inter-organisational cooperation, myriad voluntary actors and international rescue teams travelled to Nantou County, but the fire and police services experienced cooperation and coordination problems. PMID:19682006

  19. Experimental investigation of a general real-time 3D target localization method using sequential kV imaging combined with respiratory monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byungchul; Poulsen, Per; Ruan, Dan; Sawant, Amit; Keall, Paul J.

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this work was to experimentally quantify the geometric accuracy of a novel real-time 3D target localization method using sequential kV imaging combined with respiratory monitoring for clinically realistic arc and static field treatment delivery and target motion conditions. A general method for real-time target localization using kV imaging and respiratory monitoring was developed. Each dimension of internal target motion T(x, y, z; t) was estimated from the external respiratory signal R(t) through the correlation between R(ti) and the projected marker positions p(xp, yp; ti) on kV images by a state-augmented linear model: T(x, y, z; t) = aR(t) + bR(t - τ) + c. The model parameters, a, b, c, were determined by minimizing the squared fitting error ∑‖p(xp, yp; ti) - P(θi) · (aR(ti) + bR(ti - τ) + c)‖2 with the projection operator P(θi). The model parameters were first initialized based on acquired kV arc images prior to MV beam delivery. This method was implemented on a trilogy linear accelerator consisting of an OBI x-ray imager (operating at 1 Hz) and real-time position monitoring (RPM) system (30 Hz). Arc and static field plans were delivered to a moving phantom programmed with measured lung tumour motion from ten patients. During delivery, the localization method determined the target position and the beam was adjusted in real time via dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) adaptation. The beam-target alignment error was quantified by segmenting the beam aperture and a phantom-embedded fiducial marker on MV images and analysing their relative position. With the localization method, the root-mean-squared errors of the ten lung tumour traces ranged from 0.7-1.3 mm and 0.8-1.4 mm during the single arc and five-field static beam delivery, respectively. Without the localization method, these errors ranged from 3.1-7.3 mm. In summary, a general method for real-time target localization using kV imaging and respiratory monitoring has been

  20. Decoding 3D reach and grasp from hybrid signals in motor and premotor cortices: spikes, multiunit activity, and local field potentials

    PubMed Central

    Truccolo, Wilson; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos E.; Donoghue, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Neural activity in motor cortex during reach and grasp movements shows modulations in a broad range of signals from single-neuron spiking activity (SA) to various frequency bands in broadband local field potentials (LFPs). In particular, spatiotemporal patterns in multiband LFPs are thought to reflect dendritic integration of local and interareal synaptic inputs, attentional and preparatory processes, and multiunit activity (MUA) related to movement representation in the local motor area. Nevertheless, the relationship between multiband LFPs and SA, and their relationship to movement parameters and their relative value as brain-computer interface (BCI) control signals, remain poorly understood. Also, although this broad range of signals may provide complementary information channels in primary (MI) and ventral premotor (PMv) areas, areal differences in information have not been systematically examined. Here, for the first time, the amount of information in SA and multiband LFPs was compared for MI and PMv by recording from dual 96-multielectrode arrays while monkeys made naturalistic reach and grasp actions. Information was assessed as decoding accuracy for 3D arm end point and grip aperture kinematics based on SA or LFPs in MI and PMv, or combinations of signal types across areas. In contrast with previous studies with ≤16 simultaneous electrodes, here ensembles of >16 units (on average) carried more information than multiband, multichannel LFPs. Furthermore, reach and grasp information added by various LFP frequency bands was not independent from that in SA ensembles but rather typically less than and primarily contained within the latter. Notably, MI and PMv did not show a particular bias toward reach or grasp for this task or for a broad range of signal types. For BCIs, our results indicate that neuronal ensemble spiking is the preferred signal for decoding, while LFPs and combined signals from PMv and MI can add robustness to BCI control. PMID:22157115

  1. 2D/3D Image fusion for accurate target localization and evaluation of a mask based stereotactic system in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of cranial lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, J.-Y.; Ryu, Samuel; Faber, Kathleen; Mikkelsen, Tom; Chen Qing; Li Shidong; Movsas, Benjamin

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of a two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional (3D) image-fusion-guided target localization system and a mask based stereotactic system for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) of cranial lesions. A commercial x-ray image guidance system originally developed for extracranial radiosurgery was used for FSRT of cranial lesions. The localization accuracy was quantitatively evaluated with an anthropomorphic head phantom implanted with eight small radiopaque markers (BBs) in different locations. The accuracy and its clinical reliability were also qualitatively evaluated for a total of 127 fractions in 12 patients with both kV x-ray images and MV portal films. The image-guided system was then used as a standard to evaluate the overall uncertainty and reproducibility of the head mask based stereotactic system in these patients. The phantom study demonstrated that the maximal random error of the image-guided target localization was {+-}0.6 mm in each direction in terms of the 95% confidence interval (CI). The systematic error varied with measurement methods. It was approximately 0.4 mm, mainly in the longitudinal direction, for the kV x-ray method. There was a 0.5 mm systematic difference, primarily in the lateral direction, between the kV x-ray and the MV portal methods. The patient study suggested that the accuracy of the image-guided system in patients was comparable to that in the phantom. The overall uncertainty of the mask system was {+-}4 mm, and the reproducibility was {+-}2.9 mm in terms of 95% CI. The study demonstrated that the image guidance system provides accurate and precise target positioning.

  2. P wave crustal velocity structure in the greater Mount Rainier area from local earthquake tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, S.C.; Lees, J.M.; Malone, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    We present results from a local earthquake tomographic imaging experiment in the greater Mount Rainier area. We inverted P wave arrival times from local earthquakes recorded at permanent and temporary Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network seismographs between 1980 and 1996. We used a method similar to that described by Lees and Crosson [1989], modified to incorporate the parameter separation method for decoupling the hypocenter and velocity problems. In the upper 7 km of the resulting model there is good correlation between velocity anomalies and surface geology. Many focal mechanisms within the St. Helens seismic zone have nodal planes parallel to the epicentral trend as well as to a north-south trending low-velocity trough, leading us to speculate that the trough represents a zone of structural weakness in which a moderate (M 6.5-7.0) earthquake could occur. In contrast, the western Rainier seismic zone does not correlate in any simple way with anomaly patterns or focal mechanism fault planes, leading us to infer that it is less likely to experience a moderate earthquake. A ???10 km-wide low-velocity anomaly occurs 5 to 18 km beneath the summit of Mount Rainier, which we interpret to be a signal of a region composed of hot, fractured rock with possible small amounts of melt or fluid. No systematic velocity pattern is observed in association with the southern Washington Cascades conductor. A midcrustal anomaly parallels the Olympic-Wallowa lineament as well as several other geophysical trends, indicating that it may play an important role in regional tectonics. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch.

    PubMed

    De Silva, T; Uneri, A; Ketcha, M D; Reaungamornrat, S; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Aygun, N; Lo, S-F; Wolinsky, J-P; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-21

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE  <  6.4 mm (±4.4 mm interquartile range (IQR)) and a median runtime of 84 s (plus upwards of 1-2 min for manual masking). Excluding manual polygonal masks and decreasing the number of multistarts to 50 caused the GC-based registration to fail at a rate of  >14%; however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved

  4. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Ketcha, M. D.; Reaungamornrat, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Aygun, N.; Lo, S.-F.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE  <  6.4 mm (±4.4 mm interquartile range (IQR)) and a median runtime of 84 s (plus upwards of 1-2 min for manual masking). Excluding manual polygonal masks and decreasing the number of multistarts to 50 caused the GC-based registration to fail at a rate of  >14% however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved

  5. Earthquake deformation in the Zagros Simply Folded Belt (Iran) from radar interferometry and local seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen, E.; Jackson, J. A.; Yamini-Fard, F.; Tatar, M.; Roustaei, M.; Gholamzadeh, A.; Parsons, B.

    2009-12-01

    the 10 September 2008 earthquake was orthogonal to the trend of fold axes at the surface. This implies that locally, faulting and folding are decoupled. However, a number of neighboring anticlines are strongly asymmetric, with steep or overturned southern limbs, and are presumably cored by thrust faults. We therefore suggest that the Zagros contains a combination of detachment folds and fault propagation folds. We also studied the distribution of aftershocks following the 27 November 2005 and 25 March 2006 earthquakes, using data from local seismic networks. Most aftershocks occurred within the crystalline basement, at depths of ~10 km to ~25 km, substantially and resolvably deeper than the lower limit of coseismic faulting in the mainshocks. The vertical separation between the main earthquakes and aftershock activity indicates that the main earthquakes failed to rupture the full thickness of the seismogenic layer. The lower, crystalline part of the seismogenic layer may fail in separate events, although we have not yet observed one of these earthquakes with InSAR.

  6. Crust structure of northern Morocco and southern Iberian Peninsula from local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El moudnib, L.; Villasenor, A.; Harnafi, M.; Himmi, M.; Gallart, J.

    2012-12-01

    We have estimated the P-wave velocity structure under northern Morocco and Alboran Sea and Southern Spain using an iterative simultaneous inversion method of local earthquake arrival-time data for velocity and hypocentral parameters. For this investigation we applied this tomographic method to 40714 P-wave arrival times from 2429 local events recorded by 124 both temporary and permanent seismic stations of local and regional networks from January 2000 to June 2009. The P wave arrival times used are calculated by the finite difference technique which allows a flexible parameterization of the velocity model. Twenty layers with a thickness of 4km for each one were postulated to obtain the three-dimensional P-wave structure along the complex Ibero-Maghribean boundary region. The hypocenter location of the global earthquake dataset has been remarkably improved by the obtained three-dimensional velocity model (RMS reduced to 27.3%). At the uppermost level of the crust the results suggest that the most prominent feature is the very low velocity zone associated with flysch units north of the Strait of Gibraltar, and in northern Morocco extending from Al-Hoceima region to the Alboran ridge. Conversely, a high velocity anomaly is observed in the area of the Ronda Peridotites, but a similar structure is not observed in the Beni-Boussera region in Morocco. The inverted velocity model is generally consistent with geology structure of the entire area and yields more details at depth of the geology structures and tectonic units. Moreover, it shows an accurate identification at depth of the shape and the geometry of the geology structures in the area. The tomographic cross section profiles reveal a vertical downgoing highly velocity materials in the whole area and show a thick crust in either the western part of the Alboran sea or northern Morocco region compared with the eastern one. keywords: local earthquake, P arrival-time, simultaneous inversion, hypocenter relocation

  7. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The Apollo implementation of PLOT3D uses some of the capabilities of

  8. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    five groups: 1) Grid Functions for grids, grid-checking, etc.; 2) Scalar Functions for contour or carpet plots of density, pressure, temperature, Mach number, vorticity magnitude, helicity, etc.; 3) Vector Functions for vector plots of velocity, vorticity, momentum, and density gradient, etc.; 4) Particle Trace Functions for rake-like plots of particle flow or vortex lines; and 5) Shock locations based on pressure gradient. TURB3D is a modification of PLOT3D which is used for viewing CFD simulations of incompressible turbulent flow. Input flow data consists of pressure, velocity and vorticity. Typical quantities to plot include local fluctuations in flow quantities and turbulent production terms, plotted in physical or wall units. PLOT3D/TURB3D includes both TURB3D and PLOT3D because the operation of TURB3D is identical to PLOT3D, and there is no additional sample data or printed documentation for TURB3D. Graphical capabilities of PLOT3D version 3.6b+ vary among the implementations available through COSMIC. Customers are encouraged to purchase and carefully review the PLOT3D manual before ordering the program for a specific computer and graphics library. There is only one manual for use with all implementations of PLOT3D, and although this manual generally assumes that the Silicon Graphics Iris implementation is being used, informative comments concerning other implementations appear throughout the text. With all implementations, the visual representation of the object and flow field created by PLOT3D consists of points, lines, and polygons. Points can be represented with dots or symbols, color can be used to denote data values, and perspective is used to show depth. Differences among implementations impact the program's ability to use graphical features that are based on 3D polygons, the user's ability to manipulate the graphical displays, and the user's ability to obtain alternate forms of output. The Apollo implementation of PLOT3D uses some of the capabilities of

  9. The ATLAS3D project - XXI. Correlations between gradients of local escape velocity and stellar populations in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Nicholas; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L.; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Bois, Maxime; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bournaud, Frédéric; Bureau, Martin; Crocker, Alison; Davis, Timothy A.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnović, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M.; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Young, Lisa M.

    2013-07-01

    We explore the connection between the local escape velocity, Vesc, and the stellar population properties in the ATLAS3D survey, a complete, volume-limited sample of nearby early-type galaxies. We make use of ugriz photometry to construct Multi-Gaussian Expansion models of the surface brightnesses of our galaxies. We are able to fit the full range of surface brightness profiles found in our sample, and in addition we reproduce the results of state-of-the-art photometry in the literature with residuals of 0.04 mag. We utilize these photometric models and SAURON integral-field spectroscopy, combined with Jeans dynamical modelling, to determine the local Vesc derived from the surface brightness. We find that the local Vesc is tightly correlated with the Mg b and Fe5015 line strengths and optical colours, and anti-correlated with the Hβ line strength. In the case of the Mg b and colour-Vesc relations we find that the relation within individual galaxies follows the global relation between different galaxies. We intentionally ignored any uncertain contribution due to dark matter since we are seeking an empirical description of stellar population gradients in early-type galaxies that is ideal for quantitative comparison with model predictions. We also make use of single stellar population (SSP) modelling to transform our line strength index measurements into the SSP-equivalent parameters age (t), metallicity ([Z/H]) and α-enhancement [α/Fe]. The residuals from the relation are correlated with age, [α/Fe], molecular gas mass and local environmental density. We identify a population of galaxies that occur only at low Vesc that exhibit negative gradients in the Mg b- and Colour-Vesc relations. These galaxies typically have young central stellar populations and contain significant amounts of molecular gas and dust. Combining these results with N-body simulations of binary mergers we use the Mg b-Vesc relation to constrain the possible number of dry mergers experienced by

  10. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  11. Local Earthquakes Tomography in the Southern Tyrrhenian Region (Italy): Geophysical and Petrological Inferences on Subducting Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calo, M.; Dorbath, C.; Luzio, D.; Rotolo, S. G.; D'Anna, G.

    2007-12-01

    The Calabrian Arc, Southern Italy, is characterised by the subduction of the Ionian lithosphere -since Middle Miocene- beneath the Tyrrhenian basin. The related Benioff zone is seismically active to a depth > 500 km. The tomoDD code [Zhang and Thurber, 2003] was adopted to perform the tomography, using a set of 2463 earthquakes located in the window 14°30' E - 17°E and 37°N - 41°N, and recorded by seismic networks of the INGV in the period 1981-2005. Several inversions were performed using different selections of absolute and differential data obtained varying the maximum RMS and the threshold of the inter-event distance. Various synthetic and experimental tests were executed to evaluate the resolution and stability of the tomographic inversion. The inversions carried out for the synthetic and the restoration-resolution test [Zhao et al., 1992] were repeated several times with the same procedure used in the inversion of experimental data. The lack of bias in the models, related to the different grid- node positions, was tested performing inversions rotating, translating and deforming the original grid. To evaluate the dependence on the initial model, several inversions were also done using different 1D and 3D models simulating slab features. Finally, 35 models resulting from the inversions were synthesized in an average model obtained by interpolating each velocity model into a fixed grid. Each velocity value interpolated was weighted with a corresponding DWS (Derivative Weight Sum) resulting thus a Weighted Average Velocity model. The highly resolved sections through the average Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs models allowed us to image several relevant features of the structure of the subducting Ionian slab and of the Southern Tyrrhenian mantle: -the hypocenters are localized in the NW dipping fast area (Vp>8.2 km/s), 50-60 km thick, most likely composed litospheric mantle. Just below, an aseismic low Vp zone (6.6 - 7.7 km/s) 20-25 km thick, is assigned to the partially

  12. Enhancing Macrophage Drug Delivery Efficiency via Co-Localization of Cells and Drug-Loaded Microcarriers in 3D Resonant Ultrasound Field

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Hsiang; Wu, Zhen-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel synthetic 3D molecular transfer system which involved the use of model drug calcein-AM-encapsulated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres (CAPMs) and resonant ultrasound field (RUF) with frequency of 1 MHz and output intensity of 0.5 W/cm2 for macrophage drug delivery was explored. We hypothesized that the efficiency of CAPMs-mediated drug delivery aided by RUF can be promoted by increasing the contact opportunities between cells and the micrometer-sized drug carriers due to effects of acoustic radiation forces generated by RUF. Through the fluoromicroscopic and flow cytometric analyses, our results showed that both DH82 macrophages and CAPMs can be quickly brought to acoustic pressure nodes within 20 sec under RUF exposure, and were consequently aggregated throughout the time course. The efficacy of cellular uptake of CAPMs was enhanced with increased RUF exposure time where a 3-fold augmentation (P < 0.05) was obtained after 15 min of RUF exposure. We further demonstrated that the enhanced CAPM delivery efficiency was mainly contributed by the co-localization of cells and CAPMs resulting from the application of the RUF, rather than from sonoporation. In summary, the developed molecular delivery approach provides a feasible means for macrophage drug delivery. PMID:26267789

  13. Evaluation of local electric fields generated by transcranial direct current stimulation with an extracephalic reference electrode based on realistic 3D body modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Chang-Hwan; Park, Ji-Hye; Shim, Miseon; Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2012-04-01

    In this study, local electric field distributions generated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with an extracephalic reference electrode were evaluated to address extracephalic tDCS safety issues. To this aim, we generated a numerical model of an adult male human upper body and applied the 3D finite element method to electric current conduction analysis. In our simulations, the active electrode was placed over the left primary motor cortex (M1) and the reference electrode was placed at six different locations: over the right temporal lobe, on the right supraorbital region, on the right deltoid, on the left deltoid, under the chin, and on the right buccinator muscle. The maximum current density and electric field intensity values in the brainstem generated by the extracephalic reference electrodes were comparable to, or even less than, those generated by the cephalic reference electrodes. These results suggest that extracephalic reference electrodes do not lead to unwanted modulation of the brainstem cardio-respiratory and autonomic centers, as indicated by recent experimental studies. The volume energy density was concentrated at the neck area by the use of deltoid reference electrodes, but was still smaller than that around the active electrode locations. In addition, the distributions of elicited cortical electric fields demonstrated that the use of extracephalic reference electrodes might allow for the robust prediction of cortical modulations with little dependence on the reference electrode locations.

  14. Fibroblast adhesion on ECM-derived peptide modified poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) brushes: ligand co-presentation and 3D-localization.

    PubMed

    Desseaux, Solenne; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-03-01

    Polymer brushes prepared via surface-initiated polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate are powerful platforms for the fabrication of model biointerfaces to study cell-substrate interactions. In this manuscript, the versatility of surface-initiated polymerization and the poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) polymer brush platform are used to address two fundamental questions, viz. the effects of ligand co-presentation and of the 3D localization of biochemical cues on cell behavior. Using a series of PHEMA brushes that present RGD and PHSRN ligands in various relative surface concentrations, the present study unequivocally demonstrates that: (i) co-presentation of PHSRN cues on an RGD functionalized substrate enhances cell adhesion and (ii) this synergetic effect is highest when the two ligands are presented at equal surface concentrations. In the second part of this study, adhesion of 3T3 fibroblasts on a series of PHEMA brushes that present the RGD ligand at a distance of 12, 23 or 42 nm away from the cell substrate interface is investigated. While cells were found to adhere to surfaces that presented the cell adhesive peptides at distances up to 23 nm from the interface, polymer brushes that contained the RGD ligands 42 nm away from the interface did not support cell adhesion. PMID:25617123

  15. Quantum evolution: The case of weak localization for a 3D alloy-type Anderson model and application to Hamiltonian based quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhenwei

    Over the years, people have found Quantum Mechanics to be extremely useful in explaining various physical phenomena from a microscopic point of view. Anderson localization, named after physicist P. W. Anderson, states that disorder in a crystal can cause non-spreading of wave packets, which is one possible mechanism (at single electron level) to explain metal-insulator transitions. The theory of quantum computation promises to bring greater computational power over classical computers by making use of some special features of Quantum Mechanics. The first part of this dissertation considers a 3D alloy-type model, where the Hamiltonian is the sum of the finite difference Laplacian corresponding to free motion of an electron and a random potential generated by a sign-indefinite single-site potential. The result shows that localization occurs in the weak disorder regime, i.e., when the coupling parameter lambda is very small, for energies E ≤ --Clambda 2. The second part of this dissertation considers adiabatic quantum computing (AQC) algorithms for the unstructured search problem to the case when the number of marked items is unknown. In an ideal situation, an explicit quantum algorithm together with a counting subroutine are given that achieve the optimal Grover speedup over classical algorithms, i.e., roughly speaking, reduce O(2n) to O(2n/2), where n is the size of the problem. However, if one considers more realistic settings, the result shows this quantum speedup is achievable only under a very rigid control precision requirement (e.g., exponentially small control error).

  16. Northern California Seismic Attenuation: 3-D Qp and Qs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhart-Phillips, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    The northern California crust exhibits a wide range of rock types and deformation processes which produce pronounced heterogeneity in regional attenuation. Using local earthquakes, 3-D Qp and Qs crustal models have been obtained for this region which includes the San Andreas fault system, the Central Valley, the Sierra Nevada batholith, and the Mendocino subduction volcanic system. Path attenuation t* values were determined from P and S spectra of 959 spatially distributed earthquakes, magnitude 2.5-6.0 from 2005-2014, using 1254 stations from NCEDC networks and IRIS Mendocino and Sierra Nevada temporary arrays. The t* data were used in Q inversions, using existing hypocenters and 3-D velocity models, with basic 10-km node spacing. The uneven data coverage was accounted for with linking of nodes into larger areas in order to provide useful Q images across the 3-D volume. The results at shallow depth (< 2 km) show very low Q in the Sacramento Delta, the Eureka area, and parts of the Bay Area. In the brittle crust, fault zones that have high seismicity exhibit low Q. In the lower crust, low Q is observed along fault zones that have large cumulative displacement and have experienced grain size reduction. Underlying active volcanic areas, low Q features are apparent below 20-km depth. Moderately high Q is associated with igneous rocks of the Sierra Nevada and Salinian block, while the Franciscan subduction complex shows moderately low Q. The most prominent high Q feature is related to the Great Valley Ophiolite.

  17. Coseismic slip distribution of the 2015 Mw7.8 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake from joint inversion of GPS and InSAR data for slip within a 3-D heterogeneous Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Sui; Masterlark, Timothy

    2016-05-01

    We derive a coseismic slip model of the 2015 Mw7.8 Gorkha earthquake on the basis of GPS and line-of-sight displacements from ALOS-2 descending interferograms, using Green's functions calculated with a 3-D finite element model (FEM). The FEM simulates a nonuniform distribution of elastic material properties and a precise geometric configuration of the irregular topographical surface. The rupturing fault is modeled as a low-angle and north dipping surface within the Main Frontal Thrust along the convergent margin of the Himalayas. The optimal model that inherits heterogeneous material properties provides a significantly better solution than that in a homogenous domain at the 95% confidence interval. The best fit solution for the domain having a nonuniform distribution of material properties reveals a rhombus-shaped slip zone of three composite asperities. Slip is primarily concentrated at a depth of 15 km with both dip-slip (maximum 6.54 m) and strike-slip (maximum 2.0 m) components, giving rise to a geodetic-based moment of 1.09 × 1021 Nm in general agreement with the seismological estimate. The optimal relative weights among GPS and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) are deduced from a new method, MC-HVCE which combines a Monte Carlo search and a Helmert Method of Variance Components Estimation. This method determines the relative weights in a systemic approach which preserves the intrinsic solution smoothness. The joint solution is significantly better than those inverted from each individual data set. This methodology allows us to integrate multiple data sets of geodetic observations with seismic tomography, in an effort to achieve a better understanding of seismic ruptures within crustal heterogeneity.

  18. Determining hypocentral parameters for local earthquakes under ill conditions using genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woohan; Hahm, In-Kyeong; Kim, Won-Young; Lee, Jung Mo

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate that GA-MHYPO determines accurate hypocentral parameters for local earthquakes under ill conditions, such as limited number of stations (phase data), large azimuthal gap, and noisy data. The genetic algorithm (GA) in GA-MHYPO searches for the optimal 1-D velocity structure which provides the minimum traveltime differences between observed (true) and calculated P and S arrivals within prescribed ranges. GA-MHYPO is able to determine hypocentral parameters more accurately in many circumstances than conventional methods which rely on an a priori (and possibly incorrect) 1-D velocity model. In our synthetic tests, the accuracy of hypocentral parameters obtained by GA-MHYPO given ill conditions is improved by more than a factor of 20 for error-free data, and by a factor of five for data with errors, compared to that obtained by conventional methods such as HYPOINVERSE. In the case of error-free data, GA-MHYPO yields less than 0.1 km errors in focal depths and hypocenters without strong dependence on azimuthal coverage up to 45°. Errors are less than 1 km for data with errors of a 0.1-s standard deviation. To test the performance using real data, a well-recorded earthquake in the New Madrid seismic zone and earthquakes recorded under ill conditions in the High Himalaya are relocated by GA-MHYPO. The hypocentral parameters determined by GA-MHYPO under both good and ill conditions show similar computational results, which suggest that GA-MHYPO is robust and yields more reliable hypocentral parameters than standard methods under ill conditions for natural earthquakes.

  19. Localized damage caused by topographic amplification during the 2010 M7.0 Haiti earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, S.E.; Altidor, J.R.; Anglade, D.; Given, D.; Janvier, M.G.; Maharrey, J.Z.; Meremonte, M.; Mildor, B.S.-L.; Prepetit, C.; Yong, A.

    2010-01-01

    Local geological conditions, including both near-surface sedimentary layers and topographic features, are known to significantly influence ground motions caused by earthquakes. Microzonation maps use local geological conditions to characterize seismic hazard, but commonly incorporate the effect of only sedimentary layers. Microzonation does not take into account local topography, because significant topographic amplification is assumed to be rare. Here we show that, although the extent of structural damage in the 2010 Haiti earthquake was primarily due to poor construction, topographic amplification contributed significantly to damage in the district of Petionville, south of central Port-au-Prince. A large number of substantial, relatively well-built structures situated along a foothill ridge in this district sustained serious damage or collapse. Using recordings of aftershocks, we calculate the ground motion response at two seismic stations along the topographic ridge and at two stations in the adjacent valley. Ground motions on the ridge are amplified relative to both sites in the valley and a hard-rock reference site, and thus cannot be explained by sediment-induced amplification. Instead, the amplitude and predominant frequencies of ground motion indicate the amplification of seismic waves by a narrow, steep ridge. We suggest that microzonation maps can potentially be significantly improved by incorporation of topographic effects. ?? 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  20. Localized damage caused by topographic amplification during the 2010 M7.0 Haiti earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hough, Susan E.; Altidor, Jean Robert; Anglade, Dieuseul; Given, Doug; Janvier, M. Guillard; Maharrey, J. Zebulon; Meremonte, Mark; Mildor, Bernard Saint-Louis; Prepetit, Claude; Yong, Alan

    2010-11-01

    Local geological conditions, including both near-surface sedimentary layers and topographic features, are known to significantly influence ground motions caused by earthquakes. Microzonation maps use local geological conditions to characterize seismic hazard, but commonly incorporate the effect of only sedimentary layers. Microzonation does not take into account local topography, because significant topographic amplification is assumed to be rare. Here we show that, although the extent of structural damage in the 2010 Haiti earthquake was primarily due to poor construction, topographic amplification contributed significantly to damage in the district of Petionville, south of central Port-au-Prince. A large number of substantial, relatively well-built structures situated along a foothill ridge in this district sustained serious damage or collapse. Using recordings of aftershocks, we calculate the ground motion response at two seismic stations along the topographic ridge and at two stations in the adjacent valley. Ground motions on the ridge are amplified relative to both sites in the valley and a hard-rock reference site, and thus cannot be explained by sediment-induced amplification. Instead, the amplitude and predominant frequencies of ground motion indicate the amplification of seismic waves by a narrow, steep ridge. We suggest that microzonation maps can potentially be significantly improved by incorporation of topographic effects.

  1. Earthquake and tsunami hazard in West Sumatra: integrating science, outreach, and local stakeholder needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaughey, J.; Lubis, A. M.; Huang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Hill, E. M.; Eriksson, S.; Sieh, K.

    2012-04-01

    The Earth Observatory of Singapore (EOS) is building partnerships with local to provincial government agencies, NGOs, and educators in West Sumatra to inform their policymaking, disaster-risk-reduction, and education efforts. Geodetic and paleoseismic studies show that an earthquake as large as M 8.8 is likely sometime in the coming decades on the Mentawai patch of the Sunda megathrust. This earthquake and its tsunami would be devastating for the Mentawai Islands and neighboring areas of the western Sumatra coast. The low-lying coastal Sumatran city of Padang (pop. ~800,000) has been the object of many research and outreach efforts, especially since 2004. Padang experienced deadly earthquakes in 2007 and 2009 that, though tragedies in their own right, served also as wake-up calls for a larger earthquake to come. However, there remain significant barriers to linking science to policy: extant hazard information is sometimes contradictory or confusing for non-scientists, while turnover of agency leadership and staff means that, in the words of one local advocate, "we keep having to start from zero." Both better hazard knowledge and major infrastructure changes are necessary for risk reduction in Padang. In contrast, the small, isolated villages on the outlying Mentawai Islands have received relatively fewer outreach efforts, yet many villages have the potential for timely evacuation with existing infrastructure. Therefore, knowledge alone can go far toward risk reduction. The tragic October 2010 Mentawai tsunami has inspired further disaster-risk reduction work by local stakeholders. In both locations, we are engaging policymakers and local NGOs, providing science to help inform their work. Through outreach contacts, the Mentawai government requested that we produce the first-ever tsunami hazard map for their islands; this aligns well with scientific interests at EOS. We will work with the Mentawai government on the presentation and explanation of the hazard map, as

  2. SU-E-J-13: Six Degree of Freedom Image Fusion Accuracy for Cranial Target Localization On the Varian Edge Stereotactic Radiosurgery System: Comparison Between 2D/3D and KV CBCT Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H; Song, K; Chetty, I; Kim, J; Wen, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the 6 degree of freedom systematic deviations between 2D/3D and CBCT image registration with various imaging setups and fusion algorithms on the Varian Edge Linac. Methods: An anthropomorphic head phantom with radio opaque targets embedded was scanned with CT slice thicknesses of 0.8, 1, 2, and 3mm. The 6 DOF systematic errors were assessed by comparing 2D/3D (kV/MV with CT) with 3D/3D (CBCT with CT) image registrations with different offset positions, similarity measures, image filters, and CBCT slice thicknesses (1 and 2 mm). The 2D/3D registration accuracy of 51 fractions for 26 cranial SRS patients was also evaluated by analyzing 2D/3D pre-treatment verification taken after 3D/3D image registrations. Results: The systematic deviations of 2D/3D image registration using kV- kV, MV-kV and MV-MV image pairs were within ±0.3mm and ±0.3° for translations and rotations with 95% confidence interval (CI) for a reference CT with 0.8 mm slice thickness. No significant difference (P>0.05) on target localization was observed between 0.8mm, 1mm, and 2mm CT slice thicknesses with CBCT slice thicknesses of 1mm and 2mm. With 3mm CT slice thickness, both 2D/3D and 3D/3D registrations performed less accurately in longitudinal direction than thinner CT slice thickness (0.60±0.12mm and 0.63±0.07mm off, respectively). Using content filter and using similarity measure of pattern intensity instead of mutual information, improved the 2D/3D registration accuracy significantly (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively). For the patient study, means and standard deviations of residual errors were 0.09±0.32mm, −0.22±0.51mm and −0.07±0.32mm in VRT, LNG and LAT directions, respectively, and 0.12°±0.46°, −0.12°±0.39° and 0.06°±0.28° in RTN, PITCH, and ROLL directions, respectively. 95% CI of translational and rotational deviations were comparable to those in phantom study. Conclusion: 2D/3D image registration provided on the Varian Edge radiosurgery, 6 DOF

  3. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  4. Automatic localization of vertebral levels in x-ray fluoroscopy using 3D-2D registration: a tool to reduce wrong-site surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Y.; Schafer, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Kleinszig, G.; Graumann, R.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-09-01

    Surgical targeting of the incorrect vertebral level (wrong-level surgery) is among the more common wrong-site surgical errors, attributed primarily to the lack of uniquely identifiable radiographic landmarks in the mid-thoracic spine. The conventional localization method involves manual counting of vertebral bodies under fluoroscopy, is prone to human error and carries additional time and dose. We propose an image registration and visualization system (referred to as LevelCheck), for decision support in spine surgery by automatically labeling vertebral levels in fluoroscopy using a GPU-accelerated, intensity-based 3D-2D (namely CT-to-fluoroscopy) registration. A gradient information (GI) similarity metric and a CMA-ES optimizer were chosen due to their robustness and inherent suitability for parallelization. Simulation studies involved ten patient CT datasets from which 50 000 simulated fluoroscopic images were generated from C-arm poses selected to approximate the C-arm operator and positioning variability. Physical experiments used an anthropomorphic chest phantom imaged under real fluoroscopy. The registration accuracy was evaluated as the mean projection distance (mPD) between the estimated and true center of vertebral levels. Trials were defined as successful if the estimated position was within the projection of the vertebral body (namely mPD <5 mm). Simulation studies showed a success rate of 99.998% (1 failure in 50 000 trials) and computation time of 4.7 s on a midrange GPU. Analysis of failure modes identified cases of false local optima in the search space arising from longitudinal periodicity in vertebral structures. Physical experiments demonstrated the robustness of the algorithm against quantum noise and x-ray scatter. The ability to automatically localize target anatomy in fluoroscopy in near-real-time could be valuable in reducing the occurrence of wrong-site surgery while helping to reduce radiation exposure. The method is applicable beyond

  5. Measuring both Rotational and Translational Ground-Motions from Explosions and Local Earthquakes in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, B.; Lee, W.; Lin, C.; Liu, C.; Shin, T.; Teng, T.; Wu, C.

    2008-12-01

    Since rotational motions can "contaminate" translational ground-motion measurements due to the induced perturbation of the Earth's gravitational field, we started a program to measure rotational ground motions near Hualien (Taiwan) in December, 2000. However, no useful data were obtained after 3 years, until a rotational sensor of much higher sensitivity was deployed at the HGSD station in eastern Taiwan in December, 2004. Rotational and translational seismograms were obtained from several hundred local earthquakes. As noted by several authors before, we found a linear relationship between peak rotational rate (PRR in mrad/s) and peak ground acceleration (PGA in m/s2) from local earthquakes in Taiwan: PRR = 0.002 + 1.301 PGA, with a correlation coefficient of 0.988. Taking advantage of two large explosions of the TAIGER Active Seismic Experiment, we deployed 13 accelerometers and 8 rotational sensors within 600 m from the N3 shot points and obtained some interesting results, which will be presented by Langston et al. in this Session. In December, 2007, we began an instrument array deployment along the Meishan fault in southwestern Taiwan, where a major earthquake occurred in 1906 with surface rupture of more than 12 km long. The deployed instruments are: (1) a 32-element seismic array in free-field, (2) a 32-element accelerometer array in a building, (3) a six-channel unit with a low-gain broadband seismometer and an accelerometer, and (4) two six-channel units with an accelerometer and an external rotational senor. We have 8 rotational sensors now deployed in Taiwan and seven new rotational sensors are scheduled for deployment soon in a program to assess the effect of ground rotation on traditional measurements of translational strong ground motions.

  6. Polycaprolactone-Coated 3D Printed Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering: In Vitro Alendronate Release Behavior and Local Delivery Effect on In Vivo Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of in vitro alendronate (AD) release behavior through polycaprolactone (PCL) coating on in vivo bone formation using PCL-coated 3D printed interconnected porous tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds. Higher AD and Ca2+ ion release was observed at lower pH (5.0) than that at higher pH (7.4). AD and Ca2+ release, surface morphology, and phase analysis after release indicated a matrix degradation dominated AD release caused by TCP dissolution. PCL coating showed its effectiveness for controlled and sustained AD release. Six different scaffold compositions, namely, (i) TCP (bare TCP), (ii) TCP + AD (AD-coated TCP), (iii) TCP + PCL (PCL-coated TCP), (iv) TCP + PCL + AD, (v) TCP + AD + PCL, and (vi) TCP + AD + PCL + AD were tested in the distal femoral defect of Sprague–Dawley rats for 6 and 10 weeks. An excellent bone formation inside the micro and macro pores of the scaffolds was observed from histomorphology. Histomorphometric analysis revealed maximum new bone formation in TCP + AD + PCL scaffolds after 6 weeks. No adverse effect of PCL on bioactivity of TCP and in vivo bone formation was observed. All scaffolds with AD showed higher bone formation and reduced TRAP (tartrate resistant acid phosphatase) positive cells activity compared to bare TCP and TCP coated with only PCL. Bare TCP scaffolds showed the highest TRAP positive cells activity followed by TCP + PCL scaffolds, whereas TCP + AD scaffolds showed the lowest TRAP activity. A higher TRAP positive cells activity was observed in TCP + AD + PCL compared to TCP + AD scaffolds after 6 weeks. Our results show that in vivo local AD delivery from PCL-coated 3DP TCP scaffolds could further induce increased early bone formation. PMID:24826838

  7. Presentation of a High Resolution Time Lapse 3D Groundwater Model of Metsähovi for Calculating the Gravity Effect of Groundwater in Local Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokkanen, T. M.; Hartikainen, A.; Raja-Halli, A.; Virtanen, H.; Makinen, J.

    2015-12-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this study is to construct a fine resolution time lapse groundwater (GW) model of Metsähovi (MH). GW, geological, and soil moisture (SM) data were collected for several years to achieve the goal. The knowledge of the behavior of the GW at local scale is essential for superconductive gravimeter (SG) investigations performing in MH. DESCRIPTION OF THE DATA Almost 50 sensors have been recorded SM data some 6 years with 1 to 5 minutes sampling frequency. The GW table has been monitored, both in bedrock and in soil, in many stages with all together 15 piezometers. Two geological sampling campaigns were conducted to get the knowledge of hydrological properties of soil in the study area of 200×200 m2 around SG station in MH. PRINCIPLE OF TIME LAPSE 3D HYDROGEOLOGICAL MODEL The model of study site consists of the surfaces of ground and bedrock gridded with 2×2 m2 resolution. The height of GW table was interpolated to 2×2×0.1 m3 grid between GW and SM monitoring points. Close to the outline of the study site and areas lacking of sensors GW table was defined by extrapolation and considering the geological information of the area. The bedrock porosity is 2% and soil porosity determined by geological information and SM recordings is from 5 to 35%. Only fully saturated media is considered in the time lapse model excluding unsaturated one. BENEFICIERS With a new model the fluctuation of GW table can be followed with ranging time lapses from 1 minute to 1 month. The gravity effect caused by the variation of GW table can be calculated more accurate than before in MH. Moreover, the new model can be validated and refined by measured gravity, i.e. hydrological model can be improved by SG recordings (Figure 1).

  8. Tsunami Mapping Related to Local Earthquakes on the French-Italian Riviera (Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioualalen, Mansour; Larroque, Christophe; Scotti, Oona; Daubord, Camille

    2014-07-01

    The Ligurian coast, located at the French-Italian border, is densely populated as well as a touristic area. It is also a location where earthquakes and underwater landslides are recurrent. The nature of the local tsunamigenesis is therefore a legitimate question, because no tsunami warning system can resolve tsunami arrival times of a few minutes, which is the case for the area. As far as the seismicity of the area is concerned, the frequent recurrent earthquakes are generally of moderate magnitude: most of them are lower than M w 5. However, the relatively large M w 6.9 earthquake (Larroque et al., in Geophys J Int, 2012. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2012.05498.x) that occurred on the February 23, 1887, offshore of Imperia (Italian Riviera) is quite emblematic. This unusual event for the region merits a complete study: the quantification of its rupture mechanism is essential (1) to understand the regional active deformation, but also (2) to evaluate its tsunamigenesis potential by deriving relevant rupture scenarios obtained from our knowledge of the event; for that purpose the event is extensively described here. The first point has been the subject of quite a few studies based on the seismotectonics of the area. The last documented approach has been completed by Larroque et al. (Geophys J Int, 2012. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2012.05498.x) who proposed a rupture scenario involving a reverse faulting along a north dipping fault and favoring a M w 6.9 magnitude. In the present paper (1) we study the accuracy of their solutions in relation to the computational grid spacing and the dispersive/nondispersive parameterization, (2) based on an uncertainty on the recorded wave amplitude of the Genoa tide gauge they used, we propose a M w 6.7 earthquake magnitude solution for the event (the kinematics is unchanged), co-existing with the M w 6.9, (3) we evaluate the tsunami coastal impact of the 1887 event, and (4) we test a range of possible ruptures that local faults may

  9. A simulation of Earthquake Loss Estimation in Southeastern Korea using HAZUS and the local site classification Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Kim, K.

    2013-12-01

    Regionally varying seismic hazards can be estimated using an earthquake loss estimation system (e.g. HAZUS-MH). The estimations for actual earthquakes help federal and local authorities develop rapid, effective recovery measures. Estimates for scenario earthquakes help in designing a comprehensive earthquake hazard mitigation plan. Local site characteristics influence the ground motion. Although direct measurements are desirable to construct a site-amplification map, such data are expensive and time consuming to collect. Thus we derived a site classification map of the southern Korean Peninsula using geologic and geomorphologic data, which are readily available for the entire southern Korean Peninsula. Class B sites (mainly rock) are predominant in the area, although localized areas of softer soils are found along major rivers and seashores. The site classification map is compared with independent site classification studies to confirm our site classification map effectively represents the local behavior of site amplification during an earthquake. We then estimated the losses due to a magnitude 6.7 scenario earthquake in Gyeongju, southeastern Korea, with and without the site classification map. Significant differences in loss estimates were observed. The loss without the site classification map decreased without variation with increasing epicentral distance, while the loss with the site classification map varied from region to region, due to both the epicentral distance and local site effects. The major cause of the large loss expected in Gyeongju is the short epicentral distance. Pohang Nam-Gu is located farther from the earthquake source region. Nonetheless, the loss estimates in the remote city are as large as those in Gyeongju and are attributed to the site effect of soft soil found widely in the area.

  10. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  11. Local amplification of seismic waves from the Denali earthquake and damaging seiches in Lake Union, Seattle, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barberopoulou, A.; Qamar, A.; Pratt, T.L.; Creager, K.C.; Steele, W.P.

    2004-01-01

    The Mw7.9 Denali, Alaska earthquake of 3 November, 2002, caused minor damage to at least 20 houseboats in Seattle, Washington by initiating water waves in Lake Union. These water waves were likely initiated during the large amplitude seismic surface waves from this earthquake. Maps of spectral amplification recorded during the Denali earthquake on the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) strong-motion instruments show substantially increased shear and surface wave amplitudes coincident with the Seattle sedimentary basin. Because Lake Union is situated on the Seattle basin, the size of the water waves may have been increased by local amplification of the seismic waves by the basin. Complete hazard assessments require understanding the causes of these water waves during future earthquakes. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. A new crustal model of the western Alpine region derived by combining controlled-source seismology and local earthquake tomography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, M.; Kissling, E.; Husen, S.

    2012-04-01

    We present a newly developed approach of combining controlled-source seismology (CSS) and local earthquake tomography (LET) data to obtain a new 3D crustal model in the western Alpine region. Our approach takes into account the strengths of each seismic method and the quality of each individual seismic information. Therefore, our western Alpine 3D model includes a well-defined Moho, constrained by CSS and LET data, as well as smooth lateral variations in seismic velocities. The consistent combination of results from two different seismic methods is feasible due to the definition of LET Moho elements and their uncertainty estimates. Identification of LET Moho elements is based on a characteristic P-wave velocity (7.25 km/s); uncertainty estimates are derived from the diagonal element of the resolution matrix (RDE), absolute P-wave velocities that are typical for crust and mantle, and a specific velocity gradient around Moho depth. We validate our approach by comparing highest quality Moho elements from both methods coinciding in 353 localities. We find only four Moho elements for which the difference in Moho depth is greater than the error sum of the uncertainty estimates and these four Moho elements are all located close to plate boundaries, where 3D migration of CSS reflector elements is poorly constrained. Our model clearly shows three Moho surfaces, being Europe, Adria, and Liguria, as well as major tectonic structures like suture zones and the high-velocity Ivrea body. Compared to previous studies, our model allows for a more accurate definition of plate boundaries at Moho level. We attribute this to the larger number of available Moho elements derived from LET data. Therefore, the new model allows better insights in the deep crustal structure of the Alpine collision zone.

  13. Comparison of manual and automatic onset Time picking for local earthquake in North Eastern Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spallarossa, D.; Tiberi, L.; Costa, G.

    2012-04-01

    Automatic estimates of earthquake parameters continues to be of considerable interest to the seismological community. The automatic processing of seismic data, whether for real-time seismic warning system or to reprocessing large amount of seismic recordings, is increasingly being demanded by seismologists. In this study is presented a new method used for automatic phase picking (P and S) which include envelope function calculation, STA/LTA detectors and AR picking algorithms based on the Akaike information criterion (AIC) The main characteristics of the proposed picking algorithm are: a) Pre-filtering and envelope calculation to prearrange the onset; b) Preliminary detection of P onset using both the AIC based picker and the STA/LTA picker; c) S/N analysis, P validation, filtering and re-picking; d) Preliminary earthquake location; e) Detection of S onset adopting the AIC based picker; f) S/N analysis, S validation; g) Earthquake location. The algorithm is applied to a reference data composed by 200 events set with very heterogeneous qualities of P and S onsets acquired by South Eastern Alps Transfontier network from 01/01/2008 to 03/31/2008 in North Eastern Italy and surrounding regions. These data are collected through the use of the software Antelope, an integrated collection of programs for data management and seismic data analysis. The reliability and robustness of the proposed algorithm is tested by comparing manually derived P and S readings (determined by an experienced seismic analyst), serving as reference picks, with the corresponding automatically estimated P and S arrival times. An additional analysis is comparing these automatic picks with the ones produced by Antelope, which used only STA/LTA detectors and finally studying the effect of these different set of arrival times in the resultant localizations for each database event. Preliminary results indicate that seismic detectors which integrate different techniques could improve the stability of the

  14. The 2008 M7.9 Wenchuan earthquake - Result of Local and Abnormal Mass Imbalances?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, C. D.

    2008-12-01

    The May 12, 2008 M7.9 Wenchuan earthquake occurred along the Longmen Shan margin of the eastern Tibetan plateau in the Sichuan province of the People's Republic of China. A complex and NNW dipping reverse fault system including the Beichuan fault ruptured 250-300 km parallel to the Longmen Shan thrust belt. This region has been tectonically loaded for >10kyr. It has low deformation rates of less than 1.0±1.0 mm yr-1 resulting in no major seismic activity during the Quaternary period. Several geophysical observations suggest that this M7.9 earthquake was triggered by local and abnormal mass imbalances on the surface of the Earth's crust. These observations include (1) elastostatic response of the crust to the mass changes (2) slip distribution of the main rupture, and (3) aftershock distribution. Initially, approximately 2 years prior the nucleation of the mainshock, at least 320 million tonnes of water accumulated within the upper Min river valley. It enters the Chengdu plain of the Sichuan basin, a stable continental region (SCR). The water volume amplified the strain energy on the Earth's crust. Shear stresses increased by >1kPa on the Beichuan fault at the nucleation point in about 20km depth. Normal stresses decreased by <-4kPa and weakened the fault strength. Pore pressure increases might have additionally destabilized the fault locally due to pore pressure diffusion. This effect, however, might be minor in 20km depth, because of low lateral fracture connectivity and permeability between the area of water accumulation and the Beichuan fault. Overall, the stress alterations within a 120±70km2 large area resulted in the Beichuan fault coming closer to failure. Such an area ruptured would account for a M7.2±0.1 earthquake assuming only 10 MPa stress drop. Secondly, a reverse fault focal mechanism dominated, in particular, during the first 50 seconds of the main M7.9 rupture. The Beichuan fault slipped up to 7m upward peaking at shallow depth (<7km) (Nishimura

  15. Intensity-Modulated and 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Whole-Ventricular Irradiation as Compared With Conventional Whole-Brain Irradiation in the Management of Localized Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Michael Jenwei; Silva Santos, Adriana da; Sakuraba, Roberto Kenji; Lopes, Cleverson Perceu; Goncalves, Vinicius Demanboro; Weltman, Eduardo; Ferrigno, Robson; Cruz, Jose Carlos

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the sparing potential of cerebral hemispheres with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for whole-ventricular irradiation (WVI) and conventional whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in the management of localized central nervous system germ cell tumors (CNSGCTs). Methods and Materials: Ten cases of patients with localized CNSGCTs and submitted to WVI by use of IMRT with or without a 'boost' to the primary lesion were selected. For comparison purposes, similar treatment plans were produced by use of 3D-CRT (WVI with or without boost) and WBI (opposed lateral fields with or without boost), and cerebral hemisphere sparing was evaluated at dose levels ranging from 2 Gy to 40 Gy. Results: The median prescription dose for WVI was 30.6 Gy (range, 25.2-37.5 Gy), and that for the boost was 16.5 Gy (range, 0-23.4 Gy). Mean irradiated cerebral hemisphere volumes were lower for WVI with IMRT than for 3D-CRT and were lower for WVI with 3D-CRT than for WBI. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with the lowest irradiated volumes, with reductions of 7.5%, 12.2%, and 9.0% at dose levels of 20, 30, and 40 Gy, respectively, compared with 3D-CRT. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy provided statistically significant reductions of median irradiated volumes at all dose levels (p = 0.002 or less). However, estimated radiation doses to peripheral areas of the body were 1.9 times higher with IMRT than with 3D-CRT. Conclusions: Although IMRT is associated with increased radiation doses to peripheral areas of the body, its use can spare a significant amount of normal central nervous system tissue compared with 3D-CRT or WBI in the setting of CNSGCT treatment.

  16. Shallow low-velocity zone of the San Jacinto fault from local earthquake waveform modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongfeng; Zhu, Lupei

    2010-10-01

    We developed a method to determine the depth extent of low-velocity zone (LVZ) associated with a fault zone (FZ) using S-wave precursors from local earthquakes. The precursors are diffracted S waves around the edges of LVZ and their relative amplitudes to the direct S waves are sensitive to the LVZ depth. We applied the method to data recorded by three temporary arrays across three branches of the San Jacinto FZ. The FZ dip was constrained by differential traveltimes of P waves between stations at two side of the FZ. Other FZ parameters (width and velocity contrast) were determined by modelling waveforms of direct and FZ-reflected P and S waves. We found that the LVZ of the Buck Ridge fault branch has a width of ~150 m with a 30-40 per cent reduction in Vp and a 50-60 per cent reduction in Vs. The fault dips 70 +/- 5° to southwest and its LVZ extends only to 2 +/- 1 km in depth. The LVZ of the Clark Valley fault branch has a width of ~200 m with 40 per cent reduction in Vp and 50 per cent reduction in Vs. The Coyote Creek branch is nearly vertical and has a LVZ of ~150 m in width and of 25 per cent reduction in Vp and 50 per cent reduction in Vs. The LVZs of these three branches are not centred at the surface fault trace but are located to their northeast, indicating asymmetric damage during earthquakes.

  17. Tomographic imaging of local earthquake delay times for three-dimensional velocity variation in western Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.M.; Crosson, R.S. )

    1990-04-10

    Tomographic inversion is applied to delay times from local earthquakes to image three dimensional velocity variations in the Puget Sound region of western Washington. The 37,500 square km region is represented by nearly cubic blocks of 5 km per side. P-wave arrival time observations from 4,387 crustal earthquakes, with depths of 0 to 40 km, were used as sources producing 36,865 rays covering the target region. A conjugate gradient method (LSQR) is used to invert the large, sparse system of equations. To diminish the effects of noisy data, the Laplacian is constrained to be zero within horizontal layers, providing smoothing of the model. The resolution is estimated by calculating impulse responses at blocks of interest and estimates of standard errors are calculated by the jackknife statistical procedure. Results of the inversion are correlated with some known geologic features and independent geophysical measurements. High P-wave velocities along the eastern flank of the Olympic Peninsula are interpreted to reflect the subsurface extension of Crescent terrane. Low velocities beneath the Puget Sound further to the east are inferred to reflect thick sediment accumulations. The Crescent terrane appears to extend beneath Puget Sound, consistent with its interpretation as a major accretionary unit. In the southern Puget Sound basin, high velocity anomalies at depths of 10-20 km are interpreted as Crescent terrane and are correlated with a region of low seismicity. Near Mt. Ranier, high velocity anomalies may reflect buried plutons.

  18. Crustal shear-wave splitting from local earthquakes in the Hengill triple junction, southwest Iceland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, J.R.; Foulger, G.R.; Julian, B.R.; Miller, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Hengill region in SW Iceland is an unstable ridge-ridge-transform triple junction between an active and a waning segment of the mid-Atlantic spreading center and a transform that is transgressing southward. The triple junction contains active and extinct spreading segments and a widespread geothermal area. We evaluated shear-wave birefringence for locally recorded upper-crustal earthquakes using an array of 30 three-component digital seismographs. Fast-polarization directions, ??, are mostly NE to NNE, subparallel to the spreading axis and probably caused by fissures and microcracks related to spreading. However, there is significant variability in ?? throughout the array. The lag from fast to slow S is not proportional to earthquake depth (ray length), being scattered at all depths. The average wave-speed difference between qS1 and qS2 in the upper 2-5 km of the crust is 2-5%. Our results suggest considerable heterogeneity or strong S scattering.

  19. Auto Correlation Analysis of Coda Waves from Local Earthquakes for Detecting Temporal Changes in Shallow Subsurface Structures: the 2011 Tohoku-Oki, Japan Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Hisashi

    2015-02-01

    For monitoring temporal changes in subsurface structures I propose to use auto correlation functions of coda waves from local earthquakes recorded at surface receivers, which probably contain more body waves than surface waves. Use of coda waves requires earthquakes resulting in decreased time resolution for monitoring. Nonetheless, it may be possible to monitor subsurface structures in sufficient time resolutions in regions with high seismicity. In studying the 2011 Tohoku-Oki, Japan earthquake (Mw 9.0), for which velocity changes have been previously reported, I try to validate the method. KiK-net stations in northern Honshu are used in this analysis. For each moderate earthquake normalized auto correlation functions of surface records are stacked with respect to time windows in the S-wave coda. Aligning the stacked, normalized auto correlation functions with time, I search for changes in phases arrival times. The phases at lag times of <1 s are studied because changes at shallow depths are focused. Temporal variations in the arrival times are measured at the stations based on the stretching method. Clear phase delays are found to be associated with the mainshock and to gradually recover with time. The amounts of the phase delays are 10 % on average with the maximum of about 50 % at some stations. The deconvolution analysis using surface and subsurface records at the same stations is conducted for validation. The results show the phase delays from the deconvolution analysis are slightly smaller than those from the auto correlation analysis, which implies that the phases on the auto correlations are caused by larger velocity changes at shallower depths. The auto correlation analysis seems to have an accuracy of about several percent, which is much larger than methods using earthquake doublets and borehole array data. So this analysis might be applicable in detecting larger changes. In spite of these disadvantages, this analysis is still attractive because it can

  20. Coda Q Attenuation and Source Parameters Analysis in North East India Using Local Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, A. K.; Mohanty, W. K.; Earthquake Seismology

    2010-12-01

    Alok Kumar Mohapatra1* and William Kumar Mohanty1 *Corresponding author: alokgpiitkgp@gmail.com 1Department of Geology and Geophysics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India. Pin-721302 ABSTRACT In the present study, the quality factor of coda waves (Qc) and the source parameters has been estimated for the Northeastern India, using the digital data of ten local earthquakes from April 2001 to November 2002. Earthquakes with magnitude range from 3.8 to 4.9 have been taken into account. The time domain coda decay method of a single back scattering model is used to calculate frequency dependent values of Coda Q (Qc) where as, the source parameters like seismic moment(Mo), stress drop, source radius(r), radiant energy(Wo),and strain drop are estimated using displacement amplitude spectrum of body wave using Brune's model. The earthquakes with magnitude range 3.8 to 4.9 have been used for estimation Qc at six central frequencies 1.5 Hz, 3.0 Hz, 6.0 Hz, 9.0 Hz, 12.0 Hz, and 18.0 Hz. In the present work, the Qc value of local earthquakes are estimated to understand the attenuation characteristic, source parameters and tectonic activity of the region. Based on a criteria of homogeneity in the geological characteristics and the constrains imposed by the distribution of available events the study region has been classified into three zones such as the Tibetan Plateau Zone (TPZ), Bengal Alluvium and Arakan-Yuma Zone (BAZ), Shillong Plateau Zone (SPZ). It follows the power law Qc= Qo (f/fo)n where, Qo is the quality factor at the reference frequency (1Hz) fo and n is the frequency parameter which varies from region to region. The mean values of Qc reveals a dependence on frequency, varying from 292.9 at 1.5 Hz to 4880.1 at 18 Hz. Average frequency dependent relationship Qc values obtained of the Northeastern India is 198 f 1.035, while this relationship varies from the region to region such as, Tibetan Plateau Zone (TPZ): Qc= 226 f 1.11, Bengal Alluvium

  1. TRACE 3-D documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.

    1987-08-01

    TRACE 3-D is an interactive beam-dynamics program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined transport system. TRACE 3-D provides an immediate graphics display of the envelopes and the phase-space ellipses and allows nine types of beam-matching options. This report describes the beam-dynamics calculations and gives detailed instruction for using the code. Several examples are described in detail.

  2. One dimensional P wave velocity structure of the crust beneath west Java and accurate hypocentre locations from local earthquake inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Supardiyono; Santosa, Bagus Jaya

    2012-06-20

    A one-dimensional (1-D) velocity model and station corrections for the West Java zone were computed by inverting P-wave arrival times recorded on a local seismic network of 14 stations. A total of 61 local events with a minimum of 6 P-phases, rms 0.56 s and a maximum gap of 299 Degree-Sign were selected. Comparison with previous earthquake locations shows an improvement for the relocated earthquakes. Tests were carried out to verify the robustness of inversion results in order to corroborate the conclusions drawn out from our reasearch. The obtained minimum 1-D velocity model can be used to improve routine earthquake locations and represents a further step toward more detailed seismotectonic studies in this area of West Java.

  3. A local earthquake coda magnitude and its relation to duration, moment M sub O, and local Richter magnitude M sub L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suteau, A. M.; Whitcomb, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    A relationship was found between the seismic moment, M sub O, of shallow local earthquakes and the total duration of the signal, t, in seconds, measured from the earthquakes origin time, assuming that the end of the coda is composed of backscattering surface waves due to lateral heterogenity in the shallow crust following Aki. Using the linear relationship between the logarithm of M sub O and the local Richter magnitude M sub L, a relationship between M sub L and t, was found. This relationship was used to calculate a coda magnitude M sub C which was compared to M sub L for Southern California earthquakes which occurred during the period from 1972 to 1975.

  4. Synthetic Studies of Local Travel Time Tomography In The Earthquake Swarm Region Vogtland/nw-bohemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessler, D.; Korn, M.

    The Vogtland/NW-Bohemia region is characterized by periodic occurence of earth- quake swarms at upper crustal depths along deep-reaching neotectonic faults and other geophysical phenomena. As one source of these phenomena the existence of a deep- seated magma reservoir at the mantle-crust transition has been postulated. Seismic traveltime tomography making use of local seismic sources can image the 3-dimensional structure of the vp- and vp/vs-distribution in the earth's crust including the mantle-crust transition and thus might give explanations for the observed phenom- ena as aimed by the seismic experiment BOHEMA starting in 2002. The synthetic study presented here deals with the feasability to resolve given synthetic velocity anomalies embedded in a realistic background model of the Vogtland/NW- Bohemia region using realistic velocity background model derived from a refraction seismic experiment. A low velocity zone was included below 7 km representing a worst case scenario concerning ray path coverage. Synthetic travel times were com- puted for a receiver distribution consisting of 54 presently existing permanent seismic stations and 64 additional temporary stations as planned for for BOHEMA experi- ment. As for the sources, 12 epicentres of frequently recorded tectonic earthquakes and 138 sites of known quarry blasts were used guaranteeing sufficiant ray distri- bution in the crust. Applying the SIMULPS software, the tomographic inversion for P-velocity was carried out for a volume of 220 km x 180 km in horizontal and 50 km in vertical direction having increased grid density in the Vogtland/NW-Bohemia re- gion. Results of the inversion as well as considerations of their reliability are presented. The usage of a high number of quarry blasts enables high spatial resolution in the upper crust whereas reproduction of velocity patterns at Moho depth is strongly dependent on well distributed earthquake sources. Due to the existence of a low velocity zone tomographic

  5. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Maps of Seattle, Washington, Including 3D Sedimentary Basin Effects and Rupture Directivity: Implications of 3D Random Velocity Variations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, A. D.; Stephenson, W. J.; Carver, D.; Odum, J.; Williams, R. A.; Rhea, S.

    2010-12-01

    We have produced probabilistic seismic hazard maps of Seattle for 1 Hz spectral acceleration, using over five hundred 3D finite-difference simulations of earthquakes on the Seattle fault, Southern Whidbey Island fault, and Cascadia subduction zone, as well as for random deep and shallow earthquakes at various locations. The 3D velocity model was validated by modeling the observed waveforms for the 2001 M6.8 Nisqually earthquake and several smaller events in the region. At these longer periods (≥ 1 sec) that are especially important to the response of buildings of ten stories or higher, seismic waves are strongly influenced by sedimentary basins and rupture directivity. We are investigating how random spatial variations in the 3D velocity model affect the simulated ground motions for M6.7 earthquakes on the Seattle fault. A fractal random variation of shear-wave velocity with a Von Karman correlation function produces spatial variations of peak ground velocity with multiple scale lengths. We find that a 3D velocity model with a 10% standard deviation in shear-wave velocity in the top 1.5 km and 5% standard deviation from 1.5-10 km depth produces variations in peak ground velocities of as much as a factor of two, relative to the case with no random variations. The model with random variations generally reduces the peak ground velocity of the forward rupture directivity pulse for sites near the fault where basin-edge focusing of S-waves occurs. It also tends to reduce the peak velocity of localized areas where basin surface waves are focused. However, the medium with random variations also causes small-scale amplification of ground motions over distances of a few kilometers. We are also evaluating alternative methods of characterizing the aleatory uncertainty in the probabilistic hazard calculations.

  6. Integrated modelling of toroidal rotation with the 3D non-local drift-kinetic code and boundary models for JT-60U analyses and predictive simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, M.; Satake, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Hayashi, N.; Kamiya, K.; Matsuyama, A.; Shinohara, K.; Matsunaga, G.; Nakata, M.; Ide, S.; Urano, H.

    2015-07-01

    The integrated simulation framework for toroidal momentum transport is developed, which self-consistently calculates the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV), the radial electric field {{E}r} and the resultant toroidal rotation {{V}φ} together with the scrape-off-layer (SOL) physics-based boundary model. The coupling of three codes, the 1.5D transport code TOPICS, the three-dimensional (3D) equilibrium code VMEC and the 3D δ f drift-kinetic equation solver FORTEC-3D, makes it possible to calculate the NTV due to the non-axisymmetric perturbed magnetic field caused by toroidal field coils. Analyses reveal that the NTV significantly influences {{V}φ} in JT-60U and {{E}r} holds the key to determine the NTV profile. The sensitivity of the {{V}φ} profile to the boundary rotation necessitates a boundary condition modelling for toroidal momentum. Owing to the high-resolution measurement system in JT-60U, the {{E}r} gradient is found to be virtually zero at the separatrix regardless of toroidal rotation velocities. Focusing on {{E}r} , the boundary model of toroidal momentum is developed in conjunction with the SOL/divertor plasma code D5PM. This modelling realizes self-consistent predictive simulations for operation scenario development in ITER.

  7. Location and local magnitude of the Tocopilla earthquake sequence of Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuenzalida, A.; Lancieri, M.; Madariaga, R. I.; Sobiesiak, M.

    2010-12-01

    The Northern Chile gap is generally considered to the site of the next megathurst event in Chile. The Tocopilla earthquake of 14 November 2007 (Mw 7.8) and aftershock series broke the southern end of this gap. The Tocopilla event ruptured a narrow strip of 120 km of length and a width that (Peyrat et al.; Delouis et al. 2009) estimated as 30 km. The aftershock sequence comprises five large thrust events with magnitude greater than 6. The main aftershock of Mw 6.7 occurred on November 15, at 15:06 (UTM) seawards of the Mejillones Peninsula. One month later, on December 16 2007, a strong (Mw 6.8) intraplate event with slab-push mechanism occurred near the bottom of the rupture zone. These events represent a unique opportunity for the study of earthquakes in Northern Chile because of the quantity and quality of available data. In the epicentral area, the IPOC network was deployed by GFZ, CNRS/INSU and DGF before the main event. This is a digital, continuously recording network, equipped with both strong-motion and broad-band instrument. On 29 November 2007 a second network named “Task Force” (TF) was deployed by GFZ to study the aftershocks. This is a dense network, installed near the Mejillones peninsula. It is composed by 20 short-period instruments. The slab-push event of 16 december 2007 occurred in the middle of the area covered by the TF network. Aftershocks were detected using an automatic procedure and manually revised in order to pick P and S arrivals. In the 14-28 November period, we detected 635 events recorded at the IPOC network; and a further 552 events were detected between 29 November and 16 December before the slab-push event using the TF network. The events were located using a vertically layered velocity model (Husen et al. 1999), using the NLLoc software of Lomax et al. From the broadband data we estimated the moment magnitude from the displacement spectra of the events. From the short-period instruments we evaluated local magnitudes using the

  8. Non-volcanic tremor characteristics and tremor generation environment in Taiwan and a case study of their stress interaction with local earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, K.; Obara, K.; Nagai, S.; Hirata, N.; Pu, H.; Peng, Z.; Hsu, Y.; Wech, A.; Ching, K.; Leu, P.; Shin, T.; Huang, B.

    2013-12-01

    Jiashian earthquake. To better constrain the tremor location and especially the depth, we used a high-dense array data surrounding the active tremor sources operated from March to May in 2005 with a total of 40 three-component seismometers deployed by Earthquake Research Institute, the University of Tokyo and Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica. Based on the aforementioned WECC tremor catalog, this array has recorded at least 12 clear ambient tremor episodes, including tremor triggered by the 27 March 2005, Mw8.6 Nias earthquake. We used a modified envelope cross-correlation technique and conduct a 3D grid search to relocate individual ambient and triggered tremor bursts. Our preliminary results suggest that most of tremor occurs between 16 to 33km in depth and ~80% of tremor are located between 20 to 30km, with an average depth error of ~3km. Tremor tends to become deeper to the southeast direction, and the dipping angle is qualitatively consistent with a shallow detachment fault model. Our next step is to apply the same procedure to other recent dataset to better quantify the tremor behavior with local earthquakes, including the 26 February 2012, Mw5.9 Wutai earthquake that occurred ~36 km south from the tremor sources.

  9. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  10. P-Wave Velocity Tomography from Local Earthquakes in Western Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa-Chávez, Juan A.; Escudero, Christian R.; Núñez-Cornú, Francisco J.; Bandy, William L.

    2015-11-01

    In western Mexico, the subduction of the Rivera and Cocos plates beneath the North America plate has deformed and fragmented the overriding plate, forming several structural rifts and crustal blocks. To obtain a reliable subsurface image of the continental crust and uppermost mantle in this complex area, we used P-wave arrivals of local earthquakes along with the Fast Marching Method tomography technique. We followed an inversion scheme consisting of (1) the use of a high-quality earthquake catalog and corrected phase picks, (2) the selection of earthquakes using a maximum location error threshold, (3) the estimation of an improved 1-D reference velocity model, and (4) the use of checkerboard testing to determine the optimum configuration of the velocity nodes and inversion parameters. Surprisingly, the tomography results show a very simple δVp distribution that can be described as being controlled by geologic structures formed during two stages of the separation of the Rivera and Cocos plates. The earlier period represents the initial stages of the separation of the Rivera and Cocos plates beneath western Mexico; the later period represents the more advanced stage of rifting where the Rivera and Cocos plates had separated sufficiently to allow melt to accumulate below the Colima Volcanic complex. During the earlier period (14 or 10-1.6 Ma), NE-SW-oriented structures/lineaments (such as the Southern Colima Rift) were formed as the two plates separated. During the second period (1.6 Ma to the present), the deformation is attributed to magma, generated within and above the tear zone between the Rivera and Cocos plates, rising beneath the region of the Colima Volcanic Complex. The rising magma fractured the overlying crust, forming a classic triple-rift junction geometry. This triple-rift system is confined to the mid- to lower crust perhaps indicating that this rifting process is still in an early stage. This fracturing, along with fluid circulation and associated

  11. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-01

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions < ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C T . We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N . We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  12. Effect of anelastic and scattering structures of the lithosphere on the shape of local earthquake coda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chouet, B.

    1990-01-01

    A simple model of single acoustic scattering is used to study the dependence of the shape of local earthquake coda on the anelastic and scattering structures of the lithosphere. The model is applied to the coda of earthquakes located near Stone Canyon, central California, and provides an explanation for the features observed in the data, which include an interesting temporal variation in the coda shape. A surficial layer with a Q of 50 and thickness of 10 or 25 km underlain by a zone with a Q of 1000 extending to the bottom of the lithosphere, together with a scattering scale length, a, that varies with depth z according to the relation a=0.3 exp[-(z/45)2] are found to constitute the simplest structure of the medium compatible with the coda data and with body and surface wave attenuation data. The profile of heterogeneity sizes implies that the scattering strength increases strongly with depth, a constraint required by the necessity to boost the energy of the later coda without forcing the intrinsic Q to be excessively high in the uppermost mantle. This constraint is viewed as an artifact of the single scattering model which overstimates the scattering coefficient due to the neglect of multiple scattering. The observed temporal variation of the signal is difficult to explain by a simple change of the intrinsic Q at some depth. Rather, it is suggested that the scattering properties at depth changed with time through a variation of the fractional rms velocity fluctuation on the order of one percent. ?? 1990 Birkha??user Verlag.

  13. VP Structure of Mount St. Helens, Washington, USA, imaged with local earthquake tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, G.P.; Moran, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new P-wave velocity model for Mount St. Helens using local earthquake data recorded by the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Stations and Cascades Volcano Observatory since the 18 May 1980 eruption. These data were augmented with records from a dense array of 19 temporary stations deployed during the second half of 2005. Because the distribution of earthquakes in the study area is concentrated beneath the volcano and within two nearly linear trends, we used a graded inversion scheme to compute a coarse-grid model that focused on the regional structure, followed by a fine-grid inversion to improve spatial resolution directly beneath the volcanic edifice. The coarse-grid model results are largely consistent with earlier geophysical studies of the area; we find high-velocity anomalies NW and NE of the edifice that correspond with igneous intrusions and a prominent low-velocity zone NNW of the edifice that corresponds with the linear zone of high seismicity known as the St. Helens Seismic Zone. This low-velocity zone may continue past Mount St. Helens to the south at depths below 5??km. Directly beneath the edifice, the fine-grid model images a low-velocity zone between about 2 and 3.5??km below sea level that may correspond to a shallow magma storage zone. And although the model resolution is poor below about 6??km, we found low velocities that correspond with the aseismic zone between about 5.5 and 8??km that has previously been modeled as the location of a large magma storage volume. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Three-dimensional crustal structure of the Mendocino Triple Junction region from local earthquake travel times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdonck, David; Zandt, George

    1994-12-01

    The large-scale, three-dimensional geometry of the Mendocino Triple Junction at Cape Mendocino, California, was investigated by inverting nearly 19,000 P wave arrival times from over 1400 local earthquakes to estimate the three-dimensional velocity structure and hypocentral parameters. A velocity grid 175 km (N-S) by 125 km (E-W) centered near Garberville, California, was constructed with 25 km horizontal and 5 km vertical mode spacing. The model was well resolved near Cape Mendocino, where the earthquakes and stations are concentrated. At about 40.6 N latitude a high-velocity gradient between 6.5 and 7.5 km/s dips gently to the south and east from about 15 km depth near the coast. Relocated hypocenters concentrate below this high gradient which we interpret as the oceanic crust of the subducted Gorda Plate. Therefore the depth to the top of the Gorda Plate near Cape Mendocino is interpreted to be approximately 15 km. The Gorda Plate appears intact and dipping approximately 8 deg eastward due to subduction and flexing downward 6 deg - 12 deg to the south. Both hypocenters and velocity structure suggest that the southern edge of the plate intersects the coastline at 40.3 N latitude and maintains a linear trend 15 deg south of east to at least 123 W longitude. The top of a large low-velocity region at 20-30 km depth extends about 50 km N-S and 75 km E-W (roughly between Garberville and Covelo) and is located above and south of the southern edge of the Gorda Plate. We interpret this low velocity area to be locally thickened crust (8-10 km) due to either local compressional forces associated with north-south compression caused by the northward impingement of the rigid Pacific Plate or by underthrusting of the base of the accretionary subduction complex at the southern terminous of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. South of Cape Mendocino and southwest of the Garberville fault, high velocities indicative of oceanic crust are detected at 15 km depth. We interpret this

  15. Three-dimensional crustal structure for the Mendocino Triple Junction region from local earthquake travel times

    SciTech Connect

    Verdonck, D.; Zandt, G.

    1994-12-10

    The large-scale, three-dimensional geometry of the Mendocino Triple Junction at Cape Mendocino, California, was investigated by inverting nearly 19,000 P wave arrival times from over 1400 local earthquakes to estimate the three-dimensional velocity structure and hypocentral parameters. A velocity grid 175 km (N-S) by 125 km (E-W) centered near Garberville, California, was constructed with 25 km horizontal and 5 km vertical node spacing. The model was well resolved near Cape Mendocino, where the earthquakes and stations are concentrated. At about 40.6{degrees}N latitude a high-velocity gradient between 6.5 and 7.5 km/s dips gently to the south and east from about 15 km depth near the coast. Relocated hypocenters concentrate below this high gradient which the authors interpret as the oceanic crust of the subducted Gorda Plate. Therefore the depth to the top of the Gorda Plate near Cape Mendocino is interpreted to be {approximately} 15 km. The Gorda Plate appears intact and dipping {approximately}8{degrees} eastward due to subduction and flexing downward 6{degrees}-12{degrees} to the south. Both hypocenters and velocity structure suggest that the southern edge of the plate intersects the coastline at 40.3{degrees}N latitude and maintains a linear trend 15{degrees} south of east to at least 123{degrees}W longitude. The top of a large low-velocity region at 20-30 km depth extends about 50 km N-S and 75 km E-W (roughly between Garberville and Covelo) and is located above and south of the southern edge of the Gorda Plate. The authors interpret this low velocity area to be locally thickened crust (8-10 km) due to either local compressional forces associated with north-south compression caused by the northward impingement of the rigid Pacific Plate or by underthrusting of the base of the accretionary subduction complex at the southern terminous of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. 66 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Localized surface disruptions observed by InSAR during strong earthquakes in Java and Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, M.

    2010-01-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar data spanning strong earthquakes on the islands of Java and Hawai‘i in 2006 reveal patches of subsidence and incoherence indicative of localized ground failure. Interferograms spanning the 26 May 2006 Java earthquake suggest an area of about 7.5 km2 of subsidence (~2 cm) and incoherence south of the city of Yogyakarta that correlates with significant damage to housing, high modeled peak ground accelerations, and poorly consolidated geologic deposits. The subsidence and incoherence is inferred to be a result of intense shaking and/or damage. At least five subsidence patches on the west side of the Island of Hawai‘i, ranging 0.3–2.2 km2 in area and 3–8 cm in magnitude, occurred as a result of a pair of strong earthquakes on 15 October 2006. Although no felt reports or seismic data are available from the areas in Hawai‘i, the Java example suggests that the subsidence patches indicate areas of amplified earthquake shaking. Surprisingly, all subsidence areas in Hawai‘i were limited to recent, and supposedly stable, lava flows and may reflect geological conditions not detectable at the surface. In addition, two ‘a‘ā lava flows in Hawai‘i were partially incoherent in interferograms spanning the earthquakes, indicating surface disruption as a result of the earthquake shaking. Coearthquake incoherence of rubbly deposits, like ‘a‘ā flows, should be explored as a potential indicator of earthquake intensity and past strong seismic activity.

  17. States of local stresses in the Sea of Marmara through the analysis of large numbers of small earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkusuz Öztürk, Yasemin; Meral Özel, Nurcan; Özbakir, Ali Değer

    2015-12-01

    We invert the present day states of stresses for five apparent earthquake clusters in the Northern branch of the North Anatolian Fault in the Sea of Marmara. As the center of the Sea of Marmara is prone to a devastating earthquake within a seismic gap between these selected clusters, sensitive analyses of the understanding of the stress and strain characteristics of the region are all-important. We use high quality P and S phases, and P-wave first motion polarities from 398 earthquakes with ML ≥ 1.5 using at least 10 P-wave first motion polarities (FMPs), and a maximum of 1 inconsistent station, obtained from a total of 105 seismic stations, including 5 continuous OBSs. We report here on large numbers of simultaneously determined individual fault plane solutions (FPSs), and orientations of principal stress axes, which previously have not been determined with any confidence from the basins of the Sea of Marmara and prominent fault branches. We find NE-SW trending transtensional stress structures, predominantly in the earthquake clusters of the Eastern Tekirdağ Basin, Eastern Çınarcık Basin, Yalova and Gemlik areas. We infer that a dextral strike-slip deformation exist in the Eastern Ganos Offshore cluster. Furthermore, we analyze FPSs of four ML ≥ 4.0 earthquakes, occurred in seismically quiet regions after 1999 Izmit earthquake. Stress tensor solutions from a cluster of small events that we have obtained, correlate with FPSs of these moderate size events as a demonstration of the effectiveness of the small earthquakes in the derivation of states of local stresses. Consequently, our analyses of seismicity and large numbers of FPSs using the densest seismic network of Turkey contribute to better understanding of the present states of the stresses and seismotectonics of the Sea of Marmara.

  18. Wave-equation Based Earthquake Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, P.; Yang, D.; Yang, X.; Chen, J.; Harris, J.

    2014-12-01

    Precisely locating earthquakes is fundamentally important for studying earthquake physics, fault orientations and Earth's deformation. In industry, accurately determining hypocenters of microseismic events triggered in the course of a hydraulic fracturing treatment can help improve the production of oil and gas from unconventional reservoirs. We develop a novel earthquake location method based on solving full wave equations to accurately locate earthquakes (including microseismic earthquakes) in complex and heterogeneous structures. Traveltime residuals or differential traveltime measurements with the waveform cross-correlation technique are iteratively inverted to obtain the locations of earthquakes. The inversion process involves the computation of the Fréchet derivative with respect to the source (earthquake) location via the interaction between a forward wavefield emitting from the source to the receiver and an adjoint wavefield reversely propagating from the receiver to the source. When there is a source perturbation, the Fréchet derivative not only measures the influence of source location but also the effects of heterogeneity, anisotropy and attenuation of the subsurface structure on the arrival of seismic wave at the receiver. This is essential for the accuracy of earthquake location in complex media. In addition, to reduce the computational cost, we can first assume that seismic wave only propagates in a vertical plane passing through the source and the receiver. The forward wavefield, adjoint wavefield and Fréchet derivative with respect to the source location are all computed in a 2D vertical plane. By transferring the Fréchet derivative along the horizontal direction of the 2D plane into the ones along Latitude and Longitude coordinates or local 3D Cartesian coordinates, the source location can be updated in a 3D geometry. The earthquake location obtained with this combined 2D-3D approach can then be used as the initial location for a true 3D wave

  19. Source parameters and scaling relations for local earthquakes in the Pannonian basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Süle, Bálint; Wéber, Zoltán

    2014-05-01

    Source parameters have been estimated for 74 local earthquakes (0.8 < ML < 4.5) occurred in Hungary (central part of Pannonian basin) in the period of 1995-2011. Fourier displacement spectra of P- and SH- waves were analysed with respect to the ω2 model of Brune. Observed spectra were corrected for path-dependent attenuation effects using an independent regional estimate of the quality factor QS. To correct spectra for near-surface attenuation, the κ parameter was calculated, obtaining it from waveforms recorded at short epicentral distances. The values of the κ parameter vary between 0.01 to 0.06 s with a mean of 0.03 s for P-waves and between 0.01 to 0.09 s with a mean of 0.04 s for SH-waves. After correction for attenuation effects, spectral parameters (corner frequency and low-frequency spectral level) were estimated by a grid search algorithm. The obtained seismic moments range from 1.34 × 1011 to 3.68 × 1015 Nm (1.5 ≤ Mw ≤ 4.3). The source radii are between 115 and 1343 and stress drop spans from 0.14 to 32.4 bars. From the results, a linear relationship between local and moment magnitudes has been established. The obtained scaling relations show slight evidence of self-similarity violation. However, due to the high scatter of our data, the existence of self-similarity cannot be excluded.

  20. A 3D Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor for the Study of Trivalent Arsenic Binding to the ArsA ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Balsamo, Vittoria; Sun, Dali; Naja, Melodie; Wang, Xuemei; Rosen, Barry; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    A self-assembled 3D hydrogel-nanoparticle composite integrated surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor is reported here. The novel assembled substrate was developed by means of a surface mediated radical co-polymerization process to obtain a highly sensitive hydrogel-based thin film that possesses specific binding sites for target analytes. Initially, amino group modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were covalently linked to acrylic acid monomer. Following this, N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and AuNPs linked acrylic acid (AAc) monomers were randomly co-polymerized by the “grafting from” method in the presence of initiator and crosslinker onto the sensing surface. Surface charecterization techniques were utilized to evaluate the thickness and composition of the hydrogel-nanoparticle film. The sensing platform was employed to study the binding kinetics and conformational changes of the ArsA ATPase as a consequence of binding trivalent arsenicals under a variety of conditions. ArsA, the catalytic subunit of the ArsAB arsenite (As(III)) translocating ATPase, is one of the five proteins encoded by the arsenical resistance (ars) operon of plasmid R773 in cells of Escherichia coli, that confers resistance to trivalent and pentavalent salts of the metalloid arsenic. SPR measurements indicate that the 3D hydrogel-nanoparticle coated sensors exhibited a higher sensitivity than that of the 2D AuNPs decorated sensors. Binding of As(III) to ArsA is greatly facilitated by the presence of magnesium ion and ATP. PMID:22658909

  1. Crust-mantle boundaries in the Taiwan - Luzon arc-continent collision system determined from local earthquake tomography and layered Vp models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustaszewski, K. M.; Wu, Y.; Suppe, J.; Huang, H.; Carena, S.; Chang, C.

    2011-12-01

    We performed 3D mapping of crust-mantle boundaries in the Taiwan-Luzon arc-continent collision zone using a local earthquake tomographic model, providing better insight into the mode of subduction polarity reversal. The mapped crust-mantle discontinuities include three tectonically distinct Mohos. Furthermore, a crust-mantle boundary marks the eastern limit of the Eurasian lower crust against the mantle of the Philippine Sea plate. It dips steeply to the east underneath eastern and southern Taiwan and steepens progressively towards north until it becomes vertical at 23.7°N. From there it continues northward in a slightly overturned orientation, where the limit of the tomographic model at the northern tip of the island prevents further mapping. In order to map several Moho discontinuities, we contoured a surface of constant Vp = 7.5 km s-1 constrained from local earthquake tomography and confined to regions with a minimum of 500 rays per tomography cell. Additional constraints for the Moho were derived from layered (1D) Vp models using P-wave arrivals of local earthquakes recorded at 52 seismic stations, employing a genetic algorithm. The Moho of the Eurasian and the Philippine Sea plates are topologically disconnected across the plate boundary. Beneath southern Taiwan, the Eurasian Moho dips to the E at 50-60°, following the orientation of the plate boundary and continuous with the Benioff zone. Towards north, the Eurasian Moho twists to become subvertical, again together with the plate boundary. At the same time, it steps westward into a more external position underneath the thrust belt, giving way to the north-dipping Philippine Sea plate. The Philippine Sea plate Moho shallows towards the surface along the Longitudinal Valley suture. It forms a synform-like crustal root with an axis parallel to the trend of geological units at surface and it is interpreted as the base of the magmatic Luzon arc. Towards the north, the crustal root deepens from 30 km to about 70

  2. Empirical Green's functions from small earthquakes: A waveform study of locally recorded aftershocks of the 1971 San Fernando earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchings, L.; Wu, F. )

    1990-02-10

    Seismograms from 52 aftershocks of the 1971 San Fernando earthquake recorded at 25 stations distributed across the San Fernando Valley are examined to identify empirical Green's functions, and characterize the dependence of their waveforms on moment, focal mechanism, source and recording site spatial variations, recording site geology, and recorded frequency band. Recording distances ranged from 3.0 to 33.0 km, hypocentral separations ranged from 0.22 to 28.4 km, and recording site separations ranged from 0.185 to 24.2 km. The recording site geologies are diorite gneiss, marine and nonmarine sediments, and alluvium of varying thicknesses. Waveforms of events with moment below about 1.5 {times} 10{sup 21} dyn cm are independent of the source-time function and are termed empirical Green's functions. Waveforms recorded at a particular station from events located within 1.0 to 3.0 km of each other, depending upon site geology, with very similar focal mechanism solutions are nearly identical for frequencies up to 10 Hz. There is no correlation to waveforms between recording sites at least 1.2 km apart, and waveforms are clearly distinctive for two sites 0.185 km apart. The geologic conditions of the recording site dominate the character of empirical Green's functions. Even for source separations of up to 20.0 km, the empirical Green's functions at a particular site are consistent in frequency content, amplification, and energy distribution. Therefore, it is shown that empirical Green's functions can be used to obtain site response functions. The observations of empirical Green's functions are used as a basis for developing the theory for using empirical Green's functions in deconvolution for source pulses and synthesis of seismograms of larger earthquakes.

  3. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer themore » second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.« less

  4. 3D microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-02-01

    In order to circumvent the fact that only one observer can view the image from a stereoscopic microscope, an attachment was devised for displaying the 3D microscopic image on a large LCD monitor for viewing by multiple observers in real time. The principle of operation, design, fabrication, and performance are presented, along with tolerance measurements relating to the properties of the cellophane half-wave plate used in the design.

  5. Three-dimensional velocity structure of the Galeras volcano (Colombia) from passive local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Carlos Alberto; Torres, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    A three-dimensional estimation of the Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio structure at Galeras volcano was conducted by means of passive local earthquake tomography. 14,150 volcano-tectonic events recorded by 58 stations in the seismological network established for monitoring the volcanic activity by the Colombian Geological Survey - Pasto Volcano Observatory between the years 1989 and 2015, were inverted by using the LOTOS code. The seismic events are associated with shear-stress fractures in solid rock as a response to pressure induced by magma flow. Tomography resolution tests suggest a depth of imaging that yield 10 km from the summit of the main crater, illuminating a large portion of the volcanic structure and the interaction of tectonic features like the Buesaco and Silvia-Pijao faults. Full catalog tomographic inversion, that represents the stacked image of the volcanic structure or the most permanent features underneath the volcano, shows vertical structures aligned with seismicity beneath the main crater. We hypothesize that these structures correspond to a system of ducts or fractures through which magma and fluid phases flow up from deeper levels toward the top and related with the intersection of the surface traces of the Silvia-Pijao and Buesaco faults.

  6. Velocity structure around the Baikal rift zone from teleseismic and local earthquake traveltimes and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Carole; Koulakov, Ivan; Deverchère, Jacques

    1998-10-01

    We present new results on the velocity structure of the Baikal rift zone, Asia, deduced from a comparative teleseismic and local tomography analysis. The aim of this paper is to better identify the role of deep mantle processes versus that of far-field tectonic effects on the occurrence of extensional tectonics within a continental plate. We use 36000 traveltimes of P-refracted waves from the ISC catalogues and Pg and Pn traveltimes of 578 earthquakes recorded by the Russian regional network to determine a velocity model by the use of local and teleseismic inversion procedures. The models show that some velocity patterns are continuous from the surface down to at least 400 km. Among them, a narrow negative anomaly goes through Mongolia and follows the southern and eastern margins of the Siberian craton: this structure is interpreted as a thin mantle plume rising beneath the rift axis. However, our results do not evidence any wide asthenospheric upwarp at this place. Other velocity anomalies observed near the surface are not deeply rooted. In particular, a negative anomaly is observed at shallow levels (48 km) beneath the northern third of Lake Baikal, which is disconnected from deeper structures. It may be explained by the existence of underplated magmatic material at the bottom of the crust. By comparing the geometry of deep-rooted anomalies to the present-day stress field patterns, we conclude that the sub-lithospheric mantle dynamics is not the main factor controlling extensional processes in the Baikal rift. However, it does contribute to a thermal weakening of the lithosphere along a mechanical discontinuity bounding the Siberian shield. We finally conclude that three favourable conditions are gathered in the Baikal area to generate extension: far-field extensional stress field, mechanical inherited lithospheric weakness and heat supply. Further studies should help to precise the genetic link between these three factors.

  7. Late Cretaceous Localized Crustal Thickening as a Primary Control on the 3-D Architecture and Exhumation Histories of Cordilleran Metamorphic Core Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gans, P. B.; Wong, M.

    2014-12-01

    The juxtaposition of mylonitic mid-crustal rocks and faulted supracrustal rocks in metamorphic core complexes (MMCs) is usually portrayed in 2 dimensions and attributed to a single event of large-scale slip ± isostatic doming along a low-angle "detachment fault"/ shear zone. This paradigm does not explain dramatic along strike (3-D) variations in slip magnitude, footwall architecture, and burial / exhumation histories of most MMCs. A fundamental question posed by MMCs is how did their earlier thickening and exhumation histories influence the geometric evolution and 3-D slip distribution on the subsequent detachment faults? New geologic mapping and 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology from the Snake Range-Kern Mts-Deep Creek Mts (SKDC) complex in eastern Nevada offer important insights into this question. Crustal shortening and thickening by large-scale non-cylindrical recumbent folds and associated thrust faults during the late Cretaceous (90-80 Ma) resulted in deep burial (650°C, 20-25 km) of the central part of the footwall, but metamorphic grade decreases dramatically to the N and S in concert with decreasing amplitude on the shortening structures. Subsequent Paleogene extensional exhumation by normal faulting and ESE-directed mylonitic shearing is greatest in areas of maximum earlier thickening and brought highest grade rocks back to depths of~10-12 km. After ≥15 Ma of quiescence, rapid E-directed slip initiated along the brittle Miocene Snake Range detachment at 20 Ma and reactivated the Eocene shear zone. The ≥200°C gradient across the footwall at this time implies that the Miocene slip surface originated as a moderately E-dipping normal fault. This Miocene slip surface can be tracked for more than 100 km along strike, but the greatest amount of Miocene slip also coincides with parts of the footwall that were most deeply buried in the Cretaceous. These relations indicate that not only is the SKDC MMC a composite feature, but that the crustal welt created by

  8. Three-dimensional crustal structure in the Southern Alps region of New Zealand from inversion of local earthquake and active source data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhart-Phillips, Donna; Bannister, Stephen

    2002-10-01

    P and S-P arrival time data from 311 earthquakes and several thousand offshore and onshore shots have been used in simultaneous inversion for hypocenters, three-dimensional (3-D) Vp and Vp/Vs models in the Southern Alps region, New Zealand. The combined data result in a highly nonuniform ray path distribution, and linked nodes are used in sparsely sampled areas. Gravity data are used to improve the model below 20-km depth, where it is poorly sampled by local earthquakes. The crustal Vp from 5 to 25 km depth is fairly uniform, generally ranging from 5.5 to 6.5 km/s, typical of graywacke and schist. Active fault zones tend to be correlated with low-velocity zones. Where the Alpine fault is primarily strike slip, it is characterized by a vertical low-velocity zone, to at least 15-km depth. Where the fault is dipping and has a large dip-slip component, it is characterized by a large region of low velocity above and southeast of the fault, to at least 14-km depth, consistent with fluids and fracture density from active deformation. A large high-velocity, high-resistivity feature in the eastern Southern Alps may represent Mesozoic schist of higher metamorphic grade than its surroundings, which is relatively rigid and serves to both reduce deformation in the overlying basin and concentrate deformation in the adjoining low-velocity region. The imaged crustal root is deepest 80-km south of Mt. Cook and is asymmetric with a sharper gradient on the northwestern side. The approximate Moho shows regional variation, with 5-10 km thicker crust in Otago than Canterbury.

  9. Seismicity in 2010 and major earthquakes recorded and located in Costa Rica from 1983 until 2012, by the local OVSICORI-UNA seismic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronnie, Q.; Segura, J.; Burgoa, B.; Jimenez, W.; McNally, K. C.

    2013-05-01

    This work is the result of the analysis of existing information in the earthquake database of the Observatorio Sismológico y Vulcanológico de Costa Rica, Universidad Nacional (OVSICORI-UNA), and seeks disclosure of basic seismological information recorded and processed in 2010. In this year there was a transition between the software used to record, store and locate earthquakes. During the first three months of 2010, we used Earthworm (http://folkworm.ceri.memphis.edu/ew-doc), SEISAN (Haskov y Ottemoller, 1999) and Hypocenter (Lienert y Haskov, 1995) to capture, store and locate the earthquakes, respectively; in April 2010, ANTELOPE (http://www.brtt.com/software.html) start to be used for recording and storing and GENLOC (Fan at al, 2006) and LOCSAT (Bratt and Bache 1988), to locate earthquakes. GENLOC was used for local events and LOCSAT for regional and distant earthquakes. The local earthquakes were located using the 1D velocity model of Quintero and Kissling (2001) and for regional and distant earthquakes IASPEI91 (Kennett and Engdahl, 1991) was used. All the events for 2010 and shown in this work were rechecked by the authors. We located 3903 earthquakes in and around Costa Rica and 746 regional and distant seismic events were recorded (see Figure 1). In this work we also give a summary of major earthquakes recorded and located by OVSICORI-UNA network between 1983 and 2012. Seismicity recorded by OVSICORI-UNA network in 2010

  10. One-dimensional velocity model of the Middle Kura Depresion from local earthquakes data of Azerbaijan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yetirmishli, G. C.; Kazimova, S. E.; Kazimov, I. E.

    2011-09-01

    We present the method for determining the velocity model of the Earth's crust and the parameters of earthquakes in the Middle Kura Depression from the data of network telemetry in Azerbaijan. Application of this method allowed us to recalculate the main parameters of the hypocenters of the earthquake, to compute the corrections to the arrival times of P and S waves at the observation station, and to significantly improve the accuracy in determining the coordinates of the earthquakes. The model was constructed using the VELEST program, which calculates one-dimensional minimal velocity models from the travel times of seismic waves.

  11. Investigation of 1-D crustal velocity structure beneath Izmir Gulf and surroundings by using local earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, Orhan; Özer, Ćaglar

    2016-04-01

    In this study; we examined one dimensional crustal velocity structure of Izmir gulf and surroundings. We used nearly one thousand high quality (A and B class) earthquake data which recorded by Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency (AFAD) [1], Bogazici University (BU-KOERI) [2] and National Observatory of Athens (NOA) [3,4]. We tried several synthetic tests to understand power of new velocity structure, and examined phase residuals, RMS values and shifting tests. After evaluating these tests; we decided one dimensional velocity structure and minimum 1-D P wave velocities, hypocentral parameter and earthquake locations from VELEST algorithm. Distribution of earthquakes was visibly improved by using new minimum velocity structure.

  12. Seismic structure of subducted Philippine Sea plate beneath the southern Ryukyu arc by receiver function and local earthquakes tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, M.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic coupling of the Ryukyu subduction zone is assumed to be weak from the lack of historical interplate large earthquakes. However, recent investigation of repeating slow slip events (Heki & Kataoka, 2008), shallow low frequency earthquakes (Ando et al., 2012), and source of 1771 Yaeyama mega-tsunami (Nakamura, 2009), showed that the interplate coupling is not weak in the south of Ryukyu Trench. The biannually repeating SSEs (Mw=6.5) occur at the depth of 20-40 km on the upper interface of the subducted Philippine Sea plate beneath Yaeyama region, where earthquake swarm occurred on 1991 and 1992. To reveal the relation among the crustal structure, earthquake swarms, and occurrence of slow slip events (SSE), local earthquake tomography and receiver function (RF) analysis was computed in the southwestern Ryukyu arc. A tomographic inversion was used to determine P and S wave structures beneath Iriomote Island in the southwestern Ryukyu region for comparison with the locations of the SSE. The seismic tomography (Thurber & Eberhart-Phillips, 1999) was employed. The P- and S- wave arrival time data picked manually by Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) are used. The 6750 earthquakes from January 2000 to July 2012 were used. For the calculation of the receiver function, the 212 earthquakes whose magnitudes are over 6.0 and epicentral distances are between 30 and 90 degrees were selected. The teleseicmic waveforms observed at two short-period seismometers of the JMA, and one broadband seismometer of F-net of National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention were used. The water level method (the water level is 0.01) is applied to original waveforms. Assuming that each later phase in a RF is the wave converted from P to S at a depth, I transformed the time domain RF into the depth domain one along each ray path in a reference velocity model. The JMA2001 velocity model is used in this study. The results of tomography show that the low Vp and high Vp

  13. Multiviewer 3D monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrzewski, Andrew A.; Aye, Tin M.; Kim, Dai Hyun; Esterkin, Vladimir; Savant, Gajendra D.

    1998-09-01

    Physical Optics Corporation has developed an advanced 3-D virtual reality system for use with simulation tools for training technical and military personnel. This system avoids such drawbacks of other virtual reality (VR) systems as eye fatigue, headaches, and alignment for each viewer, all of which are due to the need t