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Sample records for 3d magnetic perturbations

  1. Ballooning Stability Of Tokamak Pedestals In The Presence Of Applied 3D Magnetic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, T. B.; Hegna, C. C.; Willensdorfer, M.; Strumberger, E.; Suttrop, W.; Zohm, H.

    2016-10-01

    Applied 3d magnetic perturbations can destabilize ideal mhd ballooning modes in tokamak pedestals. In this work, we describe techniques for studying infinite-n ballooning stability of 3d equilibria deduced from vmec calculations. Full magnetic profiles from vmec are used to construct local equilibria for flux surfaces in and around the edge pedestal region. These local equilibrium calculations are coupled with ideal ballooning stability analysis to determine stability of the system for given rmp configurations. This theoretical development is motivated by recent asdex-u experiments, where toroidally localized high-n mhd activity is observed in the presence of applied 3d fields. We will attempt to explain these observations. Supported by US DOE under Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER53218.

  2. Fast ion transport during applied 3D magnetic perturbations on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Van Zeeland, Michael A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Grierson, Brian A.; ...

    2015-06-26

    In this paper, measurements show fast ion losses correlated with applied three-dimensional (3D) fields in a variety of plasmas ranging from L-mode to resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) edge localized mode (ELM) suppressed H-mode discharges. In DIII-D L-mode discharges with a slowly rotatingmore » $n=2$ magnetic perturbation, scintillator detector loss signals synchronized with the applied fields are observed to decay within one poloidal transit time after beam turn-off indicating they arise predominantly from prompt loss orbits. Full orbit following using M3D-C1 calculations of the perturbed fields and kinetic profiles reproduce many features of the measured losses and points to the importance of the applied 3D field phase with respect to the beam injection location in determining the overall impact on prompt beam ion loss. Modeling of these results includes a self-consistent calculation of the 3D perturbed beam ion birth profiles and scrape-off-layer ionization, a factor found to be essential to reproducing the experimental measurements. Extension of the simulations to full slowing down timescales, including fueling and the effects of drag and pitch angle scattering, show the applied $n=3$ RMPs in ELM suppressed H-mode plasmas can induce a significant loss of energetic particles from the core. With the applied $n=3$ fields, up to 8.4% of the injected beam power is predicted to be lost, compared to 2.7% with axisymmetric fields only. These fast ions, originating from minor radii $$\\rho >0.7$$ , are predicted to be primarily passing particles lost to the divertor region, consistent with wide field-of-view infrared periscope measurements of wall heating in $n=3$ RMP ELM suppressed plasmas. Edge fast ion $${{\\text{D}}_{\\alpha}}$$ (FIDA) measurements also confirm a large change in edge fast ion profile due to the $n=3$ fields, where the effect was isolated by using short 50 ms RMP-off periods during which ELM suppression was maintained yet the fast ion profile

  3. Fast ion transport during applied 3D magnetic perturbations on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zeeland, Michael A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Grierson, Brian A.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Kramer, G. J.; Lasnier, C. J.; Pace, David C.; Allen, Steve L.; Chen, X.; Evans, T. E.; García-Muñoz, M.; Hanson, J. M.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lao, L. L.; Meyer, W. H.; Moyer, R. A.; Nazikian, R.; Orlov, D. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Wingen, A.

    2015-06-26

    In this paper, measurements show fast ion losses correlated with applied three-dimensional (3D) fields in a variety of plasmas ranging from L-mode to resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) edge localized mode (ELM) suppressed H-mode discharges. In DIII-D L-mode discharges with a slowly rotating $n=2$ magnetic perturbation, scintillator detector loss signals synchronized with the applied fields are observed to decay within one poloidal transit time after beam turn-off indicating they arise predominantly from prompt loss orbits. Full orbit following using M3D-C1 calculations of the perturbed fields and kinetic profiles reproduce many features of the measured losses and points to the importance of the applied 3D field phase with respect to the beam injection location in determining the overall impact on prompt beam ion loss. Modeling of these results includes a self-consistent calculation of the 3D perturbed beam ion birth profiles and scrape-off-layer ionization, a factor found to be essential to reproducing the experimental measurements. Extension of the simulations to full slowing down timescales, including fueling and the effects of drag and pitch angle scattering, show the applied $n=3$ RMPs in ELM suppressed H-mode plasmas can induce a significant loss of energetic particles from the core. With the applied $n=3$ fields, up to 8.4% of the injected beam power is predicted to be lost, compared to 2.7% with axisymmetric fields only. These fast ions, originating from minor radii $\\rho >0.7$ , are predicted to be primarily passing particles lost to the divertor region, consistent with wide field-of-view infrared periscope measurements of wall heating in $n=3$ RMP ELM suppressed plasmas. Edge fast ion ${{\\text{D}}_{\\alpha}}$ (FIDA) measurements also confirm a large change in edge fast ion profile due to the $n=3$ fields, where the effect was isolated by using short 50 ms RMP-off periods during which ELM suppression was maintained yet the fast ion profile was allowed

  4. Sawtooth mitigation in 3D MHD tokamak modelling with applied magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfiglio, D.; Veranda, M.; Cappello, S.; Chacón, L.; Escande, D. F.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of magnetic perturbations (MPs) on the sawtoothing dynamics of the internal kink mode in the tokamak is discussed in the framework of nonlinear 3D MHD modelling. Numerical simulations are performed with the pixie3d code (Chacón 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 056103) based on a D-shaped configuration in toroidal geometry. MPs are applied as produced by two sets of coils distributed along the toroidal direction, one set located above and the other set below the outboard midplane, like in experimental devices such as DIII-D and ASDEX Upgrade. The capability of n  =  1 MPs to affect quasi-periodic sawteeth is shown to depend on the toroidal phase difference Δ φ between the perturbations produced by the two sets of coils. In particular, sawtooth mitigation is obtained for the Δ φ =π phasing, whereas no significant effect is observed for Δ φ =0 . Numerical findings are explained by the interplay between different poloidal harmonics in the spectrum of applied MPs, and appear to be consistent with experiments performed in the DIII-D device. Sawtooth mitigation and stimulation of self-organized helical states by applied MPs have been previously demonstrated in both circular tokamak and reversed-field pinch (RFP) experiments in the RFX-mod device, and in related 3D MHD modelling.

  5. Effect of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations on 3D equilibria in the MST RFP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munaretto, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    The orientation of 3D, stellarator-like equilibria in the MST RFP can now be controlled with application of an m = 1 RMP. This has led to greatly improved diagnosis, revealing enhancements in both the central electron temperature and density. Coupled to a recent advance in the V3FIT code, reconstructions of the 3D equilibria have also been dramatically improved. The RMP also inhibits the generation of high-energy >20 keV electrons that is otherwise common with the 3D state. This state occurs when the normally broad spectrum of core-resonant m = 1 tearing modes condenses, with the innermost resonant mode growing to large amplitude, reaching ~ 8% of the axisymmetric field strength. This occurs in plasmas of sufficiently large Lundquist number ~ IpTe3/2, and the duration of the state is maximized with zero applied Bt (infinite toroidal beta). As the dominant mode grows, eddy current in MST's conducting shell slows the mode's rotation. This leads to locking of the 3D structure, but with an orientation that varies randomly shot to shot, making diagnosis difficult. An m = 1 RMP can now be applied with an array of saddle coils at the vertical insulated cut in the shell. With an amplitude br/B ~ 10% and a tailored temporal waveform, the RMP can force the 3D structure into any desired orientation relative to MST's diagnostics. A recent advance in V3FIT allows calculation of the substantial helical image current flowing in MST's shell, which has in turn allowed self-consistent utilization of both external and internal (Faraday rotation) measurements of the magnetic field. The ORBIT code predicts reduced stochasticity and improved confinement of high-energy electrons within the 3D structure. The suppression of these electrons by the m = 1 RMP may reflect a change to the central magnetic topology. The generation of these electrons is unaffected by non-resonant perturbations, such as m = 3. Supported by the US DOE.

  6. Mitigation of Alfvenic activity by 3D magnetic perturbations on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G. J.; Bortolon, A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Spong, D. A.; Crocker, N. A.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Kubota, S.; Park, J. -K.; Podesta, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2016-07-05

    Observations on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) indicate that externally applied non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) can reduce the amplitude of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) and Global Alfven Eigenmodes (GAE) in response to pulsed n=3 non-resonant fields. From full-orbit following Monte Carlo simulations with the 1- and 2-fluid resistive MHD plasma response to the magnetic perturbation included, it was found that in response to MP pulses the fast-ion losses increased and the fast-ion drive for the GAEs was reduced. The MP did not affect the fast-ion drive for the TAEs significantly but the Alfven continuum at the plasma edge was found to be altered due to the toroidal symmetry breaking which leads to coupling of different toroidal harmonics. The TAE gap was reduced at the edge creating enhanced continuum damping of the global TAEs, which is consistent with the observations. Furthermore, the results suggest that optimized non-axisymmetric MP might be exploited to control and mitigate Alfven instabilities by tailoring the fast-ion distribution function and/or continuum structure.

  7. Mitigation of Alfvenic activity by 3D magnetic perturbations on NSTX

    DOE PAGES

    Kramer, G. J.; Bortolon, A.; Ferraro, N. M.; ...

    2016-07-05

    Observations on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) indicate that externally applied non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) can reduce the amplitude of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) and Global Alfven Eigenmodes (GAE) in response to pulsed n=3 non-resonant fields. From full-orbit following Monte Carlo simulations with the 1- and 2-fluid resistive MHD plasma response to the magnetic perturbation included, it was found that in response to MP pulses the fast-ion losses increased and the fast-ion drive for the GAEs was reduced. The MP did not affect the fast-ion drive for the TAEs significantly but the Alfven continuum at the plasma edge wasmore » found to be altered due to the toroidal symmetry breaking which leads to coupling of different toroidal harmonics. The TAE gap was reduced at the edge creating enhanced continuum damping of the global TAEs, which is consistent with the observations. Furthermore, the results suggest that optimized non-axisymmetric MP might be exploited to control and mitigate Alfven instabilities by tailoring the fast-ion distribution function and/or continuum structure.« less

  8. Mitigation of Alfvénic activity by 3D magnetic perturbations on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G. J.; Bortolon, A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Spong, D. A.; Crocker, N. A.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Kubota, S.; Park, J.-K.; Podestà, M.; Heidbrink, W. W.; the NSTX Team

    2016-08-01

    Observations on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) indicate that externally applied non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) can reduce the amplitude of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) and global Alfvén eigenmodes (GAE) in response to pulsed n  =  3 non-resonant fields. From full-orbit following Monte Carlo simulations with the one- and two-fluid resistive MHD plasma response to the magnetic perturbation included, it was found that in response to MP pulses the fast-ion losses increased and the fast-ion drive for the GAEs was reduced. The MP did not affect the fast-ion drive for the TAEs significantly but the Alfvén continuum at the plasma edge was found to be altered due to the toroidal symmetry breaking which leads to coupling of different toroidal harmonics. The TAE gap was reduced at the edge creating enhanced continuum damping of the global TAEs, which is consistent with the observations. The results suggest that optimized non-axisymmetric MP might be exploited to control and mitigate Alfvén instabilities by tailoring the fast-ion distribution function and/or continuum structure.

  9. Modelling of plasma response to 3D external magnetic field perturbations in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Sun, Youwen; Liu, Yueqiang; Gu, Shuai; Liu, Yue; Wang, Huihui; Zhou, Lina; Guo, Wenfeng

    2016-11-01

    Sustained mitigation and/or suppression of type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) has been achieved in EAST high-confinement plasmas, utilizing the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields produced by two rows of magnetic coils located just inside the vacuum vessel. Systematic toroidal modelling of the plasma response to these RMP fields with various coil configurations (with dominant toroidal mode number n  = 1, 2, 3, 4) in EAST is, for the first time, carried out by using the MARS-F code (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681), with results reported here. In particular, the plasma response is computed with varying coil phasing (the toroidal phase difference of the coil currents) between the upper and lower rows of coils, from 0 to 360°. Four figures of merit, constructed based on the MARS-F computations, are used to determine the optimal coil phasing. The modelled results, taking into account the plasma response, agree well with the experimental observations in terms of the coil phasing for both the mitigated and the suppressed ELM cases in EAST experiments. This study provides a crucial confirmation of the role of the plasma edge peeling response in ELM control, complementing similar studies carried out for other tokamak devices.

  10. Plasma response measurements of external magnetic perturbations using electron cyclotron emission and comparisons to 3D ideal MHD equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willensdorfer, M.; Denk, S. S.; Strumberger, E.; Suttrop, W.; Vanovac, B.; Brida, D.; Cavedon, M.; Classen, I.; Dunne, M.; Fietz, S.; Fischer, R.; Kirk, A.; Laggner, F. M.; Liu, Y. Q.; Odstrčil, T.; Ryan, D. A.; Viezzer, E.; Zohm, H.; Luhmann, I. C.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; The EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-11-01

    The plasma response from an external n  =  2 magnetic perturbation field in ASDEX Upgrade has been measured using mainly electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics and a rigid rotating field. To interpret ECE and ECE-imaging (ECE-I) measurements accurately, forward modeling of the radiation transport has been combined with ray tracing. The measured data is compared to synthetic ECE data generated from a 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium calculated by VMEC. The measured amplitudes of the helical displacement around the outboard midplane are in reasonable agreement with the one from the synthetic VMEC diagnostics. Both exceed the predictions from the vacuum field calculations and indicate the presence of a kink response at the edge, which amplifies the perturbation. VMEC and MARS-F have been used to calculate the properties of this kink mode. The poloidal mode structure of the magnetic perturbation of this kink mode at the edge peaks at poloidal mode numbers larger than the resonant components |m|>|nq| , whereas the poloidal mode structure of its displacement is almost resonant |m|≈ |nq| . This is expected from ideal MHD in the proximity of rational surfaces. The displacement measured by ECE-I confirms this resonant response.

  11. Measurements of the 3D boundary distortion due to external n=2 magnetic perturbations in comparison to ideal MHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willensdorfer, Matthias; Suttrop, Wolfgang; Strumberger, Erika; Zohm, Hartmut; Orain, Francois; Kirk, Andrew; Ryan, David; ASDEX Upgrade Team Team

    2016-10-01

    Best ELM mitigation/suppression at DIII-D and AUG are achieved by external magnetic perturbation (MP) fields, when the applied poloidal mode spectrum is aligned with the mode (kink) at the edge that is most strongly amplified by the plasma. This kink mode causes a 3D displacement of the plasma boundary, which is characterized at AUG using data from toroidally localized high resolution diagnostics and rigid rotating MP-fields with different applied poloidal mode spectra. Various profile and imaging diagnostics, e.g. electron cyclotron emission (ECE), are used to determine the amplitude, the penetration and the poloidal mode structure of the displacement around the outer midplane. The displacement around the X-point/plasma top, which is related to ELM mitigation, is measured using a new steerable ECE and SOFT X-ray. These measurements are compared to MHD codes like JOREK, MARS-F and VMEC. As predicted by MHD, the measured amplitudes clearly exceed the vacuum field calculations. The displacement measured by imaging ECE indicates a resonant response, although the calculated magnetic structure of this edge kink peaks at poloidal mode numbers larger than the resonant components.

  12. M3D-C1 simulations of the plasma response to n = 3 magnetic perturbations applied to the NSTX-U snowflake divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, G. P.; Ferraro, N. M.; Evans, T. E.; Osborne, T. H.; Menard, J. E.; Ahn, J.-W.; Maingi, R.; Wingen, A.; Ciro, D.; Frerichs, H.; Schmitz, O.; Soukhanoviskii, V.; Waters, I.

    2016-10-01

    Single- and two-fluid resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations, performed with the code M3D-C1, are used to investigate the effect of n = 3 magnetic perturbations on the SF divertor configuration. The calculations are based on simulated NSTX-U plasmas and the results show that additional and longer magnetic lobes are created in the null-point region of the SF configuration, compared to those in the conventional single-null. The intersection of these additional and longer lobes with the divertor plates are expected to cause more striations in the particle and heat flux target profiles. In addition, the results indicate that the size of the magnetic lobes, in both single-null and SF configurations, are more sensitive to resonant than to non-resonant magnetic perturbations. The results also suggest that lower values of current in non-axisymmetric control coils close enough to the primary x-point would be required to suppress edge localized modes in plasmas with the SF configuration. This work has been supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Science under DOE Award DE-SC0012706.

  13. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  14. DIII-D Equilibrium Reconstructions with New 3D Magnetic Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Lang; Strait, E. J.; Ferraro, N. M.; Ferron, J. R.; King, J. D.; Lee, X.; Meneghini, O.; Turnbull, A. D.; Huang, Y.; Qian, J. G.; Wingen, A.

    2015-11-01

    DIII-D equilibrium reconstructions with the recently installed new 3D magnetic diagnostic are presented. In addition to providing information to allow more accurate 2D reconstructions, the new 3D probes also provide useful information to guide computation of 3D perturbed equilibria. A new more comprehensive magnetic compensation has been implemented. Algorithms are being developed to allow EFIT to reconstruct 3D perturbed equilibria making use of the new 3D probes and plasma responses from 3D MHD codes such as GATO and M3D-C1. To improve the computation efficiency, all inactive probes in one of the toroidal planes in EFIT have been replaced with new probes from other planes. Other 3D efforts include testing of 3D reconstructions using V3FIT and a new 3D variational moment equilibrium code VMOM3D. Other EFIT developments include a GPU EFIT version and new safety factor and MSE-LS constraints. The accuracy and limitation of the new probes for 3D reconstructions will be discussed. Supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG02-95ER54309.

  15. Effects of 3D Toroidally Asymmetric Magnetic Field on Tokamak Magnetic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.

    2005-10-01

    The effects of 3D error magnetic field on magnetic surfaces are investigated using the DIII-D internal coils (I-Coils). Slowly rotating n=1 traveling waves at 5 Hz and various amplitudes were applied to systematically perturb the edge surfaces by programming the I-Coil currents. The vertical separatrix location difference between EFIT magnetic reconstructions that assumes toroidal symmetry and Thomson scattering Te measurements responds in phase to the applied perturbed field. The oscillation amplitudes increase with the strength of the applied field but are much smaller than those expected from the applied field alone. The results indicate that plasma response is important. Various plasma response models based on results from the MHD codes MARS and GATO are being developed and compared to the experimental observations. To more accurately evaluate the effects of magnetic measurement errors, a new form of the magnetic uncertainty matrix is also being implemented into EFIT. Details will be presented.

  16. 3-D magnetic field calculations for wiggglers using MAGNUS-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Pissanetzky, S.; Tompkins, P.

    1988-01-01

    The recent but steady trend toward increased magnetic and geometric complexity in the design of wigglers and undulators, of which tapered wigglers, hybrid structures, laced electromagnetic wigglers, magnetic cladding, twisters and magic structures are examples, has caused a need for reliable 3-D computer models and a better understanding of the behavior of magnetic systems in three dimensions. The capabilities of the MAGNUS-3D Group of Programs are ideally suited to solve this class of problems and provide insight into 3-D effects. MAGNUS-3D can solve any problem of Magnetostatics involving permanent magnets, linear or nonlinear ferromagnetic materials and electric conductors of any shape in space. The magnetic properties of permanent magnets are described by the complete nonlinear demagnetization curve as provided by the manufacturer, or, at the user's choice, by a simpler approximation involving the coercive force, the residual induction and the direction of magnetization. The ferromagnetic materials are described by a magnetization table and an accurate interpolation relation. An internal library with properties of common industrial steels is available. The conductors are independent of the mesh and are described in terms of conductor elements from an internal library.

  17. Bifurcation to 3D helical magnetic equilibrium in an axisymmetric toroidal device.

    PubMed

    Bergerson, W F; Auriemma, F; Chapman, B E; Ding, W X; Zanca, P; Brower, D L; Innocente, P; Lin, L; Lorenzini, R; Martines, E; Momo, B; Sarff, J S; Terranova, D

    2011-12-16

    We report the first direct measurement of the internal magnetic field structure associated with a 3D helical equilibrium generated spontaneously in the core of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma containment device. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium bifurcation occurs in a reversed-field pinch when the innermost resonant magnetic perturbation grows to a large amplitude, reaching up to 8% of the mean field strength. Magnetic topology evolution is determined by measuring the Faraday effect, revealing that, as the perturbation grows, toroidal symmetry is broken and a helical equilibrium is established.

  18. 3D print of polymer bonded rare-earth magnets, and 3D magnetic field scanning with an end-user 3D printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Abert, C.; Bruckner, F.; Groenefeld, M.; Muthsam, O.; Schuschnigg, S.; Sirak, K.; Thanhoffer, R.; Teliban, I.; Vogler, C.; Windl, R.; Suess, D.

    2016-10-01

    3D print is a recently developed technique, for single-unit production, and for structures that have been impossible to build previously. The current work presents a method to 3D print polymer bonded isotropic hard magnets with a low-cost, end-user 3D printer. Commercially available isotropic NdFeB powder inside a PA11 matrix is characterized, and prepared for the printing process. An example of a printed magnet with a complex shape that was designed to generate a specific stray field is presented, and compared with finite element simulation solving the macroscopic Maxwell equations. For magnetic characterization, and comparing 3D printed structures with injection molded parts, hysteresis measurements are performed. To measure the stray field outside the magnet, the printer is upgraded to a 3D magnetic flux density measurement system. To skip an elaborate adjusting of the sensor, a simulation is used to calibrate the angles, sensitivity, and the offset of the sensor. With this setup, a measurement resolution of 0.05 mm along the z-axes is achievable. The effectiveness of our calibration method is shown. With our setup, we are able to print polymer bonded magnetic systems with the freedom of having a specific complex shape with locally tailored magnetic properties. The 3D scanning setup is easy to mount, and with our calibration method we are able to get accurate measuring results of the stray field.

  19. Controlling tokamak geometry with three-dimensional magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, T. M.; Hegna, C. C.

    2014-10-15

    It is shown that small externally applied magnetic perturbations can significantly alter important geometric properties of magnetic flux surfaces in tokamaks. Through 3D shaping, experimentally relevant perturbation levels are large enough to influence turbulent transport and MHD stability in the pedestal region. It is shown that the dominant pitch-resonant flux surface deformations are primarily induced by non-resonant 3D fields, particularly in the presence of significant axisymmetric shaping. The spectral content of the applied 3D field can be used to control these effects.

  20. Multimaterial magnetically assisted 3D printing of composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Kokkinis, Dimitri; Schaffner, Manuel; Studart, André R.

    2015-01-01

    3D printing has become commonplace for the manufacturing of objects with unusual geometries. Recent developments that enabled printing of multiple materials indicate that the technology can potentially offer a much wider design space beyond unusual shaping. Here we show that a new dimension in this design space can be exploited through the control of the orientation of anisotropic particles used as building blocks during a direct ink-writing process. Particle orientation control is demonstrated by applying low magnetic fields on deposited inks pre-loaded with magnetized stiff platelets. Multimaterial dispensers and a two-component mixing unit provide additional control over the local composition of the printed material. The five-dimensional design space covered by the proposed multimaterial magnetically assisted 3D printing platform (MM-3D printing) opens the way towards the manufacturing of functional heterogeneous materials with exquisite microstructural features thus far only accessible by biological materials grown in nature. PMID:26494528

  1. Multimaterial magnetically assisted 3D printing of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinis, Dimitri; Schaffner, Manuel; Studart, André R.

    2015-10-01

    3D printing has become commonplace for the manufacturing of objects with unusual geometries. Recent developments that enabled printing of multiple materials indicate that the technology can potentially offer a much wider design space beyond unusual shaping. Here we show that a new dimension in this design space can be exploited through the control of the orientation of anisotropic particles used as building blocks during a direct ink-writing process. Particle orientation control is demonstrated by applying low magnetic fields on deposited inks pre-loaded with magnetized stiff platelets. Multimaterial dispensers and a two-component mixing unit provide additional control over the local composition of the printed material. The five-dimensional design space covered by the proposed multimaterial magnetically assisted 3D printing platform (MM-3D printing) opens the way towards the manufacturing of functional heterogeneous materials with exquisite microstructural features thus far only accessible by biological materials grown in nature.

  2. Free-Standing Magnetic Nanopillars for 3D Nanomagnet Logic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nanomagnet logic (NML) is a relatively new computation technology that uses arrays of shape-controlled nanomagnets to enable digital processing. Currently, conventional resist-based lithographic processes limit the design of NML circuitry to planar nanostructures with homogeneous thicknesses. Here, we demonstrate the focused electron beam induced deposition of Fe-based nanomaterial for magnetic in-plane nanowires and out-of-plane nanopillars. Three-dimensional (3D) NML was achieved based on the magnetic coupling between nanowires and nanopillars in a 3D array. Additionally, the same Fe-based nanomaterial was used to produce tilt-corrected high-aspect-ratio probes for the accurate magnetic force microscopy (MFM) analysis of the fabricated 3D NML gate arrays. The interpretation of the MFM measurements was supported by magnetic simulations using the Object Oriented MicroMagnetic Framework. Introducing vertical out-of-plane nanopillars not only increases the packing density of 3D NML but also introduces an extra magnetic degree of freedom, offering a new approach to input/output and processing functionalities in nanomagnetic computing. PMID:25296008

  3. Magnetic field homogeneity perturbations in finite Halbach dipole magnets.

    PubMed

    Turek, Krzysztof; Liszkowski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Halbach hollow cylinder dipole magnets of a low or relatively low aspect ratio attract considerable attention due to their applications, among others, in compact NMR and MRI systems for investigating small objects. However, a complete mathematical framework for the analysis of magnetic fields in these magnets has been developed only for their infinitely long precursors. In such a case the analysis is reduced to two-dimensions (2D). The paper details the analysis of the 3D magnetic field in the Halbach dipole cylinders of a finite length. The analysis is based on three equations in which the components of the magnetic flux density Bx, By and Bz are expanded to infinite power series of the radial coordinate r. The zeroth term in the series corresponds to a homogeneous magnetic field Bc, which is perturbed by the higher order terms due to a finite magnet length. This set of equations is supplemented with an equation for the field profile B(z) along the magnet axis, presented for the first time. It is demonstrated that the geometrical factors in the coefficients of particular powers of r, defined by intricate integrals are the coefficients of the Taylor expansion of the homogeneity profile (B(z)-Bc)/Bc. As a consequence, the components of B can be easily calculated with an arbitrary accuracy. In order to describe perturbations of the field due to segmentation, two additional equations are borrowed from the 2D theory. It is shown that the 2D approach to the perturbations generated by the segmentation can be applied to the 3D Halbach structures unless r is not too close to the inner radius of the cylinder ri. The mathematical framework presented in the paper was verified with great precision by computations of B by a highly accurate integration of the magnetostatic Coulomb law and utilized to analyze the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field in the magnet with the accuracy better than 1 ppm.

  4. Simulation of bootstrap current in 2D and 3D ideal magnetic fields in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, M.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Pedro, M.; Sauter, O.

    2016-09-01

    We aim to simulate the bootstrap current for a MAST-like spherical tokamak using two approaches for magnetic equilibria including externally caused 3D effects such as resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), the effect of toroidal ripple, and intrinsic 3D effects such as non-resonant internal kink modes. The first approach relies on known neoclassical coefficients in ideal MHD equilibria, using the Sauter (Sauter et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2834) expression valid for all collisionalities in axisymmetry, and the second approach being the quasi-analytic Shaing-Callen (Shaing and Callen 1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3315) model in the collisionless regime for 3D. Using the ideal free-boundary magnetohydrodynamic code VMEC, we compute the flux-surface averaged bootstrap current density, with the Sauter and Shaing-Callen expressions for 2D and 3D ideal MHD equilibria including an edge pressure barrier with the application of resonant magnetic perturbations, and equilibria possessing a saturated non-resonant 1/1 internal kink mode with a weak internal pressure barrier. We compare the applicability of the self-consistent iterative model on the 3D applications and discuss the limitations and advantages of each bootstrap current model for each type of equilibrium.

  5. Effects of 3D random correlated velocity perturbations on predicted ground motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Harmsen, S.; Frankel, A.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional, finite-difference simulations of a realistic finite-fault rupture on the southern Hayward fault are used to evaluate the effects of random, correlated velocity perturbations on predicted ground motions. Velocity perturbations are added to a three-dimensional (3D) regional seismic velocity model of the San Francisco Bay Area using a 3D von Karman random medium. Velocity correlation lengths of 5 and 10 km and standard deviations in the velocity of 5% and 10% are considered. The results show that significant deviations in predicted ground velocities are seen in the calculated frequency range (≤1 Hz) for standard deviations in velocity of 5% to 10%. These results have implications for the practical limits on the accuracy of scenario ground-motion calculations and on retrieval of source parameters using higher-frequency, strong-motion data.

  6. Squire's transformation and 3D Optimal Perturbations in Bounded Parallel Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Soundar Jerome, J. John

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this short communication is to present the implication of Squire's transformation on the optimal transient growth of arbitrary 3D disturbances in parallel shear flow bounded in the cross-stream direction. To our best knowledge this simple property has never been discussed before. In particular it allows to express the long-time optimal growth for perturbations of arbitrary wavenumbers as the product of the gains from the 2D optimal at a lower Reynolds number itself due to the Orr-mechanism by a term that may be identified as due to the lift-up mechanism. This property predict scalings for the 3D optimal perturbation well verified by direct computation. It may be extended to take into account buoyancy effect.

  7. Magnetism In 3d Transition Metals at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Iota, V

    2006-02-09

    This research project examined the changes in electronic and magnetic properties of transition metals and oxides under applied pressures, focusing on complex relationship between magnetism and phase stability in these correlated electron systems. As part of this LDRD project, we developed new measurement techniques and adapted synchrotron-based electronic and magnetic measurements for use in the diamond anvil cell. We have performed state-of-the-art X-ray spectroscopy experiments at the dedicated high-pressure beamline HP-CAT (Sector 16 Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory), maintained in collaboration with of University of Nevada, Las Vegas and Geophysical Laboratory of The Carnegie Institution of Washington. Using these advanced measurements, we determined the evolution of the magnetic order in the ferromagnetic 3d transition metals (Fe, Co and Ni) under pressure, and found that at high densities, 3d band broadening results in diminished long range magnetic coupling. Our experiments have allowed us to paint a unified picture of the effects of pressure on the evolution of magnetic spin in 3d electron systems. The technical and scientific advances made during this LDRD project have been reported at a number of scientific meetings and conferences, and have been submitted for publication in technical journals. Both the technical advances and the physical understanding of correlated systems derived from this LDRD are being applied to research on the 4f and 5f electron systems under pressure.

  8. Voltage controlled magnetism in 3d transitional metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weigang

    2015-03-01

    Despite having attracted much attention in multiferroic materials and diluted magnetic semiconductors, the impact of an electric field on the magnetic properties remains largely unknown in 3d transitional ferromagnets (FMs) until recent years. A great deal of effort has been focused on the voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) effect where the modulation of anisotropy field is understood by the change of electron density among different d orbitals of FMs in the presence of an electric field. Here we demonstrate another approach to alter the magnetism by electrically controlling the oxidation state of the 3d FM at the FM/oxide interface. The thin FM film sandwiched between a heavy metal layer and a gate oxide can be reversibly changed from an optimally-oxidized state with a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy to a metallic state with an in-plane magnetic anisotropy, or to a fully-oxidized state with nearly zero magnetization, depending on the polarity and time duration of the applied electric fields. This is a voltage controlled magnetism (VCM) effect, where both the saturation magnetization and anisotropy field of the 3d FM layer can be simultaneously controlled by voltage in a non-volatile fashion. We will also discuss the impact of this VCM effect on magnetic tunnel junctions and spin Hall switching experiments. This work, in collaboration with C. Bi, Y.H. Liu, T. Newhouse-Illige, M. Xu, M. Rosales, J.W. Freeland, O. Mryasov, S. Zhang, and S.G.E. te Velthuis, was supported in part by NSF (ECCS-1310338) and by C-SPIN, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  9. Tailored complex 3D vortex lattice structures by perturbed multiples of three-plane waves.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Jolly; Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam; Joseph, Joby

    2012-04-20

    As three-plane waves are the minimum number required for the formation of vortex-embedded lattice structures by plane wave interference, we present our experimental investigation on the formation of complex 3D photonic vortex lattice structures by a designed superposition of multiples of phase-engineered three-plane waves. The unfolding of the generated complex photonic lattice structures with higher order helical phase is realized by perturbing the superposition of a relatively phase-encoded, axially equidistant multiple of three noncoplanar plane waves. Through a programmable spatial light modulator assisted single step fabrication approach, the unfolded 3D vortex lattice structures are experimentally realized, well matched to our computer simulations. The formation of higher order intertwined helices embedded in these 3D spiraling vortex lattice structures by the superposition of the multiples of phase-engineered three-plane waves interference is also studied.

  10. Kinetic shielding of magnetic islands in 3-D equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegna, C. C.

    2010-11-01

    Kinetic theory is employed to calculate corrections to analytic predictions of saturated magnetic islands due to pressure gradients in 3-D magnetic configurations. The theory calculates the dominant trapped particle response to 3-D field induced net bounce averaged radial drifts. The associated kinetic response describes plasma currents that flow within magnetic surfaces. In general, these currents have a component that resonates with the helical angle of the magnetic island and affect saturated island sizes through the parallel currents generated to satisfy quasineutrality. The resulting kinetic response generally opposes the effects of singular Pfirsch-Schlüter currents that arise at the rational surfaces of general 3-D MHD equilibria. Accounting for both the MHD and kinetic responses, self-consistent magnetic island widths are calculated using Ampere's law. The kinetic effect is largest at lowest collisionality suggesting high-β stellarators are more resilient to retaining flux surface integrity at high-temperatures than predictions from conventional MHD based theory would imply.

  11. 3D Magnetic inversion and remanence: solving the problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, V.; Morris, W.

    2003-04-01

    3D inversion of surface magnetic data is a common processing technique when used in mineral exploration. The major drawback of most 3D inversion algorithms is that they assume that the surface magnetic anomaly is produced by induced magnetization and that there are no remanent magnetization or demagnetization effects present. This has a significant impact when modeling magnetic data that has remanent magnetization. The magnetic anomaly produced by a dipping subsurface body will be identical for a consistent relationship between the dip of the body and the dip of the magnetic vector, regardless of the actual dip of the magnetic body. For example, in the case where a subsurface body is dipping, such as a dipping dike, the dip estimated by the inversion routine will be correct only if induced magnetization is present. This has serious implications for mineral exploration. A solution to the remanence problem is to model the surface magnetic anomaly using a constrained 2D approach rather than 3D. Using a priori information on dip and strike length of a source body, it is possible to approximate the remanence direction and intensity. The 2D solutions can then be rendered into a 3D imaging package to create a model in 3D. A case study was performed on a mafic-ultramafic layered igneous intrusion located in Big Trout Lake, northwestern Ontario, Canada. Large layered igneous intrusions are known to have significant remanence. Like many other layered igneous intrusions such as the Bushveld Complex in South Africa, the Big Trout Lake Complex is highly prospective for Platinum Group Elements (PGEs). Intruded during Archean time, the Big Trout Lake Complex has been subsequently folded and faulted to near vertical. As a consequence of limited surface exposures, knowledge of layering within the pluton and the extent of deformation of the pluton is very limited. Newly acquired high-resolution aeromagnetic data shows a strongly mineralized horizon within the intrusion that

  12. 3-D Display Of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Of The Spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Alan C.; Kim, Yongmin; Haralick, Robert M.; Anderson, Paul A.; Johnson, Roger H.; DeSoto, Larry A.

    1988-06-01

    The original data is produced through standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures with a surface coil applied to the lower back of a normal human subject. The 3-D spine image data consists of twenty-six contiguous slices with 256 x 256 pixels per slice. Two methods for visualization of the 3-D spine are explored. One method utilizes a verifocal mirror system which creates a true 3-D virtual picture of the object. Another method uses a standard high resolution monitor to simultaneously show the three orthogonal sections which intersect at any user-selected point within the object volume. We discuss the application of these systems in assessment of low back pain.

  13. Particle acceleration at 3D reconnecting magnetic separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Threlfall, James; Neukirch, Thomas; Parnell, Clare; Stevenson, Julie

    2015-04-01

    We present results of test particle orbit calculations in three different environments which model separator reconnection in three dimensions. The test particle (electron and proton) orbits are calculated using the relativistic guiding centre approximation. We investigate test particle orbits in a time-dependent (analytical) electro-magnetic field configuration [detailed in Threlfall et al. (A&A, in press); arXiv:1410.6465]. These results are also compared with orbits based upon large-scale 3D MHD simulations of both a single reconnecting magnetic separator and an observationally driven 3D model of a solar active region which contains several topological features of interest, including separators. We discuss how the test-particle orbits and the energy gain depend on the initial conditions, and how observations (for example, of solar flares) may be used to constrain model parameters.

  14. Note: 3D printed spheroid for uniform magnetic field generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, Y.; Aktaş, B.

    2016-10-01

    This article is focused on a novel and practical production method for a uniform magnetic field generator. The method involves building of a surface coil template using a desktop 3D printer and winding of a conducting wire onto the structure using surface grooves as a guide. Groove pattern was based on the parametric spheroidal helical coil formula. The coil was driven by a current source and the magnetic field inside was measured using a Hall probe placed into the holes on the printed structure. The measurements are found to be in good agreement with our finite element analysis results and indicate a fairly uniform field inside.

  15. Magnetism in a graphene-4 f -3 d hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huttmann, Felix; Klar, David; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Schmitz-Antoniak, Carolin; Smekhova, Alevtina; Martínez-Galera, Antonio J.; Caciuc, Vasile; Bihlmayer, Gustav; Blügel, Stefan; Michely, Thomas; Wende, Heiko

    2017-02-01

    We create an interface of graphene with a metallic and magnetic support that leaves its electronic structure largely intact. This is achieved by exposing epitaxial graphene on ferromagnetic thin films of Co and Ni to vapor of the rare earth metal Eu at elevated temperatures, resulting in the intercalation of an Eu monolayer in between graphene and its substrate. The system is atomically well defined, with the Eu monolayer forming a (√{3 }×√{3 }) R 30∘ superstructure with respect to the graphene lattice. Thereby, we avoid the strong hybridization with the (Ni,Co) substrate 3 d states that otherwise drastically modify the electronic structure of graphene. This picture is suggested by our x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements which show that after Eu intercalation the empty 2 p states of C atoms resemble more the ones measured for graphite in contrast to graphene directly bound to 3 d ferromagnetic substrates. We use x-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Co and Ni L2 ,3 and Eu M4 ,5 as an element-specific probe to investigate magnetism in these systems. An antiferromagnetic coupling between Eu and Co/Ni moments is found, which is so strong that a magnetic moment of the Eu layer can be detected at room temperature. Density functional theory calculations confirm the antiferromagnetic coupling and provide an atomic insight into the magnetic coupling mechanism.

  16. Conformal perturbation of off-critical correlators in the 3D Ising universality class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caselle, M.; Costagliola, G.; Magnoli, N.

    2016-07-01

    Thanks to the impressive progress of conformal bootstrap methods we have now very precise estimates of both scaling dimensions and operator product expansion coefficients for several 3D universality classes. We show how to use this information to obtain similarly precise estimates for off-critical correlators using conformal perturbation. We discuss in particular the ⟨σ (r )σ (0 )⟩ , ⟨ɛ (r )ɛ (0 )⟩ and ⟨σ (r )ɛ (0 )⟩ two-point functions in the high and low temperature regimes of the 3D Ising model and evaluate the leading and next to leading terms in the s =trΔt expansion, where t is the reduced temperature. Our results for ⟨σ (r )σ (0 )⟩ agree both with Monte Carlo simulations and with a set of experimental estimates of the critical scattering function.

  17. 3D Tomography of Ionospheric Perturbations Produced by Earthquakes Using Global Positioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespon, F.; Garcia, R.; Lognonné, P.; Murakami, M.

    2004-12-01

    The recent development of Global Positioning System led to establish dense regional networks of bistatic GPS receivers providing today a powerful ionospheric observing system. Now the ionosphere can be imaged by tomographic methods using GPS data. Therefore the ionospheric perturbations can be characterized by monitoring Total Electronic Content (TEC). These disturbances have multiple sources located adove and below ionospheric layers. The most known are the Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TID) produced by internal gravity waves. But some ionospheric disturbances are also due to infrasonic waves. We focus this study on ionospheric perturbations generated by infrasonic waves exited by seismic waves, resulting from the coupling between Earth and the atmosphere. We present a spectral analysis of TEC GPS data, the 3D tomographic method and its application to post-seismic perturbations. By removing background noise we are able to monitor acoustic post-seismic waves, generated by the rupture process and the seismic surface waves, that reach the ionosphere. Especially, we show the observations for the Denali earthquake of 3rd November 2002 and the Hokkaido earthquake of 25th September 2003 using respectively the Californian networks (SICGN) and the Japan network (GEONET). Both the horizontal and vertical propagation of the waves are vizualized in the 3D tomographic movies. The observed waves arrive with a timing and a propagation velocity coherent with expected waves and we purpose an interpretation in terms of infrasonic waves in the atmosphere, generated both near the epicenter and at further distance, at the level of the Rayleigh waves front. Finally we present the improvement of the 3D tomographic methods with the advent of the Galileo system and possible application in seismology.

  18. Three-dimensional two-fluid investigation of 3D-localized magnetic reconnection and its relation to whistler waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Young Dae; Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-10-01

    A full three-dimensional computer code was developed in order to simulate a 3D-localized magnetic reconnection. We assume an incompressible two-fluid regime where the ions are stationary, and electron inertia and Hall effects are present. We solve a single dimensionless differential equation for perturbed magnetic fields with arbitrary background fields. The code has successfully reproduced both experimental and analytic solutions to resonance and Gendrin mode whistler waves in a uniform background field. The code was then modified to model 3D-localized magnetic reconnection as a 3D-localized perturbation on a hyperbolic-tangent background field. Three-dimensional properties that are asymmetric in the out-of-plane direction have been observed. These properties pertained to magnetic field lines, electron currents and their convection. Helicity and energy have also been examined, as well as the addition of a guide field.

  19. Supramolecular 3d-4f single-molecule magnet architectures.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Sebastian; van Leusen, Jan; Izarova, Natalya V; Lan, Yanhua; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Kögerler, Paul; Monakhov, Kirill Yu

    2016-10-18

    The nanosized self-assemblies {[{Ln(III)}{H2O⊂CrLn}]2(H2O)} (Ln = Dy, 1 and Tb, 2) based on new 3d-4f mixed-metal coordination topologies are formed via extensive intramolecular hydrogen bonding that is directed by enclosed water molecules. Compounds 1 and 2 show single-molecule magnet characteristics manifested by hysteresis loops up to 1.6 K (Ueff = 8.3 cm(-1)) and 1 K (Ueff = 3.4 cm(-1)), respectively.

  20. The ITER 3D Magnetic Diagnostic Response to Applied n=3 and n=4 RMP's

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, S A

    2014-09-01

    The ITER magnetic diagnostic response to applied n=3 and n=4 RMPs has been calculated for the 15MA scenario. The VMEC code was utilized to calculate free boundary 3D ideal MHD equilibria, where the non-stellarator symmetric terms were included in the calculation. This allows an assessment to be made of the possible boundary displacements due to RMP application in ITER. As the VMEC code assumes a continuous set of nested flux surface, the possibility of island and stochastic region formation is ignored. At the start of the current at-top (L-Mode) application of n = 4 RMP's indicates approximately 1 cm peak-to-peak displacements on the low field side of the plasma while later in the shot (H-mode) perturbations as large as 3 cm are present. Forward modeling of the ITER magnetic diagnostics indicates significant non-axisymmetric plasma response, exceeding 10% the axisymmetric signal in many of the flux loops. Magnetic field probes seem to indicate a greater robustness to 3D effects but still indicate large sensitivities to 3D effects in a number of sensors. Forward modeling of the diagnostics response to 3D equilibria allows assessment of diagnostics design and control scenarios.

  1. Impact of plasma response on plasma displacements in DIII-D during application of external 3D perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingen, A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Shafer, M. W.; Unterberg, E. A.; Evans, T. E.; Hillis, D. L.; Snyder, P. B.

    2014-06-01

    The effects of applied 3D resonant magnetic perturbations are modelled with and without self-consistent plasma response. The plasma response is calculated using a linear two-fluid model. A synthetic diagnostic is used to simulate soft x-ray (SXR) emission within the steep gradient region of the pedestal, 0.98 > ψ > 0.94. Two methods for simulating the SXR emission given the perturbed fields are considered. In the first method, the emission is assumed to be constant on magnetic field lines, with the emission on each line determined by the penetration depth into the plasma. In the second method, the emission is taken to be a function of the perturbed electron temperature and density calculated by the two-fluid model. It is shown that the latter method is more accurate within the plasma, but is inadequate in the scrape-off layer due to the breakdown of the linearized temperature equation in the two-fluid model. The resulting synthetic emission is compared to measured SXR data, which show helical m = 11 ± 1 displacements around the 11/3 rational surface of sizes up to 5 cm, depending on the poloidal angle. The helical displacements around the 11/3 surface are identified to be directly related to the kink response, caused by amplification of non-resonant components of the magnetic field due to plasma response. The role of different plasma parameters is investigated, but it appears that the electron rotation plays a key role in the formation of screening and resonant amplification, while the kinking appears to be sensitive to the edge current density. It is also hypothesized that the plasma response affects the edge-localized-mode (ELM) stability, i.e. the discharge's operational point relative to the peeling-ballooning stability boundary.

  2. Magnetically Defined Qubits on 3D Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Gerson J.; Loss, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    We explore potentials that break time-reversal symmetry to confine the surface states of 3D topological insulators into quantum wires and quantum dots. A magnetic domain wall on a ferromagnet insulator cap layer provides interfacial states predicted to show the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). Here, we show that confinement can also occur at magnetic domain heterostructures, with states extended in the inner domain, as well as interfacial QAHE states at the surrounding domain walls. The proposed geometry allows the isolation of the wire and dot from spurious circumventing surface states. For the quantum dots, we find that highly spin-polarized quantized QAHE states at the dot edge constitute a promising candidate for quantum computing qubits.

  3. Magnetically Defined Qubits on 3D Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Gerson J.; Loss, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    We explore potentials that break time-reversal symmetry to confine the surface states of 3D topological insulators into quantum wires and quantum dots. A magnetic domain wall on a ferromagnet insulator cap layer provides interfacial states predicted to show the quantum anomalous Hall effect. Here, we show that confinement can also occur at magnetic domain heterostructures, with states extended in the inner domain, as well as interfacial QAHE states at the surrounding domain walls. The proposed geometry allows the isolation of the wire and dot from spurious circumventing surface states. For the quantum dots, we find that highly spin-polarized quantized QAHE states at the dot edge constitute a promising candidate for quantum computing qubits. See [Ferreira and Loss, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 106802 (2013)]. We explore potentials that break time-reversal symmetry to confine the surface states of 3D topological insulators into quantum wires and quantum dots. A magnetic domain wall on a ferromagnet insulator cap layer provides interfacial states predicted to show the quantum anomalous Hall effect. Here, we show that confinement can also occur at magnetic domain heterostructures, with states extended in the inner domain, as well as interfacial QAHE states at the surrounding domain walls. The proposed geometry allows the isolation of the wire and dot from spurious circumventing surface states. For the quantum dots, we find that highly spin-polarized quantized QAHE states at the dot edge constitute a promising candidate for quantum computing qubits. See [Ferreira and Loss, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 106802 (2013)]. We acknowledge support from the Swiss NSF, NCCR Nanoscience, NCCR QSIT, and the Brazillian Research Support Center Initiative (NAP Q-NANO) from Pró-Reitoria de Pesquisa (PRP/USP).

  4. Observation of a 3D Magnetic Null Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Falco, M.; Guglielmino, S. L.; Murabito, M.

    2017-03-01

    We describe high-resolution observations of a GOES B-class flare characterized by a circular ribbon at the chromospheric level, corresponding to the network at the photospheric level. We interpret the flare as a consequence of a magnetic reconnection event that occurred at a three-dimensional (3D) coronal null point located above the supergranular cell. The potential field extrapolation of the photospheric magnetic field indicates that the circular chromospheric ribbon is cospatial with the fan footpoints, while the ribbons of the inner and outer spines look like compact kernels. We found new interesting observational aspects that need to be explained by models: (1) a loop corresponding to the outer spine became brighter a few minutes before the onset of the flare; (2) the circular ribbon was formed by several adjacent compact kernels characterized by a size of 1″–2″ (3) the kernels with a stronger intensity emission were located at the outer footpoint of the darker filaments, departing radially from the center of the supergranular cell; (4) these kernels started to brighten sequentially in clockwise direction; and (5) the site of the 3D null point and the shape of the outer spine were detected by RHESSI in the low-energy channel between 6.0 and 12.0 keV. Taking into account all these features and the length scales of the magnetic systems involved in the event, we argue that the low intensity of the flare may be ascribed to the low amount of magnetic flux and to its symmetric configuration.

  5. Kinematic ground motion simulations on rough faults including effects of 3D stochastic velocity perturbations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graves, Robert; Pitarka, Arben

    2016-01-01

    We describe a methodology for generating kinematic earthquake ruptures for use in 3D ground‐motion simulations over the 0–5 Hz frequency band. Our approach begins by specifying a spatially random slip distribution that has a roughly wavenumber‐squared fall‐off. Given a hypocenter, the rupture speed is specified to average about 75%–80% of the local shear wavespeed and the prescribed slip‐rate function has a Kostrov‐like shape with a fault‐averaged rise time that scales self‐similarly with the seismic moment. Both the rupture time and rise time include significant local perturbations across the fault surface specified by spatially random fields that are partially correlated with the underlying slip distribution. We represent velocity‐strengthening fault zones in the shallow (<5  km) and deep (>15  km) crust by decreasing rupture speed and increasing rise time in these regions. Additional refinements to this approach include the incorporation of geometric perturbations to the fault surface, 3D stochastic correlated perturbations to the P‐ and S‐wave velocity structure, and a damage zone surrounding the shallow fault surface characterized by a 30% reduction in seismic velocity. We demonstrate the approach using a suite of simulations for a hypothetical Mw 6.45 strike‐slip earthquake embedded in a generalized hard‐rock velocity structure. The simulation results are compared with the median predictions from the 2014 Next Generation Attenuation‐West2 Project ground‐motion prediction equations and show very good agreement over the frequency band 0.1–5 Hz for distances out to 25 km from the fault. Additionally, the newly added features act to reduce the coherency of the radiated higher frequency (f>1  Hz) ground motions, and homogenize radiation‐pattern effects in this same bandwidth, which move the simulations closer to the statistical characteristics of observed motions as illustrated by comparison with recordings from

  6. MagicFinger: 3D Magnetic Fingerprints for Indoor Location

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Daniel; Moreno, Victoria; Úbeda, Benito; Skarmeta, Antonio F.

    2015-01-01

    Given the indispensable role of mobile phones in everyday life, phone-centric sensing systems are ideal candidates for ubiquitous observation purposes. This paper presents a novel approach for mobile phone-centric observation applied to indoor location. The approach involves a location fingerprinting methodology that takes advantage of the presence of magnetic field anomalies inside buildings. Unlike existing work on the subject, which uses the intensity of magnetic field for fingerprinting, our approach uses all three components of the measured magnetic field vectors to improve accuracy. By using adequate soft computing techniques, it is possible to adequately balance the constraints of common solutions. The resulting system does not rely on any infrastructure devices and therefore is easy to manage and deploy. The proposed system consists of two phases: the offline phase and the online phase. In the offline phase, magnetic field measurements are taken throughout the building, and 3D maps are generated. Then, during the online phase, the user's location is estimated through the best estimator for each zone of the building. Experimental evaluations carried out in two different buildings confirm the satisfactory performance of indoor location based on magnetic field vectors. These evaluations provided an error of (11.34 m, 4.78 m) in the (x, y) components of the estimated positions in the first building where the experiments were carried out, with a standard deviation of (3.41 m, 4.68 m); and in the second building, an error of (4 m, 2.98 m) with a deviation of (2.64 m, 2.33 m). PMID:26184230

  7. Designing bioinspired composite reinforcement architectures via 3D magnetic printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joshua J.; Fiore, Brad E.; Erb, Randall M.

    2015-10-01

    Discontinuous fibre composites represent a class of materials that are strong, lightweight and have remarkable fracture toughness. These advantages partially explain the abundance and variety of discontinuous fibre composites that have evolved in the natural world. Many natural structures out-perform the conventional synthetic counterparts due, in part, to the more elaborate reinforcement architectures that occur in natural composites. Here we present an additive manufacturing approach that combines real-time colloidal assembly with existing additive manufacturing technologies to create highly programmable discontinuous fibre composites. This technology, termed as `3D magnetic printing', has enabled us to recreate complex bioinspired reinforcement architectures that deliver enhanced material performance compared with monolithic structures. Further, we demonstrate that we can now design and evolve elaborate reinforcement architectures that are not found in nature, demonstrating a high level of possible customization in discontinuous fibre composites with arbitrary geometries.

  8. Unsupervised fuzzy segmentation of 3D magnetic resonance brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velthuizen, Robert P.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Clarke, Laurence P.; Bensaid, Amine M.; Arrington, J. A.; Silbiger, Martin L.

    1993-07-01

    Unsupervised fuzzy methods are proposed for segmentation of 3D Magnetic Resonance images of the brain. Fuzzy c-means (FCM) has shown promising results for segmentation of single slices. FCM has been investigated for volume segmentations, both by combining results of single slices and by segmenting the full volume. Different strategies and initializations have been tried. In particular, two approaches have been used: (1) a method by which, iteratively, the furthest sample is split off to form a new cluster center, and (2) the traditional FCM in which the membership grade matrix is initialized in some way. Results have been compared with volume segmentations by k-means and with two supervised methods, k-nearest neighbors and region growing. Results of individual segmentations are presented as well as comparisons on the application of the different methods to a number of tumor patient data sets.

  9. Designing bioinspired composite reinforcement architectures via 3D magnetic printing

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joshua J.; Fiore, Brad E.; Erb, Randall M.

    2015-01-01

    Discontinuous fibre composites represent a class of materials that are strong, lightweight and have remarkable fracture toughness. These advantages partially explain the abundance and variety of discontinuous fibre composites that have evolved in the natural world. Many natural structures out-perform the conventional synthetic counterparts due, in part, to the more elaborate reinforcement architectures that occur in natural composites. Here we present an additive manufacturing approach that combines real-time colloidal assembly with existing additive manufacturing technologies to create highly programmable discontinuous fibre composites. This technology, termed as ‘3D magnetic printing', has enabled us to recreate complex bioinspired reinforcement architectures that deliver enhanced material performance compared with monolithic structures. Further, we demonstrate that we can now design and evolve elaborate reinforcement architectures that are not found in nature, demonstrating a high level of possible customization in discontinuous fibre composites with arbitrary geometries. PMID:26494282

  10. Effects of magnetic ripple on 3D equilibrium and alpha particle confinement in the European DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfefferlé, D.; Cooper, W. A.; Fasoli, A.; Graves, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    An assessment of alpha particle confinement is performed in the European DEMO reference design. 3D MHD equilibria with nested flux-surfaces and single magnetic axis are obtained with the VMEC free-boundary code, thereby including the plasma response to the magnetic ripple created by the finite number of TF coils. Populations of fusion alphas that are consistent with the equilibrium profiles are evolved until slowing-down with the VENUS-LEVIS orbit code in the guiding-centre approximation. Fast ion losses through the last-closed flux-surface are numerically evaluated with two ripple models: (1) using the 3D equilibrium and (2) algebraically adding the non-axisymmetric ripple perturbation to the 2D equilibrium. By virtue of the small ripple field and its non-resonant nature, both models quantitatively agree. Differences are however noted in the toroidal location of particles losses on the last-closed flux-surface, which in the first case is 3D and in the second not. Superbanana transport, i.e. ripple-well trapping and separatrix crossing, is expected to be the dominant loss mechanism, the strongest effect on alphas being between 100-200 KeV. Above this, stochastic ripple diffusion is responsible for a rather weak loss rate, as the stochastisation threshold is observed numerically to be higher than analytic estimates. The level of ripple in the current 18 TF coil design of the European DEMO is not found to be detrimental to fusion alpha confinement.

  11. Testing the Validity of the Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity Model of Torque due to 3D Non-Resonant Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCubbin, A. J.; Smith, S. P.; Ferraro, N. M.; Callen, J. D.; Meneghini, O.

    2012-10-01

    Understanding the torque applied by resonant and non-resonant magnetic perturbations and its effect on rotation is essential to predict confinement and stability in burning plasmas. Non-axisymmetric 3D fields produced in the DIII-D tokamak apply a torque to the plasma, which can be evaluated through its effect on the plasma rotation. One explanation for this torque is Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity (NTV) acting through non-resonant field components [1]. We have developed a software framework in which magnetic perturbations calculated by the state of the art two fluid MHD code M3D-C1 can be used in NTV calculations. For discharges with applied external magnetic fields in DIII-D, the experimentally determined torques will be analyzed and compared with NTV models.[4pt] [1] J.D. Callen, Nucl. Fusion 51, 094026 (2011).

  12. 3-D, Impulsive Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Plasma (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, S. E.; Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Yoo, J.; Myers, C. E.; Roytershteyn, V.; Daughton, W. S.; Jara-Almonte, J.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental plasma process involving the efficient conversion of magnetic field energy to plasma kinetic energy through changing field line topology. In many space and astrophysical systems, including the solar surface and the Earth's magnetotail, reconnection is not only fast, but also impulsive; in other words, a slow buildup phase is followed by a comparatively quick release of magnetic energy. An important question in the literature is if these examples of impulsive reconnection can be described by a two-dimensional model with no variation in the out-of-plane direction or if impulsive reconnection is fundamentally three-dimensional. Events observed on the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) are characterized by large local gradients in the third direction and cannot be explained by 2-D models [1]. Detailed measurements show that the ejection of flux rope structures from the current sheet plays a key role in these events. By contrast, even though electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range are also observed concurrently with the impulsive behavior, they are not the key physics responsible. Furthermore, an important discrepancy in the layer width and force balance between the collisionless regime of MRX and kinetic simulations [2-4] persists when the fluctuations are small or absent, implying that they are not the cause of the wider electron layers observed in the experiment [5]. These wider layers may instead be due to the formation of flux ropes with a wide range of sizes; consistent with this hypothesis, flux rope signatures are observed down to the smallest scales resolved by the diagnostics. Finally, a qualitative, 3-D, two-fluid model is proposed to explain the observed disruptions. Many of the features observed in MRX including current disruptions [6], flux ropes [7], and electromagnetic fluctuations [8] have analogues in space observations. Thus, further detailed comparisons may enhance our understanding

  13. Calculating Pressure-Driven Current Near Magnetic Islands for 3D MHD Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Dhanush; Reiman, Allan

    2016-10-01

    In general, 3D MHD equilibria in toroidal plasmas do not result in nested pressure surfaces. Instead, islands and chaotic regions appear in the equilibrium. Near small magnetic islands, the pressure varies within the flux surfaces, which has a significant effect on the pressure-driven current, introducing singularities. Previously, the MHD equilibrium current near a magnetic island was calculated, including the effect of ``stellarator symmetry,'' wherein the singular components of the pressure-driven current vanish [A. H. Reiman, Phys. Plasmas 23, 072502 (2016)]. Here we first solve for pressure in a cylindrical plasma from the heat diffusion equation, after adding a helical perturbation. We then numerically calculate the corresponding Pfirsch-Schluter current. At the small island limit, we compare the pressure-driven current with the previously calculated solution, and far from the island, we recover the solution for nested flux surfaces. Lastly, we compute the current for a toroidal plasma for symmetric and non-symmetric geometries.

  14. Combined registration of 3D tibia and femur implant models in 3D magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englmeier, Karl-Hans; Siebert, Markus; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Ruediger; Graichen, Heiko

    2008-03-01

    The most frequent reasons for revision of total knee arthroplasty are loosening and abnormal axial alignment leading to an unphysiological kinematic of the knee implant. To get an idea about the postoperative kinematic of the implant, it is essential to determine the position and orientation of the tibial and femoral prosthesis. Therefore we developed a registration method for fitting 3D CAD-models of knee joint prostheses into an 3D MR image. This rigid registration is the basis for a quantitative analysis of the kinematics of knee implants. Firstly the surface data of the prostheses models are converted into a voxel representation; a recursive algorithm determines all boundary voxels of the original triangular surface data. Secondly an initial preconfiguration of the implants by the user is still necessary for the following step: The user has to perform a rough preconfiguration of both remaining prostheses models, so that the fine matching process gets a reasonable starting point. After that an automated gradient-based fine matching process determines the best absolute position and orientation: This iterative process changes all 6 parameters (3 rotational- and 3 translational parameters) of a model by a minimal amount until a maximum value of the matching function is reached. To examine the spread of the final solutions of the registration, the interobserver variability was measured in a group of testers. This variability, calculated by the relative standard deviation, improved from about 50% (pure manual registration) to 0.5% (rough manual preconfiguration and subsequent fine registration with the automatic fine matching process).

  15. Quiescence of magnetic braking and control of 3D non-resonance in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.-K.; in, Y.; Jeon, Y. M.; Logan, N. C.; Wang, Z. R.; Menard, J. E.; Kim, J. H.; Ko, W. H.; Kstar Team

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic braking using non-axisymmetric (3D) field is a promising tool to control rotation in tokamaks and thereby micro-to-macro instabilities. Ideally magnetic braking should induce only neoclassical momentum transport, without provoking resonant instabilities or unnecessary perturbations in particle or heat transport. Indeed in KSTAR, it was shown that the 3 rows of internal coils could be used to generate highly non-resonant n =1 with backward-helicity field distribution, called -90 phasing, and to change rotation without any perturbations to other transport channels. Recent KSTAR experiments, however, have also shown that the broad-wavelength field distribution, called 0 phasing, is rather more quiescent whereas -90 phasing can be highly degrading especially in high q95 plasmas. IPEC and NTV modeling are consistent with both observations, and further provide the optimal point in coil phasing and amplitude space. Additional experiments and comparisons with modeling all imply the sensitivity of plasma response to remnant resonant field, and thus importance of non-resonance control, to accomplish quiescent magnetic braking. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  16. Joint inversions of two VTEM surveys using quasi-3D TDEM and 3D magnetic inversion algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Vlad; Di Massa, Domenico; Viezzoli, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    In the current paper, we present results of a joint quasi-three-dimensional (quasi-3D) inversion of two versatile time domain electromagnetic (VTEM) datasets, as well as a joint 3D inversion of associated aeromagnetic datasets, from two surveys flown six years apart from one another (2007 and 2013) over a volcanogenic massive sulphide gold (VMS-Au) prospect in northern Ontario, Canada. The time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) data were inverted jointly using the spatially constrained inversion (SCI) approach. In order to increase the coherency in the model space, a calibration parameter was added. This was followed by a joint inversion of the total magnetic intensity (TMI) data extracted from the two surveys. The results of the inversions have been studied and matched with the known geology, adding some new valuable information to the ongoing mineral exploration initiative.

  17. 3D effects of edge magnetic field configuration on divertor/scrape-off layer transport and optimization possibilities for a future reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Xu, Y.; Ida, K.; Corre, Y.; Feng, Y.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Tabares, F. L.; Evans, T. E.; Coenen, J. W.; Liang, Y.; Bader, A.; Itoh, K.; Yamada, H.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Ciraolo, G.; Tafalla, D.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Guo, H. Y.; Cui, Z. Y.; Reiter, D.; Asakura, N.; Wenzel, U.; Morita, S.; Ohno, N.; Peterson, B. J.; Masuzaki, S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper assesses the three-dimensional (3D) effects of the edge magnetic field structure on divertor/scrape-off layer transport, based on an inter-machine comparison of experimental data and on the recent progress of 3D edge transport simulation. The 3D effects are elucidated as a consequence of competition between transports parallel (\\parallel ) and perpendicular (\\bot ) to the magnetic field, in open field lines cut by divertor plates, or in magnetic islands. The competition has strong impacts on divertor functions, such as determination of the divertor density regime, impurity screening and detachment control. The effects of magnetic perturbation on the edge electric field and turbulent transport are also discussed. Parameterization to measure the 3D effects on the edge transport is attempted for the individual divertor functions. Based on the suggested key parameters, an operation domain of the 3D divertor configuration is discussed for future devices.

  18. Magnetic reconnection in 3D magnetosphere models: magnetic separators and open flux production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glocer, A.; Dorelli, J.; Toth, G.; Komar, C. M.; Cassak, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are multiple competing definitions of magnetic reconnection in 3D (e.g., Hesse and Schindler [1988], Lau and Finn [1990], and Boozer [2002]). In this work we focus on separator reconnection. A magnetic separator can be understood as the 3D analogue of a 2D x line with a guide field, and is defined by the line corresponding to the intersection of the separatrix surfaces associated with the magnetic nulls. A separator in the magnetosphere represents the intersection of four distinct magnetic topologies: solar wind, closed, open connected to the northern hemisphere, and open connected to the southern hemisphere. The integral of the parallel electric field along the separator defines the rate of open flux production, and is one measure of the reconnection rate. We present three methods for locating magnetic separators and apply them to 3D resistive MHD simulations of the Earth's magnetosphere using the BATS-R-US code. The techniques for finding separators and determining the reconnection rate are insensitive to IMF clock angle and can in principle be applied to any magnetospheric model. The present work examines cases of high and low resistivity, for two clock angles. We also examine the separator during Flux Transfer Events (FTEs) and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.

  19. Optimization of a Hybrid Magnetic Bearing for a Magnetically Levitated Blood Pump via 3-D FEA

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shanbao; Olles, Mark W.; Burger, Aaron F.; Day, Steven W.

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a magnetically levitated (maglev) axial flow blood pump, three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA) was used to optimize the design of a hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB). Radial, axial, and current stiffness of multiple design variations of the HMB were calculated using a 3-D FEA package and verified by experimental results. As compared with the original design, the optimized HMB had twice the axial stiffness with the resulting increase of negative radial stiffness partially compensated for by increased current stiffness. Accordingly, the performance of the maglev axial flow blood pump with the optimized HMBs was improved: the maximum pump speed was increased from 6000 rpm to 9000 rpm (50%). The radial, axial and current stiffness of the HMB was found to be linear at nominal operational position from both 3-D FEA and empirical measurements. Stiffness values determined by FEA and empirical measurements agreed well with one another. The magnetic flux density distribution and flux loop of the HMB were also visualized via 3-D FEA which confirms the designers’ initial assumption about the function of this HMB. PMID:22065892

  20. Optimization of a Hybrid Magnetic Bearing for a Magnetically Levitated Blood Pump via 3-D FEA.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shanbao; Olles, Mark W; Burger, Aaron F; Day, Steven W

    2011-10-01

    In order to improve the performance of a magnetically levitated (maglev) axial flow blood pump, three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA) was used to optimize the design of a hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB). Radial, axial, and current stiffness of multiple design variations of the HMB were calculated using a 3-D FEA package and verified by experimental results. As compared with the original design, the optimized HMB had twice the axial stiffness with the resulting increase of negative radial stiffness partially compensated for by increased current stiffness. Accordingly, the performance of the maglev axial flow blood pump with the optimized HMBs was improved: the maximum pump speed was increased from 6000 rpm to 9000 rpm (50%). The radial, axial and current stiffness of the HMB was found to be linear at nominal operational position from both 3-D FEA and empirical measurements. Stiffness values determined by FEA and empirical measurements agreed well with one another. The magnetic flux density distribution and flux loop of the HMB were also visualized via 3-D FEA which confirms the designers' initial assumption about the function of this HMB.

  1. A perturbative DFT approach for magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, Khoong Hong; Laskowski, Robert

    2017-04-01

    We develop a perturbative formalism for computing magnetocrystalline anisotropy within density functional theory and the magnetic force theorem. Instead of computing eigenvalues of the spin-orbit Hamiltonian for selected spin polarizations, as in the conventional ;force theorem; approach, we show that the effect can be cast into a redefined form of the spin-orbit operator. This allows to separate the large eigenvalue shift due to spin-orbit interaction common for both polarizations from the much smaller magnetic anisotropy splitting. As a consequence the anisotropy splitting may by considered as a perturbation.

  2. Fast 3D fluid registration of brain magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leporé, Natasha; Chou, Yi-Yu; Lopez, Oscar L.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Becker, James T.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2008-03-01

    Fluid registration is widely used in medical imaging to track anatomical changes, to correct image distortions, and to integrate multi-modality data. Fluid mappings guarantee that the template image deforms smoothly into the target, without tearing or folding, even when large deformations are required for accurate matching. Here we implemented an intensity-based fluid registration algorithm, accelerated by using a filter designed by Bro-Nielsen and Gramkow. We validated the algorithm on 2D and 3D geometric phantoms using the mean square difference between the final registered image and target as a measure of the accuracy of the registration. In tests on phantom images with different levels of overlap, varying amounts of Gaussian noise, and different intensity gradients, the fluid method outperformed a more commonly used elastic registration method, both in terms of accuracy and in avoiding topological errors during deformation. We also studied the effect of varying the viscosity coefficients in the viscous fluid equation, to optimize registration accuracy. Finally, we applied the fluid registration algorithm to a dataset of 2D binary corpus callosum images and 3D volumetric brain MRIs from 14 healthy individuals to assess its accuracy and robustness.

  3. Contiguous 3 d and 4 f Magnetism: Strongly Correlated 3 d Electrons in YbFe2Al10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuntia, P.; Peratheepan, P.; Strydom, A. M.; Utsumi, Y.; Ko, K.-T.; Tsuei, K.-D.; Tjeng, L. H.; Steglich, F.; Baenitz, M.

    2014-11-01

    We present magnetization, specific heat, and Al 27 NMR investigations on YbFe2Al10 over a wide range in temperature and magnetic field. The magnetic susceptibility at low temperatures is strongly enhanced at weak magnetic fields, accompanied by a ln (T0/T ) divergence of the low-T specific heat coefficient in zero field, which indicates a ground state of correlated electrons. From our hard-x-ray photoemission spectroscopy study, the Yb valence at 50 K is evaluated to be 2.38. The system displays valence fluctuating behavior in the low to intermediate temperature range, whereas above 400 K, Yb3 + carries a full and stable moment, and Fe carries a moment of about 3.1 μB. The enhanced value of the Sommerfeld-Wilson ratio and the dynamic scaling of the spin-lattice relaxation rate divided by T [(1 /T1T ) 27 ] with static susceptibility suggests admixed ferromagnetic correlations. (1 /T1T ) 27 simultaneously tracks the valence fluctuations from the 4 f Yb ions in the high temperature range and field dependent antiferromagnetic correlations among partially Kondo screened Fe 3 d moments at low temperature; the latter evolve out of an Yb 4 f admixed conduction band.

  4. A 3D Current Loop Model of Magnetic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, James

    1992-05-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model is developed to study magnetic clouds (Burlaga et al. 1981). In this model, magnetic clouds observed near 1 AU are treated as a consequence of eruptive solar current loops. It is shown that current loops intially in MHD equilibrium can be triggered to rise rapidly, propelling material of up to 10(16) g at up to ~ 1000 km s(-1) and dissipating ~ 10(32) erg of magnetic energy in tens of minutes. The initial rise profile is consistent with observed height-time profiles of erupting filaments (Kahler et al. 1988). Two triggering mechanisms for eruption are suggested: (1)subphotospheric energy storage and trigger and (2) in situ (coronal) energy storage and trigger. In the former, eruption occurs as a result of changes in the subphotospheric magnetic topology and subsequent relaxation to a new equilibrium. In the latter, the current loop can evolve to exceed a local maximum in the magnetic potential associated with the ambient magnetic fields. The former scenario leads to more energetic and longer-lasting eruption than the latter. Burlaga, L. F., Sittler, E., Mariani, F., and Schwenn, R. 1981, J. Geophys. Res., 86, 6673. Kahler, S. W., Moore, R. L., Kane, S. R., and Zirin, H. 1988, Ap. J., 328, 824.

  5. 3D stochastic joint inversion of gravity and magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsipour, Pejman; Marcotte, Denis; Chouteau, Michel

    2012-04-01

    A novel stochastic joint inversion method based on cokriging is applied to estimate density and magnetic susceptibility distributions from gravity and total magnetic field data. The method fully integrates the physical relations between density-gravity, on one hand, and magnetic susceptibility-total magnetic field, on the other hand. As a consequence, when the data are considered noise-free, the responses from the inverted density and susceptibility data exactly reproduce the observed data. The required density and magnetic susceptibility auto- and cross covariance are assumed to follow a linear model of coregionalization (LCM). The parameters of the LCM are estimated from v-v plot fitting of the gravity and total magnetic experimental covariances. The model is tested on two synthetic cases and one real data set, the Perseverance mine (Quebec, Canada). Joint inversions are compared to separate inversions. The joint inversions better recover the known models in the synthetic cases. With the real data set, better definition and location of the mineralized lenses are achieved by joint inversion.

  6. A Compressive Sensing Approach for 3D Breast Cancer Microwave Imaging With Magnetic Nanoparticles as Contrast Agent.

    PubMed

    Bevacqua, Martina T; Scapaticci, Rosa

    2016-02-01

    In microwave breast cancer imaging magnetic nanoparticles have been recently proposed as contrast agent. Due to the non-magnetic nature of human tissues, magnetic nanoparticles make possible the overcoming of some limitations of conventional microwave imaging techniques, thus providing reliable and specific diagnosis of breast cancer. In this paper, a Compressive Sensing inspired inversion technique is introduced for the reconstruction of the magnetic contrast induced within the tumor. The applicability of Compressive Sensing theory is guaranteed by the fact that the underlying inverse scattering problem is linear and the searched magnetic perturbation is sparse. From the numerical analysis, performed in realistic conditions in 3D geometry, it has been pointed out that the adoption of this new tool allows improving resolution and accuracy of the reconstructions, as well as reducing the number of required measurements.

  7. A symmetric, triply interlaced 3-D anionic MOF that exhibits both magnetic order and SMM behaviour.

    PubMed

    Campo, J; Falvello, L R; Forcén-Vázquez, E; Sáenz de Pipaón, C; Palacio, F; Tomás, M

    2016-11-14

    A newly prepared 3-D polymer of cobalt citrate cubanes bridged by high-spin Co(ii) centres displays both single-molecule magnet (SMM) behaviour and magnetic ordering. Triple interpenetration of the 3-D diamondoid polymers yields a crystalline solid with channels that host cations and free water molecules, with the SMM behaviour of the Co4O4 cores preserved. The octahedrally coordinated Co(ii) bridges are implicated in the onset of magnetic order at an experimentally accessible temperature.

  8. A Magnetic Diagnostic Code for 3D Fusion Equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel A. Lazerson, S. Sakakibara and Y. Suzuki

    2013-03-12

    A synthetic magnetic diagnostics code for fusion equilibria is presented. This code calculates the response of various magnetic diagnostics to the equilibria produced by the VMEC and PIES codes. This allows for treatment of equilibria with both good nested flux surfaces and those with stochastic regions. DIAGNO v2.0 builds upon previous codes through the implementation of a virtual casing principle. The code is validated against a vacuum shot on the Large Helical Device (LHD) where the vertical field was ramped. As an exercise of the code, the diagnostic response for various equilibria are calculated on the LHD.

  9. Control of asymmetric magnetic perturbations in tokamaks.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Kyu; Schaffer, Michael J; Menard, Jonathan E; Boozer, Allen H

    2007-11-09

    The sensitivity of tokamak plasmas to very small deviations from the axisymmetry of the magnetic field |deltaB/B| approximately 10{-4} is well known. What was not understood until very recently is the importance of the perturbation to the plasma equilibrium in assessing the effects of externally produced asymmetries in the magnetic field, even far from a stability limit. DIII-D and NSTX experiments find that when the deleterious effects of asymmetries are mitigated, the external asymmetric field was often made stronger and had an increased interaction with the magnetic field of the unperturbed equilibrium. This Letter explains these counterintuitive results. The explanation using ideal perturbed equilibria has important implications for the control of field errors in all toroidal plasmas.

  10. 3D and 4D magnetic susceptibility tomography based on complex MR images

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-11-11

    Magnetic susceptibility is the physical property for T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2*MRI). The invention relates to methods for reconstructing an internal distribution (3D map) of magnetic susceptibility values, .chi. (x,y,z), of an object, from 3D T2*MRI phase images, by using Computed Inverse Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CIMRI) tomography. The CIMRI technique solves the inverse problem of the 3D convolution by executing a 3D Total Variation (TV) regularized iterative convolution scheme, using a split Bregman iteration algorithm. The reconstruction of .chi. (x,y,z) can be designed for low-pass, band-pass, and high-pass features by using a convolution kernel that is modified from the standard dipole kernel. Multiple reconstructions can be implemented in parallel, and averaging the reconstructions can suppress noise. 4D dynamic magnetic susceptibility tomography can be implemented by reconstructing a 3D susceptibility volume from a 3D phase volume by performing 3D CIMRI magnetic susceptibility tomography at each snapshot time.

  11. GPU-accelerated denoising of 3D magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect

    Howison, Mark; Wes Bethel, E.

    2014-05-29

    The raw computational power of GPU accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. In practice, applying these filtering operations requires setting multiple parameters. This study was designed to provide better guidance to practitioners for choosing the most appropriate parameters by answering two questions: what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? And what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? To answer the first question, we use two different metrics, mean squared error (MSE) and mean structural similarity (MSSIM), to compare denoising quality against a reference image. Surprisingly, the best improvement in structural similarity with the bilateral filter is achieved with a small stencil size that lies within the range of real-time execution on an NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU. Moreover, inappropriate choices for parameters, especially scaling parameters, can yield very poor denoising performance. To answer the second question, we perform an autotuning study to empirically determine optimal memory tiling on the GPU. The variation in these results suggests that such tuning is an essential step in achieving real-time performance. These results have important implications for the real-time application of denoising to MR images in clinical settings that require fast turn-around times.

  12. Direct-write 3D printing of NdFeB bonded magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Compton, Brett Gibson; Kemp, James William; Novikov, Timofei V.; ...

    2016-08-17

    We report a method to fabricate Nd-Fe-B bonded magnets of complex shape via extrusion-based additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D-printing. We have successfully formulated a 3D-printable epoxy-based ink for direct-write AM with anisotropic MQA NdFeB magnet particles that can be deposited at room temperature. The new feedstocks contain up to 40 vol.% MQA anisotropic Nd-Fe-B magnet particles, and they are shown to remain uniformly dispersed in the thermoset matrix throughout the deposition process. Ring, bar, and horseshoe-type 3D magnet structures were printed and cured in air at 100°C without degrading the magnetic properties. Lastly, this study provides a newmore » pathway for fabricating Nd-Fe-B bonded magnets with complex geometry at low temperature, and presents new opportunities for fabricating multifunctional hybrid structures and devices.« less

  13. Direct-write 3D printing of NdFeB bonded magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, Brett Gibson; Kemp, James William; Novikov, Timofei V.; Pack, Robert Cody; Nlebedim, Cajetan I.; Duty, Chad Edward; Rios, Orlando; Paranthaman, M. Parans

    2016-08-17

    We report a method to fabricate Nd-Fe-B bonded magnets of complex shape via extrusion-based additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D-printing. We have successfully formulated a 3D-printable epoxy-based ink for direct-write AM with anisotropic MQA NdFeB magnet particles that can be deposited at room temperature. The new feedstocks contain up to 40 vol.% MQA anisotropic Nd-Fe-B magnet particles, and they are shown to remain uniformly dispersed in the thermoset matrix throughout the deposition process. Ring, bar, and horseshoe-type 3D magnet structures were printed and cured in air at 100°C without degrading the magnetic properties. Lastly, this study provides a new pathway for fabricating Nd-Fe-B bonded magnets with complex geometry at low temperature, and presents new opportunities for fabricating multifunctional hybrid structures and devices.

  14. Statistical Flux Tube Properties of 3D Magnetic Carpet Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, R. M.; Parnell, C. E.; Mackay, D. H.; Priest, E. R.

    2003-02-01

    The quiet-Sun photosphere consists of numerous magnetic flux fragments of both polarities that evolve with granular and supergranular flow fields. These concentrations give rise to a web of intermingled magnetic flux tubes which characterise the coronal magnetic field. Here, the nature of these flux tubes is studied. The photosphere is taken to be the source plane and each photospheric fragment is represented by a series of point sources. By analysing the potential field produced by these sources, it is found that the distribution of flux tube lengths obtained by (i) integrating forward from positive sources and (ii) tracing back from negative sources is highly dependent on the total flux imbalance within the region of interest. It is established that the relation between the footpoint separation of a flux tube and its height cannot be assumed to be linear. Where there is a significant imbalance of flux within a region, it is found that fragments of the dominant polarity will have noticeably more connections, on average, than the minority polarity fragments. Despite this difference, the flux from a single fragment of either polarity is typically divided such that (i) 60-70% connects to one opposite-polarity fragment, (ii) 25-30% goes to a further 1 to 2 opposite-polarity fragments, and (iii) any remaining flux may connect to as many as another 50 or more other opposite-polarity fragments. This is true regardless of any flux imbalance within the region. It is found that fragments connect preferentially to their nearest neighbours, with, on average, around 60-70% of flux closing down within 10 Mm of a typical fragment. Only 50% of the flux in a quiet region extends higher than 2.5 Mm above the solar surface and 5-10% extends higher than 25 Mm. The fragments that contribute to the field above this height cover a range of sizes, with even the smallest of fragments contributing to the field at heights of over 50 Mm.

  15. Imaging solar coronal magnetic structures in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartledge, N. P.

    The study of solar coronal structures and, in particular prominences, is a key part of understanding the highly complex physical mechanisms occurring in the Sun's atmosphere. Solar prominences are important in their own right and some of the most puzzling questions in solar theory have arisen through their study. For example, how do they form and how is their mass continuously replenished? How can the magnetic field provide their continuous support against gravity over time periods of several months? How can such cool, dense material exist in thermal equilibrium in the surrounding coronal environment? Why do they erupt? A study of their structure and that of the surrounding medium is important in determining the nature of the coronal plasma and magnetic field. Also, prominences are closely associated with other key phenomena such as coronal mass ejections and eruptive solar flares which occur as a prominence loses equilibrium and rises from the solar surface. Our current understanding of these fascinating structures is extremely limited and we know very little about their basic global structure. In fact, recent prominence observations have caused our basic paradigms to be challenged (Priest, 1996) and so we must set up new models in order to gain even a fundamental understanding. Prominences are highly nonlinear, three-dimensional structures. Large feet (or barbs) reach out from the main body of a prominence and reach down to the photosphere where the dense material continuously drains away. These provide a real clue to the three-dimensional nature of the coronal field and its relation to the photospheric field. It is important, therefore, to make stereographic observations of prominences in order to gain a basic understanding of their essentially three-dimensional nature and attempt to formulate new paradigms for their structure and evolution. There is no doubt that the study of prominences in three dimensions is a crucial exercise if we are to develop a better

  16. Online reconstruction of 3D magnetic particle imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopp, T.; Hofmann, M.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging is a quantitative functional imaging technique that allows imaging of the spatial distribution of super-paramagnetic iron oxide particles at high temporal resolution. The raw data acquisition can be performed at frame rates of more than 40 volumes s-1. However, to date image reconstruction is performed in an offline step and thus no direct feedback is available during the experiment. Considering potential interventional applications such direct feedback would be mandatory. In this work, an online reconstruction framework is implemented that allows direct visualization of the particle distribution on the screen of the acquisition computer with a latency of about 2 s. The reconstruction process is adaptive and performs block-averaging in order to optimize the signal quality for a given amount of reconstruction time.

  17. Lapse-time-dependent coda-wave depth sensitivity to local velocity perturbations in 3-D heterogeneous elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Anne; Planès, Thomas; Hadziioannou, Céline; Campillo, Michel

    2016-10-01

    In the context of seismic monitoring, recent studies made successful use of seismic coda waves to locate medium changes on the horizontal plane. Locating the depth of the changes, however, remains a challenge. In this paper, we use 3-D wavefield simulations to address two problems: first, we evaluate the contribution of surface- and body-wave sensitivity to a change at depth. We introduce a thin layer with a perturbed velocity at different depths and measure the apparent relative velocity changes due to this layer at different times in the coda and for different degrees of heterogeneity of the model. We show that the depth sensitivity can be modelled as a linear combination of body- and surface-wave sensitivity. The lapse-time-dependent sensitivity ratio of body waves and surface waves can be used to build 3-D sensitivity kernels for imaging purposes. Second, we compare the lapse-time behaviour in the presence of a perturbation in horizontal and vertical slabs to address, for instance, the origin of the velocity changes detected after large earthquakes.

  18. 3-D explosions: a meditation on rotation (and magnetic fields)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J. C.

    This is the text of an introduction to a workshop on asymmetric explosions held in Austin in June, 2003. The great progress in supernova research over thirty-odd years is briefly reviewed. The context in which the meeting was called is then summarized. The theoretical success of the intrinsically multidimensional delayed detonation paradigm in explaining the nature of Type Ia supernovae coupled with new techniques of observations in the near IR and with spectropolarimetry promise great advances in understanding binary progenitors, the explosion physics, and the ever more accurate application to cosmology. Spectropolarimetry has also revealed the strongly asymmetric nature of core collapse and given valuable perspectives on the supernova - gamma-ray burst connection. The capability of the magneto-rotational instability to rapidly create strong toroidal magnetic fields in the core collapse ambiance is outlined. This physics may be the precursor to driving MHD jets that play a role in asymmetric supernovae. Welcome to the brave new world of three-dimensional explosions!

  19. On the magnetotransport of 3D systems in quantizing magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremisin, M. V.

    2014-12-01

    The resistivity components of 3D electron gas placed in quantizing magnetic field are calculated taking into account the correction caused by combined action of the Peltier and Seebeck thermoelectric effects. The longitudinal, transverse and the Hall magnetoresistivities exhibit familiar 1/B-period oscillations being universal functions of magnetic field and temperature.

  20. Single cell detection using 3D magnetic rolled-up structures.

    PubMed

    Ger, Tzong-Rong; Huang, Hao-Ting; Huang, Chen-Yu; Lai, Mei-Feng

    2013-11-07

    A 3D rolled-up structure made of a SiO2 layer and a fishbone-like magnetic thin film was proposed here as a biosensor. The magnetoresistance (MR) measurement results of the sensor suggest that the presence of the stray field, which is induced by the magnetic nanoparticles, significantly increased the switching field. Comparing the performance of the 2D sensor and 3D sensor designed in this study, the response in switching field variation was 12.14% in the 2D sensor and 62.55% in the 3D sensor. The response in MR ratio variation was 4.55% in the 2D sensor and 82.32% in the 3D sensor. In addition, the design of the 3D sensor structure also helped to attract and trap a single magnetic cell due to its stronger stray field compared with the 2D structure. The 3D magnetic biosensor designed here can provide important information for future biochip research and applications.

  1. Gradient expansion, curvature perturbations, and magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo; Rezaei, Zahra

    2011-04-15

    The properties of magnetized plasmas are always investigated under the hypothesis that the relativistic inhomogeneities stemming from the fluid sources and from the geometry itself are sufficiently small to allow for a perturbative description prior to photon decoupling. The latter assumption is hereby relaxed and predecoupling plasmas are described within a suitable expansion where the inhomogeneities are treated to a given order in the spatial gradients. It is argued that the (general relativistic) gradient expansion shares the same features of the drift approximation, customarily employed in the description of cold plasmas, so that the two schemes are physically complementary in the large-scale limit and for the low-frequency branch of the spectrum of plasma modes. The two-fluid description, as well as the magnetohydrodynamical reduction, is derived and studied in the presence of the spatial gradients of the geometry. Various solutions of the coupled system of evolution equations in the anti-Newtonian regime and in the quasi-isotropic approximation are presented. The relation of this analysis to the so-called separate universe paradigm is outlined. The evolution of the magnetized curvature perturbations in the nonlinear regime is addressed for the magnetized adiabatic mode in the plasma frame.

  2. Lithologic identification & mapping test based on 3D inversion of magnetic and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiayong; Lv, Qingtian; Qi, Guang; Zhao, Jinhua; Zhang, Yongqian

    2016-04-01

    Though lithologic identification & mapping to achieve ore concentration district transparent within 5km depth is the main way to realize deep fine structures study, to explore deep mineral resources and to reveal metallogenic regularity of large-scale ore district . Owing to the wide covered area, high sampling density and mature three-dimensional inversion algorithm of gravity and magnetic data, so gravity and magnetic inversion become the most likely way to achieve three-dimensional lithologic mapping at the present stage. In this paper, we take Lu-zong(Lujiang county to Zongyang county in Anhui province ,east China) ore district as a case, we proposed lithologic mapping flow based 3D inversion of gravity magnetic and then carry out the lithologic mapping test. Lithologic identification & mapping flow is as follows: 1. Analysis relations between lithology and density and magnetic susceptibility by cross plot. 2.Extracting appropriate residual anomalies from high-precision Bourger gravity and aeromagnetic. 3.Use same mesh, do 3D magnetic and gravity inversion respectively under prior information constrained, and then invert susceptibility and density 3D model. 4. According setp1, construct logical topology operations between density 3D model and susceptibility. 5.Use the logical operations, identify lithogies cell by cell in 3D mesh, and then get 3D lithological model. According this flow, we obtained three-dimensional distribution of five main type lithologies in the Lu-Zong ore district within 5km depth. The result of lithologic mapping not only showed that the shallow characteristics and surface geological mapping are basically Coincide,more importantly ,it reveals the deeper lithologic changes.The lithlogical model make up the insufficient of surface geological mapping. The lithologic mapping test results in Lu-Zong ore concentration district showed that lithological mapping using 3D inversion of gravity and magnetic is a effective method to reveal the

  3. 3D-xy critical properties of YBa2Cu4O8 and magnetic-field-induced 3D to 1D crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyeneth, S.; Schneider, T.; Bukowski, Z.; Karpinski, J.; Keller, H.

    2008-08-01

    We present reversible magnetization data of a YBa2Cu4O8 single crystal and analyze the evidence for 3D-xy critical behavior and a magnetic-field-induced 3D to 1D crossover. Remarkable consistency with these phenomena is observed in agreement with a magnetic-field-induced finite size effect, whereupon the correlation length transverse to the applied magnetic field cannot grow beyond the limiting magnetic length scale LH = (Φ0/(aH))1/2. By applying the appropriate scaling form we obtain the zero-field critical temperature, the 3D to 1D crossover, the vortex melting line and the universal ratios of the related scaling variables. Accordingly there is no continuous phase transition in the (H,T) plane along the Hc2 lines as predicted by the mean-field treatment.

  4. 3D Magnetic Induction Maps of Nanoscale Materials Revealed by Electron Holographic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of three-dimensional (3D) ferromagnetic nanoscale materials constitutes one of the key research areas of the current magnetism roadmap and carries great potential to impact areas such as data storage, sensing, and biomagnetism. The properties of such nanostructures are closely connected with their 3D magnetic nanostructure, making their determination highly valuable. Up to now, quantitative 3D maps providing both the internal magnetic and electric configuration of the same specimen with high spatial resolution are missing. Here, we demonstrate the quantitative 3D reconstruction of the dominant axial component of the magnetic induction and electrostatic potential within a cobalt nanowire (NW) of 100 nm in diameter with spatial resolution below 10 nm by applying electron holographic tomography. The tomogram was obtained using a dedicated TEM sample holder for acquisition, in combination with advanced alignment and tomographic reconstruction routines. The powerful approach presented here is widely applicable to a broad range of 3D magnetic nanostructures and may trigger the progress of novel spintronic nonplanar nanodevices. PMID:27182110

  5. Magnetic Dissipation in Asymmetric Strong Guide 3D Simulations: Examples of Magnetic Diffusion and Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Karimabadi, H.; Daughton, W. S.

    2013-12-01

    Interpretations of 2D simulations of magnetic reconnection are greatly simplified by using the flux function, usually the out of plane component of the vector potential. This theoretical device is no longer available when simulations are analyzed in 3-D. We illustrate the results of determining the locale rates of flux slippage in simulations by a technique based on Maxwell's equations. The technique recovers the usual results obtained for the flux function in 2D simulations, but remains viable in 3D simulations where there is no flux function. The method has also been successfully tested for full PIC simulations where reconnection is geometrically forbiddden. While such layers possess measurable flux slippages (diffusion) their level is not as strong as recorded in known 2D PIC reconnection sites using the same methodology. This approach will be used to explore the spatial incidence and strength of flux slippages across a 3D, asymmetric, strong guide field run discussed previously in the literature. Regions of diffusive behavior are illustrated where LHDI has been previously identified out on the separatrices, while much stronger flux slippages, typical of the X-regions of 2D simulations, are shown to occur elsewhere throughout the simulation. These results suggest that reconnection requires sufficiently vigorous flux slippage to be self sustaining, while non-zero flux slippage can and does occur without being at the reconnection site. A cross check of this approach is provided by the mixing ratio of tagged simulation particles of known spatial origin discussed by Daughton et al., 2013 (this meeting); they provide an integral measure of flux slippage up to the present point in the simulation. We will discuss the correlations between our Maxwell based flux slippage rates and the inferred rates of change of this mixing ratio (as recorded in the local fluid frame).

  6. Dynamical History Of The Local Group In ΛCDM slowromancapii@ - Including External Perturbers In 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Indranil; Zhao, Hongsheng

    2017-01-01

    We attempt to fit the observed radial velocities (RVs) of ˜ 30 Local Group (LG) galaxies using a 3D dynamical model of it and its immediate environment within the context of the standard cosmological paradigm, ΛCDM. This extends and confirms the basic results of our previous axisymmetric investigation of the LG (MNRAS, 459, 2237). We find that there remains a tendency for observed RVs to exceed those predicted by our best-fitting model. The typical mismatch is slightly higher than in our 2D model, with a root mean square value of ˜ 50 km/s. Our main finding is that including the 3D distribution of massive perturbing dark matter halos is unlikely to help greatly with the high velocity galaxy problem. Nonetheless, the 2D and 3D results differ in several other ways such as which galaxies' RVs are most problematic and the preferred values of parameters common to both models. The anomalously high RVs of several LG dwarfs may be better explained if the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) were once moving much faster than in our models. This would allow LG dwarfs to gain very high RVs via gravitational slingshot encounters with a massive fast-moving galaxy. Such a scenario is possible in some modified gravity theories, especially those which require the MW and M31 to have previously undergone a close flyby. In a ΛCDM context, however, this scenario is not feasible as the resulting dynamical friction would cause a rapid merger.

  7. Analysis and measurement of the 3D magnetic field in a rotating magnetic field driven FRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velas, K. M.; Milroy, R. D.

    2012-10-01

    A translatable three-axis probe was installed on TCSU shortly before its shutdown. The probe has 90 windings that simultaneously measure Br, Bθ, and Bz at 30 radial positions. Positioning the probe at multiple axial positions and taking multiple repeatable shots allows for a full r-z map of the magnetic field. Probe measurements are used to calculate the end-shorting torque and the rotating magnetic field (RMF) torque. The torque applied to the plasma is the RMF torque reduced by the shorting torque. An estimate of the plasma resistivity is made based on the steady state balance between the applied torque and the resistive torque. The steady state data from applying a 10 kHz low pass filter used in conjunction with data at the RMF frequency yields a map of the full 3D rotating field structure. Data from even- and odd-parity experiments will be presented. The NIMROD code has been adapted to simulate the TCSU experiment using boundary conditions adjusted to match both even- and odd-parity experimental conditions. A comparison of the n=0 components of the calculated fields to the 3-axis probe measurements shows agreement in the magnetic field structure of the FRC as well as in the jet region.

  8. RELAP5-3D Analysis of Pressure Perturbation at the Peach Bottom BWR During Low-Flow Stability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi Costa, Antonella; Petruzzi, Alessandro; D'Auria, Francesco

    2006-07-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies about the BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) stability have been performed to design a stable core configuration. BWR instabilities can be caused by inter-dependencies between thermal-hydraulic and reactivity feedback parameters such as the void-coefficient, for example, during a pressure perturbation event. In the present work, the pressure perturbation is considered in order to study in detail this type of transient. To simulate this event, including the strong feedback effects between core neutronic and reactor thermal-hydraulics, and to verify core behavior and evaluate parameters related to safety, RELAP5-3D code has been used in the analyses. The simulation was performed making use of Peach Bottom-2 BWR data to predict the dynamics of a real reactor during this type of event. Stability tests were conducted in the Peach Bottom 2 BWR, in 1977, and were done along the low-flow end of the rated power-flow line, and along the power-flow line corresponding to minimum recirculation pump speed. The calculated results are herein compared against the available experimental data. (authors)

  9. Experimental Studies on the 3D Macro- and Microphysics of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara-Almonte, J.; Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Yoo, J.; Fox, W. R., II

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection has been extensively studied in 2D geometries for many decades and considerable progress has been made in understating 2D reconnection physics, yet in real plasmas reconnection is fundamentally 3D in nature. Only recently has it become possible to study 3D reconnection using simulations, however some initial results have suggested that the inclusion of 3D effects does not strongly affect the basic properties of reconnection (e.g. reconnection rate or particle acceleration). Yet on the other hand, previous experiments, without direct 3D measurements, have implied that 3D effects could be important even in a quasi-2D system. Here we experimentally study both the (1) macro- and (2) microphysics of 3D reconnection in order to directly test the importance of 3D effects in a quasi-2D experiment. Using fully simultaneous 3D measurements, it is shown that during highly driven reconnection the macroscopic structure of the current sheet can become strongly 3D despite an essentially 2D upstream region. The correlation length along the current sheet is measured to be far shorter than suggested by kinetic simulations. Results from new experiments with stronger reconnection drive and diagnostics designed to estimate the 3D reconnection rate will be discussed. With regards to (2), the 3D microphysics, new diagnostics capable of measuring fluctuations at frequencies up to the electron cyclotron frequency (~ 300 MHz) have been developed and have identified the presence of very high frequency waves (~ 100 MHz) during asymmetric reconnection, localized to the low-density side. The detailed properties of these waves, including the measured power spectra and dispersion relation, will be discussed and compared with both previous satellite observations of high-frequency waves as well as with theoretical predictions on the generation of whistler waves during reconnection.

  10. Tuning the electronic and magnetic properties of borophene by 3d transition-metal atom adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. Y.; Lv, H. Y.; Lu, W. J.; Shao, D. F.; Xiao, R. C.; Sun, Y. P.

    2016-12-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of borophene functionalized by 3d transition metal (TM) atom adsorption are investigated by using first-principles calculations. The results show that the 3d TM atoms can be adsorbed on borophene with high binding energies ranging between 5.9 and 8.3 eV. Interestingly, the originally nonmagnetic borophene tends to be ferromagnetic when Ti, V, Cr, Mn, and Fe atoms are adsorbed, and the magnetic moments are dominated by the TM atoms. The origin of the ferromagnetism is discussed based on the Stoner criterion. Our results indicate that the magnetic properties of borophene can be effectively tuned through the adsorption of 3d TM atoms, which could have promising applications in spintronics and nanoelectronics.

  11. Multilevel-3D bit patterned magnetic media with 8 signal levels per nanocolumn.

    PubMed

    Amos, Nissim; Butler, John; Lee, Beomseop; Shachar, Meir H; Hu, Bing; Tian, Yuan; Hong, Jeongmin; Garcia, Davil; Ikkawi, Rabee M; Haddon, Robert C; Litvinov, Dmitri; Khizroev, Sakhrat

    2012-01-01

    This letter presents an experimental study that shows that a 3(rd) physical dimension may be used to further increase information packing density in magnetic storage devices. We demonstrate the feasibility of at least quadrupling the magnetic states of magnetic-based data storage devices by recording and reading information from nanopillars with three magnetically-decoupled layers. Magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy and magnetic force microscopy analysis show that both continuous (thin film) and patterned triple-stack magnetic media can generate eight magnetically-stable states. This is in comparison to only two states in conventional magnetic recording. Our work further reveals that ferromagnetic interaction between magnetic layers can be reduced by combining Co/Pt and Co/Pd multilayers media. Finally, we are showing for the first time an MFM image of multilevel-3D bit patterned media with 8 discrete signal levels.

  12. Stumbling reactions during perturbed walking: Neuromuscular reflex activity and 3-D kinematics of the trunk - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Müller, Juliane; Müller, Steffen; Engel, Tilman; Reschke, Antje; Baur, Heiner; Mayer, Frank

    2016-04-11

    Reflex activity of the lower leg muscles involved when compensating for falls has already been thoroughly investigated. However, the trunk׳s role in this compensation strategy remains unclear. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to analyze the kinematics and muscle activity of the trunk during perturbed walking. Ten subjects (29 ± 3 yr;79 ± 11 cm;74 ± 14 kg) walked (1m/s) on a split-belt treadmill, while 5 randomly timed, right-sided perturbations (treadmill belt deceleration: 40 m/s(2)) were applied. Trunk muscle activity was assessed with a 12-lead-EMG. Trunk kinematics were measured with a 3D-motion analysis system (12 markers framing 3 segments: upper thoracic area (UTA), lower thoracic area (LTA), lumbar area (LA)). The EMG-RMS [%] (0-200 ms after perturbation) was analyzed and then normalized to the RMS of normal walking. The total range of motion (ROM;[°]) for the extension/flexion, lateral flexion and rotation of each segment were calculated. Individual kinematic differences between walking and stumbling [%; ROM] were also computed. Data analysis was conducted descriptively, followed by one- and two-way ANOVAs (α=0.05). Stumbling led to an increase in ROM, compared to unperturbed gait, in all segments and planes. These increases ranged between 107 ± 26% (UTA/rotation) and 262 ± 132% (UTS/lateral flexion), significant only in lateral flexion. EMG activity of the trunk was increased during stumbling (abdominal: 665 ± 283%; back: 501 ± 215%), without significant differences between muscles. Provoked stumbling leads to a measurable effect on the trunk, quantifiable by an increase in ROM and EMG activity, compared to normal walking. Greater abdominal muscle activity and ROM of lateral flexion may indicate a specific compensation pattern occurring during stumbling.

  13. 3D fibre deposition and stereolithography techniques for the design of multifunctional nanocomposite magnetic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Roberto; D'Amora, Ugo; Russo, Teresa; Ronca, Alfredo; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds based on poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) were fabricated by 3D fibre deposition modelling (FDM) and stereolithography techniques. In addition, hybrid coaxial and bilayer magnetic scaffolds were produced by combining such techniques. The aim of the current research was to analyse some structural and functional features of 3D magnetic scaffolds obtained by the 3D fibre deposition technique and by stereolithography as well as features of multimaterial scaffolds in the form of coaxial and bilayer structures obtained by the proper integration of such methods. The compressive mechanical behaviour of these scaffolds was investigated in a wet environment at 37 °C, and the morphological features were analysed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray micro-computed tomography. The capability of a magnetic scaffold to absorb magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in water solution was also assessed. confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to assess the in vitro biological behaviour of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on 3D structures. Results showed that a wide range of mechanical properties, covering those spanning hard and soft tissues, can be obtained by 3D FDM and stereolithography techniques. 3D virtual reconstruction and SEM showed the precision with which the scaffolds were fabricated, and a good-quality interface between poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) based scaffolds was observed for bilayer and coaxial scaffolds. Magnetised scaffolds are capable of absorbing water solution of MNPs, and a preliminary information on cell adhesion and spreading of hMSCs was obtained without the application of an external magnetic field.

  14. 3D Kinetic Simulation of Plasma Jet Penetration in Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, Sergei A.; Bogatu, I. N.; Kim, J. S.

    2009-11-01

    A high velocity plasmoid penetration through a magnetic barrier is a problem of a great experimental and theoretical interest. Our LSP PIC code 3D fully kinetic numerical simulations of high density (10^16 cm-3) high velocity (30-140 km/sec) plasma jet/bullet, penetrating through the transversal magnetic field, demonstrate three different regimes: reflection by field, penetration by magnetic field expulsion and penetration by magnetic self-polarization. The behavior depends on plasma jet parameters and its composition: hydrogen, carbon (A=12) and C60-fullerene (A=720) plasmas were investigated. The 3D simulation of two plasmoid head-on injections along uniform magnetic field lines is analyzed. Mini rail plasma gun (accelerator) modeling is also presented and discussed.

  15. Spatial and temporal analysis of DIII-D 3D magnetic diagnostic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strait, E. J.; King, J. D.; Hanson, J. M.; Logan, N. C.

    2016-11-01

    An extensive set of magnetic diagnostics in DIII-D is aimed at measuring non-axisymmetric "3D" features of tokamak plasmas, with typical amplitudes ˜10-3 to 10-5 of the total magnetic field. We describe hardware and software techniques used at DIII-D to condition the individual signals and analysis to estimate the spatial structure from an ensemble of discrete measurements. Applications of the analysis include detection of non-rotating MHD instabilities, plasma control, and validation of MHD stability and 3D equilibrium models.

  16. Spatial and temporal analysis of DIII-D 3D magnetic diagnostic data.

    PubMed

    Strait, E J; King, J D; Hanson, J M; Logan, N C

    2016-11-01

    An extensive set of magnetic diagnostics in DIII-D is aimed at measuring non-axisymmetric "3D" features of tokamak plasmas, with typical amplitudes ∼10(-3) to 10(-5) of the total magnetic field. We describe hardware and software techniques used at DIII-D to condition the individual signals and analysis to estimate the spatial structure from an ensemble of discrete measurements. Applications of the analysis include detection of non-rotating MHD instabilities, plasma control, and validation of MHD stability and 3D equilibrium models.

  17. Spatial and temporal analysis of DIII-D 3D magnetic diagnostic data

    DOE PAGES

    Strait, E. J.; King, J. D.; Hanson, J. M.; ...

    2016-08-11

    An extensive set of magnetic diagnostics in DIII-D is aimed at measuring non-axisymmetric "3D" features of tokamak plasmas, with typical amplitudes ~10-3 to 10-5 of the total magnetic field. We describe hardware and software techniques used at DIII-D to condition the individual signals and analysis to estimate the spatial structure from an ensemble of discrete measurements. Lastly, applications of the analysis include detection of non-rotating MHD instabilities, plasma control, and validation of MHD stability and 3D equilibrium models.

  18. DIRECT DETECTION OF THE HELICAL MAGNETIC FIELD GEOMETRY FROM 3D RECONSTRUCTION OF PROMINENCE KNOT TRAJECTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zapiór, Maciej; Martinez-Gómez, David

    2016-02-01

    Based on the data collected by the Vacuum Tower Telescope located in the Teide Observatory in the Canary Islands, we analyzed the three-dimensional (3D) motion of so-called knots in a solar prominence of 2014 June 9. Trajectories of seven knots were reconstructed, giving information of the 3D geometry of the magnetic field. Helical motion was detected. From the equipartition principle, we estimated the lower limit of the magnetic field in the prominence to ≈1–3 G and from the Ampère’s law the lower limit of the electric current to ≈1.2 × 10{sup 9} A.

  19. 3D Geological Model of Nihe ore deposit Constrained by Gravity and Magnetic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Guang; Yan, Jiayong; Lv, Qingtan; Zhao, Jinhua

    2016-04-01

    We present a case study on using integrated geologic model in mineral exploration at depth. Nihe ore deposit in Anhui Province, is deep hidden ore deposit which was discovered in recent years, this finding is the major driving force of deep mineral exploration work in Luzong. Building 3D elaborate geological model has the important significance for prospecting to deep or surround in this area, and can help us better understand the metallogenic law and ore-controlling regularity. A 3D geological model, extending a depth from +200m to -1500m in Nihe ore deposit, has been compiled from surface geological map, cross-section, borehole logs and amounts of geological inference. And then the 3D geological models have been given physical property parameter for calculating the potential field. Modelling the potential response is proposed as means of evaluating the viability of the 3D geological models, and the evidence of making small changes to the uncertain parts of the original 3D geological models. It is expected that the final models not only reproduce supplied prior geological knowledge, but also explain the observed geophysical data. The workflow used to develop the 3D geologic model in this study includes the three major steps, as follows: (1) Determine the basic information of Model: Defining the 3D limits of the model area, the basic geological and structural unit, and the tectonic contact relations and the sedimentary sequences between these units. (2) 3D model construction: Firstly, a series of 2D geological cross sections over the model area are built by using all kinds of prior information, including surface geology, borehole data, seismic sections, and local geologists' knowledge and intuition. Lastly, we put these sections into a 3D environment according to their profile locations to build a 3D model by using geostatistics method. (3) 3D gravity and magnetic modeling: we calculate the potential field responses of the 3D model, and compare the predicted and

  20. Reproducing electric field observations during magnetic storms by means of rigorous 3-D modelling and distortion matrix co-estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püthe, Christoph; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2014-12-01

    Electric fields induced in the conducting Earth by geomagnetic disturbances drive currents in power transmission grids, telecommunication lines or buried pipelines, which can cause service disruptions. A key step in the prediction of the hazard to technological systems during magnetic storms is the calculation of the geoelectric field. To address this issue for mid-latitude regions, we revisit a method that involves 3-D modelling of induction processes in a heterogeneous Earth and the construction of a magnetospheric source model described by low-degree spherical harmonics from observatory magnetic data. The actual electric field, however, is known to be perturbed by galvanic effects, arising from very local near-surface heterogeneities or topography, which cannot be included in the model. Galvanic effects are commonly accounted for with a real-valued time-independent distortion matrix, which linearly relates measured and modelled electric fields. Using data of six magnetic storms that occurred between 2000 and 2003, we estimate distortion matrices for observatory sites onshore and on the ocean bottom. Reliable estimates are obtained, and the modellings are found to explain up to 90% of the measurements. We further find that 3-D modelling is crucial for a correct separation of galvanic and inductive effects and a precise prediction of the shape of electric field time series during magnetic storms. Since the method relies on precomputed responses of a 3-D Earth to geomagnetic disturbances, which can be recycled for each storm, the required computational resources are negligible. Our approach is thus suitable for real-time prediction of geomagnetically induced currents by combining it with reliable forecasts of the source field.

  1. Magnetic and Magnetoresistive Properties of 3D Interconnected NiCo Nanowire Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Câmara Santa Clara Gomes, Tristan; De La Torre Medina, Joaquín; Lemaitre, Matthieu; Piraux, Luc

    2016-10-01

    Track-etched polymer membranes with crossed nanochannels have been revealed to be most suitable as templates to produce large surface area and mechanically stable 3D interconnected nanowire (NW) networks by electrodeposition. Geometrically controlled NW superstructures made of NiCo ferromagnetic alloys exhibit appealing magnetoresistive properties. The combination of exact alloy compositions with the spatial arrangement of NWs in the 3D network is decisive to obtain specific magnetic and magneto-transport behavior. A proposed simple model based on topological aspects of the 3D NW networks is used to accurately determine the anisotropic magnetoresistance ratios. Despite of their complex topology, the microstructure of Co-rich NiCo NW networks display mixed fcc-hcp phases with the c-axis of the hcp phase oriented perpendicular to their axis. These interconnected NW networks have high potential as reliable and stable magnetic field sensors.

  2. Synthesis of 3D Model of a Magnetic Field-Influenced Body from a Single Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Cuilan; Newman, Timothy; Gallagher, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    A method for recovery of a 3D model of a cloud-like structure that is in motion and deforming but approximately governed by magnetic field properties is described. The method allows recovery of the model from a single intensity image in which the structure's silhouette can be observed. The method exploits envelope theory and a magnetic field model. Given one intensity image and the segmented silhouette in the image, the method proceeds without human intervention to produce the 3D model. In addition to allowing 3D model synthesis, the method's capability to yield a very compact description offers further utility. Application of the method to several real-world images is demonstrated.

  3. 3-D Localization Method for a Magnetically Actuated Soft Capsule Endoscope and Its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Sehyuk; Sitti, Metin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a 3-D localization method for a magnetically actuated soft capsule endoscope (MASCE). The proposed localization scheme consists of three steps. First, MASCE is oriented to be coaxially aligned with an external permanent magnet (EPM). Second, MASCE is axially contracted by the enhanced magnetic attraction of the approaching EPM. Third, MASCE recovers its initial shape by the retracting EPM as the magnetic attraction weakens. The combination of the estimated direction in the coaxial alignment step and the estimated distance in the shape deformation (recovery) step provides the position of MASCE in 3-D. It is experimentally shown that the proposed localization method could provide 2.0–3.7 mm of distance error in 3-D. This study also introduces two new applications of the proposed localization method. First, based on the trace of contact points between the MASCE and the surface of the stomach, the 3-D geometrical model of a synthetic stomach was reconstructed. Next, the relative tissue compliance at each local contact point in the stomach was characterized by measuring the local tissue deformation at each point due to the preloading force. Finally, the characterized relative tissue compliance parameter was mapped onto the geometrical model of the stomach toward future use in disease diagnosis. PMID:25383064

  4. Analysis of a 3-D system function measured for magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Rahmer, Jürgen; Weizenecker, Jürgen; Gleich, Bernhard; Borgert, Jörn

    2012-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new tomographic imaging approach that can quantitatively map magnetic nanoparticle distributions in vivo. It is capable of volumetric real-time imaging at particle concentrations low enough to enable clinical applications. For image reconstruction in 3-D MPI, a system function (SF) is used, which describes the relation between the acquired MPI signal and the spatial origin of the signal. The SF depends on the instrumental configuration, the applied field sequence, and the magnetic particle characteristics. Its properties reflect the quality of the spatial encoding process. This work presents a detailed analysis of a measured SF to give experimental evidence that 3-D MPI encodes information using a set of 3-D spatial patterns or basis functions that is stored in the SF. This resembles filling 3-D k-space in magnetic resonance imaging, but is faster since all information is gathered simultaneously over a broad acquisition bandwidth. A frequency domain analysis shows that the finest structures that can be encoded with the presented SF are as small as 0.6 mm. SF simulations are performed to demonstrate that larger particle cores extend the set of basis functions towards higher resolution and that the experimentally observed spatial patterns require the existence of particles with core sizes of about 30 nm in the calibration sample. A simple formula is presented that qualitatively describes the basis functions to be expected at a certain frequency.

  5. Extensions of 1d Bgk Electron Solitary Wave Solutions To 3d Magnetized and Unmagnetized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Jen; Parks, George K.

    This paper will compare the key results for BGK electron solitary waves in 3D mag- netized and unmagnetized plasmas. For 3D magnetized plasmas with highly magnetic field-aligned electrons, our results predict that the parallel widths of the solitary waves can be smaller than one Debye length, the solitary waves can be large scale features of the magnetosphere, and the parallel width-amplitude relation has a dependence on the perpendicular size. We can thus obtain an estimate on the typical perpendicular size of the observed solitary waves assuming a series of consecutive solitary waves are in the same flux tude with a particular perpendicular span. In 3D unmagnetized plasma systems such as the neutral sheet and magnetic reconnection sites, our theory indi- cates that although mathematical solutions can be constructed as the time-stationary solutions for the nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson equations, there does not exist a param- eter range for the solutions to be physical. We conclude that single-humped solitary potential pulses cannot be self-consistently supported by charged particles in 3D un- magnetized plasmas.

  6. Experimental onset threshold and magnetic pressure pileup for 3D Sweet-Parker reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, Thomas P; Sun, Xuan; Lapenta, Giovanni; Furno, Ivo

    2008-01-01

    In space, astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, magnetic reconnect ion converts magnetic into particle energy during unsteady, explosive events. The abrupt onset and cessation has been a long standing puzzle. We show the first three-dimensional (3D) laboratory example of onset and stagnation of Sweet-Parker type magnetic reconnection between magnetized and parallel current (flux) ropes driven by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) attraction and 3D instability. Mutually attracting flux ropes advect and merge oppositely directed magnetic fields. Magnetic flux is annihilated, but reaches soon a threshold where magnetic flux and pressure pile up, and reconnection magnetic topology appears. This occurs when inflow speeds exceed the SweetParker speed v{sub SP} = v{sub A} / S{sup 1/2}, where v{sub A} is the Alfven speed and S is the Lundquist number for the reconnection layer, as magnetic flux arrives faster than flux annihilation can process it. Finally piled up fields generate MHD reaction forces that stall the inflow and the reconnection process.

  7. Plasma Braking Due to External Magnetic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassinetti, L.; Olofsson, Kejo; Brunsell, P. R.; Khan, M. W. M.; Drake, J. R.

    2010-11-01

    The RFP EXTRAP T2R is equipped with a comprehensive active feedback system (128 active saddle coils in the full-coverage array) and active control of both resonant and non-resonant MHD modes has been demonstrated. The feedback algorithms, based on modern control methodology such as reference mode tracking (both amplitude and phase), are a useful tool to improve the ``state of the art'' of the MHD mode control. But this tool can be used also to improve the understanding and the characterization of other phenomena such as the ELM mitigation with a resonant magnetic perturbation or the plasma viscosity. The present work studies plasma and mode braking due to static RMPs. Results show that a static RMP produces a global braking of the flow profile. The study of the effect of RMPs characterized by different helicities will also give information on the plasma viscosity profile. Experimental results are finally compared to theoretical models.

  8. Reproducing Electric Field Observations during Magnetic Storms by means of Rigorous 3-D Modelling and Distortion Matrix Co-estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püthe, Christoph; Manoj, Chandrasekharan; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    Electric fields induced in the conducting Earth during magnetic storms drive currents in power transmission grids, telecommunication lines or buried pipelines. These geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) can cause severe service disruptions. The prediction of GIC is thus of great importance for public and industry. A key step in the prediction of the hazard to technological systems during magnetic storms is the calculation of the geoelectric field. To address this issue for mid-latitude regions, we developed a method that involves 3-D modelling of induction processes in a heterogeneous Earth and the construction of a model of the magnetospheric source. The latter is described by low-degree spherical harmonics; its temporal evolution is derived from observatory magnetic data. Time series of the electric field can be computed for every location on Earth's surface. The actual electric field however is known to be perturbed by galvanic effects, arising from very local near-surface heterogeneities or topography, which cannot be included in the conductivity model. Galvanic effects are commonly accounted for with a real-valued time-independent distortion matrix, which linearly relates measured and computed electric fields. Using data of various magnetic storms that occurred between 2000 and 2003, we estimated distortion matrices for observatory sites onshore and on the ocean bottom. Strong correlations between modellings and measurements validate our method. The distortion matrix estimates prove to be reliable, as they are accurately reproduced for different magnetic storms. We further show that 3-D modelling is crucial for a correct separation of galvanic and inductive effects and a precise prediction of electric field time series during magnetic storms. Since the required computational resources are negligible, our approach is suitable for a real-time prediction of GIC. For this purpose, a reliable forecast of the source field, e.g. based on data from satellites

  9. Modified Iterated perturbation theory in the strong coupling regime and its application to the 3d FCC lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Louis-François; Sémon, Patrick; Shastry, B. Sriram; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2012-02-01

    The Dynamical Mean-Field theory(DMFT) approach to the Hubbard model requires a method to solve the problem of a quantum impurity in a bath of non-interacting electrons. Iterated Perturbation Theory(IPT)[1] has proven its effectiveness as a solver in many cases of interest. Based on general principles and on comparisons with an essentially exact Continuous-Time Quantum Monte Carlo (CTQMC)[2], here we show that the standard implementation of IPT fails when the interaction is much larger than the bandwidth. We propose a slight modification to the IPT algorithm by requiring that double occupancy calculated with IPT gives the correct value. We call this method IPT-D. We show how this approximate impurity solver compares with respect to CTQMC. We consider a face centered cubic lattice(FCC) in 3d for different physical properties. We also use IPT-D to study the thermopower using two recently proposed approximations[3]S^* and SKelvin that do not require analytical continuation and show how thermopower is essentially the entropy per particle in the incoherent regime but not in the coherent one.[1]H.Kajueter et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 131(1996)[2]P. Werner, et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 076405(2006)[3]B.S. Sriram Shastry Rep. Prog. Phys. 72 016501(2009)

  10. Exact spectra of strong coulomb correlations of 3-D 2-e harmonic dots in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Priyanka; Sharma, Shivalika; Kaur, Harsimran; Singh, Sunny; Hazra, Ram Kuntal

    2017-01-01

    Applications of 3-D 2-e systems have proliferated very fast due to technological advancements in wide range of phenomena from atomic landscape to mesoscopic scale. The unusual properties of atomic/mesoscopic systems are the results of interplaying charge interactions among different bound states. The non-trivial e-e correlations in electrically and/or magnetically confined systems improvise wealth of intriguing challenges at fundamental level due to lack of exact solution of Schrödinger equations. For the first time, a novel methodology of exactly finite summed coulomb correlations invented by us is so handy that even usual programmable calculator can be used to examine the electronic structures of 3-D 2-e harmonic dots in perpendicular magnetic field (symmetric gauge). Statistics of electronic levels, heat capacity measurements and magnetization (T∼1 K) are also investigated in brief to probe the degree of disorderedness.

  11. Nonthermal Particle Acceleration in 3D Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection in Pair Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri; Werner, Gregory; Zhdankin, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental plasma process that converts magnetic energy into particle kinetic energy. ``Relativistic'' reconnection is of interest in astrophysical contexts because it can accelerate particles to relativistic energies high enough for synchrotron (or inverse Compton) emission to explain observed high-energy radiation. After several 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of reconnection in pair plasmas demonstrated power-law electron-energy spectra extending to high energies, a few 3D simulations surprisingly confirmed the robustness of nonthermal particle acceleration, despite fundamental differences, such as the development of the relativistic drift-kink instability (RDKI) in 3D. We present a comprehensive PIC study of 3D relativistic pair-plasma reconnection characterizing the effect of the third dimension. We investigate how reconnection dynamics and particle acceleration depend on guide magnetic field Bz and on the simulation box length Lz in the third dimension. We find that, while the RDKI does indeed grow in 3D reconnection, it does not inhibit particle acceleration, even in the absence of guide field. This work was funded by NSF, DOE, and NASA.

  12. Solitary magnetic perturbations at the ELM onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenninger, R. P.; Zohm, H.; Boom, J. E.; Burckhart, A.; Dunne, M. G.; Dux, R.; Eich, T.; Fischer, R.; Fuchs, C.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Igochine, V.; Hölzl, M.; Luhmann N., C., Jr.; Lunt, T.; Maraschek, M.; Müller, H. W.; Park, H. K.; Schneider, P. A.; Sommer, F.; Suttrop, W.; Viezzer, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2012-11-01

    Tokamak H-mode plasmas frequently exhibit edge-localized modes (ELMs). ELMs allow maintaining sufficient plasma purity and thus enable stationary H-mode. On the other hand in a future device ELMs may cause divertor power flux densities far in excess of tolerable material limits. The size of the energy loss per ELM is determined by saturation effects in the non-linear phase of the ELM, which at present is hardly understood. ASDEX Upgrade is now equipped with a set of fast sampling diagnostics, which is well suited to investigate the chain of events around the ELM crash with appropriate temporal resolution (⩽10 µs). Solitary magnetic perturbations (SMPs) are identified as dominant features in the radial magnetic fluctuations below 100 kHz. They are typically observed close (±100 µs) to the onset of pedestal erosion. SMPs are field aligned structures rotating in the electron diamagnetic drift direction with perpendicular velocities of about 10 km s-1. A comparison of perpendicular velocities suggests that the perturbation evoking SMPs is located at or inside the separatrix. Analysis of very pronounced examples showed that the number of peaks per toroidal turn is 1 or 2, which is clearly lower than the corresponding numbers in linear stability calculations. In combination with strong peaking of the magnetic signals this results in a solitary appearance resembling modes like palm tree modes, edge snakes or outer modes. This behaviour has been quantified as solitariness and correlated with main plasma parameters. SMPs may be considered as a signature of the non-linear ELM phase originating at the separatrix or further inside. Thus they provide a handle to investigate the transition from linear to non-linear ELM phase. By comparison with data from gas puff imaging processes in the non-linear phase at or inside the separatrix and in the scrape-off layer (SOL) can be correlated. A connection between the passing of an SMP and the onset of radial filament propagation has

  13. Plasma-satellite interaction driven magnetic field perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Saeed-ur-Rehman; Marchand, Richard

    2014-09-15

    We report the first fully kinetic quantitative estimate of magnetic field perturbations caused by the interaction of a spacecraft with space environment. Such perturbations could affect measurements of geophysical magnetic fields made with very sensitive magnetometers on-board satellites. Our approach is illustrated with a calculation of perturbed magnetic fields near the recently launched Swarm satellites. In this case, magnetic field perturbations do not exceed 20 pT, and they are below the sensitivity threshold of the on-board magnetometers. Anticipating future missions in which satellites and instruments would be subject to more intense solar UV radiation, however, it appears that magnetic field perturbations associated with satellite interaction with space environment, might approach or exceed instruments' sensitivity thresholds.

  14. Anisotropic heat transport in integrable and chaotic 3-D magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Blazevski, D.; Chacon, Luis

    2012-01-01

    A study of anisotropic heat transport in 3-D chaotic magnetic fields is presented. The approach is based on the recently proposed Lagrangian-Green s function (LG) method in Ref. [1] that allows an efficient and accurate integration of the parallel transport equation applicable to general magnetic fields with local or non-local parallel flux closures. We focus on reversed shear magnetic field configurations known to exhibit separatrix reconnection and shearless transport barriers. The role of reconnection and magnetic field line chaos on temperature transport is studied. Numerical results are presented on the anomalous relaxation of radial temperature gradients in the presence of shearless Cantori partial barri- ers. Also, numerical evidence of non-local effective radial temperature transport in chaotic fields is presented. Going beyond purely parallel transport, the LG method is generalized to include finite perpendicular diffusivity, and the problem of temperature flattening inside a magnetic island is studied.

  15. Magnetic and Electronic Phase Diagram of Sr2VFeAsO3-d

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tojo, Yujiro; Shibuya, Taizo; Nakamura, Tetsuro; Shoji, Koichiro; Matoba, Masanori; Yasui, Shintaro; Itoh, Mitsuru; Kitao, Shinji; Seto, Makoto; Kamihara, Yoichi; Research Grants From Keio Univ. Collaboration; Msl Collaborative Research Project Collaboration; Joint Usage in Krri Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Ae2MFePnO3 (so-called 21113 systems) with perovskite-type layers such as Ae2MO3, where Ae denotes alkaline earth metals, M does Sc, Ti, Cr, V and other transition metal atoms and Pn does As and P shows superconductivity at T <46 K. Sr2VFeAsO3-d is a representative compound in 21113 systems. [Zhu et al, Phys. Rev. B (2009); Ogino et al, Supercond. Sci. Technol. (2009); Ogino et al, Supercond. Sci. Technol. (2009)] Although the oxygen deficiency (d) as a function of Tc is still controversial in Sr2VFeAsO3-d, many samples have been reported as superconductors with Tc = 24-37 K. In this study, a polycrystalline Sr2VFeAsO3-d (d = ~ 0.1- 0.6) were prepared by a solid state reaction using an alumina tube in a sealed silica tube. DC electrical resistivity was measured by a four-probe technique. Magnetization measurements were performed on a superconducting quantum interference device. 57Fe Mossbauer spectra were obtained using conventional equipment. The electronic and magnetic phase diagram of Sr2VFeAsO3-d is elucidated.

  16. 3-D Modeling of Magnetic Fields for the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, N.; Berzak, L.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.; Zakharov, L.

    2010-11-01

    The Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) is designed to investigate low-recycling operating regimes by surrounding 85% of the last closed flux surface with liquid lithium evaporated onto a copper and stainless steel shell conformal to the plasma. Fields generated by currents in this conducting shell have significant effects on magnetic configurations. To understand these effects, the commercially available code Aether [http://www.fieldp.com] is used to simulate time varying magnetic fields in a 3-D model of LTX. The model is built using LTX CAD files and divided into a regular mesh for computing the evolution of coupled electromagnetic vector quantities through time and space. Applicable boundary conditions and symmetries are analyzed. Comparisons with measured data, results from a 2-D code, and results from a 3-D code designed specifically for LTX demonstrate the possible benefits and limitations of using this commercial code.

  17. 3D position estimation using a single coil and two magnetic field sensors.

    PubMed

    Tadayon, P; Staude, G; Felderhoff, T

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm which enables the estimation of relative 3D position of a sensor module with two magnetic sensors with respect to a magnetic field source using a single transmitting coil. Starting with the description of the ambiguity problem caused by using a single coil, a system concept comprising two sensors having a fixed spatial relation to each other is introduced which enables the unique determination of the sensors' position in 3D space. For this purpose, an iterative two-step algorithm is presented: In a first step, the data of one sensor is used to limit the number of possible position solutions. In a second step, the spatial relation between the sensors is used to determine the correct sensor position.

  18. A high-throughput in vitro ring assay for vasoactivity using magnetic 3D bioprinting

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Shen, Tsaiwei; Hebel, Chris; Barthlow, Herbert G.; Wagoner, Matthew; Souza, Glauco R.

    2016-01-01

    Vasoactive liabilities are typically assayed using wire myography, which is limited by its high cost and low throughput. To meet the demand for higher throughput in vitro alternatives, this study introduces a magnetic 3D bioprinting-based vasoactivity assay. The principle behind this assay is the magnetic printing of vascular smooth muscle cells into 3D rings that functionally represent blood vessel segments, whose contraction can be altered by vasodilators and vasoconstrictors. A cost-effective imaging modality employing a mobile device is used to capture contraction with high throughput. The goal of this study was to validate ring contraction as a measure of vasoactivity, using a small panel of known vasoactive drugs. In vitro responses of the rings matched outcomes predicted by in vivo pharmacology, and were supported by immunohistochemistry. Altogether, this ring assay robustly models vasoactivity, which could meet the need for higher throughput in vitro alternatives. PMID:27477945

  19. Reconstructing the Vulcano Island evolution from 3D modeling of magnetic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napoli, Rosalba; Currenti, Gilda

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution ground and marine magnetic data are exploited for a detailed definition of a 3D model of the Vulcano Island volcanic complex. The resulting 3D magnetic imaging, obtained by 3-D inverse modeling technique, has delivered useful constraints both to reconstruct the Vulcano Island evolution and to be used as input data for volcanic hazard assessment models. Our results constrained the depth and geometry of the main geo-structural features revealing more subsurface volcanic structures than exposed ones and allowing to elucidate the relationships between them. The recognition of two different magnetization sectors, approximatively coincident with the structural depressions of Piano caldera, in the southern half of the island, and La Fossa caldera at the north, suggests a complex structural and volcanic evolution. Magnetic highs identified across the southern half of the island reflect the main crystallized feeding systems, intrusions and buried vents, whose NNW-SSE preferential alignment highlights the role of the NNW-SSE Tindari-Letojanni regional system from the initial activity of the submarine edifice, to the more recent activity of the Vulcano complex. The low magnetization area, in the middle part of the island may result from hydrothermally altered rocks. Their presence not only in the central part of the volcano edifice but also in other peripheral areas, is a sign of a more diffuse historical hydrothermal activity than in present days. Moreover, the high magnetization heterogeneity within the upper flanks of La Fossa cone edifice is an imprint of a composite distribution of unaltered and altered rocks with different mechanical properties, which poses in this area a high risk level for failure processes especially during volcanic or hydrothermal crisis.

  20. 3D low-beta magnetized plasma equilibria from external shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassam, A.; Tenbarge, J.; Landreman, M.; Dorland, W.; Sengupta, W.

    2016-10-01

    A 3D nonlinear dissipative MHD code is in development to allow relaxation to low-beta MHD equilibrium inside a shaped 3D conducting boundary with prescribed conserved axial magnetic flux and no external current. Formation of magnetic islands is expected. Heat sources would be eventually introduced to allow the possibility of non-stationary convection depending on the stability properties of the accessible MHD equilibria. The initial development will be done using the code UMHD. The initial emphasis will be on recovering expected physics in simpler 3D geometries. A primary objective is to minimize numerical boundary noise. In particular, codes which specify the normal magnetic field B.n on bounding surfaces are prone to noise generation. We plan to shape the boundary to conform to the desired field shape so that B.n is zero on the boundary. Non-orthogonal coordinates will be chosen to effect this. We will test noise reduction within the tangential field approach. Results obtained to date support this conjecture. Initial results from simple 2D code equilibria have been verified against analytic solution of equilibria in weak shaping. Initial results also recover the expected features of the Hahm- Kulsrud island formation solution. Work supported by US DOE.

  1. 3D Design, Contruction, and Field Analysis of CIS Main Dipole Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, G. P. A.; Fox, W.; Friesel, D. L.; Rinckel, T.

    1997-05-01

    The lattice for CIS ( Cooler Injection Synchroton ) requires four laminated 90^circ main dipole magnets with bending radius ρ = 1.273 m, EFL = 2 m, and an edge angle of 12^circ. Optimum Cooler injection and injection in the planned 15 GeV LISS ring requires operation up to about 1.75 T. Initial operation of 1 Hz, with later upgrade to 5 Hz is planned. We will present 2D and 3D field calculations used to optimize the shape of laminations and endpacks of the magnet. Endpacks are designed to determine edge angle and to compensate hexapole components, in particular above 1.4 T where saturation becomes significant. The large dipole curvature required a new type of dipole construction. Each magnet consists of wedge shaped blocks fabricated from stamped lamination of cold rolled low carbon iron. B-stage (dry) epopy was used for bonding and insulation. The end blocks are machined to include the calculated 3D shape of the endpacks. All four magnets were mapped in the field range from 0.3 T - 1.8 T. Comparison of calculations and data in terms of B(I) curves, EFL, edge angle, and hexapole component as function of field excitation will be presented. The constructed magnets are well within expected specifications.

  2. Magnetic engineering in 3d transition metals on phosphorene by strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiaolin; Niu, Chunyao; Wang, Jianjun; Yu, Weiyang; Ren, XiaoYan; Zhu, Zhili

    2017-04-01

    Using first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we systematically investigate the strain effects on the adsorption energies, magnetic ordering and electronic properties of 3d transition metal (TM) atoms (from Sc to Co) adsorbed on phosphorene (P). We find that the adsorption energy of TM can be enhanced by compressive strain whereas weakened by tensile strain. Our results show that strain plays a decisive role in the magnetic moments as well as the magnetic coupling states of TM adatoms. Importantly, the transitions from antiferromagnetic (AFM) state to ferromagnetic (FM) state or to another different AFM ordering can be induced by strain effect. In addition, we observe the semiconductor to metal or half-metal transitions in some TM@P systems by applying strain. Our findings shed a new light on precisely engineering the magnetic properties and electronic properties of the TM@P systems, which will have great potential applications in spin electronics and other related fields.

  3. A 3-D Magnetic Analysis of a Linear Alternator For a Stirling Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Schwarze, Gene E.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center and the Department of Energy (DOE) are developing advanced radioisotope Stirling convertors, under contract with Stirling Technology Company (STC), for space applications. Of critical importance to the successful development of the Stirling convertor for space power applications is the development of a lightweight and highly efficient linear alternator. This paper presents a 3-D finite element method (FEM) approach for evaluating Stirling convertor linear alternators. Preliminary correlations with open-circuit voltage measurements provide an encouraging level of confidence in the model. Spatial plots of magnetic field strength (H) are presented in the region of the exciting permanent magnets. These plots identify regions of high H, where at elevated temperature and under electrical load, the potential to alter the magnetic moment of the magnets exists. This implies the need for further testing and analysis.

  4. Cross modality registration of video and magnetic tracker data for 3D appearance and structure modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Dusty; Chen, Chao-I.; Wang, Yuan-Fang

    2010-02-01

    The paper reports a fully-automated, cross-modality sensor data registration scheme between video and magnetic tracker data. This registration scheme is intended for use in computerized imaging systems to model the appearance, structure, and dimension of human anatomy in three dimensions (3D) from endoscopic videos, particularly colonoscopic videos, for cancer research and clinical practices. The proposed cross-modality calibration procedure operates this way: Before a colonoscopic procedure, the surgeon inserts a magnetic tracker into the working channel of the endoscope or otherwise fixes the tracker's position on the scope. The surgeon then maneuvers the scope-tracker assembly to view a checkerboard calibration pattern from a few different viewpoints for a few seconds. The calibration procedure is then completed, and the relative pose (translation and rotation) between the reference frames of the magnetic tracker and the scope is determined. During the colonoscopic procedure, the readings from the magnetic tracker are used to automatically deduce the pose (both position and orientation) of the scope's reference frame over time, without complicated image analysis. Knowing the scope movement over time then allows us to infer the 3D appearance and structure of the organs and tissues in the scene. While there are other well-established mechanisms for inferring the movement of the camera (scope) from images, they are often sensitive to mistakes in image analysis, error accumulation, and structure deformation. The proposed method using a magnetic tracker to establish the camera motion parameters thus provides a robust and efficient alternative for 3D model construction. Furthermore, the calibration procedure does not require special training nor use expensive calibration equipment (except for a camera calibration pattern-a checkerboard pattern-that can be printed on any laser or inkjet printer).

  5. Quantitative 3D magnetic resonance elastography: Comparison with dynamic mechanical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rossman, Phillip J.; Arani, Arvin; Lake, David S.; Glaser, Kevin J.; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Manduca, Armando; McGee, Kiaran P.; Ehman, Richard L.; Araoz, Philip A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a rapidly growing noninvasive imaging technique for measuring tissue mechanical properties in vivo. Previous studies have compared two‐dimensional MRE measurements with material properties from dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) devices that were limited in frequency range. Advanced DMA technology now allows broad frequency range testing, and three‐dimensional (3D) MRE is increasingly common. The purpose of this study was to compare 3D MRE stiffness measurements with those of DMA over a wide range of frequencies and shear stiffnesses. Methods 3D MRE and DMA were performed on eight different polyvinyl chloride samples over 20–205 Hz with stiffness between 3 and 23 kPa. Driving frequencies were chosen to create 1.1, 2.2, 3.3, 4.4, 5.5, and 6.6 effective wavelengths across the diameter of the cylindrical phantoms. Wave images were analyzed using direct inversion and local frequency estimation algorithm with the curl operator and compared with DMA measurements at each corresponding frequency. Samples with sufficient spatial resolution and with an octahedral shear strain signal‐to‐noise ratio > 3 were compared. Results Consistency between the two techniques was measured with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and was excellent with an overall ICC of 0.99. Conclusions 3D MRE and DMA showed excellent consistency over a wide range of frequencies and stiffnesses. Magn Reson Med 77:1184–1192, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:27016276

  6. Evaluation of Gastric Volumes: Comparison of 3-D Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Buisman, Wijnand J; Mauritz, Femke A; Westerhuis, Wouter E; Gilja, Odd Helge; van der Zee, David C; van Herwaarden-Lindeboom, Maud Y A

    2016-07-01

    To investigate gastric accommodation, accurate measurements of gastric volumes are necessary. An excellent technique to measure gastric volumes is dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Unfortunately, dynamic MRI is expensive and not always available. A new 3-D ultrasound (US) method using a matrix transducer was developed to measure gastric volumes. In this prospective study, 14 healthy volunteers underwent a dynamic MRI and a 3-D US. Gastric volumes were calculated with intra-gastric liquid content and total gastric volume. Mean postprandial liquid gastric content was 397 ± 96.5 mL. Mean volume difference was 1.0 mL with limits of agreement of -8.9 to 10.9 mL. When gastric air was taken into account, mean total gastric volume was 540 ± 115.4 mL SD. Mean volume difference was 2.3 mL with limits of agreement of -21.1 to 26.4 mL. The matrix 3-D US showed excellent agreement with dynamic MRI. Therefore matrix 3-D US is a reliable alternative to measure gastric volumes.

  7. Steady state reconnection at a single 3D magnetic null point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galsgaard, K.; Pontin, D. I.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We systematically stress a rotationally symmetric 3D magnetic null point by advecting the opposite footpoints of the spine axis in opposite directions. This stress eventually concentrates in the vicinity of the null point, thereby forming a local current sheet through which magnetic reconnection takes place. The aim is to look for a steady state evolution of the current sheet dynamics, which may provide scaling relations for various characteristic parameters of the system. Methods: The evolution is followed by solving numerically the non-ideal MHD equations in a Cartesian domain. The null point is embedded in an initially constant density and temperature plasma. Results: It is shown that a quasi-steady reconnection process can be set up at a 3D null by continuous shear driving. It appears that a true steady state is unlikely to be realised because the current layer tends to grow until it is restricted by the geometry of the computational domain and the imposed driving profile. However, ratios between characteristic quantities clearly settle after some time to stable values, so that the evolution is quasi-steady. The experiments show a number of scaling relations, but they do not provide a clear consensus for extending to lower magnetic resistivity or faster driving velocities. More investigations are needed to fully clarify the properties of current sheets at magnetic null points.

  8. Magnetospheric Magnetic Reconnection with Southward IMF by a 3D EMPM Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Yan, X. Y.; Cai, D. S.; Lembege, B.

    2004-01-01

    We report our new simulation results on magnetospheric magnetic reconnection with southward IMF using a 3D EMPM model, with greater resolution and more particles using the parallelized 3D HPF TRISTAN code on VPP5000 supercomputer. Main parameters used in the new simulation are: domain size is 215 x 145 x 145, grid size = 0.5 Earth radius, initial particle number is 16 per cell, the IMF is southward. Arrival of southward IMF will cause reconnection in the magnetopause, thus allowing particles to enter into the inner magnetosphere. Sunward and tailward high particle flow are observed by satellites, and these phenomena are also observed in the simulation near the neutral line (X line) of the near-Earth magnetotail. This high particle flow goes along with the reconnected island. The magnetic reconnection process contributes to direct plasma entry between the magnetosheath to the inner magnetosphere and plasma sheet, in which the entry process eats the magnetosheath plasma to plasma sheet temperatures. We investigate magnetic, electric fields, density, and current during this magnetic reconnection with southward IMF. Further investigation with this simulation will provide insight into unsolved problems, such as the triggering of storms and substorms, and the storm-substorm relationship. New results will be presented at the meeting.

  9. An approach to 3D magnetic field calculation using numerical and differential algebra methods

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.; Brady, V.O.

    1992-07-17

    Motivated by the need for new means for specification and determination of 3D fields that are produced by electromagnetic lens elements in the region interior to coil windings and seeking to obtain techniques that will be convenient for accurate conductor placement and dynamical study of particle motion, we have conveniently gene the representation of a 2D magnetic field to 3D. We have shown that the 3 dimensioal magnetic field components of a multipole magnet in the curl-fire divergence-fire region near the axis r=0 can be derived from one dimensional functions A{sub n}(z) and their derivatives (part 1). In the region interior to coil windings of accelerator magnets the three spatial components of magnet fields can be expressed in terms of harmonic components'' proportional to functions sin (n{theta}) or cos (n{theta}) of the azimuthal angle. The r,z dependence of any such component can then be expressed in terms of powers of r times functions A{sub n}(z) and their derivatives. For twodimensional configurations B{sub z} of course is identically zero, the derivatives of A{sub n}(z) vanish, and the harmonic components of the transverse field then acquire a simple proportionality B{sub r,n} {proportional to} r{sup n-1} sin (n{theta}),B{sub {theta},n} {proportional to} r{sup n-1} cos (n{theta}), whereas in a 3-D configuration the more complex nature of the field gives rise to additional so-called psuedomultipole'' components as judged by additional powers of r required in the development of the field. Computation of the 3-D magnetic field arising at a sequence of field points, as a direct result of a specified current configuration or coil geometry, can be calculated explicitly through use of the Biot-Savart law and from such data the coefficients can then be derived for a general development of the type indicated above. We indicate, discuss, and illustrate two means by which this development may be performed.

  10. Analysis of the 3D magnetic field and its errors for undulators with iron poles

    SciTech Connect

    Ingold, G.; Bahrdt, J.; Gaupp, A.

    1995-12-31

    The attainable field strength and field quality, such as the optical phase error, the electron beam displacement within the undulator and higher order multipoles of the magnetic field, are discussed. These issues are critical to the design and construction of short period undulators for use in short wavelength FEL or for operation in third generation light sources. We discuss two approaches: (i) For superferric undulators the construction of a full length device would rely on the optimum sorting of precision machined undulator segments. Magnetic data on segments with 20 periods (period length 8.80mm) will be presented. (ii) For hybrid undulators the sorting has to be done on individual poles and magnets. For this approach typical error sources such as machining tolerances, magnetization errors of the permanent magnet material and assembly errors are modeled in 3D and compared to induced errors on an existing hybrid undulator segment. In case of undulators having a full length of hundred periods at least five times as many individual parts have to be characterized. This should be done automatically where both the mechanical and magnetic data before and after the assembly of the magnetic structure are recorded in one step. A CNC programmable measuring device suitable for this task will shortly be presented.

  11. An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors for permanent magnet spherical actuators with 3D magnet array.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Zhu, Bo; Jiao, Zongxia; Chen, Chin-Yin; Chen, I-Ming

    2014-10-24

    An orientation measurement method based on Hall-effect sensors is proposed for permanent magnet (PM) spherical actuators with three-dimensional (3D) magnet array. As there is no contact between the measurement system and the rotor, this method could effectively avoid friction torque and additional inertial moment existing in conventional approaches. Curved surface fitting method based on exponential approximation is proposed to formulate the magnetic field distribution in 3D space. The comparison with conventional modeling method shows that it helps to improve the model accuracy. The Hall-effect sensors are distributed around the rotor with PM poles to detect the flux density at different points, and thus the rotor orientation can be computed from the measured results and analytical models. Experiments have been conducted on the developed research prototype of the spherical actuator to validate the accuracy of the analytical equations relating the rotor orientation and the value of magnetic flux density. The experimental results show that the proposed method can measure the rotor orientation precisely, and the measurement accuracy could be improved by the novel 3D magnet array. The study result could be used for real-time motion control of PM spherical actuators.

  12. 3D mapping of neuronal migration in the embryonic mouse brain with magnetic resonance microimaging.

    PubMed

    Deans, Abby E; Wadghiri, Youssef Zaim; Aristizábal, Orlando; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2015-07-01

    A prominent feature of the developing mammalian brain is the widespread migration of neural progenitor (NP) cells during embryogenesis. A striking example is provided by NP cells born in the ventral forebrain of mid-gestation stage mice, which subsequently migrate long distances to their final positions in the cortex and olfactory bulb. Previous studies have used two-dimensional histological methods, making it difficult to analyze three-dimensional (3D) migration patterns. Unlike histology, magnetic resonance microimaging (micro-MRI) is a non-destructive, quantitative and inherently 3D imaging method for analyzing mouse embryos. To allow mapping of migrating NP cells with micro-MRI, cells were labeled in situ in the medial (MGE) and lateral (LGE) ganglionic eminences, using targeted in utero ultrasound-guided injection of micron-sized particles of iron-oxide (MPIO). Ex vivo micro-MRI and histology were then performed 5-6days after injection, demonstrating that the MPIO had magnetically labeled the migrating NP populations, which enabled 3D visualization and automated segmentation of the labeled cells. This approach was used to analyze the distinct patterns of migration from the MGE and LGE, and to construct rostral-caudal migration maps from each progenitor region. Furthermore, abnormal migratory phenotypes were observed in Nkx2.1(-/-) embryos, most notably a significant increase in cortical neurons derived from the Nkx2.1(-/-) LGE. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MPIO labeling and micro-MRI provide an efficient and powerful approach for analyzing 3D cell migration patterns in the normal and mutant mouse embryonic brain.

  13. Treatment envelope evaluation in transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound utilizing 3D MR thermometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Current clinical targets for transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (tcMRgFUS) are all located close to the geometric center of the skull convexity, which minimizes challenges related to focusing the ultrasound through the skull bone. Non-central targets will have to be reached to treat a wider variety of neurological disorders and solid tumors. Treatment envelope studies utilizing two-dimensional (2D) magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry have previously been performed to determine the regions in which therapeutic levels of FUS can currently be delivered. Since 2D MR thermometry was used, very limited information about unintended heating in near-field tissue/bone interfaces could be deduced. Methods In this paper, we present a proof-of-concept treatment envelope study with three-dimensional (3D) MR thermometry monitoring of FUS heatings performed in a phantom and a lamb model. While the moderate-sized transducer used was not designed for transcranial geometries, the 3D temperature maps enable monitoring of the entire sonication field of view, including both the focal spot and near-field tissue/bone interfaces, for full characterization of all heating that may occur. 3D MR thermometry is achieved by a combination of k-space subsampling and a previously described temporally constrained reconstruction method. Results We present two different types of treatment envelopes. The first is based only on the focal spot heating—the type that can be derived from 2D MR thermometry. The second type is based on the relative near-field heating and is calculated as the ratio between the focal spot heating and the near-field heating. This utilizes the full 3D MR thermometry data achieved in this study. Conclusions It is shown that 3D MR thermometry can be used to improve the safety assessment in treatment envelope evaluations. Using a non-optimal transducer, it is shown that some regions where therapeutic levels of FUS can be delivered, as suggested by

  14. 3D linear inversion of magnetic susceptibility data acquired by frequency domain EMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiesson, J.; Tabbagh, A.; Simon, F.-X.; Dabas, M.

    2017-01-01

    Low induction number EMI instruments are able to simultaneously measure a soil's apparent magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity. This family of dual measurement instruments is highly useful for the analysis of soils and archeological sites. However, the electromagnetic properties of soils are found to vary over considerably different ranges: whereas their electrical conductivity varies from ≤ 0.1 to ≥ 100 mS/m, their relative magnetic permeability remains within a very small range, between 1.0001 and 1.01 SI. Consequently, although apparent conductivity measurements need to be inverted using non-linear processes, the variations of the apparent magnetic susceptibility can be approximated through the use of linear processes, as in the case of the magnetic prospection technique. Our proposed 3D inversion algorithm starts from apparent susceptibility data sets, acquired using different instruments over a given area. A reference vertical profile is defined by considering the mode of the vertical distributions of both the electrical resistivity and of the magnetic susceptibility. At each point of the mapped area, the reference vertical profile response is subtracted to obtain the apparent susceptibility variation dataset. A 2D horizontal Fourier transform is applied to these variation datasets and to the dipole (impulse) response of each instrument, a (vertical) 1D inversion is performed at each point in the spectral domain, and finally the resulting dataset is inverse transformed to restore the apparent 3D susceptibility variations. It has been shown that when applied to synthetic results, this method is able to correct the apparent deformations of a buried object resulting from the geometry of the instrument, and to restore reliable quantitative susceptibility contrasts. It also allows the thin layer solution, similar to that used in magnetic prospection, to be implemented. When applied to field data it initially delivers a level of contrast

  15. Tuning the Origin of Magnetic Relaxation by Substituting the 3d or Rare-Earth Ions into Three Isostructural Cyano-Bridged 3d-4f Heterodinuclear Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Guo, Zhen; Xie, Shuang; Li, Hui-Li; Zhu, Wen-Hua; Liu, Li; Dong, Xun-Qing; He, Wei-Xun; Ren, Jin-Chao; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Powell, Annie K

    2015-11-02

    Three isostructural cyano-bridged 3d-4f compounds, [YFe(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (1), [DyFe(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (2), and [DyCo(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (3), were successfully assembled by site-targeted substitution of the 3d or rare-earth ions. All compounds have been structurally characterized to display slightly distorted pentagonal-bipyramidal local coordination geometry around the rare-earth ions. Magnetic analyses revealed negligible magnetic coupling in compound 1, antiferromagnetic intradimer interaction in 2, and weak ferromagnetic coupling through dipolar-dipolar interaction in 3. Under an applied direct-current (dc) field, 1 (Hdc = 2.5 kOe, τ0 = 1.3 × 10(-7) s, and Ueff/kB = 23 K) and 3 (Hdc = 2.0 kOe, τ0 = 7.1 × 10(-11) s, and Ueff/kB = 63 K) respectively indicated magnetic relaxation behavior based on a single [Fe(III)]LS ion and a Dy(III) ion; nevertheless, 2 (Hdc = 2.0 kOe, τ0 = 9.7 × 10(-8) s, and Ueff/kB = 23 K) appeared to be a single-molecule magnet based on a cyano-bridged DyFe dimer. Compound 1, which can be regarded as a single-ion magnet of the [Fe(III)]LS ion linked to a diamagnetic Y(III) ion in a cyano-bridged heterodimer, represents one of the rarely investigated examples based on a single Fe(III) ion explored in magnetic relaxation behavior. It demonstrated that the introduction of intradimer magnetic interaction of 2 through a cyano bridge between Dy(III) and [Fe(III)]LS ions negatively affects the energy barrier and χ″(T) peak temperature compared to 3.

  16. Unusual Low-frequency Magnetic Perturbations in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    H. Takahashi; E.D. Fredrickson; M.S. Chance

    2001-02-12

    Low-frequency magnetic perturbations (less than or equal to 30 kHz) observed in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) tokamak do not always conform to expectations from Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) modes. The discrepancy between observations and expectations arises from the existence of three classes of magnetic perturbations in TFTR: (1) 'Edge Originated Magnetic Perturbations' (EOMP's), (2) 'Kink-like Modes' (KLM's), and (3) Tearing Modes (TM's). The EOMP class has unusual magnetic phenomenon including up/down asymmetry in poloidal intensity variation that MHD modes alone cannot generate. The contributions of MHD modes in plasma edge regions are too small to explain the magnitude of observed EOMP perturbations. At least two-thirds, possibly nearly all, of magnetic perturbations in a typical EOMP originate from sources other than MHD modes. An EOMP has a unity toroidal harmonic number and a poloidal harmonic number close to a discharge's edge q-value. It produces little temperature fluctuations, except possibly in edge regions. The KLM class produces temperature fluctuations, mostly confined within the q=1 surface with an ideal-mode-like structure, but generates little external magnetic perturbations. The TM class conforms generally to expectations from MHD modes. We propose that current flowing in the Scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasma is a possible origin of EOMP's.

  17. Protecting ITER walls: fast ion power loads in 3D magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurki-Suonio, T.; Särkimäki, K.; Äkäslompolo, S.; Varje, J.; Liu, Y.; Sipilä, S.; Asunta, O.; Hirvijoki, E.; Snicker, A.; Terävä, J.; Cavinato, M.; Gagliardi, M.; Parail, V.; Saibene, G.

    2017-01-01

    The fusion alpha and beam ion with steady-state power loads in all four main operating scenarios of ITER have been evaluated by the ASCOT code. For this purpose, high-fidelity magnetic backgrounds were reconstructed, taking into account even the internal structure of the ferritic inserts and tritium breeding modules (TBM). The beam ions were found to be almost perfectly confined in all scenarios, and only the so-called hybrid scenario featured alpha loads reaching 0.5 MW due to its more triangular plasma. The TBMs were not found to jeopardize the alpha confinement, nor cause any hot spots. Including plasma response did not bring dramatic changes to the load. The ELM control coils (ECC) were simulated in the baseline scenario and found to seriously deteriorate even the beam confinement. However, the edge perturbation in this case is so large that the sources have to be re-evaluated with plasma profiles that take into account the ECC perturbation.

  18. 3D Magnetic Measurements of Kink and Locked Modes in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Hanson, J. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Logan, N. C.; Lanctot, M. J.; Shiraki, D.

    2013-10-01

    The DIII-D magnetics diagnostic has been greatly expanded to fully characterize non-axisymmetric ``3D'' fields. Five poloidal locations now recover n <= 3 , while new HFS arrays provide poloidal spectral resolution of 7.4 cm. Initial measurements suggest externally driven kink structures deviate from MARS-F and IPEC models. These variations extend to the ideal regime, where toroidal agreement is observed. The plasma response to an n = 3 RMP increases monotonically as beta increases and q95 decreases, contrary to predictions of a screening to kink valley. Finally, the temporal evolution of the 3D eigenstructure of a slowly rotating (5 Hz) quasi-static, born locked, tearing mode provides the first evidence of an appreciable n = 2 error field, and an estimate of the phase for future correction. This new 3D capability will be used to understand and optimize control of RWMs, NTV torque, ELMs, and error field correction to extend stable tokamak operation. Work supported in part by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-95ER54309, DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FG02-04ER54761 and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. 3D kinematics of the tarsal joints from magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Bruce E.; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Okereke, Enyi; Hillstrom, Howard J.; Siegler, Sorin; Ringleb, Stacie I.; Imhauser, Carl W.

    2001-09-01

    We have developed a method for analyzing motion at skeletal joints based on the 3D reconstruction of magnetic resonance (MR) image data. Since the information about each voxel in MR images includes its location in the scanner, it follows that information is available for each organ whose 3D surface is computed from a series of MR slices. In addition, there is information on the shape and orientation of each organ, and the contact areas of adjacent bones. By collecting image data in different positions we can calculate the motion of the individual bones. We have used this method to study human foot bones, in order to understand normal and abnormal foot function. It has been used to evaluate patients with tarsal coalitions, various forms of pes planus, ankle sprains, and several other conditions. A newly described feature of this system is the ability to visualize the contact area at a joint, as determined by the region of minimum distance. The display of contact area helps understand abnormal joint function. Also, the use of 3D imaging reveals motions in joints which cannot otherwise be visualized, such as the subtalar joint, for more accurate diagnosis of joint injury.

  20. 3D In Vitro Model for Breast Cancer Research Using Magnetic Levitation and Bioprinting Method.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Fransisca; Godin, Biana

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment composition and architecture are known as a major factor in orchestrating the tumor growth and its response to various therapies. In this context, in vivo studies are necessary to evaluate the responses. However, while tumor cells can be of human origin, tumor microenvironment in the in vivo models is host-based. On the other hand, in vitro studies in a flat monoculture of tumor cells (the most frequently used in vitro tumor model) are unable to recapitulate the complexity of tumor microenvironment. Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro cell cultures of tumor cells have been proven to be an important experimental tool in understanding mechanisms of tumor growth, response to therapeutics, and transport of nutrients/drugs. We have recently described a novel tool to create 3D co-cultures of tumor cells and cells in the tumor microenvironment. Our method utilizes magnetic manipulation/levitation of the specific ratios of tumor cells and cells in the tumor microenvironment (from human or animal origin) aiding in the formation of tumor spheres with defined cellular composition and density, as quickly as within 24 h. This chapter describes the experimental protocols developed to model the 3D structure of the cancer environment using the above method.

  1. 3D in vitro model for breast cancer research using magnetic levitation and bioprinting method

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Fransisca; Godin, Biana

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tumor microenvironment composition and architecture are known as a major factor in orchestrating the tumor growth and its response to various therapies. In this context, in vivo studies are necessary to evaluate the responses. However, while tumor cells can be of human origin, tumor microenvironment in the in vivo models is host-based. On the other hand, in vitro studies in a flat monoculture of tumor cells (the most frequently used in vitro tumor model) are unable to recapitulate the complexity of tumor microenvironment. Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro cell cultures of tumor cells have been proven to be an important experimental tool in understanding mechanisms of tumor growth, response to therapeutics and transport of nutrients/drugs. We have recently described a novel tool to create 3D co-cultures of tumor cells and cells in the tumor microenvironment. Our method utilizes magnetic manipulation/levitation of the specific ratios of tumor cells and cells in the tumor microenvironment (from human or animal origin) aiding in the formation of tumor spheres with defined cellular composition and density, as quickly as within 24 hours. This chapter describes the experimental protocols developed to model the 3D structure of the cancer environment using the above method. PMID:26820961

  2. Magnetic Damping of g-Jitter Driven Flows: 3-D Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shang, D. Y.; Li, B. Q.; deGroh, H. C.

    1997-01-01

    A 3-D numerical model is developed to represent the oscillating natural convection induced in a cylindrical cavity filled with Ga-doped germanium with and without the presence of an external magnetic field. The model is developed based on the penalty-finite element solution of the equations describing the transport of momentum, heat and solutal element as well as the electromagnetic field distribution in the melt pool. Automatic time step control is applied to help speed up the calculations. Numerical simulations are conducted to study the convection and magnetic damping effects as a function of frequency, directions and amplitudes of g-jitter and also the direction and magnitudes of the applied magnetic fields. The results show that the g-jitter driven flow is time dependent and exhibits a complex recirculating convection pattern in three dimensions and that an applied magnetic field can be employed to suppress this deleterious convective flow and both magnitude and orientation of the applied field are important in magnetic damping of the g-jitter induced convective flows.

  3. Heat Transfer Affected by Transverse Magnetic Field using 3D Modeling of Arc Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Tatsuro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-10-01

    Gas shielded metal arc welding is used to join the various metal because this is the high quality joining technology. Thus, this welding is used for a welding of large buildings such as bridges and LNG tanks. However, the welding defect caused by the heat transfer decrement may occur with increasing the wind velocity. This is because that the convection loss increases because the arc deflects to leeward side with increasing the wind velocity. In order to prevent from the arc deflection, it is used that the transverse magnetic field is applied to the arc. However, the arc deflection occurs with increasing the transverse magnetic field excessively. The energy balance of the arc is changed with increasing the convection loss caused by the arc deflection, and the heat transfer to the anode decreases. Therefore, the analysis including the arc and anode is necessary to elucidate the heat transfer to the anode. In this paper, the heat transfer affected by the transverse magnetic field using 3D modeling of the arc plasma is elucidated. The heat transfer to the anode is calculated by using the EMTF(electromagnetic thermal fluid) simulation with increasing the transverse magnetic field. As a result, the heat transfer decreased with increasing the transverse magnetic field.

  4. 2D and 3D ordered arrays of Co magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, J.; Prida, V. M.; Vega, V.; Rosa, W. O.; Caballero-Flores, R.; Iglesias, L.; Hernando, B.

    2015-06-01

    Cobalt nanowire arrays spatially distributed in 2D and 3D arrangements have been performed by pulsed electrodeposition into the pores of planar and cylindrical nanoporous anodic alumina membranes, respectively. Morphological characterization points out the good filling factor reached by electroplated Co nanowires in both kinds of alumina membranes exhibiting hexagonally self-ordered porous structures. Co nanowires grown in both kinds of alumina templates exhibit the same crystalline phases. DC magnetometry and First Order Reversal Curve (FORC) analysis were carried out in order to determine the overall magnetic behavior for both nanowire array geometries. It is found that when the Co nanowires of two kinds of arrays are perpendicularly magnetized, both hysteresis loops are identical, suggesting that neither the intrinsic magnetic behavior of the nanowires nor the collective one depend on the arrays geometry. FORC analysis performed along the radial direction of the Co nanowire arrays embedded in the cylindrical alumina template reveals that the contribution of each nanowire to the magnetization reversal process involves its specific orientation with respect to the applied field direction. Furthermore, the comparison between the magnetic properties for both kinds of Co nanowire arrays allows discussing about the effect of the cylindrical geometry of the template on the magnetostatic interaction among nanowires.

  5. Development and Testing of EFIT 3D Equilibrium Reconstruction Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.; Ferraro, N. M.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; King, J. D.

    2014-10-01

    Recent development and testing of EFIT capability to reconstruct tokamak 3D perturbed equilibrium are described. The 3D extension is based on an expansion of the MHD equations to account for the 3D effects. EFIT uses the cylindrical coordinate system and can include magnetic island and stochastic effects. Several linearization schemes are being explored to improve the EFIT 3D perturbed solutions. Algorithms are also being developed to allow EFIT to reconstruct 3D perturbed equilibria directly making use of plasma response to 3D perturbations from the MARS or M3D-C1 MHD codes. Other efforts include testing of the new EFIT 3D capability using simulated magnetic data based on response calculations from MARS and M3D-C1, and performing detailed benchmarking calculations against other 3D codes such as VMEC/V3FIT. Reconstruction examples using EFIT and the new DIII-D 3D magnetic measurements to reconstruct 3D perturbed experimental equilibria using well-diagnosed discharges from DIII-D error field, RWM, and RMP experiments will be presented. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG02-95ER54309.

  6. Study of the internal magnetic field of Mercury through 3D hybrid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, Ludivine; Marcel Chanteur, Gerard; Modolo, Ronan; Leblanc, Francois; Schmidt, Carl; Langlais, Benoît; Thebault, Erwan

    2016-10-01

    In 1974, Mariner 10 discovered the intrinsic magnetic field of Mercury which interacts with the solar wind, leading to the formation of a magnetosphere. In spite of the recent MESSENGER observations, this magnetosphere remains quite unknown, especially in the Southern hemisphere. In order to improve our understanding of the Hermean magnetosphere, and to prepare the Bepi-Colombo mission (ESA/JAXA), we simulated the magnetized environment of Mercury using the model named LatHyS (LATMOS Hybrid Simulation). LatHyS is a 3D parallel multi-species hybrid code which has been applied to Mars, Titan and Ganymede, which has recently be improved by the implementation of a multi-grid method allowing to refine the spatial resolution near the planetary object (40 km in the case of Mercury). In order to investigate the Hermean environment, several hybrid simulations have been performed considering different internal field models, and results are compared with MESSENGER observations.

  7. Effects of 2D and 3D Error Fields on the SAS Divertor Magnetic Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisan, G. L.; Lao, L. L.; Strait, E. J.; Guo, H. Y.; Wu, W.; Evans, T. E.

    2016-10-01

    The successful design of plasma-facing components in fusion experiments is of paramount importance in both the operation of future reactors and in the modification of operating machines. Indeed, the Small Angle Slot (SAS) divertor concept, proposed for application on the DIII-D experiment, combines a small incident angle at the plasma strike point with a progressively opening slot, so as to better control heat flux and erosion in high-performance tokamak plasmas. Uncertainty quantification of the error fields expected around the striking point provides additional useful information in both the design and the modeling phases of the new divertor, in part due to the particular geometric requirement of the striking flux surfaces. The presented work involves both 2D and 3D magnetic error field analysis on the SAS strike point carried out using the EFIT code for 2D equilibrium reconstruction, V3POST for vacuum 3D computations and the OMFIT integrated modeling framework for data analysis. An uncertainty in the magnetic probes' signals is found to propagate non-linearly as an uncertainty in the striking point and angle, which can be quantified through statistical analysis to yield robust estimates. Work supported by contracts DE-FG02-95ER54309 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  8. 3D magnetic interactions of stars with their close-in planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Brun, Allan Sacha; Matt, Sean; Réville, Victor

    2015-08-01

    Close-in planets generally orbit in a sub-alfv ´enic stellar wind, where the perturbations they excite in the corona are able to travel upwind to the stellar surface and potentially induce observable phenomena. The effective connection between the planet and its host takes the form of two Aflv ´en wings. Depending on the topology of the planetary and stellar magnetic fields, the rotation profile of the corona, and the orbital parameters, it is possible that none, one, or the two Aflv ´en wings connect together the star and the planet.We explore the formation and sustainment of Alfv ´en wings in global three dimensional simulations under the magneto-hydrodynamic formalism with the PLUTO code. We model the stellar wind of a typical cool star in which a close-in orbiting planet is introduced as a boundary condition. By varying the magnetic topologies of the planetary and stellar magnetic fields, we explore the variety of Alfv ´en wings that can develop and quantify the Poynting flux flowing through those wings. We thus provide estimates of the amount of magnetic energy these magnetic interactions can channel to the lower corona. We also quantify the phase and latitude offsets that can be expected between the planetary subpoint on the stellar surface and the actual location where energy is deposited. We summarize the typical situations (in terms of magnetic topology, stellar type, and orbital parameters) where the star-planet magnetic interaction could trigger observable flares. We conclude by extending our results to the cases of more complex, non-axisymmetric topologies of the observed magnetic fields for a few particular stars.

  9. New Era in 3-D Modeling of Convection and Magnetic Dynamos in Stellar Envelopes and Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomre, J.; Augustson, K. C.; Brown, B. P.; Browning, M. K.; Brun, A. S.; Featherstone, N. A.; Miesch, M. S.

    2012-09-01

    The recent advances in asteroseismology and spectropolarimetry are beginning to provide estimates of differential rotation and magnetic structures for a range of F and G-type stars possessing convective envelopes, and in A-type stars with convective cores. It is essential to complement such observational work with theoretical studies based on 3-D simulations of highly turbulent convection coupled to rotation, shear and magnetic fields in full spherical geometries. We have so employed the anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code, which deals with compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in spherical shells, to examine the manner in which the global-scale convection can establish differential rotation and meridional circulations under current solar rotation rates, and these make good contact with helioseismic findings. For younger G stars rotating 3 to 5 times faster than the current Sun, the convection establishes ever stronger angular velocity contrasts between their fast equators and slow poles, and these are accompanied by prominent latitudinal temperature contrasts as well. Turning to MHD simulation of magnetic dynamo action within these younger G stars, the resulting magnetism involves wreaths of strong toroidal magnetic fields (up to 50 to 100 kG strengths) in the bulk of the convection zone, typically of opposite polarity in the northern and southern hemispheres. These fields can persist for long intervals despite being pummeled by the fast convective downflows, but they can also exhibit field reversals and cycles. Turning to shallower convective envelopes in the more luminous F-type stars that range in mass from 1.2 to 1.4 solar masses and for various rotation rates, we find that the convection can again establish solar-like differential rotation profiles with a fast equator and slow poles, but the opposite is achieved at the slower rotation rates. The F stars are also capable of building strong magnetic fields, often as wreaths, through dynamo action. We also

  10. Particle energization in 3D magnetic reconnection of relativistic pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wei; Yin Lin; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Liang, Edison P.; Li Hui

    2011-05-15

    We present large scale 3D particle-in-cell simulations to examine particle energization in magnetic reconnection of relativistic electron-positron (pair) plasmas. The initial configuration is set up as a relativistic Harris equilibrium without a guide field. These simulations are large enough to accommodate a sufficient number of tearing and kink modes. Contrary to the non-relativistic limit, the linear tearing instability is faster than the linear kink instability, at least in our specific parameters. We find that the magnetic energy dissipation is first facilitated by the tearing instability and followed by the secondary kink instability. Particles are mostly energized inside the magnetic islands during the tearing stage due to the spatially varying electric fields produced by the outflows from reconnection. Secondary kink instability leads to additional particle acceleration. Accelerated particles are, however, observed to be thermalized quickly. The large amplitude of the vertical magnetic field resulting from the tearing modes by the secondary kink modes further help thermalizing the non-thermal particles generated from the secondary kink instability. Implications of these results for astrophysics are briefly discussed.

  11. Transport of energetic ions by low-n magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.

    1992-10-01

    The stochastic transport of MeV ions induced by low-n magnetic perturbations is studied, focussing chiefly on the stochastic mechanism operative for passing particles in low frequency perturbations. Beginning with a single-harmonic form for the perturbing field, it iii first shown numerically and analytically that the stochastic threshold of energetic particles can be much lower than that of the magnetic field, contrary to earlier expectations, so that MHD perturbations could cause appreciable loss of energetic ions without destroying the bulk confinement. The analytic theory is then extended in a number of directions, to darity the relation of the present stochaistic mechanism to instances already found, to allow for more complex perturbations, and to consider the more general relationship between the stochasticity of magnetic fields, and that of particles of differing energies (and pitch angles) moving in those fields. It is shown that the stochastic threshold is in general a nonmonotonic function of energy, whose form can to some extent be tailored to achieve desired goals (e.g., burn control or ash removal) by a judicious choice of the perturbation. Illustrative perturbations are exhibited which are stochastic for low but not for high-energy ions, for high but not for low-energy ions, and for intermediate-energy ions, but not for low or high energy. The second possibility is the behavior needed for burn control; the third provides a possible mechanism for ash removal.

  12. 3-D joint inversion of the magnetotelluric phase tensor and vertical magnetic transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietze, Kristina; Ritter, Oliver; Egbert, Gary D.

    2015-11-01

    With advancing computational resources, 3-D inversion techniques have become feasible in recent years and are now a more widely used tool for magnetotelluric (MT) data interpretation. Galvanic distortion caused by small-scale near-surface inhomogeneities remains an obstacle for 3-D MT inversion which so far has experienced little attention. If not considered properly, the effect on 3-D inversion can be immense and result in erroneous subsurface models and interpretations. To tackle the problem we implemented inversion of the distortion-free phase tensor into the ModEM inversion package. The dimensionless phase tensor components describe only variations of the conductivity structure. When inverting these data, particular care has to be taken of the conductivity structure in the a priori model, which provides the reference frame when transferring the information from phase tensors into absolute conductivity values. Our results obtained with synthetic data show that phase tensor inversion can recover the regional conductivity structure in presence of galvanic distortion if the a priori model provides a reasonable assumption for the regional resistivity average. Joint inversion of phase tensor data and vertical magnetic transfer functions improves recovery of the absolute resistivity structure and is less dependent on the prior model. We also used phase tensor inversion for a data set of more than 250 MT sites from the central San Andreas fault, California, where a number of sites showed significant galvanic distortion. We find the regional structure of the phase tensor inversion results compatible with previously obtained models from impedance inversion. In the vicinity of distorted sites, phase tensor inversion models exhibit more homogeneous/smoother conductivity structures.

  13. Microscopic magnetic nature of K2NiF4-type 3d transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, J.; Nozaki, H.; Umegaki, I.; Higemoto, W.; Ansaldo, E. J.; Brewer, J. H.; Sakurai, H.; Kao, T.-H.; Yang, H.-D.; Månsson, M.

    2014-12-01

    In order to elucidate the magnetic nature of K2NiF4-type 3d transition metal oxides, we have measured μ+SR spectra for Sr2VO4, LaSrVO4, and Sr2CrO4 using powder samples. ZF- and wTF-μ+SR measurements propose that Sr2VO4 enters into the static antiferromagnetic (AF) order phase below 8 K. In addition, TF-μ+SR measurements evidence that the transition at 105 K is not magnetic but structural and/or electronic in origin. For LaSrVO4, static long-range order has not been observed down to 20 K, while, as T decreases from 145 K, wTF asymmetry starts to decrease below 60 K, suggesting the appearance and evolution of localized magnetic moments below 60 K. For Sr2CrO4, by contrast, both ZF- and wTF-μ+SR have confirmed the presence of antiferromagnetic order below 117 K, as predicted in the χ(T) curve.

  14. 3D Equilibrium Reconstruction with Improved Magnetic Diagnostics on the Compact Toroidal Hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xinxing; Hanson, James D.; Hartwell, Gregory J.; Knowlton, Stephen F.; Maurer, David A.

    2013-10-01

    Equilibrium reconstructions using the three-dimensional V3FIT code [ 1 ] have been performed for low density (low β) current carrying plasmas on the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH), a torsatron in which the magnetic configuration can be strongly modified by an ohmically-driven plasma current. These reconstructions use 50 external magnetic diagnostic measurements, including segmented and full Rogowski coils, saddle loops, poloidal and radial magnetic pickup coils. Time dependent 3D reconstructions document the evolution of the plasma cross section and current profile, with calculated value of βθ much less than the plasma internal inductance, li. Reconstructions typically show the plasma to move outward in major radius and become less elongated in poloidal cross section with increasing plasma current. In plasmas with low vacuum transform (ιvac ~ 0 . 04), the plasma current profile peaks with li above 0 . 84 when the total transform is 1 / 2 , which typically leads disruption. With values of ιvac >= 0 . 1 , li remains low (~ 0 . 7), and the discharges no longer disrupt. This work is supported by the USDoE under grant DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  15. GMC Collisions as Triggers of Star Formation. II. 3D Turbulent, Magnetized Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Benjamin; Tan, Jonathan C.; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Van Loo, Sven; Christie, Duncan; Collins, David

    2017-02-01

    We investigate giant molecular cloud collisions and their ability to induce gravitational instability and thus star formation. This mechanism may be a major driver of star formation activity in galactic disks. We carry out a series of 3D, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), adaptive mesh refinement simulations to study how cloud collisions trigger formation of dense filaments and clumps. Heating and cooling functions are implemented based on photo-dissociation region models that span the atomic-to-molecular transition and can return detailed diagnostic information. The clouds are initialized with supersonic turbulence and a range of magnetic field strengths and orientations. Collisions at various velocities and impact parameters are investigated. Comparing and contrasting colliding and non-colliding cases, we characterize morphologies of dense gas, magnetic field structure, cloud kinematic signatures, and cloud dynamics. We present key observational diagnostics of cloud collisions, especially: relative orientations between magnetic fields and density structures, like filaments; 13CO(J = 2-1), 13CO(J = 3-2), and 12CO(J = 8-7) integrated intensity maps and spectra; and cloud virial parameters. We compare these results to observed Galactic clouds.

  16. Denoising of 3D magnetic resonance images by using higher-order singular value decomposition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyuan; Xu, Zhongbiao; Jia, Nan; Yang, Wei; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Feng, Yanqiu

    2015-01-01

    The denoising of magnetic resonance (MR) images is important to improve the inspection quality and reliability of quantitative image analysis. Nonlocal filters by exploiting similarity and/or sparseness among patches or cubes achieve excellent performance in denoising MR images. Recently, higher-order singular value decomposition (HOSVD) has been demonstrated to be a simple and effective method for exploiting redundancy in the 3D stack of similar patches during denoising 2D natural image. This work aims to investigate the application and improvement of HOSVD to denoising MR volume data. The wiener-augmented HOSVD method achieves comparable performance to that of BM4D. For further improvement, we propose to augment the standard HOSVD stage by a second recursive stage, which is a repeated HOSVD filtering of the weighted summation of the residual and denoised image in the first stage. The appropriate weights have been investigated by experiments with different image types and noise levels. Experimental results over synthetic and real 3D MR data demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms current state-of-the-art denoising methods.

  17. Focused shape models for hip joint segmentation in 3D magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Shekhar S; Xia, Ying; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart; Schwarz, Raphael; Fripp, Jurgen

    2014-04-01

    Deformable models incorporating shape priors have proved to be a successful approach in segmenting anatomical regions and specific structures in medical images. This paper introduces weighted shape priors for deformable models in the context of 3D magnetic resonance (MR) image segmentation of the bony elements of the human hip joint. The fully automated approach allows the focusing of the shape model energy to a priori selected anatomical structures or regions of clinical interest by preferentially ordering the shape representation (or eigen-modes) within this type of model to the highly weighted areas. This focused shape model improves accuracy of the shape constraints in those regions compared to standard approaches. The proposed method achieved femoral head and acetabular bone segmentation mean absolute surface distance errors of 0.55±0.18mm and 0.75±0.20mm respectively in 35 3D unilateral MR datasets from 25 subjects acquired at 3T with different limited field of views for individual bony components of the hip joint.

  18. Anatomical delineation of congenital heart disease using 3D magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams Bornemeier, Renee; Fellows, Kenneth E.; Fogel, Mark A.; Weinberg, Paul M.

    1994-05-01

    Anatomic delineation of the heart and great vessels is a necessity when managing children with congenital heart disease. Spatial orientation of the vessels and chambers in the heart and the heart itself may be quite abnormal. Though magnetic resonance imaging provides a noninvasive means for determining the anatomy, the intricate interrelationships between many structures are difficult to conceptualize from a 2-D format. Taking the 2-D images and using a volumetric analysis package allows for a 3-D replica of the heart to be created. This model can then be used to view the anatomy and spatial arrangement of the cardiac structures. This information may be utilized by the physicians to assist in the clinical management of these children.

  19. Plasma-induced magnetic responses during nonlinear dynamics of magnetic islands due to resonant magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2014-12-15

    Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) produce magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas. Self-healing (annihilation) of RMP-induced magnetic islands has been observed in helical systems, where a possible mechanism of the self-healing is shielding of RMP penetration by plasma flows, which is well known in tokamaks. Thus, fundamental physics of RMP shielding is commonly investigated in both tokamaks and helical systems. In order to check this mechanism, detailed informations of magnetic island phases are necessary. In experiments, measurement of radial magnetic responses is relatively easy. In this study, based on a theoretical model of rotating magnetic islands, behavior of radial magnetic fields during the self-healing is investigated. It is confirmed that flips of radial magnetic fields are typically observed during the self-healing. Such behavior of radial magnetic responses is also observed in LHD experiments.

  20. 3D Characterization of the Magnetic Signature of a Medium Sized Impact Crater at Odessa, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A.; Soule, D.; Everett, M.; Rodman, T.; Mangue Ndong, M.; Pereira, A.; Platt, P.; Trahan, A.

    2008-12-01

    Meteorite impacts are a common occurrence throughout Earth's geologic history. Many of the surface expressions of large ancient impacts have been subsequently erased by weathering and erosion processes. The study of preserved meteorite impacts is necessary to better understand this natural hazard which has been increasingly linked to rapid climate change and mass extinctions. The 60 ka Odessa meteorite crater located in Ector Co. Texas, is unique because it is not only well-preserved, but also has been the subject of extensive geologic examination. Geologic mapping and numeric models indicate that the crater was caused by a relatively small oblique impactor. The crater rim is remarkably well exposed. Much of the ejecta blanket is present, although deeply eroded. There has been considerable site disturbance due to drilling, shaft excavation, trenching, construction of a museum, trails, and the oil/gas activity in surrounding fields. Two previous geophysical investigations have shown that our data clearly corresponds to large-scale thrust deformation. With this in mind we have performed 3D high resolution magnetic gradiometer surveys that will allow us to quantify and characterize the magnetic signature of small to medium impacts. We will tie this data set to a 3D photorealistic outcrop image provided by laser scanning with coarser-scale, below-ground geophysical information. Our geophysical imagery provides a useful constraint on numerical simulations of the impact and its immediate regional-scale environmental effects. This information can be used to identify impact sites whose surface expression has been erased by natural erosional processes, allowing for improved frequency estimates and improved geo-hazard assessment.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, magnetic and electrochemical properties of a new 3D hexa-copper-substituted germanotungstate

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanzhou; Luo, Jie; Zhang, Yanting; Zhao, Junwei; Chen, Lijuan; Ma, Pengtao; Niu, Jingyang

    2013-09-15

    An inorganic–organic hybrid hexa-copper-substituted germanotungstate Na{sub 2}[Cu(dap){sub 2}]{sub 2}[Cu(dap){sub 2}] ([Cu{sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(dap){sub 2}][B-α-GeW{sub 9}O{sub 34}]{sub 2})·4H{sub 2}O (1) (dap=1,2-diaminopropane) has been hydrothermally prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP–AES) analyses, IR spectra, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. 1 displays the six-connected 3D network with the long topological (O′Keefe) vertex symbol is 4·4·6{sub 4}·4·4·4·4·6{sub 4}·4·4·4·6{sub 4}·4·4·4 and the short vertex (Schläfli) symbol of 4{sup 12}6{sup 3}. Magnetic measurements indicate that there are the overall ferromagnetic exchange interactions in the belt-like hexa-Cu{sup II} cluster in 1. Furthermore, the electrochemical behavior and electrocatalysis of 1 modified carbon paste electrode (1-CPE) have been studied. The reductions of nitrite, bromate and hydrogen peroxide are principally mediated by the W{sup VI}-based wave. - Graphical abstract: A hexa-Cu{sup II} sandwiched germanotungstate has been synthesized and structurally characterized. The magnetic, solid-state electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties have been investigated. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Transition-metal substituted polyoxometalates. • Hexa-copper-substituted germanotungstate. • Six-connected 3D network. • Electrocatalytic reduction of nitrite, bromate and hydrogen peroxide.

  2. The Donegal Sign Tree: A Local Legend Confirmed with Holographic Radar and 3-D Magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, T.; Cassidy, M.; Inagaki, M.; Windsor, C.; Capineri, L.; Falorni, P.; Bulleti, A.; Valentini, S.; Borgioli, G.; Ivashov, S.; Zhuravlev, A.; Razewig, V.; Vasiliev, I.; Bechtel, E.

    2009-05-01

    A tree at a crossroad in Historic Donegal, PA (founded 1722) bears unusual burls. Two are similar in size, and lie on opposite sides of the trunk at a height of six feet. Locals say that the tree engulfed an old road sign, and the geometry of the burls gives this appearance. However, the trunk between these two burls bears no welt where it sealed after swallowing the sign. In addition, there are other burls farther up the tree, which are not consistent with engulfed signs. Although the locals all know the legend of the swallowed sign, none ever actually saw the sign; not even an octogenarian who has lived at the crossroad his entire life, and recalls the tree as a child just as it is today. In order to test the veracity of the legend, this study performed subsurface imaging of the tree using holographic subsurface radar (Rascan), and 3-D measurements of the magnetic field about the tree using cesium vapor sensors. The Rascan system used is a continuous wave subsurface radar that operates at 5 discrete frequencies between 1.5 and 2.0 GHz. Reflections from subsurface objects are recorded as the phase difference pattern between an internal reference signal, and the reflected signal. Thus, it is a microwave analogy for optical holography. Rascan records reflections with two receiving antennae - parallel and perpendicular to the transmitter - so a single set of scans provides ten images; five frequencies at two polarizations. This ensures that an object at arbitrary depth will produce a strong phase difference in one of the images. As a consequence, elongate objects that are angled from the plane of scanning (e.g. a dipping sheet) produce "zebra stripes" of contrast values that vary cyclically with depth. The presence of stripes, and their relative positions in the different frequency images (the movement of which has been dubbed the "zebra shift") is useful for determining the relative depth of different portions of a dipping planar, or curved subsurface object. Rascan

  3. Polyethylenimine-interlayered core-shell-satellite 3D magnetic microspheres as versatile SERS substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chongwen; Li, Ping; Wang, Junfeng; Rong, Zhen; Pang, Yuanfeng; Xu, Jiawen; Dong, Peitao; Xiao, Rui; Wang, Shengqi

    2015-11-01

    Precise fabrication of subtle nanogaps amid individual nanoparticles or between adjacent ones to obtain the highest SERS enhancement is still a challenge. Here, we reported a novel approach for fabricating core-shell-satellite 3D magnetic microspheres (CSSM), that easily form a porous 1.5 nm PEI interlayer to accommodate molecules and create sufficient hotspots between the inner Fe3O4@Ag core and outer assembled Au@Ag satellites. Experiments and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation demonstrated that the enhancement factor (EF) was about 2.03 × 108 and 6.25 × 106, respectively. In addition, the micro-scale magnetic core endowed the CSSM with a superior magnetic nature, which enabled easy separation and further enhanced Raman signals due to enrichment of targeted analytes and abundant interparticle hotspots created by magnetism-induced aggregation. Our results further demonstrated that the CSSM is expected to be a versatile SERS substrate, which has been verified by the detection of the adsorbed pesticide thiram and the non-adsorbed pesticide paraquat with a detection limit as low as 5 × 10-12 M and 1 × 10-10 M, respectively. The novel CSSM can overcome the long-standing limitations of SERS for the trace characterization of various analytes in different solutions and promises to transform SERS into a practical analytical technique.Precise fabrication of subtle nanogaps amid individual nanoparticles or between adjacent ones to obtain the highest SERS enhancement is still a challenge. Here, we reported a novel approach for fabricating core-shell-satellite 3D magnetic microspheres (CSSM), that easily form a porous 1.5 nm PEI interlayer to accommodate molecules and create sufficient hotspots between the inner Fe3O4@Ag core and outer assembled Au@Ag satellites. Experiments and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation demonstrated that the enhancement factor (EF) was about 2.03 × 108 and 6.25 × 106, respectively. In addition, the micro

  4. Relativistic MHD simulations of core-collapse GRB jets: 3D instabilities and magnetic dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberg, Omer; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Relativistic jets are associated with extreme astrophysical phenomena, like the core collapse of massive stars in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and the accretion on to supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei. It is generally accepted that these jets are powered electromagnetically, by the magnetized rotation of a central compact object (black hole or neutron star). However, how the jets produce the observed emission and survive the propagation for many orders of magnitude in distance without being disrupted by current-driven instabilities is the subject of active debate. We carry out time-dependent 3D relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of relativistic, Poynting-flux-dominated jets. The jets are launched self-consistently by the rotation of a strongly magnetized central object. This determines the natural degree of azimuthal magnetic field winding, a crucial factor that controls jet stability. We find that the jets are susceptible to two types of instability: (i) a global, external kink mode that grows on long time-scales. It bodily twists the jet, reducing its propagation velocity. We show analytically that in flat density profiles, like the ones associated with galactic cores, the external mode grows and may stall the jet. In the steep profiles of stellar envelopes the external kink weakens as the jet propagates outward. (ii) a local, internal kink mode that grows over short time-scales and causes small-angle magnetic reconnection and conversion of about half of the jet electromagnetic energy flux into heat. We suggest that internal kink instability is the main dissipation mechanism responsible for powering GRB prompt emission.

  5. A remark on the Beale-Kato-Majda criterion for the 3D MHD equations with zero magnetic diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gala, Sadek; Ragusa, Maria Alessandra

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we show that a smooth solution of the 3D MHD equations with zero magnetic diffusivity in the whole space ℝ3 breaks down if and only if a certain norm of the magnetic field blows up at the same time.

  6. Ce 5d and Fe 3d magnetic profiles in CeH2/Fe multilayers probed by XRMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaouen, N.; Tonnerre, J. M.; Raoux, D.; Ortega, L.; Bontempi, E.; Münzenberg, M.; Felsch, W.; Suzuki, M.; Maruyama, H.; Dürr, H. A.; Dudzik, E.; van der Laan, G.

    The element and electronic shell specificities of X-ray resonant magnetic scattering have been used to investigate the magnetization of Ce 5d and Fe 3d states in [CeH2(19.6 Å)/Fe(25.4 Å)]*38 a multilayer. We show that the measurement of the magnetic contribution to the intensities reflected at low angles at the Ce L2 and Fe L2,3 edges allows us to investigate the profile of the Ce 5d and Fe 3d magnetic polarization. The Fe 3d polarization is found to be uniform across the Fe layer and the Ce 5d polarization appears to be restricted close to the interface with Fe.

  7. Accretion to magnetized stars through the Rayleigh-Taylor instability: global 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, A. K.; Romanova, M. M.

    2008-05-01

    We present results of 3D simulations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instabilities at the accretion disc-magnetosphere boundary. The instability is Rayleigh-Taylor, and develops for a fairly broad range of accretion rates and stellar rotation rates and magnetic fields. It manifests itself in the form of tall, thin tongues of plasma that penetrate the magnetosphere in the equatorial plane. The shape and number of the tongues changes with time on the inner disc dynamical time-scale. In contrast with funnel flows, which deposit matter mainly in the polar region, the tongues deposit matter much closer to the stellar equator. The instability appears for relatively small misalignment angles, Θ <~ 30°, between the star's rotation and magnetic axes, and is associated with higher accretion rates. The hotspots and light curves during accretion through instability are generally much more chaotic than during stable accretion. The unstable state of accretion has possible implications for quasi-periodic oscillations and intermittent pulsations from accreting systems, as well as planet migration.

  8. Cation Exchange in Dynamic 3D Porous Magnets: Improvement of the Physical Properties.

    PubMed

    Grancha, Thais; Acosta, Alvaro; Cano, Joan; Ferrando-Soria, Jesús; Seoane, Beatriz; Gascon, Jorge; Pasán, Jorge; Armentano, Donatella; Pardo, Emilio

    2015-11-16

    We report two novel three-dimensional porous coordination polymers (PCPs) of formulas Li4{Mn4[Cu2(Me3mpba)2]3}·68H2O (2) and K4{Mn4[Cu2(Me3mpba)2]3}·69H2O (3) obtained-via alkali cation exchange in a single-crystal to single-crystal process-from the earlier reported anionic manganese(II)-copper(II) PCP of formula Na4{Mn4[Cu2(Me3mpba)2]3}·60H2O (1) [Me3mpba(4-) = N,N'-2,4,6-trimethyl-1,3-phenylenebis(oxamate)]. This postsynthetic process succeeds where the direct synthesis in solution from the corresponding building blocks fails and affords significantly more robust PCPs with enhanced magnetic properties [long-range 3D magnetic ordering temperatures for the dehydrated phases (1'-3') of 2.0 (1'), 12.0 (2'), and 20.0 K (3')]. Changes in the adsorptive properties upon postsynthetic exchange suggest that the nature, electrostatic properties, mobility, and location of the cations within the framework are crucial for the enhanced structural stability. Overall, these results further confirm the potential of postsynthetic methods (including cation exchange) to obtain PCPs with novel or enhanced physical properties while maintaining unaltered their open-framework structures.

  9. Local and Global 3-D Effects in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, S.; Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Oz, E.; Yoo, J.; Daughton, W.; Roytershteyn, V.

    2009-11-01

    One of the key open questions in Magnetic Reconnection is the nature of the mechanism that governs the reconnection rate in real astrophysical and laboratory systems. Comparisons between fully kinetic 2-D simulations of the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) and experimental data show that the 2-D, collisionless expression for the electric field due to particle dynamics [1] does not match MRX data; related to this is a factor of 3-5 discrepancy in the layer width [2,3]. Adding collisions to the simulation leads to a broadening of the layer, but the level of collisionality present in MRX may not be high enough to resolve the discrepancy. Ongoing research on MRX explores the role of fluctuations and 3-D effects in the force balance. Significant toroidal asymmetries have been found, manifested by regions of high inductive electric field moving in the electron flow direction within the layer. Electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range [4] tend to occur in discharges with high local currents and a rapid local reconnection rate. The precise relation of these phenomena to fast reconnection is actively being investigated. [1] M. Hesse, et al., Phys. Plasmas, 6:1781 (1999). [2] Y. Ren, et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 082113 (2008). [3] S. Dorfman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 102107 (2008). [4] H. Ji, et al., Phys.Rev.Lett. 92 (2004) 115001. Supported by NDSEG, DOE, NASA, and NSF.

  10. Anisotropic Heat Transport in the Presence of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Eric; Kruger, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Heat transport in the H-mode tokamak edge is significantly modified by the presence of resonant magnetic perturbations. Application of collisional transport models to this problem ignores the fact that temperatures at the top of the edge pedestal may be several keV. Here, we compare the effective radial heat transport predicted by local (diffusive) and nonlocal (integral) forms for the parallel heat flux. Accurately predicting this effective radial heat transport becomes important when significant magnetic field line stochasticity is present, as in the case of overlapping magnetic perturbations. For such cases, the integral form for the parallel heat transport correctly assesses the effects of temperature perturbations all along the magnetic field line and yields predictions that vary substantially from the diffusive closure, which relies only on the local temperature gradient. Quantitative comparisons of effective radial transport are given for single helicity and multiple helicity magnetic perturbations in cylindrical and toroidal geometry, with emphasis given to a toroidal case with a narrow pedestal width and a high temperature at the top of the pedestal. E. D. Held, J. D. Callen, C. C. Hegna, C. R. Sovinec, T. A. Gianakon,and S. E. Kruger, Phys Plasmas, 11, 2419 (2004).

  11. Anisotropic Heat Transport in the Presence of Resonant Magnetic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, Scott; Held, Eric

    2008-11-01

    Heat transport in the H-mode tokamak edge is significantly modified by the presence of resonant magnetic perturbations. Application of collisional transport models to this problem ignores the fact that temperatures at the top of the edge pedestal may be several keV. Here, we compare the effective radial heat transport predicted by local (diffusive) and nonlocal [1] (integral) forms for the parallel heat flux. Accurately predicting this effective radial heat transport becomes important when significant magnetic field line stochasticity is present, as in the case of overlapping magnetic perturbations. For such cases, the integral form for the parallel heat transport correctly assesses the effects of temperature perturbations all along the magnetic field line and yields predictions that vary substantially from the diffusive closure, which relies only on the local temperature gradient. Quantitative comparisons of effective radial transport are given for single helicity and multiple helicity magnetic perturbations in cylindrical and toroidal geometry, with emphasis given to a toroidal case with a narrow pedestal width and a high temperature at the top of the pedestal. [0pt] [1] E. D. Held, J. D. Callen, C. C. Hegna, C. R. Sovinec, T. A. Gianakon, and S. E. Kruger, Phys Plasmas, 11, 2419 (2004).

  12. Properties of the prominence magnetic field and plasma distributions as obtained from 3D whole-prominence fine structure modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, S.; Mackay, D. H.

    2016-07-01

    Aims: We analyze distributions of the magnetic field strength and prominence plasma (temperature, pressure, plasma β, and mass) using the 3D whole-prominence fine structure model. Methods: The model combines a 3D magnetic field configuration of an entire prominence, obtained from non-linear force-free field simulations, with a detailed semi-empirically derived description of the prominence plasma. The plasma is located in magnetic dips in hydrostatic equilibrium and is distributed along multiple fine structures within the 3D magnetic model. Results: We show that in the modeled prominence, the variations of the magnetic field strength and its orientation are insignificant on scales comparable to the smallest dimensions of the observed prominence fine structures. We also show the ability of the 3D whole-prominence fine structure model to reveal the distribution of the prominence plasma with respect to its temperature within the prominence volume. This provides new insights into the composition of the prominence-corona transition region. We further demonstrate that the values of the plasma β are small throughout the majority of the modeled prominences when realistic photospheric magnetic flux distributions and prominence plasma parameters are assumed. While this is generally true, we also find that in the region with the deepest magnetic dips, the plasma β may increase towards unity. Finally, we show that the mass of the modeled prominence plasma is in good agreement with the mass of observed non-eruptive prominences.

  13. Relevance of 3D magnetic resonance imaging sequences in diagnosing basal subarachnoid neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Carrillo Mezo, Roger; Lara García, Javier; Arroyo, Mariana; Fleury, Agnès

    2015-12-01

    Imagenological diagnosis of subarachnoid neurocysticercosis is usually difficult when classical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences are used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the advantages of 3D MRI sequences (Fast Imaging Employing Steady-state Acquisition (FIESTA) and Spoiled Gradient Recalled Echo (SPGR)) with respect to classical sequences (Fluid Attenuation Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) and T1) in visualizing Taenia solium cyst in these locations. Forty-seven T. solium cysts located in the basal cisterns of the subarachnoid space were diagnosed in eighteen Mexican patients. A pre-treatment MRI was performed on all patients, and all four sequences (FIESTA, FLAIR, T1 SPGR, and T2) were evaluated independently by two neuroradiologists. The sensitivity of each sequence to detect the parasite membrane and scolex was evaluated, along with its capacity to detect differences in signal intensity between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and cysts. FIESTA sequences allowed the visualization of cyst membrane in 87.2% of the parasites evaluated, FLAIR in 38.3%, SPGR in 23.4%, and T2 in 17.0%. The superiority of FIESTA sequences over the other three imaging methods was statistically significant (P<0.001). Scolices were detected by FIESTA twice as much as the other sequences did, although this difference was not significant (P>0.05). Differences in signal intensity between CSF and parasite cysts were significant in FIESTA (P<0.0001), SPGR (P<0.0001), and FLAIR (P=0.005) sequences. For the first time, the usefulness of 3D MRI sequences to diagnose T. solium cysts located in the basal cisterns of the subarachnoid space was demonstrated. The routine use of these sequences could favor an earlier diagnosis and greatly improve the prognosis of patients affected by this severe form of the disease.

  14. Electronic structure and local magnetism of 3d-5d impurity substituted CeFe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rakesh; Das, G. P.; Srivastava, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    We present here a systematic first-principles study of electronic structure and local magnetic properties of Ce[Fe0.75M0.25]2 compounds, where M is a 3d, 4d or 5d transition or post-transition element, using the generalized gradient approximation of the density functional theory. The d-f band hybridizations existing in CeFe2 get modified by the impurity M in an orderly manner across a period for each impurity series: the hybridization is strongest for the Mn group impurity in the period and gets diminished on either side of it. The weakening of the d-f hybridization strength is also associated with a relative localization of the Ce 4f states with respect to the delocalized 4f states in CeFe2. The above effects are most prominent for 3d impurity series, while for 4d and 5d impurities, the hybridizations and relocalizations are relatively weak due primarily to the relatively extended nature of 4d and 5d wavefunctions. The Ce local moment is found to decrease from the CeFe2 value in proportion to the strength of relocalization, thus following almost the same orderly trend as obeyed by the d-f hybridization. Further, depending on the way the spin-up and spin-down densities of states of an impurity shift relative to the Fermi energy, the impurity local moments are highest for Mn or Fe group, reduce on either side, become zero for Ni to Ga, and are small but negative for V and Ti. The Ce hyperfine field is found to follow the M local moment in a linear fashion, and vice-versa.

  15. Magnetic field induced controllable self-assembly of maghemite nanocrystals: From 3D arrays to 1D nanochains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yan; Chen, Qianwang; Chen, Rongsheng

    2015-08-01

    A hydrothermal process has been used to synthesize walnut-like maghemite superstructures which can be further self-assembled in a controllable manner into ordered three-dimensional (3D) architectures and one-dimensional (1D) nanochains in the presence of different external magnetic field. The assembly behavior of the maghemite nanoparticles isclosely related to the van der Waals interactions and external-field-induced magnetic dipole interactions. The magnetic properties of these nanostructures are also investigated.

  16. Tokamak magnetic islands in the presence of nonaxisymmetric perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Reiman, A.H.

    1991-07-01

    The effects of a small, externally imposed, nonaxisymmetric magnetic field perturbation on magnetic islands are studied analytically, assuming zero {beta}, tokamak ordering, and narrow islands. For the tearing stable case, the conditions under which the self-consistent plasma response is self-healing or amplifying are elucidated. For the tearing unstable case, the quasilinear theory of tearing modes is extended to a description of locked modes. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  17. Helical modulation of the electrostatic plasma potential due to edge magnetic islands induced by resonant magnetic perturbation fields at TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaccio, G. Spizzo, G.; Schmitz, O. Frerichs, H.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Evans, T. E.; White, R. B.

    2015-10-15

    The electrostatic response of the edge plasma to a magnetic island induced by resonant magnetic perturbations to the plasma edge of the circular limiter tokamak TEXTOR is analyzed. Measurements of plasma potential are interpreted by simulations with the Hamiltonian guiding center code ORBIT. We find a strong correlation between the magnetic field topology and the poloidal modulation of the measured plasma potential. The ion and electron drifts yield a predominantly electron driven radial diffusion when approaching the island X-point while ion diffusivities are generally an order of magnitude smaller. This causes a strong radial electric field structure pointing outward from the island O-point. The good agreement found between measured and modeled plasma potential connected to the enhanced radial particle diffusivities supports that a magnetic island in the edge of a tokamak plasma can act as convective cell. We show in detail that the particular, non-ambipolar drifts of electrons and ions in a 3D magnetic topology account for these effects. An analytical model for the plasma potential is implemented in the code ORBIT, and analyses of ion and electron radial diffusion show that both ion- and electron-dominated transport regimes can exist, which are known as ion and electron root solutions in stellarators. This finding and comparison with reversed field pinch studies and stellarator literature suggest that the role of magnetic islands as convective cells and hence as major radial particle transport drivers could be a generic mechanism in 3D plasma boundary layers.

  18. Ising-like chain magnetism, Arrhenius magnetic relaxation, and case against 3D magnetic ordering in β-manganese phthalocyanine (C32H16MnN8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengjun; Seehra, Mohindar S.

    2016-04-01

    Previous magnetic studies in the organic semiconductor β-manganese phthalocyanine (β-MnPc) have reported it to be a canted ferromagnet below T C  ≈  8.6 K. However, the recent result of the lack of a λ-type anomaly in the specific heat versus temperature data near the quoted T C has questioned the presence of long-range 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic ordering in this system. In this paper, detailed measurements and analysis of the temperature (2 K-300 K) and magnetic field (up to 90 kOe) dependence of the dc and ac magnetic susceptibilities in a powder sample of β-MnPc leads us to conclude that 3D long-range magnetic ordering is absent in this material. This is supported by the Arrott plots and the lack of a peak in the ac susceptibilities, χ‧ and χ″, near the quoted T C. Instead, the system can be best described as an Ising-like chain magnet with Arrhenius relaxation of the magnetization governed by an intra-layer ferromagnetic exchange constant J/k B  =  2.6 K and the single ion anisotropy energy parameter |D|/k B  =  8.3 K. The absence of 3D long range order is consistent with the measured \\mid D\\mid   >  J.

  19. Effect of rosiglitazone on progression of atherosclerosis: insights using 3D carotid cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Anitha; Yee, Michael S; Chan, Cheuk F; Crowe, Lindsey A; Keenan, Niall G; Johnston, Desmond G; Pennell, Dudley J

    2009-01-01

    Background There is recent evidence suggesting that rosiglitazone increases death from cardiovascular causes. We investigated the direct effect of this drug on atheroma using 3D carotid cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Results A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study was performed to evaluate the effect of rosiglitazone treatment on carotid atherosclerosis in subjects with type 2 diabetes and coexisting vascular disease or hypertension. The primary endpoint of the study was the change from baseline to 52 weeks of carotid arterial wall volume, reflecting plaque burden, as measured by carotid cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Rosiglitazone or placebo was allocated to 28 and 29 patients respectively. Patients were managed to have equivalent glycemic control over the study period, but in fact the rosiglitazone group lowered their HbA1c by 0.88% relative to placebo (P < 0.001). Most patients received a statin or fibrate as lipid control medication (rosiglitazone 78%, controls 83%). Data are presented as mean ± SD. At baseline, the carotid arterial wall volume in the placebo group was 1146 ± 550 mm3 and in the rosiglitazone group was 1354 ± 532 mm3. After 52 weeks, the respective volumes were 1134 ± 523 mm3 and 1348 ± 531 mm3. These changes (-12.1 mm3 and -5.7 mm3 in the placebo and rosiglitazone groups, respectively) were not statistically significant between groups (P = 0.57). Conclusion Treatment with rosiglitazone over 1 year had no effect on progression of carotid atheroma in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to placebo. PMID:19635160

  20. 4D Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry in a 3D printed brain aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amili, Omid; Schiavazzi, Daniele; Coletti, Filippo

    2016-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysms are of great clinical importance. It is believed that hemodynamics play a critical role in the development, growth, and rupture of brain arteries with such condition. The flow structure in the aneurysm sac is complex, unsteady, and three-dimensional. Therefore the time-resolved measurement of the three-dimensional three-component velocity field is crucial to predict the clinical outcome. In this study magnetic resonance velocimetry is used to assess the fluid dynamics inside a 3D printed model of a giant intracranial aneurysm. We reach sub-millimeter resolution while resolving sixteen instances within the cardiac cycle. The physiological flow waveform is imposed using an in-house built pump in a flow circuit where the cardiovascular impedance is matched. The flow evolution over time is reconstructed in detail. The complex flow structure is characterized by vortical and helical motions that reside in the aneurysm for most part of the cycle. The 4D pressured distribution is also reconstructed from the velocity field. The present case study was used in a previous CFD challenge, therefore these results may provide useful experimental comparison for simulations performed by other research groups.

  1. Connecting Global Measures of 3D Magnetic Reconnection to Local Kinetic Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Daughton, William Scott

    2015-07-16

    After giving the motivation for the work, slides present the topic under the following headings: Description of LAPD experiment; Actual simulation setup; Simple kinetic theory of ined-tied tearing; Diagnostics to characterizing 3D reconnection; Example #1 - short-tied system; and Example #2 - long line-tied system. Colorful simulations are shown for quasipotential vs field line exponentiation, field line integrated Ohms Law, and correlation with agyrotopy & energy conversion for example #1; and evolution of current density for largest case, field exponentiation vs quasi-potential, and time evolution of magnetic field lines for example #2. To satisfy line-tied boundary conditions, there is need for superposition of oblique modes--the simple two-mode approximation works surprisingly well. For force-free layers with bg >1, the fastest growing periodic modes are oblique with kxλ ~0.5. This implies a minimum length of Ly > 2πλbg. There are strong correlations between σ → Ξ → A0e (observable with spacecraft). Electron pressure tensor is the dominant non-ideal term.

  2. Craniosynostosis: prenatal diagnosis by 2D/3D ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Helfer, Talita Micheletti; Peixoto, Alberto Borges; Tonni, Gabriele; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2016-09-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the process of premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. It is a common condition that occurs in about 1 to 2,000 live births. Craniosynostosis may be classified in primary or secondary. It is also classified as nonsyndromic or syndromic. According to suture commitment, craniosynostosis may affect a single suture or multiple sutures. There is a wide range of syndromes involving craniosynostosis and the most common are Apert, Pffeifer, Crouzon, Shaethre-Chotzen and Muenke syndromes. The underlying etiology of nonsyndromic craniosynostosis is unknown. Mutations in the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling pathway play a crucial role in the etiology of craniosynostosis syndromes. Prenatal ultrasound`s detection rate of craniosynostosis is low. Nowadays, different methods can be applied for prenatal diagnosis of craniosynostosis, such as two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) scan and, finally, molecular diagnosis. The presence of craniosynostosis may affect the birthing process. Fetuses with craniosynostosis also have higher rates of perinatal complications. In order to avoid the risks of untreated craniosynostosis, children are usually treated surgically soon after postnatal diagnosis.

  3. Synthesis, characterization, magnetic and electrochemical properties of a new 3D hexa-copper-substituted germanotungstate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanzhou; Luo, Jie; Zhang, Yanting; Zhao, Junwei; Chen, Lijuan; Ma, Pengtao; Niu, Jingyang

    2013-09-01

    An inorganic-organic hybrid hexa-copper-substituted germanotungstate Na2[Cu(dap)2]2[Cu(dap)2] {[Cu6(H2O)2(dap)2][B-α-GeW9O34]2}·4H2O (1) (dap=1,2-diaminopropane) has been hydrothermally prepared and characterized by elemental analyses, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) analyses, IR spectra, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. 1 displays the six-connected 3D network with the long topological (O'Keefe) vertex symbol is 4·4·64·4·4·4·4·64·4·4·4·64·4·4·4 and the short vertex (Schläfli) symbol of 41263. Magnetic measurements indicate that there are the overall ferromagnetic exchange interactions in the belt-like hexa-CuII cluster in 1. Furthermore, the electrochemical behavior and electrocatalysis of 1 modified carbon paste electrode (1-CPE) have been studied. The reductions of nitrite, bromate and hydrogen peroxide are principally mediated by the WVI-based wave.

  4. Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T. E.

    2015-11-13

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δ$b_⊥^{ext}$ ≈ $10^{-4}$ → $10^{-3}$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.

  5. Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices

    DOE PAGES

    Evans, T. E.

    2015-11-13

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δmore » $$b_⊥^{ext}$$ ≈ $$10^{-4}$$ → $$10^{-3}$$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.« less

  6. Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δ b\\bot\\text{ext}≈ {{10}-4}\\to {{10}-3}~\\text{T} ). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes (ELMs). At the same time, theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design (Loarte et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 033007). This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.

  7. A review of 3D first-pass, whole-heart, myocardial perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Fair, Merlin J; Gatehouse, Peter D; DiBella, Edward V R; Firmin, David N

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive review is undertaken of the methods available for 3D whole-heart first-pass perfusion (FPP) and their application to date, with particular focus on possible acceleration techniques. Following a summary of the parameters typically desired of 3D FPP methods, the review explains the mechanisms of key acceleration techniques and their potential use in FPP for attaining 3D acquisitions. The mechanisms include rapid sequences, non-Cartesian k-space trajectories, reduced k-space acquisitions, parallel imaging reconstructions and compressed sensing. An attempt is made to explain, rather than simply state, the varying methods with the hope that it will give an appreciation of the different components making up a 3D FPP protocol. Basic estimates demonstrating the required total acceleration factors in typical 3D FPP cases are included, providing context for the extent that each acceleration method can contribute to the required imaging speed, as well as potential limitations in present 3D FPP literature. Although many 3D FPP methods are too early in development for the type of clinical trials required to show any clear benefit over current 2D FPP methods, the review includes the small but growing quantity of clinical research work already using 3D FPP, alongside the more technical work. Broader challenges concerning FPP such as quantitative analysis are not covered, but challenges with particular impact on 3D FPP methods, particularly with regards to motion effects, are discussed along with anticipated future work in the field.

  8. Synthesis and Application of Novel 3D Magnetic Chlorogenic Acid Imprinted Polymers Based on a Graphene-Carbon Nanotube Composite.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Yin, Yuli; Lv, Piaopiao; Zhang, Zhaohui; Wang, Jing; Long, Fang

    2016-04-20

    A novel three-dimensional (3D) magnetic chlorogenic acid (CGA) imprinted polymer (MMIP) was prepared with novel carbon hybrid nanocomposite as the carrier, chlorogenic acid as the template molecule, and methacrylic acid as the functional monomer. The 3D MMIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, vibrating sample magnetometer, and UV spectrometry in detail. The results showed that the imprinted layer was attached successfully on the surface of a 3D magnetic carbon hybrid nanocomposite. The adsorption performance of the 3D MMIPs was investigated, and the results showed that the 3D MMIPs exhibited high adsorption capacity and fast adsorption rate toward CGA with a maximum adsorption capacity of 10.88 mg g(-1). The extraction conditions involving washing solvent, the pH of eluent solvent, elution volume, and desorption time were also investigated in detail. Combined with high-performance liquid chromatography, the 3D MMIPs have been applied to successfully extract CGA from Eucommia leaf extract samples.

  9. Seven 3d-4f coordination polymers of macrocyclic oxamide with polycarboxylates: Syntheses, crystal structures and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Na; Sun, Ya-Qiu; Zheng, Yan-Feng; Xu, Yan-Yan; Gao, Dong-Zhao; Zhang, Guo-Ying

    2016-11-01

    Seven new 3d-4f heterometallic coordination polymers, [Ln(CuL)2(Hbtca)(btca)(H2O)]·2H2O (Ln = TbIII1, PrIII2, SmIII3, EuIII4, YbIII5), [Nd(NiL)(nip)(Rnip)]·0·25H2O·0.25CH3OH (R= 0.6CH3, 0.4H) 6 and [Nd2(NiL)(nip)3(H2O)]·2H2O 7(CuL or NiL, H2L = 2, 3-dioxo-5, 6, 14, 15-dibenzo-1, 4, 8, 12-tetraazacyclo-pentadeca-7, 13-dien; H2btca = benzotriazole-5-carboxylic acid; H2nip = 5-nitroisophthalic acid) have been synthesized by a solvothermal method and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Complexes 1-5 exhibit a double-strand meso-helical chain structures formed by [LnIIICuII2] units via the oxamide and benzotriazole-5-carboxylate bridges, while complex 6 exhibits a four-strand meso-helical chain formed by NdNi unit via the oxamide and 5-nitroisophthalate bridges. Complex 7 consists of a 2D layer framework formed by four-strand meso-helical chain via the nip2- bridges. Moreover, the magnetic properties of them were investigated, and the best-fit analysis of χMT versus T show that the anisotropic contribution of Ln(III) ions (arising from the spin-orbit coupling or the crystal field perturbation) dominates (weak exchange limit) in these complexes(for 3, λ = 214.6 cm-1, zj' = -0.33 cm-1, gav = 1.94; for 5, Δ = 6.98 cm-1, zj' = 1.53 cm-1, gav = 1.85).

  10. Solitary perturbations in the steep boundary of magnetized toroidal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. E.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Kim, M. H.; Choi, M.; Lee, J.; Kim, M.; Park, H. K.; Bak, J. G.; Ko, W. H.; Park, Y. S.

    2017-03-01

    Solitary perturbations (SPs) localized both poloidally and radially are detected within ~100 μs before the partial collapse of the high pressure gradient boundary region (called pedestal) of magnetized toroidal plasma in the KSTAR tokamak device. The SP develops with a low toroidal mode number (typically unity) in the pedestal ingrained with quasi-stable edge-localized mode (QSM) which commonly appears during the inter-collapse period. The SPs have smaller mode pitch and different (often opposite) rotation velocity compared to the QSMs. Similar solitary perturbations are also frequently observed before the onset of complete pedestal collapse, suggesting a strong connection between the SP generation and the pedestal collapse.

  11. Advancement of 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Using GRAPPA Reconstruction on a 3D Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevenger, Tony

    The overall objective of this research is to improve currently available metabolic imaging techniques for clinical use in monitoring and predicting treatment response to radiation therapy in liver cancer. Liver metabolism correlates with inflammatory and neoplastic liver diseases, which alter the intracellular concentration of phosphorus- 31 (31P) metabolites [1]. It is assumed that such metabolic changes occur prior to physical changes of the tissue. Therefore, information on regional changes of 31P metabolites in the liver, obtained by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) [1,2], can help in diagnosis and follow-up of various liver diseases. Specifically, there appears to be an immediate need of this technology for both the assessment of tumor response in patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) [3--5], as well as assessment of radiation toxicity, which can result in worsening liver dysfunction [6]. Pilot data from our lab has shown that 31P MRSI has the potential to identify treatment response five months sooner than conventional methods [7], and to assess the biological response of liver tissue to radiation 24 hours post radiation therapy [8]. While this data is very promising, commonly occurring drawbacks for 31P MRSI are patient discomfort due to long scan times and prone positioning within the scanner, as well as reduced data quality due to patient motion and respiration. To further advance the full potential of 31P MRSI as a clinical diagnostic tool in the management of liver cancer, this PhD research project had the following aims: I) Reduce the long acquisition time of 3D 31P MRS by formulating and imple- menting an appropriate GRAPPA undersampling scheme and reconstruction on a clinical MRI scanner II) Testing and quantitative validation of GRAPPA reconstruction on 3D 31P MRSI on developmental phantoms and healthy volunteers At completion, this work should considerably advance 31P MRSI

  12. Breast Density Analysis with Automated Whole-Breast Ultrasound: Comparison with 3-D Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeon-Hor; Lee, Yan-Wei; Chan, Si-Wa; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a semi-automatic breast segmentation method was proposed on the basis of the rib shadow to extract breast regions from 3-D automated whole-breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. The density results were correlated with breast density values acquired with 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI images of 46 breasts were collected from 23 women without a history of breast disease. Each subject also underwent ABUS. We used Otsu's thresholding method on ABUS images to obtain local rib shadow information, which was combined with the global rib shadow information (extracted from all slice projections) and integrated with the anatomy's breast tissue structure to determine the chest wall line. The fuzzy C-means classifier was used to extract the fibroglandular tissues from the acquired images. Whole-breast volume (WBV) and breast percentage density (BPD) were calculated in both modalities. Linear regression was used to compute the correlation of density results between the two modalities. The consistency of density measurement was also analyzed on the basis of intra- and inter-operator variation. There was a high correlation of density results between MRI and ABUS (R(2) = 0.798 for WBV, R(2) = 0.825 for PBD). The mean WBV from ABUS images was slightly smaller than the mean WBV from MR images (MRI: 342.24 ± 128.08 cm(3), ABUS: 325.47 ± 136.16 cm(3), p < 0.05). In addition, the BPD calculated from MR images was smaller than the BPD from ABUS images (MRI: 24.71 ± 15.16%, ABUS: 28.90 ± 17.73%, p < 0.05). The intra-operator and inter-operator variant analysis results indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in breast density measurement variation between the two modalities. Our results revealed a high correlation in WBV and BPD between MRI and ABUS. Our study suggests that ABUS provides breast density information useful in the assessment of breast health.

  13. 3D Equilibrium Reconstructions in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.; Ferraro, N. W.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; King, J. D.; Hirshman, H. P.; Lazarus, E. A.; Sontag, A. C.; Hanson, J.; Trevisan, G.

    2013-10-01

    Accurate and efficient 3D equilibrium reconstruction is needed in tokamaks for study of 3D magnetic field effects on experimentally reconstructed equilibrium and for analysis of MHD stability experiments with externally imposed magnetic perturbations. A large number of new magnetic probes have been recently installed in DIII-D to improve 3D equilibrium measurements and to facilitate 3D reconstructions. The V3FIT code has been in use in DIII-D to support 3D reconstruction and the new magnetic diagnostic design. V3FIT is based on the 3D equilibrium code VMEC that assumes nested magnetic surfaces. V3FIT uses a pseudo-Newton least-square algorithm to search for the solution vector. In parallel, the EFIT equilibrium reconstruction code is being extended to allow for 3D effects using a perturbation approach based on an expansion of the MHD equations. EFIT uses the cylindrical coordinate system and can include the magnetic island and stochastic effects. Algorithms are being developed to allow EFIT to reconstruct 3D perturbed equilibria directly making use of plasma response to 3D perturbations from the GATO, MARS-F, or M3D-C1 MHD codes. DIII-D 3D reconstruction examples using EFIT and V3FIT and the new 3D magnetic data will be presented. Work supported in part by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-95ER54309 and DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  14. ORBXYZ: a 3D single-particle orbit code for following charged-particle trajectories in equilibrium magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.V.; Cohen, R.H.; Ferguson, J.R.; Johnston, B.M.; Sharp, C.B.; Willmann, P.A.

    1981-06-30

    The single particle orbit code, TIBRO, has been modified extensively to improve the interpolation methods used and to allow use of vector potential fields in the simulation of charged particle orbits on a 3D domain. A 3D cubic B-spline algorithm is used to generate spline coefficients used in the interpolation. Smooth and accurate field representations are obtained. When vector potential fields are used, the 3D cubic spline interpolation formula analytically generates the magnetic field used to push the particles. This field has del.BETA = 0 to computer roundoff. When magnetic induction is used the interpolation allows del.BETA does not equal 0, which can lead to significant nonphysical results. Presently the code assumes quadrupole symmetry, but this is not an essential feature of the code and could be easily removed for other applications. Many details pertaining to this code are given on microfiche accompanying this report.

  15. ORBXYZ: A 3D single-particle orbit code for following charged particle trajectories in equilibrium magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. V.; Cohen, R. H.; Ferguson, J. R.; Johnston, B. M.; Sharp, C. B.; Willmann, P. A.

    1981-06-01

    The single particle orbit code, TIBRO, was modified extensively to improve the interpolation methods used and to allow use of vector potential fields in the simulation of charged particle orbits on a 3D domain. A 3D cubic B-spline algorithm is used to generate spline coefficients used in the interpolation. Smooth and accurate field representations are obtained. When vector potential fields are used, the 3D cubic spline interpolation formula analytically generates the magnetic field used to push the particles. This field has del.BETA = 0 to computer roundoff. When magnetic induction is used the interpolation allows del.BETA does not equal 0, which can lead to significant nonphysical results. Presently the code assumes quadrupole symmetry, but this is not an essential feature of the code and could be easily removed for other applications.

  16. A new approach for magnetic curves in 3D Riemannian manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Bozkurt, Zehra Gök, Ismail Yaylı, Yusuf Ekmekci, F. Nejat

    2014-05-15

    A magnetic field is defined by the property that its divergence is zero in a three-dimensional oriented Riemannian manifold. Each magnetic field generates a magnetic flow whose trajectories are curves called as magnetic curves. In this paper, we give a new variational approach to study the magnetic flow associated with the Killing magnetic field in a three-dimensional oriented Riemann manifold, (M{sup 3}, g). And then, we investigate the trajectories of the magnetic fields called as N-magnetic and B-magnetic curves.

  17. Effective pinning energy landscape perturbations for propagating magnetic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burn, D. M.; Atkinson, D.

    2016-10-01

    The interaction between a magnetic domain wall and a pinning site is explored in a planar nanowire using micromagnetics to reveal perturbations of the pinning energetics for propagating domain walls. Numerical simulations in the high damping ’quasi-static’ and low damping ’dynamic’ regimes are compared and show clear differences in de-pinning fields, indicating that dynamical micromagnetic models, which incorporate precessionally limited magnetization processes, are needed to understand domain wall pinning. Differences in the micromagnetic domain wall structure strongly influence the pinning and show periodic behaviour with increasing applied field associated with Walker breakdown. In the propagating regime pinning is complicated.

  18. Effective pinning energy landscape perturbations for propagating magnetic domain walls

    PubMed Central

    Burn, D. M.; Atkinson, D.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between a magnetic domain wall and a pinning site is explored in a planar nanowire using micromagnetics to reveal perturbations of the pinning energetics for propagating domain walls. Numerical simulations in the high damping ’quasi-static’ and low damping ’dynamic’ regimes are compared and show clear differences in de-pinning fields, indicating that dynamical micromagnetic models, which incorporate precessionally limited magnetization processes, are needed to understand domain wall pinning. Differences in the micromagnetic domain wall structure strongly influence the pinning and show periodic behaviour with increasing applied field associated with Walker breakdown. In the propagating regime pinning is complicated. PMID:27694953

  19. Effective pinning energy landscape perturbations for propagating magnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Burn, D M; Atkinson, D

    2016-10-03

    The interaction between a magnetic domain wall and a pinning site is explored in a planar nanowire using micromagnetics to reveal perturbations of the pinning energetics for propagating domain walls. Numerical simulations in the high damping 'quasi-static' and low damping 'dynamic' regimes are compared and show clear differences in de-pinning fields, indicating that dynamical micromagnetic models, which incorporate precessionally limited magnetization processes, are needed to understand domain wall pinning. Differences in the micromagnetic domain wall structure strongly influence the pinning and show periodic behaviour with increasing applied field associated with Walker breakdown. In the propagating regime pinning is complicated.

  20. 3D Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Divin, A. V.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Unlike the Earth and Mercury, our Moon has no global magnetic field and is therefore not shielded from the impinging solar wind by a magnetosphere. However, lunar magnetic field measurements made by the Apollo missions provided direct evidence that the Moon has regions of small-scale crustal magnetic fields, ranging up to a few 100km in scale size with surface magnetic field strengths up to hundreds of nanoTeslas. More recently, the Lunar Prospector spacecraft has provided high-resolution observations allowing to construct magnetic field maps of the entire Moon, confirming the earlier results from Apollo, but also showing that the lunar plasma environment is much richer than earlier believed. Typically the small-scale magnetic fields are non-dipolar and rather tiny compared to the lunar radius and mainly clustered on the far side of the moon. Using iPic3D we present the first 3D fully kinetic and electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies. We study the behaviour of a dipole model with variable surface magnetic field strength under changing solar wind conditions and confirm that lunar crustal magnetic fields may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind and form a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by MHD and hybrid simulations and spacecraft observations. 3D-PIC simulations reveal to be very helpful to analyze the diversion/braking of the particle flux and the characteristics of the resulting particles accumulation. The particle flux to the surface is significantly reduced at the magnetic anomaly, surrounded by a region of enhanced density due to the magnetic mirror effect. Second, the ability of iPic3D to resolve all plasma components (heavy ions, protons and electrons) allows to discuss in detail the electron physics leading to the highly non-adiabatic interactions expected as well as the implications for solar wind shielding of the lunar surface, depending on the scale size (solar wind protons

  1. 3D non-linear inversion of magnetic anomalies caused by prismatic bodies using differential evolution algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkaya, Çağlayan; Ekinci, Yunus Levent; Göktürkler, Gökhan; Turan, Seçil

    2017-01-01

    3D non-linear inversion of total field magnetic anomalies caused by vertical-sided prismatic bodies has been achieved by differential evolution (DE), which is one of the population-based evolutionary algorithms. We have demonstrated the efficiency of the algorithm on both synthetic and field magnetic anomalies by estimating horizontal distances from the origin in both north and east directions, depths to the top and bottom of the bodies, inclination and declination angles of the magnetization, and intensity of magnetization of the causative bodies. In the synthetic anomaly case, we have considered both noise-free and noisy data sets due to two vertical-sided prismatic bodies in a non-magnetic medium. For the field case, airborne magnetic anomalies originated from intrusive granitoids at the eastern part of the Biga Peninsula (NW Turkey) which is composed of various kinds of sedimentary, metamorphic and igneous rocks, have been inverted and interpreted. Since the granitoids are the outcropped rocks in the field, the estimations for the top depths of two prisms representing the magnetic bodies were excluded during inversion studies. Estimated bottom depths are in good agreement with the ones obtained by a different approach based on 3D modelling of pseudogravity anomalies. Accuracy of the estimated parameters from both cases has been also investigated via probability density functions. Based on the tests in the present study, it can be concluded that DE is a useful tool for the parameter estimation of source bodies using magnetic anomalies.

  2. Screening of external magnetic perturbation fields due to sheared plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Liang, Y.; Wang, N.; Luan, Q.; Zhong, F. C.; Liu, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Within the single fluid resistive magnetohydrodynamic model, systematic toroidal modelling efforts are devoted to investigate the plasma response induced screening of the applied external 3D magnetic field perturbations in the presence of sheared toroidal flow. One particular issue of interest is addressed, when the local flow speed approaches zero at the perturbation rational surface inside the plasma. Subtle screening physics, associated with the favourable averaged toroidal curvature effect (the GGJ effect (Glasser et al 1975 Phys. Fluids 7 875)), is found to play an essential role during slow flow near the rational surface by enhancing the screening at reduced flow. A strong cancellation effect between different terms of Ohm’s law is discovered, leading to different screening physics in the GGJ regime, as compared to that of conventional screening of the typical resistive-inertial regime occurring at faster flow. These modelling results may be applicable to interpret certain mode locking experiments, as well as type-I edge localized mode suppression experiments, with resonant magnetic field perturbations being applied to tokamak plasmas at low input toroidal torque.

  3. A supervisor for the successive 3D computations of magnetic, mechanical and acoustic quantities in power oil inductors and transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Reyne, G.; Magnin, H.; Berliat, G.; Clerc, C.

    1994-09-01

    A supervisor has been developed so as to allow successive 3D computations of different quantities by different softwares on the same physical problem. Noise of a given power oil transformer can be deduced from the surface vibrations of the tank. These vibrations are obtained through a mechanic computation whose Inputs are the electromagnetic forces provided . by an electromagnetic computation. Magnetic, mechanic and acoustic experimental data are compared with the results of the 3D computations. Stress Is put on the main characteristics of the supervisor such as the transfer of a given quantity from one mesh to the other.

  4. 3D Seismic and Magnetic characterization of the Borax Lake Hydrothermal System in the Alvord Desert, southeastern Oregon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, S.; Bradford, J.; Lyle, M.; Routh, P.; Liberty, L.; Donaldson, P.

    2004-05-01

    As part of an interdisciplinary project aiming to study the link between the physical characteristics of hydrothermal systems and biota that occupy those systems, we are conducting a detailed geophysical characterization of an active hydrothermal system. The Borax Lake Hydrothermal System (BLHS), consisting of Borax Lake and the surrounding hot springs. BLHS is located near the center of the Alvord Basin in southeastern Oregon. The Alvord Basin is a north-south trending graben in the Northern Great Basin bounded by the Steens Mountains to the west and the Trout Creek Mountains to the east. We conducted a 2D seismic survey to characterize the geologic structure of the basin, a high-resolution 3D seismic survey to characterize the geologic structure of the BLHS, and a high-resolution 3D magnetic survey to characterize any lineaments in the bedrock that might control fluid flow in the BLHS. Previous results from the 2D seismic survey show a mid-basin basement high aligned approximately with the hot springs. In this study we present the results from the high-resolution 3D seismic and magnetic survey of the BLHS. We acquired the 3D seismic data using an SKS rifle and 240 channel recording system. The seismic survey covers approximately 90,000 sq. m with a maximum inline offset aperture of 225 m, crossline aperture of 75 m, and 360 degree azimuthal coverage. The coincidental magnetic survey was collected using a Geometrics 858G cesium vapor magnetometer. We designed both surveys to span nearly 100 active hydrothermal springs, including an approximately 50 m stepover in the trend of the surface expression of the hot springs. After preliminary processing, the 3D seismic data show continuous reflections up to 300 ms (~ 480 m). The initial interpretation of features seen in the 3D data cube include: normal faults dipping to the east and west, near-surface disturbances that are consistent with the trend of the hot springs, and significant near surface velocity anomalies

  5. Analytical study of acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Arun; Jat, K. L.

    2015-07-31

    An analytical study of acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma has been reported. In the present analytical investigation, the lattice displacement, acousto-optical polarization, susceptibility, acousto-optical gain constant arising due to the induced nonlinear current density and acousto-optical process are deduced in an acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma using the hydrodynamical model of plasma and coupled mode scheme. The influence of wave number and magnetic field has been explored. The analysis has been applied to centrosymmetric crystal. Numerical estimates are made for n-type InSb crystal duly irradiated by a frequency doubled 10.6 µm CO{sub 2} laser. It is found that lattice displacement, susceptibility and acousto-optical gain increase linearly with incident wave number and applied dc magnetic field, while decrease with scattering angle. The gain also increases with electric amplitude of incident laser beam. Results are found to be well in agreement with available literature.

  6. 3-D residual eddy current field characterisation: applied to diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kieran; Daducci, Alessandro; Kickler, Nils; Lazeyras, Francois; Gruetter, Rolf; Feiweier, Thorsten; Krueger, Gunnar

    2013-08-01

    Clinical use of the Stejskal-Tanner diffusion weighted images is hampered by the geometric distortions that result from the large residual 3-D eddy current field induced. In this work, we aimed to predict, using linear response theory, the residual 3-D eddy current field required for geometric distortion correction based on phantom eddy current field measurements. The predicted 3-D eddy current field induced by the diffusion-weighting gradients was able to reduce the root mean square error of the residual eddy current field to ~1 Hz. The model's performance was tested on diffusion weighted images of four normal volunteers, following distortion correction, the quality of the Stejskal-Tanner diffusion-weighted images was found to have comparable quality to image registration based corrections (FSL) at low b-values. Unlike registration techniques the correction was not hindered by low SNR at high b-values, and results in improved image quality relative to FSL. Characterization of the 3-D eddy current field with linear response theory enables the prediction of the 3-D eddy current field required to correct eddy current induced geometric distortions for a wide range of clinical and high b-value protocols.

  7. Inductively Driven, 3D Liner Compression of a Magnetized Plasma to Megabar Energy Densities

    SciTech Connect

    Slough, John

    2015-02-01

    modules. The additional energy and switching capability proposed will thus provide for optimal utilization of the liner energy. The following tasks were outlined for the three year effort: (1) Design and assemble the foil liner compression test structure and chamber including the compression bank and test foils [Year 1]. (2) Perform foil liner compression experiments and obtain performance data over a range on liner dimensions and bank parameters [Year 2]. (3) Carry out compression experiments of the FRC plasma to Megagauss fields and measure key fusion parameters [Year 3]. (4) Develop numerical codes and analyze experimental results, and determine the physics and scaling for future work [Year 1-3]. The principle task of the project was to design and assemble the foil liner FRC formation chamber, the full compression test structure and chamber including the compression bank. This task was completed successfully. The second task was to test foils in the test facility constructed in year one and characterize the performance obtained from liner compression. These experimental measurements were then compared with analytical predictions, and numerical code results. The liner testing was completed and compared with both the analytical results as well as the code work performed with the 3D structural dynamics package of ANSYS Metaphysics®. This code is capable of modeling the dynamic behavior of materials well into the non-linear regime (e.g. a bullet hit plate glass). The liner dynamic behavior was found to be remarkably close to that predicted by the 3D structural dynamics results. Incorporating a code that can also include the magnetics and plasma physics has also made significant progress at the UW. The remaining test bed construction and assembly task is was completed, and the FRC formation and merging experiments were carried out as planned. The liner compression of the FRC to Megagauss fields was not performed due to not obtaining a sufficiently long lived FRC during the

  8. Microfluidic Fabrication of Bio-Inspired Microfibers with Controllable Magnetic Spindle-Knots for 3D Assembly and Water Collection.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Heng; Wang, Wei; Liu, Ying-Mei; Jiang, Ming-Yue; Wu, Fang; Deng, Ke; Liu, Zhuang; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2015-08-12

    A simple and flexible approach is developed for controllable fabrication of spider-silk-like microfibers with tunable magnetic spindle-knots from biocompatible calcium alginate for controlled 3D assembly and water collection. Liquid jet templates with volatile oil drops containing magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles are generated from microfluidics for fabricating spider-silk-like microfibers. The structure of jet templates can be precisely adjusted by simply changing the flow rates to tailor the structures of the resultant spider-silk-like microfibers. The microfibers can be well manipulated by external magnetic fields for controllably moving, and patterning and assembling into different 2D and 3D structures. Moreover, the dehydrated spider-silk-like microfibers, with magnetic spindle-knots for collecting water drops, can be controllably assembled into spider-web-like structures for excellent water collection. These spider-silk-like microfibers are promising as functional building blocks for engineering complex 3D scaffolds for water collection, cell culture, and tissue engineering.

  9. 3D-FIESTA Magnetic Resonance Angiography Fusion Imaging of Distal Segment of Occluded Middle Cerebral Artery.

    PubMed

    Kuribara, Tomoyoshi; Haraguchi, Koichi; Ogane, Kazumi; Matsuura, Nobuki; Ito, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    Middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion was examined with basi-parallel anatomical scanning (BPAS) using three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA), and 3D-FIESTA and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) fusion images were created. We expected that an incidence of hemorrhagic complications due to vessel perforations would be decreased by obtaining vascular information beyond the occlusion and thus acute endovascular revascularization could be performed using such techniques. We performed revascularization for acute MCA occlusion for five patients who were admitted in our hospital from October 2012 to October 2014. Patients consisted of 1 man and 4 women with a mean age of 76.2 years (range: 59-86 years). Fusion images were created from three-dimensional time of flight (3D-TOF) MRA and 3D-FIESTA with phase cycling (3D-FIESTA-C). Then thrombectomy was performed in all the 5 patients. Merci retriever to 1 patient, Penumbra system to 1, urokinase infusion to 2, and Solitaire to 1 using such techniques. In all cases, a 3D-FIESTA-MRA fusion imaging could depict approximately clear vascular information to at least the M3 segment beyond the occlusion. And each acute revascularization was able to perform smoothly using these imaging techniques. In all cases, there was no symptomatic hemorrhagic complication. It showed that 3D-FIESTA MRA fusion imaging technique could obtain vascular information beyond the MCA occlusion. In this study, no symptomatic hemorrhagic complications were detected. It could imply that such techniques were useful not only to improve treatment efficiency but also to reduce the risk of development of hemorrhagic complications caused by vessel perforations in acute revascularization.

  10. Defect energetics and magnetic properties of 3 d-transition-metal-doped topological crystalline insulator SnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Na; Wang, JianFeng; Si, Chen; Gu, Bing-Lin; Duan, WenHui

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of magnetism in SnTe-class topological crystalline insulators is a challenging subject with great importance in the quantum device applications. Based on the first-principles calculations, we have studied the defect energetics and magnetic properties of 3 d transition-metal (TM)-doped SnTe. We find that the doped TM atoms prefer to stay in the neutral states and have comparatively high formation energies, suggesting that the uniform TMdoping in SnTe with a higher concentration will be difficult unless clustering. In the dilute doping regime, all the magnetic TMatoms are in the high-spin states, indicating that the spin splitting energy of 3 d TM is stronger than the crystal splitting energy of the SnTe ligand. Importantly, Mn-doped SnTe has relatively low defect formation energy, largest local magnetic moment, and no defect levels in the bulk gap, suggesting that Mn is a promising magnetic dopant to realize the magnetic order for the theoretically-proposed large-Chern-number quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in SnTe.

  11. Recent EFIT Developments and 3D Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.; Chu, M. S.; St. John, H. E.; Strait, E. J.; Montgomery, A. L.; Perkins, F. W.

    2006-10-01

    Recent developments of the equilibrium reconstruction code EFIT and its 3D extension to model toroidally asymmetric effects due to error and externally applied perturbation magnetic fields are presented. These include a new more complete uncertainty matrix for magnetic diagnostics based on detailed knowledge about their fabrication, installation, calibration, and operation. A new algorithm to efficiently compute high bootstrap-fraction equilibria that explicitly separates out the Pfirsch-Schluter and bootstrap contributions to the poloidal current stream function is also being developed. Other on-going and planned developments include a new computational structure based on Fortran 90/95 with a unified interface that can conveniently accommodate different tokamak devices and grid sizes, as well as a computational link that allows easy integration with transport and stability physics modules for integrated modeling. EFIT reconstruction capability is also being extended to 3D based on perturbation solutions to the 3D Grad-Shafranov equilibrium equation.

  12. 3-D MHD modeling and stability analysis of jet and spheromak plasmas launched into a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Dustin; Zhang, Yue; Wallace, Ben; Gilmore, Mark; Manchester, Ward; Arge, C. Nick

    2016-10-01

    The Plasma Bubble Expansion Experiment (PBEX) at the University of New Mexico uses a coaxial plasma gun to launch jet and spheromak magnetic plasma configurations into the Helicon-Cathode (HelCat) plasma device. Plasma structures launched from the gun drag frozen-in magnetic flux into the background magnetic field of the chamber providing a rich set of dynamics to study magnetic turbulence, force-free magnetic spheromaks, and shocks. Preliminary modeling is presented using the highly-developed 3-D, MHD, BATS-R-US code developed at the University of Michigan. BATS-R-US employs an adaptive mesh refinement grid that enables the capture and resolution of shock structures and current sheets, and is particularly suited to model the parameter regime under investigation. CCD images and magnetic field data from the experiment suggest the stabilization of an m =1 kink mode trailing a plasma jet launched into a background magnetic field. Results from a linear stability code investigating the effect of shear-flow as a cause of this stabilization from magnetic tension forces on the jet will be presented. Initial analyses of a possible magnetic Rayleigh Taylor instability seen at the interface between launched spheromaks and their entraining background magnetic field will also be presented. Work supported by the Army Research Office Award No. W911NF1510480.

  13. Lunar fossil magnetism and perturbations of the solar wind.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonett, C. P.; Mihalov, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Perturbations of the solar wind downstream of the moon and lying outside of the rarefaction wave that defines the diamagnetic cavity are used to define possible source regions comprised of intrinsically magnetized areas of the moon. A map of the moon is constructed showing that a model in which the sources are exposed to the grazing solar wind during the lunation yields a selenographically invariant set of regions strongly favoring the lunar highlands over the maria. An alternative model with the source due to electromagnetic induction is explored. The ages of the field sources should be consistent with those based on the basalt ages and possibly far older if the sources are connected with the formation of the highland rocks themselves. The perturbations are tentatively identified as weak shock waves, and a Mach angle in accord with nominal values for the solar wind is found.

  14. Solitary perturbations in the steep boundary of magnetized toroidal plasma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. E.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Kim, M. H.; Choi, M.; Lee, J.; Kim, M.; Park, H. K.; Bak, J. G.; Ko, W. H.; Park, Y. S.

    2017-01-01

    Solitary perturbations (SPs) localized both poloidally and radially are detected within ~100 μs before the partial collapse of the high pressure gradient boundary region (called pedestal) of magnetized toroidal plasma in the KSTAR tokamak device. The SP develops with a low toroidal mode number (typically unity) in the pedestal ingrained with quasi-stable edge-localized mode (QSM) which commonly appears during the inter-collapse period. The SPs have smaller mode pitch and different (often opposite) rotation velocity compared to the QSMs. Similar solitary perturbations are also frequently observed before the onset of complete pedestal collapse, suggesting a strong connection between the SP generation and the pedestal collapse. PMID:28338046

  15. Effect of magnetism on the solubility of 3 d elements in BCC iron: Results of first-principle investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatov, O. I.; Okatov, S. V.; Gornostyrev, Yu. N.; Korzhavyi, P. A.; Ruban, A. V.

    2013-08-01

    The methods of quantum-mechanical simulation have been used to study alloys of bcc iron with 3 d transition metals in the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic states. It has been shown that the main factor that determines the solubility of the 3 d elements is their electronic structure. The energy of the solution, mixing, and effective interatomic interactions vary regularly depending on the position of the element in the Periodic Table and on the magnetic state of the matrix. In some cases, depending on the magnetic state, changes in these quantities lead to the violation of the Hume-Rothery rules that determine the solubility of substitutional elements in alloys. The results obtained help us to understand the microscopic mechanisms that determine the solubility of alloying elements and their effect on the phase stability and structural state of steels.

  16. First MMS Observations of High Time Resolution 3D Electric and Magnetic fields at the Dayside Magnetopause.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Le Contel, O.; Vaith, H.; Macri, J.; Myers, S.; Rau, D.; Needell, J.; King, B.; Granoff, M.; Chutter, M.; Dors, I.; Argall, M. R.; Shuster, J. R.; Olsson, G.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Eriksson, A. I.; Kletzing, C.; Bounds, S. R.; Anderson, B. J.; Baumjohann, W.; Steller, M.; Bromund, K. R.; Le, G.; Nakamura, R.; Strangeway, R. J.; Leinweber, H. K.; Tucker, S.; Westfall, J.; Fischer, D.; Plaschke, F.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Moore, T. E.; Mauk, B.; Fuselier, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The electrodynamics at the magnetopause is key to our understanding of ion and electron acceleration within reconnection regions. The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) fleet of four spacecraft was launched into its Phase-1 equatorial orbit of 12 Re apogee specifically to investigate these regions at the Earth's magnetopause. In addition to a comprehensive suite of particle measurements, MMS makes very high time resolution 3D electric and magnetic field measurements of high accuracy using flux-gate, search coil, 3-axis double probe, and electron drift sensors. In September 2015, the MMS fleet will begin to encounter the dusk-side magnetopause in its initial configuration of approximately 160 km separation, allowing investigation of the spatial and temporal characteristics of important electrodynamics during reconnection. Using these field and particle measurements, we present first observations of 3D magnetic and electric fields (including their parallel component), and inferred current sheets, during active magnetopause crossings using the highest time resolution data available on MMS.

  17. Magnetic properties of Pd atomic chains formed during submonolayer deposition of 3d metals on Pd(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanyuk, O. V.; Ignatiev, P. A.; Negulyaev, N. N.; Saletsky, A. M.; Hergert, W.

    2012-06-01

    Recently, an unusual intermixing-driven scenario for the growth of atomic Pd chains on a Pd(110) surface during deposition of 3d metal atoms has been predicted (Stepanyuk 2009 Phys. Rev. B 79 155410) and confirmed by STM and STS experiments (Wie et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 225504). Performing ab initio calculations we demonstrate that Pd atomic chains grown above embedded Fe atoms exhibit magnetic properties which depend on the substrate mediated exchange interaction between the Fe atoms.

  18. Magnetic properties of Pd atomic chains formed during submonolayer deposition of 3d metals on Pd(110).

    PubMed

    Stepanyuk, O V; Ignatiev, P A; Negulyaev, N N; Saletsky, A M; Hergert, W

    2012-06-13

    Recently, an unusual intermixing-driven scenario for the growth of atomic Pd chains on a Pd(110) surface during deposition of 3d metal atoms has been predicted (Stepanyuk 2009 Phys. Rev. B 79 155410) and confirmed by STM and STS experiments (Wie et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 225504). Performing ab initio calculations we demonstrate that Pd atomic chains grown above embedded Fe atoms exhibit magnetic properties which depend on the substrate mediated exchange interaction between the Fe atoms.

  19. Investigation of Plutonic Rocks in Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey, using 3D Normalized Full Gradient of Magnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekinci, Y. L.; Yiǧitbaş, E.

    2012-04-01

    Airborne magnetic data of Biga Peninsula were investigated by using 3D Normalized Full Gradient (NFG) technique. The NFG procedure is based on the downward continuation of the potential field data and the NFG amplitude is calculated by dividing the Analytic Signal (AS) of downward continued magnetic data by the average of AS. Application of NFG technique usually enhances the anomalies by computing the anomaly to a level close to the source bodies and points to the boundaries of causative bodies. To that end, a MATLAB based code consisting of a series of linked functions was developed and used for analyses. Study area covers an area of 120 km x 180 km and the data were collected with 1-2 km profile intervals and with about 70 m sampling from 625 m above the ground surface by MTA (General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration). 2 km sampling intervals for both north and east directions were used for gridding of the magnetic data. Regional anomalies were approximated by means of element shape functions used in finite element method and then residuals were computed. Prior to the application of 3D NFG, Reduction to the Pole (RTP) transformation was applied to residual data in order to remove the complexity due to the effects of the direction of magnetization and ambient field. RTP transformation process was performed using 55 and 4 degrees for inclination and declination angles, respectively. 3D NFG operation was performed to reduced to pole data for 6 different depth levels (-200, -400, -600, -800, -1000 and -1200 m). Analyzing the resulting anomaly maps of different depth levels together with the geological map (1/500.000) showed that the locations of maximum NFG amplitudes indicate the boundaries of plutonic rocks having high magnetization intensity. Additionally, horizontal and vertical extensions of plutonic rocks were also determined. Keywords: Airborne magnetic data, normalized full gradient, plutonic rocks, Biga Peninsula-Turkey

  20. Simulation of the 3-D Evolution of Electron Scale Magnetic Reconnection - Motivated by Laboratory Experiments Predictions for MMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buechner, J.; Jain, N.; Sharma, A.

    2013-12-01

    The four s/c of the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, to be launched in 2014, will use the Earth's magnetosphere as a laboratory to study the microphysics of three fundamental plasma processes. One of them is magnetic reconnection, an essentially multi-scale process. While laboratory experiments and past theoretical investigations have shown that important processes necessary to understand magnetic reconnection take place at electron scales the MMS mission for the first time will be able to resolve these scales by in space observations. For the measurement strategy of MMS it is important to make specific predictions of the behavior of current sheets with a thickness of the order of the electron skin depth which play an important role in the evolution of collisionless magnetic reconnection. Since these processes are highly nonlinear and non-local numerical simulation is needed to specify the current sheet evolution. Here we present new results about the nonlinear evolution of electron-scale current sheets starting from the linear stage and using 3-D electron-magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) simulations. The growth rates of the simulated instabilities compared well with the growth rates obtained from linear theory. Mechanisms and conditions of the formation of flux ropes and of current filamentation will be discussed in comparison with the results of fully kinetic simulations. In 3D the X- and O-point configurations of the magnetic field formed in reconnection planes alternate along the out-of-reconnection-plane direction with the wavelength of the unstable mode. In the presence of multiple reconnection sites, the out-of-plane magnetic field can develop nested structure of quadrupoles in reconnection planes, similar to the 2-D case, but now with variations in the out-of-plane direction. The structures of the electron flow and magnetic field in 3-D simulations will be compared with those in 2-D simulations to discriminate the essentially 3D features. We also discuss

  1. New 3D parallel GILD electromagnetic modeling and nonlinear inversion using global magnetic integral and local differential equation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, G.; Li, J.; Majer, E.; Zuo, D.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes a new 3D parallel GILD electromagnetic (EM) modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm. The algorithm consists of: (a) a new magnetic integral equation instead of the electric integral equation to solve the electromagnetic forward modeling and inverse problem; (b) a collocation finite element method for solving the magnetic integral and a Galerkin finite element method for the magnetic differential equations; (c) a nonlinear regularizing optimization method to make the inversion stable and of high resolution; and (d) a new parallel 3D modeling and inversion using a global integral and local differential domain decomposition technique (GILD). The new 3D nonlinear electromagnetic inversion has been tested with synthetic data and field data. The authors obtained very good imaging for the synthetic data and reasonable subsurface EM imaging for the field data. The parallel algorithm has high parallel efficiency over 90% and can be a parallel solver for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic modeling and inversion. The parallel GILD algorithm can be extended to develop a high resolution and large scale seismic and hydrology modeling and inversion in the massively parallel computer.

  2. Finite Element Treatment of Vortex States in 3D Cubic Superconductors in a Tilted Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lin; Cai, Chuanbing

    2017-03-01

    The time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations have been solved numerically by a finite element analysis for superconducting samples with a cubic shape in a tilted magnetic field. We obtain different vortex patterns as a function of the external magnetic field. With a magnetic field not parallel to the x- or y-axis, the vortices attempt to change their orientation accordingly. Our analysis of the corresponding changes in the magnetic response in different directions can provide information not only about vorticity but also about the three-dimensional vortex arrangement, even about the very subtle changes for the superconducting samples with a cubic shape in a tilted magnetic field.

  3. Analyses of Magnetic Structures of Active Region 11117 Evolution using a 3D Data-Driven Magnetohydrodynamic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shi; Jiang, Chaowei; Feng, Xueshang

    We use the photospheric vector magnetograms obtained by Helioseismic and Magnetic Image (HMI) on-board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) as the boundary conditions for a Data-Driven CESE-MHD model (Jiang et al. 2012) to investigate the physical characteristics and evolution of magnetic field configurations in the corona before and after a solar eruptive event. Specifically, the evolution of AR11117 characteristics such as length of magnetic shear along the neutral line, current helicity, magnetic free energy and the energy flux across the photosphere due to flux emergence and surface flow are presented. The computed 3D magnetic field configuration are compared with AIA (Atmosphere Image Assembly) which shows remarkable resemblance. A topological analyses reveals that the small flare is correlated with a bald patch (BP, where the magnetic field is tangent to the photosphere), suggesting that the energy release of the flare is caused by magnetic reconnection associated with the BP separatrices. The total magnetic flux and energy keep increasing slightly in spite of flare, while the computed magnetic free energy drops during the flare by 10 (30) ergs which is adequate in providing the energy budget of a minor C-class confined flare as observed. Jiang, Chaowei, Xueshang, Feng, S. T Wu and Qiang Hu, Ap. J., 759:85, 2012 Nov 10

  4. Toroidal modeling of penetration of the resonant magnetic perturbation field

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yueqiang; Kirk, A.

    2013-04-15

    A toroidal, quasi-linear model is proposed to study the penetration dynamics of the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field into the plasma. The model couples the linear, fluid plasma response to a toroidal momentum balance equation, which includes torques induced by both fluid electromagnetic force and by (kinetic) neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) force. The numerical results for a test toroidal equilibrium quantify the effects of various physical parameters on the field penetration and on the plasma rotation braking. The neoclassical toroidal viscous torque plays a dominant role in certain region of the plasma, for the RMP penetration problem considered in this work.

  5. Toroidal modeling of penetration of the resonant magnetic perturbation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Kirk, A.; Sun, Y.

    2013-04-01

    A toroidal, quasi-linear model is proposed to study the penetration dynamics of the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field into the plasma. The model couples the linear, fluid plasma response to a toroidal momentum balance equation, which includes torques induced by both fluid electromagnetic force and by (kinetic) neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) force. The numerical results for a test toroidal equilibrium quantify the effects of various physical parameters on the field penetration and on the plasma rotation braking. The neoclassical toroidal viscous torque plays a dominant role in certain region of the plasma, for the RMP penetration problem considered in this work.

  6. Application of the Ideal Perturbed Equilibrium Code to DIII-D Magnetic Diagnostic Upgrade Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, N. C.; Menard, J. E.; Park, J. K.; Strait, E. J.

    2012-10-01

    The Ideal Perturbed Equilibrium Code (IPEC) has been upgraded with advanced visualization tools and synthetic diagnostics to make its output directly comparable with DIII-D diagnostic measurements. Using the synthetic magnetic diagnostics, IPEC has been used to assist in the design of an advanced 3D magnetic field diagnostic currently being built as an upgrade to the DIII-D tokamak experiment. This poster outlines the application of IPEC modeling to the magnetic diagnostic design, highlighting the power and versatility of both the computational tools and proposed diagnostics. Of the many new measurements that will be possible with the magnetic diagnostic upgrade, special emphasis is given here to the ability to directly measure electromagnetic torques on the plasma. The magnetic diagnostic design will be able to simultaneously measure electromagnetic torque from non-axisymmetric fields with toroidal mode numbers 1, 2 and 3. This will open the door to many new possibilities in studying rotational braking effects that will be further supported by IPEC.

  7. Influence of Critical Current Density on Magnetic Force of Htsc Bulk above Pmr with 3D-MODELING Numerical Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yiyun; Lu, Bingjuan; Ge, Yunwang; Chen, Wenqing

    Numerical electromagnetic field simulations of high-temperature superconductors (HTSC) bulk were carried out to calculate the magnetic force between the HTSC bulk and the permanent magnet railway (PMR). A 3D-modeling numerical calculation method is proposed using the finite element method. The model is formulated with the magnetic field vector (H-method). The resulting code was written with FORTRAN language. The electric field intensity E and the current density J constitutive relation of HTSC were described with E-J power law. The Kim macro-model is used to describe critical current density Jc of HTSC bulk. Two virtual HTSC bulks were used to solve the critical current density Jc anisotropic properties of HTSC materials. A superconducting levitation system composed of one HTSC bulk and PMR is successfully investigated using the proposed method. By this method, the influence of critical current density on magnetic levitation force of the superconducting levitation system is mathematically studied.

  8. Enhancing the sensitivity of magnetic sensors by 3D metamaterial shells

    PubMed Central

    Navau, Carles; Mach-Batlle, Rosa; Parra, Albert; Prat-Camps, Jordi; Laut, Sergi; Del-Valle, Nuria; Sanchez, Alvaro

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic sensors are key elements in our interconnected smart society. Their sensitivity becomes essential for many applications in fields such as biomedicine, computer memories, geophysics, or space exploration. Here we present a universal way of increasing the sensitivity of magnetic sensors by surrounding them with a spherical metamaterial shell with specially designed anisotropic magnetic properties. We analytically demonstrate that the magnetic field in the sensing area is enhanced by our metamaterial shell by a known factor that depends on the shell radii ratio. When the applied field is non-uniform, as for dipolar magnetic field sources, field gradient is increased as well. A proof-of-concept experimental realization confirms the theoretical predictions. The metamaterial shell is also shown to concentrate time-dependent magnetic fields upto frequencies of 100 kHz. PMID:28303951

  9. Enhancing the sensitivity of magnetic sensors by 3D metamaterial shells.

    PubMed

    Navau, Carles; Mach-Batlle, Rosa; Parra, Albert; Prat-Camps, Jordi; Laut, Sergi; Del-Valle, Nuria; Sanchez, Alvaro

    2017-03-17

    Magnetic sensors are key elements in our interconnected smart society. Their sensitivity becomes essential for many applications in fields such as biomedicine, computer memories, geophysics, or space exploration. Here we present a universal way of increasing the sensitivity of magnetic sensors by surrounding them with a spherical metamaterial shell with specially designed anisotropic magnetic properties. We analytically demonstrate that the magnetic field in the sensing area is enhanced by our metamaterial shell by a known factor that depends on the shell radii ratio. When the applied field is non-uniform, as for dipolar magnetic field sources, field gradient is increased as well. A proof-of-concept experimental realization confirms the theoretical predictions. The metamaterial shell is also shown to concentrate time-dependent magnetic fields upto frequencies of 100 kHz.

  10. Enhancing the sensitivity of magnetic sensors by 3D metamaterial shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navau, Carles; Mach-Batlle, Rosa; Parra, Albert; Prat-Camps, Jordi; Laut, Sergi; Del-Valle, Nuria; Sanchez, Alvaro

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic sensors are key elements in our interconnected smart society. Their sensitivity becomes essential for many applications in fields such as biomedicine, computer memories, geophysics, or space exploration. Here we present a universal way of increasing the sensitivity of magnetic sensors by surrounding them with a spherical metamaterial shell with specially designed anisotropic magnetic properties. We analytically demonstrate that the magnetic field in the sensing area is enhanced by our metamaterial shell by a known factor that depends on the shell radii ratio. When the applied field is non-uniform, as for dipolar magnetic field sources, field gradient is increased as well. A proof-of-concept experimental realization confirms the theoretical predictions. The metamaterial shell is also shown to concentrate time-dependent magnetic fields upto frequencies of 100 kHz.

  11. Perineal body anatomy in living women: 3-D analysis using thin-slice magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Kindra A.; Yousuf, Aisha; Lewicky-Gaupp, Christina; Fenner, Dee E.; DeLancey, John O.L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe a framework for visualizing the perineal body's complex anatomy using thin-slice MR imaging. Study Design Two mm-thick MR images were acquired in 11 women with normal pelvic support and no incontinence/prolapse symptoms. Anatomic structures were analyzed in axial, sagittal and coronal slices. 3-D models were generated from these images. Results Three distinct perineal body regions are visible on MRI: (1) a superficial region at the level of the vestibular bulb, (2) a mid region at the proximal end of the superficial transverse perineal muscle, and (3) a deep region at the level of the midurethra and puborectalis muscle. Structures are best visualized on axial scans while cranio-caudal relationships are appreciated on sagittal scans. The 3-D model further clarifies inter-relationships. Conclusion Advances in MR technology allow visualization of perineal body anatomy in living women and development of 3D models which enhance our understanding of its three different regions: superficial, mid and deep. PMID:21055513

  12. Mini-conference Poster: 3D Onset and Propagation of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Ricci, P.; Brackbill, J. U.; Daughton, W.; Delzanno, G. L.

    2005-10-01

    A fundamental problem in reconnection physics is how to relate 2D and 3D reconnection. The great majority of studies of reconnection focus on 2D configurations. The state of affair is best described by the cave allegory of Plato. In 2D we look at the reconnection process as if we were studying the real world through its reflections on the walls of a cave [1]. We propose to turn our head away from the familiar wall and face the real world. We do 3D fully kinetic (i.e. both electrons and ions are kinetic) simulations of reconnection. We use the implicit PIC code CELESTE to achieve parameter ranges and system sizes inaccessible to traditional explicit codes. Our results will clarify the fundamental issue: if reconnection is started at one location, does it propagate in the system? How? And what coupling of microscopic and macroscopic processes causes the reconnection onset in the first place? All these effects can only be studied in 3D [2]. The crucial physics missing in 2D simulations is the role of macroscopic equilibrium changes induced by the microinstabilities [3].1) Plato, Republic, Book VII, Hackett Pub. Co., 1992. 2) P. Ricci, J.U. Brackbill, W.S. Daughton, G. Lapenta, Phys. Plasmas, 11, 4489, 2004.3) W. Daughton, G. Lapenta, P. Ricci, Phys. Rev. Lett., 93, 105004, 2004.

  13. Fast magnetic twister and plasma perturbations in a three-dimensional coronal arcade

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, K.; Srivastava, A. K.; Musielak, Z. E. E-mail: asrivastava.app@iitbhu.ac.in E-mail: musielak@kis.uni-freiburg.de

    2014-06-10

    We present results of three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations of a fast magnetic twister excited above a foot-point of the potential solar coronal arcade that is embedded in the solar atmosphere with the initial VAL-IIIC temperature profile, which is smoothly extended into the solar corona. With the use of the FLASH code, we solve 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations by specifying a twist in the azimuthal component of magnetic field in the solar chromosphere. The imposed perturbation generates torsional Alfvén waves as well as plasma swirls that reach the other foot-point of the arcade and partially reflect back from the transition region. The two vortex channels are evident in the generated twisted flux-tube with a fragmentation near its apex which results from the initial twist as well as from the morphology of the tube. The numerical results are compared to observational data of plasma motions in a solar prominence. The comparison shows that the numerical results and the data qualitatively agree even though the observed plasma motions occur over comparatively large spatio-temporal scales in the prominence.

  14. Effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on microturbulence in DIII-D pedestal

    DOE PAGES

    Holod, I.; Lin, Z.; Taimourzadeh, S.; ...

    2016-10-03

    Vacuum resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) applied to otherwise axisymmetric tokamak plasmas produce in general a combination of non-resonant effects that preserve closed flux surfaces (kink response) and resonant effects that introduce magnetic islands and/or stochasticity (tearing response). The effect of the plasma kink response on the linear stability and nonlinear transport of edge turbulence is studied using the gyrokinetic toroidal code GTC for a DIII-D plasma with applied n = 2 vacuum RMP. GTC simulations use the 3D equilibrium of DIII-D discharge 158103 (Nazikian et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 105002), which is provided by nonlinear ideal MHD VMECmore » equilibrium solver in order to include the effect of the plasma kink response to the external field but to exclude island formation at rational surfaces. Analysis using the GTC simulation results reveal no increase of growth rates for the electrostatic drift wave instability and for the electromagnetic kinetic-ballooning mode in the presence of the plasma kink response to the RMP. Moreover, nonlinear electrostatic simulations show that the effect of the 3D equilibrium on zonal flow damping is very weak and found to be insufficient to modify turbulent transport in the electrostatic turbulence.« less

  15. Effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on microturbulence in DIII-D pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Holod, I.; Lin, Z.; Taimourzadeh, S.; Nazikian, R.; Spong, D.; Wingen, A.

    2016-10-03

    Vacuum resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) applied to otherwise axisymmetric tokamak plasmas produce in general a combination of non-resonant effects that preserve closed flux surfaces (kink response) and resonant effects that introduce magnetic islands and/or stochasticity (tearing response). The effect of the plasma kink response on the linear stability and nonlinear transport of edge turbulence is studied using the gyrokinetic toroidal code GTC for a DIII-D plasma with applied n = 2 vacuum RMP. GTC simulations use the 3D equilibrium of DIII-D discharge 158103 (Nazikian et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 105002), which is provided by nonlinear ideal MHD VMEC equilibrium solver in order to include the effect of the plasma kink response to the external field but to exclude island formation at rational surfaces. Analysis using the GTC simulation results reveal no increase of growth rates for the electrostatic drift wave instability and for the electromagnetic kinetic-ballooning mode in the presence of the plasma kink response to the RMP. Moreover, nonlinear electrostatic simulations show that the effect of the 3D equilibrium on zonal flow damping is very weak and found to be insufficient to modify turbulent transport in the electrostatic turbulence.

  16. Effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on microturbulence in DIII-D pedestal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holod, I.; Lin, Z.; Taimourzadeh, S.; Nazikian, R.; Spong, D.; Wingen, A.

    2017-01-01

    Vacuum resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) applied to otherwise axisymmetric tokamak plasmas produce in general a combination of non-resonant effects that preserve closed flux surfaces (kink response) and resonant effects that introduce magnetic islands and/or stochasticity (tearing response). The effect of the plasma kink response on the linear stability and nonlinear transport of edge turbulence is studied using the gyrokinetic toroidal code GTC for a DIII-D plasma with applied n  =  2 vacuum RMP. GTC simulations use the 3D equilibrium of DIII-D discharge 158103 (Nazikian et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 105002), which is provided by nonlinear ideal MHD VMEC equilibrium solver in order to include the effect of the plasma kink response to the external field but to exclude island formation at rational surfaces. Analysis using the GTC simulation results reveal no increase of growth rates for the electrostatic drift wave instability and for the electromagnetic kinetic-ballooning mode in the presence of the plasma kink response to the RMP. Furthermore, nonlinear electrostatic simulations show that the effect of the 3D equilibrium on zonal flow damping is very weak and found to be insufficient to modify turbulent transport in the electrostatic turbulence.

  17. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  18. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-02-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  19. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of 3d metal trioxide clusters-doped monolayer graphene: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Muhammad; Shuai, Yong; Tan, He-Ping; Hassan, Muhammad

    2017-03-01

    We present first-principles density-functional calculations for the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of monolayer graphene doped with 3d (Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Mn and Ni) metal trioxide TMO3 halogen clusters. In this paper we used two approaches for 3d metal trioxide clusters (i) TMO3 halogen cluster was embedded in monolayer graphene substituting four carbon (C) atoms (ii) three C atoms were substituted by three oxygen (O) atoms in one graphene ring and TM atom was adsorbed at the hollow site of O atoms substituted graphene ring. All the impurities were tightly bonded in the graphene ring. In first case of TMO3 doped graphene layer, the bond length between Csbnd O atom was reduced and bond length between TM-O atom was increased. In case of Cr, Fe, Co and Ni atoms substitution in between the O atoms, leads to Fermi level shifting to conduction band thereby causing the Dirac cone to move into valence band, however a band gap appears at high symmetric K-point. In case of TiO3 and VO3 substitution, system exhibits semiconductor properties. Interestingly, TiO3-substituted system shows dilute magnetic semiconductor behavior with 2.00 μB magnetic moment. On the other hand, the substitution of CoO3, CrO3, FeO3 and MnO3 induced 1.015 μB, 2.347 μB, 2.084 μB and 3.584 μB magnetic moment, respectively. In second case of O atoms doped in graphene and TM atoms adsorbed at the hollow site, the O atom bulges out of graphene plane and bond length between TM-O atom is increased. After TM atoms adsorption at the O substituted graphene ring the Fermi level (EF) shifts into conduction band. In case of Cr and Ni adsorption, system displays indirect band gap semiconductor properties with 0.0 μB magnetic moment. Co adsorption exhibits dilute magnetic semiconductor behavior producing 0.916 μB magnetic moment. Fe, Mn, Ti and V adsorption introduces band gap at high symmetric K-point also inducing 1.54 μB, 0.9909 μB, 1.912 μB, and 0.98 μB magnetic moments, respectively

  20. A spheroid toxicity assay using magnetic 3D bioprinting and real-time mobile device-based imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A.; Shen, Tsaiwei; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Shiao, Sue; Chen, Jianbo; Desai, Pujan K.; Liao, Angela; Hebel, Chris; Raphael, Robert M.; Becker, Jeanne L.; Souza, Glauco R.

    2015-01-01

    An ongoing challenge in biomedical research is the search for simple, yet robust assays using 3D cell cultures for toxicity screening. This study addresses that challenge with a novel spheroid assay, wherein spheroids, formed by magnetic 3D bioprinting, contract immediately as cells rearrange and compact the spheroid in relation to viability and cytoskeletal organization. Thus, spheroid size can be used as a simple metric for toxicity. The goal of this study was to validate spheroid contraction as a cytotoxic endpoint using 3T3 fibroblasts in response to 5 toxic compounds (all-trans retinoic acid, dexamethasone, doxorubicin, 5′-fluorouracil, forskolin), sodium dodecyl sulfate (+control), and penicillin-G (−control). Real-time imaging was performed with a mobile device to increase throughput and efficiency. All compounds but penicillin-G significantly slowed contraction in a dose-dependent manner (Z’ = 0.88). Cells in 3D were more resistant to toxicity than cells in 2D, whose toxicity was measured by the MTT assay. Fluorescent staining and gene expression profiling of spheroids confirmed these findings. The results of this study validate spheroid contraction within this assay as an easy, biologically relevant endpoint for high-throughput compound screening in representative 3D environments. PMID:26365200

  1. 3D magnetic field configuration of small-scale reconnection events in the solar plasma atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T.

    2015-10-01

    The outer solar atmosphere, i.e., the corona and the chromosphere, is replete with small energy-release events, which are accompanied by transient brightening and jet-like ejections. These events are considered to be magnetic reconnection events in the solar plasma, and their dynamics have been studied using recent advanced observations from the Hinode spacecraft and other observatories in space and on the ground. These events occur at different locations in the solar atmosphere and vary in their morphology and amount of the released energy. The magnetic field configurations of these reconnection events are inferred based on observations of magnetic fields at the photospheric level. Observations suggest that these magnetic configurations can be classified into two groups. In the first group, two anti-parallel magnetic fields reconnect to each other, yielding a 2D emerging flux configuration. In the second group, helical or twisted magnetic flux tubes are parallel or at a relative angle to each other. Reconnection can occur only between anti-parallel components of the magnetic flux tubes and may be referred to as component reconnection. The latter configuration type may be more important for the larger class of small-scale reconnection events. The two types of magnetic configurations can be compared to counter-helicity and co-helicity configurations, respectively, in laboratory plasma collision experiments.

  2. 3D magnetic field configuration of small-scale reconnection events in the solar plasma atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, T.

    2015-10-15

    The outer solar atmosphere, i.e., the corona and the chromosphere, is replete with small energy-release events, which are accompanied by transient brightening and jet-like ejections. These events are considered to be magnetic reconnection events in the solar plasma, and their dynamics have been studied using recent advanced observations from the Hinode spacecraft and other observatories in space and on the ground. These events occur at different locations in the solar atmosphere and vary in their morphology and amount of the released energy. The magnetic field configurations of these reconnection events are inferred based on observations of magnetic fields at the photospheric level. Observations suggest that these magnetic configurations can be classified into two groups. In the first group, two anti-parallel magnetic fields reconnect to each other, yielding a 2D emerging flux configuration. In the second group, helical or twisted magnetic flux tubes are parallel or at a relative angle to each other. Reconnection can occur only between anti-parallel components of the magnetic flux tubes and may be referred to as component reconnection. The latter configuration type may be more important for the larger class of small-scale reconnection events. The two types of magnetic configurations can be compared to counter-helicity and co-helicity configurations, respectively, in laboratory plasma collision experiments.

  3. Crystal, magnetic and electronic structures of 3d-5d ordered double perovskite Ba2CoReO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa Saad H.-E., M.; Rammeh, N.

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive study on crystal, magnetic and electronic structures of ordered double perovskite Ba2CoReO6 was carried out using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Also, the density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed by full potential linear muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO) method within the localized spin density approximation (LSDA+U) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA+U). At room temperature, the crystal structure of Ba2CoReO6 is face-centered cubic, space group Fm 3 bar m , containing an almost completely ordered arrangement of CoO6-ReO6 octahedra. Magnetic structure showed an antiferromagnetic (AF) behavior below TN=41 K. The magnetic and electronic structures are consistent with the electronic configurations Co2+(3d7)-Re6+(5d1) having a total spin magnetic moment of about 2.0 μB/f.u. DFT electronic structures predicted half-metallic yields from 3d-t2g↓ and 5d-t2g↓ through O2-.

  4. Fast 3-D large-scale gravity and magnetic modeling using unstructured grids and an adaptive multilevel fast multipole method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Tang, Jingtian; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2017-01-01

    A novel fast and accurate algorithm is developed for large-scale 3-D gravity and magnetic modeling problems. An unstructured grid discretization is used to approximate sources with arbitrary mass and magnetization distributions. A novel adaptive multilevel fast multipole (AMFM) method is developed to reduce the modeling time. An observation octree is constructed on a set of arbitrarily distributed observation sites, while a source octree is constructed on a source tetrahedral grid. A novel characteristic is the independence between the observation octree and the source octree, which simplifies the implementation of different survey configurations such as airborne and ground surveys. Two synthetic models, a cubic model and a half-space model with mountain-valley topography, are tested. As compared to analytical solutions of gravity and magnetic signals, excellent agreements of the solutions verify the accuracy of our AMFM algorithm. Finally, our AMFM method is used to calculate the terrain effect on an airborne gravity data set for a realistic topography model represented by a triangular surface retrieved from a digital elevation model. Using 16 threads, more than 5800 billion interactions between 1,002,001 observation points and 5,839,830 tetrahedral elements are computed in 453.6 s. A traditional first-order Gaussian quadrature approach requires 3.77 days. Hence, our new AMFM algorithm not only can quickly compute the gravity and magnetic signals for complicated problems but also can substantially accelerate the solution of 3-D inversion problems.

  5. Ideal plasma response to vacuum magnetic fields with resonant magnetic perturbations in non-axisymmetric tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kimin; Ahn, J. -W.; Scotti, F.; Park, J. -K.; Menard, J. E.

    2015-09-03

    Ideal plasma shielding and amplification of resonant magnetic perturbations in non-axisymmetric tokamak is presented by field line tracing simulation with full ideal plasma response, compared to measurements of divertor lobe structures. Magnetic field line tracing simulations in NSTX with toroidal non-axisymmetry indicate the ideal plasma response can significantly shield/amplify and phase shift the vacuum resonant magnetic perturbations. Ideal plasma shielding for n = 3 mode is found to prevent magnetic islands from opening as consistently shown in the field line connection length profile and magnetic footprints on the divertor target. It is also found that the ideal plasma shielding modifies the degree of stochasticity but does not change the overall helical lobe structures of the vacuum field for n = 3. Furthermore, amplification of vacuum fields by the ideal plasma response is predicted for low toroidal mode n = 1, better reproducing measurements of strong striation of the field lines on the divertor plate in NSTX.

  6. 3D positional control of magnetic levitation system using adaptive control: improvement of positioning control in horizontal plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Toshimasa; Fujitani, Yasuhiro; Kato, Norihiko; Tsuda, Naoaki; Nomura, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to establish a technique that levitates and conveys a hand, a kind of micro-robot, by applying magnetic forces: the hand is assumed to have a function of holding and detaching the objects. The equipment to be used in our experiments consists of four pole-pieces of electromagnets, and is expected to work as a 4DOF drive unit within some restricted range of 3D space: the three DOF are corresponding to 3D positional control and the remaining one DOF, rotational oscillation damping control. Having used the same equipment, Khamesee et al. had manipulated the impressed voltages on the four electric magnetics by a PID controller by the use of the feedback signal of the hand's 3D position, the controlled variable. However, in this system, there were some problems remaining: in the horizontal direction, when translating the hand out of restricted region, positional control performance was suddenly degraded. The authors propose a method to apply an adaptive control to the horizontal directional control. It is expected that the technique to be presented in this paper contributes not only to the improvement of the response characteristic but also to widening the applicable range in the horizontal directional control.

  7. A 3-D Magnetic Analysis of a Stirling Convertor Linear Alternator Under Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Steven M.; Schwarze, Gene E.; Niedra, Janis M.; Regan, Timothy F.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Stirling Technology Company (STC) are developing Stirling convertors for Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (SRPS) to provide electrical power for future NASA deep space missions. STC is developing the 55-We Technology Demonstration Convertor (TDC) under contract to DOE. Of critical importance to the successful development of the Stirling convertor for space power applications is the development of a lightweight and highly efficient linear alternator. This paper presents a 3-dimensional finite element method (FEM) approach for evaluating Stirling convertor linear alternators. The model extends a magnetostatic analysis previously reported at the 35th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference (IECEC) to include the effects of the load current. STC's 55-We linear alternator design was selected to validate the model. Spatial plots of magnetic field strength (H) are presented in the region of the exciting permanent magnets. The margin for permanent magnet demagnetization is calculated at the expected magnet operating temperature for the near earth environment and for various average magnet temperatures. These thermal conditions were selected to represent a worst-case condition for the planned deep space missions. This paper presents plots that identify regions of high H where the potential to alter the magnetic moment of the magnets exists.

  8. A thermoresponsive and magnetic colloid for 3D cell expansion and reconfiguration.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Aram; Francini, Nora; White, Lisa; Dixon, James; Gould, Toby; Rashidi, Hassan; Al Ghanami, Racha Cheikh; Hruschka, Veronika; Redl, Heinz; Saunders, Brian R; Alexander, Cameron; Shakesheff, Kevin M

    2015-01-27

    A dual thermoresponsive and magnetic colloidal gel matrix is described for enhanced stem-cell culture. The combined properties of the material allow enzyme-free passaging and expansion of mesenchymal stem cells, as well as isolation of cells postculture by the simple process of lowering the temperature and applying an external magnetic field. The colloidal gel can be reconfigured with thermal and magnetic stimuli to allow patterning of cells in discrete zones and to control movement of cells within the porous matrix during culture.

  9. Electric current variations and 3D magnetic configuration of coronal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Brigitte; Harra, Louise K.; Aulanier, Guillaume; Guo, Yang; Demoulin, Pascal; Moreno-Insertis, Fernando, , Prof

    Coronal jets (EUV) were observed by SDO/AIA on September 17, 2010. HMI and THEMIS measured the vector magnetic field from which we derived the magnetic flux, the phostospheric velocity and the vertical electric current. The magnetic configuration was computed with a non linear force-free approach. The phostospheric current pattern of the recurrent jets were associated with the quasi-separatrix layers deduced from the magnetic extrapolation. The large twisted near-by Eiffel-tower-shape jet was also caused by reconnection in current layers containing a null point. This jet cannot be classified precisely within either the quiescent or the blowout jet types. We will show the importance of the existence of bald patches in the low atmosphere

  10. 3D field calculation of the GEM prototype magnet and comparison with measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, R.J.

    1983-10-28

    The proposed 4 GeV Electron Microtron (GEM) is designed to fill the existing buildings left vacant by the demise of the Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) accelerator. One of the six large dipole magnets is shown as well as the first 10 electron orbits. A 3-orbit prototype magnet has been built. The stepped edge of the magnet is to keep the beam exiting perpendicular to the pole. The end guards that wrap around the main coils are joined together by the 3 shield plates. The auxiliary coils are needed to keep the end guards and shield plates from saturating. A 0.3 cm Purcell filter air gap exists between the pole and the yoke. Can anyone question this being a truly three-dimensional magnetostatic problem. The computer program TOSCA, developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory by the Computing Applications Group, was used to calculate this magnet and the results have been compared with measurements.

  11. 3-D RPIC Simulations of Relativistic Jets: Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets into ambient plasmas show that acceleration occurs in relativistic shocks. The Weibel instability created in shocks is responsible for particle acceleration, and generation and amplification of highly inhomogeneous, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection in relativistic jets. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than the synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understand the complex time evolution and spectral structure in relativistic jets and gamma-ray bursts. We will present recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration and magnetic field generation. We will also calculate associated self-consistent emission from relativistic shocks.

  12. 3D-Printed Permanent Magnets Outperform Conventional Versions, Conserve Rare Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2016-11-01

    Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated that permanent magnets produced by additive manufacturing can outperform bonded magnets made using traditional techniques while conserving critical materials. The project is part of DOE’s Critical Materials Institute (CMI), which seeks ways to eliminate and reduce reliance on rare earth metals and other materials critical to the success of clean energy technologies.

  13. 3D-Printed Permanent Magnets Outperform Conventional Versions, Conserve Rare Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2016-11-23

    Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated that permanent magnets produced by additive manufacturing can outperform bonded magnets made using traditional techniques while conserving critical materials. The project is part of DOE’s Critical Materials Institute (CMI), which seeks ways to eliminate and reduce reliance on rare earth metals and other materials critical to the success of clean energy technologies.

  14. Single crystalline cylindrical nanowires – toward dense 3D arrays of magnetic vortices

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Yurii P.; Chuvilin, Andrey; Vivas, Laura G.; Kosel, Jurgen; Chubykalo-Fesenko, Oksana; Vázquez, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic vortex-based media have recently been proposed for several applications of nanotechnology; however, because lithography is typically used for their preparation, their low-cost, large-scale fabrication is a challenge. One solution may be to use arrays of densely packed cobalt nanowires that have been efficiently fabricated by electrodeposition. In this work, we present this type of nanoscale magnetic structures that can hold multiple stable magnetic vortex domains at remanence with different chiralities. The stable vortex state is observed in arrays of monocrystalline cobalt nanowires with diameters as small as 45 nm and lengths longer than 200 nm with vanishing magnetic cross talk between closely packed neighboring wires in the array. Lorentz microscopy, electron holography and magnetic force microscopy, supported by micromagnetic simulations, show that the structure of the vortex state can be adjusted by varying the aspect ratio of the nanowires. The data we present here introduce a route toward the concept of 3-dimensional vortex-based magnetic memories. PMID:27030143

  15. Single crystalline cylindrical nanowires – toward dense 3D arrays of magnetic vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yurii P.; Chuvilin, Andrey; Vivas, Laura G.; Kosel, Jurgen; Chubykalo-Fesenko, Oksana; Vázquez, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic vortex-based media have recently been proposed for several applications of nanotechnology; however, because lithography is typically used for their preparation, their low-cost, large-scale fabrication is a challenge. One solution may be to use arrays of densely packed cobalt nanowires that have been efficiently fabricated by electrodeposition. In this work, we present this type of nanoscale magnetic structures that can hold multiple stable magnetic vortex domains at remanence with different chiralities. The stable vortex state is observed in arrays of monocrystalline cobalt nanowires with diameters as small as 45 nm and lengths longer than 200 nm with vanishing magnetic cross talk between closely packed neighboring wires in the array. Lorentz microscopy, electron holography and magnetic force microscopy, supported by micromagnetic simulations, show that the structure of the vortex state can be adjusted by varying the aspect ratio of the nanowires. The data we present here introduce a route toward the concept of 3-dimensional vortex-based magnetic memories.

  16. CONTINUUM INTENSITY AND [O i] SPECTRAL LINE PROFILES IN SOLAR 3D PHOTOSPHERIC MODELS: THE EFFECT OF MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbian, D.; Moreno-Insertis, F. E-mail: fmi@iac.es

    2015-04-01

    The importance of magnetic fields in three-dimensional (3D) magnetoconvection models of the Sun’s photosphere is investigated in terms of their influence on the continuum intensity at different viewing inclination angles and on the intensity profile of two [O i] spectral lines. We use the RH numerical radiative transfer code to perform a posteriori spectral synthesis on the same time series of magnetoconvection models used in our publications on the effect of magnetic fields on abundance determination. We obtain a good match of the synthetic disk-center continuum intensity to the absolute continuum values from the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) observational spectrum; the match of the center-to-limb variation synthetic data to observations is also good, thanks, in part, to the 3D radiation transfer capabilities of the RH code. The different levels of magnetic flux in the numerical time series do not modify the quality of the match. Concerning the targeted [O i] spectral lines, we find, instead, that magnetic fields lead to nonnegligible changes in the synthetic spectrum, with larger average magnetic flux causing both of the lines to become noticeably weaker. The photospheric oxygen abundance that one would derive if instead using nonmagnetic numerical models would thus be lower by a few to several centidex. The inclusion of magnetic fields is confirmed to be important for improving the current modeling of the Sun, here in particular in terms of spectral line formation and of deriving consistent chemical abundances. These results may shed further light on the still controversial issue regarding the precise value of the solar oxygen abundance.

  17. Interpretation of gravity and magnetic data with geological constraints for 3D structure of the Thuringian Basin, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prutkin, Ilya; Vajda, Peter; Jahr, Thomas; Bleibinhaus, Florian; Novák, Pavel; Tenzer, Robert

    2017-01-01

    We apply a novel method for the separation of potential field sources and their 3D inversion at the regional study area of Thuringian Basin in central Germany. The gravity and magnetic data are separated into long, medium and short wavelengths and then inverted separately. The main goal is to study uniqueness of the solution and its stability in all numerical steps of the interpretation process and to demonstrate, how geological constraints can diminish the degree of non-uniqueness by the interpretation of the gravity and magnetic anomalies. Our numerical experiments with medium wavelengths reveal that if we explain negative anomalies with the topography of near-surface layers, the obtained solution is not supported by borehole data. These negative anomalies are thus explained by restricted bodies (granitic intrusions) at the depths from 4 down to 10 km. These bodies are located above a density interface with topography at the depth of approximately 10 km. The 3D inversion of magnetic data (at short wavelengths) allows investigating a detailed structure of the upper boundary of the crystalline basement: two uplifts in the depths between 2.0 and 0.7 km are found. By using the residual negative anomalies we further study the salt tectonics, showing that the geometry of a salt pillow with a thickness of approximately 200 m closely agrees with borehole data.

  18. RKKY-like contributions to the magnetic anisotropy energy: 3 d adatoms on Pt(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhassoune, Mohammmed; Dias, Manuel dos Santos; Zimmermann, Bernd; Dederichs, Peter H.; Lounis, Samir

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic anisotropy energy defines the energy barrier that stabilizes a magnetic moment. Utilizing density-functional-theory-based simulations and analytical formulations, we establish that this barrier is strongly modified by long-range contributions very similar to Friedel oscillations and Rudermann-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions. Thus, oscillations are expected and observed, with different decaying factors and highly anisotropic in realistic materials, which can switch nontrivially the sign of the magnetic anisotropy energy. This behavior is general, and for illustration we address the transition-metal adatoms, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co deposited on a Pt(111) surface. We explain, in particular, the mechanisms leading to the strong site dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy observed for Fe adatoms on a Pt(111) surface as revealed previously via first-principles-based simulations and inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy [A. A. Khajetoorians et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 157204 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.157204]. The same mechanisms are probably active for the site dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy obtained for Fe adatoms on Pd or Rh(111) surfaces and for Co adatoms on a Rh(111) surface [P. Blonski et al., Phys. Rev. B 81, 104426 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.81.104426].

  19. A novel method for assessing the 3-D orientation accuracy of inertial/magnetic sensors.

    PubMed

    Faber, Gert S; Chang, Chien-Chi; Rizun, Peter; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2013-10-18

    A novel method for assessing the accuracy of inertial/magnetic sensors is presented. The method, referred to as the "residual matrix" method, is advantageous because it decouples the sensor's error with respect to Earth's gravity vector (attitude residual error: pitch and roll) from the sensor's error with respect to magnetic north (heading residual error), while remaining insensitive to singularity problems when the second Euler rotation is close to ±90°. As a demonstration, the accuracy of an inertial/magnetic sensor mounted to a participant's forearm was evaluated during a reaching task in a laboratory. Sensor orientation was measured internally (by the inertial/magnetic sensor) and externally using an optoelectronic measurement system with a marker cluster rigidly attached to the sensor's enclosure. Roll, pitch and heading residuals were calculated using the proposed novel method, as well as using a common orientation assessment method where the residuals are defined as the difference between the Euler angles measured by the inertial sensor and those measured by the optoelectronic system. Using the proposed residual matrix method, the roll and pitch residuals remained less than 1° and, as expected, no statistically significant difference between these two measures of attitude accuracy was found; the heading residuals were significantly larger than the attitude residuals but remained below 2°. Using the direct Euler angle comparison method, the residuals were in general larger due to singularity issues, and the expected significant difference between inertial/magnetic sensor attitude and heading accuracy was not present.

  20. 3D hybrid simulations of the plasma penetration across a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelchenko, Yuri

    2016-10-01

    The expansion of hot dense plasmas across ambient magnetic fields in physical systems with spatial scales comparable to the ion gyro and inertial lengths is of great interest to space physics and fusion. This work presents results from recent three-dimensional hybrid simulations (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) of experiments at the LAPD and Nevada Terawatt Facility where short-pulse lasers are used to ablate solid targets to produce plasmas that expand across external magnetic fields. The first simulation recreates flutelike density striations observed at the leading edge of the carbon plasma and predicts an early destruction of the magnetic cavity in agreement with experimental evidence. In the second simulation the plasma contains protons and carbon ions produced during the ablation of a polyethylene target. A mechanism is demonstrated that allows protons to penetrate the magnetic field in the form of a collimated flow while the carbon ion component forms a supporting magnetic structure. The role of ion kinetic and Hall effects in creating an electric field responsible for plasma transport is discussed and results are compared to experimental data. The hybrid simulations are performed with a massively parallel hybrid code, HYPERS that advances fields and particles asynchronously on time scales determined by local physical and geometric properties. Supported by US DOE Award DE-SC0012345.

  1. Locating magnetic reconnection x-lines in 3D PIC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, D. K.; Dorelli, J.; Daughton, W. S.; Karimabadi, H.

    2013-12-01

    In a three-dimensional PIC simulation of turbulent magnetic reconnection, a reconnection 'X-line' can be identified as a separator in the magnetic topology. From this x-line, it is possible to compute the reconnection rate by evaluating the line integral of the electric field along the separator. This technique is used in a reconnection simulation of a symmetric Harris sheet driven by inflow at the upstream boundaries with a strong guide field (such that the magnetic field is non-vanishing everywhere and there are no magnetic nulls). The results of this analysis are compared to the General Magnetic Reconnection theory (GMR) [Hesse and Schindler, 1998], showing that in this symmetric case GMR agrees with our topological approach to finding the location of the x-line. The parallel electric field is non-trivial along the entire length of the x-line, however, suggesting that the reconnection diffusion region cannot be identified by local measures of the breakdown of ideal MHD alone. We discuss the implications of these results for NASA's upcoming Magnetospheric Multiscale mission.

  2. Scattering of electromagnetic waves from 3D multilayer random rough surfaces based on the second-order small perturbation method: energy conservation, reflectivity, and emissivity.

    PubMed

    Sanamzadeh, Mohammadreza; Tsang, Leung; Johnson, Joel T; Burkholder, Robert J; Tan, Shurun

    2017-03-01

    A theoretical investigation of energy conservation, reflectivity, and emissivity in the scattering of electromagnetic waves from 3D multilayer media with random rough interfaces using the second-order small perturbation method (SPM2) is presented. The approach is based on the extinction theorem and develops integral equations for surface fields in the spectral domain. Using the SPM2, we calculate the scattered and transmitted coherent fields and incoherent fields. Reflected and transmitted powers are then found in the form of 2D integrations over wavenumber in the spectral domain. In the integrand, there is a summation over the spectral densities of each of the rough interfaces with each weighted by a corresponding kernel function. We show in this paper that there exists a "strong" condition of energy conservation in that the kernel functions multiplying the spectral density of each interface obey energy conservation exactly. This means that energy is conserved independent of the roughness spectral densities of the rough surfaces. Results of this strong condition are illustrated numerically for up to 50 rough interfaces without requiring specification of surface roughness properties. Two examples are illustrated. One is a multilayer configuration having weak contrasts between adjacent layers, random layer thicknesses, and randomly generated permittivity profiles. The second example is a photonic crystal of periodically alternating permittivities of larger dielectric contrast. The methodology is applied to study the effect of roughness on the brightness temperatures of the Antarctic ice sheet, which is characterized by layers of ice with permittivity fluctuations in addition to random rough interfaces. The results show that the influence of roughness can significantly increase horizontally polarized thermal emission while leaving vertically polarized emissions relatively unaffected.

  3. The effect of anisotropic heat transport on magnetic islands in 3-D configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Schlutt, M. G.; Hegna, C. C.

    2012-08-15

    An analytic theory of nonlinear pressure-induced magnetic island formation using a boundary layer analysis is presented. This theory extends previous work by including the effects of finite parallel heat transport and is applicable to general three dimensional magnetic configurations. In this work, particular attention is paid to the role of finite parallel heat conduction in the context of pressure-induced island physics. It is found that localized currents that require self-consistent deformation of the pressure profile, such as resistive interchange and bootstrap currents, are attenuated by finite parallel heat conduction when the magnetic islands are sufficiently small. However, these anisotropic effects do not change saturated island widths caused by Pfirsch-Schlueter current effects. Implications for finite pressure-induced island healing are discussed.

  4. Non-magnetic photospheric bright points in 3D simulations of the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, F.; Steiner, O.; Freytag, B.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Small-scale bright features in the photosphere of the Sun, such as faculae or G-band bright points, appear in connection with small-scale magnetic flux concentrations. Aims: Here we report on a new class of photospheric bright points that are free of magnetic fields. So far, these are visible in numerical simulations only. We explore conditions required for their observational detection. Methods: Numerical radiation (magneto-)hydrodynamic simulations of the near-surface layers of the Sun were carried out. The magnetic field-free simulations show tiny bright points, reminiscent of magnetic bright points, only smaller. A simple toy model for these non-magnetic bright points (nMBPs) was established that serves as a base for the development of an algorithm for their automatic detection. Basic physical properties of 357 detected nMBPs were extracted and statistically evaluated. We produced synthetic intensity maps that mimic observations with various solar telescopes to obtain hints on their detectability. Results: The nMBPs of the simulations show a mean bolometric intensity contrast with respect to their intergranular surroundings of approximately 20%, a size of 60-80 km, and the isosurface of optical depth unity is at their location depressed by 80-100 km. They are caused by swirling downdrafts that provide, by means of the centripetal force, the necessary pressure gradient for the formation of a funnel of reduced mass density that reaches from the subsurface layers into the photosphere. Similar, frequently occurring funnels that do not reach into the photosphere, do not produce bright points. Conclusions: Non-magnetic bright points are the observable manifestation of vertically extending vortices (vortex tubes) in the photosphere. The resolving power of 4-m-class telescopes, such as the DKIST, is needed for an unambiguous detection of them. The movie associated to Fig. 1 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Observation of Magnetic Reconnection at a 3D Null Point Associated with a Solar Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. Q.; Zhang, J.; Yang, K.; Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic null has long been recognized as a special structure serving as a preferential site for magnetic reconnection (MR). However, the direct observational study of MR at null-points is largely lacking. Here, we show the observations of MR around a magnetic null associated with an eruption that resulted in an M1.7 flare and a coronal mass ejection. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites X-ray profile of the flare exhibited two peaks at ∼02:23 UT and ∼02:40 UT on 2012 November 8, respectively. Based on the imaging observations, we find that the first and also primary X-ray peak was originated from MR in the current sheet (CS) underneath the erupting magnetic flux rope (MFR). On the other hand, the second and also weaker X-ray peak was caused by MR around a null point located above the pre-eruption MFR. The interaction of the null point and the erupting MFR can be described as a two-step process. During the first step, the erupting and fast expanding MFR passed through the null point, resulting in a significant displacement of the magnetic field surrounding the null. During the second step, the displaced magnetic field started to move back, resulting in a converging inflow and subsequently the MR around the null. The null-point reconnection is a different process from the current sheet reconnection in this flare; the latter is the cause of the main peak of the flare, while the former is the cause of the secondary peak of the flare and the conspicuous high-lying cusp structure.

  6. Correlation of magnetic perturbation inspection data with rolling element bearing fatigue results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    A magnetic perturbation technique was used to nondestructively detect subsurface nonmetallic inclusions in the inner races of 207-size, deep groove ball bearings. The bearings were fatigue tested at 2750 rpm under a radial load of. The inner races were subsequently sectioned at fatigue spall locations and at magnetic perturbation signal locations. Analyses of the data indicated good correlation between magnetic perturbation signals and inclusion size and location. Exclusion of those bearings that had significant magnetic perturbation signals did not alter the statistical life of the bearings.

  7. Analysis of 3-D Tongue Motion from Tagged and Cine Magnetic Resonance Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xing, Fangxu; Woo, Jonghye; Lee, Junghoon; Murano, Emi Z.; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring tongue deformation and internal muscle motion during speech has been a challenging task because the tongue deforms in 3 dimensions, contains interdigitated muscles, and is largely hidden within the vocal tract. In this article, a new method is proposed to analyze tagged and cine magnetic resonance images of the tongue during…

  8. Magnetic monopoles in 4D: a perturbative calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvedelidze, Arsen; McMullan, David; Kovner, Alex

    2006-01-01

    We address the question of defining the second quantised monopole creation operator in the 3+1 dimensional Georgi-Glashow model, and calculating its expectation value in the confining phase. Our calculation is performed directly in the continuum theory within the framework of perturbation theory. We find that, although it is possible to define the \\lq\\lq coherent state" operator M(x) that creates the Coulomb magnetic field, the dependence of this operator on the Dirac string does not disappear even in the nonabelian theory. This is due to the presence of the charged fields (W±). We also set up the calculation of the expectation value of this operator in the confining phase and show that it is not singular along the Dirac string. We find that in the leading order of the perturbation theory the VEV vanishes as a power of the volume of the system. This is in accordance with our naive expectation. We expect that nonperturbative effects will introduce an effective infrared cutoff on the calculation making the VEV finite.

  9. A 3D model of crustal magnetization at the Pinacate Volcanic Field, NW Sonora, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Abdeslem, Juan; Calmus, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The Pinacate Volcanic Field (PVF) is located near the western border of the southern Basin and Range province, in the State of Sonora NW Mexico, and within the Gulf of California Extensional Province. This volcanic field contains the shield volcano Santa Clara, which mainly consists of basaltic to trachytic volcanic rocks, and reaches an altitude of 1200 m. The PVF disrupts a series of discontinuous ranges of low topographic relief aligned in a NW direction, which consist mainly of Proterozoic metamorphic rocks and Proterozoic through Paleogene granitoids. The PVF covers an area of approximately 60 by 55 km, and includes more than 400 well-preserved cinder cones and vents and eight maar craters. It was active from about 1.7 Ma until about 13 ka. We have used the ages and magnetic polarities of the volcanic rocks, along with mapped magnetic anomalies and their inverse modeling to determine that the Pinacate Volcanic Field was formed during two volcanic episodes. The oldest one built the Santa Clara shield volcano of basaltic and trachytic composition, and occurred during the geomagnetic Matuyama Chron of reverse polarity, which also includes the normal polarity Jaramillo and Olduvai Subchrons, thus imprinting both normal and reverse magnetization in the volcanic products. The younger Pinacate series of basaltic composition represents monogenetic volcanic activity that extends all around the PVF and occurred during the subsequent geomagnetic Brunhes Chron of normal polarity. Magnetic anomalies toward the north of the Santa Clara volcano are the most intense in the PVF, and their inverse modeling indicates the presence of a large subsurface body magnetized in the present direction of the geomagnetic field. This suggests that the magma chambers at depth cooled below the Curie temperature during the Brunhes Chron.

  10. Anisotropic Pressure, Transport, and Shielding of Magnetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick and A.H. Boozer

    2008-05-23

    We compute the effect on a tokamak of applying a nonaxisymmetric magnetic perturbation δΒ. An equilibrium with scalar pressure p yields zero net radial current, and therefore zero torque. Thus, the usual approach, which assumes scalar pressure, is not self-consistent, and masks the close connection which exists between that radial current and the in-surface currents, which provide shielding or amplification of δΒ. Here, we analytically compute the pressure anisoptropy, anisoptropy, pll, p⊥ ≠ p, and from this, both the radial and in-surface currents. The surface-average of the radial current recovers earlier expressions for ripple transport, while the in-surface currents provide an expression for the amount of self-consistent shielding the plasma provides.

  11. Tearing mode velocity braking due to resonant magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassinetti, L.; Menmuir, S.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on the tearing mode (TM) velocity is studied in EXTRAP T2R. Experimental results show that the RMP produces TM braking until a new steady velocity or wall locking is reached. The braking is initially localized at the TM resonance and then spreads to the other TMs and to the rest of the plasma producing a global velocity reduction via the viscous torque. The process has been used to experimentally estimate the kinematic viscosity profile, in the range 2-40 m2 s-1, and the electromagnetic torque produced by the RMP, which is strongly localized at the TM resonance. Experimental results are then compared with a theoretical model which gives a reasonable qualitative explanation of the entire process.

  12. Influence of rotating resonant magnetic perturbations on particle confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiming; Yu, Q.; Wang, Nengchao; Shi, Peng; Yi, Bin; Ding, Yonghua; Rao, Bo; Chen, Zhipeng; Gao, Li; Hu, Xiwei; Jin, Hai; Li, Mao; Li, Jianchao; Yu, Kexun; Zhuang, Ge; the J-TEXT Team

    2014-12-01

    The effect of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on particle confinement is studied in J-TEXT tokamak by using externally applied rotating RMPs. It is found that RMPs cause improved (degraded) particle confinement when its frequency is higher (lower) than the natural m/n = 2/1 tearing mode frequency, and the amount of change in electron density is proportional to the difference between these two frequencies, where m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode number, respectively. These results reveal the important role of the relative rotation between RMPs and the electron fluid in affecting the particle confinement. The experimental results are compared to numerical ones based on nonlinear two-fluid equations, and quantitative agreement is found.

  13. Use of 3-D magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography in detecting human cerebral stroke: a simulation study*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Nuo; Zhu, Shan-an; He, Bin

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a new three dimensional (3-D) conductivity imaging approach and have used it to detect human brain conductivity changes corresponding to acute cerebral stroke. The proposed Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) approach is based on the J-Substitution algorithm and is expanded to imaging 3-D subject conductivity distribution changes. Computer simulation studies have been conducted to evaluate the present MREIT imaging approach. Simulations of both types of cerebral stroke, hemorrhagic stroke and ischemic stroke, were performed on a four-sphere head model. Simulation results showed that the correlation coefficient (CC) and relative error (RE) between target and estimated conductivity distributions were 0.9245±0.0068 and 8.9997%±0.0084%, for hemorrhagic stroke, and 0.6748±0.0197 and 8.8986%±0.0089%, for ischemic stroke, when the SNR (signal-to-noise radio) of added GWN (Gaussian White Noise) was 40. The convergence characteristic was also evaluated according to the changes of CC and RE with different iteration numbers. The CC increases and RE decreases monotonously with the increasing number of iterations. The present simulation results show the feasibility of the proposed 3-D MREIT approach in hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke detection and suggest that the method may become a useful alternative in clinical diagnosis of acute cerebral stroke in humans. PMID:15822161

  14. Reconstruction of 3D Coronal Magnetic Structures from THEMIS/MTR and Hinode/SOT Vector Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Guo, Y.; Aulanier, G.; Démoulin, P.; Török, T.; Bommier, V.; Wiegelmann, T.; Gosain, S.

    2012-08-01

    Coordinated campaigns using THEMIS, Hinode, and other instruments have allowed us to study the magnetic fields of faculae, filaments, and active regions. In a first case, we modelled the 3D magnetic field in a flaring active region with a nonlinear force-free field extrapolation, using magnetic vectors observed by THEMIS/MTR as boundary condition. In order to construct a consistent bottom boundary for the model, we first removed the 180 degree ambiguity of the transverse fields and minimized the force and torque in the observed vector fields. We found a twisted magnetic flux rope, well aligned with the polarity inversion line and a part of an Hα filament, and located where a large flare is initiated about two hours later. In a second case, Hinode/SOT allowed us to detect fine flux concentrations in faculae, while MTR provided us with magnetic information at different levels in the atmosphere. The polarimetry analysis of the MTR and SOT data gave consistent results, using both UNNOFIT and MELANIE inversion codes.

  15. 3D modeling inversion calculation of magnetic data using iterative reweighted least squares at the Lau basin, Southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S.; Kim, C.; Kim, H. R.; Park, C.; Park, H. Y.

    2015-12-01

    We performed the marine magnetic and the bathymetry survey in the Lau basin for finding the submarine hydrothermal deposits in October 2009. We acquired magnetic and bathymetry datasets by using Overhouser Proton Magnetometer SeaSPY(Marine Magnetics Co.) and Multi-Beam Echo Sounder EM120(Kongsberg Co.). We conducted the data processing to obtain detailed seabed topography, magnetic anomaly and reduction to the pole(RTP). The Lau basin is one of the youngest back-arc basins in the Southwest Pacific. This region was a lot of hydrothermal activities and hydrothermal deposits. In particular, Tofua Arc(TA) in the Lau basin consists of various and complex stratovolcanos(from Massoth et al., 2007).), We calculated the magnetic susceptibility distribution of the TA19-1 seamount(longitude:176°23.5'W, latitude: 22°42.5'W)area using the RTP data by 3-D magnetic inversion from Jung's previous study(2013). Based on 2D 'compact gravity inversion' by Last & Kubik(1983), we expend it to the 3D algorithm using iterative reweighted least squares method with some weight matrices. The used weight matrices are two types: 1) the minimum gradient support(MGS) that controls the spatial distribution of the solution from Porniaguine and Zhdanov(1999); 2) the depth weight that are used according to the shape of subsurface structures. From the modeling, we derived the appropriate scale factor for the use of depth weight and setting magnetic susceptibility. Furthermore, we have to enter a very small error value to control the computation of the singular point of the inversion model that was able to be easily calculated for modeling. In addition, we applied separately weighted value for the correct shape and depth of the magnetic source. We selected the best results model by change to converge of RMS. Compared between the final modeled result and RTP values in this study, they are generally similar to the each other. But the input values and the modeled values have slightly little difference

  16. Sensitivity of a 3D fully-gapped topological superconductor to non-magnetic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Yukihiro; Nagai, Yuki; Machida, Masahiko

    2015-03-01

    Topological superconductors (TSC) are notable materials, owing to the mathematical curiosity and the application potential. The bulk TSC can emerge by copper intercalation into topological insulator Bi2Se3. In this paper, we theoretically study the non-magnetic impurity effects in the mean-field model of CuxBi2Se3, focusing on the odd-parity fully-gapped superconducting state. Calculating the density of states with a self-consistent T-matrix approach, we test the presence of mid-gap states, leading to pair-breaking effects. Remarkably, the sensitivity to non-magnetic impurities strongly depend on a normal-state dispersion character, i.e., either non-relativistic or relativistic dispersion relations. We show unification picture for understanding this intriguing result, deriving a low-energy effective superconducting theory.

  17. The feasibility assessment of radiation dose of movement 3D NIPAM gel by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chih-Ming; Leung, Joseph Hang; Ng, Yu-Bun; Cheng, Chih-Wu; Sun, Jung-Chang; Lin, Ping-Chin; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung

    2015-11-01

    NIPAM dosimeter is widely accepted and recommended for its 3D distribution and accuracy in dose absorption. Up to the moment, most research works on dose measurement are based on a fixed irradiation target without the consideration of the effect from physiological motion. We present a study to construct a respiratory motion simulating patient anatomical and dosimetry model for the study of dosimetic effect of organ motion. The dose on fixed and motion targets was measured by MRI after a dose adminstration of 1, 2, 5, 8, and 10 Gy from linear accelerator. Comparison of two situations is made. The average sensitivity of fixed NIPAM was 0.1356 s-1/Gy with linearity R2=0.998. The average sensitivity of movement NIPAM was 0.1366 s-1/Gy with linearity R2=0.998 both having only 0.001 of the sensitivity difference. The difference between the two based on dose rate dependency, position and depth was not significant. There was thus no apparent impact on NIPAM dosimeter from physiological motion. The high sensitivity, linearity and stability of NIPAM dosimeter proved to be an ideal apparatus in the dose measurement in these circumstances.

  18. Simulations of Gyrosynchrotron Microwave Emission from an Oscillating 3D Magnetic Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. A.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Reznikova, V. E.

    2015-04-01

    Radio observations of solar flares often reveal various periodic or quasi-periodic oscillations. Most likely, these oscillations are caused by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations of flaring loops which modulate the emission. Interpreting the observations requires comparing them with simulations. We simulated the gyrosynchrotron radio emission from a semicircular (toroidal-shaped) magnetic loop containing sausage-mode MHD oscillations. The aim was to detect the observable signatures specific to the considered MHD mode and to study their dependence on the various source parameters. The MHD waves were simulated using a linear three-dimensional model of a magnetized plasma cylinder; both standing and propagating waves were considered. The curved loop was formed by replicating the MHD solutions along the plasma cylinder and bending the cylinder; this model allowed us to study the effect of varying the viewing angle along the loop. The radio emission was simulated using a three-dimensional model, and its spatial and temporal variations were analyzed. We considered several loop orientations and different parameters of the magnetic field, plasma, and energetic electrons in the loop. In the model with low plasma density, the intensity oscillations at all frequencies are synchronous (with the exception of a narrow spectral region below the spectral peak). In the model with high plasma density, the emission at low frequencies (where the Razin effect is important) oscillates in anti-phase with the emissions at higher frequencies. The oscillations at high and low frequencies are more pronounced in different parts of the loop (depending on the loop orientation). The layers where the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field changes sign can produce additional peculiarities in the oscillation patterns.

  19. Adsorbent 2D and 3D carbon matrices with protected magnetic iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Carreño, N L V; Escote, M T; Valentini, A; McCafferty, L; Stolojan, V; Beliatis, M; Mills, C A; Rhodes, R; Smith, C T G; Silva, S R P

    2015-11-07

    We report on the synthesis of two and three dimensional carbonaceous sponges produced directly from graphene oxide (GO) into which functionalized iron nanoparticles can be introduced to render it magnetic. This simple, low cost procedure, wherein an iron polymeric resin precursor is introduced into the carbon framework, results in carbon-based materials with specific surface areas of the order of 93 and 66 m(2) g(-1), compared to approx. 4 m(2) g(-1) for graphite, decorated with ferromagnetic iron nanoparticles giving coercivity fields postulated to be 216 and 98 Oe, values typical for ferrite magnets, for 3.2 and 13.5 wt% Fe respectively. The strongly magnetic iron nanoparticles are robustly anchored to the GO sheets by a layer of residual graphite, on the order of 5 nm, formed during the pyrolysis of the precursor material. The applicability of the carbon sponges is demonstrated in their ability to absorb, store and subsequently elute an organic dye, Rhodamine B, from water as required. It is possible to regenerate the carbon-iron hybrid material after adsorption by eluting the dye with a solvent to which it has a high affinity, such as ethanol. The use of a carbon framework opens the hybrid materials to further chemical functionalization, for enhanced chemical uptake of contaminants, or co-decoration with, for example, silver nanoparticles for bactericidal properties. Such analytical properties, combined with the material's magnetic character, offer solutions for environmental decontamination at land and sea, wastewater purification, solvent extraction, and for the concentration of dilute species.

  20. Adsorbent 2D and 3D carbon matrices with protected magnetic iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreño, N. L. V.; Escote, M. T.; Valentini, A.; McCafferty, L.; Stolojan, V.; Beliatis, M.; Mills, C. A.; Rhodes, R.; Smith, C. T. G.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the synthesis of two and three dimensional carbonaceous sponges produced directly from graphene oxide (GO) into which functionalized iron nanoparticles can be introduced to render it magnetic. This simple, low cost procedure, wherein an iron polymeric resin precursor is introduced into the carbon framework, results in carbon-based materials with specific surface areas of the order of 93 and 66 m2 g-1, compared to approx. 4 m2 g-1 for graphite, decorated with ferromagnetic iron nanoparticles giving coercivity fields postulated to be 216 and 98 Oe, values typical for ferrite magnets, for 3.2 and 13.5 wt% Fe respectively. The strongly magnetic iron nanoparticles are robustly anchored to the GO sheets by a layer of residual graphite, on the order of 5 nm, formed during the pyrolysis of the precursor material. The applicability of the carbon sponges is demonstrated in their ability to absorb, store and subsequently elute an organic dye, Rhodamine B, from water as required. It is possible to regenerate the carbon-iron hybrid material after adsorption by eluting the dye with a solvent to which it has a high affinity, such as ethanol. The use of a carbon framework opens the hybrid materials to further chemical functionalization, for enhanced chemical uptake of contaminants, or co-decoration with, for example, silver nanoparticles for bactericidal properties. Such analytical properties, combined with the material's magnetic character, offer solutions for environmental decontamination at land and sea, wastewater purification, solvent extraction, and for the concentration of dilute species.

  1. Magnetic field perturbation of neural recording and stimulating microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Santiesteban, Francisco M.; Swanson, Scott D.; Noll, Douglas C.; Anderson, David J.

    2007-04-01

    To improve the overall temporal and spatial resolution of brain mapping techniques, in animal models, some attempts have been reported to join electrophysiological methods with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, little attention has been paid to the image artefacts produced by the microelectrodes that compromise the anatomical or functional information of those studies. This work presents a group of simulations and MR images that show the limitations of wire microelectrodes and the potential advantages of silicon technology, in terms of image quality, in MRI environments. Magnetic field perturbations are calculated using a Fourier-based method for platinum (Pt) and tungsten (W) microwires as well as two different silicon technologies. We conclude that image artefacts produced by microelectrodes are highly dependent not only on the magnetic susceptibility of the materials used but also on the size, shape and orientation of the electrodes with respect to the main magnetic field. In addition silicon microelectrodes present better MRI characteristics than metallic microelectrodes. However, metallization layers added to silicon materials can adversely affect the quality of MR images. Therefore only those silicon microelectrodes that minimize the amount of metallic material can be considered MR-compatible and therefore suitable for possible simultaneous fMRI and electrophysiological studies. High resolution gradient echo images acquired at 2 T (TR/TE = 100/15 ms, voxel size = 100 × 100 × 100 µm3) of platinum-iridium (Pt-Ir, 90%-10%) and tungsten microwires show a complete signal loss that covers a volume significantly larger than the actual volume occupied by the microelectrodes: roughly 400 times larger for Pt-Ir and 180 for W, at the tip of the microelectrodes. Similar MR images of a single-shank silicon microelectrode only produce a partial volume effect on the voxels occupied by the probe with less than 50% of signal loss.

  2. Orbital driven impurity spin effect on the magnetic order of quasi-3D cupric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganga, B. G.; Santhosh, P. N.; Nanda, B. R. K.

    2017-04-01

    Density functional calculations are performed to study the magnetic order of the severely distorted square planar cupric oxide (CuO) and local spin disorder in it in the presence of the transition metal impurities M (=Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni). The distortion in the crystal structure, arisen to reduce the band energy by minimizing the covalent interaction, creates two crisscrossing zigzag spin-1/2 chains. From the spin dimer analysis we find that while the spin chain along ≤ft[1 0 \\bar{1}\\right] has strong Heisenberg type antiferromagnetic coupling (J ~ 127 meV), along ≤ft[1 0 1\\right] it exhibits weak, but robust, ferromagnetic coupling (J ~ 9 meV) mediated by reminiscent p-d covalent interactions. The impurity effect on the magnetic ordering is independent of M and purely orbital driven. If the given spin-state of M is such that the {{d}{{x2}-{{y}2}}} orbital is spin-polarized, then the original long-range ordering is maintained. However, if {{d}{{x2}-{{y}2}}} orbital is unoccupied, the absence of corresponding covalent interaction breaks the weak ferromagnetic coupling and a spin-flip takes place at the impurity site leading to breakdown of the long range magnetic ordering.

  3. 3-D Modelling of Magnetic Data from an Archaeological Site in Northwestern Tlaxcala State, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, R. E.; Argote, D. L.; Cifuentes, G.; Tejero, A.; Camara, E.

    2009-05-01

    In Archaeology, geophysical methods had been applied usually in a qualitative form, limited only to the use of filters that enhance the data display. The main objective in this work is the implementation of a modeling technique that allows us to reconstruct the geometry of buried bodies and the determination of their depths. This is done by means of the estimation of the magnetic moments of archaeological objects using a three- dimensional mesh of individual magnetic dipoles using the least squares method and the singular value decomposition of a weighted matrix to solve the linear problem. The distribution and shape of the underlying archaeological remains can be inferred. This methodology was applied to an archaeological site called Los Teteles de Ocotitla, in the state of Tlaxcala, Mexico. A high-resolution magnetic prospection was carried out in three selected areas (terraces). The most important total field anomalies found on each area were inverted, obtaining results that were corroborated by archaeological excavations. This investigation demonstrates the potential of quantitative geophysical methods for the characterization of archaeological structures, in extension and in depth.

  4. Orbital driven impurity spin effect on the magnetic order of quasi-3D cupric oxide.

    PubMed

    Ganga, B G; Santhosh, P N; Nanda, B R K

    2017-04-20

    Density functional calculations are performed to study the magnetic order of the severely distorted square planar cupric oxide (CuO) and local spin disorder in it in the presence of the transition metal impurities M (=Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni). The distortion in the crystal structure, arisen to reduce the band energy by minimizing the covalent interaction, creates two crisscrossing zigzag spin-1/2 chains. From the spin dimer analysis we find that while the spin chain along [Formula: see text] has strong Heisenberg type antiferromagnetic coupling (J ~ 127 meV), along [Formula: see text] it exhibits weak, but robust, ferromagnetic coupling (J ~ 9 meV) mediated by reminiscent p-d covalent interactions. The impurity effect on the magnetic ordering is independent of M and purely orbital driven. If the given spin-state of M is such that the [Formula: see text] orbital is spin-polarized, then the original long-range ordering is maintained. However, if [Formula: see text] orbital is unoccupied, the absence of corresponding covalent interaction breaks the weak ferromagnetic coupling and a spin-flip takes place at the impurity site leading to breakdown of the long range magnetic ordering.

  5. The Effect of Dissipation Mechanism on X-line Spreading in 3D Magnetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, L. S.; Cassak, P.; Phan, T.; Shay, M. A.; Gosling, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    Naturally occurring magnetic reconnection generally begins in a spatially localized region and spreads in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane as time progresses. Reconnection spreading is associated with dawn-dusk asymmetries during substorms in the magnetotail and has been observed in two-ribbon flares (such as the Bastille Day flare) and laboratory experiments at the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) and the Magnetic Reconnection eXperiment (MRX). It was suggested that X-line spreading is necessary to explain the existence of X-lines extending more than 390 Earth radii (Phan et al., Nature, 404, 848, 2006). Previous numerical studies exploring the spreading of localized magnetic reconnection exclusively addressed collisionless (Hall) reconnection. Here, we address the effect of dissipation mechanism has on X-line spreading with and without a guide field. We compare previous results with simulations using three alternate phases of reconnection - Sweet-Parker reconnection, collisional reconnection with secondary islands, and reconnection with anomalous resistivity. We present results from three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations to address the nature of X-line spreading. Applications to reconnection in the solar wind and corona will be discussed.

  6. Tunable electronic and magnetic properties in stanene by 3d transition metal atoms absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Dan-Xu; Ren, Ceng-Ceng; Zhang, Shu-Feng; Feng, Yong; Chen, Xin-Lian; Zhang, Chang-Wen; Wang, Pei-Ji

    2017-03-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal (TM) atoms (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) adsorption on stanene are investigated by first-principles calculations. The results indicate that the TM atoms prefer to be relaxed on a H site on stanene except V atom which lies on the valley site. Fe-absorbed stanene is a spin gapless semiconductor with up-spin electron and down-spin hole carriers allowing the coexistence of charge current and the pure spin current. Co-absorbed stanene lies in the half metal phase. The V-, Cr-, Mn-, and Cu-absorbed stanene turn the stanene into metal, while Ni- and Zn-absorbed stanene open a narrow band gap. For V-, Cr-, Mn-, Fe-, and Co-absorbed stanene, the magnetic moment of the TM will survive while the Ni-, Cu-, and Zn-absorbed stanene will be non-magnetic material. These findings may have great potential in the design of new electrically controllable spintronic devices.

  7. 3-D RPIC simulations of relativistic jets: Particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing (relativistic) jets and shocks, e.g., supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the .shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration in jets.

  8. Registration and real-time visualization of transcranial magnetic stimulation with 3-D MR images.

    PubMed

    Noirhomme, Quentin; Ferrant, Matthieu; Vandermeeren, Yves; Olivier, Etienne; Macq, Benoît; Cuisenaire, Olivier

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes a method for registering and visualizing in real-time the results of transcranial magnetic stimulations (TMS) in physical space on the corresponding anatomical locations in MR images of the brain. The method proceeds in three main steps. First, the patient scalp is digitized in physical space with a magnetic-field digitizer, following a specific digitization pattern. Second, a registration process minimizes the mean square distance between those points and a segmented scalp surface extracted from the magnetic resonance image. Following this registration, the physician can follow the change in coil position in real-time through the visualization interface and adjust the coil position to the desired anatomical location. Third, amplitude of motor evoked potentials can be projected onto the segmented brain in order to create functional brain maps. The registration has subpixel accuracy in a study with simulated data, while we obtain a point to surface root-mean-square error of 1.17+/-0.38 mm in a 24 subject study.

  9. Convective radial energy flux due to resonant magnetic perturbations and magnetic curvature at the tokamak plasma edge

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, F. A.; Beyer, P.; Fuhr, G.; Monnier, A.; Benkadda, S.

    2014-08-15

    With the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) consolidating as an important tool to control the transport barrier relaxation, the mechanism on how they work is still a subject to be clearly understood. In this work, we investigate the equilibrium states in the presence of RMPs for a reduced MHD model using 3D electromagnetic fluid numerical code with a single harmonic RMP (single magnetic island chain) and multiple harmonics RMPs in cylindrical and toroidal geometry. Two different equilibrium states were found in the presence of the RMPs with different characteristics for each of the geometries used. For the cylindrical geometry in the presence of a single RMP, the equilibrium state is characterized by a strong convective radial thermal flux and the generation of a mean poloidal velocity shear. In contrast, for toroidal geometry, the thermal flux is dominated by the magnetic flutter. For multiple RMPs, the high amplitude of the convective flux and poloidal rotation are basically the same in cylindrical geometry, but in toroidal geometry the convective thermal flux and the poloidal rotation appear only with the islands overlapping of the linear coupling between neighbouring poloidal wavenumbers m, m – 1, and m + 1.

  10. Effect of rotation zero-crossing on single-fluid plasma response to three-dimensional magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, B. C.; Ferraro, N. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Nazikian, R.; Wingen, A.

    2017-04-01

    In order to understand the effect of rotation on the response of a plasma to three-dimensional magnetic perturbations, we perform a systematic scan of the zero-crossing of the rotation profile in a DIII-D ITER-similar shape equilibrium using linear, time-independent modeling with the M3D-C1 extended magnetohydrodynamics code. We confirm that the local resonant magnetic field generally increases as the rotation decreases at a rational surface. Multiple peaks in the resonant field are observed near rational surfaces, however, and the maximum resonant field does not always correspond to zero rotation at the surface. Furthermore, we show that non-resonant current can be driven at zero-crossings not aligned with rational surfaces if there is sufficient shear in the rotation profile there, leading to amplification of near-resonant Fourier harmonics of the perturbed magnetic field and a decrease in the far-off-resonant harmonics. The quasilinear electromagnetic torque induced by this non-resonant plasma response provides drive to flatten the rotation, possibly allowing for increased transport in the pedestal by the destabilization of turbulent modes. In addition, this torque acts to drive the rotation zero-crossing to dynamically stable points near rational surfaces, which would allow for increased resonant penetration. By one or both of these mechanisms, this torque may play an important role in bifurcations into suppression of edge-localized modes. Finally, we discuss how these changes to the plasma response could be detected by tokamak diagnostics. In particular, we show that the changes to the resonant field discussed here have a significant impact on the external perturbed magnetic field, which should be observable by magnetic sensors on the high-field side of tokamaks but not on the low-field side. In addition, TRIP3D-MAFOT simulations show that none of the changes to the plasma response described here substantially affects the divertor footprint structure.

  11. Integration of 3D 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy data into neuronavigation systems for tumor biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanberoglu, Berkay; Moore, Nina Z.; Frakes, David; Karam, Lina J.; Debbins, Josef P.; Preul, Mark C.

    2013-03-01

    Many important applications in clinical medicine can benefit from the fusion of spectroscopy data with anatomical images. For example, the correlation of metabolite profiles with specific regions of interest in anatomical tumor images can be useful in characterizing and treating heterogeneous tumors that appear structurally homogeneous. Such applications can build on the correlation of data from in-vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Imaging (1HMRSI) with data from genetic and ex-vivo Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. To establish that correlation, tissue samples must be neurosurgically extracted from specifically identified locations with high accuracy. Toward that end, this paper presents new neuronavigation technology that enhances current clinical capabilities in the context of neurosurgical planning and execution. The proposed methods improve upon the current state-of-the-art in neuronavigation through the use of detailed three dimensional (3D) 1H-MRSI data. MRSI spectra are processed and analyzed, and specific voxels are selected based on their chemical contents. 3D neuronavigation overlays are then generated and applied to anatomical image data in the operating room. Without such technology, neurosurgeons must rely on memory and other qualitative resources alone for guidance in accessing specific MRSI-identified voxels. In contrast, MRSI-based overlays provide quantitative visual cues and location information during neurosurgery. The proposed methods enable a progressive new form of online MRSI-guided neuronavigation that we demonstrate in this study through phantom validation and clinical application.

  12. Self-assembly of a 3d-5f trinuclear single-molecule magnet from a pentavalent uranyl complex.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Lucile; Walsh, James P S; Pécaut, Jacques; Tuna, Floriana; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2014-12-01

    Mixed-metal uranium compounds are very attractive candidates in the design of single-molecule magnets (SMMs), but only one 3d-5f hetero-polymetallic SMM containing a uranium center is known. Herein, we report two trimeric heterodimetallic 3d-5f complexes self-assembled by cation-cation interactions between a uranyl(V) complex and a TPA-capped M(II)  complex (M=Mn (1), Cd (2); TPA=tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine). The metal centers were strategically chosen to promote the formation of discrete molecules rather than extended chains. Compound 1, which contains an almost linear {MnOUOMn} core, exhibits SMM behavior with a relaxation barrier of 81±0.5 K-the highest reported for a mono-uranium system-arising from intramolecular Mn-U exchange interactions combined with the high Ising anisotropy of the uranyl(V) moiety. Compound 1 also exhibits an open magnetic hysteresis loop at temperatures less than 3 K, with a significant coercive field of 1.9 T at 1.8 K.

  13. Extended MHD modeling of edge-localized mode suppression by three-dimensional magnetic perturbations in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, G. Y.; Kim, J.; Evans, T. E.; Lyons, B. C.; Orlov, D. M.; Ferraro, N. M.; in, Y.; Choi, M. J.; Yoon, S. W.

    2016-10-01

    In this presentation, we report on numerical calculations of the linear response of a plasma to applied three-dimensional magnetic perturbations (MPs) in KSTAR. Simulations are implemented using the extended MHD code M3D-C1. Initial M3D-C1 calculation of the plasma response in KSTAR has already produced results that are qualitatively consistent with some experimental characteristics observed during the application of MPs in KSTAR, i.e., amplified kink response and associated plasma displacements. Both of the tearing and kink responses are considered and used to explain the basic experimental characteristics of the suppression of edge-localized modes (ELMs) in KSTAR, i.e., q95, heating, and plasma shape dependences of the suppression. In particular, attention is focused on validation studies comparing the M3D-C1 plasma response results to the magnetic and imaging diagnostic measurements (i.e., ECEI data) in KSTAR. In addition, comparison study of the M3D-C1 results with KSTAR and DIII-D data will be presented to help understand a common ELM suppression mechanism which is expected to hold across the different tokamaks.

  14. Three-dimensional modeling of plasma edge transport and divertor fluxes during application of resonant magnetic perturbations on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, O.; Becoulet, M.; Cahyna, P.; Evans, T. E.; Feng, Y.; Frerichs, H.; Loarte, A.; Pitts, R. A.; Reiser, D.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Harting, D.; Kirschner, A.; Kukushkin, A.; Lunt, T.; Saibene, G.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Wiesen, S.

    2016-06-01

    Results from three-dimensional modeling of plasma edge transport and plasma-wall interactions during application of resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields for control of edge-localized modes in the ITER standard 15 MA Q  =  10 H-mode are presented. The full 3D plasma fluid and kinetic neutral transport code EMC3-EIRENE is used for the modeling. Four characteristic perturbed magnetic topologies are considered and discussed with reference to the axisymmetric case without RMP fields. Two perturbation field amplitudes at full and half of the ITER ELM control coil current capability using the vacuum approximation are compared to a case including a strongly screening plasma response. In addition, a vacuum field case at high q 95  =  4.2 featuring increased magnetic shear has been modeled. Formation of a three-dimensional plasma boundary is seen for all four perturbed magnetic topologies. The resonant field amplitudes and the effective radial magnetic field at the separatrix define the shape and extension of the 3D plasma boundary. Opening of the magnetic field lines from inside the separatrix establishes scrape-off layer-like channels of direct parallel particle and heat flux towards the divertor yielding a reduction of the main plasma thermal and particle confinement. This impact on confinement is most accentuated at full RMP current and is strongly reduced when screened RMP fields are considered, as well as for the reduced coil current cases. The divertor fluxes are redirected into a three-dimensional pattern of helical magnetic footprints on the divertor target tiles. At maximum perturbation strength, these fingers stretch out as far as 60 cm across the divertor targets, yielding heat flux spreading and the reduction of peak heat fluxes by 30%. However, at the same time substantial and highly localized heat fluxes reach divertor areas well outside of the axisymmetric heat flux decay profile. Reduced RMP amplitudes due to screening or reduced RMP

  15. Optimization of applied non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations using multimodal plasma response on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisberg, D. B.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Lanctot, M. J.; Strait, E. J.; Evans, T. E.

    2016-10-01

    The plasma response to proposed 3D coil geometries in the DIII-D tokamak is investigated using the linear MHD plasma response code MARS-F. An extensive examination of low- and high-field side coil arrangements shows the potential to optimize the coupling between imposed non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations and the total plasma response by varying the toroidal and poloidal spectral content of the applied field. Previous work has shown that n=2 and n=3 perturbations can suppress edge-localized modes (ELMs) in cases where the applied field's coupling to resonant surfaces is enhanced by amplifying marginally-stable kink modes. This research is extended to higher n-number configurations of 2 to 3 rows with up to 12 coils each in order to advance the physical understanding and optimization of both the resonant and non-resonant responses. Both in- and ex-vessel configurations are considered. The plasma braking torque is also analyzed, and coil geometries with favorable plasma coupling characteristics are discussed. Work supported by GA internal funds.

  16. Resonant magnetic perturbation effect on tearing mode dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassinetti, L.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.

    2010-03-01

    The effect of a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) on the tearing mode (TM) dynamics is experimentally studied in the EXTRAP T2R device. EXTRAP T2R is equipped with a set of sensor coils and active coils connected by a digital controller allowing a feedback control of the magnetic instabilities. The recently upgraded feedback algorithm allows the suppression of all the error field harmonics but keeping a selected harmonic to the desired amplitude, therefore opening the possibility of a clear study of the RMP effect on the corresponding TM. The paper shows that the RMP produces two typical effects: (1) a weak oscillation in the TM amplitude and a modulation in the TM velocity or (2) a strong modulation in the TM amplitude and phase jumps. Moreover, the locking mechanism of a TM to a RMP is studied in detail. It is shown that before the locking, the TM dynamics is characterized by velocity modulation followed by phase jumps. Experimental results are reasonably explained by simulations obtained with a model.

  17. 3-D Modelling of Stretched Solitary Waves along Magnetic Field Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschietti, L.; Roth, I.; Carlson, C. W.; Berthomier, M.

    2001-12-01

    A model is presented for a new type of fast solitary waves which is observed by FAST in downward current regions of the auroral zone. The three-dimensional, coherent structures are electrostatic, have a positive potential, and move along the ambient magnetic field lines with speeds on the order of the electron drift. Their potential profile in the parallel direction, which can be directly measured, is flat-top whereby it cannot fit to the Gaussian shape used in previous work. Their potential profile in the perpendicular direction can only be inferred from a measured unipolar electric signal. We develop an extended BGK model which includes a flattened potential and an assumed cylindrical symmetry around a centric magnetic field line. The model envisions concentric shells of trapped electrons slowly drifting azimuthally while bouncing back and forth in the parallel direction. The electron dynamics is analysed in terms of three basic motions that occur on different time scales. These are defined by the cyclotron frequency Ω e, the bounce frequency ω b, and the azimuthal drift frequency ω γ , for which explicit analytical expressions are obtained. Subject to the ordering ω γ <<ωb<< Ωe, we calculate self-consistent distribution functions in terms of approximate constants of motion. Constraints on the parameters characterizing the amplitude and shape of the stretched solitary wave are discussed.

  18. 3D Magnetically Ordered Open Supramolecular Architectures Based on Ferrimagnetic Cu/Adenine/Hydroxide Heptameric Wheels.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguirre, Rubén; Beobide, Garikoitz; Castillo, Oscar; de Pedro, Imanol; Luque, Antonio; Pérez-Yáñez, Sonia; Rodríguez Fernández, Jesús; Román, Pascual

    2016-08-01

    The present work provides two new examples of supramolecular metal-organic frameworks consisting of three-dimensional extended noncovalent assemblies of wheel-shaped heptanuclear [Cu7(μ-H2O)6(μ3-OH)6(μ-adeninato-κN3:κN9)6](2+) entities. The heptanuclear entity consists of a central [Cu(OH)6](4-) core connected to six additional copper(II) metal centers in a radial and planar arrangement through the hydroxides. It generates a wheel-shaped entity in which water molecules and μ-κN3:κN9 adeninato ligands bridge the peripheral copper atoms. The magnetic characterization indicates the central copper(II) center is anti-ferromagnetically coupled to external copper(II) centers, which are ferromagnetically coupled among them leading to an S = 5/2 ground state. The packing of these entities is sustained by π-π stacking interactions between the adenine nucleobases and by hydrogen bonds established among the hydroxide ligands, sulfate anions, and adenine nucleobases. The sum of both types of supramolecular interactions creates a rigid synthon that in combination with the rigidity of the heptameric entity generates an open supramolecular structure (40-50% of available space) in which additional sulfate and triethylammonium ions are located altogether with solvent molecules. These compounds represent an interesting example of materials combining both porosity and magnetic relevant features.

  19. Localization and propagation of the energy release during 3D kinetic magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Markidis, Stefano; Goldman, Marty; Newman, David

    2013-04-01

    Reconnection is a key processes where energy is released: magnetic field lines break, merge in a new configuration. In the process some of the energy is released. Recent work by Shay and collaborators has pointed out that energy is released far and moving fast away from the reconnection site, at a speed exceeding several times the Alfven speed. We revisit this point, considering the release of energy from reconnection and considering both laminar processes and turbulent reconnection. We analyse the energy budget and the processes of energy transfer via Poynting flux and particle flows. The results are compared with the recent findings by Shay. The effect of the guide field can be very significant at even relatively weak strength, as our recent analysis shows. The effect on the life cycle of energy is considered. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under the grant agreement SWIFF (project n° 263340, www.swiff.eu). [1] M. A. Shay, J. F. Drake, J. P. Eastwood, and T. D. Phan, Super-Alfvénic Propagation of Substorm Reconnection Signatures and Poynting Flux, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 089901, 2011. [2] M.V. Goldman, G. Lapenta, D. L. Newman, S. Markidis, H. Che, Jet Deflection by Very Weak Guide Fields during Magnetic Reconnection, Physical Review Letters, 107, 135001, 2011.

  20. 3D calculations of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) 3 Tesla magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Lari, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    A 20 TeV Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) proton accelerator is being proposed by the High Energy Physics Community. One proposal would consist of a ring of magnets 164 km in circumference with a field strength of 3 Tesla and would cost 2.7 billion dollars. The magnet consists of stacked steel laminations with superconducting coils. The desired field uniformity is obtained for all fields from 0.2 to 3 Tesla by using three (or more) different pole shapes. These three different laminations are stacked in the order 1-2-3-1-2-3-... creating a truly three dimensional geometry. A three laminated stack 1-2-3 with periodic boundary conditions at 1 and 3 was assigned about 5000 finite elements per lamination and solved using the computer program TOSCA. To check the TOSCA results, the field of each of the three different shaped laminations was calculated separately using periodic boundary conditions and compared to the two dimensional field calculations using TRIM. This was done for a constant permeability of 2000 and using the B-H table for fully annealed 1010 steel. The difference of the field calculations in the region of interest was always less than +-.2%

  1. 3D imaging of magnetic particles using the 7-channel magnetoencephalography device without pre-magnetization or displacement of the sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polikarpov, M. A.; Ustinin, M. N.; Rykunov, S. D.; Yurenya, A. Y.; Naurzakov, S. P.; Grebenkin, A. P.; Panchenko, V. Y.

    2017-04-01

    SQUID-based magnetoencephalography device was used for the measurement of a magnetic noise generated by ferrofluid in the stationary standing vial. It was found that a free surface of the ferrofluid generates spontaneous magnetic field sufficient to detect the presence of nanoparticles in the experimental setup. The spatial distribution of elementary magnetic sources was reconstructed by the frequency-pattern analysis of multichannel time series. The localization of ferrofluids was performed based on the analysis of quasirandom time series in two cases of oscillation source. One of them was infrasound from outer noise, and another one was the human heartbeat. These results are prospective for 3D imaging of magnetic particles without pre-magnetization.

  2. Computation of load performance and other parameters of extra high speed modified Lundell alternators from 3D-FE magnetic field solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, R.; Demerdash, N. A.

    1992-01-01

    The combined magnetic vector potential - magnetic scalar potential method of computation of 3D magnetic fields by finite elements, introduced in a companion paper, in combination with state modeling in the abc-frame of reference, are used for global 3D magnetic field analysis and machine performance computation under rated load and overload condition in an example 14.3 kVA modified Lundell alternator. The results vividly demonstrate the 3D nature of the magnetic field in such machines, and show how this model can be used as an excellent tool for computation of flux density distributions, armature current and voltage waveform profiles and harmonic contents, as well as computation of torque profiles and ripples. Use of the model in gaining insight into locations of regions in the magnetic circuit with heavy degrees of saturation is demonstrated. Experimental results which correlate well with the simulations of the load case are given.

  3. Development of 3-D magnetic nano-arrays by electrodeposition into mesoporous silica.

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.; Manning, J.; Bakker, M.G.; Li, X.; Lee, D.R.; Wang, J.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of Alabama

    2006-01-01

    The development of periodic nanostructures fabricated by self-assembly of surfactants and block co-polymers has opened up the possibility of generating periodic magnetic nanostructures of types not accessible by self-assembly of nano-particles. The fabrication of mesoporous silica thin films around self-assembled block co-polymers is well established. Common structures for such films are SBA-15 which consists of hexagonal arrays of cylindrical pores and SBA-16 which has face centered arrays of spherical voids. These pores are connected by 1-2 nm thick flaws in the continuous silica phase producing an effectively continuous porous phase. After removal of the block co-polymer template, electrodeposition into the mesoporous silica thin films produces arrays of 5-10 nm diameter nano-wires and nano-particles. We have demonstrated that such materials can be fabricated on a wide range of metal substrates. Characterization by Scanning Electron Microscopies shows that the mesoporous silica is well ordered over micron scale areas. Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-ray Scattering (GISAXS) studies shows diffraction spots, consistent with the entire film being well ordered. GISAXS also shows that the mesoporous silica films survive removal of the template and electrodeposition of nickel and cobalt into the mesoporous silica films. Such films are of interest for their magnetic properties, as the nanophase and scale can be independently varied. Further, the presence of nanowires inside an insulator suggests that these films might also be of interest as the current confining element for Confined Current Path-Current Perpendicular to Plane GMR sensors.

  4. Adapting 3D Equilibrium Reconstruction to Reconstruct Weakly 3D H-mode Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianciosa, M. R.; Hirshman, S. P.; Seal, S. K.; Unterberg, E. A.; Wilcox, R. S.; Wingen, A.; Hanson, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    The application of resonant magnetic perturbations for edge localized mode (ELM) mitigation breaks the toroidal symmetry of tokamaks. In these scenarios, the axisymmetric assumptions of the Grad-Shafranov equation no longer apply. By extension, equilibrium reconstruction tools, built around these axisymmetric assumptions, are insufficient to fully reconstruct a 3D perturbed equilibrium. 3D reconstruction tools typically work on systems where the 3D components of signals are a significant component of the input signals. In nominally axisymmetric systems, applied field perturbations can be on the order of 1% of the main field or less. To reconstruct these equilibria, the 3D component of signals must be isolated from the axisymmetric portions to provide the necessary information for reconstruction. This presentation will report on the adaptation to V3FIT for application on DIII-D H-mode discharges with applied resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs). Newly implemented motional stark effect signals and modeling of electric field effects will also be discussed. Work supported under U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  5. Simulation of runaway electrons, transport affected by J-TEXT resonant magnetic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z. H.; Wang, X. H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Sun, X. F.; Xu, T.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-09-01

    The topology of a magnetic field and transport properties of runaway electrons can be changed by a resonant magnetic perturbation field. The J-TEXT magnetic topology can be effectively altered via static resonant magnetic perturbation (SRMP) and dynamic resonant magnetic perturbation (DRMP). This paper studies the effect of resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) on the confinement of runaway electrons via simulating their drift orbits in the magnetic perturbation field and calculating the orbit losses for different runaway initial energies and different runaway electrons, initial locations. The model adopted is based on Hamiltonian guiding center equations for runaway electrons, and the J-TEXT magnetic turbulences and RMP are taken into account. The simulation indicates that the loss rate of runaway electrons is sensitive to the radial position of electrons. The loss of energetic runaway beam is dominated by the shrinkage of the confinement region. Outside the shrinkage region of the runaway electrons are lost rapidly. Inside the shrinkage region the runaway beam is confined very well and is less sensitive to the magnetic perturbation. The experimental result on the response of runaway transport to the application RMP indicates that the loss of runaway electrons is dominated by the shrinkage of the confinement region, other than the external magnetic perturbation.

  6. 3D magnetic resonance imaging as a non-invasive tool for investigating water-filled karst formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legchenko, A.; Ezersky, M.; Boucher, M.; Chevalier, A.; Vouillamoz, J.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS) is a geophysical technique developed for groundwater exploration. MRS can be used for reliable identification of karst aquifers because of the relaxation time of the magnetic resonance signal (T1) is longer for bulk water in karst caverns and channels (about 2 s) than for water in porous rock (few tens of ms). MRS is sensitive primary to groundwater volume but electrically conductive layers modify electromagnetic fields in the subsurface and thus may have an effect on MRS performance. Generally, the study of a karst requires a 3D field set-up and we developed a measuring procedure and interpretation software that makes it possible to image heterogeneous water-bearing geological formations down to about 80 m (3D-SNMR method). Numerical modeling results show that limited resolution of the method allows only identification of large karst formations. For example detectable karst should be larger than a few hundred cubic meters when karst is located close to the surface and a few thousand cubic meters when it is located at 60 m. Time Domain Electromagnetic method (TDEM) is known as an efficient tool for investigating electrical conductivity of rocks. TDEM results allow more accurate computing of the EM field in the subsurface and thus contribute for improving accuracy of MRS results. TDEM and 3D-SNMR methods were applied jointly in the Dead Sea coast of Israel (Nahal Hever South). The subsurface in this area is heterogeneous and composed of intercalated sand and clay layers over a salt rock, which is partly karstified. Groundwater is very saline, with a chloride concentration of 100-225 g/l thus rendering the resistivity of geological formations less than 1 ohm-m. We have shown numerically that under Dead Sea coast conditions, 3D-SNMR is able to detect and to locate the target within an error of a few tens of meters. In the investigated area (500×500 m2) our results reveal a very heterogeneous shallow aquifer that could be divided into

  7. Effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on three dimensional equilibria in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munaretto, S.; Chapman, B. E.; Nornberg, M. D.; Boguski, J.; DuBois, A. M.; Almagri, A. F.; Sarff, J. S.

    2016-05-01

    The orientation of 3D equilibria in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] reversed-field pinch can now be controlled with a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP). Absent the RMP, the orientation of the stationary 3D equilibrium varies from shot to shot in a semi-random manner, making its diagnosis difficult. Produced with a poloidal array of saddle coils at the vertical insulated cut in MST's thick conducting shell, an m = 1 RMP with an amplitude br/B ˜ 10% forces the 3D structure into any desired orientation relative to MST's diagnostics. This control has led to improved diagnosis, revealing enhancements in both the central electron temperature and density. With sufficient amplitude, the RMP also inhibits the generation of high-energy (>20 keV) electrons, which otherwise emerge due to a reduction in magnetic stochasticity in the core. Field line tracing reveals that the RMP reintroduces stochasticity to the core. A m = 3 RMP of similar amplitude has little effect on the magnetic topology or the high-energy electrons.

  8. Pressure driven currents near magnetic islands in 3D MHD equilibria: Effects of pressure variation within flux surfaces and of symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiman, Allan H.

    2016-07-01

    In toroidal, magnetically confined plasmas, the heat and particle transport is strongly anisotropic, with transport along the field lines sufficiently strong relative to cross-field transport that the equilibrium pressure can generally be regarded as constant on the flux surfaces in much of the plasma. The regions near small magnetic islands, and those near the X-lines of larger islands, are exceptions, having a significant variation of the pressure within the flux surfaces. It is shown here that the variation of the equilibrium pressure within the flux surfaces in those regions has significant consequences for the pressure driven currents. It is further shown that the consequences are strongly affected by the symmetry of the magnetic field if the field is invariant under combined reflection in the poloidal and toroidal angles. (This symmetry property is called "stellarator symmetry.") In non-stellarator-symmetric equilibria, the pressure-driven currents have logarithmic singularities at the X-lines. In stellarator-symmetric MHD equilibria, the singular components of the pressure-driven currents vanish. These equilibria are to be contrasted with equilibria having B ṡ∇p =0 , where the singular components of the pressure-driven currents vanish regardless of the symmetry. They are also to be contrasted with 3D MHD equilibrium solutions that are constrained to have simply nested flux surfaces, where the pressure-driven current goes like 1 /x near rational surfaces, where x is the distance from the rational surface, except in the case of quasi-symmetric flux surfaces. For the purpose of calculating the pressure-driven currents near magnetic islands, we work with a closed subset of the MHD equilibrium equations that involves only perpendicular force balance, and is decoupled from parallel force balance. It is not correct to use the parallel component of the conventional MHD force balance equation, B ṡ∇p =0 , near magnetic islands. Small but nonzero values of B

  9. Quantitative 3D Analysis of Plant Roots Growing in Soil Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kochs, Johannes; Pflugfelder, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Precise measurements of root system architecture traits are an important requirement for plant phenotyping. Most of the current methods for analyzing root growth require either artificial growing conditions (e.g. hydroponics), are severely restricted in the fraction of roots detectable (e.g. rhizotrons), or are destructive (e.g. soil coring). On the other hand, modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are noninvasive and allow high-quality three-dimensional imaging of roots in soil. Here, we present a plant root imaging and analysis pipeline using MRI together with an advanced image visualization and analysis software toolbox named NMRooting. Pots up to 117 mm in diameter and 800 mm in height can be measured with the 4.7 T MRI instrument used here. For 1.5 l pots (81 mm diameter, 300 mm high), a fully automated system was developed enabling measurement of up to 18 pots per day. The most important root traits that can be nondestructively monitored over time are root mass, length, diameter, tip number, and growth angles (in two-dimensional polar coordinates) and spatial distribution. Various validation measurements for these traits were performed, showing that roots down to a diameter range between 200 μm and 300 μm can be quantitatively measured. Root fresh weight correlates linearly with root mass determined by MRI. We demonstrate the capabilities of MRI and the dedicated imaging pipeline in experimental series performed on soil-grown maize (Zea mays) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants. PMID:26729797

  10. Quantitative 3D Analysis of Plant Roots Growing in Soil Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Metzner, Ralf; Kochs, Johannes; Postma, Johannes A; Pflugfelder, Daniel; Bühler, Jonas; Schurr, Ulrich; Jahnke, Siegfried

    2016-03-01

    Precise measurements of root system architecture traits are an important requirement for plant phenotyping. Most of the current methods for analyzing root growth require either artificial growing conditions (e.g. hydroponics), are severely restricted in the fraction of roots detectable (e.g. rhizotrons), or are destructive (e.g. soil coring). On the other hand, modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are noninvasive and allow high-quality three-dimensional imaging of roots in soil. Here, we present a plant root imaging and analysis pipeline using MRI together with an advanced image visualization and analysis software toolbox named NMRooting. Pots up to 117 mm in diameter and 800 mm in height can be measured with the 4.7 T MRI instrument used here. For 1.5 l pots (81 mm diameter, 300 mm high), a fully automated system was developed enabling measurement of up to 18 pots per day. The most important root traits that can be nondestructively monitored over time are root mass, length, diameter, tip number, and growth angles (in two-dimensional polar coordinates) and spatial distribution. Various validation measurements for these traits were performed, showing that roots down to a diameter range between 200 μm and 300 μm can be quantitatively measured. Root fresh weight correlates linearly with root mass determined by MRI. We demonstrate the capabilities of MRI and the dedicated imaging pipeline in experimental series performed on soil-grown maize (Zea mays) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) plants.

  11. Erratum: Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 123001)

    DOE PAGES

    Evans, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δmore » $$b_⊥^{ext}$$ ≈ $$10^{-4}$$ → $$10^{-3}$$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.« less

  12. Interactive 3D segmentation of the prostate in magnetic resonance images using shape and local appearance similarity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahedi, Maysam; Fenster, Aaron; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Ward, Aaron D.

    2013-03-01

    3D segmentation of the prostate in medical images is useful to prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy guidance, but is time-consuming to perform manually. Clinical translation of computer-assisted segmentation algorithms for this purpose requires a comprehensive and complementary set of evaluation metrics that are informative to the clinical end user. We have developed an interactive 3D prostate segmentation method for 1.5T and 3.0T T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2W MRI) acquired using an endorectal coil. We evaluated our method against manual segmentations of 36 3D images using complementary boundary-based (mean absolute distance; MAD), regional overlap (Dice similarity coefficient; DSC) and volume difference (ΔV) metrics. Our technique is based on inter-subject prostate shape and local boundary appearance similarity. In the training phase, we calculated a point distribution model (PDM) and a set of local mean intensity patches centered on the prostate border to capture shape and appearance variability. To segment an unseen image, we defined a set of rays - one corresponding to each of the mean intensity patches computed in training - emanating from the prostate centre. We used a radial-based search strategy and translated each mean intensity patch along its corresponding ray, selecting as a candidate the boundary point with the highest normalized cross correlation along each ray. These boundary points were then regularized using the PDM. For the whole gland, we measured a mean+/-std MAD of 2.5+/-0.7 mm, DSC of 80+/-4%, and ΔV of 1.1+/-8.8 cc. We also provided an anatomic breakdown of these metrics within the prostatic base, mid-gland, and apex.

  13. 3-D laser confocal microscopy study of the oxidation of NdFeB magnets in atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meakin, J. P.; Speight, J. D.; Sheridan, R. S.; Bradshaw, A.; Harris, I. R.; Williams, A. J.; Walton, A.

    2016-08-01

    Neodymium iron boron (NdFeB) magnets are used in a number of important applications, such as generators in gearless wind turbines, motors in electric vehicles and electronic goods (e.g.- computer hard disk drives, HDD). Hydrogen can be used as a processing gas to separate and recycle scrap sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets from end-of-life products to form a powder suitable for recycling. However, the magnets are likely to have been exposed to atmospheric conditions prior to processing, and any oxidation could lead to activation problems for the hydrogen decrepitation reaction. Many previous studies on the oxidation of NdFeB magnets have been performed at elevated temperatures; however, few studies have been formed under atmospheric conditions. In this paper a combination of 3-D laser confocal microscopy and Raman spectroscopy have been used to assess the composition, morphology and rate of oxidation/corrosion on scrap sintered NdFeB magnets. Confocal microscopy has been employed to measure the growth of surface reaction products at room temperature, immediately after exposure to air. The results showed that there was a significant height increase at the triple junctions of the Nd-rich grain boundaries. Using Raman spectroscopy, the product was shown to consist of Nd2O3 and formed only on the Nd-rich triple junctions. The diffusion coefficient of the triple junction reaction product growth at 20 °C was determined to be approximately 4 × 10-13 cm2/sec. This value is several orders of magnitude larger than values derived from the diffusion controlled oxide growth observations at elevated temperatures in the literature. This indicates that the growth of the room temperature oxidation products are likely defect enhanced processes at the NdFeB triple junctions.

  14. 3D PIC Simulations of Collisionless Shocks at Lunar Magnetic Anomalies and Their Role in Forming Lunar Swirls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamford, R. A.; Alves, E. P.; Cruz, F.; Kellett, B. J.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Halekas, J. S.; Kramer, G.; Harnett, E.; Cairns, R. A.; Bingham, R.

    2016-10-01

    Investigation of the lunar crustal magnetic anomalies offers a comprehensive long-term data set of observations of small-scale magnetic fields and their interaction with the solar wind. In this paper a review of the observations of lunar mini-magnetospheres is compared quantifiably with theoretical kinetic-scale plasma physics and 3D particle-in-cell simulations. The aim of this paper is to provide a complete picture of all the aspects of the phenomena and to show how the observations from all the different and international missions interrelate. The analysis shows that the simulations are consistent with the formation of miniature (smaller than the ion Larmor orbit) collisionless shocks and miniature magnetospheric cavities, which has not been demonstrated previously. The simulations reproduce the finesse and form of the differential proton patterns that are believed to be responsible for the creation of both the “lunar swirls” and “dark lanes.” Using a mature plasma physics code like OSIRIS allows us, for the first time, to make a side-by-side comparison between model and space observations. This is shown for all of the key plasma parameters observed to date by spacecraft, including the spectral imaging data of the lunar swirls. The analysis of miniature magnetic structures offers insight into multi-scale mechanisms and kinetic-scale aspects of planetary magnetospheres.

  15. A series of rare earth complexes with novel non-interpenetrating 3D networks: synthesis, structures, magnetic and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Hua; Yang, Lin-Yan; Liao, Sheng-Yun; Zhang, Ming; Tian, Jin-Lei; Du, Pei-Yao; Gu, Wen; Liu, Xin

    2014-04-21

    A series of metal-organic framework {Ln(BCPBA)(H2O)}n {Ln = Nd (1), Sm (2), Eu (3), Tb (4), Dy (5)}; {[Ln(BCPBA)(H2O)](H2O)}n {Ln = Pr (6), Gd (7)} have been synthesized through the hydrothermal synthesis method. These compounds possess non-interpenetrating 3D networks with 10.1438 Å× 17.9149 Å rhombic channels along the [001] direction. The results of temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that compounds 4 and 7 exhibit Ln(III)Ln(III) antiferromagnetic interactions, while compound 5 exhibits Ln(III)Ln(III) ferromagnetic interactions. Frequency dependent out-of-phase signals were observed in alternating current (ac) magnetic susceptibility measurements which indicate that they have slow magnetic relaxation characteristics. The luminescent properties of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 are also discussed. Due to the good match between the lowest triplet state of the ligand and the resonant energy level of the lanthanide ion, compound 4 has longer fluorescence lifetime (τ1 = 400.0000 ms, τ2 = 1143.469 ms) and higher quantum yield (Φ = 42%) compared with other compounds.

  16. 3D cine magnetic resonance imaging of rat lung ARDS using gradient-modulated SWIFT with retrospective respiratory gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Lei, Jianxun; Utecht, Lynn; Garwood, Michael; Ingbar, David H.; Bhargava, Maneesh

    2015-03-01

    SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation (SWIFT) with gradient modulation and DC navigator retrospective gating is introduced as a 3D cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for the lung. In anesthetized normal rats, the quasi-simultaneous excitation and acquisition in SWIFT enabled extremely high sensitivity to the fast-decaying parenchymal signals (TE=~4 μs), which are invisible with conventional MRI techniques. Respiratory motion information was extracted from DC navigator signals and the SWIFT data were reconstructed to 3D cine images with 16 respiratory phases. To test this technique's capabilities, rats exposed to > 95% O2 for 60 hours for induction of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), were imaged and compared with normal rat lungs (N=7 and 5 for ARDS and normal groups, respectively). SWIFT images showed lung tissue density differences along the gravity direction. In the cine SWIFT images, a parenchymal signal drop at the inhalation phase was consistently observed for both normal and ARDS rats due to lung inflation (i.e. decrease of the proton density), but the drop was less for ARDS rats. Depending on the respiratory phase and lung region, the lungs from the ARDS rats showed 1-24% higher parenchymal signal intensities relative to the normal rat lungs, likely due to accumulated extravascular water (EVLW). Those results demonstrate that SWIFT has high enough sensitivity for detecting the lung proton density changes due to gravity, different phases of respiration and accumulation of EVLW in the rat ARDS lungs.

  17. 3D Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rat Lung ARDS using Gradient-modulated SWIFT with Retrospective Respiratory Gating.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Lei, Jianxun; Utecht, Lynn; Garwood, Michael; Ingbar, David; Bhargava, Maneesh

    2015-02-21

    SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation (SWIFT) with gradient modulation and DC navigator retrospective gating is introduced as a 3D cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for the lung. The quasi-simultaneous excitation and acquisition in SWIFT enabled extremely high sensitivity to the fast-decaying parenchymal signals (TE=~4 μs), which are invisible with conventional MRI techniques. Based on respiratory motion information extracted from DC navigator signals, the SWIFT data were reconstructed to 3D cine images with 16 respiratory phases. To test the capability of the proposed technique, rats exposed to > 95% O2 for 60 hours for induction of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), were imaged and compared with normal rat lungs (N=7 and 5 for ARDS and normal group, respectively). SWIFT images showed lung tissue density difference along the gravity direction. In the cine SWIFT images, parenchymal signal drop at the inhalation phase was consistently observed for both normal and ARDS rats due to inflation of the lung (i.e. decrease of the proton density), but the drop was less for ARDS rats. Depending on the respiration phase and lung region, the lungs from the ARDS rats showed 1-24% higher parenchymal signal intensities relative to the normal rat lungs, which would be mainly from accumulation of extravascular water (EVLW). Those results demonstrate that SWIFT has high enough sensitivity for detecting the lung proton density changes due to gravity, different respiration phases and accumulation of EVLW in the rat ARDS lungs.

  18. 3D modelling of an aero-gravity and -magnetic survey as an first exploration step in a frontier basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köther, Nils; Eckard, Marcel; Götze, Hans-Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    The West African Taoudeni basin covers a desert area of about 1.8 million km² and is one of the last frontier basins worldwide. Here Wintershall Holding AG holds acreage of about 68000 km². During 2005-2007 geological surveys and an aero-gravity and -magnetic survey were conducted in this area. The potential field modelling should contribute first insight about the subsurface to plan an economic seismic survey. 2D models lead to poor results. 2008 the results of an internship (NK) were 3D subsurface models, which were enhanced during the following diploma thesis (Köther, 2009). Complex igneous rocks and sparsely distributed constraints lead to an ambiguous interpretation. Therefore, several simple 3D models were compiled with the in-house software IGMAS+, which base on geological ideas of the underground and fit well the measured data. These basic models allow a geophysical evaluation of different geological theories about the subsurface. Also, for a thorough interpretation field transformations (Euler, Curvature, and Derivatives) were calculated. These results led to new constraints for further interpretation of the basin structures and therefore they are important contributions for future exploration e.g. the planning of seismic surveys.

  19. A series of novel lanthanide carboxyphosphonates with a 3D framework structure: synthesis, structure, and luminescent and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Dong, Da-Peng; Sun, Zhen-Gang; Jiao, Cheng-Qi; Li, Chao; Wang, Cheng-Lin; Zhu, Yan-Yu; Zhao, Yan; Zhu, Jiang; Sun, Shou-Hui; Zheng, Ming-Jing; Tian, Hui; Chu, Wei

    2012-08-28

    By introduction of 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid as the second organic ligand, a series of novel lanthanide carboxyphosphonates with a 3D framework structure, namely, [Ln(3)(H(2)L)(HL)(2)(bdc)(2)(H(2)O)]·7H(2)O (Ln = La (1), Ce (2), Pr (3), Nd (4), Sm (5), Eu (6), Gd (7), Tb (8); H(3)L = H(2)O(3)PCH(2)NC(5)H(9)COOH; H(2)bdc = HOOCC(6)H(4)COOH) have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Compounds are isostructural and feature a 3D framework in which Ln(III) polyhedra are interconnected by bridging {CPO(3)} tetrahedra into 2D inorganic layers parallel to the ab plane. The organic groups of H(2)L(-) are grafted on the two sides of the layer. These layers are further cross-linked by the bdc(2-) ligands from one layer to the Ln atoms from the other into a pillared-layered architecture with one-dimensional channel system along the a axis. The thermal stability of compounds has been investigated. Luminescent properties of compounds , and the magnetic properties of compound have also been studied.

  20. Interpretation of Magnetic Anomalies in Salihli (Turkey) Geothermal Area Using 3-D Inversion and Edge Detection Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timur, Emre

    2016-04-01

    There are numerous geophysical methods used to investigate geothermal areas. The major purpose of this magnetic survey is to locate the boudaries of active hydrothermal system in the South of Gediz Graben in Salihli (Manisa/Turkey). The presence of the hydrothermal system had already been inferred from surface evidence of hydrothermal activity and drillings. Firstly, 3-D prismatic models were theoretically investigated and edge detection methods were utilized with an iterative inversion method to define the boundaries and the parameters of the structure. In the first step of the application, it was necessary to convert the total field anomaly into a pseudo-gravity anomaly map. Then the geometric boudaries of the structures were determined by applying a MATLAB based software with 3 different edge detection algorithms. The exact location of the structures were obtained by using these boundary coordinates as initial geometric parameters in the inversion process. In addition to these methods, reduction to pole and horizontal gradient methods were applied to the data to achieve more information about the location and shape of the possible reservoir. As a result, the edge detection methods were found to be successful, both in the field and as theoretical data sets for delineating the boundaries of the possible geothermal reservoir structure. The depth of the geothermal reservoir was determined as 2,4 km from 3-D inversion and 2,1 km from power spectrum methods.

  1. Novel methodology for 3D reconstruction of carotid arteries and plaque characterization based upon magnetic resonance imaging carotid angiography data.

    PubMed

    Sakellarios, Antonis I; Stefanou, Kostas; Siogkas, Panagiotis; Tsakanikas, Vasilis D; Bourantas, Christos V; Athanasiou, Lambros; Exarchos, Themis P; Fotiou, Evangelos; Naka, Katerina K; Papafaklis, Michail I; Patterson, Andrew J; Young, Victoria E L; Gillard, Jonathan H; Michalis, Lampros K; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we present a novel methodology that allows reliable segmentation of the magnetic resonance images (MRIs) for accurate fully automated three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the carotid arteries and semiautomated characterization of plaque type. Our approach uses active contours to detect the luminal borders in the time-of-flight images and the outer vessel wall borders in the T(1)-weighted images. The methodology incorporates the connecting components theory for the automated identification of the bifurcation region and a knowledge-based algorithm for the accurate characterization of the plaque components. The proposed segmentation method was validated in randomly selected MRI frames analyzed offline by two expert observers. The interobserver variability of the method for the lumen and outer vessel wall was -1.60%±6.70% and 0.56%±6.28%, respectively, while the Williams Index for all metrics was close to unity. The methodology implemented to identify the composition of the plaque was also validated in 591 images acquired from 24 patients. The obtained Cohen's k was 0.68 (0.60-0.76) for lipid plaques, while the time needed to process an MRI sequence for 3D reconstruction was only 30 s. The obtained results indicate that the proposed methodology allows reliable and automated detection of the luminal and vessel wall borders and fast and accurate characterization of plaque type in carotid MRI sequences. These features render the currently presented methodology a useful tool in the clinical and research arena.

  2. Kidney stone imaging with 3D ultra-short echo time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, El-Sayed H; Pooley, Robert A; Bridges, Mellena D; Cernigliaro, Joseph G; Haley, William E

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the current gold standard for imaging kidney stones, albeit at the cost of radiation exposure. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences are insensitive to detecting the stones because of their appearance as a signal void. With the development of 2D ultra-short echo-time (UTE) MRI sequences, it becomes possible to image kidney stones in vitro. In this work, we optimize and implement a modified 3D UTE MRI sequence for imaging kidney stones embedded in agarose phantoms mimicking the kidney tissue and in urine phantoms at 3.0T. The proposed technique is capable of imaging the stones with high spatial resolution in a short scan time.

  3. Simulation of MST tokamak discharges with resonant magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornille, B. S.; Sovinec, C. R.; Chapman, B. E.; Dubois, A.; McCollam, K. J.; Munaretto, S.

    2016-10-01

    Nonlinear MHD modeling of MST tokamak plasmas with an applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) reveals degradation of flux surfaces that may account for the experimentally observed suppression of runaway electrons with the RMP. Runaway electrons are routinely generated in MST tokamak discharges with low plasma density. When an m = 3 RMP is applied these electrons are strongly suppressed, while an m = 1 RMP of comparable amplitude has little effect. The computations are performed using the NIMROD code and use reconstructed equilibrium states of MST tokamak plasmas with q (0) < 1 and q (a) = 2.2 . Linear computations show that the (1 , 1) -kink and (2 , 2) -tearing modes are unstable, and nonlinear simulations produce sawtoothing with a period of approximately 0.5 ms, which is comparable to the period of MHD activity observed experimentally. Adding an m = 3 RMP in the computation degrades flux surfaces in the outer region of the plasma, while no degradation occurs with an m = 1 RMP. The outer flux surface degradation with the m = 3 RMP, combined with the sawtooth-induced distortion of flux surfaces in the core, may account for the observed suppression of runaway electrons. Work supported by DOE Grant DE-FC02-08ER54975.

  4. Effects of compressional magnetic perturbation on kinetic Alfven waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ge; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Lin, Zhihong

    2016-10-01

    Kinetic Alfven waves play a very important role in the dynamics of fusion as well as space and astrophysical plasmas. The compressional magnetic perturbation δB|| can play important role in kinetic Alfven waves (KAW) and various instabilities at large plasma β. It could affect the nonlinear behavior of these modes significantly even at small β. In this study, we have implemented δB|| in gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC). The perpendicular Ampere's law is solved as a force balance equation. Double gyroaveraging is incorporated in the code to treat the finite Larmor radius effects related to δB|| terms. KAW is studied in slab geometry as a benchmark case. A scan in β for the KAW dispersion relation shows that as β approaches 1 (>0.3), the effects of δB|| becomes important. Connections are made with other existing studies of KAWs in the fusion and space plasma literature. This new capability of including δB|| in GTC could be applied to nonlinear simulations of modes such as kinetic ballooning and tearing modes. This research is supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  5. [Measurement of left atrial and ventricular volumes in real-time 3D echocardiography. Validation by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Qin, J. X.; White, R. D.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of the left ventricular ejection fraction is important for the evaluation of cardiomyopathy and depends on the measurement of left ventricular volumes. There are no existing conventional echocardiographic means of measuring the true left atrial and ventricular volumes without mathematical approximations. The aim of this study was to test anew real time 3-dimensional echocardiographic system of calculating left atrial and ventricular volumes in 40 patients after in vitro validation. The volumes of the left atrium and ventricle acquired from real time 3-D echocardiography in the apical view, were calculated in 7 sections parallel to the surface of the probe and compared with atrial (10 patients) and ventricular (30 patients) volumes calculated by nuclear magnetic resonance with the simpson method and with volumes of water in balloons placed in a cistern. Linear regression analysis showed an excellent correlation between the real volume of water in the balloons and volumes given in real time 3-dimensional echocardiography (y = 0.94x + 5.5, r = 0.99, p < 0.001, D = -10 +/- 4.5 ml). A good correlation was observed between real time 3-dimensional echocardiography and nuclear magnetic resonance for the measurement of left atrial and ventricular volumes (y = 0.95x - 10, r = 0.91, p < 0.001, D = -14.8 +/- 19.5 ml and y = 0.87x + 10, r = 0.98, P < 0.001, D = -8.3 +/- 18.7 ml, respectively. The authors conclude that real time three-dimensional echocardiography allows accurate measurement of left heart volumes underlying the clinical potential of this new 3-D method.

  6. Investigating Cardiac Motion Patterns Using Synthetic High-Resolution 3D Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Images and Statistical Shape Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Biffi, Benedetta; Bruse, Jan L.; Zuluaga, Maria A.; Ntsinjana, Hopewell N.; Taylor, Andrew M.; Schievano, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis of ventricular dysfunction in congenital heart disease is more and more based on medical imaging, which allows investigation of abnormal cardiac morphology and correlated abnormal function. Although analysis of 2D images represents the clinical standard, novel tools performing automatic processing of 3D images are becoming available, providing more detailed and comprehensive information than simple 2D morphometry. Among these, statistical shape analysis (SSA) allows a consistent and quantitative description of a population of complex shapes, as a way to detect novel biomarkers, ultimately improving diagnosis and pathology understanding. The aim of this study is to describe the implementation of a SSA method for the investigation of 3D left ventricular shape and motion patterns and to test it on a small sample of 4 congenital repaired aortic stenosis patients and 4 age-matched healthy volunteers to demonstrate its potential. The advantage of this method is the capability of analyzing subject-specific motion patterns separately from the individual morphology, visually and quantitatively, as a way to identify functional abnormalities related to both dynamics and shape. Specifically, we combined 3D, high-resolution whole heart data with 2D, temporal information provided by cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance images, and we used an SSA approach to analyze 3D motion per se. Preliminary results of this pilot study showed that using this method, some differences in end-diastolic and end-systolic ventricular shapes could be captured, but it was not possible to clearly separate the two cohorts based on shape information alone. However, further analyses on ventricular motion allowed to qualitatively identify differences between the two populations. Moreover, by describing shape and motion with a small number of principal components, this method offers a fully automated process to obtain visually intuitive and numerical information on cardiac shape and motion

  7. Ideal plasma response to vacuum magnetic fields with resonant magnetic perturbations in non-axisymmetric tokamaks

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Kimin; Ahn, J. -W.; Scotti, F.; ...

    2015-09-03

    Ideal plasma shielding and amplification of resonant magnetic perturbations in non-axisymmetric tokamak is presented by field line tracing simulation with full ideal plasma response, compared to measurements of divertor lobe structures. Magnetic field line tracing simulations in NSTX with toroidal non-axisymmetry indicate the ideal plasma response can significantly shield/amplify and phase shift the vacuum resonant magnetic perturbations. Ideal plasma shielding for n = 3 mode is found to prevent magnetic islands from opening as consistently shown in the field line connection length profile and magnetic footprints on the divertor target. It is also found that the ideal plasma shielding modifiesmore » the degree of stochasticity but does not change the overall helical lobe structures of the vacuum field for n = 3. Furthermore, amplification of vacuum fields by the ideal plasma response is predicted for low toroidal mode n = 1, better reproducing measurements of strong striation of the field lines on the divertor plate in NSTX.« less

  8. PB3D: A new code for edge 3-D ideal linear peeling-ballooning stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyens, T.; Sánchez, R.; Huijsmans, G.; Loarte, A.; García, L.

    2017-02-01

    A new numerical code PB3D (Peeling-Ballooning in 3-D) is presented. It implements and solves the intermediate-to-high-n ideal linear magnetohydrodynamic stability theory extended to full edge 3-D magnetic toroidal configurations in previous work [1]. The features that make PB3D unique are the assumptions on the perturbation structure through intermediate-to-high mode numbers n in general 3-D configurations, while allowing for displacement of the plasma edge. This makes PB3D capable of very efficient calculations of the full 3-D stability for the output of multiple equilibrium codes. As first verification, it is checked that results from the stability code MISHKA [2], which considers axisymmetric equilibrium configurations, are accurately reproduced, and these are then successfully extended to 3-D configurations, through comparison with COBRA [3], as well as using checks on physical consistency. The non-intuitive 3-D results presented serve as a tentative first proof of the capabilities of the code.

  9. EFIT 3D Reconstruction and Recent Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.; Chu, M. S.; St. John, H. E.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; Ren, Q.; Jeon, Y. M.; Flannagan, D.

    2007-11-01

    Recent 3D extension of the EFIT equilibrium reconstruction code to model toroidally asymmetric effects due to error and externally applied perturbation magnetic fields and other developments are presented. The 3D extension is based on an expansion of the MHD equations. Other developments include a new computational structure based on Fortran 90/95 with a unified interface that can conveniently accommodate different tokamak devices and grid sizes, as well as a Python-based GUI. New computational links that allow easy integration with transport and stability physics modules to facilitate kinetic reconstruction and stability analysis are also being developed. A new more complete uncertainty matrix for magnetic diagnostics based on knowledge about their fabrication, installation, calibration, and operation has also been implemented into EFIT and tested. Reconstructions with the new magnetic uncertainty matrix yield results similar to those using the existing one but with more realistic fitting merit figures.

  10. Toxicity evaluation of magnetic hyperthermia induced by remote actuation of magnetic nanoparticles in 3D micrometastasic tumor tissue analogs for triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Stocke, Nathanael A; Sethi, Pallavi; Jyoti, Amar; Chan, Ryan; Arnold, Susanne M; Hilt, J Zach; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia as a treatment modality is acquiring increased recognition for loco-regional therapy of primary and metastatic lung malignancies by pulmonary delivery of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP). The unique characteristic of magnetic nanoparticles to induce localized hyperthermia in the presence of an alternating magnetic field (AMF) allows for preferential killing of cells at the tumor site. In this study we demonstrate the effect of hyperthermia induced by low and high dose of MNP under the influence of an AMF using 3D tumor tissue analogs (TTA) representing the micrometastatic, perfusion independent stage of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) that infiltrates the lungs. While application of inhalable magnetic nanocomposite microparticles or magnetic nanocomposites (MnMs) to the micrometastatic TNBC model comprised of TTA generated from cancer and stromal cells, showed no measureable adverse effects in the absence of AMF-exposure, magnetic hyperthermia generated under the influence of an AMF in TTA incubated in a high concentration of MNP (1 mg/mL) caused significant increase in cellular death/damage with mechanical disintegration and release of cell debris indicating the potential of these inhalable composites as a promising approach for thermal treatment of diseased lungs. The novelty and significance of this study lies in the development of methods to evaluate in vitro the application of inhalable composites containing MNPs in thermal therapy using a physiologically relevant metastatic TNBC model representative of the microenvironmental characteristics in secondary lung malignancies.

  11. Conceptual design of the 3D magnetic field configuration relevant to the magnetopause reconnection in the SPERF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Aohua; Ji, Hantao; Ren, Yang; E, Peng; Wang, Zhibin; Xiao, Qingmei; Xiao, Chijie

    2016-10-01

    A new terrella device, the Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF), is designed and under construction in China, with Asymmetric Reconnection EXperiment (AREX) as one component to study the interaction between the magnetosheath and magnetosphere plasmas. AREX will provide a unique platform for studying asymmetric magnetic reconnection relevant to the magnetopause, via a set of coils for simulating ``solar-wind-side'' magnetosheath field and a dipole field on the ``magnetosphere-side''. Thus it could be able to investigate a range of important issues in the magnetosphere geometry, such as the electron and ion-scale dynamics in the current sheet, particle and energy transfer from magnetosheath to magnetosphere, particle energization/heating during magnetic reconnection, 3D and asymmetric effects in fast reconnection, and so on. The plasma is generated by two flux cores at the ``magnetosheath-side'' and one electron cyclotron resonance source at the ``magnetosphere-side''. Different kinds of coils with specific current driven functions, as well as advanced diagnostics are designed. Motivation, overview of the AREX design and reconnection scenarios will be discussed.

  12. Magnetic Tweezers-based 3D Microchannel Electroporation for High-Throughput Gene Transfection in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei-Ching; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Yang, Zhaogang; Lu, Wu; Byrd, John C.; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Lee, L. James.; Sooryakumar, Ratnasingham

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel, high throughput magnetic-tweezers based 3D microchannel electroporation system capable of transfecting 40,000 cells/cm2 on a single-chip for gene therapy, regenerative medicine and intracellular detection of target mRNA for screening cellular heterogeneity. A single cell or an ordered array of individual cells are remotely guided by programmable magnetic fields to poration sites with high (> 90%) cell alignment efficiency to enable various transfection reagents to be delivered simultaneously into the cells. The present technique, in contrast to the conventional vacuum based approach, is significantly gentler on the cellular membrane yielding > 90% cell viability and, moreover, allows transfected cells to be transported for further analysis. Illustrating the versatility of the system, the GATA2 molecular beacon was delivered into leukemia cells to detect the regulation level of the GATA2 gene that is associated with the initiation of leukemia. The uniform delivery and a sharp contrast of fluorescence intensity between GATA2 positive and negative cells demonstrate key aspects of the platform for gene transfer, screening and detection of targeted intracellular markers in living cells. PMID:25469659

  13. Remote magnetic actuation of micrometric probes for in situ 3D mapping of bacterial biofilm physical properties.

    PubMed

    Galy, Olivier; Zrelli, Kais; Latour-Lambert, Patricia; Kirwan, Lyndsey; Henry, Nelly

    2014-05-02

    Bacterial adhesion and growth on interfaces lead to the formation of three-dimensional heterogeneous structures so-called biofilms. The cells dwelling in these structures are held together by physical interactions mediated by a network of extracellular polymeric substances. Bacterial biofilms impact many human activities and the understanding of their properties is crucial for a better control of their development - maintenance or eradication - depending on their adverse or beneficial outcome. This paper describes a novel methodology aiming to measure in situ the local physical properties of the biofilm that had been, until now, examined only from a macroscopic and homogeneous material perspective. The experiment described here involves introducing magnetic particles into a growing biofilm to seed local probes that can be remotely actuated without disturbing the structural properties of the biofilm. Dedicated magnetic tweezers were developed to exert a defined force on each particle embedded in the biofilm. The setup is mounted on the stage of a microscope to enable the recording of time-lapse images of the particle-pulling period. The particle trajectories are then extracted from the pulling sequence and the local viscoelastic parameters are derived from each particle displacement curve, thereby providing the 3D-spatial distribution of the parameters. Gaining insights into the biofilm mechanical profile is essential from an engineer's point of view for biofilm control purposes but also from a fundamental perspective to clarify the relationship between the architectural properties and the specific biology of these structures.

  14. 3D modeling of the total electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation using the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, F. S.; Lancaster, J. L.; Fox, P. T.

    2009-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians with a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this paper, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistically shaped head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. Secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes typically range from 20% to 35% of the primary E-field's magnitude. The direction of the secondary E-field was generally in opposition to the primary E-field; however, for some locations, this was not the case (i.e. going from high to low conductivity tissues). These findings show that realistically shaped head geometries are important for accurate modeling of the total E-field.

  15. Remote Magnetic Actuation of Micrometric Probes for in situ 3D Mapping of Bacterial Biofilm Physical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Galy, Olivier; Zrelli, Kais; Latour-Lambert, Patricia; Kirwan, Lyndsey; Henry, Nelly

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and growth on interfaces lead to the formation of three-dimensional heterogeneous structures so-called biofilms. The cells dwelling in these structures are held together by physical interactions mediated by a network of extracellular polymeric substances. Bacterial biofilms impact many human activities and the understanding of their properties is crucial for a better control of their development — maintenance or eradication — depending on their adverse or beneficial outcome. This paper describes a novel methodology aiming to measure in situ the local physical properties of the biofilm that had been, until now, examined only from a macroscopic and homogeneous material perspective. The experiment described here involves introducing magnetic particles into a growing biofilm to seed local probes that can be remotely actuated without disturbing the structural properties of the biofilm. Dedicated magnetic tweezers were developed to exert a defined force on each particle embedded in the biofilm. The setup is mounted on the stage of a microscope to enable the recording of time-lapse images of the particle-pulling period. The particle trajectories are then extracted from the pulling sequence and the local viscoelastic parameters are derived from each particle displacement curve, thereby providing the 3D-spatial distribution of the parameters. Gaining insights into the biofilm mechanical profile is essential from an engineer's point of view for biofilm control purposes but also from a fundamental perspective to clarify the relationship between the architectural properties and the specific biology of these structures. PMID:24837001

  16. Use of magnetic micro-cantilevers to study the dynamics of 3D engineered smooth muscle constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan; Zhao, Ruogang; Copeland, Craig; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    The normal and pathological response of arterial tissue to mechanical stimulus sheds important light on such conditions as atherosclerosis and hypertension. While most previous methods of determining the biomechanical properties of arteries have relied on excised tissue, we have devised a system that enables the growth and in situ application of forces to arrays of stable suspended microtissues consisting of arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Briefly, this magnetic microtissue tester system consists of arrays of pairs of elastomeric magnetically actuated micro-cantilevers between which SMC-infused 3D collagen gels self-assemble and remodel into aligned microtissue constructs. These devices allow us to simultaneously apply force and track stress-strain relationships of multiple microtissues per substrate. We have studied the dilatory capacity and subsequent response of the tissues and find that the resulting stress-strain curves show viscoelastic behavior as well as a linear dynamic recovery. These results provide a foundation for elucidating the mechanical behavior of this novel model system as well as further experiments that simulate pathological conditions. Supported in part by NIH grant HL090747.

  17. Use of Earth’s Magnetic Field for Mitigating Gyroscope Errors Regardless of Magnetic Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Muhammad Haris; Renaudin, Valérie; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2011-01-01

    Most portable systems like smart-phones are equipped with low cost consumer grade sensors, making them useful as Pedestrian Navigation Systems (PNS). Measurements of these sensors are severely contaminated by errors caused due to instrumentation and environmental issues rendering the unaided navigation solution with these sensors of limited use. The overall navigation error budget associated with pedestrian navigation can be categorized into position/displacement errors and attitude/orientation errors. Most of the research is conducted for tackling and reducing the displacement errors, which either utilize Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) or special constraints like Zero velocity UPdaTes (ZUPT) and Zero Angular Rate Updates (ZARU). This article targets the orientation/attitude errors encountered in pedestrian navigation and develops a novel sensor fusion technique to utilize the Earth’s magnetic field, even perturbed, for attitude and rate gyroscope error estimation in pedestrian navigation environments where it is assumed that Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) navigation is denied. As the Earth’s magnetic field undergoes severe degradations in pedestrian navigation environments, a novel Quasi-Static magnetic Field (QSF) based attitude and angular rate error estimation technique is developed to effectively use magnetic measurements in highly perturbed environments. The QSF scheme is then used for generating the desired measurements for the proposed Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) based attitude estimator. Results indicate that the QSF measurements are capable of effectively estimating attitude and gyroscope errors, reducing the overall navigation error budget by over 80% in urban canyon environment. PMID:22247672

  18. Use of Earth's magnetic field for mitigating gyroscope errors regardless of magnetic perturbation.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad Haris; Renaudin, Valérie; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2011-01-01

    Most portable systems like smart-phones are equipped with low cost consumer grade sensors, making them useful as Pedestrian Navigation Systems (PNS). Measurements of these sensors are severely contaminated by errors caused due to instrumentation and environmental issues rendering the unaided navigation solution with these sensors of limited use. The overall navigation error budget associated with pedestrian navigation can be categorized into position/displacement errors and attitude/orientation errors. Most of the research is conducted for tackling and reducing the displacement errors, which either utilize Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) or special constraints like Zero velocity UPdaTes (ZUPT) and Zero Angular Rate Updates (ZARU). This article targets the orientation/attitude errors encountered in pedestrian navigation and develops a novel sensor fusion technique to utilize the Earth's magnetic field, even perturbed, for attitude and rate gyroscope error estimation in pedestrian navigation environments where it is assumed that Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) navigation is denied. As the Earth's magnetic field undergoes severe degradations in pedestrian navigation environments, a novel Quasi-Static magnetic Field (QSF) based attitude and angular rate error estimation technique is developed to effectively use magnetic measurements in highly perturbed environments. The QSF scheme is then used for generating the desired measurements for the proposed Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) based attitude estimator. Results indicate that the QSF measurements are capable of effectively estimating attitude and gyroscope errors, reducing the overall navigation error budget by over 80% in urban canyon environment.

  19. AE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  20. Cross-Modality Validation of Acetabular Surface Models Using 3-D Ultrasound Versus Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Normal and Dysplastic Infant Hips.

    PubMed

    Diederichs, Chad; Heath, Alana; Hareendranathan, Abhilash R; Zonoobi, Dornoosh; Kuntze, Gregor; Dulai, Sukhdeep; Mabee, Myles G; Ronsky, Janet L; Jaremko, Jacob L

    2016-09-01

    Current imaging diagnosis of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in infancy relies on 2-D ultrasound (US), which is highly operator-dependent. 3-D US offers more complete, and potentially more reliable, imaging of infant hip geometry. We sought to validate the fidelity of acetabular surface models obtained by 3-D US against those obtained concurrently by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 3-D US and MRI scans were performed on the same d in 20 infants with normal to severely dysplastic hips (mean age, 57 d; range 13-181 d). 3-D US was performed by two observers using a Philips VL13-5 probe. Coronal 3-D multi-echo data image combination (MEDIC) magnetic resonance (MR) images (1-mm slice thickness) were obtained, usually without sedation, in a 1.5 T Siemens unit. Acetabular surface models were generated for 40 hips from 3-D US and MRI using semi-automated tracing software, separately by three observers. For each hip, the 3-D US and MRI models were co-registered to overlap as closely as possible using Amira software, and the root mean square (RMS) distances between points on the models were computed. 3-D US scans took 3.2 s each. Inter-modality variability was visually minimal. Mean RMS distance between corresponding points on the acetabular surface at 3-D US and MRI was 0.4 ± 0.3 mm, with 95% confidence interval <1 mm. Mean RMS errors for inter-observer and intra-observer comparisons were significantly less for 3-D US than for MRI, while inter-scan and inter-modality comparisons showed no significant difference. Acetabular geometry was reproduced by 3-D US surface models within 1 mm of the corresponding 3-D MRI surface model, and the 3-D US models were more reliable. This validates the fidelity of 3-D US modeling and encourages future use of 3-D US in assessing infant acetabulum anatomy, which may be useful to detect and monitor treatment of hip dysplasia.

  1. Calibrating MMS Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux Measurements and Characterizing 3D Electric Field Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuster, J. R.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Argall, M. R.; Li, G.; Chen, L. J.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Le Contel, O.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    The electron drift instruments (EDIs) onboard each MMS spacecraft are designed with large geometric factors (~0.01cm2 str) to facilitate detection of weak (~100 nA) electron beams fired and received by the two gun-detector units (GDUs) when EDI is in its "electric field mode" to determine the local electric and magnetic fields. A consequence of the large geometric factor is that "ambient mode" electron flux measurements (500 eV electrons having 0°, 90°, or 180° pitch angle) can vary depending on the orientation of the EDI instrument with respect to the magnetic field, a nonphysical effect that requires a correction. Here, we present determinations of the θ- and ø-dependent correction factors for the eight EDI GDUs, where θ (ø) is the polar (azimuthal) angle between the GDU symmetry axis and the local magnetic field direction, and compare the corrected fluxes with those measured by the fast plasma instrument (FPI). Using these corrected, high time resolution (~1,000 samples per second) ambient electron fluxes, combined with the unprecedentedly high resolution 3D electric field measurements taken by the spin-plane and axial double probes (SDP and ADP), we are equipped to accurately detect electron-scale current layers and electric field waves associated with the non-Maxwellian (anisotropic and agyrotropic) particle distribution functions predicted to exist in the reconnection diffusion region. We compare initial observations of the diffusion region with distributions and wave analysis from PIC simulations of asymmetric reconnection applicable for modeling reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause, where MMS will begin Science Phase 1 as of September 1, 2015.

  2. Investigation of surfactant-enhanced mass removal and flux reduction in 3D correlated permeability fields using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changyong; Werth, Charles J; Webb, Andrew G

    2008-09-10

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to visualize the NAPL source zone architecture before and after surfactant-enhanced NAPL dissolution in three-dimensional (3D) heterogeneously packed flowcells characterized by different longitudinal correlation lengths: 2.1 cm (aquifer 1) and 1.1 cm (aquifer 2). Surfactant flowpaths were determined by imaging the breakthrough of a paramagnetic tracer (MnCl(2)) analyzed by the method of moments. In both experimental aquifers, preferential flow occurred in high permeability materials with low NAPL saturations, and NAPL was preferentially removed from the top of the aquifers with low saturation. Alternate flushing with water and two surfactant pulses (5-6 pore volumes each) resulted in approximately 63% of NAPL mass removal from both aquifers. However, overall reduction in mass flux (Mass Flux 1) exiting the flowcell was lower in aquifer 2 (68%) than in aquifer 1 (81%), and local effluent concentrations were found to increase by as high as 120 times at local sampling ports from aquifer 2 after surfactant flushing. 3D MRI images of NAPL revealed that NAPL migrated downward and created additional NAPL source zones in previously uncontaminated areas at the bottom of the aquifers. The additional NAPL source zones were created in the direction transverse to flow in aquifer 2, which explains the higher mass flux relative to aquifer 1. Analysis using a total trapping number indicates that mobilization of NAPL trapped in the two coarsest sand fractions is possible when saturation is below 0.5 and 0.4, respectively. Results from this study highlight the potential impacts of porous media heterogeneity and NAPL source zone architecture on advanced in-situ flushing technologies.

  3. Internal structure and volcanic hazard potential of Mt Tongariro, New Zealand, from 3D gravity and magnetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Craig A.; Williams-Jones, Glyn

    2016-06-01

    A new 3D geophysical model of the Mt Tongariro Volcanic Massif (TgVM), New Zealand, provides a high resolution view of the volcano's internal structure and hydrothermal system, from which we derive implications for volcanic hazards. Geologically constrained 3D inversions of potential field data provides a greater level of insight into the volcanic structure than is possible from unconstrained models. A complex region of gravity highs and lows (± 6 mGal) is set within a broader, ~ 20 mGal gravity low. A magnetic high (1300 nT) is associated with Mt Ngauruhoe, while a substantial, thick, demagnetised area occurs to the north, coincident with a gravity low and interpreted as representing the hydrothermal system. The hydrothermal system is constrained to the west by major faults, interpreted as an impermeable barrier to fluid migration and extends to basement depth. These faults are considered low probability areas for future eruption sites, as there is little to indicate they have acted as magmatic pathways. Where the hydrothermal system coincides with steep topographic slopes, an increased likelihood of landslides is present and the newly delineated hydrothermal system maps the area most likely to have phreatic eruptions. Such eruptions, while small on a global scale, are important hazards at the TgVM as it is a popular hiking area with hundreds of visitors per day in close proximity to eruption sites. The model shows that the volume of volcanic material erupted over the lifespan of the TgVM is five to six times greater than previous estimates, suggesting a higher rate of magma supply, in line with global rates of andesite production. We suggest that our model of physical property distribution can be used to provide constraints for other models of dynamic geophysical processes occurring at the TgVM.

  4. Uranyl and uranyl-3d block cation complexes with 1,3-adamantanedicarboxylate: crystal structures, luminescence, and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Thuéry, Pierre; Rivière, Eric; Harrowfield, Jack

    2015-03-16

    The reaction of 1,3-adamantanedicarboxylic acid (LH2) with uranyl nitrate under solvo-hydrothermal conditions, either alone or in the presence of additional metal cations (Co(2+), Ni(2+), or Cu(2+)) gives a series of nine complexes displaying a wide range of architectures. While [UO2(L)(H2O)]·1.25CH3CN (1) and [UO2(L)(DMF)] (2) are one-dimensional (1D) species analogous to that previously known, [H2NMe2]2[(UO2)2(L)3]·1.5H2O (3), which includes dimethylammonium counterions generated in situ, is a three-dimensional (3D) framework, and [UO2(L)(NMP)] (4) (NMP = N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone) is a braid-shaped 1D polymer. When 3d block metal ions are present and bound to 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) coligands, their role is reduced to that of decorating species attached to uranyl-containing 1D polymers, as in [UO2M(L)2(bipy)2]·0.5H2O with M = Co (5) or Ni (6), and [(UO2)2Cu2(L)3(NO3)2(bipy)2]·0.5H2O (9), or of counterions, as in [Ni(bipy)3][(UO2)4(O)2(L)3]·3H2O (7), in which a two-dimensional (2D) assembly is built from tetranuclear uranyl-containing building units. In contrast, the heterometallic 3D framework [UO2Cu(L)2] (8) can be isolated in the absence of bipy. The emission spectra measured in the solid state display the usual uranyl vibronic fine structure, with various degrees of resolution and quenching, except for that of complex 7, which shows emission from the nickel(II) centers. The magnetic properties of complexes 5, 6, 8, and 9 were investigated, showing, in particular, the presence of zero-field splitting effects in 6 and weak antiferromagnetic interactions in 9.

  5. A 3D MOF constructed from dysprosium(III) oxalate and capping ligands: ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cai-Ming; Zhang, De-Qing; Zhu, Dao-Ben

    2016-04-04

    A novel 3D MOF based on dysprosium(iii) oxalate and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), {[Dy(C2O4)1.5phen]·0.5H2O}n (1), has been hydrothermally synthesized. The Dy(3+) ion acts as a typical Y-shaped node, linking to each other to generate an interesting 3D topology structure. Complex 1 is the first 3D DyMOF displaying both ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation.

  6. Non-linear magnetohydrodynamic modeling of plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Orain, F.; Bécoulet, M.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Nardon, E.; Passeron, C.; Latu, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Fil, A.; Ratnani, A.; Huijsmans, G.; Pamela, S.; Chapman, I.; Kirk, A.; Thornton, A.; Cahyna, P.

    2013-10-15

    The interaction of static Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) with the plasma flows is modeled in toroidal geometry, using the non-linear resistive MHD code JOREK, which includes the X-point and the scrape-off-layer. Two-fluid diamagnetic effects, the neoclassical poloidal friction and a source of toroidal rotation are introduced in the model to describe realistic plasma flows. RMP penetration is studied taking self-consistently into account the effects of these flows and the radial electric field evolution. JET-like, MAST, and ITER parameters are used in modeling. For JET-like parameters, three regimes of plasma response are found depending on the plasma resistivity and the diamagnetic rotation: at high resistivity and slow rotation, the islands generated by the RMPs at the edge resonant surfaces rotate in the ion diamagnetic direction and their size oscillates. At faster rotation, the generated islands are static and are more screened by the plasma. An intermediate regime with static islands which slightly oscillate is found at lower resistivity. In ITER simulations, the RMPs generate static islands, which forms an ergodic layer at the very edge (ψ≥0.96) characterized by lobe structures near the X-point and results in a small strike point splitting on the divertor targets. In MAST Double Null Divertor geometry, lobes are also found near the X-point and the 3D-deformation of the density and temperature profiles is observed.

  7. Heterometallic 3d-4f single-molecule magnets: ligand and metal ion influences on the magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Langley, Stuart K; Le, Crystal; Ungur, Liviu; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Abrahams, Brendan F; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Murray, Keith S

    2015-04-06

    Six tetranuclear 3d–4f single-molecule magnet (SMM) complexes formed using N-n-butyldiethanolamine and N-methyldiethanolamine in conjunction with ortho- and para-substituted benzoic acid and hexafluoroacetoacetone ligands yield two families, both having a butterfly metallic core. The first consists of four complexes of type {Co2(III)Dy2(III)} and {Co2(III)Co(II)Dy(III)} using N-n-butyldiethanolamine with variation of the carboxylate ligand. The anisotropy barriers are 80 cm–1, (77 and 96 cm–1—two relaxation processes occur), 117 and 88 cm–1, respectively, each following a relaxation mechanism from a single DyIII ion. The second family consists of a {Co2(III)Dy2(III)} and a {Cr2(III)Dy2(III)} complex, from the ligand combination of N-methyldiethanolamine and hexafluoroacetylacetone. Both show SMM behavior, the Co(III) example displaying an anisotropy barrier of 23 cm–1. The Cr(III) complex displays a barrier of 28 cm–1, with longer relaxation times and open hysteresis loops, the latter of which is not seen in the Co(III) case. This is a consequence of strong Dy(III)–Cr(III) magnetic interactions, with the relaxation arising from the electronic structure of the whole complex and not from a single DyIII ion. The results suggest that the presence of strong exchange interactions lead to significantly longer relaxation times than in isostructural complexes where the exchange is weak. The study also suggests that electron-withdrawing groups on both bridging (carboxylate) and terminal (β-diketonate) ligands enhance the anisotropy barrier.

  8. Quasi-closed orbit in a harmonically perturbed magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.V. )

    1992-11-01

    The paper generalizes a notion of the closed orbit for the case when the accelertor lattice is perturbed by a time-dependent harmonic dipole field. The problem is motivated by effects of current ripple in a proton accelerator. Our result allows to estimate the amplitude of the beam excursions as a function of the amplitude and the frequency of the perturbation. It predicts that the deviation of the beam increases as the frequency of the ripple approaches the sideband betatron frequency.

  9. Trans-Hudsonian far-field deformation effects in the Rae foreland: An integrated geological-3D magnetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percival, J. A.; Tschirhart, V.

    2017-03-01

    The intracratonic Rae cover sequence, deposited ca. 2.2-1.9 Ga, forms a useful marker for unravelling tectonic events that affected the Archean Rae Province at ca.2.0, 1.9 and 1.85 Ga. Polyphase deformation is recognized within the Rae cover rocks, including the 70 × 10 km Montresor belt, and attributed to distal effects of the ca. 1.85 Ga Trans-Hudson orogeny. In this contribution we explore the 3D geometry and structural history of the Montresor belt, previously considered to be a simple syncline lying unconformably on Archean basement. New geological, geophysical and geochronological results define a more complex history in which lower Montresor units were thrust-imbricated with basement gneisses and metamorphosed to the amphibolite facies. Mid-to upper greenschist facies upper Montresor units, exposed in an open synform, are superficially less deformed. However, using high-resolution aeromagnetic data and distinct magnetic marker units considered proxies for bedding, we constructed a set of forward models to explore the three-dimensional geometry of the belt. The re-analysis outlines a set of pre-synform structures defined by low-angle truncations of the magnetic markers. Geometric relationships indicate the presence of at least three faults at low angles to bedding, interpreted as D1 piggy-back thrusts, and bracketed by available geochronology between 1.924 and 1.87 Ga. D1 strain in the upper Montresor strata is significantly less intense than that further south in Rae cover rocks, consistent with a more distal foreland setting during the Trans-Hudson orogeny. The Montresor belt preserves a record of the Trans-Hudson tectonic style at relatively shallow crustal levels as a result of its foreland setting and structural history including a syn-orogenic extensional detachment event.

  10. Solar Wind Heating as Revealed from the Variation of 3D Ion Velocity Distributions across the Magnetic Reconnection Exhaust Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection within current sheet has been regarded as one of the crucial dissipation and heating processes of coherent structures in the solar wind turbulence. Counter-streaming of ions is an important phenomenon in the reconnection exhaust region ranged from the ion diffusion region to the extended outflow region. It has been suggested by theoretical and numerical models that the ions are going to be picked up by the ejecting magnetic field and show larger T_perpendicular than T_parallel, if the guide field is strong enough (in other word, the shear angle is relatively low). The pick-up behavior seems to favor the heating of heavy ions with high mass-to-charge ratio, since the high M/Q ions have larger gyro-period/transit-time and tend to be non-adiabatic more easily. The above statements from theoretical models have not been thoroughly testified in the solar wind observations, though the changes in total temperature and 1D reduced velocity distribution function had been studied. Until now, it remains unclear about the difference of full 3D velocity distribution for the proton and helium ions between the upstream and the exhaust regions. Here, we will analyze the plasma measurement data from WIND/3DP to explore and compare the parallel and perpendicular heating effect of different species of ions. As a preliminary result, the proton is found to show bi-directional streams in its velocity distribution in some reconnection exhaust regions. The thermalization of the counter-streaming protons will be presented. The relation between proton T_parallel/T_perpendicular and guide field strength (or shear angle) will be studied. The velocity distributions of helium ions will be illustrated, which shows the difference of heating effect between different M/Q ratios.

  11. Finite element analysis of a 3D moving vacuum arc for transverse magnetic field contacts based on Gundlach's formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Chang-Seob; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Se-Hee

    2017-01-01

    A systematic numerical method for analyzing a 3D moving vacuum arc was proposed and tested in this research by using a transverse magnetic field (TMF) contact. The analysis was carried out by employing the finite element method and the experimental energy equation defined by Gundlach's formula. In the literature, the vacuum interrupter has been widely applied to medium-voltage switching circuits. TMF-type contacts use the Lorentz force density to move a high-temperature arc so as to prevent the contacts from being melted and damaged. The material erosion caused by the arc on the electrode's surface is an important process that results in the interruptive capabilities of these vacuum interrupters. In a classical arc model, to move the vacuum arc, it is required that the magneto-hydrodynamics be analyzed in the arc region at each step. However, with this approach convergence is difficult, resulting in a very time-consuming. Therefore, we propose a new technique to predict the behaviors of vacuum arc between two electrodes. This new approach adopts the experimental arc voltage equation between two electrodes defined by Gundlach's formula. We verify our proposed model by comparing its results with the arcing behaviors obtained from earlier experiments.

  12. EDITORIAL: 15th Workshop on MHD Stability Control: 3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control 15th Workshop on MHD Stability Control: 3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttery, Richard

    2011-08-01

    This annual workshop on MHD Stability Control has been held since 1996 with a focus on understanding and developing control of MHD instabilities for future fusion reactors. The workshop generally covers a wide range of stability topics: from disruptions, to tearing modes, error fields, ELMs, resistive wall modes (RWMs) and ideal MHD. It spans many device types, particularly tokamaks, stellarators and reversed field pinches, to pull out commonalities in the physics and improve understanding. In 2010 the workshop was held on 15-17 November at the University of Wisconsin in Madison and was combined with the annual US-Japan MHD Workshop. The theme was `3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control', with a focus on multidisciplinary sessions exploring issues of plasma response to 3D fields, the manifestation of such fields in the plasma, and how they influence stability. This has been a topic of renewed interest, with utilisation of 3D fields for ELM control now planned in ITER, and a focus on the application of such fields for error field correction, disruption avoidance, and RWM control. Key issues included the physics of the interaction, types of coils and harmonic spectra needed to control instabilities, and subsidiary effects such as braking (or rotating) the plasma. More generally, a wider range of issues were discussed including RWM physics, tearing mode physics, disruption mitigation, ballooning stability, the snowflake divertor concept, and the line tied pinch! A novel innovation to the meeting was a panel discussion session, this year on Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity, which ran well; more will be tried next year. In this special section of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion we present several of the invited and contributed papers from the 2010 workshop, which have been subject to the normal refereeing procedures of the journal. These papers give a sense of the exceptional quality of the presentations at this workshop, all of which may be found at http

  13. First observation of rotation acceleration of magnetic island by using rotating resonant magnetic perturbation on the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, B.; Ding, Y. H.; Hu, Q. M.; Wang, N. C.; Yi, B.; Zheng, M. Y.; Jin, W.; Li, J. C.; Cheng, Z. F.; Yu, Q.; Yu, K. X.; Zhuang, G.

    2013-12-01

    A set of in-vessel saddle coils called dynamic resonant magnetic perturbation (DRMP) for generating rotating resonant magnetic perturbations has recently been constructed on the J-TEXT tokamak. The phenomenon of tearing mode locking to DRMP and rotating together with the DRMP field has been observed. There is an apparent decrease of the island width during the locking and unlocking procedure. Similar results are obtained in the numerical simulation.

  14. 3D-printed microfluidic magnetic preconcentrator for the detection of bacterial pathogen using an ATP luminometer and antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Park, Chanyong; Lee, Jinyeop; Kim, Yonghee; Kim, Jaewon; Lee, Jinkee; Park, Sungsu

    2017-01-01

    Various types of microfluidic systems have been developed to detect bacterial pathogens. However, most of these require enrichment steps that take at least several hours when detecting bacteria that are present with a low number of cells and, in addition, fabrication requires complicated assembly steps. In this study, we report the development of 3D microfluidic magnetic preconcentrator (3DμFMP) made of plastic via 3D printing without the need for any assembly. 3DμFMP could selectively preconcentrate enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 in 100mL by a factor of 700 within 1h using antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles (Ab-MNPs). With the combined use of an ATP luminometer, as low as 10 E. coli O157:H7 CFU (colony forming unit)/mL could be detected in blood. These results demonstrate the feasibility of 3DμFMP as a preconcentrator to improve the detection limit of existing bacterial detection systems.

  15. External control of the Drosophila melanogaster egg to imago development period by specific combinations of 3D low-frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Vladimir I; Khmelinskii, Igor

    2016-01-01

    We report that the duration of the egg-to-imago development period of the Drosophila melanogaster, and the imago longevity, are both controllable by combinations of external 3-dimensional (3D) low-frequency electric and magnetic fields (LFEMFs). Both these periods may be reduced or increased by applying an appropriate configuration of external 3D LFEMFs. We report that the longevity of D. melanogaster imagoes correlates with the duration of the egg-to-imago development period of the respective eggs. We infer that metabolic processes in both eggs and imago are either accelerated (resulting in reduced time periods) or slowed down (resulting in increased time periods). We propose that external 3D LFEMFs induce electric currents in live systems as well as mechanical vibrations on sub-cell, whole-cell and cell-group levels. These external fields induce media polarization due to ionic motion and orientation of electric dipoles that could moderate the observed effects. We found that the longevity of D. melanogaster imagoes is affected by action of 3D LFEMFs on the respective eggs in the embryonic development period (EDP). We interpret this effect as resulting from changes in the regulation mechanism of metabolic processes in D. melanogaster eggs, inherited by the resulting imagoes. We also tested separate effects of either 3D electric or 3D magnetic fields, which were significantly weaker.

  16. 3-D Full-kinetic Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Magnetic Anomalies: Particle Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Divin, A. V.; Wang, X.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.; Horanyi, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present three-dimensional full-kinetic electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier MHD and hybrid simulations, the full-kinetic nature of iPic3D allows to self-consistently investigate space charge effects, and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe the general mechanism of the interaction of both a horizontal and vertical dipole model embedded just below the lunar surface focussing on the ion and electron kinetic behaviour of the system. It is shown that the configurations are largely dominated by electron motion, because the LMA scale size is small with respect to the gyro-radius of the solar wind ions. The formation of mini-magnetospheres is an electrostatic effect. Additionally, we discuss typical particle trajectories as well as complete particle distribution functions covering thermal and suprathermal energies, within the interaction region and on viable spacecraft altitudes. Our work opens new frontiers of research toward a deeper understanding of LMAs and is ideally suited to be compared with field or particle observations from spacecraft such as Kaguya (SELENE), Lunar Prospector or ARTEMIS. The ability to evaluate the implications for future lunar exploration as well as lunar science in general hinges on a better understanding of LMAs.This research has received funding from the European Commission's FP7 Program with the grant agreement EHEROES (project 284461, www.eheroes.eu). The simulations were conducted on the computational resources provided by the PRACE Tier-0 project 2013091928 (SuperMUC). This research was supported by the Swedish National Space Board

  17. A 3D reconstruction algorithm for magneto-acoustic tomography with magnetic induction based on ultrasound transducer characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ren; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Shunqi; Yin, Tao; Liu, Zhipeng

    2016-12-01

    In this study we present a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction algorithm for magneto-acoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) based on the characteristics of the ultrasound transducer. The algorithm is investigated to solve the blur problem of the MAT-MI acoustic source image, which is caused by the ultrasound transducer and the scanning geometry. First, we established a transducer model matrix using measured data from the real transducer. With reference to the S-L model used in the computed tomography algorithm, a 3D phantom model of electrical conductivity is set up. Both sphere scanning and cylinder scanning geometries are adopted in the computer simulation. Then, using finite element analysis, the distribution of the eddy current and the acoustic source as well as the acoustic pressure can be obtained with the transducer model matrix. Next, using singular value decomposition, the inverse transducer model matrix together with the reconstruction algorithm are worked out. The acoustic source and the conductivity images are reconstructed using the proposed algorithm. Comparisons between an ideal point transducer and the realistic transducer are made to evaluate the algorithms. Finally, an experiment is performed using a graphite phantom. We found that images of the acoustic source reconstructed using the proposed algorithm are a better match than those using the previous one, the correlation coefficient of sphere scanning geometry is 98.49% and that of cylinder scanning geometry is 94.96%. Comparison between the ideal point transducer and the realistic transducer shows that the correlation coefficients are 90.2% in sphere scanning geometry and 86.35% in cylinder scanning geometry. The reconstruction of the graphite phantom experiment also shows a higher resolution using the proposed algorithm. We conclude that the proposed reconstruction algorithm, which considers the characteristics of the transducer, can obviously improve the resolution of the

  18. Dependence of radial thermal diffusivity on parameters of toroidal plasma affected by resonant magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Ryutaro; Nunami, Masanori; Satake, Shinsuke; Takamaru, Hisanori; Okamoto, Masao

    2013-06-01

    We investigate how the neoclassical thermal diffusivity of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma is modified by the effect of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), using a drift-kinetic simulation code for calculating the radial thermal diffusivity of ion in the perturbed region under an assumption of zero electric field. Here, the perturbed region is assumed to be generated on and near the resonance surfaces, and is wedged in between the regular closed magnetic surfaces. We find that the dependence of the radial thermal diffusivity on parameters of the toroidal plasma is represented as \\chi_r=\\chi_r^{(0)} \\{1+ c_0\\,(\\omega_b/\

  19. Electric and magnetic components of ballooning perturbations in the magnetotail plasma sheet before breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogai, T. G.; Golovchanskaya, I. V.; Kornilov, I. A.; Kornilova, T. A.; Fedorenko, Y. V.

    2016-01-01

    Using data from THEMIS spacecraft we investigated transverse to the magnetic field mutually perpendicular electric and magnetic components of ballooning type perturbations with periods 60-240 s, which are observed in the magnetospheric plasma sheet during the period preceding substorm onset. With applying Hilbert transform, we analyzed the phase relations between them. It is shown that the perturbations are dominated by radial electric and azimuthal magnetic (that is, toroidal) components which are usually in phase or out-of-phase. Along with them, approximately 2.5 times less intense azimuthal electric and radial magnetic components are present, which are more often phase-shifted by π/2. It is concluded that the observed perturbations are not a simple consequence of the development of plasma sheet ballooning instability, leading to the growth of strongly elongated along the magnetotail ballooning structures. It is pointed out that this conclusion is confirmed by simultaneous ground-based observations of magnetically conjugate auroral structures.

  20. High-Magnetic-Field Effect on Interplay between Sm 4f and Mn 3d Moments in SmMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyama, Ayato; Jung, Jong-Suck; Choi, Eun Sang; Hwang, Jungmin; Kimura, Tsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of magnetization and dielectric constant were carried out in static magnetic fields up to 35 T for an N-type ferrimagnetic SmMnO3 with the compensation temperature Tcomp = 9.4 K. In-field data exhibit a first-order-like transition at around Tcomp. The temperature profiles of the magnetization around the transition point show different behaviors between the data taken in magnetic fields whose energy is below and above the magnitude of the interaction between Sm 4f and Mn 3d moments. We interpret that the observed transition results from keen competition among thermal energy, the Zeeman energy, and the f--d interaction.

  1. Use of a twisted 3D Cauchy condition surface to reconstruct the last closed magnetic surface in a non-axisymmetric fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itagaki, Masafumi; Okubo, Gaku; Akazawa, Masayuki; Matsumoto, Yutaka; Watanabe, Kiyomasa; Seki, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2012-12-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) Cauchy condition surface (CCS) method code, ‘CCS3D’, is now under development to reconstruct the 3D magnetic field profile outside a non-axisymmetric fusion plasma using only magnetic sensor signals. A new ‘twisted CCS’ is introduced, whose elliptic cross-section rotates with the variation in plasma geometry in the toroidal direction of a helical-type device. Independent of the toroidal angle, this CCS can be placed at a certain distance from the last closed magnetic surface (LCMS). With this new CCS, it is found through test calculations for the Large Helical Device that the numerical accuracy in the reconstructed field is improved. Furthermore, the magnetic field line tracing indicates the LCMS more precisely than with the use of the axisymmetric CCS. A new idea to determine the LCMS numerically is also proposed.

  2. Dodecanuclear 3d/4f-metal clusters with a 'Star of David' topology: single-molecule magnetism and magnetocaloric properties.

    PubMed

    Alexandropoulos, Dimitris I; Cunha-Silva, Luís; Lorusso, Giulia; Evangelisti, Marco; Tang, Jinkui; Stamatatos, Theocharis C

    2016-01-28

    A family of interwoven molecular inorganic knots, shaped like the 'Star of David', was prepared by the employment of naphthalene-2,3-diol in 3d/4f-metal cluster chemistry; the isoskeletal dodecanuclear compounds exhibit slow relaxation of the magnetization and magnetocaloric properties, depending on the metal ion.

  3. A unique 2D → 3D polycatenation cobalt(II)-based molecule magnet showing coexistence of paramagnetism and canted antiferromagnetism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Lin, Xi; He, Zhangzhen; Lin, Zujin; Cao, Rong

    2011-04-07

    A novel entangled architecture [Co(1.5)(bpmp)(Hcda)(cda)(H(2)O)] (1) based on 4(4)-sql subunits, showing an interesting 2D → 3D inclined polycatenation structure feature, is reported. Magnetic investigation shows that compound 1 exhibits coexistence of paramagnetism and canted antiferromagnetism with Tc of 48 K.

  4. MO-F-CAMPUS-I-04: Magnetic Resonance Imaging of An in Vitro 3D Tumor Model

    SciTech Connect

    Veiga, C; Long, T; Siow, B; Loizidou, M; Royle, G; Ricketts, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of an in vitro 3D tumor model (tumoroid) as a bio-phantom for repetitive and sequential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. Methods: The tissue engineered tumoroid comprised an artificial cancer mass (ACM) containing 30 million HT29 cancer cells seeded in a collagen type I matrix, whose density was increased by plastic compression (dry/wet weight=40%). The ACM was embedded in an uncompressed collagen gel that mimicked the tumor stroma, and the tumoroid was incubated for 24h before imaging. Images were acquired using the 1T ICON™ (Bruker Corporation, Billerica, MA) MRI scanner. T1 maps were calculated using an IR-RARE sequence (TE=12ms, TR=10000ms, 7 inversion times), while for T2 maps a MSME technique (TR=6000ms, 16 echoes) was used. T1 and T2 fittings were performed using a pixel-wise approach to produce relaxometric parametric maps. Results: The images acquired and corresponding T1 and T2 maps indicate contrast between the ACM and the stroma. T1 was 2500 and 2800ms, while T2 was 520 and 760ms, for the ACM and stroma respectively. The ACM construct was not homogenous and internal features were visible, which can be explained by local gradients of cell and/or collagen density. The viability of the cells was confirmed via confocal microscopy for several days after the imaging session, demonstrating the suitability of the tumoroid for sequential imaging studies. Conclusions: We have engineered a tumor model compatible with repetitive and sequential MRI. We found T1 and T2 contrast between the ACM and stroma using a pre-clinical MRI scanner. The model, which enables controllable cell and matrix densities, has potential for a wide range of applications in radiotherapy, such as to study tumor progression and to validate imaging biomarkers. Further work is necessary to understand the mechanisms behind the contrast achieved, and to correlate findings with biology and histology data.

  5. Modification of magnetic anisotropy through 3d-4f coupling in La0.75Pr0.25Co2P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovnir, Kirill; Thompson, Corey M.; Garlea, V. Ovidiu; Haskel, Daniel; Polyanskii, Anatolii A.; Zhou, Haidong; Shatruk, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic behavior of La0.75Pr0.25Co2P2 was investigated by a combination of magnetic measurements, magneto-optical imaging, neutron diffraction, and x-ray absorption spectroscopy, including x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. The material crystallizes in the ThCr2Si2 structure type and exhibits three consecutive magnetic phase transitions. At 167 K, the Co magnetic moments order ferromagnetically in the ab plane of the tetragonal crystal structure. At 66 K, a ferromagnetic ordering of Pr(4f) moments parallel to the c axis causes a rotation of the Co(3d) moments towards the c axis in the direction opposite to the Pr moments, thus forming a noncollinear ferrimagnetically ordered structure and switching the direction of the total magnetization from the ab plane to the c axis. The third magnetic transition observed at 35 K is likely associated with the establishment of the collinear ferrimagnetic order along the c axis.

  6. Modeling magnetic perturbation fields associated with ionospheric and geomagnetic-field-aligned currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, A. D.; Maute, A.

    2003-04-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General-Circulation Model calculates ionospheric and geomagnetic-field-aligned electric currents produced by ionospheric wind dynamo action, taking into account magnetospheric sources at high latitudes. The associated magnetic perturbations at the ground and at low-Earth-orbit (LEO) satellite altitudes are calculated by representing the height-integrated horizontal ionospheric current as a current sheet at 110 km, connected to geomagnetic-field-aligned currents flowing into and out of the top. The horizontal sheet current can be divided into two components: a divergence-free equivalent current which, together with the associated induced Earth currents, is responsible for all of the magnetic perturbations below the current sheet, and a divergent (but not irrotational) current that closes the field-aligned currents above. We call the combination of the field-aligned currents and their closing ionospheric currents the ``nonequivalent'' currents. By definition, these produce no magnetic effect at the ground, but they do produce important magnetic effects at LEO altitudes, generally dominating the component of LEO magnetic perturbations perpendicular to the main geomagnetic field. At high magnetic latitudes the nonequivalent LEO magnetic perturbations are largely toroidal, and are associated with the strong field-aligned currents that couple the ionosphere with the outer magnetosphere. At middle and low magnetic latitudes the nonequivalent LEO magnetic perturbations are largely associated with field-aligned currents that flow between the northern and southern hemispheres, and that can produce east-west perturbations of tens of nanoteslas.

  7. Insertion of a single-molecule magnet inside a ferromagnetic lattice based on a 3D bimetallic oxalate network: towards molecular analogues of permanent magnets.

    PubMed

    Clemente-León, Miguel; Coronado, Eugenio; Gómez-García, Carlos J; López-Jordà, Maurici; Camón, Agustín; Repollés, Ana; Luis, Fernando

    2014-02-03

    The insertion of the single-molecule magnet (SMM) [Mn(III)(salen)(H2O)]2(2+) (salen(2-) = N,N'-ethylenebis-(salicylideneiminate)) into a ferromagnetic bimetallic oxalate network affords the hybrid compound [Mn(III)(salen)(H2O)]2[Mn(II)Cr(III)(ox)3]2⋅(CH3OH)⋅(CH3CN)2 (1). This cationic Mn2 cluster templates the growth of crystals formed by an unusual achiral 3D oxalate network. The magnetic properties of this hybrid magnet are compared with those of the analogous compounds [Mn(III)(salen)(H2O)]2[Zn(II)Cr(III)(ox)3]2⋅(CH3OH)⋅(CH3CN)2 (2) and [In(III)(sal2-trien)][Mn(II)Cr(III)(ox)3]⋅(H2O)0.25⋅(CH3OH)0.25⋅(CH3CN)0.25 (3), which are used as reference compounds. In 2 it has been shown that the magnetic isolation of the Mn2 clusters provided by their insertion into a paramagnetic oxalate network of Cr(III) affords a SMM behavior, albeit with blocking temperatures well below 500 mK even for frequencies as high as 160 kHz. In 3 the onset of ferromagnetism in the bimetallic Mn(II) Cr(III) network is observed at Tc = 5 K. Finally, in the hybrid compound 1 the interaction between the two magnetic networks leads to the antiparallel arrangement of their respective magnetizations, that is, to a ferrimagnetic phase. This coupling induces also important changes on the magnetic properties of 1 with respect to those of the reference compounds 2 and 3. In particular, compound 1 shows a large magnetization hysteresis below 1 K, which is in sharp contrast with the near-reversible magnetizations that the SMMs and the oxalate ferromagnetic lattice show under the same conditions.

  8. Numerical Simulation on Applicability of Resonant Magnetic Perturbation to KSTAR Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doohyun; Han, Hyunsun; Kim, Ki Min; Hong, Sang Hee

    2009-11-01

    A numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the perturbed magnetic field configurations for a feasibility study on the resonant magnetic perturbation(RMP) to mitigate ELM damages to the divertor in KSTAR tokamak. The perturbed magnetic fields are described by vacuum superposition of equilibrium fields and fluctuating fields induced from the in- vessel control coils (IVCCs) will be installed in KSTAR. The equilibrium and induced fields are calculated using Grad- Shafranov equation and Biot-Savart law, respectively. For visualizing the magnetic field configurations, a field line tracing code has been developed using the 4th-order Runge-Kutta method. Magnetic field perturbations and island configurations can be found with this tracing code by describing poloidal positions of field lines as the increment of toroidal angle. And the Chirikov parameter is calculated to verify the generation of stochastic layer by overlap of magnetic islands. From this numerical work, it is confirmed that stochastic magnetic field lines are formed when the IVCC magnetic fields are generated, and the effect of RMP on KSTAR operation is discussed.

  9. A novel skeleton based quantification and 3-D volumetric visualization of left atrium fibrosis using late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ravanelli, Daniele; dal Piaz, Elena Costanza; Centonze, Maurizio; Casagranda, Giulia; Marini, Massimiliano; Del Greco, Maurizio; Karim, Rashed; Rhode, Kawal; Valentini, Aldo

    2014-02-01

    This work presents the results of a new tool for 3-D segmentation, quantification and visualization of cardiac left atrium fibrosis, based on late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI), for stratifying patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) that are candidates for radio-frequency catheter ablation. In this study 10 consecutive patients suffering AF with different grades of atrial fibrosis were considered. LGE-MRI and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images were used to detect and quantify fibrosis of the left atrium using a threshold and 2-D skeleton based approach. Quantification and 3-D volumetric views of atrial fibrosis were compared with quantification and 3-D bipolar voltage maps measured with an electro-anatomical mapping (EAM) system, the clinical reference standard technique for atrial substrate characterization. Segmentation and quantification of fibrosis areas proved to be clinically reliable among all different fibrosis stages. The proposed tool obtains discrepancies in fibrosis quantification less than 4% from EAM results and yields accurate 3-D volumetric views of fibrosis of left atrium. The novel 3-D visualization and quantification tool based on LGE-MRI allows detection of cardiac left atrium fibrosis areas. This noninvasive method provides a clinical alternative to EAM systems for quantification and localization of atrial fibrosis.

  10. Automatic quantification of aortic regurgitation using 3D full volume color doppler echocardiography: a validation study with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaehuk; Hong, Geu-Ru; Kim, Minji; Cho, In Jeong; Shim, Chi Young; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Mancina, Joel; Ha, Jong-Won; Chung, Namsik

    2015-10-01

    Recent advances in real-time three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography provide the automated measurement of mitral inflow and aortic stroke volume without the need to assume the geometry of the heart. The aim of this study is to explore the ability of 3D full volume color Doppler echocardiography (FVCDE) to quantify aortic regurgitation (AR). Thirty-two patients with more than a moderate degree of AR were enrolled. AR volume was measured by (1) two-dimensional-CDE, using the proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) and (2) real-time 3D-FVCDE with (3) phase-contrast cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (PC-CMR) as the reference method. Automated AR quantification using 3D-FVCDE was feasible in 30 of the 32 patients. 2D-PISA underestimated the AR volume compared to 3D-FVCDE and PC-CMR (38.6 ± 9.9 mL by 2D-PISA; 49.5 ± 10.2 mL by 3D-FVCDE; 52.3 ± 12.6 mL by PC-CMR). The AR volume assessed by 3D-FVCDE showed better correlation and agreement with PC-CMR (r = 0.93, p < 0.001, 2SD: 9.5 mL) than did 2D-PISA (r = 0.76, p < 0.001, 2SD: 15.7 mL). When used to classify AR severity, 3D-FVCDE agreed better with PC-CMR (k = 0.94) than did 2D-PISA (k = 0.53). In patients with eccentric jets, only 30% were correctly graded by 2D-PISA. Conversely, almost all patients with eccentric jets (86.7%) were correctly graded by 3D-FVCDE. In patients with multiple jets, only 3 out of 10 were correctly graded by 2D-PISA, while 3D-FVCDE correctly graded 9 out of 10 of these patients. Automated quantification of AR using the 3D-FVCDE method is clinically feasible and more accurate than the current 2D-based method. AR quantification by 2D-PISA significantly misclassified AR grade in patients with eccentric or multiple jets. This study demonstrates that 3D-FVCDE is a valuable tool to accurately measure AR volume regardless of AR characteristics.

  11. Study of the 3D Coronal Magnetic Field of Active Region 11117 Around the Time of a Confined Flare Using a Data-Driven CESE-MHD Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Feng, X.; Wu, S.; Hu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Non-potentiality of the solar coronal magnetic field accounts for the solar explosion like flares and CMEs. We apply a data-driven CESE-MHD model to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) coronal magnetic field of NOAA active region (AR) 11117 around the time of a C-class confined flare occurred on 2010 October 25. The CESE-MHD model, based on the spacetime conservation-element and solution-element scheme, is designed to focus on the magnetic-field evolution and to consider a simplified solar atomsphere with finite plasma β. Magnetic vector-field data derived from the observations at the photoshpere is inputted directly to constrain the model. Assuming that the dynamic evolution of the coronal magnetic field can be approximated by successive equilibria, we solve a time sequence of MHD equilibria basing on a set of vector magnetograms for AR 11117 taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) around the time of flare. The model qualitatively reproduces the basic structures of the 3D magnetic field, as supported by the visual similarity between the field lines and the coronal loops observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), which shows that the coronal field can indeed be well characterized by the MHD equilibrium in most time. The magnetic configuration changes very limited during the studied time interval of two hours. A topological analysis reveals that the small flare is correlated with a bald patch (BP, where the magnetic field is tangent to the photoshpere), suggesting that the energy release of the flare can be understood by magnetic reconnection associated with the BP separatrices. The total magnetic flux and energy keep increasing slightly in spite of the flare, while the magnetic free energy drops during the flare with an amount of 1.7 × 1030 erg, which can be interpreted as the energy budget released by the minor C-class flare.

  12. Connection between plasma response and resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) edge localized mode (ELM) suppression in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Wingen, Andreas; Ferraro, N. M.; Shafer, Morgan W.; Unterberg, Ezekial A.; Canik, John M.; Evans, T. E.; Hillis, Donald Lee; Hirshman, Steven Paul; Seal, Sudip K.; Snyder, P. B.; Sontag, Aaron C.

    2015-09-03

    Calculations of the plasma response to applied non-axisymmetric fields in several DIII-D discharges show that predicted displacements depend strongly on the edge current density. This result is found using both a linear two-fluid-MHD model (M3D-C1) and a nonlinear ideal-MHD model (VMEC). Furthermore, it is observed that the probability of a discharge being edge localized mode (ELM)-suppressed is most closely related to the edge current density, as opposed to the pressure gradient. It is found that discharges with a stronger kink response are closer to the peeling–ballooning stability limit in ELITE simulations and eventually cross into the unstable region, causing ELMs to reappear. Thus for effective ELM suppression, the RMP has to prevent the plasma from generating a large kink response, associated with ELM instability. Experimental observations are in agreement with the finding; discharges which have a strong kink response in the MHD simulations show ELMs or ELM mitigation during the RMP phase of the experiment, while discharges with a small kink response in the MHD simulations are fully ELM suppressed in the experiment by the applied resonant magnetic perturbation. The results are cross-checked against modeled 3D ideal MHD equilibria using the VMEC code. The procedure of constructing optimal 3D equilibria for diverted H-mode discharges using VMEC is presented. As a result, kink displacements in VMEC are found to scale with the edge current density, similar to M3D-C1, but the displacements are smaller. A direct correlation in the flux surface displacements to the bootstrap current is shown.

  13. Connection between plasma response and resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) edge localized mode (ELM) suppression in DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Wingen, Andreas; Ferraro, N. M.; Shafer, Morgan W.; ...

    2015-09-03

    Calculations of the plasma response to applied non-axisymmetric fields in several DIII-D discharges show that predicted displacements depend strongly on the edge current density. This result is found using both a linear two-fluid-MHD model (M3D-C1) and a nonlinear ideal-MHD model (VMEC). Furthermore, it is observed that the probability of a discharge being edge localized mode (ELM)-suppressed is most closely related to the edge current density, as opposed to the pressure gradient. It is found that discharges with a stronger kink response are closer to the peeling–ballooning stability limit in ELITE simulations and eventually cross into the unstable region, causing ELMsmore » to reappear. Thus for effective ELM suppression, the RMP has to prevent the plasma from generating a large kink response, associated with ELM instability. Experimental observations are in agreement with the finding; discharges which have a strong kink response in the MHD simulations show ELMs or ELM mitigation during the RMP phase of the experiment, while discharges with a small kink response in the MHD simulations are fully ELM suppressed in the experiment by the applied resonant magnetic perturbation. The results are cross-checked against modeled 3D ideal MHD equilibria using the VMEC code. The procedure of constructing optimal 3D equilibria for diverted H-mode discharges using VMEC is presented. As a result, kink displacements in VMEC are found to scale with the edge current density, similar to M3D-C1, but the displacements are smaller. A direct correlation in the flux surface displacements to the bootstrap current is shown.« less

  14. Connection between plasma response and resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) edge localized mode (ELM) suppression in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingen, A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Shafer, M. W.; Unterberg, E. A.; Canik, J. M.; Evans, T. E.; Hillis, D. L.; Hirshman, S. P.; Seal, S. K.; Snyder, P. B.; Sontag, A. C.

    2015-10-01

    Calculations of the plasma response to applied non-axisymmetric fields in several DIII-D discharges show that predicted displacements depend strongly on the edge current density. This result is found using both a linear two-fluid-MHD model (M3D-C1) and a nonlinear ideal-MHD model (VMEC). Furthermore, it is observed that the probability of a discharge being edge localized mode (ELM)-suppressed is most closely related to the edge current density, as opposed to the pressure gradient. It is found that discharges with a stronger kink response are closer to the peeling-ballooning stability limit in ELITE simulations and eventually cross into the unstable region, causing ELMs to reappear. Thus for effective ELM suppression, the RMP has to prevent the plasma from generating a large kink response, associated with ELM instability. Experimental observations are in agreement with the finding; discharges which have a strong kink response in the MHD simulations show ELMs or ELM mitigation during the RMP phase of the experiment, while discharges with a small kink response in the MHD simulations are fully ELM suppressed in the experiment by the applied resonant magnetic perturbation. The results are cross-checked against modeled 3D ideal MHD equilibria using the VMEC code. The procedure of constructing optimal 3D equilibria for diverted H-mode discharges using VMEC is presented. Kink displacements in VMEC are found to scale with the edge current density, similar to M3D-C1, but the displacements are smaller. A direct correlation in the flux surface displacements to the bootstrap current is shown.

  15. Effect of perturbations on magnetic fields as a possible problem for implementing toroidal magnetic configurations with a zero rotational transform

    SciTech Connect

    Danilkin, I. S.

    2007-10-15

    Approved reliable methods and a unified quasi-resonant approach are used to reproduce the results characterizing the effect of dangerous perturbations on three particular types of toroidal magnetic configurations with a zero rotational transform ({iota}/2{pi} = 0). An analysis is made of the perturbations whose geometry and amplitudes correspond to imperfections and defects in the assembly of the actual magnetic systems of conventional stellarators. The effect of perturbations on magnetic configurations with {iota}/2{pi} = 0 is of the same quasi-resonant nature as that for systems with {iota}/2{pi} {ne} 0 and a zero magnetic shear. However, in contrast to shearless configurations with a nonzero rotational transform, the most dangerous perturbations are those with n = 0 and m = 1, 2, 3, ? (where m is the poloidal mode number and n is the toroidal mode number) and the effect of harmonics with the smallest poloidal and toroidal numbers is more destructive and nonlocal even for the amplitudes corresponding to imperfections and defects in the assembly of conventional stellarators. Such an extremely high sensitivity of magnetic systems with {iota}/2{pi} = 0 to the perturbations under consideration may be a serious obstacle for their practical implementation.

  16. Novel 3D magnetic resonance elastography for the noninvasive diagnosis of advanced fibrosis in NAFLD: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Loomba, Rohit; Cui, Jeffrey; Wolfson, Tanya; Haufe, William; Hooker, Jonathan; Szeverenyi, Nikolaus; Ang, Brandon; Bhatt, Archana; Wang, Kang; Aryafar, Hamed; Behling, Cindy; Valasek, Mark A.; Lin, Grace Y.; Gamst, Anthony; Brenner, David A.; Yin, Meng; Glaser, Kevin J.; Ehman, Richard L.; Sirlin, Claude B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent studies show two-dimensional (2D)-MRE is accurate in diagnosing advanced fibrosis (stages 3 and 4) in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients. 3D-MRE is a more advanced version of the technology that can image shear-wave fields in 3D of the entire liver. The aim of this study was to prospectively compare the diagnostic accuracy of 3D-MRE and 2D-MRE for diagnosing advanced fibrosis in patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD. Design This cross-sectional analysis of a prospective study included 100 consecutive patients (56% women) with biopsy-proven NAFLD who also underwent MRE. Area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) ana3lysis was performed to assess the accuracy of 2D and 3D-MRE in diagnosing advanced fibrosis. Results The mean (±sd) of age and BMI was 50.2 (±13.6) yrs and 32.1 (±5.0) kg/m2, respectively. The AUROC for diagnosing advanced fibrosis was 0.981 for 3D-MRE at 40 Hz, 0.927 for 3D-MRE at 60 Hz (standard shear-wave frequency), and 0.921 for 2D-MRE at 60 Hz (standard shear-wave frequency). At a threshold of 2.43 kPa, 3D-MRE at 40 Hz had sensitivity 1.0, specificity 0.94, positive predictive value 0.72, and negative predictive value 1.0 for diagnosing advanced fibrosis. 3D-MRE at 40 Hz had significantly higher AUROC (p<0.05) than 2D-MRE at 60 Hz for diagnosing advanced fibrosis. Conclusion Utilizing a prospective study design, we demonstrate that 3D MRE at 40 Hz has the highest diagnostic accuracy in diagnosing NAFLD advanced fibrosis. Both 2D and 3D-MRE at 60 Hz, the standard shear-wave frequency, are also highly accurate in diagnosing NAFLD advanced fibrosis. PMID:27002798

  17. Structure and magnetism of a binuclear Cu(II) pyrophosphate: transition to a 3D magnetic behaviour studied by single crystal EPR.

    PubMed

    Sartoris, Rosana P; Nascimento, Otaciro R; Santana, Ricardo C; Perec, Mireille; Baggio, Ricardo F; Calvo, Rafael

    2015-03-14

    A binuclear Cu(II) compound [Cu2(bpa)2(P2O7)(H2O)2]·2.5H2O, 1, (bpa = 2,2'-bipyridylamine), with pairs of Cu(II) ions bridged by one pyrophosphate tetra-anion, was synthesized and crystallized. Its triclinic structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of single crystal samples of 1 were recorded for a fixed orientation of the magnetic field (B0) as a function of temperature (T) between 4.7 and 293 K, and at T = 4.7, 50 and 293 K, as a function of the orientation of B0. Below ∼8 K, the spectra are assigned to two types of mononuclear crystal defects hyperfine-coupled to one copper and two nitrogen nuclei. The g-matrices and hyperfine couplings at these T provide information about the structures of these defects. Above 10 K, the spectrum is dominated by the response of the bulk binuclear Cu(II) material, showing hyperfine interactions with two copper nuclei, collapsing to a single peak above 18 K when the units are magnetically connected, and the magnetic behaviour becomes 3D. We attribute the results above 10 K to the interplay of an AFM intrabinuclear exchange interaction J0 = -28(3) cm(-1) (defined as Hex = -J0S1·S2), and three orders of magnitude weaker exchange coupling with average magnitude |J1| ≥ 0.022 cm(-1) between Cu(II) ions in neighbouring binuclear units. The interplays between structure, exchange couplings, magnetic dimension and spin dynamics in the binuclear compound are discussed. A previously unreported situation, where the structure of the spectra arising from the anisotropic spin-spin interaction term (D) within the binuclear unit is averaged out, but the forbidden half field transition is not, is observed and explained.

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Double Resonance Using Weak Perturbing RF Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, G. Fredric

    1977-01-01

    Describes a nuclear magnetic resonance experimental example of spin tickling; also discusses a direct approach for verifying the relative signs of coupling constants in three-spin cyclopropyl systems. (SL)

  19. Resolvent estimates for perturbations by large magnetic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, Fernando Cuevas, Claudio; Vodev, Georgi

    2014-02-15

    We prove optimal high-frequency resolvent estimates for self-adjoint operators of the form G = −Δ + ib(x) · ∇ + i∇ · b(x) + V(x) on L{sup 2}(R{sup n}), n ⩾ 3, where b(x) and V(x) are large magnetic and electric potentials, respectively. No continuity of the magnetic potential is assumed.

  20. Towards understanding edge localised mode mitigation by resonant magnetic perturbations in MAST

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, I. T.; Kirk, A.; Ham, C. J.; Harrison, J. R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Saarelma, S.; Scannell, R.; Thornton, A. J.; Team, MAST

    2013-05-15

    Type-I Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) have been mitigated in MAST through the application of n=3,4, and 6 resonant magnetic perturbations. For each toroidal mode number of the non-axisymmetric applied fields, the frequency of the ELMs has been increased significantly, and the peak heat flux on the divertor plates reduced commensurately. This increase in ELM frequency occurs despite a significant drop in the edge pressure gradient, which would be expected to stabilise the peeling-ballooning modes thought to be responsible for type-I ELMs. Various mechanisms which could cause a destabilisation of the peeling-ballooning modes are presented, including pedestal widening, plasma rotation braking, three dimensional corrugation of the plasma boundary, and the existence of radially extended lobe structures near to the X-point. This leads to a model aimed at resolving the apparent dichotomy of ELM control, which is to say ELM suppression occurring due to the pedestal pressure reduction below the peeling-ballooning stability boundary, whilst the reduction in pressure can also lead to ELM mitigation, which is ostensibly a destabilisation of peeling-ballooning modes. In the case of ELM mitigation, the pedestal broadening, 3d corrugation, or lobes near the X-point degrade ballooning stability so much that the pedestal recovers rapidly to cross the new stability boundary at lower pressure more frequently, whilst in the case of suppression, the plasma parameters are such that the particle transport reduces the edge pressure below the stability boundary, which is only mildly affected by negligible rotation braking, small edge corrugation or short, broad lobe structures.

  1. Magnetic island and plasma rotation under external resonant magnetic perturbation in the T-10 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Eliseev, L. G.; Ivanov, N. V. Kakurin, A. M.; Perfilov, S. V.; Melnikov, A. V.

    2015-05-15

    Experimental comparison of the m = 2, n = 1 mode and plasma rotation velocities at q = 2 magnetic surface in a wide range of the mode amplitudes is presented. Phase velocity of the mode rotation is measured with a set of poloidal magnetic field sensors located at the inner side of the vacuum vessel wall. Plasma rotation velocity at the q = 2 magnetic surface in the direction of the mode phase velocity is measured with the heavy ion beam probe diagnostics. In the presence of a static Resonant Magnetic Perturbation (RMP), the rotation is irregular that appears as cyclical variations of the mode and plasma instantaneous velocities. The period of these variations is equal to the period of the mode oscillations. In the case of high mode amplitude, the rotation irregularity of the mode is consistent with the rotation irregularity of the resonant plasma layer. On the contrary, the observed rise of the mode rotation irregularity in the case of low mode amplitude occurs without an increase of the rotation irregularity of the resonant plasma layer. The experimental results are simulated and analyzed with the TEAR code based on the two-fluid MHD approximation. Calculated irregularities of the mode and plasma rotation depend on the mode amplitude similar to the experimental data. For large islands, the rotation irregularity is attributed to oscillations of the electromagnetic torque applied to the resonant plasma layer. For small islands, the deviation of the mode rotation velocity from the plasma velocity occurs due to the effect of finite plasma resistivity.

  2. Versatile controllability of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations in KSTAR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hyunsun; Jeon, Y. M.; in, Y.; Kim, J.; Yoon, S. W.; Hahn, S. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Woo, M. H.; Park, B. H.; Bak, J. G.; Kstar Team

    2015-11-01

    A newly upgraded IVCC (In-Vessel Control Coil) system equipped with four broadband power supplies, along with current connection patch panel, will be presented and discussed in terms of its capability on various KSTAR experiments. Until the last run-campaign, there were impressive experimental results on ELM(Edge Localized Mode) control experiments using the 3D magnetic field, but the non-axisymmetric field configuration could not be changed in a shot, let alone the limited number of accessible configurations. Introducing the new power supplies, such restrictions have been greatly reduced. Based on the preliminary commissioning results for 2015 KSTAR run-campaign, this new system has been confirmed to easily cope with various dynamic demands for toroidal and poloidal phases of 3D magnetic field in a shot. This enables us to diagnose the plasma response in more detail and to address the 3-D field impacts on the ELM behaviors better than ever.

  3. In vivo application of 3D-line skeleton graph analysis (LSGA) technique with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of trabecular bone structure.

    PubMed

    Pothuaud, Laurent; Newitt, David C; Lu, Ying; MacDonald, Brian; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2004-05-01

    Over the last several years magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has emerged as a means of measuring in vivo 3D trabecular bone structure. In particular, MR based diagnosis could be used to complement standard bone mineral density (BMD) methods for assessing osteoporosis and evaluating longitudinal changes. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using the 3D-LSGA technique for the evaluation of trabecular bone structure of high-resolution MR images, particularly for assessing longitudinal changes, in vivo. First, the reproducibility of topological 3D-LSGA based measurements was evaluated in a set of seven volunteers, and coefficients of variations ranged from 3.5% to 6%. Second, high-resolution MR images of the radius in 30 postmenopausal women from a placebo controlled drug study (Idoxifene), divided into placebo ( n=9) and treated ( n=21) groups, were obtained at baseline (BL) and after 1 year of treatment (follow-up, FU). In addition, dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measures of BMD were obtained in the distal radius. Standard morphological measurements based on the mean intercept length (MIL) technique as well as 3D-LSGA based measurements were applied to the 3D MR images. Significant changes from BL to FU were detected, in the treated group, using the topological 3D-LSGA based measurements, morphological measures of volume of connected trabeculae and App Tb.N from MIL analysis. The duration of the study was short, and the number of patients remaining in the study was small, hence these results cannot be interpreted with regard to a true therapeutic response. Furthermore, the site (wrist) and the drug (idoxifene) are not optimal for follow-up study. However, this paper demonstrated the feasibility of using 3D-LSGA based evaluation coupled with in vivo high-resolution MR imaging as a complementary approach for the monitoring of trabecular bone changes in individual subjects.

  4. Characteristics of spondylotic myelopathy on 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo and 2D fast spin echo magnetic resonance imaging: a retrospective cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Abdulhadi, Mike A; Perno, Joseph R; Melhem, Elias R; Nucifora, Paolo G P

    2014-01-01

    In patients with spinal stenosis, magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine can be improved by using 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences to provide a high-resolution assessment of osseous and ligamentous structures. However, it is not yet clear whether 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences adequately evaluate the spinal cord itself. As a result, they are generally supplemented by additional 2D fast spin echo sequences, adding time to the examination and potential discomfort to the patient. Here we investigate the hypothesis that in patients with spinal stenosis and spondylotic myelopathy, 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences can characterize cord lesions equally well as 2D fast spin echo sequences. We performed a retrospective analysis of 30 adult patients with spondylotic myelopathy who had been examined with both 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences and 2D fast spin echo sequences at the same scanning session. The two sequences were inspected separately for each patient, and visible cord lesions were manually traced. We found no significant differences between 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo and 2D fast spin echo sequences in the mean number, mean area, or mean transverse dimensions of spondylotic cord lesions. Nevertheless, the mean contrast-to-noise ratio of cord lesions was decreased on 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences compared to 2D fast spin echo sequences. These findings suggest that 3D driven-equilibrium fast spin echo sequences do not need supplemental 2D fast spin echo sequences for the diagnosis of spondylotic myelopathy, but they may be less well suited for quantitative signal measurements in the spinal cord.

  5. Tearing mode suppression by using resonant magnetic perturbation coils on J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    J-TEXT Team; Rao, B.; Ding, Y. H.; Hu, Q. M.; Shi, W. F.; Zhang, X. Q.; Zhang, M.; Jin, X. S.; Nan, J. Y.; Yu, K. X.; Zhuang, G.

    2013-01-01

    A series of experiments on the interactions between external resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) and plasmas has recently been conducted, using static resonant magnetic perturbation (SRMP) coils on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT). The tearing mode can be completely suppressed by applying SRMP. However, the locked mode is likely to be stimulated under a larger SRMP field even though the tearing mode has been first suppressed. A numerical simulation shows three typical regimes of RMP's effects on the tearing mode, which are consistent with experimental results.

  6. In vivo static field perturbations in magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Kevin Matthew

    2007-12-01

    Fundamental magnetic resonance (MR) theory assumes the spatial homogeneity of a dominating static magnetic field B = B 0ẑ. When this assumption is violated, a myriad of artifacts and compromising factors are introduced to MR spectra and images. Though in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is one of the most widely used scientific and diagnostic tools in medicine and biology, it remains haunted by the continual and persistant ghost of B0 inhomogeneity. An inclusive list of in vivo NMR applications severely impacted by B0 inhomogeneity could go on ad infinitum. Examples of such applications include neurosurgical utility in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), cerebral metabolic flux mapping, cerebral diffusion tractography, and abdominal diagnostic imaging. Given this wide impact on in vivo NMR, significant effort has been exerted in developing methods of compensating B0 inhomogeneity. Complicating this task is the sample-specific nature of in vivo B 0 inhomogeneity and its exacerbation with ever increasing B 0 field strengths. State of the art B 0 inhomogeneity compensation is currently at a critical juncture where homogenization demands are overwhelming the outer capabilities of existing technology and methods. This thesis addresses the B 0 inhomogeneity problem in the mammalian brain and presents novel solutions to the homogenization technology stalemate.

  7. Reduction of magnetic perturbation for SR-POEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patla, B. R.

    2016-02-01

    SR-POEM is a Galilean test of the weak equivalence principle that aims to measure the fractional acceleration difference η with a mission uncertainty σ (η )=1× {10}-17 for a pair of test substances. It is to be conducted during the low-drag free fall portion of a sounding rocket flight. The interaction of the magnetic field gradient with tiny remanent magnetic moments of the test masses will produce a spurious acceleration that is not sufficiently reduced by a single Mu-metal shield. In this paper, we study configurations with two and three shields. Approximate analytic formulae are used to study the shielding factor as a function of geometry. We use finite element analysis (FEA) to determine the magnetic field and gradient for certain cases that satisfy the mission requirements. FEA results are compared with analytic expressions wherever appropriate. Several configurations reduce both axial and transverse magnetic field within the shielding volume by at least the required factor of 4× {10}5.

  8. Enhanced 4f-3d interaction by Ti-doping on the magnetic properties of perovskite SmFe1-xTixO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huazhi; Cao, Shixun; Huang, Ruoxiang; Ren, Wei; Yuan, Shujuan; Kang, Baojuan; Lu, Bo; Zhang, Jincang

    2013-09-01

    We report the Ti-doping effects on the total magnetization of perovskite SmFe1-xTixO3 samples with x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy studies indicate that with the increase of Ti doping concentration, the lattice parameter b decreases and the oxygen octahedron is compressed along b axis. Such lattice distortion is also reflected by the changes of antisymmetric stretching mode and symmetric stretching mode of the oxygen octahedron through Raman spectra measurement. An enhancement of the interaction between Sm-4f and Fe-3d electrons is observed due to Ti-doping. This strong interplay between Sm-4f and Fe-3d electrons weakens the total magnetization and considerably suppresses the weak ferromagnetism of Fe sublattice starting from 260 K.

  9. Right Ventricular Strain, Torsion, and Dyssynchrony in Healthy Subjects using 3D Spiral Cine DENSE Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Suever, Jonathan; Wehner, Gregory; Jing, Linyuan; Powell, David; Hamlet, Sean; Grabau, Jonathan; Mojsejenko, Dimitri; Andres, Kristin; Haggerty, Christopher; Fornwalt, Brandon

    2016-12-29

    Mechanics of the left ventricle (LV) are important indicators of cardiac function. The role of right ventricular (RV) mechanics is largely unknown due to the technical limitations of imaging its thin wall and complex geometry and motion. By combining 3D Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) with a post-processing pipeline that includes a local coordinate system, it is possible to quantify RV strain, torsion, and synchrony. In this study, we sought to characterize RV mechanics in 50 healthy individuals and compare these values to their LV counterparts. For each cardiac frame, 3D displacements were fit to continuous and differentiable radial basis functions, allowing for the computation of the 3D Cartesian Lagrangian strain tensor at any myocardial point. The geometry of the RV was extracted via a surface fit to manually delineated endocardial contours. Throughout the RV, a local coordinate system was used to transform from a Cartesian strain tensor to a polar strain tensor. It was then possible to compute peak RV torsion as well as peak longitudinal and circumferential strain. A comparable analysis was performed for the LV. Dyssynchrony was computed from the standard deviation of regional activation times. Global circumferential strain was comparable between the RV and LV (-18.0% for both) while longitudinal strain was greater in the RV (-18.1% vs. -15.7%). RV torsion was comparable to LV torsion (6.2 vs. 7.1 degrees, respectively). Regional activation times indicated that the RV contracted later but more synchronously than the LV. 3D spiral cine DENSE combined with a post-processing pipeline that includes a local coordinate system can resolve both the complex geometry and 3D motion of the RV.

  10. Parasitic extraction and magnetic analysis for transformers, inductors and igbt bridge busbar with maxwell 2d and maxwell 3d simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning

    This thesis presents the parasitic extraction and magnetic analysis for transformers, inductors, and IGBT bridge busbars with Maxwell 2D and Maxwell 3D simulation. In the first chapter, the magnetic field of a transformer in Maxwell 2D is analyzed. The parasitic capacitance between each winding of the transformer are extracted by Maxwell 2D. According to the actual dimensions, the parasitic capacitances are calculated. The results are verified by comparing with the measurement results from 4395A impedance analyzer. In the second chapter, two CM inductors are simulated in Maxwell 3D. One is the conventional winding inductor, the other one is the proposed one. The magnetic field distributions of different winding directions are analyzed. The analysis is verified by the simulation result. The last chapter introduces a technique to analyze, extract, and measure the parasitic inductance of planar busbars. With this technique, the relationship between self-inductance and mutual-inductance is analyzed. Secondly, a total inductance is calculated based on the developed technique. Thirdly, the current paths and the inductance on a planar busbar are investigated with DC-link capacitors. Furthermore, the analysis of the inductance is addressed. Ansys Q3D simulation and analysis are presented. Finally, the experimental verification is shown by the S-parameter measurement.

  11. 2D/3D quench simulation using ANSYS for epoxy impregnated Nb3Sn high field magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2002-09-19

    A quench program using ANSYS is developed for the high field collider magnet for three-dimensional analysis. Its computational procedure is explained. The quench program is applied to a one meter Nb{sub 3}Sn high field model magnet, which is epoxy impregnated. The quench simulation program is used to estimate the temperature and mechanical stress inside the coil as well as over the whole magnet. It is concluded that for the one meter magnet with the presented cross section and configuration, the thermal effects due to the quench is tolerable. But we need much more quench study and improvements in the design for longer magnets.

  12. Using a modified 3D-printer for mapping the magnetic field of RF coils designed for fetal and neonatal imaging.

    PubMed

    Vavoulas, Alexander; Vaiopoulos, Nicholas; Hedström, Erik; Xanthis, Christos G; Sandalidis, Harilaos G; Aletras, Anthony H

    2016-08-01

    An experimental setup for characterizing the magnetic field of MRI RF coils was proposed and tested. The setup consisted of a specially configured 3D-printer, a network analyzer and a mid-performance desktop PC. The setup was tested on a single loop RF coil, part of a phased array for fetal imaging. Then, the setup was used for determining the magnetic field characteristics of a high-pass birdcage coil used for neonatal MR imaging with a vertical static field. The scattering parameter S21, converted into power ratio, was used for mapping the B1 magnetic field. The experimental measurements from the loop coil were close to the theoretical results (R=0.924). A high degree of homogeneity was measured for the neonatal birdcage RF coil. The development of MR RF coils is time consuming and resource intensive. The proposed experimental setup provides an alternative method for magnetic field characterization of RF coils used in MRI.

  13. Using a modified 3D-printer for mapping the magnetic field of RF coils designed for fetal and neonatal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavoulas, Alexander; Vaiopoulos, Nicholas; Hedström, Erik; Xanthis, Christos G.; Sandalidis, Harilaos G.; Aletras, Anthony H.

    2016-08-01

    An experimental setup for characterizing the magnetic field of MRI RF coils was proposed and tested. The setup consisted of a specially configured 3D-printer, a network analyzer and a mid-performance desktop PC. The setup was tested on a single loop RF coil, part of a phased array for fetal imaging. Then, the setup was used for determining the magnetic field characteristics of a high-pass birdcage coil used for neonatal MR imaging with a vertical static field. The scattering parameter S21, converted into power ratio, was used for mapping the B1 magnetic field. The experimental measurements from the loop coil were close to the theoretical results (R = 0.924). A high degree of homogeneity was measured for the neonatal birdcage RF coil. The development of MR RF coils is time consuming and resource intensive. The proposed experimental setup provides an alternative method for magnetic field characterization of RF coils used in MRI.

  14. Numerical simulation on edge localized mode control capability of resonant magnetic perturbation in the KSTAR tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doohyun; Han, Hyunsun; Kim, Ki Min; Park, Jong Kyu; Jeon, Young Mu; Na, Yong-Su; Hong, Sang Hee

    2010-09-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the applicability of resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) to KSTAR plasmas for a possible control of edge localized mode (ELM) to suppress or mitigate its damages to divertor materials. For the verification of the feasibility of RMP application, magnetic island configurations, resonant normal fields, magnetic island widths and Chirikov parameters are calculated for two types of KSTAR operation scenarios: steady state and hybrid. Field error correction (FEC) coils in KSTAR are considered to produce externally perturbed magnetic fields for RMP, and the directions of coil currents determine the toroidal mode n and the parity (even or odd). The RMP configurations are described by vacuum superposition of the equilibrium magnetic fields and the perturbed ones induced by FEC coils. The numerical simulations for n = 2 toroidal mode in both operation scenarios show that when the pitches of the equilibrium and perturbed magnetic fields are well aligned, magnetic islands are formed for a series of m poloidal modes and the adjacent islands are overlapped to generate a stochastic layer in the edge region. Even parity turns out to be more effective in making the magnetic islands overlapped to become stochastic field lines in the steady-state operation, while odd parity in the hybrid operation. The formation of the stochastic layer is verified by the calculated Chirikov parameters, which also give basic information on the current requirement of FEC coils. Additionally, lobe structures of stochastic field lines are found in the edge region extended to the divertor plate in the hybrid scenario. Based on the standard vacuum criteria for RMP, the simulation results indicate that the FEC coils will be feasible for control of ELMs and mitigation of divertor heat load by RMP in both steady-state and hybrid operation scenarios.

  15. 3D Hall MHD Reconnection Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.; Rudakov, L.

    2002-05-01

    A 3D Hall MHD simulation code (VooDoo) has recently been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory. We present preliminary results of a fully 3D magnetic reconnection study using this code. The initial configuration of the plasma system is as follows. The ambient, reversed magnetic field is in the x-direction and is proportional to B0 tanh(y/Ly) where Ly is the scale length of the current sheet. Perturbation fields δ Bx and δ By are introduced to initiate the reconnection process. This initial configuration is similar to that used in the 2D GEM reconnection study. However, the perturbation fields are localized in the z-direction. We consider two cases: no guide field (Bz = 0) and a weak guide field (Bz = 0.1B0). We find that the reconnection process is not stationary in the z-direction but propagates in the B x ∇ n direction consistent with Hall drift physics. Hence, an asymmetric disruption of the current sheet ensues. The flow structure of the plasma in the vicinity of the X-point is complex. We find that the `neutral line' (i.e, along the z-direction) is not an ignorable coordinate and is not periodic in Hall MHD reconnection dynamics; two assumptions that are often made in reconnection studies. \\ Research supported by NASA and ONR

  16. Motion of relativistic particles in axially symmetric and perturbed magnetic fields in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    de Rover, M.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.; Montvai, A.

    1996-12-01

    An extensive comparison is given between an analytical theory for the computations of particle orbits of relativistic runaway electrons [M. de Rover {ital et} {ital al}., Phys. Plasmas {bold 3}, 4468 (1996)], and numerical simulations. A new numerical scheme is used for the computer simulations of guiding center orbits. Furthermore, simulations of the full particle motion, including the gyration are performed to check the guiding center approximation. The behavior of drift surfaces and particle orbits in axially symmetric magnetic fields, as predicted in the companion paper are confirmed. This includes the smaller minor radius of a drift surface compared to a magnetic flux surface with identical rotational transform, and the decrease of the minor radius of a drift surface with increasing particle energy. Magnetic islands and drift islands appear when the axial symmetry of the magnetic field is broken by harmonic perturbations. In the numerical simulations the amplitudes of the perturbations have been chosen to increase towards the plasma edge. The analytic theory gave predictions of the width of the drift islands that are in good agreement with the numerical simulations. When overlap of the magnetic perturbations introduces stochasticity, the Hamiltonian theory shows that drift islands can exist in the region of stochastic magnetic field lines, which is also confirmed by the numerical simulations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E. J.; Park, J. -K.; Marmar, E. S.; Ahn, J. -W.; Berkery, J. W.; Burrell, K. H.; Canik, J. M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Ferraro, N. M.; Garofalo, A. M.; Gates, D. A.; Greenwald, M.; Kim, K.; King, J. D.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lazerson, S. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lore, J. D.; Menard, J. E.; Nazikian, R.; Shafer, M. W.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Reiman, A. H.; Rice, J. E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sugiyama, L.; Turnbull, A. D.; Volpe, F.; Wang, Z. R.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2014-09-30

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10-4 of the main axisymmetric field, such “3D” fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data, in

  18. Towards direct head navigation for robot-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation using 3D laserscans: Idea, setup and feasibility.

    PubMed

    Richter, Lars; Bruder, Ralf; Schlaefer, Alexander; Schweikard, Achim

    2010-01-01

    Direct tracking is more robust than tracking that is based on additional markers. 3D laser scans can be used for direct tracking because they result in a 3D data set of surface points of the scanned object. For head-navigated robotized systems, it is crucial to know where the patient's head is positioned relatively to the robot. We present a novel method to use a 3D laserscanner for direct head navigation in the robotized TMS system that places a coil on the patient's head using an industrial robot. First experimental results showed a translational error < 2mm in the robot hand-eye-calibration with the laserscanner. The rotational error was 0.75° and the scaling error < 0.001. Furthermore, we found that the error of a scanned head to a reference head image was < 0.2mm using ICP. These results have shown that a direct head navigation is feasible for the robotized TMS system. Additional effort has to be made in future systems to speed up the compution time for real time capability.

  19. Investigation of ELM [edge localized mode] Dynamics with the Resonant Magnetic Perturbation Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Pankin, Alexei Y.; Kritz, Arnold H.

    2011-07-19

    Topics covered are: anomalous transport and E x B flow shear effects in the H-mode pedestal; RMP (resonant magnetic perturbation) effects in NSTX discharges; development of a scaling of H-mode pedestal in tokamak plasmas with type I ELMs (edge localized modes); and divertor heat load studies.

  20. Multifractal analysis of white matter structural changes on 3D magnetic resonance imaging between normal aging and early Alzheimer’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Huang-Jing; Zhou, Lu-Ping; Zeng, Peng; Huang, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Hong-Xing; Ning, Xin-Bao

    2015-07-01

    Applications of multifractal analysis to white matter structure changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have recently received increasing attentions. Although some progresses have been made, there is no evident study on applying multifractal analysis to evaluate the white matter structural changes on MRI for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) research. In this paper, to explore multifractal analysis of white matter structural changes on 3D MRI volumes between normal aging and early AD, we not only extend the traditional box-counting multifractal analysis (BCMA) into the 3D case, but also propose a modified integer ratio based BCMA (IRBCMA) algorithm to compensate for the rigid division rule in BCMA. We verify multifractal characteristics in 3D white matter MRI volumes. In addition to the previously well studied multifractal feature, Δα, we also demonstrated Δf as an alternative and effective multifractal feature to distinguish NC from AD subjects. Both Δα and Δf are found to have strong positive correlation with the clinical MMSE scores with statistical significance. Moreover, the proposed IRBCMA can be an alternative and more accurate algorithm for 3D volume analysis. Our findings highlight the potential usefulness of multifractal analysis, which may contribute to clarify some aspects of the etiology of AD through detection of structural changes in white matter. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61271079), the Vice Chancellor Research Grant in University of Wollongong, and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China.

  1. A comprehensive method for magnetic sensor calibration: a precise system for 3-D tracking of the tongue movements.

    PubMed

    Farajidavar, Aydin; Block, Jacob M; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic localization has been used in a variety of applications, including the medical field. Small magnetic tracers are often modeled as dipoles and localization has been achieved by solving well-defined dipole equations. However, in practice, the precise calculation of the tracer location not only depends on solving the highly nonlinear dipole equations through numerical algorithms but also on the precision of the magnetic sensor, accuracy of the tracer magnetization, and the earth magnetic field (EMF) measurements. We have developed and implemented a comprehensive calibration method that addresses all of the aforementioned factors. We evaluated this method in a bench-top setting by moving the tracer along controlled trajectories. We also conducted several experiments to track the tongue movement in a human subject.

  2. Filling the gap between the quantum and classical worlds of nanoscale magnetism: giant molecular aggregates based on paramagnetic 3d metal ions.

    PubMed

    Papatriantafyllopoulou, Constantina; Moushi, Eleni E; Christou, George; Tasiopoulos, Anastasios J

    2016-03-21

    In this review, aspects of the syntheses, structures and magnetic properties of giant 3d and 3d/4f paramagnetic metal clusters in moderate oxidation states are discussed. The term "giant clusters" is used herein to denote metal clusters with nuclearity of 30 or greater. Many synthetic strategies towards such species have been developed and are discussed in this paper. Attempts are made to categorize some of the most successful methods to giant clusters, but it will be pointed out that the characteristics of the crystal structures of such compounds including nuclearity, shape, architecture, etc. are unpredictable depending on the specific structural features of the included organic ligands, reaction conditions and other factors. The majority of the described compounds in this review are of special interest not only for their fascinating nanosized structures but also because they sometimes display interesting magnetic phenomena, such as ferromagnetic exchange interactions, large ground state spin values, single-molecule magnetism behaviour or impressively large magnetocaloric effects. In addition, they often possess the properties of both the quantum and the classical world, and thus their systematic study offers the potential for the discovery of new physical phenomena, as well as a better understanding of the existing ones. The research field of giant clusters is under continuous evolution and their intriguing structural characteristics and magnetism properties that attract the interest of synthetic Inorganic Chemists promise a brilliant future for this class of compounds.

  3. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  4. Erratum: Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 123001)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δ$b_⊥^{ext}$ ≈ $10^{-4}$ → $10^{-3}$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.

  5. Magnetic exchange couplings from noncollinear perturbation theory: dinuclear CuII complexes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jordan J; Peralta, Juan E

    2014-08-07

    To benchmark the performance of a new method based on noncollinear coupled-perturbed density functional theory [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 174115 (2013)], we calculate the magnetic exchange couplings in a series of triply bridged ferromagnetic dinuclear Cu(II) complexes that have been recently synthesized [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 15, 1966 (2013)]. We find that for any basis-set the couplings from our noncollinear coupled-perturbed methodology are practically identical to those of spin-projected energy-differences when a hybrid density functional approximation is employed. This demonstrates that our methodology properly recovers a Heisenberg description for these systems, and is robust in its predictive power of magnetic couplings. Furthermore, this indicates that the failure of density functional theory to capture the subtle variation of the exchange couplings in these complexes is not simply an artifact of broken-symmetry methods, but rather a fundamental weakness of current approximate density functionals for the description of magnetic couplings.

  6. Magnetization of ternary alloys based on Fe0.65Ni0.35 invar with 3d transition metal additions: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoue, Masatoshi; Trimarchi, Giancarlo; Freeman, Arthur J.; Popescu, Voicu; Matsen, Marc R.

    2015-01-01

    Smart susceptors are being developed for use as tooling surfaces in molding machines that use apply electro-magnetic induction heating to mold and form plastics or metal powders into structural parts, e.g., on aerospace and automotive manufacturing lines. The optimal magnetic materials for the induction heating process should have large magnetization, high magnetic permeability, but also small thermal expansion coefficient. The Fe0.65Ni0.35 invar alloy with its negligible thermal expansion coefficient is thus a natural choice for this application. Here, we use density functional theory as implemented through the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method within the coherent-potential approximation, to design new alloys with the large magnetization desired for smart susceptor applications. We consider the Fe0.65-xNi0.35-yMx+y alloys derived from Fe0.65Ni0.35 invar adding a third element M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, or Co with concentration (x + y) reaching up to 5 at. %. We find that the total magnetization depends linearly on the concentration of M. Specifically, the early 3d transition metals from Sc to Cr decrease the magnetization with respect to that of the invar alloy whereas Mn and Co increase it.

  7. Antenatal Diagnosis of a Large Immature Abdominal Wall Teratoma by 2D-3D Ultrasound Using HDlive and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Werner, Heron; Mocarzel, Carolina; Sá, Renato Augusto; Tonni, Gabriele; Novoa Y Novoa, Victoria Arruga; Avvad-Portari, Elyzabeth; Bonasoni, Paola; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first case of prenatally detected teratoma of the fetal abdomen wall using ultrasound and fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A heterogeneous mass, partly solid and cystic, originating from the anterior abdominal wall of the fetus close to an omphalocele sac was detected by means of 2D/3D ultrasound and MRI. Amniodrainage was performed and due to sign of impending fetal risk, an emergency Cesarean section was performed. A bulky, crumbly and bleeding tumoral mass was confirmed at delivery. Ligation of the supplying artery to the tumor was complicated by uncontrollable hemorrhage and early neonatal death. Pathology identified the tumor as an immature teratoma of the anterior fetal abdominal wall. 2D/3D ultrasound, especially using HDlive application and MRI demonstrated accurate detection and characterization of this congenital tumor.

  8. The change of the LMM auger spectra in 3d-metals due to oxidation and its correlation with the change of the atomic magnetic moment.

    PubMed

    Zheltysheva, Olga R; Surnin, Dmitry V; Guy, Dmitry E; Gil'mutdinov, Faat Z; Ruts, Yuri V; Grebennikov, Vladimir I

    2005-12-01

    The surfaces of crystalline samples of 3d-metals (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) and their stoichiometric oxides have been studied by Auger spectroscopy. A correlation between the change in the LVV (L-inner level-valence-valence electron transition) Auger intensities and the change of the squares of the corresponding atomic-magnetic moments has been observed. This is because of the complicated nature of the Auger process. That is, the Auger electron emission is a result of the inner atomic level excitation by electron impact and Auger annihilation of the inner-level hole. Therefore, the Auger process has been considered a second-order process, and spin polarization of the valence states has been taken into account for the LMM (L-inner level-M-inner level-M-inner level electron transition) Auger spectra of 3d-metals.

  9. Final Report for the project “The Electron Diffusion Region in 3D Spontaneous Magnetic Reconnection”

    SciTech Connect

    Egedal-Pedersen, Jan

    2016-01-19

    The DOE award, Grant ER55099, supported in part three graduate students (now Drs. A. Le, O. Ohia and A Vrublenski) and material expenses. The grant enabled these students to operate a basic plasma physics experiment on magnetic reconnection at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center. The experimental investigations utilized the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) in various magnetic geometries. In addition, based in part on the experimental results, new theoretical models were developed for the reconnection process.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of a magnetic micro-actuator based on deformable Fe-doped PDMS artificial cilium using 3D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fengli; Alici, Gursel; Zhang, Binbin; Beirne, Stephen; Li, Weihua

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes the use of a 3D extrusion printer to fabricate artificial magnetic cilium. The cilia are fabricated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) doped with iron particles so that they remain slender and flexible. They can be driven by a magnetic field to closely mimic the behaviour of biological cilia. Doping iron particles to the polymers has already been done; however, to the best of our knowledge, printing such active and soft magnetic structures has not. The existing methods for manufacturing magnetic polymeric structures are complex and difficult to use for the fabrication of micro-sized high-aspect-ratio cilia. The 3D printing technique we propose here is simple and inexpensive compared to previously suggested fabrication methods. In this study, free-standing magnetic PDMS cilia were fabricated in different sizes up to 5 mm in length and 1 mm in width. The stress-strain curves of the PDMS cilia were experimentally obtained to quantify the effect of the concentration of the iron particles on the modulus of elasticity of the cilia. The higher the iron concentration, the higher the modulus of elasticity. We have quantified the characteristics of the cilia made of 40% w/w iron particles in PDMS. A single cilium (5 × 1 × 0.0035 mm) can output up to 27 μN blocking force under a magnetic field of 160 mT. These cilia can be used as a mixer in lap-on-chip applications and as the anchoring and propulsion legs of endoscopic capsule robots operating within the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Analytical expressions estimating the blocking force are established and compared with the experimental results.

  11. The advantages of complementing MT profiles in 3-D environments with geomagnetic transfer function and interstation horizontal magnetic transfer function data: results from a synthetic case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanyà, Joan; Ogaya, Xènia; Jones, Alan G.; Rath, Volker; Vozar, Jan; Meqbel, Naser

    2016-12-01

    As a consequence of measuring time variations of the electric and the magnetic field, which are related to current flow and charge distribution, magnetotelluric (MT) data in 2-D and 3-D environments are not only sensitive to the geoelectrical structures below the measuring points but also to any lateral anomalies surrounding the acquisition site. This behaviour complicates the characterization of the electrical resistivity distribution of the subsurface, particularly in complex areas. In this manuscript we assess the main advantages of complementing the standard MT impedance tensor (Z) data with interstation horizontal magnetic tensor (H) and geomagnetic transfer function (T) data in constraining the subsurface in a 3-D environment beneath a MT profile. Our analysis was performed using synthetic responses with added normally distributed and scattered random noise. The sensitivity of each type of data to different resistivity anomalies was evaluated, showing that the degree to which each site and each period is affected by the same anomaly depends on the type of data. A dimensionality analysis, using Z, H and T data, identified the presence of the 3-D anomalies close to the profile, suggesting a 3-D approach for recovering the electrical resistivity values of the subsurface. Finally, the capacity for recovering the geoelectrical structures of the subsurface was evaluated by performing joint inversion using different data combinations, quantifying the differences between the true synthetic model and the models from inversion process. Four main improvements were observed when performing joint inversion of Z, H and T data: (1) superior precision and accuracy at characterizing the electrical resistivity values of the anomalies below and outside the profile; (2) the potential to recover high electrical resistivity anomalies that are poorly recovered using Z data alone; (3) improvement in the characterization of the bottom and lateral boundaries of the anomalies with low

  12. The Effect of Dissipation Mechanism and Guide Field Strength on X-line Spreading in 3D Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Lucas; Cassak, P.; Drake, J.; Gosling, J.; Phan, T.; Shay, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    In two-ribbon flares, the fact that the ribbons separate in time is considered evidence of magnetic reconnection. However, in addition to the ribbons separating, they can also elongate (as seen in animations of, for example, the Bastille Day flare). The elongation is undoubtedly related to the reconnection spreading in the out-of-plane direction. Indeed, naturally occurring magnetic reconnection generally begins in a spatially localized region and spreads in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane as time progresses. For example, it was suggested that X-line spreading is necessary to explain the observation of X-lines extending more than 390 Earth radii (Phan et al., Nature, 404, 848, 2006), and has been seen in reconnection experiments. A sizeable out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field is present at flare sites and in the solar wind. Here, we study the effect of dissipation mechanism and the strength of the guide field has on X-line spreading. We present results from three-dimensional numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection, comparing spreading with the Hall term to spreading with anomalous resistivity. Applications to solar flares and magnetic reconnection in the solar wind will be discussed.

  13. Infrared-induced variation of the magnetic properties of a magnetoplasmonic film with a 3D sub-micron periodic triangular roof-type antireflection structure.

    PubMed

    Tian, Junlong; Zhang, Wang; Huang, Yiqiao; Liu, Qinglei; Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Di

    2015-01-26

    A carbon-matrix nickel composite magnetoplasmonic film with a 3D sub-micron periodic triangular roof-type antireflection structure (SPTAS) was fabricated via a simple and promising method that combines chemosynthesis with biomimetic techniques. The Troides helena (Linnaeus) forewing (T_FW) was chosen as the biomimetic template. The carbon-matrix Ni wing fabricated via electroless Ni deposition for 6 h (CNMF_6h) exhibits enhanced infrared absorption. Over a wavelength range (888-2500 nm), the enhancement of the infrared absorption of CNMF_6h is up to 1.85 times compared with the T_FW. Furthermore, infrared excitation induces a photothermal effect that results in variation in the magnetic properties of the carbon-matrix Ni wing. The magnetic properties were also confirmed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The good correlation between the AFM and MFM images demonstrates that the surface of the SPTAS of CNMF_6h exhibits strong magnetic properties. The infrared induced photothermal effect that results in magnetic variation is promising for use in the design of novel magnetoplasmonic films with potential applications in infrared information recording and heat-assisted magnetic recording.

  14. Infrared-induced variation of the magnetic properties of a magnetoplasmonic film with a 3D sub-micron periodic triangular roof-type antireflection structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Junlong; Zhang, Wang; Huang, Yiqiao; Liu, Qinglei; Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Di

    2015-01-01

    A carbon-matrix nickel composite magnetoplasmonic film with a 3D sub-micron periodic triangular roof-type antireflection structure (SPTAS) was fabricated via a simple and promising method that combines chemosynthesis with biomimetic techniques. The Troides helena (Linnaeus) forewing (T_FW) was chosen as the biomimetic template. The carbon-matrix Ni wing fabricated via electroless Ni deposition for 6 h (CNMF_6h) exhibits enhanced infrared absorption. Over a wavelength range (888-2500 nm), the enhancement of the infrared absorption of CNMF_6h is up to 1.85 times compared with the T_FW. Furthermore, infrared excitation induces a photothermal effect that results in variation in the magnetic properties of the carbon-matrix Ni wing. The magnetic properties were also confirmed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The good correlation between the AFM and MFM images demonstrates that the surface of the SPTAS of CNMF_6h exhibits strong magnetic properties. The infrared induced photothermal effect that results in magnetic variation is promising for use in the design of novel magnetoplasmonic films with potential applications in infrared information recording and heat-assisted magnetic recording.

  15. Infrared-induced variation of the magnetic properties of a magnetoplasmonic film with a 3D sub-micron periodic triangular roof-type antireflection structure

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Junlong; Zhang, Wang; Huang, Yiqiao; Liu, Qinglei; Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Di

    2015-01-01

    A carbon-matrix nickel composite magnetoplasmonic film with a 3D sub-micron periodic triangular roof-type antireflection structure (SPTAS) was fabricated via a simple and promising method that combines chemosynthesis with biomimetic techniques. The Troides helena (Linnaeus) forewing (T_FW) was chosen as the biomimetic template. The carbon-matrix Ni wing fabricated via electroless Ni deposition for 6 h (CNMF_6h) exhibits enhanced infrared absorption. Over a wavelength range (888–2500 nm), the enhancement of the infrared absorption of CNMF_6h is up to 1.85 times compared with the T_FW. Furthermore, infrared excitation induces a photothermal effect that results in variation in the magnetic properties of the carbon-matrix Ni wing. The magnetic properties were also confirmed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The good correlation between the AFM and MFM images demonstrates that the surface of the SPTAS of CNMF_6h exhibits strong magnetic properties. The infrared induced photothermal effect that results in magnetic variation is promising for use in the design of novel magnetoplasmonic films with potential applications in infrared information recording and heat-assisted magnetic recording. PMID:25620787

  16. Influence of the Resonant Magnetic Perturbation on the Plasma Boundary in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, M. W.; Evans, T.E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Schmitz, O.; Wolf, R. C.; Baylor, Larry R; Boedo, J.A.; Burrell, K. H.; Frerichs, H.; DeGrassie, J. S.; Gohil, P.; Mordijck, S.; Moyer, R.A.; Leonard, A. W.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Schaffer, M. J.; Osborne, T. H.; Unterberg, Ezekial A; Watkins, J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Stochastic boundaries in fusion devices have been investigated in tokamaks, stellarators and reversed field pinch experiments for many years. However, since edge localized modes (ELMs) have been successfully eliminated in H-mode plasmas at the DIII-D tokamak [1,2] with small, edge resonant magnetic perturbations, they have become a widely investigated topic in tokamaks. In DIII-D stochastic boundaries are produced by coils external to the plasma. The magnetic field there consists of field lines with very different connection lengths, which produces a three dimensional, heterogenous structure of stochastic volume. The most obvious manifestation of the perturbed plasma edge is the strike line splitting observable in heat and particle fluxes, which changes with collisionality. The interaction of the magnetic perturbation and the magnetic equilibrium is of a resonant nature and the structure of the stochastic volume is a strong function of q(95). This is observed as a modulation of e.g. electron temperature as measured by ECE or Thomson scattering. In this work we summarize recent experimental findings on properties of the stochastic boundary in DIII-D. (C) 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  17. On the resonance amplification of magnetic perturbations near the threshold of tearing instability in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenin, V. V. Skovoroda, A. A.

    2015-12-15

    Using a cylindrical model, a relatively simple description is presented of how a magnetic field perturbation stimulated by a low external helical current or a small helical distortion of the boundary and generating magnetic islands penetrates into a plasma column with a magnetic surface q=m/n to which tearing instability is attached. Linear analysis of the classical instability with an aperiodic growth of the perturbation in time shows that the perturbation amplitude in plasma increases in a resonant manner as the discharge parameters approach the threshold of tearing instability. In a stationary case, under the assumption on the helical character of equilibrium, which can be found from the two-dimensional nonlinear equation for the helical flux, there is no requirement for the small size of the island. Examples of calculations in which magnetic islands are large near the threshold of tearing instability are presented. The bifurcation of equilibrium near the threshold of tearing instability in plasma with a cylindrical boundary, i.e., the existence of helical equilibrium (along with cylindrical equilibrium) with large islands, is described. Moreover, helical equilibrium can also exist in the absence of instability.

  18. Single-Step 3-D Image Reconstruction in Magnetic Induction Tomography: Theoretical Limits of Spatial Resolution and Contrast to Noise Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Hollaus, Karl; Rosell-Ferrer, Javier; Merwa, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a low-resolution imaging modality for reconstructing the changes of the complex conductivity in an object. MIT is based on determining the perturbation of an alternating magnetic field, which is coupled from several excitation coils to the object. The conductivity distribution is reconstructed from the corresponding voltage changes induced in several receiver coils. Potential medical applications comprise the continuous, non-invasive monitoring of tissue alterations which are reflected in the change of the conductivity, e.g. edema, ventilation disorders, wound healing and ischemic processes. MIT requires the solution of an ill-posed inverse eddy current problem. A linearized version of this problem was solved for 16 excitation coils and 32 receiver coils with a model of two spherical perturbations within a cylindrical phantom. The method was tested with simulated measurement data. Images were reconstructed with a regularized single-step Gauss–Newton approach. Theoretical limits for spatial resolution and contrast/noise ratio were calculated and compared with the empirical results from a Monte-Carlo study. The conductivity perturbations inside a homogeneous cylinder were localized for a SNR between 44 and 64 dB. The results prove the feasibility of difference imaging with MIT and give some quantitative data on the limitations of the method. PMID:17031597

  19. A new 3D Co(II)–organic framework with acylamide-containing tetracarboxylate ligand: Solvothermal synthesis, crystal structure, gas adsorption and magnetic property

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qingfu Zhang, Haina; Geng, Aijing; Wang, Suna; Zhang, Chong

    2014-04-01

    A new cobalt(II)–organic framework, [Co{sub 2}(L)(py){sub 2}(DMSO)]{sub n}• 0.5nDMF• 2nDMSO (1) [H{sub 4}L=5,5'-((naphthalene-2,6-dicarbonyl)bis(azanediyl))diisophthalic acid, py=pyridine, DMSO=dimethyl sulfoxide, DMF=N,N-dimethylformamide], has been solvothermally synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, PXRD and single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The structural analysis reveals that complex 1 is a 3D framework built from nanosized acylamide-containing tetracarboxylate ligands (L{sup 4−}) and dinuclear [Co{sub 2}(CO{sub 2}){sub 4}] secondary building units (SBUs), exhibiting a uninodal (4,4)-connected crb topology with the Schläfli symbol of (4• 6{sup 5}). The desolvated complex (1a) displays higher adsorption capability for CO{sub 2} than N{sub 2}, which may be due to the relatively strong binding affinity between the CO{sub 2} molecules and acylamide groups in the framework. The magnetic investigation shows that the dominant antiferromagnetic interaction is observed in complex 1. - Graphical abstract: A new 3D Co(II)–organic framework with nanosized acylamide-containing tetracarboxylate ligand was solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized, its thermal stability, gas adsorption and magnetic property were studied. - Highlights: • A new 3D Co(II)–organic framework with nanosized acylamide-containing tetracarboxylate ligand has been solvothermally synthesized and characterized. • Complex 1 exhibits a uninodal (4,4)-connected crb topology. • The thermal stability, gas adsorption and magnetic property were studied.

  20. Variation of magnetic braking by non-axisymmetric magnetic fields depending on the perturbed field structure in the KSTAR tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kimin; Jeon, Y. M.; Park, J.-K.; Ko, W. H.; In, Y.; Choe, W.; Kim, J.; Lee, S. G.; Yoon, S. W.; Kwak, J. G.; Oh, Y. K.

    2017-03-01

    The variation of a magnetic braking profile by non-axisymmetric magnetic fields has been experimentally demonstrated and numerically validated in the KSTAR tokamak. Two types of n  =  2 non-resonant magnetic fields were applied by changing the relative phase of non-axisymmetric field coils. One is even parity, of which non-resonant fields deeply penetrate into the plasma core, and the other is odd parity localized at the plasma edge. The even and odd parity produced significantly different perturbed magnetic field structures, and thereby drove global and edge-dominant toroidal rotation damping, respectively. These distinct braking profiles are consistently reproduced by drift-kinetic particle simulations, indicating the possibility of the predictive utilization of non-resonant magnetic fields for rotation profile control.

  1. Jovian Plasmas Torus Interaction with Europa. Plasma Wake Structure and Effect of Inductive Magnetic Field: 3D Hybrid Kinetic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J F.; Paterson, W. R.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Simpson, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa moon-magnetosphere system with respect to a variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flyby measurements from the Galileo Orbiter mission, and for planning flyby and orbital measurements (including the surface and atmospheric compositions) for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa (Cassidy et al., 2007; Shematovich et al., 2005). In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyroradius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ion velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field (assuming an initial Maxwellian velocity distribution for upstream background ions). Photoionization, electron-impact ionization, charge exchange and collisions between the ions and neutrals are also included in our model. We consider the models with Oþ þ and Sþ þ background plasma, and various betas for background ions and electrons, and pickup electrons. The majority of O2 atmosphere is thermal with an extended non-thermal population (Cassidy et al., 2007). In this paper, we discuss two tasks: (1) the plasma wake structure dependence on the parameters of the upstream plasma and Europa's atmosphere (model I, cases (a) and (b) with a homogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive magnetic dipole and high oceanic shell conductivity); and (2) estimation of the possible effect of an induced magnetic field arising from oceanic shell conductivity. This effect was estimated based on the difference between the observed and modeled magnetic fields (model II, case (c) with an inhomogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive

  2. Calculation of the inboard magnetic footprint in the DIII-D from the low mn magnetic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Michael; Punjabi, Alkesh; Ali, Halima

    2010-11-01

    The equilibrium EFIT data for the DIII-D shot 115467 at 3000 ms is used to construct the equilibrium generating function for magnetic field line trajectories in the DIII-D tokamak in natural canonical coordinates [1,2]. The generating function represents the axisymmetric magnetic geometry and the topology of the DIII-D shot very accurately [1,2]. A symplectic map for field line trajectories in the natural canonical coordinates in the DIII-D is constructed. We call this map the DIII-D map. The natural canonical coordinates can be readily inverted to physical coordinates (R,φ,Z) [1,2]. Low mn magnetic perturbation with mode numbers (m,n)=(1,1)+(1,-1) is added to the generating function of the map. The amplitude for the low mn perturbation is chosen to be 6X10-4, which is the expected value of the amplitude in tokamaks. The forward DIII-D map and its continuous analog are used to calculate the inboard magnetic footprint from the low mn perturbation in the DIII-D. This work is supported by US Department of Energy grants DE-FG02-07ER54937, DE-FG02-01ER54624 and DE-FG02-04ER54793.

  3. Calculation of the outboard magnetic footprint in the DIII-D from the low mn magnetic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Quentin; Ali, Halima; Punjabi, Alkesh

    2010-11-01

    The equilibrium EFIT data for the DIII-D shot 115467 at 3000 ms is used to construct the equilibrium generating function for magnetic field line trajectories in the DIII-D tokamak in natural canonical coordinates [1,2]. The generating function represents the axisymmetric magnetic geometry and the topology of the DIII-D shot very accurately [1,2]. A symplectic map for field line trajectories in the natural canonical coordinates in the DIII-D is constructed. We call this map the DIII-D map. The natural canonical coordinates can be readily inverted to physical coordinates (R,φ,Z) [1,2]. Low mn magnetic perturbation with mode numbers (m,n)=(1,1)+(1,-1) is added to the generating function of the map. The amplitude for the low mn perturbation is chosen to be 6X10-4, which is the expected value of the amplitude in tokamaks. The backward DIII-D map and its continuous analog are used to calculate the outboard magnetic footprint from the low mn perturbation in the DIII-D. This work is supported by US Department of Energy grants DE-FG02-07ER54937, DE-FG02-01ER54624 and DE-FG02-04ER54793.

  4. Perturbative Quantum Analysis and Classical Limit of the Electron Scattering by a Solenoidal Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Murguia, Gabriela; Moreno, Matias; Torres, Manuel

    2009-04-20

    A well known example in quantum electrodynamics (QED) shows that Coulomb scattering of unpolarized electrons, calculated to lowest order in perturbation theory, yields a results that exactly coincides (in the non-relativistic limit) with the Rutherford formula. We examine an analogous example, the classical and perturbative quantum scattering of an electron by a magnetic field confined in an infinite solenoid of finite radius. The results obtained for the classical and the quantum differential cross sections display marked differences. While this may not be a complete surprise, one should expect to recover the classical expression by applying the classical limit to the quantum result. This turn not to be the case. Surprisingly enough, it is shown that the classical result can not be recuperated even if higher order corrections are included. To recover the classic correspondence of the quantum scattering problem a suitable non-perturbative methodology should be applied.

  5. Critical aspects of ELM crash suppression by magnetic perturbations in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jayhyun; Jeon, Y. M.; Park, G. Y.; Choi, M. J.; in, Y.; Yoon, S. W.; Bae, C.; Lee, J.; Park, J.-K.; Ahn, J.; The Kstar Team Team

    2016-10-01

    ELM crash suppressions have been achieved by low n (n = 1, 2, and mixture of them) magnetic perturbations (MPs) with using various configurations of in-vessel perturbation coils in KSTAR. So far, the suppressed periods are extended longer than 10 seconds. In KSTAR, the complete suppression of ELM crashes almost always accompany with the increase of edge fluctuations which are likely to be excited by applied MPs. The excitation of edge fluctuation exhibited the bifurcation-like feature depending on the strength of MPs. The conditions to excite edge fluctuations were investigated with including well known q95 window. On the other hand, ELM mitigation does not come with the increase of edge fluctuations. Instead, it seems that applied MPs directly trigger small frequent ELMs since the mitigated ELMs suddenly disappear when turning MPs off. The results stress the importance of stability analysis with the use of perturbed equilibrium since most stability studies have assumed unperturbed/undistorted equilibrium.

  6. Changes in particle transport as a result of resonant magnetic perturbations in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mordijck, S.; Doyle, E. J.; Rhodes, T. L.; Zeng, L.; Wang, G.; McKee, G. R.; Moyer, R. A.; Commaux, N.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Gentle, K. W.; Reimerdes, H.; Schmitz, O.; Solomon, W. M.; Staebler, G. M.

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we introduce the first direct perturbed particle transport measurements in resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) H-mode plasmas. The perturbed particle transport increases as a result of application of RMP deep into the core. In the core, a large reduction in E Multiplication-Sign B shear to a value below the linear growth rate, in conjunction with increasing density fluctuations, is consistent with an increase in turbulent particle transport. In the edge, the changes in turbulent particle transport are less obvious. There is a clear correlation between the linear growth rates and the density fluctuations measured at different scales, but it is uncertain which is the cause and which is the consequence.

  7. Changes in particle transport as a result of resonant magnetic perturbations in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mordijck, S.; Doyle, E. J.; McKee, G. R.; Moyer, R.A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Zeng, L.; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Gentle, T. K.; Reimerdes, H.; Schmitz, O.; Solomon, W. M.; Staebler, G. M.; Wang, G. Y.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the first direct perturbed particle transport measurements in resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) H-mode plasmas. The perturbed particle transport increases as a result of application of RMP deep into the core. In the core, a large reduction in E x B shear to a value below the linear growth rate, in conjunction with increasing density fluctuations, is consistent with an increase in turbulent particle transport. In the edge, the changes in turbulent particle transport are less obvious. There is a clear correlation between the linear growth rates and the density fluctuations measured at different scales, but it is uncertain which is the cause and which is the consequence.

  8. Neutron stars in a perturbative f(R) gravity model with strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Deliduman, Cemsinan; Güngör, Can; Keleş, Vildan; Ryu, C.Y.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J. E-mail: cemsinan@msgsu.edu.tr E-mail: kelesvi@itu.edu.tr E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp

    2013-10-01

    In Kaluza-Klein electromagnetism it is natural to associate modified gravity with strong electromagnetic fields. Hence, in this paper we investigate the combined effects of a strong magnetic field and perturbative f(R) gravity on the structure of neutron stars. The effect of an interior strong magnetic field of about 10{sup 17−18} G on the equation of state is derived in the context of a quantum hadrodynamics (QHD) equation of state (EoS) including effects of the magnetic pressure and energy along with occupied Landau levels. Adopting a random orientation of interior field domains, we solve the modified spherically symmetric hydrostatic equilibrium equations derived for a gravity model with f(R) = R+αR{sup 2}. Effects of both the finite magnetic field and the modified gravity are detailed for various values of the magnetic field and the perturbation parameter α along with a discussion of their physical implications. We show that there exists a parameter space of the modified gravity and the magnetic field strength, in which even a soft equation of state can accommodate a large ( > 2 M{sub s}un) maximum neutron star mass.

  9. Static Magnetic Properties of Films Measured by Means of Angular Perturbative Magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Alexandre; Melo, Abner; da Costa, Ricardo; Chesman, Carlos

    In this work we introduced a new technique to measure magnetic anisotropies and magnetoelectrical properties, such as Anisotropic Magnetoresistance (AMR) and Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) amplitudes. The Perturbative Magnetoresistance (PMR) consist of a regular collinear four probe magnetoresistance set up with an AC magnetic field (hac) applied perpendicular to the DC (Hdc) one. hac amplitude is about 1.0 Oe and oscillate at 270 Hz. We successfully interpreted the signal response from the voltage measured by lock-in amplifier and proposed a model based on energy minimization to extract magnetic anisotropies, AMR and GMR amplitudes. Measuring the in-plane angular dependency of PMR signal we were able to identify the usual magnetic anisotropy, such as uniaxial, unidirectional and cubic. Taking into account the perturbative nature of this technique (small hac amplitude and low frequency), we argue that angular PMR can be used to investigate some dynamic magnetic effects where static technique can not provide such information. A distinct feature of angular PMR is the capability to be used in saturated and non-saturated regime, so revealing magnetic properties dependency on applied field strength. We addressed the Rotatable Anisotropy as an example in this work.

  10. Non-perturbative calculation of molecular magnetic properties within current-density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Tellgren, E I; Teale, A M; Furness, J W; Lange, K K; Ekström, U; Helgaker, T

    2014-01-21

    We present a novel implementation of Kohn-Sham density-functional theory utilizing London atomic orbitals as basis functions. External magnetic fields are treated non-perturbatively, which enable the study of both magnetic response properties and the effects of strong fields, using either standard density functionals or current-density functionals-the implementation is the first fully self-consistent implementation of the latter for molecules. Pilot applications are presented for the finite-field calculation of molecular magnetizabilities, hypermagnetizabilities, and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants, focusing on the impact of current-density functionals on the accuracy of the results. Existing current-density functionals based on the gauge-invariant vorticity are tested and found to be sensitive to numerical details of their implementation. Furthermore, when appropriately regularized, the resulting magnetic properties show no improvement over standard density-functional results. An advantage of the present implementation is the ability to apply density-functional theory to molecules in very strong magnetic fields, where the perturbative approach breaks down. Comparison with high accuracy full-configuration-interaction results show that the inadequacies of current-density approximations are exacerbated with increasing magnetic field strength. Standard density-functionals remain well behaved but fail to deliver high accuracy. The need for improved current-dependent density-functionals, and how they may be tested using the presented implementation, is discussed in light of our findings.

  11. Electronic and magnetic properties of 2 H -NbS2 intercalated by 3 d transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankovsky, S.; Polesya, S.; Ebert, H.; Bensch, W.

    2016-11-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of the 2 H -NbS2 compound intercalated by Cr, Mn, and Fe, respectively, have been investigated by means of the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method. Magnetic torque calculations result in an easy plane magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MCA) of Cr1 /3NbS2 for the ground state (T =0 K). Relativistic disorder local moment calculations show that the corresponding anisotropy constant decreases monotonously with rising temperature in line with experiment. Going from the Cr and Mn to the Fe intercalated system, the modification of the electronic structure results in a change of the easy axis from in-plane to out-of-plane. It is shown that for Cr1 /3NbS2 and Mn1 /3NbS2 , the in-plane MCA and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions give rise to a helimagnetic structure along the hexagonal c axis, following the experimental observations. The negative exchange interactions in the Fe1 /3NbS2 compound result in a noncollinear frustrated magnetic structure if the MCA is not taken into account. It is shown, however, that a strong MCA along the hexagonal c axis leads to a magnetic ordering referred to as an ordering of the third kind, which was observed experimentally.

  12. Reconstructing the 3D coronal magnetic field using a Potential Field Source Surface model comparing different magnetograph input data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, M. A., II; Peleikis, T.; Berger, L.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    We utilize a Potential Field Source Sourface (PFSS) model developed by Altschuler & Newkirk (1969) to model and analyze the coronal magnetic field up to the source surface at 2.5 solar radii. As the photospheric boundary to that model we employ data from several instruments, namely the Wilcox Solar Observatory, NSO's Kitt Peak Vacuum Telescope, the Michelson Doppler Imager onboard the SOHO spacecraft and its successor, the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard SDO. Instead of the harmonic function approach commonly used, we employ a three dimensional computational grid and methods of computational fluid dynamics to solve the governing equations in order to easily incorporate more complex phenomena if the need for doing so arises during the course of our work. Another advantage of the grid approach is the possibility to outsource the computational work to a parallel computing architecture like NVIDIA's CUDA, which we employ to speed up processing time and increase data throughput significantly. The obtained magnetic field data is utilized in several ways. First it is compared with in-situ data from several spacecraft like Ulysses to validate the employed PFSS model. We further use the expansion geometry of the magnetic field as an input to a 1D-solar-wind model developed by Cranmer et al. (2007) to determine characteristics of the solar wind in several magnetic flux tubes. We can then infer the theoretical charge-state composition inside these flux tubes, which in turn can be employed to test our hypotheses on the origin of the slow solar wind.

  13. Robust solution procedure for the discrete energy-averaged model on the calculation of 3D hysteretic magnetization and magnetostriction of iron-gallium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tari, H.; Scheidler, J. J.; Dapino, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    A reformulation of the Discrete Energy-Averaged model for the calculation of 3D hysteretic magnetization and magnetostriction of iron-gallium (Galfenol) alloys is presented in this paper. An analytical solution procedure based on an eigenvalue decomposition is developed. This procedure avoids the singularities present in the existing approximate solution by offering multiple local minimum energy directions for each easy crystallographic direction. This improved robustness is crucial for use in finite element codes. Analytical simplifications of the 3D model to 2D and 1D applications are also presented. In particular, the 1D model requires calculation for only one easy direction, while all six easy directions must be considered for general applications. Compared to the approximate solution procedure, it is shown that the resulting robustness comes at no expense for 1D applications, but requires almost twice the computational effort for 3D applications. To find model parameters, we employ the average of the hysteretic data, rather than anhysteretic curves, which would require additional measurements. An efficient optimization routine is developed that retains the dimensionality of the prior art. The routine decouples the parameters into exclusive sets, some of which are found directly through a fast preprocessing step to improve accuracy and computational efficiency. The effectiveness of the model is verified by comparison with existing measurement data.

  14. Prenatal diagnosis of a patent urachus cyst with the use of 2D, 3D, 4D ultrasound and fetal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, F; Picone, O; Levaillant, J M; Mabille, M; Mas, A E; Frydman, R; Senat, M V

    2008-01-01

    Patent urachus cyst is a rare umbilical anomaly, which is poorly detected prenatally and frequently confounded with pseudo bladder exstrophy or omphalocele. A 27-year-old woman was referred to our prenatal diagnosis centre at 18 weeks of gestation after diagnosis of a megabladder and 2 umbilical cord cysts. Subsequent 2D, 3D and 4D ultrasound examinations and fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a typical umbilical cyst and an extra-abdominal cyst, communicating with the vertex of the fetal bladder through a small channel that increased in size when the fetus voided urine. Termination of pregnancy occured at 31 weeks because of associated cerebral septal agenesis, and autopsy confirmed the prenatal diagnosis of urachus cyst. Few cases of urachus cyst diagnosed prenatally are reported in literature, but none were associated with other extra-abdominal disorders and none used 3D, 4D and fetal MRI. Our case illustrated the efficiency in prenatal diagnosis of 3D and 4D ultrasound examinations. This could help pediatrician surgeons to explain to a couple about neonatal surgical repair and plastic reconstruction in the prenatal period.

  15. Interaction of faults and perturbation of slip: influence of anisotropic stress states in the presence of fault friction and comparison between Wallace Bott and 3D Distinct Element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, C.

    2002-10-01

    Two decades after their birth, the validity of fault slip inversion methods is still strongly debated. These methods are based upon a very simplified mechanical background, the Wallace-Bott hypothesis. Following previous studies, the 3D Distinct Element Method (3DEC software) is used to explore the effect of varying stress anisotropy (i.e. the "shape" ratio) on slip perturbation along pairs of faults. Two end-member configurations are modelled in taking into account fault friction and internal deformation of faulted blocks. The first model deals with a relatively simple case where two nonintersecting conjugate normal faults are reactivated in an oblique normal stress regime. The second one simulates an extreme situation where two perpendicular intersecting faults are submitted to oblique extension. The average direction of fault slip predicted by 3DEC models is compared to the corresponding slip predicted by the simplified Wallace-Bott model. For the two simulated cases, it is shown that results from 3DEC and Wallace-Bott models are mutually consistent and argue for the validity of fault slip data inversion methods. Consistency remains even if slip is significantly deviated near the intersection line of faults. These deviations depend on the degree of anisotropy of applied stresses in presence of fault friction. Furthermore, modelling results suggest that, for intersecting faults with convergent slip directions, consideration of fault friction in the models leads to reduction of slip perturbation. In other words, modelling results lead to the nonintuitive conclusion that the validity of the simplified Wallace-Bott model is strengthened when 3DEC model's complexity (i.e. the number of parameters incorporated) increases.

  16. Heterogeneous anisotropic magnetic susceptibility of the myelin-water layers causes local magnetic field perturbations in axons.

    PubMed

    Puwal, Steffan; Roth, Bradley J; Basser, Peter J

    2017-04-01

    One goal of MRI is to determine the myelin water fraction in neural tissue. One approach is to measure the reduction in T2 * arising from microscopic perturbations in the magnetic field caused by heterogeneities in the magnetic susceptibility of myelin. In this paper, analytic expressions for the induced magnetic field distribution are derived within and around an axon, assuming that the myelin susceptibility is anisotropic. Previous models considered the susceptibility to be piecewise continuous, whereas this model considers a sinusoidally varying susceptibility. Many conclusions are common in both models. When the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the axon, the magnetic field in the intraaxonal space is uniformly perturbed, the magnetic field in the myelin sheath oscillates between the lipid and water layers, and the magnetic field in the extracellular space just outside the myelin sheath is heterogeneous. These field heterogeneities cause the spins to dephase, shortening T2 *. When the magnetic field is applied along the axon, the field is homogeneous within water-filled regions, including between lipid layers. Therefore the spins do not dephase and the magnetic susceptibility has no effect on T2 *. Generally, the response of an axon is given as the superposition of these two contributions. The sinusoidal model uses a different set of approximations compared with the piecewise model, so their common predictions indicate that the models are not too sensitive to the details of the myelin-water distribution. Other predictions, such as the sensitivity to water diffusion between myelin and water layers, may highlight differences between the two approaches. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Analysis of Magnetic Properties on the Outer Rotor Type Hybrid Stepping Motors Using 3D Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Yuji; Miyata, Kenji; Oonishi, Kazuo; Motegi, Yasuaki

    The three-dimensional magnetic field analysis has clarified the effect of several structural and manufacturing factors on the properties of the outer rotor type stepping motors. (1) The number of rotor teeth, 128, can make a unit step angle under 0.5 degree and a cogging torque under 1mNm for the outer rotor type stepping motor with the outer diameter under 60mm and with the output torque above 0.4Nm. (2) The permanent magnet flux has an optimal value dependent on the thickness of the laminated core to maximize the motor torque. (3) The lamination stacking error of the small teeth of the rotor and stator has a large effect on the cogging torque of the stepping motor.

  18. The effect of tumour size on drug transport and uptake in 3-D tumour models reconstructed from magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Wenbo; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw

    2017-01-01

    Drug transport and its uptake by tumour cells are strongly dependent on tumour properties, which vary in different types of solid tumours. By simulating the key physical and biochemical processes, a numerical study has been carried out to investigate the transport of anti-cancer drugs in 3-D tumour models of different sizes. The therapeutic efficacy for each tumour is evaluated by using a pharmacodynamics model based on the predicted intracellular drug concentration. Simulation results demonstrate that interstitial fluid pressure and interstitial fluid loss vary non-linearly with tumour size. Transvascular drug exchange, driven by the concentration gradient of unbound drug between blood and interstitial fluid, is more efficient in small tumours, owing to the low spatial-mean interstitial fluid pressure and dense microvasculature. However, this has a detrimental effect on therapeutic efficacy over longer periods as a result of enhanced reverse diffusion of drug to the blood circulation after the cessation of drug infusion, causing more rapid loss of drug in small tumours. PMID:28212385

  19. 3D structural cartography based on magnetic and gravity data inversion - Case of South-West Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hichem, Boubekri; Mohamed, Hamoudi; Abderrahmane, Bendaoud; Ivan, Priezzhev; Karim, Allek

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the results of 3D aeromagnetic and gravity data inversion across the West African Craton (WAC) in South West Algeria. Although the used data have different origins and resolutions, the performed manual and automatic interpretation for each dataset shows a good correlation with some earlier geological studies of the region, major structural aspects of the locality, as well as other new structural features. Many curved faults parallel to the suture zone indicate the presence of terranes or the metacratonization of the WAC and a related fault network of great importance with NE-SW and NW-SE directions. The mega shear zones from north to south, which are visible at the surface in the Hoggar, are also observed along the Saharan Platform. The fact that these faults are observed since the Cambro-Ordovician in all crust (including the Saharan Basins) indicates that this area, which is situated on the border of the WAC, remained active during the entire period of time.

  20. Spectral, Magnetic and Biological Studie on Some Bivalent 3d Metal Complexes of Hydrazine Derived Schiff-Base Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Sherazi, Syed K. A.

    1997-01-01

    Metal(II) complexes of hydrazine derived Schiff-base ligands of the type M(L)2Cl2 where M = Co, Cu, Ni and Zn and L = L1 and L2 have been prepared and characterised by molar conductance, magnetic moment, elemental analysis and electronic, IR, H-NMR and 13C spectral data.The different modes of chelation of the ligands and their comparative biological properties against different bacterial species are reported. PMID:18475770

  1. Runaway electron mitigation by applied magnetic perturbations in RFX-mod tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbin, M.; Valisa, M.; White, R. B.; Cester, D.; Marrelli, L.; Nocente, M.; Piovesan, P.; Stevanato, L.; Puiatti, M. E.; Zuin, M.

    2017-01-01

    Thanks to its advanced system for the control of magnetohydrodynamic modes, the RFX-mod device run as a tokamak is particularly suited to the study of the possible impact on runaway electron (RE) de-confinement in response to applied magnetic perturbations. This paper shows that during the flat-top phase in RFX-mod discharges, with a plasma current of {{I}\\text{p}}˜ 150 kA and a low density ({{n}\\text{e}}<{{10}19} m-3), the amount of REs scales with the m  =  2,n  =  1 perturbation both in q(a)  <  2 and q(a)  >  2 plasmas. Similar results have also been obtained in post-disruption phases, but still with limited statistics. The mechanisms generating REs and the effect of magnetic perturbation (MP) on their confinement are interpreted by numerical simulations with the relativistic guiding center code ORBIT. The role played by different magnetic equilibria on the energy of REs and on their loss rates is investigated. ORBIT simulations indicate that RE-enhanced losses are associated with a raised level of stochasticity, the effect being more pronounced when the MP amplitude is higher and internally resonant.

  2. Resonant-magnetic-perturbation-induced plasma transport in H-mode pedestals

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Cole, A. J.

    2012-11-15

    Plasma toroidal rotation reduces reconnection of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields {delta}B on rational (q = m/n) magnetic flux surfaces. Hence, it causes radial perturbations {delta}B{sub {rho}m/n} to be small there, and thus inhibits magnetic island formation and stochasticity in the edge of high (H-) mode confinement tokamak plasmas. However, electron collisional damping combined with the spatial magnetic flutter {delta}B{sub {rho}m/n} induced by RMPs in the vicinity of rational surfaces causes a radial electron heat diffusivity in which {chi}{sub e Parallel-To }{sup eff}{approx}(v{sub Te}{sup 2}/{nu}{sub e})/(1+x{sup 2}/{delta}{sub Parallel-To }{sup 2}) is an effective parallel electron thermal diffusivity. These effects are reduced by magnetic shear effects at a distance x from rational surfaces for |x|>{delta}{sub Parallel-To} but amplified for {delta}B-caret{sub {rho}m/n}(x)>{delta}B-caret{sub {rho}m/n}(0). A kinetic, toroidal model of these RMP-flutter-induced plasma transport effects is developed and compared to a previously developed cylindrical model. The RMP-induced increases in plasma transport can be large enough to reduce plasma gradients in H-mode pedestals. Thus, they may contribute to suppressing edge localized modes in tokamak plasmas.

  3. A series of 3D metal organic frameworks based on [24-MC-6] metallacrown clusters: structure, magnetic and luminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Zou, Hua-Hong; Chen, Zi-Lu; Zhang, Zhong; Sun, Wei-Yin; Liang, Fu-Pei

    2014-09-14

    Four isostructural metal organic frameworks (MOFs), namely [Co6(HipO)6]·6H2O (1), [Mn6(HipO)6]·6H2O (2), [Cd6(HipO)6]·6H2O (3) and [Zn6(HipO)6]·7H2O (4) (H3ipO = 2-hydroxyisophthalic acid), were synthesized and structurally characterized. They have a 3D (4,6)-connected framework based on [24-MC-6] metallacrown clusters ([24-MC-6]-based MOFs). The arrangements of the 24-MC-6 metallacrown SBUs show a regular change indicated by the orientation of their symmetry axes, resulting in a special dense packing mode different from other [24-MC-6]-based MOFs. The analysis of SQUID measurements reveal that compound 1 displays the dominant antiferromagnetic exchanges in 300-10 K between the adjacent Co(II) ions and a ferromagnetic-like behavior at lower temperatures, whereas compound 2 shows an antiferromagnetic interaction between the adjacent Mn(II) ions. Compound 1 exhibits a magnetocaloric effect (MCE) with the resulting entropy change (-ΔS(m)) of 15.20 J kg(-1) K(-1) for ΔH = 50 kG at 6 K, which is the highest value among the cobalt-based MOFs with MCE reported so far. The luminescence properties of compounds 3 and 4 were studied, both of them exhibit photoluminescence in the solid state at room temperature which can be ascribed to intraligand π→π* transitions.

  4. Enhancing the blocking temperature in single-molecule magnets by incorporating 3d-5d exchange interactions.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Kasper S; Schau-Magnussen, Magnus; Bendix, Jesper; Weihe, Høgni; Palii, Andrei V; Klokishner, Sophia I; Ostrovsky, Serghei; Reu, Oleg S; Mutka, Hannu; Tregenna-Piggott, Philip L W

    2010-12-03

    We report the first single-molecule magnet (SMM) to incorporate the [Os(CN)(6)](3-) moiety. The compound (1) has a trimeric, cyanide-bridged Mn(III)-Os(III)-Mn(III) skeleton in which Mn(III) designates a [Mn(5-Brsalen)(MeOH)](+) unit (5-Brsalen=N,N'-ethylenebis(5-bromosalicylideneiminato)). X-ray crystallographic experiments reveal that 1 is isostructural with the Mn(III)-Fe(III)-Mn(III) analogue (2). Both compounds exhibit a frequency-dependent out-of-phase χ''(T) alternating current (ac) susceptibility signal that is suggestive of SMM behaviour. From the Arrhenius expression, the effective barrier for 1 is found to be Δ(eff)/k(B)=19 K (τ(0)=5.0×10(-7) s; k(B)=Boltzmann constant), whereas only the onset (1.5 kHz, 1.8 K) of χ''(T) is observed for 2, thus indicating a higher blocking temperature for 1. The strong spin-orbit coupling present in Os(III) isolates the E'(1g(1/2))(O(h)*) Kramers doublet that exhibits orbital contributions to the single-ion anisotropy. Magnetic susceptibility and inelastic neutron-scattering measurements reveal that substitution of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-) by the [Os(CN)(6)](3-) anion results in larger ferromagnetic, anisotropic exchange interactions going from quasi-Ising exchange interactions in 2 to pure Ising exchange for 1 with J(parallel)(MnOs)=-30.6 cm(-1). The combination of diffuse magnetic orbitals and the Ising-type exchange interaction effectively contributes to a higher blocking temperature. This result is in accordance with theoretical predictions and paves the way for the design of a new generation of SMMs with enhanced SMM properties.

  5. General principles of describing second- and higher-order null points of a potential magnetic field in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukashenko, A. T.; Veselovsky, I. S.

    2015-12-01

    General principles of describing secondand higher-order null points of a potential magnetic field are formulated. The potential near a second-order null of the general form can be specified by a linear combination of four basic functions, the list of which is presented. Near secondand higher-order null points, field line equations often cannot be integrated analytically; however, in some cases, it is possible to present a qualitative description of the geometry of null vicinities with consideration of the behavior of field lines near rays outgoing from null, at which the field is radial or equals zero.

  6. Antiferromagnetic spin chain behavior and a transition to 3D magnetic order in Cu(D,L-alanine)2: Roles of H-bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Rafael; Sartoris, Rosana P.; Calvo, Hernán L.; Chagas, Edson F.; Rapp, Raul E.

    2016-05-01

    We study the spin chain behavior, a transition to 3D magnetic order and the magnitudes of the exchange interactions for the metal-amino acid complex Cu(D,L-alanine)2•H2O, a model compound to investigate exchange couplings supported by chemical paths characteristic of biomolecules. Thermal and magnetic data were obtained as a function of temperature (T) and magnetic field (B0). The magnetic contribution to the specific heat, measured between 0.48 and 30 K, displays above 1.8 K a 1D spin-chain behavior that can be fitted with an intrachain antiferromagnetic (AFM) exchange coupling constant 2J0=(-2.12±0.08) cm-1 (defined as ℋex(i,i+1) = -2J0SiṡSi+1), between neighbor coppers at 4.49 Å along chains connected by non-covalent and H-bonds. We also observe a narrow specific heat peak at 0.89 K indicating a phase transition to a 3D magnetically ordered phase. Magnetization curves at fixed T = 2, 4 and 7 K with B0 between 0 and 9 T, and at T between 2 and 300 K with several fixed values of B0 were globally fitted by an intrachain AFM exchange coupling constant 2J0=(-2.27±0.02) cm-1 and g = 2.091±0.005. Interchain interactions J1 between coppers in neighbor chains connected through long chemical paths with total length of 9.51 Å cannot be estimated from magnetization curves. However, observation of the phase transition in the specific heat data allows estimating the range 0.1≤|2J1|≤0.4 cm-1, covering the predictions of various approximations. We analyze the magnitudes of 2J0 and 2J1 in terms of the structure of the corresponding chemical paths. The main contribution in supporting the intrachain interaction is assigned to H-bonds while the interchain interactions are supported by paths containing H-bonds and carboxylate bridges, with the role of the H-bonds being predominant. We compare the obtained intrachain coupling with studies of compounds showing similar behavior and discuss the validity of the approximations allowing to calculate the interchain

  7. An efficient 3-D eddy-current solver using an independent impedance method for transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    De Geeter, Nele; Crevecoeur, Guillaume; Dupre, Luc

    2011-02-01

    In many important bioelectromagnetic problem settings, eddy-current simulations are required. Examples are the reduction of eddy-current artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and techniques, whereby the eddy currents interact with the biological system, like the alteration of the neurophysiology due to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). TMS has become an important tool for the diagnosis and treatment of neurological diseases and psychiatric disorders. A widely applied method for simulating the eddy currents is the impedance method (IM). However, this method has to contend with an ill conditioned problem and consequently a long convergence time. When dealing with optimal design problems and sensitivity control, the convergence rate becomes even more crucial since the eddy-current solver needs to be evaluated in an iterative loop. Therefore, we introduce an independent IM (IIM), which improves the conditionality and speeds up the numerical convergence. This paper shows how IIM is based on IM and what are the advantages. Moreover, the method is applied to the efficient simulation of TMS. The proposed IIM achieves superior convergence properties with high time efficiency, compared to the traditional IM and is therefore a useful tool for accurate and fast TMS simulations.

  8. Influence of critical current density on magnetic force of HTSC bulk above PMR with 3D-modeling numerical solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yiyun; Qin, Yujie

    2015-09-01

    Numerical simulations of thermo-electromagnetic properties of a high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk levitating over a permanent magnetic guideway (PMG) are performed by resorting to the quasistatic approximation of the H-method coupling with the classical description of the heat conduction equation. The numerical resolving codes are practiced with the help of the finite element program generation system (FEPG) platform using finite element method (FEM). The E-J power law is used to describe the electric current nonlinear characteristics of HTS bulk. The simulation results show that the heat conduction and the critical current density are tightly relative to the thermal effects of the HTS bulk over the PMG. The heat intensity which responds to the heat loss of the HTS bulk is mainly distributed at the two bottom-corners of the bulk sample.

  9. 3D segmentation and quantification of magnetic resonance data: application to the osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klifa, Catherine S.; Lynch, John A.; Zaim, Souhil; Genant, Harry K.

    1999-05-01

    The general objective of our study is the development of a clinically robust three-dimensional segmentation and quantification technique of Magnetic Resonance (MR) data, for the objective and quantitative evaluation of the osteonecrosis (ON) of the femoral head. This method will help evaluate the effects of joint preserving treatments for femoral head osteonecrosis from MR data. The disease is characterized by tissue changes (death of bone and marrow cells) within the weight-bearing portion of the femoral head. Due to the fuzzy appearance of lesion tissues and their different intensity patterns in various MR sequences, we proposed a semi-automatic multispectral segmentation of MR data introducing data constraints (anatomical and geometrical) and using a classical K-means unsupervised clustering algorithm. The method was applied on ON patient data. Results of volumetric measurements and configuration of various tissues obtained with the semi- automatic method were compared with quantitative results delineated by a trained radiologist.

  10. Self-assembled 3D heterometallic Cu(II)/Fe(II) coordination polymers with octahedral net skeletons: structural features, molecular magnetism, thermal and oxidation catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Karabach, Yauhen Y; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Kopylovich, Maximilian N; Gil-Hernández, Beatriz; Sanchiz, Joaquin; Kirillov, Alexander M; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2010-12-06

    The new three-dimensional (3D) heterometallic Cu(II)/Fe(II) coordination polymers [Cu(6)(H(2)tea)(6)Fe(CN)(6)](n)(NO(3))(2n)·6nH(2)O (1) and [Cu(6)(Hmdea)(6)Fe(CN)(6)](n)(NO(3))(2n)·7nH(2)O (2) have been easily generated by aqueous-medium self-assembly reactions of copper(II) nitrate with triethanolamine or N-methyldiethanolamine (H(3)tea or H(2)mdea, respectively), in the presence of potassium ferricyanide and sodium hydroxide. They have been isolated as air-stable crystalline solids and fully characterized including by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. The latter reveal the formation of 3D metal-organic frameworks that are constructed from the [Cu(2)(μ-H(2)tea)(2)](2+) or [Cu(2)(μ-Hmdea)(2)](2+) nodes and the octahedral [Fe(CN)(6)](4-) linkers, featuring regular (1) or distorted (2) octahedral net skeletons. Upon dehydration, both compounds show reversible escape and binding processes toward water or methanol molecules. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of 1 and 2 reveal strong antiferromagnetic [J = -199(1) cm(-1)] or strong ferromagnetic [J = +153(1) cm(-1)] couplings between the copper(II) ions through the μ-O-alkoxo atoms in 1 or 2, respectively. The differences in magnetic behavior are explained in terms of the dependence of the magnetic coupling constant on the Cu-O-Cu bridging angle. Compounds 1 and 2 also act as efficient catalyst precursors for the mild oxidation of cyclohexane by aqueous hydrogen peroxide to cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone (homogeneous catalytic system), leading to maximum total yields (based on cyclohexane) and turnover numbers (TONs) up to about 22% and 470, respectively.

  11. From charge motion in general magnetic fields to the non perturbative gyrokinetic equation

    SciTech Connect

    Di Troia, C.

    2015-04-15

    The exact analytical description of non relativistic charge motion in general magnetic fields is, apparently, a simple problem, even if it has not been solved until now, apart for rare cases. The key feature of the present derivation is to adopt a non perturbative magnetic field description to find new solutions of motion. Among all solutions, two are particularly important: guiding particle and gyro-particle solutions. The guiding particle has been characterized to be minimally coupled to the magnetic field; the gyro-particle has been defined to be maximally coupled to the magnetic field and, also, to move on a closed orbit. The generic charged particle motion is shown to be expressed as the sum of such particular solutions. This non perturbative approach corresponds to the description of the particle motion in the gyro-center and/or guiding center reference frame obtained at all the orders of the modern gyro-center transformation. The Boltzmann equation is analyzed with the described exact guiding center coordinates. The obtained gyrokinetic equation is solved for the Boltzmann equation at marginal stability conditions.

  12. ON MULTIPLE RECONNECTION X-LINES AND TRIPOLAR PERTURBATIONS OF STRONG GUIDE MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, S.; Gosling, J. T.; Lapenta, G.; Newman, D. L.; Goldman, M. V.; Phan, T. D.; Lavraud, B.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Carr, C. M.; Markidis, S.

    2015-05-20

    We report new multi-spacecraft Cluster observations of tripolar guide magnetic field perturbations at a solar wind reconnection exhaust in the presence of a guide field B{sub M} {sub  }which is almost four times as strong as the reversing field B{sub L}. The novel tripolar field consists of two narrow regions of depressed B{sub M}, with an observed 7%–14% ΔB{sub M} magnitude relative to the external field, which are found adjacent to a wide region of enhanced B{sub M} within the exhaust. A stronger reversing field is associated with each B{sub M} depression. A kinetic reconnection simulation for realistic solar wind conditions and the observed strong guide field reveals that tripolar magnetic fields preferentially form across current sheets in the presence of multiple X-lines as magnetic islands approach one another and merge into fewer and larger islands. The simulated ΔB{sub M}/ΔX{sub N} over the normal width ΔX{sub N} between a B{sub M} minimum and the edge of the external region agree with the normalized values observed by Cluster. We propose that a tripolar guide field perturbation may be used to identify candidate regions containing multiple X-lines and interacting magnetic islands at individual solar wind current sheets with a strong guide field.

  13. Magnetic-perturbation-induced plasma transport in H-mode pedestals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callen, J. D.; Cole, A. J.; Hegna, C. C.

    2012-03-01

    Plasma toroidal rotation can prevent reconnection of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields on rational surfaces and hence magnetic island formation and stochasticity in the edge of tokamak H-mode plasmas. However, magnetic flutter induced by RMPs off the rational surfaces causes a radial electron heat diffusivity χe^RMP˜(δBr/B0)^2χ| F(x) in which χ|˜vTe^2/νe is an effective parallel electron heat diffusivity and F is a spatially varying factor [1]. The flutter also diffuses electrons radially and causes a factor of about 3 smaller increases in density diffusion. Since the electron density transport is non-ambipolar, this flutter process also modifies the radial electric field and plasma toroidal rotation. This work extends the previously developed periodic cylinder screw pinch model [1] of RMP-flutter-induced plasma transport to a full toroidal model which is axisymmetric to lowest order plus gyroradius-small magnetic field perturbations. The possible role of the RMP-flutter-induced plasma transport in reducing pressure gradients in H-mode pedestals and thereby suppressing ELMs will be discussed.[4pt] [1] J.D. Callen et al., UW-CPTC 11-13, http://www.cptc.wisc.edu (submitted to Nucl. Fusion.)

  14. A 3D oxalate-based network as a precursor for the CoMn₂O₄ spinel: synthesis and structural and magnetic studies.

    PubMed

    Habjanič, Jelena; Jurić, Marijana; Popović, Jasminka; Molčanov, Krešimir; Pajić, Damir

    2014-09-15

    A novel heterometallic oxalate-based compound of the formula {[Co(bpy)3][Mn2(C2O4)3]·H2O}n (1; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), and magnetization measurement. The molecular structure of 1 is made of a three-dimensional (3D) anionic network, [Mn2(C2O4)3]n(2n-), and tris-chelated cations [Co(bpy)3](2+) occupying the vacancies of the framework. Splitting between the zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) branches of susceptibility below the small peak at 13 K indicates magnetic ordering. Compound 1 was used as a single-source precursor for the formation of the mixed-metal oxide CoMn2O4. This conversion via thermal decomposition was explored by thermal analysis (TGA and DTA), IR spectroscopy, powder XRD, and magnetic susceptibility measurement. From refined structural parameters, it could be seen that the spinel obtained by the thermal treatment of 1 at 800 °C is characterized by the inversion parameter δ = 21%, and therefore the structural formula at room temperature can be written as (tet)[Co(0.79)Mn(0.21)](oct)[Co(0.105)Mn(0.895)]2O4. The temperature dependence of magnetization for CoMn2O4 points to at least three magnetic phases: the ferrimagnetic state is observed below 83 K, and up to 180 K blocking of the magnetic moments of nanocrystallites of 31 nm appears, transforming to paramagnetic-like behavior above 180 K. Microstructural characterization of the CoMn2O4 sample was carried out by means of XRD line-broadening analysis.

  15. Experimental evidence and DFT studies of next-nearest-neighbor magnetic interactions through diamagnetic 3d and 4d ions.

    PubMed

    Costes, Jean-Pierre; Duhayon, Carine; Vendier, Laure; Colacio, Enrique; Mota Ávila, Antonio J; Suarez Varela, Jose

    2012-01-16

    The copper template effect allows the preparation of tridentate ligands that chelate copper ions, leaving unoccupied the fourth basal coordination position and at least one axial position of the copper coordination polyhedron. Two such cationic complexes, [LCu](+) and [L(1)Cu](+) (L(-) = 2-{(E)-[(2-aminoethyl)imino]methyl}phenoxo] and L(1-) = 2-{(E)-[(2-aminopropyl)imino]methyl}phenoxo), react with diamagnetic polycyanometalate tectons such as Ni(CN)(4)(2-) or Ag(CN)(2)(-) to yield different neutral 1D complexes. In {[(LCu)(2)Ni(CN)(4)]}(n) (1) the four cyano nitrogen atoms are involved in coordination with copper ions in such a manner that each copper atom is pentacoordinated and linked to two cyano functions that occupy axial and equatorial coordination positions. Two L(1)Cu(+) cationic entities are linked, through their equatorial plane, to two trans cyano groups of the Ni(CN)(4)(2-) tecton in complex [(L(1)Cu)(2)Ni(CN)(4)] (2), the two uncoordinated cyano groups being involved in hydrogen bonds. 2 is a racemate, a S stereoisomer being associated with a R one in each [(L(1)Cu)(2)Ni(CN)(4)] unit. Zigzag Cu-Ag chains are present in [(LCu)Ag(CN)(2)] (3), where the copper centers are pentacoordinated and connected to the cyano groups in an alternate axial-equatorial coordination scheme. A bidimensional structure is developed by interchain argentophilic interactions. In complex 4, {(L(1)CuMeOH)(L(1)Cu)[Ag(CN)(2)](2)}, two L(1)Cu units are connected by a NC-Ag-CN bridge in an equatorial position. These resulting units exhibit argentophilic interactions with [Ag(CN(2))](-) entities that are monocoordinated in the equatorial position to the next unit, ultimately leading to a chain. Weak Cu-Cu magnetic interactions are detected in the four compounds, antiferromagnetic in the case of equatorial-equatorial copper interactions, ferromagnetic for orthogonal interacting copper orbitals (axial-equatorial interactions), while axial-axial bridges are characterized by an absence

  16. Perturbed soliton excitations of Rao-dust Alfvén waves in magnetized dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavitha, L.; Lavanya, C.; Senthil Kumar, V.; Gopi, D.; Pasqua, A.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the propagation dynamics of the perturbed soliton excitations in a three component fully ionized dusty magnetoplasma consisting of electrons, ions, and heavy charged dust particulates. We derive the governing equation of motion for the two dimensional Rao-dust magnetohydrodynamic (R-D-MHD) wave by employing the inertialess electron equation of motion, inertial ion equation of motion, the continuity equations in a plasma with immobile charged dust grains, together with the Maxwell's equations, by assuming quasi neutrality and neglecting the displacement current in Ampere's law. Furthermore, we assume the massive dust particles are practically immobile since we are interested in timescales much shorter than the dusty plasma period, thereby neglecting any damping of the modes due to the grain charge fluctuations. We invoke the reductive perturbation method to represent the governing dynamics by a perturbed cubic nonlinear Schrödinger (pCNLS) equation. We solve the pCNLS, along the lines of Kodama-Ablowitz multiple scale nonlinear perturbation technique and explored the R-D-MHD waves as solitary wave excitations in a magnetized dusty plasma. Since Alfvén waves play an important role in energy transport in driving field-aligned currents, particle acceleration and heating, solar flares, and the solar wind, this representation of R-D-MHD waves as soliton excitations may have extensive applications to study the lower part of the earth's ionosphere.

  17. Tearing mode dynamics and locking in the presence of external magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridström, R.; Munaretto, S.; Frassinetti, L.; Chapman, B. E.; Brunsell, P. R.; Sarff, J. S.

    2016-06-01

    In normal operation, Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] reversed-field pinch plasmas exhibit several rotating tearing modes (TMs). Application of a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) results in braking of mode rotation and, if the perturbation amplitude is sufficiently high, in a wall-locked state. The coils that produce the magnetic perturbation in MST give rise to RMPs with several toroidal harmonics. As a result, simultaneous deceleration of all modes is observed. The measured TM dynamics is shown to be in qualitative agreement with a magnetohydrodynamical model of the RMP interaction with the TM [R. Fitzpatrick, Nucl. Fusion 33, 1049 (1993)] adapted to MST. To correctly model the TM dynamics, the electromagnetic torque acting on several TMs is included. Quantitative agreement of the TM slowing-down time was obtained for a kinematic viscosity in the order of νki n≈10 -20 m2/s. Analysis of discharges with different plasma densities shows an increase of the locking threshold with increasing density. Modeling results show good agreement with the experimental trend, assuming a density-independent kinematic viscosity. Comparison of the viscosity estimates in this paper to those made previously with other techniques in MST plasmas suggests the possibility that the RMP technique may allow for estimates of the viscosity over a broad range of plasmas in MST and other devices.

  18. Large-scale rotational perturbations of a Friedmann universe with collisionless matter and primordial magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebhan, Anton

    1992-06-01

    The dynamical equations for rotational (vector) perturbations of a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe containing a perfect fluid of massive matter and radiation together with relativistic collisionless matter are established. These equations have solutions which remain regular as the initial singularity is approached, in contras