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Sample records for 3d navier-stokes solver

  1. Computational results for flows over 2-D ramp and 3-D obstacle with an upwind Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    1990-01-01

    An implicit, finite-difference, upwind, full Navier-Stokes solver was applied to supersonic/hypersonic flows over two-dimensional ramps and three-dimensional obstacle. Some of the computed results are presented. The numerical scheme used in the study is an implicit, spacially second order accurate, upwind, LU-ADI scheme based on Roe's approximate Reimann solver with MUSCL differencing of Van Leer. An algebraic grid generation scheme based on generalized interpolation scheme was used in generating the grids for the various 2-D and 3-D problems.

  2. Calculations of separated 3-D flows with a pressure-staggered Navier-Stokes equations solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.

    1991-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes equations solver based on a pressure correction method with a pressure-staggered mesh and calculations of separated three-dimensional flows are presented. It is shown that the velocity pressure decoupling, which occurs when various pressure correction algorithms are used for pressure-staggered meshes, is caused by the ill-conditioned discrete pressure correction equation. The use of a partial differential equation for the incremental pressure eliminates the velocity pressure decoupling mechanism by itself and yields accurate numerical results. Example flows considered are a three-dimensional lid driven cavity flow and a laminar flow through a 90 degree bend square duct. For the lid driven cavity flow, the present numerical results compare more favorably with the measured data than those obtained using a formally third order accurate quadratic upwind interpolation scheme. For the curved duct flow, the present numerical method yields a grid independent solution with a very small number of grid points. The calculated velocity profiles are in good agreement with the measured data.

  3. A 3-D CE/SE Navier-Stokes Solver With Unstructured Hexahedral Grid for Computation of Near Field Jet Screech Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; Himansu, Ananda; Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2003-01-01

    A 3-D space-time CE/SE Navier-Stokes solver using an unstructured hexahedral grid is described and applied to a circular jet screech noise computation. The present numerical results for an underexpanded jet, corresponding to a fully expanded Mach number of 1.42, capture the dominant and nonaxisymmetric 'B' screech mode and are generally in good agreement with existing experiments.

  4. Some topics of Navier-Stokes solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, H.; Nishikawa, N.

    1990-03-01

    The process of numerical simulation consists of selection of some items: a mathematical model, a numerical scheme, the level of the computer, and post processing. From this point of view, recent numerical studies of viscous flows are described especially for the fluid engineering laboratories in the Chiba University. The examples of simulations are Mach reflection on a wedge using a kinetic model equation and a cylinder-plate juncture flow using incompressible Navier Stokes equation. Some attempts at graphic monitoring of fluid mechanical calculations are also shown for some combinations of computers with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solvers.

  5. Application of the FUN3D Unstructured-Grid Navier-Stokes Solver to the 4th AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Hammond, Dana P.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Pirzadeh, S. Z.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    FUN3D Navier-Stokes solutions were computed for the 4th AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop grid convergence study, downwash study, and Reynolds number study on a set of node-based mixed-element grids. All of the baseline tetrahedral grids were generated with the VGRID (developmental) advancing-layer and advancing-front grid generation software package following the gridding guidelines developed for the workshop. With maximum grid sizes exceeding 100 million nodes, the grid convergence study was particularly challenging for the node-based unstructured grid generators and flow solvers. At the time of the workshop, the super-fine grid with 105 million nodes and 600 million elements was the largest grid known to have been generated using VGRID. FUN3D Version 11.0 has a completely new pre- and post-processing paradigm that has been incorporated directly into the solver and functions entirely in a parallel, distributed memory environment. This feature allowed for practical pre-processing and solution times on the largest unstructured-grid size requested for the workshop. For the constant-lift grid convergence case, the convergence of total drag is approximately second-order on the finest three grids. The variation in total drag between the finest two grids is only 2 counts. At the finest grid levels, only small variations in wing and tail pressure distributions are seen with grid refinement. Similarly, a small wing side-of-body separation also shows little variation at the finest grid levels. Overall, the FUN3D results compare well with the structured-grid code CFL3D. The FUN3D downwash study and Reynolds number study results compare well with the range of results shown in the workshop presentations.

  6. Higher-order in time "quasi-unconditionally stable" ADI solvers for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in 2D and 3D curvilinear domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Oscar P.; Cubillos, Max

    2016-02-01

    This paper introduces alternating-direction implicit (ADI) solvers of higher order of time-accuracy (orders two to six) for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in two- and three-dimensional curvilinear domains. The higher-order accuracy in time results from 1) An application of the backward differentiation formulae time-stepping algorithm (BDF) in conjunction with 2) A BDF-like extrapolation technique for certain components of the nonlinear terms (which makes use of nonlinear solves unnecessary), as well as 3) A novel application of the Douglas-Gunn splitting (which greatly facilitates handling of boundary conditions while preserving higher-order accuracy in time). As suggested by our theoretical analysis of the algorithms for a variety of special cases, an extensive set of numerical experiments clearly indicate that all of the BDF-based ADI algorithms proposed in this paper are ;quasi-unconditionally stable; in the following sense: each algorithm is stable for all couples (h , Δt)of spatial and temporal mesh sizes in a problem-dependent rectangular neighborhood of the form (0 ,Mh) × (0 ,Mt). In other words, for each fixed value of Δt below a certain threshold, the Navier-Stokes solvers presented in this paper are stable for arbitrarily small spatial mesh-sizes. The second-order formulation has further been rigorously shown to be unconditionally stable for linear hyperbolic and parabolic equations in two-dimensional space. Although implicit ADI solvers for the Navier-Stokes equations with nominal second-order of temporal accuracy have been proposed in the past, the algorithms presented in this paper are the first ADI-based Navier-Stokes solvers for which second-order or better accuracy has been verified in practice under non-trivial (non-periodic) boundary conditions.

  7. 3-D adaptive grid Navier-Stokes rocket plume calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, J. Eric

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional adaptive-grid full Navier-Stokes calculations performed for the base region and plume of the Minuteman first stage and a simplified version of the Titan first stage are used to demonstrate the applicability of the Navier-Stokes flow solver, EAGLE adaptive grid generator, and k-epsilon turbulence model to rocket plume flowfields. The calculations include realistic exhaust gas thermodynamic properties, with frozen chemistry.

  8. Development of advanced Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan

    1994-01-01

    The objective of research was to develop and validate new computational algorithms for solving the steady and unsteady Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. The end-products are new three-dimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes codes that are faster, more reliable, more accurate, and easier to use. The three-dimensional Euler and full/thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for compressible/incompressible flows are solved on structured hexahedral grids. The Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model is used for closure. The space discretization is based on a cell-centered finite-volume method augmented by a variety of numerical dissipation models with optional total variation diminishing limiters. The governing equations are integrated in time by an implicit method based on lower-upper factorization and symmetric Gauss-Seidel relaxation. The algorithm is vectorized on diagonal planes of sweep using two-dimensional indices in three dimensions. Convergence rates and the robustness of the codes are enhanced by the use of an implicit full approximation storage multigrid method.

  9. The Openpipeflow Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Ashley P.

    Pipelines are used in a huge range of industrial processes involving fluids, and the ability to accurately predict properties of the flow through a pipe is of fundamental engineering importance. Armed with parallel MPI, Arnoldi and Newton-Krylov solvers, the Openpipeflow code can be used in a range of settings, from large-scale simulation of highly turbulent flow, to the detailed analysis of nonlinear invariant solutions (equilibria and periodic orbits) and their influence on the dynamics of the flow.

  10. INS3D: An incompressible Navier-Stokes code in generalized three-dimensional coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, S. E.; Kwak, D.; Chang, J. L. C.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of the INS3D code, which computes steady-state solutions to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, is described. The flow solver utilizes a pseudocompressibility approach combined with an approximate factorization scheme. This manual describes key operating features to orient new users. This includes the organization of the code, description of the input parameters, description of each subroutine, and sample problems. Details for more extended operations, including possible code modifications, are given in the appendix.

  11. Application of Aeroelastic Solvers Based on Navier Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    2001-01-01

    The propulsion element of the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) initiative is directed towards increasing the overall efficiency of current aircraft engines. This effort requires an increase in the efficiency of various components, such as fans, compressors, turbines etc. Improvement in engine efficiency can be accomplished through the use of lighter materials, larger diameter fans and/or higher-pressure ratio compressors. However, each of these has the potential to result in aeroelastic problems such as flutter or forced response. To address the aeroelastic problems, the Structural Dynamics Branch of NASA Glenn has been involved in the development of numerical capabilities for analyzing the aeroelastic stability characteristics and forced response of wide chord fans, multi-stage compressors and turbines. In order to design an engine to safely perform a set of desired tasks, accurate information of the stresses on the blade during the entire cycle of blade motion is required. This requirement in turn demands that accurate knowledge of steady and unsteady blade loading is available. To obtain the steady and unsteady aerodynamic forces for the complex flows around the engine components, for the flow regimes encountered by the rotor, an advanced compressible Navier-Stokes solver is required. A finite volume based Navier-Stokes solver has been developed at Mississippi State University (MSU) for solving the flow field around multistage rotors. The focus of the current research effort, under NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3- 596 was on developing an aeroelastic analysis code (entitled TURBO-AE) based on the Navier-Stokes solver developed by MSU. The TURBO-AE code has been developed for flutter analysis of turbomachine components and delivered to NASA and its industry partners. The code has been verified. validated and is being applied by NASA Glenn and by aircraft engine manufacturers to analyze the aeroelastic stability characteristics of modem fans, compressors

  12. A Navier-Stokes solver for cascade flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnone, A.; Swanson, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    A computer code for solving the Reynolds averaged full Navier-Stokes equations has been developed and applied using sheared H-type grids. The Baldwin-Lomax eddy-viscosity model is used for turbulence closure. The integration in time is based on an explicit four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme. Local time stepping, variable coefficient implicit residual smoothing, and a full multigrid method have been implemented to accelerate steady state calculations. Comparisons with experimental data show that the code is an accurate viscous solver and can give very good blade-to-blade predictions for engineering applications in less than 100 multigrid cycles on the finest mesh.

  13. Algorithmic Enhancements to the VULCAN Navier-Stokes Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litton, D. K.; Edwards, J. R.; White, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    VULCAN (Viscous Upwind aLgorithm for Complex flow ANalysis) is a cell centered, finite volume code used to solve high speed flows related to hypersonic vehicles. Two algorithms are presented for expanding the range of applications of the current Navier-Stokes solver implemented in VULCAN. The first addition is a highly implicit approach that uses subiterations to enhance block to block connectivity between adjacent subdomains. The addition of this scheme allows more efficient solution of viscous flows on highly-stretched meshes. The second algorithm addresses the shortcomings associated with density-based schemes by the addition of a time-derivative preconditioning strategy. High speed, compressible flows are typically solved with density based schemes, which show a high level of degradation in accuracy and convergence at low Mach numbers (M less than or equal to 0.1). With the addition of preconditioning and associated modifications to the numerical discretization scheme, the eigenvalues will scale with the local velocity, and the above problems will be eliminated. With these additions, VULCAN now has improved convergence behavior for multi-block, highly-stretched meshes and also can solve the Navier-Stokes equations for very low Mach numbers.

  14. Three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes solver using lower-upper symmetric-Gauss-Seidel algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Kwak, Dochan

    1991-01-01

    A numerical method based on the pseudocompressibility concept is developed for solving the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using the lower-upper symmetric-Gauss-Seidel implicit scheme. Very high efficiency is achieved in a new flow solver, INS3D-LU code, by accomplishing the complete vectorizability of the algorithm on oblique planes of sweep in three dimensions.

  15. Three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes solver using lower-upper symmetric-Gauss-Seidel algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Kwak, Dochan

    1991-01-01

    A numerical method based on the pseudocompressibility concept is developed for solving the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using the lower-upper symmetric-Gauss-Seidel implicit scheme. Very high efficiency is achieved in a new flow solver, INS3D-LU code, by accomplishing the complete vectorizability of the algorithm on oblique planes of sweep in three dimensions.

  16. An exact solution of the 3-D Navier-Stokes equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muriel, A.

    2011-01-01

    We continue our work (A. Muriel and M. Dresden, Physica D 101, 299, 1997) to calculate the time evolution of the one-particle distribution function. An improved operator formalism, heretofore unused, is applied for spatially uniform initial data. We then choose a Gaussian pair potential between particles. With these two conditions, the velocity fields, energy and pressure are calculated exactly. All stipulations of the Clay Mathematics Institute for proposed solutions of the 3-D Navier-Stokes Equation [ http://www.claymath.org/millennium/Navier-Stokes_Equations/navierstokes.pdf] are satisfied by our time evolution equation. We then substitute our results for the velocity fields into the 3-D Navier-Stokes Equation and calculate the pressure. The results from our time evolution equation and the prescribed pressure from the Navier-Stokes Equation constitute an exact solution to the Navier-Stokes Equation. No turbulence is obtained from the solution.

  17. Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser Device Simulation Using the 3D, Unsteady Navier-Stokes Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    overall rate of dimensional ( 3D ) GASP model for the COIL flowfield dissociation of I2. was executed in time accurate mode utilizing lst-order The gas... 3D , Unsteady Navier-Stokes Equations DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report...ADP023803 UNCLASSIFIED Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser Device Simulation Using the 3D , Unsteady Navier- Stokes Equations Timothy J. Madden US Air Force

  18. Exponential Mixing of the 3D Stochastic Navier-Stokes Equations Driven by Mildly Degenerate Noises

    SciTech Connect

    Albeverio, Sergio; Debussche, Arnaud; Xu Lihu

    2012-10-15

    We prove the strong Feller property and exponential mixing for 3D stochastic Navier-Stokes equation driven by mildly degenerate noises (i.e. all but finitely many Fourier modes being forced) via a Kolmogorov equation approach.

  19. Algorithmic Enhancements for the VULCAN Navier-Stokes Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Jack R.

    2004-01-01

    Work performed over the last three years has resulted in the addition of several new algorithms to the VULCAN code, NASA's standard for Navier-Stokes calculations in high-speed aeropropulsion devices. This final report describes the new techniques in brief and presents sample results from their use.

  20. Convergence Acceleration of a Navier-Stokes Solver for Efficient Static Aeroelastic Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, Shigeru; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1995-01-01

    New capabilities have been developed for a Navier-Stokes solver to perform steady-state simulations more efficiently. The flow solver for solving the Navier-Stokes equations is based on a combination of the lower-upper factored symmetric Gauss-Seidel implicit method and the modified Harten-Lax-van Leer-Einfeldt upwind scheme. A numerically stable and efficient pseudo-time-marching method is also developed for computing steady flows over flexible wings. Results are demonstrated for transonic flows over rigid and flexible wings.

  1. Conservative multizonal interface algorithm for the 3-D Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klopfer, G. H.; Molvik, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    A conservative zonal interface algorithm using features of both structured and unstructured mesh CFD technology is presented. The flow solver within each of the zones is based on structured mesh CFD technology. The interface algorithm was implemented into two three-dimensional Navier-Stokes finite volume codes and was found to yield good results.

  2. Numerical solution of 3D Navier-Stokes equations with upwind implicit schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marx, Yves P.

    1990-01-01

    An upwind MUSCL type implicit scheme for the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations is presented. Comparison between different approximate Riemann solvers (Roe and Osher) are performed and the influence of the reconstructions schemes on the accuracy of the solution as well as on the convergence of the method is studied. A new limiter is introduced in order to remove the problems usually associated with non-linear upwind schemes. The implementation of a diagonal upwind implicit operator for the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations is also discussed. Finally the turbulence modeling is assessed. Good prediction of separated flows are demonstrated if a non-equilibrium turbulence model is used.

  3. Simulation of Unsteady Flows Using an Unstructured Navier-Stokes Solver on Moving and Stationary Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Atkins, Harold L.

    2005-01-01

    We apply an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver for unstructured grids to unsteady flows on moving and stationary grids. Example problems considered are relevant to active flow control and stability and control. Computational results are presented using the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model and are compared to experimental data. The effect of grid and time-step refinement are examined.

  4. Navier-Stokes Neutral and Plasma Fluid Modelling in 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Riemann, J; Borchardt, M; Schneider, R; Mutzke, A; Rognlien, T; Umansky, M

    2004-05-17

    The 3D finite volume transport code BoRiS is applied to a system of coupled plasma and neutral fluid equations in a slab. Demonstrating easy implementation of new equations, a new parallel BoRiS version is tested on three different models for the neutral fluid - diffusive, parallel Navier-Stokes and full Navier-Stokes - and the results are compared to each other. Typical effects like density enhancement by ionization of recycled neutrals in front of a target plate can be seen and differences are linked to the neutral models in use.

  5. The 3D Navier-Stokes analysis of a Mach 2.68 bifurcated rectangular mixed-compression inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, M.; Saunders, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    The supersonic diffuser of a Mach 2.68 bifurcated, rectangular, mixed-compression inlet was analyzed using a three-dimensional (3D) Navier-Stokes flow solver. A two-equation turbulence model, and a porous bleed model based on unchoked bleed hole discharge coefficients were used. Comparisons were made with experimental data, inviscid theory, and two-dimensional Navier-Stokes analyses. The main objective was to gain insight into the inlet fluid dynamics. Examination of the computational results along with the experimental data suggest that the cowl shock-sidewall boundary layer interaction near the leading edge caused a substantial separation in the wind tunnel inlet model. As a result, the inlet performance may have been compromised by increased spillage and higher bleed mass flow requirements. The internal flow contained substantial waves that were not in the original inviscid design. 3D effects were fairly minor for this inlet at on-design conditions. Navier-Stokes analysis appears to be an useful tool for gaining insight into the inlet fluid dynamics. It provides a higher fidelity simulation of the flowfield than the original inviscid design, by taking into account boundary layers, porous bleed, and their interactions with shock waves.

  6. On the Dynamic Programming Approach for the 3D Navier-Stokes Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Manca, Luigi

    2008-06-15

    The dynamic programming approach for the control of a 3D flow governed by the stochastic Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible fluid in a bounded domain is studied. By a compactness argument, existence of solutions for the associated Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation is proved. Finally, existence of an optimal control through the feedback formula and of an optimal state is discussed.

  7. Turbomachinery Heat Transfer and Loss Modeling for 3D Navier-Stokes Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth; Ameri, Ali

    2005-01-01

    This report's contents focus on making use of NASA Glenn on-site computational facilities,to develop, validate, and apply models for use in advanced 3D Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes to enhance the capability to compute heat transfer and losses in turbomachiney.

  8. Large Deviations for Stochastic Tamed 3D Navier-Stokes Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Roeckner, Michael; Zhang, Tusheng; Zhang Xicheng

    2010-04-15

    In this paper, using weak convergence method, we prove a large deviation principle of Freidlin-Wentzell type for the stochastic tamed 3D Navier-Stokes equations driven by multiplicative noise, which was investigated in (Roeckner and Zhang in Probab. Theory Relat. Fields 145(1-2), 211-267, 2009).

  9. Turbomachinery Heat Transfer and Loss Modeling for 3D Navier-Stokes Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth; Ameri, Ali

    2005-01-01

    This report's contents focus on making use of NASA Glenn on-site computational facilities,to develop, validate, and apply models for use in advanced 3D Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes to enhance the capability to compute heat transfer and losses in turbomachiney.

  10. Eigenvalue calculation procedure for an Euler/Navier-Stokes solver with application to flows over airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Dowell, Earl H.; Bliss, Donald B.

    1991-01-01

    A Lanczos procedure is presently applied to a Navier-Stokes (N-S) solver for eigenvalues and eigenvectors associated with the small-perturbation analysis of the N-S equations' finite-difference representation for airfoil flows; the matrix used is very large, sparse, real, and nonsymmetric. The Lanczos procedure is shown to furnish complete spectral information for the eigenvalues, as required for transient-stability analysis of N-S solvers.

  11. A Comparison of Three Navier-Stokes Solvers for Exhaust Nozzle Flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Yoder, Dennis A.; Debonis, James R.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of the NPARC, PAB, and WIND (previously known as NASTD) Navier-Stokes solvers is made for two flow cases with turbulent mixing as the dominant flow characteristic, a two-dimensional ejector nozzle and a Mach 1.5 elliptic jet. The objective of the work is to determine if comparable predictions of nozzle flows can be obtained from different Navier-Stokes codes employed in a multiple site research program. A single computational grid was constructed for each of the two flows and used for all of the Navier-Stokes solvers. In addition, similar k-e based turbulence models were employed in each code, and boundary conditions were specified as similarly as possible across the codes. Comparisons of mass flow rates, velocity profiles, and turbulence model quantities are made between the computations and experimental data. The computational cost of obtaining converged solutions with each of the codes is also documented. Results indicate that all of the codes provided similar predictions for the two nozzle flows. Agreement of the Navier-Stokes calculations with experimental data was good for the ejector nozzle. However, for the Mach 1.5 elliptic jet, the calculations were unable to accurately capture the development of the three dimensional elliptic mixing layer.

  12. An approximate Riemann solver for real gas parabolized Navier-Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect

    Urbano, Annafederica; Nasuti, Francesco

    2013-01-15

    Under specific assumptions, parabolized Navier-Stokes equations are a suitable mean to study channel flows. A special case is that of high pressure flow of real gases in cooling channels where large crosswise gradients of thermophysical properties occur. To solve the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations by a space marching approach, the hyperbolicity of the system of governing equations is obtained, even for very low Mach number flow, by recasting equations such that the streamwise pressure gradient is considered as a source term. For this system of equations an approximate Roe's Riemann solver is developed as the core of a Godunov type finite volume algorithm. The properties of the approximated Riemann solver, which is a modification of Roe's Riemann solver for the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations, are presented and discussed with emphasis given to its original features introduced to handle fluids governed by a generic real gas EoS. Sample solutions are obtained for low Mach number high compressible flows of transcritical methane, heated in straight long channels, to prove the solver ability to describe flows dominated by complex thermodynamic phenomena.

  13. Euler/Navier-Stokes Solvers Applied to Ducted Fan Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Srivastava, Rakesh

    1997-01-01

    Due to noise considerations, ultra high bypass ducted fans have become a more viable design. These ducted fans typically consist of a rotor stage containing a wide chord fan and a stator stage. One of the concerns for this design is the classical flutter that keeps occurring in various unducted fan blade designs. These flutter are catastrophic and are to be avoided in the flight envelope of the engine. Some numerical investigations by Williams, Cho and Dalton, have suggested that a duct around a propeller makes it more unstable. This needs to be further investigated. In order to design an engine to safely perform a set of desired tasks, accurate information of the stresses on the blade during the entire cycle of blade motion is required. This requirement in turn demands that accurate knowledge of steady and unsteady blade loading be available. Aerodynamic solvers based on unsteady three-dimensional analysis will provide accurate and fast solutions and are best suited for aeroelastic analysis. The Euler solvers capture significant physics of the flowfield and are reasonably fast. An aerodynamic solver Ref. based on Euler equations had been developed under a separate grant from NASA Lewis in the past. Under the current grant, this solver has been modified to calculate the aeroelastic characteristics of unducted and ducted rotors. Even though, the aeroelastic solver based on three-dimensional Euler equations is computationally efficient, it is still very expensive to investigate the effects of multiple stages on the aeroelastic characteristics. In order to investigate the effects of multiple stages, a two-dimensional multi stage aeroelastic solver was also developed under this task, in collaboration with Dr. T. S. R. Reddy of the University of Toledo. Both of these solvers were applied to several test cases and validated against experimental data, where available.

  14. Navier-Stokes cascade analysis with a stiff Kappa-Epsilon turbulence solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jong-Shang; Sockol, Peter M.; Prahl, Joseph M.

    1987-01-01

    The two dimensional, compressible, thin layer Navier-Stokes equations with the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model and the kinetic energy-energy dissipation (k-epsilon) model are solved numerically to simulate the flow through a cascade. The governing equations are solved for the entire flow domain, without the boundary layer assumptions. The stiffness of the k-epsilon equations is discussed. A semi-implicit, Runge-Kutta, time-marching scheme is developed to solve the k-epsilon equations. The impact of the k-epsilon solver on the explicit Runge-Kutta Navier-Stokes solver is discussed. Numerical solutions are presented for two dimensional turbulent flow over a flat plate and a double circular arc cascade and compared with experimental data.

  15. Navier-Stokes cascade analysis with a stiff k-epsilon turbulence solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jong-Shang; Sockol, Peter M.; Prahl, Joseph M.

    1988-01-01

    The two dimensional, compressible, thin layer Navier-Stokes equations with the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model and the kinetic energy-energy dissipation (k-epsilon) model are solved numerically to simulate the flow through a cascade. The governing equations are solved for the entire flow domain, without the boundary layer assumptions. The stiffness of the k-epsilon equations is discussed. A semi-implicit, Runge-Kutta, time-marching scheme is developed to solve the k-epsilon equations. The impact of the k-epsilon solver on the explicit Runge-Kutta Navier-Stokes solver is discussed. Numerical solutions are presented for two dimensional turbulent flow over a flat plate and a double circular arc cascade and compared with experimental data.

  16. Navier-Stokes Solvers and Generalizations for Reacting Flow Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Elman, Howard C

    2013-01-27

    This is an overview of our accomplishments during the final term of this grant (1 September 2008 -- 30 June 2012). These fall mainly into three categories: fast algorithms for linear eigenvalue problems; solution algorithms and modeling methods for partial differential equations with uncertain coefficients; and preconditioning methods and solvers for models of computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

  17. Navier-Stokes calculations on multi-element airfoils using a chimera-based solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasper, Donald W.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Robinson, Brian A.

    1993-01-01

    A study of Navier-Stokes calculations of flows about multielement airfoils using a chimera grid approach is presented. The chimera approach utilizes structured, overlapped grids which allow great flexibility of grid arrangement and simplifies grid generation. Calculations are made for two-, three-, and four-element airfoils, and modeling of the effect of gap distance between elements is demonstrated for a two element case. Solutions are obtained using the thin-layer form of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations with turbulence closure provided by the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model or the Baldwin-Barth one equation model. The Baldwin-Barth turbulence model is shown to provide better agreement with experimental data and to dramatically improve convergence rates for some cases. Recently developed, improved farfield boundary conditions are incorporated into the solver for greater efficiency. Computed results show good comparison with experimental data which include aerodynamic forces, surface pressures, and boundary layer velocity profiles.

  18. Navier-Stokes calculations on multi-element airfoils using a chimera-based solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasper, Donald W.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Robinson, Brian A.

    1993-01-01

    A study of Navier-Stokes calculations of flows about multielement airfoils using a chimera grid approach is presented. The chimera approach utilizes structured, overlapped grids which allow great flexibility of grid arrangement and simplifies grid generation. Calculations are made for two-, three-, and four-element airfoils, and modeling of the effect of gap distance between elements is demonstrated for a two element case. Solutions are obtained using the thin-layer form of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations with turbulence closure provided by the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model or the Baldwin-Barth one equation model. The Baldwin-Barth turbulence model is shown to provide better agreement with experimental data and to dramatically improve convergence rates for some cases. Recently developed, improved farfield boundary conditions are incorporated into the solver for greater efficiency. Computed results show good comparison with experimental data which include aerodynamic forces, surface pressures, and boundary layer velocity profiles.

  19. Bypass Transitional Flow Calculations Using a Navier-Stokes Solver and Two-Equation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liuo, William W.; Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Povinelli, L. A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Bypass transitional flows over a flat plate were simulated using a Navier-Stokes solver and two equation models. A new model for the bypass transition, which occurs in cases with high free stream turbulence intensity (TI), is described. The new transition model is developed by including an intermittency correction function to an existing two-equation turbulence model. The advantages of using Navier-Stokes equations, as opposed to boundary-layer equations, in bypass transition simulations are also illustrated. The results for two test flows over a flat plate with different levels of free stream turbulence intensity are reported. Comparisons with the experimental measurements show that the new model can capture very well both the onset and the length of bypass transition.

  20. Nearly Interactive Parabolized Navier-Stokes Solver for High Speed Forebody and Inlet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Liou, May-Fun; Jones, William H.; Trefny, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    A system of computer programs is being developed for the preliminary design of high speed inlets and forebodies. The system comprises four functions: geometry definition, flow grid generation, flow solver, and graphics post-processor. The system runs on a dedicated personal computer using the Windows operating system and is controlled by graphical user interfaces written in MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc.). The flow solver uses the Parabolized Navier-Stokes equations to compute millions of mesh points in several minutes. Sample two-dimensional and three-dimensional calculations are demonstrated in the paper.

  1. Flowfield Comparisons from Three Navier-Stokes Solvers for an Axisymmetric Separate Flow Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. Danielle; Bridges, James; Khavaran, Abbas

    2002-01-01

    To meet new noise reduction goals, many concepts to enhance mixing in the exhaust jets of turbofan engines are being studied. Accurate steady state flowfield predictions from state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solvers are needed as input to the latest noise prediction codes. The main intent of this paper was to ascertain that similar Navier-Stokes solvers run at different sites would yield comparable results for an axisymmetric two-stream nozzle case. Predictions from the WIND and the NPARC codes are compared to previously reported experimental data and results from the CRAFT Navier-Stokes solver. Similar k-epsilon turbulence models were employed in each solver, and identical computational grids were used. Agreement between experimental data and predictions from each code was generally good for mean values. All three codes underpredict the maximum value of turbulent kinetic energy. The predicted locations of the maximum turbulent kinetic energy were farther downstream than seen in the data. A grid study was conducted using the WIND code, and comments about convergence criteria and grid requirements for CFD solutions to be used as input for noise prediction computations are given. Additionally, noise predictions from the MGBK code, using the CFD results from the CRAFT code, NPARC, and WIND as input are compared to data.

  2. Parallelization of Unsteady Adaptive Mesh Refinement for Unstructured Navier-Stokes Solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwing, Alan M.; Nompelis, Ioannis; Candler, Graham V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the implementation of the MPI parallelization in a Navier-Stokes solver using adaptive mesh re nement. Viscous and inviscid test problems are considered for the purpose of benchmarking, as are implicit and explicit time advancement methods. The main test problem for comparison includes e ects from boundary layers and other viscous features and requires a large number of grid points for accurate computation. Ex- perimental validation against double cone experiments in hypersonic ow are shown. The adaptive mesh re nement shows promise for a staple test problem in the hypersonic com- munity. Extension to more advanced techniques for more complicated ows is described.

  3. Application of a Scalable, Parallel, Unstructured-Grid-Based Navier-Stokes Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh

    2001-01-01

    A parallel version of an unstructured-grid based Navier-Stokes solver, USM3Dns, previously developed for efficient operation on a variety of parallel computers, has been enhanced to incorporate upgrades made to the serial version. The resultant parallel code has been extensively tested on a variety of problems of aerospace interest and on two sets of parallel computers to understand and document its characteristics. An innovative grid renumbering construct and use of non-blocking communication are shown to produce superlinear computing performance. Preliminary results from parallelization of a recently introduced "porous surface" boundary condition are also presented.

  4. On the Critical One Component Regularity for 3-D Navier-Stokes System: General Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemin, Jean-Yves; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Zhifei

    2017-02-01

    Let us consider initial data {v_0} for the homogeneous incompressible 3D Navier-Stokes equation with vorticity belonging to {L^{3/2}\\cap L^2} . We prove that if the solution associated with {v_0} blows up at a finite time {T^star} , then for any p in {]4,∞[} , and any unit vector e of R^3, the L p norm in time with value in dot{H}^{1/2 + 2/p} of {(v|e)_{R^3}} blows up at {T^star}.

  5. Free boundary value problem to 3D spherically symmetric compressible Navier-Stokes-Poisson equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Huihui; Li, Hai-Liang

    2017-02-01

    In the paper, we consider the free boundary value problem to 3D spherically symmetric compressible isentropic Navier-Stokes-Poisson equations for self-gravitating gaseous stars with γ -law pressure density function for 6/5 <γ ≤ 4/3. For stress-free boundary condition and zero flow density continuously across the free boundary, the global existence of spherically symmetric weak solutions is shown, and the regularity and long time behavior of global solution are investigated for spherically symmetric initial data with the total mass smaller than a critical mass.

  6. Parallel performance investigations of an unstructured mesh Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    2000-01-01

    A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver based on unstructured mesh techniques for analysis of high-lift configurations is described. The method makes use of an agglomeration multigrid solver for convergence acceleration. Implicit line-smoothing is employed to relieve the stiffness associated with highly stretched meshes. A GMRES technique is also implemented to speed convergence at the expense of additional memory usage. The solver is cache efficient and fully vectorizable, and is parallelized using a two-level hybrid MPI-OpenMP implementation suitable for shared and/or distributed memory architectures, as well as clusters of shared memory machines. Convergence and scalability results are illustrated for various high-lift cases.

  7. A point implicit unstructured grid solver for the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thareja, Rajiv R.; Stewart, James R.; Hassan, Obey; Morgan, Ken; Peraire, Jaime

    1988-01-01

    An upwind finite element technique that uses cell centered quantities and implicit and/or explicit time marching has been developed for computing hypersonic laminar viscous flows using adaptive unstructured triangular grids. A structured grid of quadrilaterals is laid out near the body surface. For inviscid flows the method is stable at Courant numbers of over 100,000. A first order basic scheme and a higher order flux corrected transport (FCT) scheme have been implemented. This technique has been applied to the problem of predicting type III and IV shock wave interactions on a cylinder, with a view of simulating the pressure and heating rate augmentation caused by an impinging shock on the leading edge of a cowl lip of an engine inlet. The predictions of wall pressure and heating rates compare very well with experimental data. The flow features are very distinctly captured with a sequence of adaptively generated grids. The adaptive mesh generator and the upwind Navier-Stokes solver are combined in a set of programs called LARCNESS, an acronym for Langley Adaptive Remeshing Code and Navier-Stokes Solver.

  8. A point implicit unstructured grid solver for the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thareja, Rajiv R.; Stewart, James R.; Hassan, Obey; Morgan, Ken; Peraire, Jaime

    1988-01-01

    An upwind finite element technique that uses cell centered quantities and implicit and/or explicit time marching has been developed for computing hypersonic laminar viscous flows using adaptive unstructured triangular grids. A structured grid of quadrilaterals is laid out near the body surface. For inviscid flows the method is stable at Courant numbers of over 100,000. A first order basic scheme and a higher order flux corrected transport (FCT) scheme have been implemented. This technique has been applied to the problem of predicting type III and IV shock wave interactions on a cylinder, with a view of simulating the pressure and heating rate augmentation caused by an impinging shock on the leading edge of a cowl lip of an engine inlet. The predictions of wall pressure and heating rates compare very well with experimental data. The flow features are very distinctly captured with a sequence of adaptively generated grids. The adaptive mesh generator and the upwind Navier-Stokes solver are combined in a set of programs called LARCNESS, an acronym for Langley Adaptive Remeshing Code and Navier-Stokes Solver.

  9. Nonlinear Aeroelastic Analysis Using a Time-Accurate Navier-Stokes Equations Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuruvila, Geojoe; Bartels, Robert E.; Hong, Moeljo S.; Bhatia, G.

    2007-01-01

    A method to simulate limit cycle oscillation (LCO) due to control surface freeplay using a modified CFL3D, a time-accurate Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis code with structural modeling capability, is presented. This approach can be used to analyze aeroelastic response of aircraft with structural behavior characterized by nonlinearity in the force verses displacement curve. A limited validation of the method, using very low Mach number experimental data for a three-degrees-of-freedom (pitch/plunge/flap deflection) airfoil model with flap freeplay, is also presented.

  10. Statistical properties of the 3-D poor man's Navier--Stokes equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonough, J. M.

    2007-11-01

    The poor man's Navier--Stokes (PMNS) equation is an efficiently-evaluated discrete dynamical system (DDS) derived directly from the Navier--Stokes (N.--S.) equations via a Galerkin procedure. The 2-D version of this DDS was introduced by McDonough and Huang, Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids (2004), where it was thoroughly analyzed for values of bifurcation parameters that might be associated with isotropic turbulence. Yang et al., AIAA J. (2003), demonstrated that the PMNS equation could be employed to accurately fit experimental data. These results suggest possible use of the PMNS equation as part of a subgrid-scale (SGS) model for LES formulated to capture effects of interactions between turbulence and other physics on unresolved scales. Here, we consider statistical properties of the 3-D PMNS equation to ascertain whether they are sufficiently close to those of physical N.--S. flows to warrant development of such models. In particular, we will present auto and cross correlation of velocity components, probability density functions, flatness and skewness of velocity derivatives, and scaling of longitudinal velocity structure functions of orders two, three, four and six. It will be demonstrated that PMNS equation statistics are generally in accord with those of the full N.--S. equations, and as a consequence this DDS could lead to very efficient LES SGS models able to replicate small-scale turbulence interactions with other physics.

  11. Least-squares finite element solution of 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, Tsung-Liang; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1992-01-01

    Although significant progress has been made in the finite element solution of incompressible viscous flow problems. Development of more efficient methods is still needed before large-scale computation of 3D problems becomes feasible. This paper presents such a development. The most popular finite element method for the solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is the classic Galerkin mixed method based on the velocity-pressure formulation. The mixed method requires the use of different elements to interpolate the velocity and the pressure in order to satisfy the Ladyzhenskaya-Babuska-Brezzi (LBB) condition for the existence of the solution. On the other hand, due to the lack of symmetry and positive definiteness of the linear equations arising from the mixed method, iterative methods for the solution of linear systems have been hard to come by. Therefore, direct Gaussian elimination has been considered the only viable method for solving the systems. But, for three-dimensional problems, the computer resources required by a direct method become prohibitively large. In order to overcome these difficulties, a least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) has been developed. This method is based on the first-order velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation. In this paper the LSFEM is extended for the solution of three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations written in the following first-order quasi-linear velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation.

  12. Oasis: A high-level/high-performance open source Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Mikael; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian

    2015-03-01

    Oasis is a high-level/high-performance finite element Navier-Stokes solver written from scratch in Python using building blocks from the FEniCS project (fenicsproject.org). The solver is unstructured and targets large-scale applications in complex geometries on massively parallel clusters. Oasis utilizes MPI and interfaces, through FEniCS, to the linear algebra backend PETSc. Oasis advocates a high-level, programmable user interface through the creation of highly flexible Python modules for new problems. Through the high-level Python interface the user is placed in complete control of every aspect of the solver. A version of the solver, that is using piecewise linear elements for both velocity and pressure, is shown to reproduce very well the classical, spectral, turbulent channel simulations of Moser et al. (1999). The computational speed is strongly dominated by the iterative solvers provided by the linear algebra backend, which is arguably the best performance any similar implicit solver using PETSc may hope for. Higher order accuracy is also demonstrated and new solvers may be easily added within the same framework.

  13. The 3-D Navier-Stokes analysis of crossing, glancing shocks/turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    Three dimensional viscous flow analysis is performed for a configuration where two crossing and glancing shocks interact with a turbulent boundary layer. A time marching 3-D full Navier-Stokes code, called PARC3D, is used to compute the flow field, and the solution is compared to the experimental data obtained at the NASA Lewis Research Center's 1 x 1 ft supersonic wind tunnel facility. The study is carried out as part of the continuing code assessment program in support of the generic hypersonic research at NASA Lewis. Detailed comparisons of static pressure fields and oil flow patterns are made with the corresponding solution on the wall containing the shock/boundary layer interaction in an effort to validate the code for hypersonic inlet applications.

  14. A least-squares finite element method for 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Hou, Lin-Jun; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations, and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system. An additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. The flow in a half of 3D cubic cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 52 x 25 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Gortler-like vortices are observed at Re = 1,000.

  15. Turbine Internal and Film Cooling Modeling For 3D Navier-Stokes Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth; Garg Vijay; Ameri, Ali

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this research project is to make use of NASA Glenn on-site computational facilities in order to develop, validate and apply aerodynamic, heat transfer, and turbine cooling models for use in advanced 3D Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes such as the Glenn-" code. Specific areas of effort include: Application of the Glenn-HT code to specific configurations made available under Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC), and Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) projects. Validating the use of a multi-block code for the time accurate computation of the detailed flow and heat transfer of cooled turbine airfoils. The goal of the current research is to improve the predictive ability of the Glenn-HT code. This will enable one to design more efficient turbine components for both aviation and power generation. The models will be tested against specific configurations provided by NASA Glenn.

  16. A least-squares finite element method for 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Hou, Lin-Jun; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations, and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system. An additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. The flow in a half of 3D cubic cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 52 x 25 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Gortler-like vortices are observed at Re = 1,000.

  17. A three dimensional multigrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver for unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional unstructured mesh Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes solver is described. Turbulence is simulated using a single field-equation model. Computational overheads are minimized through the use of a single edge-based data-structure, and efficient multigrid solution technique, and the use of multi-tasking on shared memory multi-processors. The accuracy and efficiency of the code are evaluated by computing two-dimensional flows in three dimensions and comparing with results from a previously validated two-dimensional code which employs the same solution algorithm. The feasibility of computing three-dimensional flows on grids of several million points in less than two hours of wall clock time is demonstrated.

  18. Discrete sensitivity derivatives of the Navier-Stokes equations with a parallel Krylov solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Taylor, Arthur C., III

    1994-01-01

    This paper solves an 'incremental' form of the sensitivity equations derived by differentiating the discretized thin-layer Navier Stokes equations with respect to certain design variables of interest. The equations are solved with a parallel, preconditioned Generalized Minimal RESidual (GMRES) solver on a distributed-memory architecture. The 'serial' sensitivity analysis code is parallelized by using the Single Program Multiple Data (SPMD) programming model, domain decomposition techniques, and message-passing tools. Sensitivity derivatives are computed for low and high Reynolds number flows over a NACA 1406 airfoil on a 32-processor Intel Hypercube, and found to be identical to those computed on a single-processor Cray Y-MP. It is estimated that the parallel sensitivity analysis code has to be run on 40-50 processors of the Intel Hypercube in order to match the single-processor processing time of a Cray Y-MP.

  19. Finite-volume Euler and Navier-Stokes solvers for three-dimensional and conical vortex flows over delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Chuang, Andrew H.; Shifflette, James M.

    1987-01-01

    A unified central-difference finite-volume Euler and Navier-Stokes solver with four-stage Runge-Kutta time stepping is presented. The computer code developed for this purpose is capable of solving the standard set and nonstandard sets (zero-total-pressure loss) of Euler equations and the thin-layer and full Navier-Stokes equations. Applications are presented for conical supersonic flows with weak shocks using the standard and nonstandard sets of Euler equations, and the thin-layer and full Navier-Stokes equations for sharp and round-edged delta wings. Applications are also presented for three-dimensional transonic and subsonic flows using the standard set of Euler equations for sharp-edged delta wings. The computational results of the different sets of equations are compared with each other and with the experimental results and conclusions on the validity of these sets to these applications, are presented.

  20. Numerical simulation of jet aerodynamics using the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code PAB3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents a unified method for subsonic and supersonic jet analysis using the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code PAB3D. The Navier-Stokes code was used to obtain solutions for axisymmetric jets with on-design operating conditions at Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 3.0, supersonic jets containing weak shocks and Mach disks, and supersonic jets with nonaxisymmetric nozzle exit geometries. This report discusses computational methods, code implementation, computed results, and comparisons with available experimental data. Very good agreement is shown between the numerical solutions and available experimental data over a wide range of operating conditions. The Navier-Stokes method using the standard Jones-Launder two-equation kappa-epsilon turbulence model can accurately predict jet flow, and such predictions are made without any modification to the published constants for the turbulence model.

  1. Preconditioned implicit solvers for the Navier-Stokes equations on distributed-memory machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Liou, Meng-Sing; Dyson, Rodger W.

    1994-01-01

    The GMRES method is parallelized, and combined with local preconditioning to construct an implicit parallel solver to obtain steady-state solutions for the Navier-Stokes equations of fluid flow on distributed-memory machines. The new implicit parallel solver is designed to preserve the convergence rate of the equivalent 'serial' solver. A static domain-decomposition is used to partition the computational domain amongst the available processing nodes of the parallel machine. The SPMD (Single-Program Multiple-Data) programming model is combined with message-passing tools to develop the parallel code on a 32-node Intel Hypercube and a 512-node Intel Delta machine. The implicit parallel solver is validated for internal and external flow problems, and is found to compare identically with flow solutions obtained on a Cray Y-MP/8. A peak computational speed of 2300 MFlops/sec has been achieved on 512 nodes of the Intel Delta machine,k for a problem size of 1024 K equations (256 K grid points).

  2. On a particular analytical solution to the 3D Navier-Stokes equations and its peculiarity for high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitch, Alexander S.

    2015-09-01

    A special class of axially symmetric nonstationary flows of incompressible viscous fluids is examined. For it, the 3D Navier-Stokes equations are reduced to a nonlinear partial differential equation of the third order and a linear partial differential equation of the second order. These equations are studied and their particular analytical solutions are found. The obtained particular solution to the Navier-Stokes equations could be used to describe some types of turbulent flows of viscous fluids in the case of high Reynolds numbers.

  3. A high-order gas-kinetic Navier-Stokes flow solver

    SciTech Connect

    Li Qibing; Xu Kun; Fu Song

    2010-09-20

    The foundation for the development of modern compressible flow solver is based on the Riemann solution of the inviscid Euler equations. The high-order schemes are basically related to high-order spatial interpolation or reconstruction. In order to overcome the low-order wave interaction mechanism due to the Riemann solution, the temporal accuracy of the scheme can be improved through the Runge-Kutta method, where the dynamic deficiencies in the first-order Riemann solution is alleviated through the sub-step spatial reconstruction in the Runge-Kutta process. The close coupling between the spatial and temporal evolution in the original nonlinear governing equations seems weakened due to its spatial and temporal decoupling. Many recently developed high-order methods require a Navier-Stokes flux function under piece-wise discontinuous high-order initial reconstruction. However, the piece-wise discontinuous initial data and the hyperbolic-parabolic nature of the Navier-Stokes equations seem inconsistent mathematically, such as the divergence of the viscous and heat conducting terms due to initial discontinuity. In this paper, based on the Boltzmann equation, we are going to present a time-dependent flux function from a high-order discontinuous reconstruction. The theoretical basis for such an approach is due to the fact that the Boltzmann equation has no specific requirement on the smoothness of the initial data and the kinetic equation has the mechanism to construct a dissipative wave structure starting from an initially discontinuous flow condition on a time scale being larger than the particle collision time. The current high-order flux evaluation method is an extension of the second-order gas-kinetic BGK scheme for the Navier-Stokes equations (BGK-NS). The novelty for the easy extension from a second-order to a higher order is due to the simple particle transport and collision mechanism on the microscopic level. This paper will present a hierarchy to construct such

  4. Software design of a multi-block, multi-zone, Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogels, M. E. S.

    A multi-block flow solver technique broadens the applicability of structured grid approaches to stationary flows about complex geometries. For instance, the compuational flow domain about a wing-section with extended flap and slat cannot be covered by a single structured grid. It can, however, be subdivided into a number of blocks (topologically a cube), and per block a structured grid can be generated. In a multi-zone flow solver, the flow domain is subdivided into zones in which models (and sometimes algorithms) can be chosen. Thus, one has the option to trade off accuracy versus efficiency by choosing the Euler equations in the far field zones and the Navier-Stokes equations in the near-geometry zones. In the present multi-block, multi-zone flow solver (SOLEQS) both techniques have been combined: a zone is the union of one or more blocks. In addition, in a zone not only a model can be chosen, but also a numerical integration scheme.

  5. A fast Poisson solver for unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on the half-staggered grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, G. H.; Huang, L. C.; Simon, H.; Tang, W. -P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, a fast Poisson solver for unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with finite difference methods on the non-uniform, half-staggered grid is presented. To achieve this, new algorithms for diagonalizing a semi-definite pair are developed. Our fast solver can also be extended to the three dimensional case. The motivation and related issues in using this second kind of staggered grid are also discussed. Numerical testing has indicated the effectiveness of this algorithm.

  6. Preconditioning for modal discontinuous Galerkin methods for unsteady 3D Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birken, Philipp; Gassner, Gregor; Haas, Mark; Munz, Claus-Dieter

    2013-05-01

    We compare different block preconditioners in the context of parallel time adaptive higher order implicit time integration using Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) solvers for discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretizations of the three dimensional time dependent Navier-Stokes equations. A special emphasis of this work is the performance for a relative high number of processors, i.e. with a low number of elements on the processor. For high order DG discretizations, a particular problem that needs to be addressed is the size of the blocks in the Jacobian. Thus, we propose a new class of preconditioners that exploits the hierarchy of modal basis functions and introduces a flexible order of the off-diagonal Jacobian blocks. While the standard preconditioners 'block Jacobi' (no off-blocks) and full symmetric Gauss-Seidel (full off-blocks) are included as special cases, the reduction of the off-block order results in the new scheme ROBO-SGS. This allows us to investigate the impact of the preconditioner's sparsity pattern with respect to the computational performance. Since the number of iterations is not well suited to judge the efficiency of a preconditioner, we additionally consider CPU time for the comparisons. We found that both block Jacobi and ROBO-SGS have good overall performance and good strong parallel scaling behavior.

  7. Extension of the ADjoint Approach to a Laminar Navier-Stokes Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paige, Cody

    The use of adjoint methods is common in computational fluid dynamics to reduce the cost of the sensitivity analysis in an optimization cycle. The forward mode ADjoint is a combination of an adjoint sensitivity analysis method with a forward mode automatic differentiation (AD) and is a modification of the reverse mode ADjoint method proposed by Mader et al.[1]. A colouring acceleration technique is presented to reduce the computational cost increase associated with forward mode AD. The forward mode AD facilitates the implementation of the laminar Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The forward mode ADjoint method is applied to a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics solver. The resulting Euler and viscous ADjoint sensitivities are compared to the reverse mode Euler ADjoint derivatives and a complex-step method to demonstrate the reduced computational cost and accuracy. Both comparisons demonstrate the benefits of the colouring method and the practicality of using a forward mode AD. [1] Mader, C.A., Martins, J.R.R.A., Alonso, J.J., and van der Weide, E. (2008) ADjoint: An approach for the rapid development of discrete adjoint solvers. AIAA Journal, 46(4):863-873. doi:10.2514/1.29123.

  8. Implementation of algebraic stress models in a general 3-D Navier-Stokes method (PAB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional multiblock Navier-Stokes code, PAB3D, which was developed for propulsion integration and general aerodynamic analysis, has been used extensively by NASA Langley and other organizations to perform both internal (exhaust) and external flow analysis of complex aircraft configurations. This code was designed to solve the simplified Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A two-equation k-epsilon turbulence model has been used with considerable success, especially for attached flows. Accurate predicting of transonic shock wave location and pressure recovery in separated flow regions has been more difficult. Two algebraic Reynolds stress models (ASM) have been recently implemented in the code that greatly improved the code's ability to predict these difficult flow conditions. Good agreement with Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) for a subsonic flat plate was achieved with ASM's developed by Shih, Zhu, and Lumley and Gatski and Speziale. Good predictions were also achieved at subsonic and transonic Mach numbers for shock location and trailing edge boattail pressure recovery on a single-engine afterbody/nozzle model.

  9. a Non-Linear Adapted Tri-Tree Multigrid Solver for Finite Element Formulation of the Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wille, S. Ø.

    1996-06-01

    An iterative adaptive equation multigrid solver for solving the implicit Navier-Stokes equations simultaneously with tri-tree grid generation is developed. The tri-tree grid generator builds a hierarchical grid structur e which is mapped to a finite element grid at each hierarchical level. For each hierarchical finite element multigrid the Navier-Stokes equations are solved approximately. The solution at each level is projected onto the next finer grid and used as a start vector for the iterative equation solver at the finer level. When the finest grid is reached, the equation solver is iterated until a tolerated solution is reached. The iterative multigrid equation solver is preconditioned by incomplete LU factorization with coupled node fill-in.The non-linear Navier-Stokes equations are linearized by both the Newton method and grid adaption. The efficiency and behaviour of the present adaptive method are compared with those of the previously developed iterative equation solver which is preconditioned by incomplete LU factorization with coupled node fill-in.

  10. Global Solutions to the 3-D Incompressible Anisotropic Navier-Stokes System in the Critical Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paicu, Marius; Zhang, Ping

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we consider the global wellposedness of the 3-D incompressible anisotropic Navier-Stokes equations with initial data in the critical Besov-Sobolev type spaces {mathcal{B}} and {mathcal{B}^{-frac12,frac12}_4} (see Definitions 1.1 and 1.2 below). In particular, we proved that there exists a positive constant C such that ( ANS ν ) has a unique global solution with initial data {u_0 = (u_0^h, u_0^3)} which satisfies {\\|u_0^h\\|_{mathcal{B}} expbigl(C/ν^4 \\|u_0^3\\|_{mathcal{B}}^4bigr) ≤ c_0ν} or {\\|u_0^h\\|_{mathcal{B}^{-frac12,frac12}4} exp bigl(C/ν^4 \\|u_0^3\\|_{mathcal{B}^{-frac12,frac12}4}^4bigr)≤ c_0ν} for some c 0 sufficiently small. To overcome the difficulty that Gronwall's inequality can not be applied in the framework of Chemin-Lerner type spaces, {widetilde{L^p_t}(mathcal{B})}, we introduced here sort of weighted Chemin-Lerner type spaces, {widetilde{L^2_{t, f}}(mathcal{B})} for some apropriate L 1 function f( t).

  11. Quasi-3D Navier-Stokes model for a rotating airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.Z.; Soerensen, J.N.

    1999-04-10

    The design of blade shapes for wind turbines is typically based on employing the blade-element momentum-theory (BEM) with lift and drag forces determined from 2D measurements. The results obtained are reasonable in the vicinity of the design point, but in stalled conditions the BEM is known to underpredict the forces acting on the blades. Here, a quasi-3D model of the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations in a rotating frame of reference has been developed. The equations governing the flow past a rotating blade are approximated using an order of magnitude analysis on the spanwise derivatives. The model takes into account rotational effects and spanwise outflow at computing expenses in the order of what is typical for similar 2D calculations. Results are presented for both laminar and turbulent flows past blades in pure rotation. In the turbulent case the influence of small-scale turbulence is modelled by the one-equation Baldwin-Barth turbulence model. The computations demonstrate that the main influence of rotation is to increase the maximum lift.

  12. Aerodynamic Design Exploration for Reusable Launch Vehicle Using Genetic Algorithm with Navier Stokes Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsukawa, Tomoaki; Nonomura, Taku; Oyama, Akira; Fujii, Kozo

    In this study, aerodynamic design exploration for reusable launch vehicle (RLV) is conducted using genetic algorithm with Navier-Stokes solver to understand the aerodynamic characteristics for various body configurations and find design information such as tradeoff information among objectives. The multi-objective aerodynamic design optimization for minimizing zero-lift drag at supersonic condition, maximizing maximum lift-to-drag ratio (L/D) at subsonic condition, maximizing maximum L/D at supersonic condition, and maximizing volume of shape is conducted for bi-conical shape RLV based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The total number of evaluation in multi-objective optimization is 400, and it is necessary for evaluating one body configuration to conduct 8 CFD runs. In total, 3200 CFD runs are conducted. The analysis of Pareto-optimal solutions shows that there are various trade-off relations among objectives clearly, and the analysis of flow fields shows that the shape for the minimum drag configuration is almost the same as that of the shape for the maximum L/D configuration at supersonic condition. The shape for the maximum L/D at subsonic condition obtains additional lift at the kink compared with the minimum drag configuration. It leads to enhancement of L/D.

  13. Application of an Unstructured Grid Navier-Stokes Solver to a Generic Helicopter Boby: Comparison of Unstructured Grid Results with Structured Grid Results and Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.

    1999-01-01

    An unstructured-grid Navier-Stokes solver was used to predict the surface pressure distribution, the off-body flow field, the surface flow pattern, and integrated lift and drag coefficients on the ROBIN configuration (a generic helicopter) without a rotor at four angles of attack. The results are compared to those predicted by two structured- grid Navier-Stokes solvers and to experimental surface pressure distributions. The surface pressure distributions from the unstructured-grid Navier-Stokes solver are in good agreement with the results from the structured-grid Navier-Stokes solvers. Agreement with the experimental pressure coefficients is good over the forward portion of the body. However, agreement is poor on the lower portion of the mid-section of the body. Comparison of the predicted surface flow patterns showed similar regions of separated flow. Predicted lift and drag coefficients were in fair agreement with each other.

  14. Universal Bounds for the Littlewood-Paley First-Order Moments of the 3D Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Felix; Ramos, Fabio

    2010-12-01

    We derive upper bounds for the infinite-time and space average of the L 1-norm of the Littlewood-Paley decomposition of weak solutions of the 3 D periodic Navier-Stokes equations. The result suggests that the Kolmogorov characteristic velocity scaling, {mathbf{U}_kappa˜ɛ^{1/3} kappa^{-1/3}} , holds as an upper bound for a region of wavenumbers near the dissipative cutoff.

  15. On the use of a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver for rocket engine pump impeller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Prueger, George H.; Chan, Daniel C.; Eastland, Anthony H.

    1992-01-01

    A 3D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes Solver and a Fast Grid Generator (FGG), developed specially for centrifugal impeller design, were incorporated into the pump impeller design process. The impeller performance from the CFD analysis was compared to one-dimensional prediction. Both analyses showed good agreement of the impeller hydraulic efficiency, 94.5 percent, but with an 8 percent discrepancy of Euler head prediction. The impeller blade angle, discharge hub to shroud width, axial length and blade stacking were systematically changed to achieve an optimum impeller design. Impeller overall efficiency, loss distribution, hub-to-tip flow angle distortion and blade-to-blade flow angle change are among those criteria used to evaluate impeller performance. Two grid sizes, one with 10 K grid points and one with 80 K grid points were used to evaluate grid dependency issues. The effects of grid resolution on the accuracy and turnaround time are discussed. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that CFD can be effectively used for design and optimization of rocket engine pump components.

  16. A numerical method for solving the 3D unsteady incompressible Navier Stokes equations in curvilinear domains with complex immersed boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2007-08-01

    A novel numerical method is developed that integrates boundary-conforming grids with a sharp interface, immersed boundary methodology. The method is intended for simulating internal flows containing complex, moving immersed boundaries such as those encountered in several cardiovascular applications. The background domain (e.g. the empty aorta) is discretized efficiently with a curvilinear boundary-fitted mesh while the complex moving immersed boundary (say a prosthetic heart valve) is treated with the sharp-interface, hybrid Cartesian/immersed-boundary approach of Gilmanov and Sotiropoulos [A. Gilmanov, F. Sotiropoulos, A hybrid cartesian/immersed boundary method for simulating flows with 3d, geometrically complex, moving bodies, Journal of Computational Physics 207 (2005) 457-492.]. To facilitate the implementation of this novel modeling paradigm in complex flow simulations, an accurate and efficient numerical method is developed for solving the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The method employs a novel, fully-curvilinear staggered grid discretization approach, which does not require either the explicit evaluation of the Christoffel symbols or the discretization of all three momentum equations at cell interfaces as done in previous formulations. The equations are integrated in time using an efficient, second-order accurate fractional step methodology coupled with a Jacobian-free, Newton-Krylov solver for the momentum equations and a GMRES solver enhanced with multigrid as preconditioner for the Poisson equation. Several numerical experiments are carried out on fine computational meshes to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method for standard benchmark problems as well as for unsteady, pulsatile flow through a curved, pipe bend. To demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate flows with complex, moving immersed boundaries we apply it to calculate pulsatile, physiological flow

  17. Incompressible Navier-Stokes Solvers in Primative Variables and their Applications to Steady and Unsteady Flow Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Kwak, Dochan; Rogers, Stuart E.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress made in incompressible Navier-Stokes simulation procedures and their application to problems of engineering interest. Discussions are focused on the methods designed for complex geometry applications in three dimensions, and thus are limited to primitive variable formulation. A summary of efforts in flow solver development is given followed by numerical studies of a few example problems of current interest. Both steady and unsteady solution algorithms and their salient features are discussed. Solvers discussed here are based on a structured-grid approach using either a finite -difference or a finite-volume frame work. As a grand-challenge application of these solvers, an unsteady turbopump flow simulation procedure has been developed which utilizes high performance computing platforms. In the paper, the progress toward the complete simulation capability of the turbo-pump for a liquid rocket engine is reported. The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbo-pump is used as a test case for evaluation of two parallel computing algorithms that have been implemented in the INS3D code. The relative motion of the grid systems for the rotorstator interaction was obtained using overact grid techniques. Unsteady computations for the SSME turbo-pump, which contains 114 zones with 34.5 million grid points, are carried out on SCSI Origin 3000 systems at NASA Ames Research Center. The same procedure has been extended to the development of NASA-DeBakey Ventricular Assist Device (VAD) that is based on an axial blood pump. Computational, and clinical analysis of this device are presented.

  18. Application of Navier-Stokes code PAB3D with kappa-epsilon turbulence model to attached and separated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Lakshmanan, B.; Carlson, John R.

    1995-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver was used to determine how accurately computations can predict local and average skin friction coefficients for attached and separated flows for simple experimental geometries. Algebraic and transport equation closures were used to model turbulence. To simulate anisotropic turbulence, the standard two-equation turbulence model was modified by adding nonlinear terms. The effects of both grid density and the turbulence model on the computed flow fields were also investigated and compared with available experimental data for subsonic and supersonic free-stream conditions.

  19. Frequency Localized Regularity Criteria for the 3D Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Z.; Grujić, Z.

    2017-04-01

    Two regularity criteria are established to highlight which Littlewood-Paley frequencies play an essential role in possible singularity formation in a Leray-Hopf weak solution to the Navier-Stokes equations in three spatial dimensions. One of these is a frequency localized refinement of known Ladyzhenskaya-Prodi-Serrin-type regularity criteria restricted to a finite window of frequencies, the lower bound of which diverges to {+∞} as t approaches an initial singular time.

  20. An integral equation approach to smooth 3D Navier-Stokes solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costin, O.; Luo, G.; Tanveer, S.

    2008-12-01

    We summarize a recently developed integral equation (IE) approach to tackling the long-time existence problem for smooth solution v(x, t) to the 3D Navier-Stokes (NS) equation in the context of a periodic box problem with smooth time independent forcing and initial condition v0. Using an inverse-Laplace transform of {\\skew5\\hat v} (k, t) - {\\skew5\\hat v}_0 in 1/t, we arrive at an IE for {\\skew5\\hat U} (k, p) , where p is inverse-Laplace dual to 1/t and k is the Fourier variable dual to x. The advantage of this formulation is that the solution {\\skew5\\hat U} to the IE is known to exist a priori for p \\in \\mathbb{R}^+ and the solution is integrable and exponentially bounded at ∞. Global existence of NS solution in this formulation is reduced to an asymptotics question. If \\parallel\\!{\\skew5\\hat U} (\\cdot, p)\\!\\parallel_{{l^{1} (\\mathbb{Z}^3)}} has subexponential bounds as p→∞, then global existence to NS follows. Moreover, if f=0, then the converse is also true in the following sense: if NS has global solution, then there exists n>=1 for which the inverse-Laplace transform of {\\skew5\\hat v} (k, t) - {\\skew5\\hat v}_0 in 1/tn necessarily decays as q→∞, where q is the inverse-Laplace dual to 1/tn. We also present refined estimates of the exponential growth when the solution {\\skew5\\hat U} is known on a finite interval [0, p0]. We also show that for analytic v[0] and f, with finitely many nonzero Fourier-coefficients, the series for {\\skew5\\hat U} (k, p) in powers of p has a radius of convergence independent of initial condition and forcing; indeed the radius gets bigger for smaller viscosity. We also show that the IE can be solved numerically with controlled errors. Preliminary numerical calculations for Kida (1985 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 54 2132) initial conditions, though far from being optimized, and performed on a modest interval in the accelerated variable q show decay in q.

  1. Global classical solutions to the 3D isentropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations in a bounded domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haibo; Zhao, Junning

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we study the global existence for classical solutions to the 3D isentropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations in a cuboid domain. Compared to the Cauchy problem studied in Hoff (1995 J. Differ. Equ. 120 215-54), Hoff (2005 J. Math. Fluid Mech. 7 315-38), Huang et al (2012 Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 65 549-85), some new thoughts are applied to obtain upper bounds for density. Precisely, through piecewise estimation and some time-depending a priori estimates, we establish time-uniform upper bounds for density under the assumption that the initial energy is small. The initial vacuum is allowed.

  2. Global well-posedness for the 3D incompressible inhomogeneous Navier-Stokes equations and MHD equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiaoping; Yin, Zhaoyang

    2017-02-01

    The present paper is dedicated to the global well-posedness for the 3D inhomogeneous incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, in critical Besov spaces without smallness assumption on the variation of the density. We aim at extending the work by Abidi, Gui and Zhang (2012) [2], and (2013) [3] to a lower regularity index about the initial velocity. The key to that improvement is a new a priori estimate for an elliptic equation with nonconstant coefficients in Besov spaces which have the same degree as L2 in R3. Finally, we also generalize our well-posedness result to the inhomogeneous incompressible MHD equations.

  3. On the Global Regularity of a Helical-Decimated Version of the 3D Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biferale, Luca; Titi, Edriss S.

    2013-06-01

    We study the global regularity, for all time and all initial data in H 1/2, of a recently introduced decimated version of the incompressible 3D Navier-Stokes (dNS) equations. The model is based on a projection of the dynamical evolution of Navier-Stokes (NS) equations into the subspace where helicity (the L 2-scalar product of velocity and vorticity) is sign-definite. The presence of a second (beside energy) sign-definite inviscid conserved quadratic quantity, which is equivalent to the H 1/2-Sobolev norm, allows us to demonstrate global existence and uniqueness, of space-periodic solutions, together with continuity with respect to the initial conditions, for this decimated 3D model. This is achieved thanks to the establishment of two new estimates, for this 3D model, which show that the H 1/2 and the time average of the square of the H 3/2 norms of the velocity field remain finite. Such two additional bounds are known, in the spirit of the work of H. Fujita and T. Kato (Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 16:269-315, 1964; Rend. Semin. Mat. Univ. Padova 32:243-260, 1962), to be sufficient for showing well-posedness for the 3D NS equations. Furthermore, they are directly linked to the helicity evolution for the dNS model, and therefore with a clear physical meaning and consequences.

  4. 3-D Navier-Stokes Analysis of Blade Root Aerodynamics for a Tiltrotor Aircraft In Cruise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romander, Ethan

    2006-01-01

    The blade root area of a tiltrotor aircraft's rotor is constrained by a great many factors, not the least of which is aerodynamic performance in cruise. For this study, Navier-Stokes CFD techniques are used to study the aerodynamic performance in cruise of a rotor design as a function of airfoil thickness along the blade and spinner shape. Reducing airfoil thickness along the entire blade will be shown to have the greatest effect followed by smaller but still significant improvements achieved by reducing the thickness of root airfoils only. Furthermore, altering the shape of the spinner will be illustrated as a tool to tune the aerodynamic performance very near the blade root.

  5. Complex Singular Solutions of the 3-d Navier-Stokes Equations and Related Real Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrighini, Carlo; Li, Dong; Sinai, Yakov G.

    2017-02-01

    By applying methods of statistical physics Li and Sinai (J Eur Math Soc 10:267-313, 2008) proved that there are complex solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations in the whole space R3 which blow up at a finite time. We present a review of the results obtained so far, by theoretical work and computer simulations, for the singular complex solutions, and compare with the behavior of related real solutions. We also discuss the possible application of the techniques introduced in (J Eur Math Soc 10:267-313, 2008) to the study of the real ones.

  6. The 3-D Euler and Navier-Stokes calculations for aircraft components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Wedan, Bruce W.; Turkel, Eli

    1989-01-01

    An explicit multistage Runge-Kutta type of time-stepping scheme is used for solving transonic flow past a transport type wing/fuselage configuration. Solutions for both Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are obtained for quantitative assessment of boundary layer interaction effects. The viscous solutions are obtained on both a medium resolution grid of approximately 270,000 points and a find grid of 460,000 points to assess the effects of grid density on the solution. Computed pressure distributions are compared with the experimental data.

  7. Complex Singular Solutions of the 3-d Navier-Stokes Equations and Related Real Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrighini, Carlo; Li, Dong; Sinai, Yakov G.

    2017-04-01

    By applying methods of statistical physics Li and Sinai (J Eur Math Soc 10:267-313, 2008) proved that there are complex solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations in the whole space R3 which blow up at a finite time. We present a review of the results obtained so far, by theoretical work and computer simulations, for the singular complex solutions, and compare with the behavior of related real solutions. We also discuss the possible application of the techniques introduced in (J Eur Math Soc 10:267-313, 2008) to the study of the real ones.

  8. Development of an Aeroelastic Code Based on an Euler/Navier-Stokes Aerodynamic Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Srivastava, Rakesh; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Stefko, George L.; Janus, Mark J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an aeroelastic code (TURBO-AE) based on an Euler/Navier-Stokes unsteady aerodynamic analysis. A brief review of the relevant research in the area of propulsion aeroelasticity is presented. The paper briefly describes the original Euler/Navier-Stokes code (TURBO) and then details the development of the aeroelastic extensions. The aeroelastic formulation is described. The modeling of the dynamics of the blade using a modal approach is detailed, along with the grid deformation approach used to model the elastic deformation of the blade. The work-per-cycle approach used to evaluate aeroelastic stability is described. Representative results used to verify the code are presented. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the development thus far, and some plans for further development and validation of the TURBO-AE code.

  9. Verification of a low Mach variable-density Navier-Stokes solver for turbulent combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullyadzhanov, R.; Palkin, E.; Nićeno, B.; Vervisch, L.; Hanjalić, K.

    2016-10-01

    We describe the low Mach variable-density Navier-Stokes numerical iterative solution procedure implemented in the finite-volume unstructured T-FlowS code. As the test cases we use a number of analytic manufactured solutions and Rayleigh-Taylor instability problem from the literature for algorithm verification purposes. The tests show that the code is second-order accurate in agreement with the spatial discretization scheme. We outline the recent combustion ADEF model implemented in the program.

  10. On the Helicity in 3D-Periodic Navier-Stokes Equations II: The Statistical Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foias, Ciprian; Hoang, Luan; Nicolaenko, Basil

    2009-09-01

    We study the asymptotic behavior of the statistical solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations using the normalization map [9]. It is then applied to the study of mean energy, mean dissipation rate of energy, and mean helicity of the spatial periodic flows driven by potential body forces. The statistical distribution of the asymptotic Beltrami flows are also investigated. We connect our mathematical analysis with the empirical theory of decaying turbulence. With appropriate mathematically defined ensemble averages, the Kolmogorov universal features are shown to be transient in time. We provide an estimate for the time interval in which those features may still be present. Our collaborator and friend Basil Nicolaenko passed away in September of 2007, after this work was completed. Honoring his contribution and friendship, we dedicate this article to him.

  11. Implementation of wall boundary conditions for transpiration in F3D thin-layer Navier-Stokes code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, M.; Martin, F. W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical boundary conditions for mass injection/suction at the wall are incorporated in the thin-layer Navier-Stokes code, F3D. The accuracy of the boundary conditions and the code is assessed by a detailed comparison of the predictions of velocity distributions and skin-friction coefficients with exact similarity solutions for laminar flow over a flat plate with variable blowing/suction, and measurements for turbulent flow past a flat plate with uniform blowing. In laminar flow, F3D predictions for friction coefficient compare well with exact similarity solution with and without suction, but produces large errors at moderate-to-large values of blowing. A slight Mach number dependence of skin-friction coefficient due to blowing in turbulent flow is computed by F3D code. Predicted surface pressures for turbulent flow past an airfoil with mass injection are in qualitative agreement with measurements for a flat plate.

  12. Iterative solvers for Navier-Stokes equations: Experiments with turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Page, M.; Garon, A.

    1994-12-31

    In the framework of developing software for the prediction of flows in hydraulic turbine components, Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with {kappa}-{omega} two-equation turbulence model are discretized by finite element method. Since the resulting matrices are large, sparse and nonsymmetric, strategies based on CG-type iterative methods must be devised. A segregated solution strategy decouples the momentum equation, the {kappa} transport equation and the {omega} transport equation. These sets of equations must be solved while satisfying constraint equations. Experiments with orthogonal projection method are presented for the imposition of essential boundary conditions in a weak sense.

  13. A Navier-Stokes solver for high speed equilibrium flows and application to blunt bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Ramadas K.; Stewart, James R.; Thareja, Rajiv R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a finite element method for the solution of Navier-Stokes equations with the assumption of thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium. The method employs an upwind finite element technique with an implicit time-marching scheme for the solution, and uses an adaptively generated unstructured triangular mesh with several layers of quadrilateral elements near solid walls. The complexity associated with the assumption that the flow is in equilibrium is treated consistently, and the inviscid flux Jacobian matrices are derived. Several problems involving inviscid and viscous hypersonic flow past blunt are solved. Results are compared with other numerical results and experimental data, and generally good agreement is observed.

  14. A Navier-Stokes solver for high speed equilibrium flows and application to blunt bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Ramadas K.; Stewart, James R.; Thareja, Rajiv R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a finite element method for the solution of Navier-Stokes equations with the assumption of thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium. The method employs an upwind finite element technique with an implicit time-marching scheme for the solution, and uses an adaptively generated unstructured triangular mesh with several layers of quadrilateral elements near solid walls. The complexity associated with the assumption that the flow is in equilibrium is treated consistently, and the inviscid flux Jacobian matrices are derived. Several problems involving inviscid and viscous hypersonic flow past blunt are solved. Results are compared with other numerical results and experimental data, and generally good agreement is observed.

  15. On the stability analysis of approximate factorization methods for 3D Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Ibraheem, S. O.

    1993-01-01

    The convergence characteristics of various approximate factorizations for the 3D Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are examined using the von-Neumann stability analysis method. Three upwind-difference based factorizations and several central-difference based factorizations are considered for the Euler equations. In the upwind factorizations both the flux-vector splitting methods of Steger and Warming and van Leer are considered. Analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations is performed only on the Beam and Warming central-difference scheme. The range of CFL numbers over which each factorization is stable is presented for one-, two-, and three-dimensional flow. Also presented for each factorization is the CFL number at which the maximum eigenvalue is minimized, for all Fourier components, as well as for the high frequency range only. The latter is useful for predicting the effectiveness of multigrid procedures with these schemes as smoothers. Further, local mode analysis is performed to test the suitability of using a uniform flow field in the stability analysis. Some inconsistencies in the results from previous analyses are resolved.

  16. A unified multigrid solver for the Navier-Stokes equations on mixed element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1995-01-01

    A unified multigrid solution technique is presented for solving the Euler and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured meshes using mixed elements consisting of triangles and quadrilaterals in two dimensions, and of hexahedra, pyramids, prisms, and tetrahedra in three dimensions. While the use of mixed elements is by no means a novel idea, the contribution of the paper lies in the formulation of a complete solution technique which can handle structured grids, block structured grids, and unstructured grids of tetrahedra or mixed elements without any modification. This is achieved by discretizing the full Navier-Stokes equations on tetrahedral elements, and the thin layer version of these equations on other types of elements, while using a single edge-based data-structure to construct the discretization over all element types. An agglomeration multigrid algorithm, which naturally handles meshes of any types of elements, is employed to accelerate convergence. An automatic algorithm which reduces the complexity of a given triangular or tetrahedral mesh by merging candidate triangular or tetrahedral elements into quadrilateral or prismatic elements is also described. The gains in computational efficiency afforded by the use of non-simplicial meshes over fully tetrahedral meshes are demonstrated through several examples.

  17. Hypersonic blunt body wake computations using DSMC and Navier-Stokes solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Dogra, Virendra K.; Wilmoth, Richard G.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical results obtained with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and Navier-Stokes methods are presented for Mach 20 nitrogen flow about a 70-deg blunted cone. The flow conditions simulated are those that can be obtained in existing low-density hypersonic wind tunnels. Three sets of flow conditions are considered with freestream Knudsen numbers ranging from 0.03 to 0.001. The focus is on the wake structure: how does the wake structure change as a function of rarefaction, what are the afterbody levels of heating, and to what limits are continuum models realistic as rarefaction in the wake is progressively increased. Calculations are made with and without an afterbody sting. Results for the afterbody sting are emphasized in anticipation of an experimental study for the current flow conditions and model configuration. The Navier-Stokes calculations were made with and without slip boundary conditions. Comparisons of the results obtained with the two simulation methodologies are made for both flowfield structure and surface quantities.

  18. A simplified 3-D Navier-Stokes numerical model for landslide-tsunami: Application to the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horrillo, J.; Wood, A.; Kim, G.-B.; Parambath, A.

    2013-12-01

    A simplified three-dimensional Navier-Stokes (3-D NS) model for two fluids, water and landslide material (mudslide) is presented and validated with standard laboratory experiments. Dubbed TSUNAMI3D (Tsunami Solution Using Navier-Stokes Algorithm with Multiple Interfaces) is applied to a 3-D full-scale landslide scenario in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), i.e., the East-Breaks underwater landslide. The simplified 3-D NS model is conceived to be computationally efficient for tsunami calculations. The simplification is derived from the large aspect ratio of the tsunami waves (wavelength/wave-height) and the selected computational grid that has a smaller aspect ratio. This allows us to assume a horizontal fluid surface in each individual cell containing the interface (air-water, air-mudslide, and water-mudslide). The tracking of fluid interfaces is based on the Volume of Fluid method and the surfaces are obtained by integrating the fluxes of each individual fluid cell along the water column. In the momentum equation, the pressure term is split into two components, hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic. The internal friction is solved in a simplified manner by adjusting the viscosity coefficient. Despite the simplification to get an efficient solution, the numerical results agree fairly well with standard landslide laboratory experiments required by the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program for tsunami model validation. The numerical effect caused by using a sharp versus a diffusive water-mudslide interface for a full-scale landslide-tsunami scenario is also investigated. Observations from this experiment indicated that choosing a sharp or diffusive interface seems to have no remarkable effect at early stages of the tsunami wave propagation. Last, a large scale 3-D numerical simulation is carried out for the ancient GOM's East-Breaks landslide by using the simplified model to calculate the early stages of the tsunami wave propagation.

  19. An efficient transient Navier-Stokes solver on compact nonuniform space grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Jiten C.; Dass, Anoop K.; Nidhi, Nimisha

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we propose an implicit higher-order compact (HOC) finite difference scheme for solving the two-dimensional (2D) unsteady Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations on nonuniform space grids. This temporally second-order accurate scheme which requires no transformation from the physical to the computational plane is at least third-order accurate in space, which has been demonstrated with numerical experiments. It efficiently captures both transient and steady-state solutions of the N-S equations with Dirichlet as well as Neumann boundary conditions. The proposed scheme is likely to be very useful for the computation of transient viscous flows involving free and wall bounded shear layers which invariably contain spatial scale variation. Numerical results are presented and compared with analytical as well as established numerical data. Excellent comparison is obtained in all the cases.

  20. On the role of artificial viscosity in Navier-Stokes solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Dowell, Earl H.; Bliss, Donald B.

    1989-01-01

    A method is proposed to determine directly the amount of artificial viscosity needed for stability using an eigenvalue analysis for a finite difference representation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The stability and growth of small perturbations about a steady flow over the airfoils are analyzed for various amounts of artificial viscosity. The eigenvalues were determined for a small perturbation about a steady inviscid flow over a NACA 0012 airfoil at a Mach number of 0.8 and angle of attack of 0 degrees. The movement of the eigenvalue constellation with respect to the amount of artificial viscosity is studied. The stability boundries as a function of the amount of artificial viscosity from both the eigenvalue analysis and the time marching scheme are also presented. This procedure not only allows for determining the effect of varying amounts of artificial viscosity, but also for the effects of different forms of terms for artificial viscosity.

  1. Control-volume based Navier-Stokes equation solver valid at all flow velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.

    1989-01-01

    A control-volume based finite difference method to solve the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations is presented. A pressure correction equation valid at all flow velocities and a pressure staggered grid layout are used in the method. Example problems presented herein include: a developing laminar channel flow, developing laminar pipe flow, a lid-driven square cavity flow, a laminar flow through a 90-degree bent channel, a laminar polar cavity flow, and a turbulent supersonic flow over a compression ramp. A k-epsilon turbulence model supplemented with a near-wall turbulence model was used to solve the turbulent flow. It is shown that the method yields accurate computational results even when highly skewed, unequally spaced, curved grids are used. It is also shown that the method is strongly convergent for high Reynolds number flows.

  2. Validation Process for LEWICE by Use of a Navier-Stokes Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.; Porter, Christopher E.

    2017-01-01

    A research project is underway at NASA Glenn to produce computer software that can accurately predict ice growth under any meteorological conditions for any aircraft surface. This report will present results from the latest LEWICE release, version 3.5. This program differs from previous releases in its ability to model mixed phase and ice crystal conditions such as those encountered inside an engine. It also has expanded capability to use structured grids and a new capability to use results from unstructured grid flow solvers. A quantitative comparison of the results against a database of ice shapes that have been generated in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) has also been performed. This paper will extend the comparison of ice shapes between LEWICE 3.5 and experimental data from a previous paper. Comparisons of lift and drag are made between experimentally collected data from experimentally obtained ice shapes and simulated (CFD) data on simulated (LEWICE) ice shapes. Comparisons are also made between experimentally collected and simulated performance data on select experimental ice shapes to ensure the CFD solver, FUN3D, is valid within the flight regime. The results show that the predicted results are within the accuracy limits of the experimental data for the majority of cases.

  3. An analysis of booster tone noise using a time-linearized Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wukie, Nathan A.

    This thesis details a computational investigation of tone noise generated from a booster(low-pressure compressor) in a fan test rig. The computational study consisted of sets of time-linearized Navier-Stokes simulations in the booster region to investigate the blade-wake interactions that act as the primary noise-generating mechanism for the booster blade-passing frequency and harmonics. An acoustic test database existed with data at several operating points for the fan test rig that was used to compare against the predicted noise data from the computational study. It is shown that the computational methodology is able to capture trends in sound power for the 1st and 2nd booster tones along the operating line for the rig. It is also shown that the computational study underpredicts one of the tones at low power and is not able to capture a peak in the data at the Cutback condition. Further investigation of this type is warranted to quantify the source of discrepancies between the computational and experimental data as the reflected transmisison of sound off the fan through the bypass duct was not accounted for in this study.

  4. Role of artificial viscosity in Euler and Navier-Stokes solvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, Aparajit J.; Dowell, Earl H.; Bliss, Donald B.

    1991-01-01

    A method is proposed to determine directly the amount of artificial viscosity needed for stability using an eigenvalue analysis for a finite difference representation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The stability and growth of small perturbations about a steady flow over airfoils are analyzed for various amounts of artificial viscosity. The eigenvalues were determined for a small time-dependent perturbation about a steady inviscid flow over an NACA 0012 airfoil at a Mach number of 0.8 and angle of attack of 0 deg. The method has been applied to inviscid flows here, but as discussed is also applicable to viscous flows. The movement of the eigenvalue constellation with respect to the amount of artificial viscosity is studied. The stability boundaries as a function of the amount of artificial viscosity from both the eigenvalue analysis and the time-marching scheme are also presented. The eigenvalue procedure not only allows for determining the effect of varying amounts of artificial viscosity, but also for the effects of different forms of artificial viscosity.

  5. An O(Nm(sup 2)) Plane Solver for the Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. L.; Bonhaus, D. L.; Anderson, W. K.; Rumsey, C. L.; Biedron, R. T.

    1999-01-01

    A hierarchical multigrid algorithm for efficient steady solutions to the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations is developed and demonstrated. The algorithm applies multigrid in two ways: a Full Approximation Scheme (FAS) for a nonlinear residual equation and a Correction Scheme (CS) for a linearized defect correction implicit equation. Multigrid analyses which include the effect of boundary conditions in one direction are used to estimate the convergence rate of the algorithm for a model convection equation. Three alternating-line- implicit algorithms are compared in terms of efficiency. The analyses indicate that full multigrid efficiency is not attained in the general case; the number of cycles to attain convergence is dependent on the mesh density for high-frequency cross-stream variations. However, the dependence is reasonably small and fast convergence is eventually attained for any given frequency with either the FAS or the CS scheme alone. The paper summarizes numerical computations for which convergence has been attained to within truncation error in a few multigrid cycles for both inviscid and viscous ow simulations on highly stretched meshes.

  6. A multigrid solver for the vorticity-velocity Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, M.; Catalano, L. A.

    1991-06-01

    This paper provides a multigrid incremental line-Gauss-Seidel method for solving the steady Navier-Stokes equations in two and three dimensions expressed in terms of the vorticity and velocity variables. The system of parabolic and Poisson equations governing the scalar components of the vector unknowns is solved using centered finite differences on a nonstaggered grid. Numerical results for the two-dimensional driven cavity problem indicate that the spatial discretization of the equation defining the value of the vorticity on the boundary is extremely critical to obtaining accurate solutions. In fact, a standard one-sided three-point second-order-accurate approximation produces very inaccurate results for moderate-to-high values of the Reynolds number unless an exceedingly fine mesh is employed. On the other hand, a compact two-point second-order-accurate discretization is found to be always satisfactory and provides accurate solutions for Reynolds number up to 3200, a target impossible heretofore using this formulation and a nonstaggered grid.

  7. A multiblock/multizone code (PAB 3D-v2) for the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations: Preliminary applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    1990-01-01

    The development and applications of multiblock/multizone and adaptive grid methodologies for solving the three-dimensional simplified Navier-Stokes equations are described. Adaptive grid and multiblock/multizone approaches are introduced and applied to external and internal flow problems. These new implementations increase the capabilities and flexibility of the PAB3D code in solving flow problems associated with complex geometry.

  8. Cpu/gpu Computing for AN Implicit Multi-Block Compressible Navier-Stokes Solver on Heterogeneous Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Liang; Bai, Hanli; Wang, Fang; Xu, Qingxin

    2016-06-01

    CPU/GPU computing allows scientists to tremendously accelerate their numerical codes. In this paper, we port and optimize a double precision alternating direction implicit (ADI) solver for three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations from our in-house Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software on heterogeneous platform. First, we implement a full GPU version of the ADI solver to remove a lot of redundant data transfers between CPU and GPU, and then design two fine-grain schemes, namely “one-thread-one-point” and “one-thread-one-line”, to maximize the performance. Second, we present a dual-level parallelization scheme using the CPU/GPU collaborative model to exploit the computational resources of both multi-core CPUs and many-core GPUs within the heterogeneous platform. Finally, considering the fact that memory on a single node becomes inadequate when the simulation size grows, we present a tri-level hybrid programming pattern MPI-OpenMP-CUDA that merges fine-grain parallelism using OpenMP and CUDA threads with coarse-grain parallelism using MPI for inter-node communication. We also propose a strategy to overlap the computation with communication using the advanced features of CUDA and MPI programming. We obtain speedups of 6.0 for the ADI solver on one Tesla M2050 GPU in contrast to two Xeon X5670 CPUs. Scalability tests show that our implementation can offer significant performance improvement on heterogeneous platform.

  9. A dynamic-solver-consistent minimum action method: With an application to 2D Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaoliang; Yu, Haijun

    2017-02-01

    This paper discusses the necessity and strategy to unify the development of a dynamic solver and a minimum action method (MAM) for a spatially extended system when employing the large deviation principle (LDP) to study the effects of small random perturbations. A dynamic solver is used to approximate the unperturbed system, and a minimum action method is used to approximate the LDP, which corresponds to solving an Euler-Lagrange equation related to but more complicated than the unperturbed system. We will clarify possible inconsistencies induced by independent numerical approximations of the unperturbed system and the LDP, based on which we propose to define both the dynamic solver and the MAM on the same approximation space for spatial discretization. The semi-discrete LDP can then be regarded as the exact LDP of the semi-discrete unperturbed system, which is a finite-dimensional ODE system. We achieve this methodology for the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations using a divergence-free approximation space. The method developed can be used to study the nonlinear instability of wall-bounded parallel shear flows, and be generalized straightforwardly to three-dimensional cases. Numerical experiments are presented.

  10. Fast solvers for finite difference approximations for the Stokes and Navier-Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, D.

    1992-01-01

    The authors consider several methods for solving the linear equations arising from finite difference discretizations of the Stokes equations. The pressure equation method presented here for the first time, apparently, and the method, presented by Bramble and Pasciak, are shown to have computational effort that grows slowly with the number of grid points. The methods work with second-order accurate discretizations. Computational results are shown for both the Stokes and incompressible Navier-Stokes at low Reynolds number. The inf-sup conditions resulting from three finite difference approximations of the Stokes equations are proven. These conditions are used to prove that the Schur complement Q[sub h] of the linear system generated by each of these approximations is bounded uniformly away from zero. For the pressure equation method, this guarantees that the conjugate gradient method applied to Q[sub h] converges in a finite number of iterations which is independent of mesh size. The fact that Q[sub h] is bounded below is used to prove convergence estimates for the solutions generated by these finite difference approximations. One of the estimates is for a staggered grid and the estimate of the scheme shows that both the pressure and the velocity parts of the solution are second-order accurate. Iterative methods are compared by the use of the regularized central differencing introduced by Strikwerda. Several finite difference approximations of the Stokes equations by the SOR method are compared and the excellence of the approximations by the regularized central differencing over the other finite difference approximation is mentioned. This difference gives rise to a linear equation with a matrix which is slightly non-symmetric. The convergence of the typical steepest descent method and conjugate gradient method, which is almost as same as the typical conjugate gradient method, applied to slightly non-symmetric positive definite matrices are proven.

  11. A lattice-Boltzmann scheme of the Navier-Stokes equations on a 3D cuboid lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Haoda; Peng, Cheng; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2015-11-01

    The standard lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) for fluid flow simulation is based on a square (in 2D) or cubic (in 3D) lattice grids. Recently, two new lattice Boltzmann schemes have been developed on a 2D rectangular grid using the MRT (multiple-relaxation-time) collision model, by adding a free parameter in the definition of moments or by extending the equilibrium moments. Here we developed a lattice Boltzmann model on 3D cuboid lattice, namely, a lattice grid with different grid lengths in different spatial directions. We designed our MRT-LBM model by matching the moment equations from the Chapman-Enskog expansion with the Navier-Stokes equations. The model guarantees correct hydrodynamics. A second-order term is added to the equilibrium moments in order to restore the isotropy of viscosity on a cuboid lattice. The form and the coefficients of the extended equilibrium moments are determined through an inverse design process. An additional benefit of the model is that the viscosity can be adjusted independent of the stress-moment relaxation parameter, thus improving the numerical stability of the model. The resulting cuboid MRT-LBM model is then validated through benchmark simulations using laminar channel flow, turbulent channel flow, and the 3D Taylor-Green vortex flow.

  12. A grid-independent approximate Riemann solver with applications to the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Van Leer, Bram; Roe, Philip L.

    1991-01-01

    A new two-dimensional approximate Riemann solver has been developed that obtains fluxes on grid faces via wave decomposition. By utilizing information propagation in the velocity-difference directions rather than in the grid-normal directions, this flux function more appropriately interprets and hence more sharply resolves shock and shear waves when they lie oblique to the grid. The model uses five waves to describe the difference in states at a grid face. Two acoustic waves, one shear wave, and one entropy wave propagate in the direction defined by the local velocity difference vector, while the fifth wave is a shear wave that propagates at a right angle to the other four. Test cases presented include a shock reflecting off a wall, a pure shear wave, supersonic flow over an airfoil, and viscous separated airfoil flow. Results using the new model give significantly sharper shock and shear contours than a grid-aligned solver. Navier-Stokes computations over an aifoil show reduced pressure distortions in the separated region as a result of the grid-independent upwinding.

  13. Analysis of wall shear stress around a competitive swimmer using 3D Navier-Stokes equations in CFD.

    PubMed

    Popa, C V; Zaidi, H; Arfaoui, A; Polidori, G; Taiar, R; Fohanno, S

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the flow dynamics around a competitive swimmer during underwater glide phases occurring at the start and at every turn. The influence of the head position, namely lifted up, aligned and lowered, on the wall shear stress and the static pressure distributions is analyzed. The problem is considered as 3D and in steady hydrodynamic state. Three velocities (1.4 m/s, 2.2 m/s and 3.1 m/s) that correspond to inter-regional, national and international swimming levels are studied. The flow around the swimmer is assumed turbulent. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations are solved with the standard k-ω turbulent model by using the CFD (computational fluid dynamics) numerical method based on a volume control approach. Numerical simulations are carried out with the ANSYS FLUENT® CFD code. The results show that the wall shear stress increases with the velocity and consequently the drag force opposing the movement of the swimmer increases as well. Also, high wall shear stresses are observed in the areas where the body shape, globally rigid in form, presents complex surface geometries such as the head, shoulders, buttocks, heel and chest.

  14. Analysis of a high speed civil transport configuration at subsonic flow conditions using a Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Victor R.

    1993-01-01

    Computations of three dimensional vortical flows over a generic High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configuration with an aspect ratio of 3.04 are performed using a thin-layer Navier-Stokes solver. The HSCT cruise configuration is modeled without leading or trailing edge flap deflections and without engine nacelles. The flow conditions, which correspond to tests done in the NASA Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel (TPT), are a subsonic Mach number of 0.3 and Reynolds number of 4.4 million for a range-of-attack (-.23 deg to 17.78 deg). The effects of the farfield boundary location with respect to the body are investigated. The boundary layer is assumed turbulent and simulated using an algebraic turbulence model. The key features of the vortices and their interactions are captured. Grid distribution in the vortex regions is critical for predicting the correct induced lift. Computed forces and surface pressures compare reasonably well with the experimental TPT data.

  15. An adaptive finite element Moreau-Yosida-based solver for a coupled Cahn-Hilliard/Navier-Stokes system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintermüller, M.; Hinze, M.; Kahle, C.

    2013-02-01

    An adaptive a posteriori error estimator based finite element method for the numerical solution of a coupled Cahn-Hilliard/Navier-Stokes system with a double-obstacle homogenous free (interfacial) energy density is proposed. A semi-implicit Euler scheme for the time-integration is applied which results in a system coupling a quasi-Stokes or Oseen-type problem for the fluid flow to a variational inequality for the concentration and the chemical potential according to the Cahn-Hilliard model [16]. A Moreau-Yosida regularization is employed which relaxes the constraints contained in the variational inequality and, thus, enables semi-smooth Newton solvers with locally superlinear convergence in function space. Moreover, upon discretization this yields a mesh independent method for a fixed relaxation parameter. For the finite dimensional approximation of the concentration and the chemical potential piecewise linear and globally continuous finite elements are used, and for the numerical approximation of the fluid velocity Taylor-Hood finite elements are employed. The paper ends by a report on numerical examples showing the efficiency of the new method.

  16. A diagonally inverted LU implicit multigrid scheme for the 3-D Navier-Stokes equations and a two equation model of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokota, Jeffrey W.

    1988-01-01

    An LU implicit multigrid algorithm is developed to calculate 3-D compressible viscous flows. This scheme solves the full 3-D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equation with a two-equation kappa-epsilon model of turbulence. The flow equations are integrated by an efficient, diagonally inverted, LU implicit multigrid scheme while the kappa-epsilon equations are solved, uncoupled from the flow equations, by a block LU implicit algorithm. The flow equations are solved within the framework of the multigrid method using a four-grid level W-cycle, while the kappa-epsilon equations are iterated only on the finest grid. This treatment of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations proves to be an efficient method for calculating 3-D compressible viscous flows.

  17. Response analysis of a laminar premixed M-flame to flow perturbations using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, M.; Schuller, T.; Sipp, D.; Schmid, P. J.

    2015-04-15

    The response of a laminar premixed methane-air flame subjected to flow perturbations around a steady state is examined experimentally and using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver with a one-step chemistry mechanism to describe combustion. The unperturbed flame takes an M-shape stabilized both by a central bluff body and by the external rim of a cylindrical nozzle. This base flow is computed by a nonlinear direct simulation of the steady reacting flow, and the flame topology is shown to qualitatively correspond to experiments conducted under comparable conditions. The flame is then subjected to acoustic disturbances produced at different locations in the numerical domain, and its response is examined using the linearized solver. This linear numerical model then allows the componentwise investigation of the effects of flow disturbances on unsteady combustion and the feedback from the flame on the unsteady flow field. It is shown that a wrinkled reaction layer produces hydrodynamic disturbances in the fresh reactant flow field that superimpose on the acoustic field. This phenomenon, observed in several experiments, is fully interpreted here. The additional perturbations convected by the mean flow stem from the feedback of the perturbed flame sheet dynamics onto the flow field by a mechanism similar to that of a perturbed vortex sheet. The different regimes where this mechanism prevails are investigated by examining the phase and group velocities of flow disturbances along an axis oriented along the main direction of the flow in the fresh reactant flow field. It is shown that this mechanism dominates the low-frequency response of the wrinkled shape taken by the flame and, in particular, that it fully determines the dynamics of the flame tip from where the bulk of noise is radiated.

  18. A GPU-based incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on moving overset grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandar, Dominic D. J.; Sitaraman, Jayanarayanan; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    2013-07-01

    In pursuit of obtaining high fidelity solutions to the fluid flow equations in a short span of time, graphics processing units (GPUs) which were originally intended for gaming applications are currently being used to accelerate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. With a high peak throughput of about 1 TFLOPS on a PC, GPUs seem to be favourable for many high-resolution computations. One such computation that involves a lot of number crunching is computing time accurate flow solutions past moving bodies. The aim of the present paper is thus to discuss the development of a flow solver on unstructured and overset grids and its implementation on GPUs. In its present form, the flow solver solves the incompressible fluid flow equations on unstructured/hybrid/overset grids using a fully implicit projection method. The resulting discretised equations are solved using a matrix-free Krylov solver using several GPU kernels such as gradient, Laplacian and reduction. Some of the simple arithmetic vector calculations are implemented using the CU++: An Object Oriented Framework for Computational Fluid Dynamics Applications using Graphics Processing Units, Journal of Supercomputing, 2013, doi:10.1007/s11227-013-0985-9 approach where GPU kernels are automatically generated at compile time. Results are presented for two- and three-dimensional computations on static and moving grids.

  19. On the 3D multigrid and ADI algorithms for the numerical solution of Navier-Stokes equations on distributed memory multiprocessors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromeur-Dervout, D.; Phuoc, L. Ta

    Since 1979 ONERA has been studying the adequacy of the parallel architectures for numerical simulation in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). In this context a 3D Navier-Stokes code has been developed and implmented on INTEL iPSC860 with 128 processors. The code uses multigrid and ADI methods, to solve unsteady 3D Navier-Stokes equations in velocity-vorticity formulation. The lid-driven cavity of spanwise aspect ratio equal to 3:1, at a Reynolds number Re equal to 3200, constitutes a test case running on the INTEL iPSC860 system as on the Cray-YMP computer. Results are given for the characteristic times T = 50, 100, 200.

  20. Suitable weak solutions to the 3D Navier-Stokes equations are constructed with the Voigt approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berselli, Luigi C.; Spirito, Stefano

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we consider the Navier-Stokes equations supplemented with either the Dirichlet or vorticity-based Navier slip boundary conditions. We prove that weak solutions obtained as limits of solutions of the Navier-Stokes-Voigt model satisfy the local energy inequality, and we also prove certain regularity results for the pressure. Moreover, in the periodic setting we prove that if the parameters are chosen in an appropriate way, then we can construct suitable weak solutions through a Fourier-Galerkin finite-dimensional approximation in the space variables.

  1. Global existence and asymptotic behavior for the 3D compressible Navier-Stokes equations without heat conductivity in a bounded domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guochun

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the global existence and uniqueness of strong solutions to the initial boundary value problem for the 3D compressible Navier-Stokes equations without heat conductivity in a bounded domain with slip boundary. The global existence and uniqueness of strong solutions are obtained when the initial data is near its equilibrium in H2 (Ω). Furthermore, the exponential convergence rates of the pressure and velocity are also proved by delicate energy methods.

  2. Application of a Navier-Stokes Solver to the Analysis of Multielement Airfoils and Wings Using Multizonal Grid Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kenneth M.; Biedron, Robert T.; Whitlock, Mark

    1995-01-01

    A computational study was performed to determine the predictive capability of a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes code (CFL3D) for two-dimensional and three-dimensional multielement high-lift systems. Three configurations were analyzed: a three-element airfoil, a wing with a full span flap and a wing with a partial span flap. In order to accurately model these complex geometries, two different multizonal structured grid techniques were employed. For the airfoil and full span wing configurations, a chimera or overset grid technique was used. The results of the airfoil analysis illustrated that although the absolute values of lift were somewhat in error, the code was able to predict reasonably well the variation with Reynolds number and flap position. The full span flap analysis demonstrated good agreement with experimental surface pressure data over the wing and flap. Multiblock patched grids were used to model the partial span flap wing. A modification to an existing patched- grid algorithm was required to analyze the configuration as modeled. Comparisons with experimental data were very good, indicating the applicability of the patched-grid technique to analyses of these complex geometries.

  3. Framework for a Robust General Purpose Navier-Stokes Solver on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Cheng-Nian; Denner, Fabian; van Wachem, Berend G. M.

    2016-11-01

    A numerical framework for a pressure-based all-speeds flow solver operating on unstructured meshes, which is robust for a broad range of flow configurations, is proposed. The distinct features of our framework are the full coupling of the momentum and continuity equations as well as the use of an energy equation in conservation form to relate the thermal quantities with the flow field. In order to overcome the well-documented instability occurring while coupling the thermal energy to the remaining flow variables, a multistage iteration cycle has been devised which exhibits excellent convergence behavior without requiring any numerical relaxation parameters. Different spatial schemes for accurate shock resolution as well as complex thermodynamic gas models are also seamlessly incorporated into the framework. The solver is directly applicable to stationary and transient flows in all Mach number regimes (sub-, trans-, supersonic), exhibits strong robustness and accurately predicts flow and thermal variables at all speeds across shocks of different strengths. We present a wide range of results for both steady and transient compressible flows with vastly different Mach numbers and thermodynamic conditions in complex geometries represented by different types of unstructured meshes. The authors are grateful for the financial support provided by Shell.

  4. A compressible Navier-Stokes solver with two-equation and Reynolds stress turbulence closure models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Joseph H.

    1992-01-01

    This report outlines the development of a general purpose aerodynamic solver for compressible turbulent flows. Turbulent closure is achieved using either two equation or Reynolds stress transportation equations. The applicable equation set consists of Favre-averaged conservation equations for the mass, momentum and total energy, and transport equations for the turbulent stresses and turbulent dissipation rate. In order to develop a scheme with good shock capturing capabilities, good accuracy and general geometric capabilities, a multi-block cell centered finite volume approach is used. Viscous fluxes are discretized using a finite volume representation of a central difference operator and the source terms are treated as an integral over the control volume. The methodology is validated by testing the algorithm on both two and three dimensional flows. Both the two equation and Reynolds stress models are used on a two dimensional 10 degree compression ramp at Mach 3, and the two equation model is used on the three dimensional flow over a cone at angle of attack at Mach 3.5. With the development of this algorithm, it is now possible to compute complex, compressible high speed flow fields using both two equation and Reynolds stress turbulent closure models, with the capability of eventually evaluating their predictive performance.

  5. Validation Process for LEWICE Coupled by Use of a Navier-stokes Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.

    2016-01-01

    A research project is underway at NASA Glenn to produce computer software that can accurately predict ice growth for many meteorological conditions for any aircraft surface. This report will present results from the latest LEWICE release, version 3.5. This program differs from previous releases in its ability to model mixed phase and ice crystal conditions such as those encountered inside an engine. It also has expanded capability to use structured grids and a new capability to use results from unstructured grid flow solvers. An extensive comparison of the results in a quantifiable manner against the database of ice shapes that have been generated in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) has also been performed. This paper will show the differences in ice shape between LEWICE 3.5 and experimental data. In addition, comparisons will be made between the lift and drag calculated on the ice shapes from experiment and those produced by LEWICE. This report will also provide a description of both programs. Quantitative geometric comparisons are shown for horn height, horn angle, icing limit, area and leading edge thickness. Quantitative comparisons of calculated lift and drag will also be shown. The results show that the predicted results are within the accuracy limits of the experimental data for the majority of cases.

  6. The stationary Navier-Stokes equations in 3D exterior domains. An approach in anisotropically weighted L spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razafison, Ulrich

    We consider the three-dimensional exterior problem for stationary Navier-Stokes equations. We prove, under assumptions of smallness of the data, existence and uniqueness of solutions. By setting the problem in weighted spaces where the weights reflect the anisotropic decay properties of the fundamental solution of Oseen, we show the better decay of the solutions outside the wake region. Moreover, the solutions we obtained have a finite Dirichlet integral and under additional assumptions on the weights they are also PR-solutions in the sense of Finn [R. Finn, On the exterior stationary problem for the Navier-Stokes equations, and associated perturbation problems, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 19 (1965) 363-406]. The study relies on an L-theory for 1

  7. On Bi-Grid Local Mode Analysis of Solution Techniques for 3-D Euler and Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibraheem, S. O.; Demuren, A. O.

    1994-01-01

    A procedure is presented for utilizing a bi-grid stability analysis as a practical tool for predicting multigrid performance in a range of numerical methods for solving Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. Model problems based on the convection, diffusion and Burger's equation are used to illustrate the superiority of the bi-grid analysis as a predictive tool for multigrid performance in comparison to the smoothing factor derived from conventional von Neumann analysis. For the Euler equations, bi-grid analysis is presented for three upwind difference based factorizations, namely Spatial, Eigenvalue and Combination splits, and two central difference based factorizations, namely LU and ADI methods. In the former, both the Steger-Warming and van Leer flux-vector splitting methods are considered. For the Navier-Stokes equations, only the Beam-Warming (ADI) central difference scheme is considered. In each case, estimates of multigrid convergence rates from the bi-grid analysis are compared to smoothing factors obtained from single-grid stability analysis. Effects of grid aspect ratio and flow skewness are examined. Both predictions are compared with practical multigrid convergence rates for 2-D Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions based on the Beam-Warming central scheme.

  8. Calculations of High-Temperature Jet Flow Using Hybrid Reynolds-Average Navier-Stokes Formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Giriamaji, Sharath S.

    2008-01-01

    Two multiscale-type turbulence models are implemented in the PAB3D solver. The models are based on modifying the Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes equations. The first scheme is a hybrid Reynolds-averaged- Navier Stokes/large-eddy-simulation model using the two-equation k(epsilon) model with a Reynolds-averaged-Navier Stokes/large-eddy-simulation transition function dependent on grid spacing and the computed turbulence length scale. The second scheme is a modified version of the partially averaged Navier Stokes model in which the unresolved kinetic energy parameter f(sub k) is allowed to vary as a function of grid spacing and the turbulence length scale. This parameter is estimated based on a novel two-stage procedure to efficiently estimate the level of scale resolution possible for a given flow on a given grid for partially averaged Navier Stokes. It has been found that the prescribed scale resolution can play a major role in obtaining accurate flow solutions. The parameter f(sub k) varies between zero and one and is equal to one in the viscous sublayer and when the Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes turbulent viscosity becomes smaller than the large-eddy-simulation viscosity. The formulation, usage methodology, and validation examples are presented to demonstrate the enhancement of PAB3D's time-accurate turbulence modeling capabilities. The accurate simulations of flow and turbulent quantities will provide a valuable tool for accurate jet noise predictions. Solutions from these models are compared with Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes results and experimental data for high-temperature jet flows. The current results show promise for the capability of hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes and large eddy simulation and partially averaged Navier Stokes in simulating such flow phenomena.

  9. Development of a Two-Dimensional/Axisymmetric implicit Navier-Stokes solver using flux-difference splitting concepts and fully general geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindman, R. G.

    1985-09-01

    Theoretical background and several basic test cases are presented for a new, time dependent Navier-Stokes solver for two-dimensional and axisymmetric flows. The goal of the effort is to invoke state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology to improve modeling of viscous phenomenal and to increase the robustness of CFD analysis. The original motivation was inadequate representation of supersonic ramp-induced separation by existing CFD codes. The present work addresses that inadequacy by using modern numerical methods which accurately model signal propagation in high-speed fluid flow. This technique solves the Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates in a four-sided domain bounded by a wall, and upper boundary opposite the wall, an inflow boundary, and an outflow boundary. The interior algorithm is a flux-difference splitting method similar to that of Yang, Lombard, and Bershader, but is blended into a second order, implicit factored delta form. With implicitly treated boundary conditions, the solution is performed using a block tridiagonal method followed by an explicit updating of the boundaries. The resulting scheme satisfies the global conversation requirement to within the order of accuracy of the algorithm. The grid is generated using a relaxation Poisson solver. A systematic and rigorous development of the complete method is presented. Initial steps in code validation include successful reproduction of Couette and Blasius solutions.

  10. Development of a time-dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes solver based on a fractional-step method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Moshe

    1990-01-01

    The development, validation and application of a fractional step solution method of the time-dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized coordinate systems are discussed. A solution method that combines a finite-volume discretization with a novel choice of the dependent variables and a fractional step splitting to obtain accurate solutions in arbitrary geometries was previously developed for fixed-grids. In the present research effort, this solution method is extended to include more general situations, including cases with moving grids. The numerical techniques are enhanced to gain efficiency and generality.

  11. Implementation of the Vanka-type multigrid solver for the finite element approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations on GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Petr; Klement, Vladimír; Oberhuber, Tomáš; Žabka, Vítězslav

    2016-03-01

    We present a complete GPU implementation of a geometric multigrid solver for the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow. The approximate solution is constructed on a two-dimensional unstructured triangular mesh. The problem is discretized by means of the mixed finite element method with semi-implicit timestepping. The linear saddle-point problem arising from the scheme is solved by the geometric multigrid method with a Vanka-type smoother. The parallel solver is based on the red-black coloring of the mesh triangles. We achieved a speed-up of 11 compared to a parallel (4 threads) code based on OpenMP and 19 compared to a sequential code.

  12. A study on H and O-H grid generation and associated flow codes for gas turbine 3D Navier Stokes analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, D.; Knight, C. J.

    1991-06-01

    A method to generate H and O-H grid systems for 3D gas turbine geometries has been developed. It is a simple procedure which solves a set of elliptic equations starting from an initial grid system generated algebraically. This grid generation procedure is for 3D Navier-Stokes analysis based on the scalar or diagonalized form of approximate factorization. The grids generated by this procedure have been applied to 3D heat transfer calculations and compared with experimental results. Detailed comparisons are given for both H and O-H grid topologies, considering the Low Aspect Ratio Turbine (LART) and using a two-equation turbulence model with viscous sublayer resolution.

  13. A comparative study of Rosenbrock-type and implicit Runge-Kutta time integration for discontinuous Galerkin method for unsteady 3D compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaodong; Xia, Yidong; Luo, Hong; ...

    2016-10-05

    A comparative study of two classes of third-order implicit time integration schemes is presented for a third-order hierarchical WENO reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin (rDG) method to solve the 3D unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations: — 1) the explicit first stage, single diagonally implicit Runge-Kutta (ESDIRK3) scheme, and 2) the Rosenbrock-Wanner (ROW) schemes based on the differential algebraic equations (DAEs) of Index-2. Compared with the ESDIRK3 scheme, a remarkable feature of the ROW schemes is that, they only require one approximate Jacobian matrix calculation every time step, thus considerably reducing the overall computational cost. A variety of test cases, ranging from inviscid flowsmore » to DNS of turbulent flows, are presented to assess the performance of these schemes. Here, numerical experiments demonstrate that the third-order ROW scheme for the DAEs of index-2 can not only achieve the designed formal order of temporal convergence accuracy in a benchmark test, but also require significantly less computing time than its ESDIRK3 counterpart to converge to the same level of discretization errors in all of the flow simulations in this study, indicating that the ROW methods provide an attractive alternative for the higher-order time-accurate integration of the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations.« less

  14. A comparative study of Rosenbrock-type and implicit Runge-Kutta time integration for discontinuous Galerkin method for unsteady 3D compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaodong; Xia, Yidong; Luo, Hong; Xuan, Lijun

    2016-10-05

    A comparative study of two classes of third-order implicit time integration schemes is presented for a third-order hierarchical WENO reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin (rDG) method to solve the 3D unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations: — 1) the explicit first stage, single diagonally implicit Runge-Kutta (ESDIRK3) scheme, and 2) the Rosenbrock-Wanner (ROW) schemes based on the differential algebraic equations (DAEs) of Index-2. Compared with the ESDIRK3 scheme, a remarkable feature of the ROW schemes is that, they only require one approximate Jacobian matrix calculation every time step, thus considerably reducing the overall computational cost. A variety of test cases, ranging from inviscid flows to DNS of turbulent flows, are presented to assess the performance of these schemes. Here, numerical experiments demonstrate that the third-order ROW scheme for the DAEs of index-2 can not only achieve the designed formal order of temporal convergence accuracy in a benchmark test, but also require significantly less computing time than its ESDIRK3 counterpart to converge to the same level of discretization errors in all of the flow simulations in this study, indicating that the ROW methods provide an attractive alternative for the higher-order time-accurate integration of the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  15. Aspects of Unstructured Grids and Finite-Volume Solvers for the Euler and Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.

    1992-01-01

    One of the major achievements in engineering science has been the development of computer algorithms for solving nonlinear differential equations such as the Navier-Stokes equations. In the past, limited computer resources have motivated the development of efficient numerical schemes in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) utilizing structured meshes. The use of structured meshes greatly simplifies the implementation of CFD algorithms on conventional computers. Unstructured grids on the other hand offer an alternative to modeling complex geometries. Unstructured meshes have irregular connectivity and usually contain combinations of triangles, quadrilaterals, tetrahedra, and hexahedra. The generation and use of unstructured grids poses new challenges in CFD. The purpose of this note is to present recent developments in the unstructured grid generation and flow solution technology.

  16. An incompressible Navier-Stokes flow solver in three-dimensional curvilinear coordinate systems using primitive variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.; Chang, J. L. C.; Shanks, S. P.; Chakravarthy, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    An implicit, finite-difference computer code has been developed to solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in a three-dimensional, curvilinear coordinate system. The pressure-field solution is based on the pseudo compressibility approach in which the time derivative pressure term is introduced into the mass conservation equation to form a set of hyperbolic equations. The solution procedure employs an implicit, approximate factorization scheme. The Reynolds stresses, that are uncoupled from the implicit scheme, are lagged by one time-step to facilitate implementing various levels of the turbulence model. Test problems for external and internal flows are computed, and the results are compared with existing experimental data. The application of this technique for general three-dimensional problems is then demonstrated.

  17. Modeling of high pressure arc-discharge with a fully-implicit Navier-Stokes stabilized finite element flow solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, A.; Mansour, N. N.; Lopez, B.; Panesi, M.

    2017-05-01

    This work addresses the modeling of high pressure electric discharge in an arc-heated wind tunnel. The combined numerical solution of Poisson’s equation, radiative transfer equations, and the set of Favre-averaged thermochemical nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes equations allows for the determination of the electric, radiation, and flow fields, accounting for their mutual interaction. Semi-classical statistical thermodynamics is used to determine the plasma thermodynamic properties, while transport properties are obtained from kinetic principles with the Chapman-Enskog method. A multi-temperature formulation is used to account for thermal non-equilibrium. Finally, the turbulence closure of the flow equations is obtained by means of the Spalart-Allmaras model, which requires the solution of an additional scalar transport equation. A Streamline upwind Petrov-Galerkin stabilized finite element formulation is employed to solve the Navier-Stokes equation. The electric field equation is solved using the standard Galerkin formulation. A stable formulation for the radiative transfer equations is obtained using the least-squares finite element method. The developed simulation framework has been applied to investigate turbulent plasma flows in the 20 MW Aerodynamic Heating Facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The current model is able to predict the process of energy addition and re-distribution due to Joule heating and thermal radiation, resulting in a hot central core surrounded by colder flow. The use of an unsteady three-dimensional treatment also allows the asymmetry due to a dynamic electric arc attachment point in the cathode chamber to be captured accurately. The current work paves the way for detailed estimation of operating characteristics for arc-heated wind tunnels which are critical in testing thermal protection systems.

  18. Chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) beam quality predictions using 3D Navier-Stokes (MINT) and wave optics (OCELOT) codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampson, Alan I.; Plummer, David N.; Erkkila, John H.; Crowell, Peter G.; Helms, Charles A.

    1998-05-01

    This paper describes a series of analyses using the 3-d MINT Navier-Stokes and OCELOT wave optics codes to calculate beam quality in a COIL laser cavity. To make this analysis tractable, the problem was broken into two contributions to the medium quality; that associated with microscale disturbances primarily from the transverse iodine injectors, and that associated with the macroscale including boundary layers and shock-like effects. Results for both microscale and macroscale medium quality are presented for the baseline layer operating point in terms of single pass wavefront error. These results show that the microscale optical path difference effects are 1D in nature and of low spatial order. The COIL medium quality is shown to be dominated by macroscale effects; primarily pressure waves generated from flow/boundary layer interactions on the cavity shrouds.

  19. A Unified Approach to Regularity Problems for the 3D Navier-Stokes and Euler Equations: the Use of Kolmogorov's Dissipation Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheskidov, A.; Shvydkoy, R.

    2014-06-01

    Motivated by Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence we present a unified approach to the regularity problems for the 3D Navier-Stokes and Euler equations. We introduce a dissipation wavenumber that separates low modes where the Euler dynamics is predominant from the high modes where the viscous forces take over. Then using an indifferent to the viscosity technique we obtain a new regularity criterion which is weaker than every Ladyzhenskaya-Prodi-Serrin condition in the viscous case, and reduces to the Beale-Kato-Majda criterion in the inviscid case. In the viscous case we prove that Leray-Hopf solutions are regular provided , which improves our previous condition. We also show that for all Leray-Hopf solutions. Finally, we prove that Leray-Hopf solutions are regular when the time-averaged spatial intermittency is small, i.e., close to Kolmogorov's regime.

  20. A fully coupled Navier-Stokes solver for calculation of turbulent incompressible free surface flow past a ship hull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessandrini, B.; Delhommeau, G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with the calculation of free surface flow of viscous incompressible fluid around the hull of a boat moving with rectilinear motion. An original method used to avoid a large part of the theoretical problems connected with free surface boundary conditions in three-dimensional Navier-Stokes-Reynolds equations is proposed here. The linearised system of convective equations for velocities, pressure and free surface elevation unknowns is discretised by finite differences and two methods to solve the fully coupled resulting matrix are presented here. The non-linear convergence of fully coupled algorithm is compared with the velocity-pressure weakly coupled algorithm SIMPLER. Turbulence is taken into account through Reynolds decomposition and k- or k- model to close the equations. These two models are implemented without wall function and numerical calculations are performed up to the viscous sub-layer. Numerical results and comparisons with experiments are presented on the Series 60 CB=0.60 ship model for a Reynolds number Rn=4.5×106 and a Froude number Fn=0.316. Copyright

  1. Adaptive unstructured triangular mesh generation and flow solvers for the Navier-Stokes equations at high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashford, Gregory A.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    A method for generating high quality unstructured triangular grids for high Reynolds number Navier-Stokes calculations about complex geometries is described. Careful attention is paid in the mesh generation process to resolving efficiently the disparate length scales which arise in these flows. First the surface mesh is constructed in a way which ensures that the geometry is faithfully represented. The volume mesh generation then proceeds in two phases thus allowing the viscous and inviscid regions of the flow to be meshed optimally. A solution-adaptive remeshing procedure which allows the mesh to adapt itself to flow features is also described. The procedure for tracking wakes and refinement criteria appropriate for shock detection are described. Although at present it has only been implemented in two dimensions, the grid generation process has been designed with the extension to three dimensions in mind. An implicit, higher-order, upwind method is also presented for computing compressible turbulent flows on these meshes. Two recently developed one-equation turbulence models have been implemented to simulate the effects of the fluid turbulence. Results for flow about a RAE 2822 airfoil and a Douglas three-element airfoil are presented which clearly show the improved resolution obtainable.

  2. Aspects of Unstructured Grids and Finite-Volume Solvers for the Euler and Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    One of the major achievements in engineering science has been the development of computer algorithms for solving nonlinear differential equations such as the Navier-Stokes equations. These algorithms are now used in the practical engineering design of devices such as cars and airplanes as well as theoretical studies of complex phenomena such as fluid turbulence. In past years, limited computer resources have motivated the development of efficient numerical methods in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) utilizing structured meshes. These meshes are comprised of systematic arrays of quadrilateral or hexahedral cells. The use of structured meshes greatly simplifies the implementation of CFD algorithms on conventional computers. Structured meshes also permit the use of highly efficient solution techniques such as alternating direction implicit (ADI) iteration schemes or multigrid. Following the dramatic improvement in computing speed in recent years, emphasis has shifted towards the design of algorithms capable of treating complex geometries. The automatic generation of structured grids about complex geometries is problematic. Unstructured grids offer one promising alternative technique for treating these general geometries. Unstructured meshes have irregular connectivity and usually contain triangles and/or quadrilaterals in two dimensions and tetrahedra and/or hexahedra in three dimensions. The generation and use of unstructured grids poses new challenges in computational fluid dynamics. This is true for both grid generation as well as for the design of algorithms for flow solution. The purpose of these notes is to present recent developments in the unstructured grid generation and flow solution technology.

  3. Whole-annulus aeroelasticity analysis of a 17-bladerow WRF compressor using an unstructured Navier Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Vahdati, M.; Sayma, A.; Imregun, M.

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes a large-scale aeroelasticity computation for an aero-engine core compressor. The computational domain includes all 17 bladerows, resulting in a mesh with over 68 million points. The Favre-averaged Navier Stokes equations are used to represent the flow in a non-linear time-accurate fashion on unstructured meshes of mixed elements. The structural model of the first two rotor bladerows is based on a standard finite element representation. The fluid mesh is moved at each time step according to the structural motion so that changes in blade aerodynamic damping and flow unsteadiness can be accommodated automatically. An efficient domain decomposition technique, where special care was taken to balance the memory requirement across processors, was developed as part of the work. The calculation was conducted in parallel mode on 128 CPUs of an SGI Origin 3000. Ten vibration cycles were obtained using over 2.2 CPU years, though the elapsed time was a week only. Steady-state flow measurements and predictions were found to be in good agreement. A comparison of the averaged unsteady flow and the steady-state flow revealed some discrepancies. It was concluded that, in due course, the methodology would be adopted by industry to perform routine numerical simulations of the unsteady flow through entire compressor assemblies with vibrating blades not only to minimise engine and rig tests but also to improve performance predictions.

  4. Effect of boundary representation on viscous, separated flows in a discontinuous-Galerkin Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Daniel A.; Jacobs, Gustaaf B.; Kopriva, David A.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of curved-boundary representation on the physics of the separated flow over a NACA 65(1)-412 airfoil is thoroughly investigated. A method is presented to approximate curved boundaries with a high-order discontinuous-Galerkin spectral element method for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Multiblock quadrilateral element meshes are constructed with the grid generation software GridPro. The boundary of a NACA 65(1)-412 airfoil, defined by a cubic natural spline, is piecewise-approximated by isoparametric polynomial interpolants that represent the edges of boundary-fitted elements. Direct numerical simulation of the airfoil is performed on a coarse mesh and fine mesh with polynomial orders ranging from four to twelve. The accuracy of the curve fitting is investigated by comparing the flows computed on curved-sided meshes with those given by straight-sided meshes. Straight-sided meshes yield irregular wakes, whereas curved-sided meshes produce a regular Karman street wake. Straight-sided meshes also produce lower lift and higher viscous drag as compared with curved-sided meshes. When the mesh is refined by reducing the sizes of the elements, the lift decrease and viscous drag increase are less pronounced. The differences in the aerodynamic performance between the straight-sided meshes and the curved-sided meshes are concluded to be the result of artificial surface roughness introduced by the piecewise-linear boundary approximation provided by the straight-sided meshes.

  5. A Navier-Stokes solver for complex three-dimensional turbulent flows adopting non-linear modelling of the Reynolds stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botte, V.; Tourlidakis, A.; Elder, R. L.

    1998-11-01

    A non-linear modelling of the Reynolds stresses has been incorporated into a Navier-Stokes solver for complex three-dimensional geometries. A k- model, adopting a modelling of the turbulent transport which is not based on the eddy viscosity, has been written in generalised co-ordinates and solved with a finite volume approach, using both a GMRES solver and a direct solver for the solution of the linear systems of equations. An additional term, quadratic in the main strain rate, has been introduced into the modelling of the Reynolds stresses to the basic Boussinesq's form; the corresponding constant has been evaluated through comparison with the experimental data. The computational procedure is implemented for the flow analysis in a 90° square section bend and the obtained results show that with the non-linear modelling a much better agreement with the measured data is obtained, both for the velocity and the pressure. The importance of the convection scheme is also discussed, showing how the effect of the non-linear correction added to the Reynolds stresses is effectively hidden by the additional numerical diffusion introduced by a low-order convection scheme as the first-order upwind scheme, thus making the use of higher order schemes necessary.

  6. A Numerical Method for Solving the 3D Unsteady Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in Curvilinear Domains with Complex Immersed Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2008-01-01

    A novel numerical method is developed that integrates boundary-conforming grids with a sharp interface, immersed boundary methodology. The method is intended for simulating internal flows containing complex, moving immersed boundaries such as those encountered in several cardiovascular applications. The background domain (e.g the empty aorta) is discretized efficiently with a curvilinear boundary-fitted mesh while the complex moving immersed boundary (say a prosthetic heart valve) is treated with the sharp-interface, hybrid Cartesian/immersed-boundary approach of Gilmanov and Sotiropoulos [1]. To facilitate the implementation of this novel modeling paradigm in complex flow simulations, an accurate and efficient numerical method is developed for solving the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The method employs a novel, fully-curvilinear staggered grid discretization approach, which does not require either the explicit evaluation of the Christoffel symbols or the discretization of all three momentum equations at cell interfaces as done in previous formulations. The equations are integrated in time using an efficient, second-order accurate fractional step methodology coupled with a Jacobian-free, Newton-Krylov solver for the momentum equations and a GMRES solver enhanced with multigrid as preconditioner for the Poisson equation. Several numerical experiments are carried out on fine computational meshes to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method for standard benchmark problems as well as for unsteady, pulsatile flow through a curved, pipe bend. To demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate flows with complex, moving immersed boundaries we apply it to calculate pulsatile, physiological flow through a mechanical, bileaflet heart valve mounted in a model straight aorta with an anatomical-like triple sinus. PMID:19194533

  7. A Numerical Method for Solving the 3D Unsteady Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in Curvilinear Domains with Complex Immersed Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2007-08-01

    A novel numerical method is developed that integrates boundary-conforming grids with a sharp interface, immersed boundary methodology. The method is intended for simulating internal flows containing complex, moving immersed boundaries such as those encountered in several cardiovascular applications. The background domain (e.g the empty aorta) is discretized efficiently with a curvilinear boundary-fitted mesh while the complex moving immersed boundary (say a prosthetic heart valve) is treated with the sharp-interface, hybrid Cartesian/immersed-boundary approach of Gilmanov and Sotiropoulos [1]. To facilitate the implementation of this novel modeling paradigm in complex flow simulations, an accurate and efficient numerical method is developed for solving the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The method employs a novel, fully-curvilinear staggered grid discretization approach, which does not require either the explicit evaluation of the Christoffel symbols or the discretization of all three momentum equations at cell interfaces as done in previous formulations. The equations are integrated in time using an efficient, second-order accurate fractional step methodology coupled with a Jacobian-free, Newton-Krylov solver for the momentum equations and a GMRES solver enhanced with multigrid as preconditioner for the Poisson equation. Several numerical experiments are carried out on fine computational meshes to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method for standard benchmark problems as well as for unsteady, pulsatile flow through a curved, pipe bend. To demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate flows with complex, moving immersed boundaries we apply it to calculate pulsatile, physiological flow through a mechanical, bileaflet heart valve mounted in a model straight aorta with an anatomical-like triple sinus.

  8. PSH3D fast Poisson solver for petascale DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Darren; Dodd, Michael; Ferrante, Antonino

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of high Reynolds number, Re >= O (105) , turbulent flows requires computational meshes >= O (1012) grid points, and, thus, the use of petascale supercomputers. DNS often requires the solution of a Helmholtz (or Poisson) equation for pressure, which constitutes the bottleneck of the solver. We have developed a parallel solver of the Helmholtz equation in 3D, PSH3D. The numerical method underlying PSH3D combines a parallel 2D Fast Fourier transform in two spatial directions, and a parallel linear solver in the third direction. For computational meshes up to 81923 grid points, our numerical results show that PSH3D scales up to at least 262k cores of Cray XT5 (Blue Waters). PSH3D has a peak performance 6 × faster than 3D FFT-based methods when used with the 'partial-global' optimization, and for a 81923 mesh solves the Poisson equation in 1 sec using 128k cores. Also, we have verified that the use of PSH3D with the 'partial-global' optimization in our DNS solver does not reduce the accuracy of the numerical solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  9. Zonal Detached Eddy Simulation of a simplified nose landing-gear for flow and noise predictions using an unstructured Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Puente Cerezo, Fernando; Sanders, Laurent; Vuillot, François; Druault, Philippe; Manoha, Eric

    2017-09-01

    A Zonal Detached Eddy Simulation has been performed on the simplified LAGOON nose landing gear geometry using a Navier-Stokes solver on a fully unstructured grid. The attached boundary layers have been finely resolved using Y+ values in the order of unity, while the high curvature zones have been intensively meshed in order to accurately solving adverse pressure gradients present in these regions. The mean and fluctuating flow fields have been compared with the experimental results, proving that both the mean flow field and the spectral content recorded at the wall are accurately reproduced. Following these comparisons, a detailed analysis of the topology of the flow has been carried out through the analysis of the skin friction coefficient and friction lines, coupled with three dimensional visualizations of the landing gear wake. The far-field acoustics, computed through the Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings equation from the computed pressure on the landing gear skin, has been compared with the experimental results, obtaining a very good agreement for the different microphones and directions. Finally, the CFD methodology presented in this study proves to be a moderate cost approach, enabling an accurate flow and noise prediction for bluff bodies such as landing gears.

  10. Automatic differentiation and Navier-Stokes.

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.; Hovland, P.; Mohammadi, B.

    1997-12-17

    We describe the use of automatic differentiation (AD) to enhance a compressible Navier-Stokes model. With the solver, AD is used to accelerate convergence by more than an order of magnitude. Outside the solver, AD is used to compute the derivatives needed for optimization. We emphasize the potential for performance gains if the programmer does not treat AD as a black box, but instead utilizes high-level knowledge about the nature of the application.

  11. A spectral anelastic Navier-Stokes solver for a stratified two-miscible-layer system in infinite horizontal channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Nicolas; Hammouch, Zohra; Labrosse, Gérard; Gauthier, Serge

    2015-10-01

    We present a consistent Chebyshev-Fourier-Fourier pseudo-spectral algorithm for the numerical solution of anelastic models. These models satisfy the constraint ∂i (ρ ˜ ui) = 0, where ρ ˜ is a mean density profile and u the velocity field. The choice of the decoupling method is discussed and the Uzawa approach is generalized to such a constraint. The pressure operator properties are detailed and the solution of the zeroth Fourier mode case is discussed. The solution of linear systems is obtained and refined, using an iterative method. The Uzawa algorithm is embedded in an auto-adaptive multidomain approach in order to handle steep evolving gradients. The algorithm is reduced to the Boussinesq approximation. The characteristics and performance of the resulting numerical code are analyzed. The validation includes comparisons with linear stability results and with the Waddell et al. [55] single-mode experiment. We also compute the nonlinear growth rate of a Boussinesq turbulent mixing layer. A comparison between Boussinesq and anelastic models is then sketched out. Finally four 3D simulations are carried out (with the anelastic and Boussinesq models). These results illustrate the capability of the entire method to handle stiff problems such as the Rayleigh-Taylor configuration.

  12. INS3D - NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF THE INCOMPRESSIBLE NAVIER-STOKES EQUATIONS IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL GENERALIZED CURVILINEAR COORDINATES (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.

    1994-01-01

    INS3D computes steady-state solutions to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The INS3D approach utilizes pseudo-compressibility combined with an approximate factorization scheme. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code has been verified on problems such as flow through a channel, flow over a backwardfacing step and flow over a circular cylinder. Three dimensional cases include flow over an ogive cylinder, flow through a rectangular duct, wind tunnel inlet flow, cylinder-wall juncture flow and flow through multiple posts mounted between two plates. INS3D uses a pseudo-compressibility approach in which a time derivative of pressure is added to the continuity equation, which together with the momentum equations form a set of four equations with pressure and velocity as the dependent variables. The equations' coordinates are transformed for general three dimensional applications. The equations are advanced in time by the implicit, non-iterative, approximately-factored, finite-difference scheme of Beam and Warming. The numerical stability of the scheme depends on the use of higher-order smoothing terms to damp out higher-frequency oscillations caused by second-order central differencing. The artificial compressibility introduces pressure (sound) waves of finite speed (whereas the speed of sound would be infinite in an incompressible fluid). As the solution converges, these pressure waves die out, causing the derivation of pressure with respect to time to approach zero. Thus, continuity is satisfied for the incompressible fluid in the steady state. Computational efficiency is achieved using a diagonal algorithm. A block tri-diagonal option is also available. When a steady-state solution is reached, the modified continuity equation will satisfy the divergence-free velocity field condition. INS3D is capable of handling several different types of boundaries encountered in numerical simulations, including solid-surface, inflow and outflow, and far

  13. INS3D - NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF THE INCOMPRESSIBLE NAVIER-STOKES EQUATIONS IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL GENERALIZED CURVILINEAR COORDINATES (DEC RISC ULTRIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biyabani, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    INS3D computes steady-state solutions to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The INS3D approach utilizes pseudo-compressibility combined with an approximate factorization scheme. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code has been verified on problems such as flow through a channel, flow over a backwardfacing step and flow over a circular cylinder. Three dimensional cases include flow over an ogive cylinder, flow through a rectangular duct, wind tunnel inlet flow, cylinder-wall juncture flow and flow through multiple posts mounted between two plates. INS3D uses a pseudo-compressibility approach in which a time derivative of pressure is added to the continuity equation, which together with the momentum equations form a set of four equations with pressure and velocity as the dependent variables. The equations' coordinates are transformed for general three dimensional applications. The equations are advanced in time by the implicit, non-iterative, approximately-factored, finite-difference scheme of Beam and Warming. The numerical stability of the scheme depends on the use of higher-order smoothing terms to damp out higher-frequency oscillations caused by second-order central differencing. The artificial compressibility introduces pressure (sound) waves of finite speed (whereas the speed of sound would be infinite in an incompressible fluid). As the solution converges, these pressure waves die out, causing the derivation of pressure with respect to time to approach zero. Thus, continuity is satisfied for the incompressible fluid in the steady state. Computational efficiency is achieved using a diagonal algorithm. A block tri-diagonal option is also available. When a steady-state solution is reached, the modified continuity equation will satisfy the divergence-free velocity field condition. INS3D is capable of handling several different types of boundaries encountered in numerical simulations, including solid-surface, inflow and outflow, and far

  14. Inverse Design of Nacelles Using Multi-Block Navier Stokes Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, D. A.; Krist, S. E.; Campbell, R. L.; Vatsa, V. N.; Buning, P. G.; Gea, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this work is to reshape a nacelle to achieve a specified nacelle pressure distribution. The nacelle may be either isolated or installed on an airplane. There are no restrictions on the attitude (toe, incidence, and roll) and position of the nacelle. The design algorithm is coupled to two different multi-block 3-D Navier Stokes flow solvers. The coupling between design and analysis is automated to the point where the design proceeds with minimal user input.

  15. Application of the multigrid approach for solving 3D Navier-Stokes equations on hexahedral grids using the discontinuous Galerkin method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolkov, A. V.

    2010-03-01

    The Galerkin method with discontinuous basis functions is adapted for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured hexahedral grids. A hybrid multigrid algorithm involving the finite element and grid stages is used as an iterative solution method. Numerical results of calculating the sphere inviscid flow, viscous flow in a bent pipe, and turbulent flow past a wing are presented. The numerical results and the computational cost are compared with those obtained using the finite volume method.

  16. Thin-layer and full Navier-Stokes calculations for turbulent supersonic flow over a cone at an angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Crawford F.; Podleski, Steve D.

    1993-01-01

    The proper use of a computational fluid dynamics code requires a good understanding of the particular code being applied. In this report the application of CFL3D, a thin-layer Navier-Stokes code, is compared with the results obtained from PARC3D, a full Navier-Stokes code. In order to gain an understanding of the use of this code, a simple problem was chosen in which several key features of the code could be exercised. The problem chosen is a cone in supersonic flow at an angle of attack. The issues of grid resolution, grid blocking, and multigridding with CFL3D are explored. The use of multigridding resulted in a significant reduction in the computational time required to solve the problem. Solutions obtained are compared with the results using the full Navier-Stokes equations solver PARC3D. The results obtained with the CFL3D code compared well with the PARC3D solutions.

  17. Stochastic nonhomogeneous incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutland, Nigel J.; Enright, Brendan

    We construct solutions for 2- and 3-D stochastic nonhomogeneous incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with general multiplicative noise. These equations model the velocity of a mixture of incompressible fluids of varying density, influenced by random external forces that involve feedback; that is, multiplicative noise. Weak solutions for the corresponding deterministic equations were first found by Kazhikhov [A.V. Kazhikhov, Solvability of the initial and boundary-value problem for the equations of motion of an inhomogeneous viscous incompressible fluid, Soviet Phys. Dokl. 19 (6) (1974) 331-332; English translation of the paper in: Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 216 (6) (1974) 1240-1243]. A stochastic version with additive noise was solved by Yashima [H.F. Yashima, Equations de Navier-Stokes stochastiques non homogènes et applications, Thesis, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, 1992]. The methods here extend the Loeb space techniques used to obtain the first general solutions of the stochastic Navier-Stokes equations with multiplicative noise in the homogeneous case [M. Capiński, N.J. Cutland, Stochastic Navier-Stokes equations, Applicandae Math. 25 (1991) 59-85]. The solutions display more regularity in the 2D case. The methods also give a simpler proof of the basic existence result of Kazhikhov.

  18. Time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations with multigrid acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melson, N. Duane; Atkins, Harold L.; Sanetrik, Mark D.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical scheme to solve the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations is described. The scheme is implemented by modifying the multigrid-multiblock version of the steady Navier-Stokes equations solver, TLNS3D. The scheme is fully implicit in time and uses TLNS3D to iteratively invert the equations at each physical time step. The design objective of the scheme is unconditional stability (at least for first- and second-order discretizations of the physical time derivatives). With unconditional stability, the choice of the time step is based on the physical phenomena to be resolved rather than limited by numerical stability which is especially important for high Reynolds number viscous flows, where the spatial variation of grid cell size can be as much as six orders of magnitude. An analysis of the iterative procedure and the implementation of this procedure in TLNS3D are discussed. Numerical results are presented to show both the capabilities of the scheme and its speed up relative to the use of global minimum time stepping. Reductions in computational times of an order of magnitude are demonstrated.

  19. Euler/Navier-Stokes Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulliam, Tom; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Implicit methods have been the workhorse for the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations for the last 25 years. The ground breaking work of Dr. Joe Steger in implementing such techniques in practical Euler and Navier-Stokes codes provided the basis for all the success in this area. This presentation will highlight his contribution and technical excellence in the area of implicit methods for CFD.

  20. A Parallel 3D Spectral Difference Method for Solutions of Compressible Navier Stokes Equations on Deforming Grids and Simulations of Vortex Induced Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeJong, Andrew

    Numerical models of fluid-structure interaction have grown in importance due to increasing interest in environmental energy harvesting, airfoil-gust interactions, and bio-inspired formation flying. Powered by increasingly powerful parallel computers, such models seek to explain the fundamental physics behind the complex, unsteady fluid-structure phenomena. To this end, a high-fidelity computational model based on the high-order spectral difference method on 3D unstructured, dynamic meshes has been developed. The spectral difference method constructs continuous solution fields within each element with a Riemann solver to compute the inviscid fluxes at the element interfaces and an averaging mechanism to compute the viscous fluxes. This method has shown promise in the past as a highly accurate, yet sufficiently fast method for solving unsteady viscous compressible flows. The solver is monolithically coupled to the equations of motion of an elastically mounted 3-degree of freedom rigid bluff body undergoing flow-induced lift, drag, and torque. The mesh is deformed using 4 methods: an analytic function, Laplace equation, biharmonic equation, and a bi-elliptic equation with variable diffusivity. This single system of equations -- fluid and structure -- is advanced through time using a 5-stage, 4th-order Runge-Kutta scheme. Message Passing Interface is used to run the coupled system in parallel on up to 240 processors. The solver is validated against previously published numerical and experimental data for an elastically mounted cylinder. The effect of adding an upstream body and inducing wake galloping is observed.

  1. Investigation of upwind, multigrid, multiblock numerical schemes for three dimensional flows. Volume 1: Runge-Kutta methods for a thin layer Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannizzaro, Frank E.; Ash, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    A state-of-the-art computer code has been developed that incorporates a modified Runge-Kutta time integration scheme, upwind numerical techniques, multigrid acceleration, and multi-block capabilities (RUMM). A three-dimensional thin-layer formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations is employed. For turbulent flow cases, the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model is used. Two different upwind techniques are available: van Leer's flux-vector splitting and Roe's flux-difference splitting. Full approximation multi-grid plus implicit residual and corrector smoothing were implemented to enhance the rate of convergence. Multi-block capabilities were developed to provide geometric flexibility. This feature allows the developed computer code to accommodate any grid topology or grid configuration with multiple topologies. The results shown in this dissertation were chosen to validate the computer code and display its geometric flexibility, which is provided by the multi-block structure.

  2. External heat transfer predictions in a highly loaded transonic linear turbine guide vane cascade using an upwind biased Navier-Stokes solver

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrer, A.; Jericha, H.

    1999-07-01

    External heat transfer predictions are performed for two-dimensional turbine blade cascades. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with algebraic (Arnone and Pacciani, 1998), one-equation (Spalart and Allmaras, 1994), and two-equation (low-Re {kappa}-{epsilon}, Biswas and Fukuyama, 1994) turbulence closures are solved with a fully implicit time-marching finite volume method. Comparisons with measurements (Arts et al., 1990; Arts, 1994) for a highly loaded transonic turbine nozzle guide vane cascade show good agreement in some cases, but also reveal problems with transition prediction and turbulence modeling. Special attention has been focused on the low-Re {kappa}-{epsilon} model concerning the influence of the inlet boundary condition for the {epsilon}-equation and problems in the stagnation point region.

  3. Addition of equilibrium air to an upwind Navier-Stokes code and other first steps toward a more generalized flow solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Bruce S.

    1991-01-01

    An upwind three-dimensional volume Navier-Stokes code is modified to facilitate modeling of complex geometries and flow fields represented by proposed National Aerospace Plane concepts. Code enhancements include an equilibrium air model, a generalized equilibrium gas model and several schemes to simplify treatment of complex geometric configurations. The code is also restructured for inclusion of an arbitrary number of independent and dependent variables. This latter capability is intended for eventual use to incorporate nonequilibrium/chemistry gas models, more sophisticated turbulence and transition models, or other physical phenomena which will require inclusion of additional variables and/or governing equations. Comparisons of computed results with experimental data and results obtained using other methods are presented for code validation purposes. Good correlation is obtained for all of the test cases considered, indicating the success of the current effort.

  4. Irregular reflection of weak acoustic shock pulses on rigid boundaries : Schlieren experiments and direct numerical simulation based on a Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjouy, Cyril; Ollivier, Sébastien; Marsden, Olivier; Karzova, Maria; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The local interactions occurring between incident and reflected shock waves in the vicinity of rigid surfaces are investigated. Both regular and irregular — also called von Neumann — regimes of reflection are studied, via experimental and numerical simulations. Shock waves are produced experimentally with a 20 kV electrical spark source which allows the generation of spherically diverging acoustic shocks. The behaviour of the resulting weak acoustic shocks near rigid boundaries is visualized with a Schlieren optical technique which allows the spatial structure of the shocks to be studied. In particular, the evolution of the Mach stem forming above a flat surface is examined, and its height is observed to be directly linked to the angle of incidence and the pressure amplitude of the incident shock. The propagation of an acoustic shock between two parallel rigid boundaries is also studied. It is shown that the strong interactions between the Mach stems emerging from the two boundaries can lead to a drastic modification of the morphology of the acoustic field in the waveguide. Experimental results are compared to numerical results obtained from high-order finite-difference based simulations of the 2D Navier-Stokes equations. The good agreement between the experimental distribution of the acoustic field and numerical results suggests that numerical simulations are promising as a predictive tool to study nonlinear acoustic propagation of acoustic waves in complex geometrical configurations with rigid boundaries.

  5. Reacting Multi-Species Gas Capability for USM3D Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Schuster, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The USM3D Navier-Stokes flow solver contributed heavily to the NASA Constellation Project (CxP) as a highly productive computational tool for generating the aerodynamic databases for the Ares I and V launch vehicles and Orion launch abort vehicle (LAV). USM3D is currently limited to ideal-gas flows, which are not adequate for modeling the chemistry or temperature effects of hot-gas jet flows. This task was initiated to create an efficient implementation of multi-species gas and equilibrium chemistry into the USM3D code to improve its predictive capabilities for hot jet impingement effects. The goal of this NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) assessment was to implement and validate a simulation capability to handle real-gas effects in the USM3D code. This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  6. A multidimensional flux function with applications to the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Van Leer, Bram; Roe, Philip L.

    1993-01-01

    In the present grid-independent approximate Riemann solver for 2D and 3D flows that are governed by the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations, fluxes on grid faces are obtained by wave decomposition; the assumption of information-propagation in the velocity-difference directions leads to a more accurate resolution of shear and shock waves, when these are are oblique to the grid. The model, which yields significantly greater accuracy in both supersonic and subsonic first-order spatially accurate computations, describes the difference in states at each grid interface by the action of five waves.

  7. Navier-Stokes simulations of WECS airfoil flowfields

    SciTech Connect

    Homicz, G.F.

    1994-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has initiated an effort to apply Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the study of WECS aerodynamics. Preliminary calculations are presented for the flow past a SAND 0018/50 airfoil. The flow solver used is F3D, an implicitly, finite-difference code which solves the Thin-Layer Navier-airfoil. The flow solver used is F3D, an implicit, finite-difference code which solves the Thin-Layer Navier-Stokes equations. 2D steady-state calculations are presented at various angles of attack, {alpha}. Sectional lift and drag coefficient, as well as surface pressure distributions, are compared with wind tunnel data, and exhibit reasonable agreement at low to moderate angles of attack. At high {alpha}, where the airfoil is stalled, a converged solution to the steady-state equations could not be obtained. The flowfield continued to change with successive iterations, which is consistent with the fact that the actual flow is inherently transient, and requires the solution of the full unsteady form of the equations.

  8. Development of a GPU and multi-CPU accelerated non-isothermal, multiphase, incompressible Navier-Stokes solver with phase-change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Christopher J.; Glezer, Ari; Smith, Marc K.

    2012-11-01

    Accurate 3D boiling simulations often use excessive computational resources - in many cases taking several weeks or months to solve. To alleviate this problem, a parallelized, multiphase fluid solver using a particle level-set (PLS) method was implemented. The PLS method offers increased accuracy in interface location tracking, the ability to capture sharp interfacial features with minimal numerical diffusion, and significantly improved mass conservation. The independent nature of the particles is amenable to parallelization using graphics processing unit (GPU) and multi-CPU implementations, since each particle can be updated simultaneously. The present work will explore the speedup provided by GPU and multi-CPU implementations and determine the effectiveness of PLS for accurately capturing sharp interfacial features. The numerical model will be validated by comparison to experimental data for vibration-induced droplet atomization. Further development will add the physics of boiling in the presence of acoustic fields. It is hoped that the resultant boiling simulations will be sufficiently improved to allow for optimization studies of various boiling configurations to be performed in a timely manner. Supported by ONR.

  9. A 3D agglomeration multigrid solver for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvriplis, D. J.; Venkatakrishnan, V.

    1995-01-01

    An agglomeration multigrid strategy is developed and implemented for the solution of three-dimensional steady viscous flows. The method enables convergence acceleration with minimal additional memory overheads, and is completely automated, in that it can deal with grids of arbitrary construction. The multigrid technique is validated by comparing the delivered convergence rates with those obtained by a previously developed overset-mesh multigrid approach, and by demonstrating grid independent convergence rates for aerodynamic problems on very large grids. Prospects for further increases in multigrid efficiency for high-Reynolds number viscous flows on highly stretched meshes are discussed.

  10. A dual potential formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gegg, S. G.; Pletcher, R. H.; Steger, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    A dual potential formulation for numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations is developed and presented. The velocity field is decomposed using a scalar and vector potential. Vorticity and dilatation are used as the dependent variables in the momentum equations. Test cases in two dimensions verify the capability to solve flows using approximations from potential flow to full Navier-Stokes simulations. A three-dimensional incompressible flow formulation is also described. An interesting feature of this approach to solving the Navier-Stokes equations is the decomposition of the velocity field into a rotational part (vector potential) and an irrotational part (scalar potential). The Helmholtz decomposition theorem allows this splitting of the velocity field. This approach has had only limited use since it increases the number of dependent variables in the solution. However, it has often been used for incompressible flows where the solution scheme is known to be fast and accurate. This research extends the usage of this method to fully compressible Navier-Stokes simulations by using the dilatation variable along with vorticity. A time-accurate, iterative algorithm is used for the uncoupled solution of the governing equations. Several levels of flow approximation are available within the framework of this method. Potential flow, Euler and full Navier-Stokes solutions are possible using the dual potential formulation. Solution efficiency can be enhanced in a straightforward way. For some flows, the vorticity and/or dilatation may be negligible in certain regions (e.g., far from a viscous boundary in an external flow). It is possible to drop the calculation of these variables then and optimize the solution speed. Also, efficient Poisson solvers are available for the potentials. The relative merits of non-primitive variables versus primitive variables for solution of the Navier-Stokes equations are also discussed.

  11. Progress Toward Overset-Grid Moving Body Capability for USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandyna, Mohagna J.; Frink, Neal T.; Noack, Ralph W.

    2005-01-01

    A static and dynamic Chimera overset-grid capability is added to an established NASA tetrahedral unstructured parallel Navier-Stokes flow solver, USM3D. Modifications to the solver primarily consist of a few strategic calls to the Donor interpolation Receptor Transaction library (DiRTlib) to facilitate communication of solution information between various grids. The assembly of multiple overlapping grids into a single-zone composite grid is performed by the Structured, Unstructured and Generalized Grid AssembleR (SUGGAR) code. Several test cases are presented to verify the implementation, assess overset-grid solution accuracy and convergence relative to single-grid solutions, and demonstrate the prescribed relative grid motion capability.

  12. Development Of A Navier-Stokes Computer Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Kwak, Dochan

    1993-01-01

    Report discusses aspects of development of CENS3D computer code, solving three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations of compressible, viscous, unsteady flow. Implements implicit finite-difference or finite-volume numerical-integration scheme, called "lower-upper symmetric-Gauss-Seidel" (LU-SGS), offering potential for very low computer time per iteration and for fast convergence.

  13. Time-Accurate, Unstructured-Mesh Navier-Stokes Computations with the Space-Time CESE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2006-01-01

    Application of the newly emerged space-time conservation element solution element (CESE) method to compressible Navier-Stokes equations is studied. In contrast to Euler equations solvers, several issues such as boundary conditions, numerical dissipation, and grid stiffness warrant systematic investigations and validations. Non-reflecting boundary conditions applied at the truncated boundary are also investigated from the stand point of acoustic wave propagation. Validations of the numerical solutions are performed by comparing with exact solutions for steady-state as well as time-accurate viscous flow problems. The test cases cover a broad speed regime for problems ranging from acoustic wave propagation to 3D hypersonic configurations. Model problems pertinent to hypersonic configurations demonstrate the effectiveness of the CESE method in treating flows with shocks, unsteady waves, and separations. Good agreement with exact solutions suggests that the space-time CESE method provides a viable alternative for time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations of a broad range of problems.

  14. Navier Stokes Theorem in Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2005-12-01

    In a paper presented at the 2004 AGU International Conference, the author outlined and stressed the importance of studying and teaching certain important mathematical techniques while developing a course in Hydrology and Fluid Mechanics. The Navier-Stokes equations are the foundation of fluid mechanics, and Stokes' theorem is used in nearly every branch of mechanics as well as electromagnetics. Stokes' Theorem also plays a vital role in many secondary theorems such as those pertaining to vorticity and circulation. Mathematically expressed, Stokes' theorem can be expressed by considering a surface S having a bounding curve C. Here, V is any sufficiently smooth vector field defined on the surface and its bounding curve C. In an article entitled "Corrections to Fluid Dynamics" R. F. Streater, (Open Systems and Information Dynamics, 10, 3-30, 2003.) proposes a kinetic model of a fluid in which five macroscopic fields, the mass, energy, and three components of momentum, are conserved. The dynamics is constructed using the methods of statistical dynamics, and results in a non-linear discrete-time Markov chain for random fields on a lattice. In the continuum limit he obtains a non-linear coupled parabolic system of field equations, showing a correction to the Navier-Stokes equations. In 2001, David Hoff published an article in Journees Equations aux derivees partielles. (Art. No. 7, 9 p.). His paper is entitled : Dynamics of Singularity Surfaces for Compressible Navier-Stokes Flows in Two Space Dimensions. In his paper, David Hoff proves the global existence of solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations of compressible, barotropic flow in two space dimensions with piecewise smooth initial data. These solutions remain piecewise smooth for all time, retaining simple jump discontinuities in the density and in the divergence of the velocity across a smooth curve, which is convected with the flow. The strengths of these discontinuities are shown to decay exponentially in time

  15. Turbomachinery blade optimization using the Navier-Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect

    Chand, K.K.; Lee, K.D.

    1997-12-01

    A method is presented to perform aerodynamic design optimization of turbomachinery blades. The method couples a Navier-Stokes flow solver with a grid generator and numerical optimization algorithm to seek improved designs for transonic turbine blades. A fast and efficient multigrid, finite-volume flow solver provides accurate performance evaluations of potential designs. Design variables consist of smooth perturbations to the blade surface. A unique elliptic-hyperbolic grid generation method is used to regenerate a Navier-Stokes grid after perturbations have been added to the geometry. Designs are sought which improve a design objective while remaining within specified constraints. The method is demonstrated with two transonic turbine blades with different types and numbers of design variables.

  16. A comparative study of full Navier-Stokes and Reduced Navier-Stokes analyses for separating flows within a diffusing inlet S-duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. H.; Reddy, D. R.; Kapoor, K.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional implicit Full Navier-Stokes (FNS) analysis and a 3D Reduced Navier-Stokes (RNS) initial value space marching solution technique has been applied to a class of separate flow problems within a diffusing S-duct configuration characterized as vortex-liftoff. Both Full Navier-Stokes and Reduced Navier-Stokes solution techniques were able to capture the overall flow physics of vortex lift-off, however more consideration must be given to the development of turbulence models for the prediction of the locations of separation and reattachment. This accounts for some of the discrepancies in the prediction of the relevant inlet distortion descriptors, particularly circumferential distortion. The 3D RNS solution technique adequately described the topological structure of flow separation associated with vortex lift-off.

  17. Lift coefficient calculation using a geometric/solution adaptive Navier Stokes solver on two-dimensional cartesian grids for compressible and turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, Emre; Kutlar, Ahmet Ihsan; Aksel, Mehmet Haluk

    2017-09-01

    In this study, two-dimensional geometric and solution adaptive refinement/coarsening scheme codes are generated by the use of Cartesian grid generation techniques. In the solution of compressible, turbulent flows one-equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model is implemented. The performance of the flow solver is tested on the case of high Reynolds number, steady flow around NACA 0012 airfoil. The lift coefficient solution for the airfoil at a real-life-flight Reynolds number is compared with the experimental study in literature.

  18. A 3-D Navier-Stokes CFD study of turbojet/ramjet nozzle plume interactions at Mach 3.0 and comparison with data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Ing; Hunter, Louis G.

    1995-01-01

    Advanced airbreathing propulsion systems used in Mach 4-6 mission scenarios, usually consist of a single integrated turboramjet or as in this study, a turbojet housed in an upper bay with a separate ramjet housed in a lower bay. As the engines transition from turbojet to ramjet, there is an operational envelope where both engines operate simultaneously. One nozzle concept under consideration has a common nozzle, where the plumes from the turbojet and ramjet interact with one another as they expand to ambient conditions. In this paper, the two plumes interact at the end of a common 2-D cowl, when they both reach an approximate Mach 3.0 condition and then jointly expand to Mach 3.6 at the common nozzle exit plane. At this condition, the turbojet engine operated at a higher NPR than the ramjet, where the turbojet overpowers the ramjet plume, deflecting it approximately 12 degrees downward and in turn the turbojet plume is deflected 6 degrees upward. In the process, shocks were formed at the deflections and a shear layer formed at the confluence of the two jets. This particular case was experimentally tested and the data used to compare with the PARC3D code with k-kl two equation turbulence model. The 2-D and 3-D centerline CFD solutions are in good agreement, but as the CFD solutions approach the outer sidewall, a slight variance occurs. The outer wall boundary layers are thin and do not present much of an interaction, however, where the confluence interaction shocks interact with the thin boundary layer on the outer wall, strong vortices run down each shock causing substantial disturbances in the boundary layer. These disturbances amplify somewhat as they propagate downstream axially from the confluence point. The nozzle coefficient (CFG) is reduced 1/2 percent as a result of this sidewall interaction, from 0.9850 to 0.9807. This three-dimensional reduction is in better agreement with the experimental value of 0.9790.

  19. Navier-Stokes solutions for flows related to store separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay; Stallings, Robert L., Jr.; Plentovich, Elizabeth B.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is developing CFD capabilities to obtain solutions for viscous flows about generic configurations of internally and externally carried stores. The emphasis is placed on the supersonic flow regime with extensions being made to the transonic regime. The project is broken into four steps: (1) Cavity flows for internal carriage configurations; (2) High angle of attack flows, which may be experienced during the separation of the stores: (3) Flows about a body near a flat plate for external carriage configurations; and (4) Flows about a body inside or in the proximity of a cavity. Three-dimensional unsteady cavity flow solutions are obtained by an explicit, MacCormack algorithm, EMCAV3, for open, close, and transitional cavities. High angle of attack flows past cylinders are solved by an implicit, upwind algorithm. All the results compare favorably with the experimental data. For flows about multiple body configurations, the Chimera embedding scheme is modified for finite-volume and multigrid algorithms, MaGGiE. Then a finite volume, implicit, upwind, multigrid Navier-Stokes solver which uses on overlapped/embedded and zonal grids, VUMXZ3, is developed from the CFL3D code. Supersonic flows past a cylinder near a flat plate are computed using this code. The results are compared with the experimental data. Currently the VUMXZ3 code is being modified to accomplish step 4 of this project. Wind tunnel experiments are also being conducted for validation purposes.

  20. Stochastic 2-D Navier-Stokes Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Menaldi, J.L. Sritharan, S.S.

    2002-10-01

    In this paper we prove the existence and uniqueness of strong solutions for the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation in bounded and unbounded domains. These solutions are stochastic analogs of the classical Lions-Prodi solutions to the deterministic Navier-Stokes equation. Local monotonicity of the nonlinearity is exploited to obtain the solutions in a given probability space and this significantly improves the earlier techniques for obtaining strong solutions, which depended on pathwise solutions to the Navier-Stokes martingale problem where the probability space is also obtained as a part of the solution.

  1. Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions for the leeside flow over delta wings at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillin, S. N.; Thomas, J. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1987-01-01

    Distinctly different types of leeside flowfields over highly swept sharp leading edge delta wings in supersonic flow were numerically simulated using Euler and Navier-Stokes solvers. The Euler code was seen to be adequate only in predicting primary flow structures (leading edge vortex and cross flow shock) whereas the Navier-Stokes code was capable of predicting secondary flow structures (i.e., secondary vortex). A comparison of laminar and turbulent Navier-Stokes solutions indicated that the turbulent boundary layer model is more accurate in predicting the effect of the boundary layer model on the flowfield. Also, the Navier-Stokes code indicated detailed flow structures not observed in the qualitative experimental data available (i.e., vapor screen photographs) indicating a need for quantitative flow field data.

  2. Short Communication: A Parallel Newton-Krylov Method for Navier-Stokes Rotorcraft Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekici, Kivanc; Lyrintzis, Anastasios S.

    2003-05-01

    The application of Krylov subspace iterative methods to unsteady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes codes on massively parallel and distributed computing environments is investigated. Previously, the Euler mode of the Navier-Stokes flow solver Transonic Unsteady Rotor Navier-Stokes (TURNS) has been coupled with a Newton-Krylov scheme which uses two Conjugate-Gradient-like (CG) iterative methods. For the efficient implementation of Newton-Krylov methods to the Navier-Stokes mode of TURNS, efficient preconditioners must be used. Parallel implicit operators are used and compared as preconditioners. Results are presented for two-dimensional and three-dimensional viscous cases. The Message Passing Interface (MPI) protocol is used, because of its portability to various parallel architectures.

  3. Design and Navier-Stokes analysis of hypersonic wind tunnel nozzles. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, James R.

    1989-01-01

    Four hypersonic wind tunnel nozzles ranging in Mach number from 6 to 17 are designed with the method of characteristics and boundary layer approach (MOC/BL) and analyzed with a Navier-Stokes solver. Limitations of the MOC/BL approach when applied to thick high speed boundary layers with non-zero normal pressure gradients are investigated. Working gases include ideal air, thermally perfect nitrogen and virial CF4. Agreement between the design conditions and Navier-Stokes solutions for ideal air at Mach 6 is good. Thermally perfect nitrogen showed poor agreement at Mach 13.5 and Mach 17. Navier-Stokes solutions for CF4 are not obtained, but comparison of the effects of low gamma to those of high Mach number suggests that the Navier-Stokes solution would not compare well with design.

  4. Transonic airfoil and wing design using Navier-Stokes codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, N. J.; Campbell, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    An iterative design method has been implemented into 2D and 3D Navier-Stokes codes for the design of airfoils or wings with given target pressure distributions. The method begins with the analysis of an initial geometry, and obtains the analysis pressure distributions of that geometry. The differences between analysis pressures and target pressures are used to drive geometry changes through the use of a streamline curvature method. This paper describes the procedure that makes the iterative design method work for Navier-Stokes codes. Examples of 2D airfoil design, and 3D wing design are included. It is demonstrated that the method is highly effective for airfoil or wing design at flow conditions where no substantial separation occurs. Problems encountered in the airfoil design with shock induced flow separations are discussed.

  5. Alpha models for rotating Navier-Stokes equations in geophysics with nonlinear dispersive regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bong-Sik

    Three dimensional (3D) Navier-Stokes-alpha equations are considered for uniformly rotating geophysical fluid flows (large Coriolis parameter f = 2O). The Navier-Stokes-alpha equations are a nonlinear dispersive regularization of usual Navier-Stokes equations obtained by Lagrangian averaging. The focus is on the existence and global regularity of solutions of the 3D rotating Navier-Stokes-alpha equations and the uniform convergence of these solutions to those of the original 3D rotating Navier-Stokes equations for large Coriolis parameters f as alpha → 0. Methods are based on fast singular oscillating limits and results are obtained for periodic boundary conditions for all domain aspect ratios, including the case of three wave resonances which yields nonlinear "2½-dimensional" limit resonant equations for f → 0. The existence and global regularity of solutions of limit resonant equations is established, uniformly in alpha. Bootstrapping from global regularity of the limit equations, the existence of a regular solution of the full 3D rotating Navier-Stokes-alpha equations for large f for an infinite time is established. Then, the uniform convergence of a regular solution of the 3D rotating Navier-Stokes-alpha equations (alpha ≠ 0) to the one of the original 3D rotating NavierStokes equations (alpha = 0) for f large but fixed as alpha → 0 follows; this implies "shadowing" of trajectories of the limit dynamical systems by those of the perturbed alpha-dynamical systems. All the estimates are uniform in alpha, in contrast with previous estimates in the literature which blow up as alpha → 0. Finally, the existence of global attractors as well as exponential attractors is established for large f and the estimates are uniform in alpha.

  6. A comparative study of Full Navier-Stokes and Reduced Navier-Stokes analyses for separating flows within a diffusing inlet S-duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. H.; Reddy, D. R.; Kapoor, K.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional implicit Full Navier-Stokes (FNS) analysis and a 3D Reduced Navier Stokes (RNS) initial value space marching solution technique has been applied to a class of separated flow problems within a diffusing S-duct configuration characterized by vortex-liftoff. Both the FNS and the RNS solution technique were able to capture the overall flow physics of vortex lift-off, and gave remarkably similar results which agreed reasonably well with the experimental measured averaged performance parameters of engine face total pressure recovery and distortion. However, the Full Navier-Stokes and Reduced Navier-Stokes also consistently predicted separation further downstream in the M2129 inlet S-duct than was indicated by experimental data, thus compensating errors were present in the two Navier-Stokes analyses. The difficulties encountered in the Navier-Stokes separations analyses of the M2129 inlet S-duct center primarily on turbulence model issues, and these focused on two distinct but different phenomena, namely, (1) characterization of low skin friction adverse pressure gradient flows, and (2) description of the near wall behavior of flows characterized by vortex lift-off.

  7. Self-similarity in incompressible Navier-Stokes equations.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Ali; Kavvas, M Levent

    2015-12-01

    The self-similarity conditions of the 3-dimensional (3D) incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are obtained by utilizing one-parameter Lie group of point scaling transformations. It is found that the scaling exponents of length dimensions in i = 1, 2, 3 coordinates in 3-dimensions are not arbitrary but equal for the self-similarity of 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. It is also shown that the self-similarity in this particular flow process can be achieved in different time and space scales when the viscosity of the fluid is also scaled in addition to other flow variables. In other words, the self-similarity of Navier-Stokes equations is achievable under different fluid environments in the same or different gravity conditions. Self-similarity criteria due to initial and boundary conditions are also presented. Utilizing the proposed self-similarity conditions of the 3D hydrodynamic flow process, the value of a flow variable at a specified time and space can be scaled to a corresponding value in a self-similar domain at the corresponding time and space.

  8. Preconditioned conjugate gradient methods for the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Ng, Wing-Fai; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1994-01-01

    A preconditioned Krylov subspace method (GMRES) is used to solve the linear systems of equations formed at each time-integration step of the unsteady, two-dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes equations of fluid flow. The Navier-Stokes equations are cast in an implicit, upwind finite-volume, flux-split formulation. Several preconditioning techniques are investigated to enhance the efficiency and convergence rate of the implicit solver based on the GMRES algorithm. The superiority of the new solver is established by comparisons with a conventional implicit solver, namely line Gauss-Seidel relaxation (LGSR). Computational test results for low-speed (incompressible flow over a backward-facing step at Mach 0.1), transonic flow (trailing edge flow in a transonic turbine cascade), and hypersonic flow (shock-on-shock interactions on a cylindrical leading edge at Mach 6.0) are presented. For the Mach 0.1 case, overall speedup factors of up to 17 (in terms of time-steps) and 15 (in terms of CPU time on a CRAY-YMP/8) are found in favor of the preconditioned GMRES solver, when compared with the LGSR solver. The corresponding speedup factors for the transonic flow case are 17 and 23, respectively. The hypersonic flow case shows slightly lower speedup factors of 9 and 13, respectively. The study of preconditioners conducted in this research reveals that a new LUSGS-type preconditioner is much more efficient than a conventional incomplete LU-type preconditioner.

  9. Navier Stokes simulations of supersonic jets from axisymmetric and rectangular nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, S. X.; Krothapalli, A.; Wishart, D.

    1992-07-01

    A mass-weighted time-averaged Navier-Stokes approach is used to solve a 3D flow of supersonic jets. An algebraic eddy viscosity model is presented which accounts for the turbulence of the compressible mixing layer. Particular attention is given to Mach 2 jets from an axisymmetric nozzle and a rectangular nozzle of aspect ratio 4:1. Good agreement is found between measurements and the Navier-Stokes simulations for supersonic jets from both axisymmetric and rectangular nozzles.

  10. Scaling Relations and Self-Similarity of 3-Dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Ali; Kavvas, M Levent

    2017-07-25

    Scaling conditions to achieve self-similar solutions of 3-Dimensional (3D) Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations, as an initial and boundary value problem, are obtained by utilizing Lie Group of Point Scaling Transformations. By means of an open-source Navier-Stokes solver and the derived self-similarity conditions, we demonstrated self-similarity within the time variation of flow dynamics for a rigid-lid cavity problem under both up-scaled and down-scaled domains. The strength of the proposed approach lies in its ability to consider the underlying flow dynamics through not only from the governing equations under consideration but also from the initial and boundary conditions, hence allowing to obtain perfect self-similarity in different time and space scales. The proposed methodology can be a valuable tool in obtaining self-similar flow dynamics under preferred level of detail, which can be represented by initial and boundary value problems under specific assumptions.

  11. A Navier-Stokes boundary element solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, D. R.; Lafe, O.; Cheng, A. H-D.

    1995-01-01

    Using global interpolation functions (GIF's) boundary element solutions are obtained for two-dimensional laminar flows. Two schemes are proposed for handling the convective terms. The first treats convection as a forcing function, and converts the flow equations to pseudo-Poisson equations. In the second scheme, some convective effect is incorporated into the fundamental solution used in constructing the pertinent integral equations. The lid-driven cavity flow is selected as the benchmark problem.

  12. Finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine (SSME) has extremely complex internal flow structure. The geometry of the flow domain is three-dimensional with complicated topology. The flow is compressible, viscous, and turbulent with large gradients in flow quantities and regions of recirculations. The analysis of the flow field in SSME involves several tedious steps. One is the geometrical modeling of the particular zone of the SSME being studied. Accessing the geometry definition, digitalizing it, and developing surface interpolations suitable for an interior grid generator require considerable amount of manual labor. There are several types of grid generators available with some general-purpose finite element programs. An efficient and robust computational scheme for solving 3D Navier-Stokes equations has to be implemented. Post processing software has to be adapted to visualize and analyze the computed 3D flow field. The progress made in a project to develop software for the analysis of the flow is discussed. The technical approach to the development of the finite element scheme and the relaxation procedure are discussed. The three dimensional finite element code for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is listed.

  13. Novel Scalable 3-D MT Inverse Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvshinov, A. V.; Kruglyakov, M.; Geraskin, A.

    2016-12-01

    We present a new, robust and fast, three-dimensional (3-D) magnetotelluric (MT) inverse solver. As a forward modelling engine a highly-scalable solver extrEMe [1] is used. The (regularized) inversion is based on an iterative gradient-type optimization (quasi-Newton method) and exploits adjoint sources approach for fast calculation of the gradient of the misfit. The inverse solver is able to deal with highly detailed and contrasting models, allows for working (separately or jointly) with any type of MT (single-site and/or inter-site) responses, and supports massive parallelization. Different parallelization strategies implemented in the code allow for optimal usage of available computational resources for a given problem set up. To parameterize an inverse domain a mask approach is implemented, which means that one can merge any subset of forward modelling cells in order to account for (usually) irregular distribution of observation sites. We report results of 3-D numerical experiments aimed at analysing the robustness, performance and scalability of the code. In particular, our computational experiments carried out at different platforms ranging from modern laptops to high-performance clusters demonstrate practically linear scalability of the code up to thousands of nodes. 1. Kruglyakov, M., A. Geraskin, A. Kuvshinov, 2016. Novel accurate and scalable 3-D MT forward solver based on a contracting integral equation method, Computers and Geosciences, in press.

  14. Navier-Stokes Computations on Commodity Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Faulkner, Thomas R.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we discuss and demonstrate the feasibility of solving high-fidelity, nonlinear computational fluid dynamics (CFD) problems of practical interest on commodity machines, namely Pentium Pro PC's. Such calculations have now become possible due to the progress in computational power and memory of the off-the-shelf commodity computers, along with the growth in bandwidth and communication speeds of networks. A widely used CFD code known as TLNS3D, which was developed originally on large shared memory computers was selected for this effort. This code has recently been ported to massively parallel processor (MPP) type machines, where natural partitioning along grid blocks is adopted in which one or more blocks are distributed to each of the available processors. In this paper, a similar approach is adapted to port this code to a cluster of Pentium Pro computers. The message passing among the processors is accomplished through the use of standard message passing interface (MPI) libraries. Scaling studies indicate fairly high level of parallelism on such clusters of commodity machines, thus making solutions to Navier-Stokes equations for practical problems more affordable.

  15. Three-Dimensional Navier-Stokes Simulation of Space Shuttle Main Propulsion 17-inch Disconnect Valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, M.; Pearce, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A steady incompressible three-dimensional viscous flow analysis has been conducted for the Space Shuttle external tank/orbiter propellant feed line disconnect flapper valves with upstream elbows. The Navier-Stokes code, INS3D, is modified to handle interior obstacles and a simple turbulence model. The flow solver is tested for stability and convergence in the presence of interior flappers. An under-relaxation scheme has been incorporated to improve the solution stability. Important flow characteristics such as secondary flows, recirculation, vortex and wake regions, and separated flows are observed. Computed values for forces, moments, and pressure drop are in satisfactory agreement with water flow test data covering a maximum tube Reynolds number of 3.5 million. The predicted hydrodynamical stability of the flappers correlates well with the measurements.

  16. Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes simulation of Space Shuttle Main Propulsion 17-inch disconnect valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, M.; Pearce, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A steady incompressible three-dimensional viscous flow analysis has been conducted for the Space Shuttle external tank/orbiter propellant feed line disconnect flapper valves with upstream elbows. The Navier-Stokes code, INS3D, is modified to handle interior obstacles and a simple turbulence model. The flow solver is tested for stability and convergence in the presence of interior flappers. An under-relaxation scheme has been incorporated to improve the solution stability. Important flow characteristics such as secondary flows, recirculation, vortex and wake regions, and separated flows are observed. Computed values for forces, moments, and pressure drop are in satisfactory agreement with water flow test data covering a maximum tube Reynolds number of 3.5 million. The predicted hydrodynamical stability of the flappers correlates well with the measurements.

  17. Parabolized Navier-Stokes methods for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Scott L.

    1991-01-01

    A representative sampling of the techniques used in the integration of the Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) equations is presented. Special atention is given to recent algorithms developed specifically for application to high speed flows, characterized by the presence of strong embedded shock waves and real gas effects. It is shown that PNS solvers are being used in the analysis of sonic boom signatures. Methods for modeling physical effects are discussed, including an overview of commonly used turbulence models and a more detailed discussion of techniques for including equilibrium and finite rate real gas effects.

  18. About the Regularized Navier Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannone, Marco; Karch, Grzegorz

    2005-03-01

    The first goal of this paper is to study the large time behavior of solutions to the Cauchy problem for the 3-dimensional incompressible Navier Stokes system. The Marcinkiewicz space L3,∞ is used to prove some asymptotic stability results for solutions with infinite energy. Next, this approach is applied to the analysis of two classical “regularized” Navier Stokes systems. The first one was introduced by J. Leray and consists in “mollifying” the nonlinearity. The second one was proposed by J.-L. Lions, who added the artificial hyper-viscosity (-Δ)ℓ/ 2, ℓ > 2 to the model. It is shown in the present paper that, in the whole space, solutions to those modified models converge as t → ∞ toward solutions of the original Navier Stokes system.

  19. A gas-kinetic BGK scheme for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Kun

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an improved gas-kinetic scheme based on the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) model for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The current method extends the previous gas-kinetic Navier-Stokes solver developed by Xu and Prendergast by implementing a general nonequilibrium state to represent the gas distribution function at the beginning of each time step. As a result, the requirement in the previous scheme, such as the particle collision time being less than the time step for the validity of the BGK Navier-Stokes solution, is removed. Therefore, the applicable regime of the current method is much enlarged and the Navier-Stokes solution can be obtained accurately regardless of the ratio between the collision time and the time step. The gas-kinetic Navier-Stokes solver developed by Chou and Baganoff is the limiting case of the current method, and it is valid only under such a limiting condition. Also, in this paper, the appropriate implementation of boundary condition for the kinetic scheme, different kinetic limiting cases, and the Prandtl number fix are presented. The connection among artificial dissipative central schemes, Godunov-type schemes, and the gas-kinetic BGK method is discussed. Many numerical tests are included to validate the current method.

  20. Implementation of Flow Tripping Capability in the USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Abdol-Harrid, Khaled S.; Campbell, Richard L.; Frink, Neal T.

    2006-01-01

    A flow tripping capability is added to an established NASA tetrahedral unstructured parallel Navier-Stokes flow solver, USM3D. The capability is based on prescribing an appropriate profile of turbulence model variables to energize the boundary layer in a plane normal to a specified trip region on the body surface. We demonstrate this approach using the k-e two-equation turbulence model of USM3D. Modification to the solution procedure primarily consists of developing a data structure to identify all unstructured tetrahedral grid cells located in the plane normal to a specified surface trip region and computing a function based on the mean flow solution to specify the modified profile of the turbulence model variables. We leverage this data structure and also show an adjunct approach that is based on enforcing a laminar flow condition on the otherwise fully turbulent flow solution in user specified region. The latter approach is applied for the solutions obtained using other one- and two-equation turbulence models of USM3D. A key ingredient of the present capability is the use of a graphical user-interface tool PREDISC to define a trip region on the body surface in an existing grid. Verification of the present modifications is demonstrated on three cases, namely, a flat plate, the RAE2822 airfoil, and the DLR F6 wing-fuselage configuration.

  1. Implementation of Flow Tripping Capability in the USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Campbell, Richard L.; Frink, Neal T.

    2006-01-01

    A flow tripping capability is added to an established NASA tetrahedral unstructured parallel Navier-Stokes flow solver, USM3D. The capability is based on prescribing an appropriate profile of turbulence model variables to energize the boundary layer in a plane normal to a specified trip region on the body surface. We demonstrate this approach using the k-epsilon two-equation turbulence model of USM3D. Modification to the solution procedure primarily consists of developing a data structure to identify all unstructured tetrahedral grid cells located in the plane normal to a specified surface trip region and computing a function based on the mean flow solution to specify the modified profile of the turbulence model variables. We leverage this data structure and also show an adjunct approach that is based on enforcing a laminar flow condition on the otherwise fully turbulent flow solution in user-specified region. The latter approach is applied for the solutions obtained using other one-and two-equation turbulence models of USM3D. A key ingredient of the present capability is the use of a graphical user-interface tool PREDISC to define a trip region on the body surface in an existing grid. Verification of the present modifications is demonstrated on three cases, namely, a flat plate, the RAE2822 airfoil, and the DLR F6 wing-fuselage configuration.

  2. Relaxation Method for Navier-Stokes Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, P. M. C.

    2012-04-01

    The motivation for this work was a simple experiment [P. M. C. de Oliveira, S. Moss de Oliveira, F. A. Pereira and J. C. Sartorelli, preprint (2010), arXiv:1005.4086], where a little polystyrene ball is released falling in air. The interesting observation is a speed breaking. After an initial nearly linear time-dependence, the ball speed reaches a maximum value. After this, the speed finally decreases until its final, limit value. The provided explanation is related to the so-called von Kármán street of vortices successively formed behind the falling ball. After completely formed, the whole street extends for some hundred diameters. However, before a certain transient time needed to reach this steady-state, the street is shorter and the drag force is relatively reduced. Thus, at the beginning of the fall, a small and light ball may reach a speed superior to the sustainable steady-state value. Besides the real experiment, the numerical simulation of a related theoretical problem is also performed. A cylinder (instead of a 3D ball, thus reducing the effective dimension to 2) is positioned at rest inside a wind tunnel initially switched off. Suddenly, at t = 0 it is switched on with a constant and uniform wind velocity ěc{V} far from the cylinder and perpendicular to it. This is the first boundary condition. The second is the cylinder surface, where the wind velocity is null. In between these two boundaries, the velocity field is determined by solving the Navier-Stokes equation, as a function of time. For that, the initial condition is taken as the known Stokes laminar limit V → 0, since initially the tunnel is switched off. The numerical method adopted in this task is the object of the current text.

  3. LINFLUX-AE: A Turbomachinery Aeroelastic Code Based on a 3-D Linearized Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Bakhle, M. A.; Trudell, J. J.; Mehmed, O.; Stefko, G. L.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the development and validation of LINFLUX-AE, a turbomachinery aeroelastic code based on the linearized unsteady 3-D Euler solver, LINFLUX. A helical fan with flat plate geometry is selected as the test case for numerical validation. The steady solution required by LINFLUX is obtained from the nonlinear Euler/Navier Stokes solver TURBO-AE. The report briefly describes the salient features of LINFLUX and the details of the aeroelastic extension. The aeroelastic formulation is based on a modal approach. An eigenvalue formulation is used for flutter analysis. The unsteady aerodynamic forces required for flutter are obtained by running LINFLUX for each mode, interblade phase angle and frequency of interest. The unsteady aerodynamic forces for forced response analysis are obtained from LINFLUX for the prescribed excitation, interblade phase angle, and frequency. The forced response amplitude is calculated from the modal summation of the generalized displacements. The unsteady pressures, work done per cycle, eigenvalues and forced response amplitudes obtained from LINFLUX are compared with those obtained from LINSUB, TURBO-AE, ASTROP2, and ANSYS.

  4. Navier-Stokes Computations With One-Equation Turbulence Model for Flows Along Concave Wall Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the use of a time-marching three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equation numerical solver with a one-equation turbulence model to simulate the flow fields developed along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension flat wall surface. The 3-D Navier- Stokes numerical solver came from the NASA Glenn-HT code. The one-equation turbulence model was derived from the Spalart and Allmaras model. The computational approach was first calibrated with the computations of the velocity and Reynolds shear stress profiles of a steady flat plate boundary layer flow. The computational approach was then used to simulate developing boundary layer flows along concave wall surfaces without and with a downstream extension wall. The author investigated the computational results of surface friction factors, near surface velocity components, near wall temperatures, and a turbulent shear stress component in terms of turbulence modeling, computational mesh configurations, inlet turbulence level, and time iteration step. The computational results were compared with existing measurements of skin friction factors, velocity components, and shear stresses of the developing boundary layer flows. With a fine computational mesh and a one-equation model, the computational approach could predict accurately the skin friction factors, near surface velocity and temperature, and shear stress within the flows. The computed velocity components and shear stresses also showed the vortices effect on the velocity variations over a concave wall. The computed eddy viscosities at the near wall locations were also compared with the results from a two equation turbulence modeling technique. The inlet turbulence length scale was found to have little effect on the eddy viscosities at locations near the concave wall surface. The eddy viscosities, from the one-equation and two-equation modeling, were comparable at most stream-wise stations. The present one

  5. Navier-Stokes analysis of cold scramjet-afterbody flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay; Engelund, Walter C.; Eleshaky, Mohamed E.

    1989-01-01

    The progress of two efforts in coding solutions of Navier-Stokes equations is summarized. The first effort concerns a 3-D space marching parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code being modified to compute the supersonic mixing flow through an internal/external expansion nozzle with multicomponent gases. The 3-D PNS equations, coupled with a set of species continuity equations, are solved using an implicit finite difference scheme. The completed work is summarized and includes code modifications for four chemical species, computing the flow upstream of the upper cowl for a theoretical air mixture, developing an initial plane solution for the inner nozzle region, and computing the flow inside the nozzle for both a N2/O2 mixture and a Freon-12/Ar mixture, and plotting density-pressure contours for the inner nozzle region. The second effort concerns a full Navier-Stokes code. The species continuity equations account for the diffusion of multiple gases. This 3-D explicit afterbody code has the ability to use high order numerical integration schemes such as the 4th order MacCormack, and the Gottlieb-MacCormack schemes. Changes to the work are listed and include, but are not limited to: (1) internal/external flow capability; (2) new treatments of the cowl wall boundary conditions and relaxed computations around the cowl region and cowl tip; (3) the entering of the thermodynamic and transport properties of Freon-12, Ar, O, and N; (4) modification to the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model to account for turbulent eddies generated by cowl walls inside and external to the nozzle; and (5) adopting a relaxation formula to account for the turbulence in the mixing shear layer.

  6. Navier-Stokes analysis of cold scramjet-afterbody flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baysal, Oktay; Engelund, Walter C.; Eleshaky, Mohamed E.

    1989-04-01

    The progress of two efforts in coding solutions of Navier-Stokes equations is summarized. The first effort concerns a 3-D space marching parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code being modified to compute the supersonic mixing flow through an internal/external expansion nozzle with multicomponent gases. The 3-D PNS equations, coupled with a set of species continuity equations, are solved using an implicit finite difference scheme. The completed work is summarized and includes code modifications for four chemical species, computing the flow upstream of the upper cowl for a theoretical air mixture, developing an initial plane solution for the inner nozzle region, and computing the flow inside the nozzle for both a N2/O2 mixture and a Freon-12/Ar mixture, and plotting density-pressure contours for the inner nozzle region. The second effort concerns a full Navier-Stokes code. The species continuity equations account for the diffusion of multiple gases. This 3-D explicit afterbody code has the ability to use high order numerical integration schemes such as the 4th order MacCormack, and the Gottlieb-MacCormack schemes. Changes to the work are listed and include, but are not limited to: (1) internal/external flow capability; (2) new treatments of the cowl wall boundary conditions and relaxed computations around the cowl region and cowl tip; (3) the entering of the thermodynamic and transport properties of Freon-12, Ar, O, and N; (4) modification to the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model to account for turbulent eddies generated by cowl walls inside and external to the nozzle; and (5) adopting a relaxation formula to account for the turbulence in the mixing shear layer.

  7. Navier-Stokes analysis of radial turbine rotor performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of flow through a radial turbine rotor using the three-dimensional, thin-layer Navier-Stokes code RVC3D is described. The rotor is a solid version of an air-cooled metallic radial turbine having thick trailing edges, shroud clearance, and scalloped-backface clearance. Results are presented at the nominal operating condition using both a zero-clearance model and a model simulating the effects of the shroud and scalloped-backface clearance flows. A comparison with the available test data is made and details of the internal flow physics are discussed, allowing a better understanding of the complex flow distribution within the rotor.

  8. Enhancement of USM3D Unstructured Flow Solver for High-Speed High-Temperature Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Frink, Neal T.

    2009-01-01

    Large temperature and pressure fluctuations have a profound effect on turbulence development in transonic and supersonic jets. For high-speed, high-temperature jet flows, standard turbulence models lack the ability to predict the observed mixing rate of a shear layer. Several proposals to address this deficiency have been advanced in the literature to modify the turbulence transport equations in a variety of ways. In the present study, some of the most proven and simple modifications to two-equation turbulence models have been selected and implemented in NASA's USM3D tetrahedral Navier-Stokes flow solver. The modifications include the addition of compressibility correction and pressure dilatation terms in the turbulence transport equations for high-speed flows, and the addition of a simple modification to the Boussinesq's closure model coefficient for high-temperature jets. The efficacy of the extended models is demonstrated by comparison with experimental data for two supersonic axisymmetric jet test cases at design pressure ratio.

  9. Some practical turbulence modeling options for Reynolds-averaged full Navier-Stokes calculations of three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    New turbulence modeling options recently implemented for the 3-D version of Proteus, a Reynolds-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes code, are described. The implemented turbulence models include: the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model, the Baldwin-Barth one-equation model, the Chien k-epsilon model, and the Launder-Sharma k-epsilon model. Features of this turbulence modeling package include: well documented and easy to use turbulence modeling options, uniform integration of turbulence models from different classes, automatic initialization of turbulence variables for calculations using one- or two-equation turbulence models, multiple solid boundaries treatment, and fully vectorized L-U solver for one- and two-equation models. Validation test cases include the incompressible and compressible flat plate turbulent boundary layers, turbulent developing S-duct flow, and glancing shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction. Good agreement is obtained between the computational results and experimental data. Sensitivity of the compressible turbulent solutions with the method of y(sup +) computation, the turbulent length scale correction, and some compressibility corrections are examined in detail. The test cases show that the highly optimized one-and two-equation turbulence models can be used in routine 3-D Navier-Stokes computations with no significant increase in CPU time as compared with the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model.

  10. Some practical turbulence modeling options for Reynolds-averaged full Navier-Stokes calculations of three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Trong T.

    1993-01-01

    New turbulence modeling options recently implemented for the 3D version of Proteus, a Reynolds-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes code, are described. The implemented turbulence models include: the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model, the Baldwin-Barth one-equation model, the Chien k-epsilon model, and the Launder-Sharma k-epsilon model. Features of this turbulence modeling package include: well documented and easy to use turbulence modeling options, uniform integration of turbulence models from different classes, automatic initialization of turbulence variables for calculations using one- or two-equation turbulence models, multiple solid boundaries treatment, and fully vectorized L-U solver for one- and two-equation models. Good agreements are obtained between the computational results and experimental data. Sensitivity of the compressible turbulent solutions with the method of y(+) computation, the turbulent length scale correction, and some compressibility corrections are examined in detail. Test cases show that the highly optimized one- and two-equation turbulence models can be used in routine 3D Navier-Stokes computations with no significant increase in CPU time as compared with the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model.

  11. From Navier-Stokes to Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredberg, Irene; Keeler, Cynthia; Lysov, Vyacheslav; Strominger, Andrew

    2012-07-01

    We show by explicit construction that for every solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation in p + 1 dimensions, there is a uniquely associated "dual" solution of the vacuum Einstein equations in p + 2 dimensions. The dual geometry has an intrinsically flat timelike boundary segment Σc whose extrinsic curvature is given by the stress tensor of the Navier-Stokes fluid. We consider a "near-horizon" limit in which Σc becomes highly accelerated. The near-horizon expansion in gravity is shown to be mathematically equivalent to the hydrodynamic expansion in fluid dynamics, and the Einstein equation reduces to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation. For p = 2, we show that the full dual geometry is algebraically special Petrov type II. The construction is a mathematically precise realization of suggestions of a holographic duality relating fluids and horizons which began with the membrane paradigm in the 70's and resurfaced recently in studies of the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  12. Parametrics on 2D Navier-Stokes analysis of a Mach 2.68 bifurcated rectangular mixed-compression inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, M.; Saunders, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    The supersonic diffuser of a Mach 2.68 bifurcated, rectangular, mixed-compression inlet was analyzed using a two-dimensional (2D) Navier-Stokes flow solver. Parametric studies were performed on turbulence models, computational grids and bleed models. The computer flowfield was substantially different from the original inviscid design, due to interactions of shocks, boundary layers, and bleed. Good agreement with experimental data was obtained in many aspects. Many of the discrepancies were thought to originate primarily from 3D effects. Therefore, a balance should be struck between expending resources on a high fidelity 2D simulation, and the inherent limitations of 2D analysis. The solutions were fairly insensitive to turbulence models, grids and bleed models. Overall, the k-e turbulence model, and the bleed models based on unchoked bleed hole discharge coefficients or uniform velocity are recommended. The 2D Navier-Stokes methods appear to be a useful tool for the design and analysis of supersonic inlets, by providing a higher fidelity simulation of the inlet flowfield than inviscid methods, in a reasonable turnaround time.

  13. A poor man's compressible Navier--Stokes equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonough, J. M.; Strodtbeck, J. P.

    2008-11-01

    We outline derivation of a ``poor man's compressible Navier--Stokes'' (PMCNS) equation, a discrete dynamical system (DDS) extending analyses of McDonough and Huang (Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 44, 545, 2004) for the 2-D incompressible Navier--Stokes (N.--S.) equation to the 3-D compressible counterpart, and we indicate a method for computing bifurcation parameters of the DDS directly from those of the original differential equations, along with known physical parameters such as transport properties. We briefly provide a mathematical characterization of the PMCNS equation, in particular noting an approximate relationship to micro-local analysis of a pseudo-differential operator of the compressible N.--S. equation. We then investigate time series, power spectra and bifurcation diagrams of this DDS for various combinations of bifurcation parameters, including those most closely corresponding to homogeneous, isotropic turbulence; and we present comparisons of PMCNS calculations with extant experimental and DNS compressible flow data. We conclude by discussing application of this discrete dynamical system to construction of subgrid-scale models for LES of compressible flows within a synthetic-velocity/multi-scale framework.

  14. Navier-Stokes analysis of turbomachinery blade external heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, A. A.; Sockol, P. M.; Gorla, R. S. R.

    1992-01-01

    The two-dimensional, compressible, thin-layer Navier-Stokes and energy equations were solved numerically to obtain heat transfer rates on turbomachinery blades. The Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model and the q - omega low Reynolds number, two-equation model were used for modeling of turbulence. For the numerical solution of the governing equations a four-stage Runge-Kutta solver was employed. The turbulence model equations were solved using an implicit scheme. Numerical solutions are presented for two-dimensional flow within two vane cascades. The heat transfer results and the pressure distributions were compared with published experimental data. The agreement between the numerical calculations and the experimental values were found to be generally favorable. The position of transition from laminar to turbulent flow was also predicted accurately.

  15. Navier-Stokes analysis of turbomachinery blade external heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorla, Rama S. R.

    1991-01-01

    The two-dimensional, compressible, thin-layer Navier-Stokes and energy equations were solved numerically to obtain heat transfer rates on turbomachinery blades. The Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model and the q-omega low Reynolds number two-equation model were used for modeling of turbulence. For the numerical solution of the governing equations a four-stage Runge-Kutta solver was employed. The turbulence model equations were solved using an implicit scheme. Numerical solutions are presented for two-dimensional flow within two vane cascades. The heat transfer results and the pressure distributions were compared with published experimental data. The agreement between the numerical calculations and the experimental values were found to be generally favorable. The position of transition from laminar to turbulent flow was also predicted accurately.

  16. Navier-Stokes analysis of turbomachinery blade external heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, A. A.; Sockol, P. M.; Gorla, R. S. R.

    1992-01-01

    The two-dimensional, compressible, thin-layer Navier-Stokes and energy equations were solved numerically to obtain heat transfer rates on turbomachinery blades. The Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model and the q - omega low Reynolds number, two-equation model were used for modeling of turbulence. For the numerical solution of the governing equations a four-stage Runge-Kutta solver was employed. The turbulence model equations were solved using an implicit scheme. Numerical solutions are presented for two-dimensional flow within two vane cascades. The heat transfer results and the pressure distributions were compared with published experimental data. The agreement between the numerical calculations and the experimental values were found to be generally favorable. The position of transition from laminar to turbulent flow was also predicted accurately.

  17. Towards Optimal Multigrid Efficiency for the Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    A fast multigrid solver for the steady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is presented. Unlike time-marching schemes, this approach uses relaxation of the steady equations. Application of this method results in a discretization that correctly distinguishes between the advection and elliptic parts of the operator, allowing efficient smoothers to be constructed. Numerical solutions are shown for flow over a flat plate and a Karman-Trefftz airfoil. Using collective Gauss-Seidel line relaxation in both the vertical and horizontal directions, multigrid convergence behavior approaching that of O(N) methods is achieved. The computational efficiency of the numerical scheme is compared with that of a Runge-Kutta based multigrid method.

  18. Incompressible Navier-Stokes and parabolized Navier-Stokes formulations and computational techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, S. G.

    1984-01-01

    The differential formulations and computational techniques currently used for the incompressible Navier-Stokes (NS) and parabolic Navier-Stokes (PNS) equations are reviewed. In particular, attention is given to problems associated with the choice of difference equations, the method of solution and the choice of algorithm, the coupling of dependent variables and discretized equations, the application of boundary conditions, and grid generation. A new composite velocity NS and PNS formulation in (u,v,p) variables is presented, and the applicability of a 'forward' difference global pressure iteration for the (u,v,p) PNS system is demonstrated.

  19. A finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.; Nayani, S.

    1990-01-01

    Computation of the flow field inside a space shuttle main engine (SSME) requires the application of state of the art computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technology. Several computer codes are under development to solve 3-D flow through the hot gas manifold. Some algorithms were designed to solve the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations, either by implicit or explicit factorization methods, using several hundred or thousands of time steps to reach a steady state solution. A new iterative algorithm is being developed for the solution of the implicit finite element equations without assembling global matrices. It is an efficient iteration scheme based on a modified nonlinear Gauss-Seidel iteration with symmetric sweeps. The algorithm is analyzed for a model equation and is shown to be unconditionally stable. Results from a series of test problems are presented. The finite element code was tested for couette flow, which is flow under a pressure gradient between two parallel plates in relative motion. Another problem that was solved is viscous laminar flow over a flat plate. The general 3-D finite element code was used to compute the flow in an axisymmetric turnaround duct at low Mach numbers.

  20. A three-dimensional upwind PNS code for chemically reacting scramjet flowfields. [Parabolized Navier Stokes

    SciTech Connect

    Wadawadigi, G.; Tannehill, J.C.; Buelow, P.E.; Lawrence, S.L. NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA )

    1992-07-01

    A new upwind, parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code has been developed to compute the three-dimensional (3D) chemically reacting flow in scramjet (supersonic combustion ramjet) engines. The code is a modification of the 3D upwind PNS (UPS) airflow code which has been extended in the present study to permit internal flow calculations with hydrogen-air chemistry. With these additions, the new code has the capability of computing aerodynamic and propulsive flowfields simultaneously. The algorithm solves the PNS equations using a finite-volume, upwind TVD method based on Roe's approximate Riemann solver that has been modified to account for 'real gas' effects. The fluid medium is assumed to be a chemically reacting mixture of thermally perfect (but calorically imperfect) gases in thermal equilibrium. The new code has been applied to two test cases. These include the Burrows-Kurkov supersonic combustion experiment and a generic 3D scramjet flowfield. The computed results compare favorably with the available experimental data. 38 refs.

  1. An Immersed Boundary Method for Solving the Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations with Fluid Structure Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brehm, Christoph; Barad, Michael F.; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2016-01-01

    An immersed boundary method for the compressible Navier-Stokes equation and the additional infrastructure that is needed to solve moving boundary problems and fully coupled fluid-structure interaction is described. All the methods described in this paper were implemented in NASA's LAVA solver framework. The underlying immersed boundary method is based on the locally stabilized immersed boundary method that was previously introduced by the authors. In the present paper this method is extended to account for all aspects that are involved for fluid structure interaction simulations, such as fast geometry queries and stencil computations, the treatment of freshly cleared cells, and the coupling of the computational fluid dynamics solver with a linear structural finite element method. The current approach is validated for moving boundary problems with prescribed body motion and fully coupled fluid structure interaction problems in 2D and 3D. As part of the validation procedure, results from the second AIAA aeroelastic prediction workshop are also presented. The current paper is regarded as a proof of concept study, while more advanced methods for fluid structure interaction are currently being investigated, such as geometric and material nonlinearities, and advanced coupling approaches.

  2. Navier-Stokes Simulation of Several High-Lift Reference H Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Wendy B.

    1999-01-01

    The subsonic flow field was numerically simulated around several High Speed Research Reference H configurations at various pitch and yaw angles. A sequence of structured-viscous grids were generated; the first grid modeled the wing-body high-lift geometry, and the second grid incorporated the nacelles and the horizontal tail. The third grid modeled the full-span geometry for sideslip calculations, and was obtained by mirroring a coarser version of the second grid. The CFL3D code, a Reynolds averaged, thin-layer Navier-Stokes flow solver for structural grids, was used for the flow solver and modeled the free-air Reference H high-lift configuration at wind tunnel conditions of Mach number 0.24 and Reynolds number of 1.4 x 10(exp 5) per in. Pitch sweeps were performed at angles of attack from 6 deg to 15 deg. Sideslip angle sweeps at 0 deg <= Beta <= +18 deg were performed at an angle of attack of 8 deg. The lateral and longitudinal performance characteristics were well predicted and very good force and moment comparisons were obtained. A very complex multiple vortical system develops at the higher angles of attack, and detailed postprocessing of the solutions provided a comprehensive three-dimensional understanding of the flow which helps to correlate and interpret the wind tunnel data.

  3. Incompressible Navier-Stokes Simulation Procedure for a Wingtip Vortex Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dacles-Mariani, Jennifer; Kwak, Dochan; Zilliac, Greg

    1995-01-01

    The pacing items to reach the highly desirable goal of obtaining computationally accurate flow simulation of a wingtip vortex include; super-computer development, solver accuracy, grid generation and turbulence modeling. In these four areas, many advances have been made but the fact remains that most wing computations are, at best, five percent accurate (in drag coefficient, for example). This level of accuracy has been sufficient for many purposes such as airfoil design, rudimentary wing design, and some forms of optimization. However, this accuracy level will not allow commercial aircraft designers to extract the remaining few percent of efficiency theoretically possible for conventional aircraft configurations. Thus further research is needed, particularly in the areas of solver development and turbulence modeling, to advance the state of the art of viscous computational techniques as applied to problems in aerodynamics. During the course of this study, a substantial amount of measured and computed results have been acquired. In this paper, only a small selection of experimental and computational results will be presented. This paper will outline and discuss a simulation procedure for a wingtip vortex flow analysis using the method of artificial compressibility to solve the three-dimensional, incompressible, Navier-Stokes equations (INS3D-UP).

  4. LU-SGS implicit algorithm for three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with source term

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Chang, Leon; Kwak, Dochan

    1989-01-01

    A numerical method is developed for solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using the concept of pseudocompressibility. A lower-upper symmetric-Gauss-Seidel implicit scheme is developed for three-dimensional incompressible viscous flow computations. The present algorithm offers additional advantages when solving the flow equations with source terms. Complete vectorizability of the algorithm on oblique planes of sweep in three-dimensions is accomplished in a new flow solver, INS3D-LU code. Spatial differencing is a second-order accurate semi-discrete finite-volume method augmented by a third-order accurate numerical dissipation model which is based on spectral-radii. Comparison of numerical solutions for a curved duct with experimental data shows good agreement. The method is applied to calculate the inducer flow of the Space Shuttle Main Engine turbopump.

  5. Chemical nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes solutions for hypersonic flow over an ablating graphite nosetip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. K.; Henline, W. D.

    1993-01-01

    The general boundary conditions including mass and energy balances of chemically equilibrated or nonequilibrated gas adjacent to ablating surfaces have been derived. A computer procedure based on these conditions was developed and interfaced with the Navier-Stokes solver for predictions of the flow field, surface temperature, and surface ablation rates over re-entry space vehicles with ablating Thermal Protection Systems (TPS). The Navier-Stokes solver with general surface thermochemistry boundary conditions can predict more realistic solutions and provide useful information for the design of TPS. A test case with a proposed hypersonic test vehicle configuration and associated free stream conditions was developed. Solutions with various surface boundary conditions were obtained, and the effect of nonequilibrium gas as well as surface chemistry on surface heating and ablation rate were examined. The solutions of the GASP code with complete ablating surface conditions were compared with those of the ASC code. The direction of future work is also discussed.

  6. Evaluation of a Multigrid Scheme for the Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    A fast multigrid solver for the steady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The multigrid solver is based upon a factorizable discrete scheme for the velocity-pressure form of the Navier-Stokes equations. This scheme correctly distinguishes between the advection-diffusion and elliptic parts of the operator, allowing efficient smoothers to be constructed. To evaluate the multigrid algorithm, solutions are computed for flow over a flat plate, parabola, and a Karman-Trefftz airfoil. Both nonlifting and lifting airfoil flows are considered, with a Reynolds number range of 200 to 800. Convergence and accuracy of the algorithm are discussed. Using Gauss-Seidel line relaxation in alternating directions, multigrid convergence behavior approaching that of O(N) methods is achieved. The computational efficiency of the numerical scheme is compared with that of Runge-Kutta and implicit upwind based multigrid methods.

  7. Chemical nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes solutions for hypersonic flow over an ablating graphite nosetip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. K.; Henline, W. D.

    1993-01-01

    The general boundary conditions including mass and energy balances of chemically equilibrated or nonequilibrated gas adjacent to ablating surfaces have been derived. A computer procedure based on these conditions was developed and interfaced with the Navier-Stokes solver for predictions of the flow field, surface temperature, and surface ablation rates over re-entry space vehicles with ablating Thermal Protection Systems (TPS). The Navier-Stokes solver with general surface thermochemistry boundary conditions can predict more realistic solutions and provide useful information for the design of TPS. A test case with a proposed hypersonic test vehicle configuration and associated free stream conditions was developed. Solutions with various surface boundary conditions were obtained, and the effect of nonequilibrium gas as well as surface chemistry on surface heating and ablation rate were examined. The solutions of the GASP code with complete ablating surface conditions were compared with those of the ASC code. The direction of future work is also discussed.

  8. Navier-Stokes and Euler solutions for lee-side flows over supersonic delta wings. A correlation with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillin, S. Naomi; Thomas, James L.; Murman, Earll M.

    1990-01-01

    An Euler flow solver and a thin layer Navier-Stokes flow solver were used to numerically simulate the supersonic leeside flow fields over delta wings which were observed experimentally. Three delta wings with 75, 67.5, and 60 deg leading edge sweeps were computed over an angle-of-attack range of 4 to 20 deg at a Mach number 2.8. The Euler code and Navier-Stokes code predict equally well the primary flow structure where the flow is expected to be separated or attached at the leading edge based on the Stanbrook-Squire boundary. The Navier-Stokes code is capable of predicting both the primary and the secondary flow features for the parameter range investigated. For those flow conditions where the Euler code did not predict the correct type of primary flow structure, the Navier-Stokes code illustrated that the flow structure is sensitive to boundary layer model. In general, the laminar Navier-Stokes solutions agreed better with the experimental data, especially for the lower sweep delta wings. The computational results and a detailed re-examination of the experimental data resulted in a refinement of the flow classifications. This refinement in the flow classification results in the separation bubble with the shock flow type as the intermediate flow pattern between separated and attached flows.

  9. AIC Computations Using Navier-Stokes Equations on Single Image Supercomputers For Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru

    2004-01-01

    A procedure to accurately generate AIC using the Navier-Stokes solver including grid deformation is presented. Preliminary results show good comparisons between experiment and computed flutter boundaries for a rectangular wing. A full wing body configuration of an orbital space plane is selected for demonstration on a large number of processors. In the final paper the AIC of full wing body configuration will be computed. The scalability of the procedure on supercomputer will be demonstrated.

  10. Solution of three-dimensional afterbody flow using reduced Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almahroos, H. M. H.; Khosla, P. K.; Rubin, S. G.

    1991-01-01

    The flow over afterbody geometries was investigated using the reduced Navier-Stokes (RNS) approximation. Both pressure velocity flux-split and composites velocity primitive variable formulations were considered. Pressure or pseudopotential relaxation procedures are combined with sparse matrix or coupled strongly implicit algorithms to form a three-dimensional solver for general non-orthogonal coordinates. Three-dimensional subsonic and transonic viscous/inviscid interacting flows were evaluated. Solutions with and without regions of recirculation were obtained.

  11. Automated Euler and Navier-Stokes Database Generation for a Glide-Back Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Aftosmis, Mike J.; Pandya, Shishir A.; Ahmad, Jasim U.; Tejnil, Edward

    2004-01-01

    The past two decades have seen a sustained increase in the use of high fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in basic research, aircraft design, and the analysis of post-design issues. As the fidelity of a CFD method increases, the number of cases that can be readily and affordably computed greatly diminishes. However, computer speeds now exceed 2 GHz, hundreds of processors are currently available and more affordable, and advances in parallel CFD algorithms scale more readily with large numbers of processors. All of these factors make it feasible to compute thousands of high fidelity cases. However, there still remains the overwhelming task of monitoring the solution process. This paper presents an approach to automate the CFD solution process. A new software tool, AeroDB, is used to compute thousands of Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions for a 2nd generation glide-back booster in one week. The solution process exploits a common job-submission grid environment, the NASA Information Power Grid (IPG), using 13 computers located at 4 different geographical sites. Process automation and web-based access to a MySql database greatly reduces the user workload, removing much of the tedium and tendency for user input errors. The AeroDB framework is shown. The user submits/deletes jobs, monitors AeroDB's progress, and retrieves data and plots via a web portal. Once a job is in the database, a job launcher uses an IPG resource broker to decide which computers are best suited to run the job. Job/code requirements, the number of CPUs free on a remote system, and queue lengths are some of the parameters the broker takes into account. The Globus software provides secure services for user authentication, remote shell execution, and secure file transfers over an open network. AeroDB automatically decides when a job is completed. Currently, the Cart3D unstructured flow solver is used for the Euler equations, and the Overflow structured overset flow solver is used for the

  12. Automated Euler and Navier-Stokes Database Generation for a Glide-Back Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Aftosmis, Mike J.; Pandya, Shishir A.; Ahmad, Jasim U.; Tejnil, Edward

    2004-01-01

    The past two decades have seen a sustained increase in the use of high fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in basic research, aircraft design, and the analysis of post-design issues. As the fidelity of a CFD method increases, the number of cases that can be readily and affordably computed greatly diminishes. However, computer speeds now exceed 2 GHz, hundreds of processors are currently available and more affordable, and advances in parallel CFD algorithms scale more readily with large numbers of processors. All of these factors make it feasible to compute thousands of high fidelity cases. However, there still remains the overwhelming task of monitoring the solution process. This paper presents an approach to automate the CFD solution process. A new software tool, AeroDB, is used to compute thousands of Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions for a 2nd generation glide-back booster in one week. The solution process exploits a common job-submission grid environment, the NASA Information Power Grid (IPG), using 13 computers located at 4 different geographical sites. Process automation and web-based access to a MySql database greatly reduces the user workload, removing much of the tedium and tendency for user input errors. The AeroDB framework is shown. The user submits/deletes jobs, monitors AeroDB's progress, and retrieves data and plots via a web portal. Once a job is in the database, a job launcher uses an IPG resource broker to decide which computers are best suited to run the job. Job/code requirements, the number of CPUs free on a remote system, and queue lengths are some of the parameters the broker takes into account. The Globus software provides secure services for user authentication, remote shell execution, and secure file transfers over an open network. AeroDB automatically decides when a job is completed. Currently, the Cart3D unstructured flow solver is used for the Euler equations, and the Overflow structured overset flow solver is used for the

  13. The Proteus Navier-Stokes code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Bui, Trong T.; Cavicchi, Richard H.; Conley, Julianne M.; Molls, Frank B.; Schwab, John R.

    1992-01-01

    An effort is currently underway at NASA Lewis to develop two- and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes codes, called Proteus, for aerospace propulsion applications. The emphasis in the development of Proteus is not algorithm development or research on numerical methods, but rather the development of the code itself. The objective is to develop codes that are user-oriented, easily-modified, and well-documented. Well-proven, state-of-the-art solution algorithms are being used. Code readability, documentation (both internal and external), and validation are being emphasized. This paper is a status report on the Proteus development effort. The analysis and solution procedure are described briefly, and the various features in the code are summarized. The results from some of the validation cases that have been run are presented for both the two- and three-dimensional codes.

  14. Progress in incompressible Navier-Stokes computations for propulsion flows and its dual-use applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin

    1995-01-01

    Development of an incompressible Navier-Stokes solution procedure was performed for the analysis of a liquid rocket engine pump components and for the mechanical heart assist devices. The solution procedure for the propulsion systems is applicable to incompressible Navier-Stokes flows in a steadily rotating frame of reference for any general complex configurations. The computer codes were tested on different complex configurations such as liquid rocket engine inducer and impellers. As a spin-off technology from the turbopump component simulations, the flow analysis for an axial heart pump was conducted. The baseline Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) design was improved by adding an inducer geometry by adapting from the liquid rocket engine pump. The time-accurate mode of the incompressible Navier-Stokes code was validated with flapping foil experiment by using different domain decomposition methods. In the flapping foil experiment, two upstream NACA 0025 foils perform high-frequency synchronized motion and generate unsteady flow conditions for a downstream larger stationary foil. Fairly good agreement was obtained between unsteady experimental data and numerical results from two different moving boundary procedures. Incompressible Navier-Stokes code (INS3D) has been extended for heat transfer applications. The temperature equation was written for both forced and natural convection phenomena. Flow in a square duct case was used for the validation of the code in both natural and forced convection.

  15. Algorithm and code development for unsteady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, Shigeru

    1991-01-01

    A streamwise upwind algorithm for solving the unsteady 3-D Navier-Stokes equations was extended to handle the moving grid system. It is noted that the finite volume concept is essential to extend the algorithm. The resulting algorithm is conservative for any motion of the coordinate system. Two extensions to an implicit method were considered and the implicit extension that makes the algorithm computationally efficient is implemented into Ames's aeroelasticity code, ENSAERO. The new flow solver has been validated through the solution of test problems. Test cases include three-dimensional problems with fixed and moving grids. The first test case shown is an unsteady viscous flow over an F-5 wing, while the second test considers the motion of the leading edge vortex as well as the motion of the shock wave for a clipped delta wing. The resulting algorithm has been implemented into ENSAERO. The upwind version leads to higher accuracy in both steady and unsteady computations than the previously used central-difference method does, while the increase in the computational time is small.

  16. Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Simulation of a 2D Circulation Control Wind Tunnel Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Jones, Greg; Lin, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations are performed using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver for a circulation control airfoil. 2D and 3D simulation results are compared to a circulation control wind tunnel test conducted at the NASA Langley Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART). The RANS simulations are compared to a low blowing case with a jet momentum coefficient, C(sub u), of 0:047 and a higher blowing case of 0.115. Three dimensional simulations of the model and tunnel walls show wall effects on the lift and airfoil surface pressures. These wall effects include a 4% decrease of the midspan sectional lift for the C(sub u) 0.115 blowing condition. Simulations comparing the performance of the Spalart Allmaras (SA) and Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence models are also made, showing the SST model compares best to the experimental data. A Rotational/Curvature Correction (RCC) to the turbulence model is also evaluated demonstrating an improvement in the CFD predictions.

  17. Prediction of Business Jet Airloads Using The Overflow Navier-Stokes Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bounajem, Elias; Buning, Pieter G.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the application of Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics technology, for the purpose of predicting off-design condition airloads on a business jet configuration in the transonic regime. The NASA Navier-Stokes flow solver OVERFLOW with Chimera overset grid capability, availability of several numerical schemes and convergence acceleration techniques was selected for this work. A set of scripts which have been compiled to reduce the time required for the grid generation process are described. Several turbulence models are evaluated in the presence of separated flow regions on the wing. Computed results are compared to available wind tunnel data for two Mach numbers and a range of angles-of-attack. Comparisons of wing surface pressure from numerical simulation and wind tunnel measurements show good agreement up to fairly high angles-of-attack.

  18. Applying and validating the RANS-3D flow-solver for evaluating a subsonic serpentine diffuser geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Michael J.; Won, Mark J.; Cosentino, Gary B.; Te, Alexander

    1993-01-01

    Subsonic inlet ducts for advanced, high-performance aircraft are evolving towards complex three-dimensional shapes for reasons of overall integration and weight. These factors lead to diffuser geometries that may sacrifice inlet performance, unless careful attention to design details and boundary layer management techniques are employed. The ability of viscous computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis of such geometries to aid the aircraft configurator in this complex design problem is herein examined. The RANS-3D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solver is applied to model the complex flowfield occurring in a representative diffuser geometry and the solutions are compared to experimental results from a static test of the inlet duct. The computational results are shown to compare very favorably with experimental results over a range of mass flow rates, including those involving large amounts of separation in the diffuser. In addition, a novel grid topology is presented, and two turbulence models are evaluated in this study as part of the RANS-3D code.

  19. A three-dimensional structured/unstructured hybrid Navier-Stokes method for turbine blade rows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsung, F.-L.; Loellbach, J.; Kwon, O.; Hah, C.

    1994-12-01

    A three-dimensional viscous structured/unstructured hybrid scheme has been developed for numerical computation of high Reynolds number turbomachinery flows. The procedure allows an efficient structured solver to be employed in the densely clustered, high aspect-ratio grid around the viscous regions near solid surfaces, while employing an unstructured solver elsewhere in the flow domain to add flexibility in mesh generation. Test results for an inviscid flow over an external transonic wing and a Navier-Stokes flow for an internal annular cascade are presented.

  20. Hypersonic Navier Stokes Comparisons to Orbiter Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Nompelis, Ioannis; Candler, Graham; Barnhart, Michael; Yoon, Seokkwan

    2009-01-01

    Hypersonic chemical nonequilibrium simulations of low earth orbit entry flow fields are becoming increasingly commonplace as software and computational capabilities become more capable. However, development of robust and accurate software to model these environments will always encounter a significant barrier in developing a suite of high quality calibration cases. The US3D hypersonic nonequilibrium Navier Stokes analysis capability has been favorably compared to a number of wind tunnel test cases. Extension of the calibration basis for this software to Orbiter flight conditions will provide an incremental increase in confidence. As part of the Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment and the Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements project, NASA is performing entry flight testing on the Orbiter to provide valuable aerothermodynamic heating data. An increase in interest related to orbiter entry environments is resulting from this activity. With the advent of this new data, comparisons of the US3D software to the new flight testing data is warranted. This paper will provide information regarding the framework of analyses that will be applied with the US3D analysis tool. In addition, comparisons will be made to entry flight testing data provided by the Orbiter BLT Flight Experiment and HYTHIRM projects. If data from digital scans of the Orbiter windward surface become available, simulations will also be performed to characterize the difference in surface heating between the CAD reference OML and the digitized surface provided by the surface scans.

  1. Chaos Synchronization in Navier-Stokes Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalescu, Cristian; Meneveau, Charles; Eyink, Gregory

    2013-03-01

    Chaos synchronization (CS) has been studied for some time now (Pecora & Carroll 1990), for systems with only a few degrees of freedom as well as for systems described by partial differential equations (Boccaletti et al 2002). CS in general is said to be present in coupled dynamical systems when a specific property of each system has the same time evolution for all, even though the evolution itself is chaotic. The Navier-Stokes (NS) equations describe the velocity for a wide range of fluids, and their solutions are usually called turbulent if fluctuation amplitudes decrease as a power of their wavenumber. There have been some studies of CS for continuous systems (Kocarev et al 1997), but CS for NS turbulence seems not to have been investigated so far. We focus on the synchronization of the small scales of a turbulent flow for which the time history of large scales is prescribed. Our DNS results show that high-wavenumbers in turbulence are fully slaved to modes with wavenumbers up to a critical fraction of the Kolmogorov dissipation wavenumber. The motivation for our work is to study deeply sub-Kolmogorov scales in fully developed turbulence (Schumacher 2007), which we found to be recoverable even at very high Reynolds number from simulations with moderate resolutions. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation's CDI-II program, project CMMI-0941530

  2. Chaos Synchronization in Navier-Stokes Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalescu, Cristian C.; Meneveau, Charles; Eyink, Gregory L.

    2012-11-01

    Chaos synchronization (CS) has been studied for some time now (Pecora & Carroll 1990), for systems with only a few degrees of freedom as well as for systems described by partial differential equations (Boccaletti et al. 2002). CS in general is said to be present in a pair of coupled dynamical systems when a specific property of each system has the same time evolution for both, even though the evolution itself is chaotic. There have been some studies of CS for systems with an infinite number of degrees of freedom (Kocarev et al. 1997), but CS for Navier-Stokes (NS) turbulence seems not to have been investigated so far. We focus on the synchronization of the small scales of a turbulent flow for which the time history of large scales is prescribed. We present DNS results which show that high-wavenumbers in turbulence are fully slaved to modes with wavenumbers up to a critical fraction of the Kolmogorov dissipation wavenumber. We compare our results with related ideas of ``approximate inertial manifolds.'' The motivation for our work is to study deeply sub-Kolmogorov scales in fully developed turbulence (Schumacher 2007), which we show are recoverable even at very high Reynolds number from simulations that only resolve down to about the Kolmogorov scale. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation's CDI-II program, project CMMI-0941530.

  3. An Explicit Upwind Algorithm for Solving the Parabolized Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, John J.

    1991-01-01

    An explicit, upwind algorithm was developed for the direct (noniterative) integration of the 3-D Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) equations in a generalized coordinate system. The new algorithm uses upwind approximations of the numerical fluxes for the pressure and convection terms obtained by combining flux difference splittings (FDS) formed from the solution of an approximate Riemann (RP). The approximate RP is solved using an extension of the method developed by Roe for steady supersonic flow of an ideal gas. Roe's method is extended for use with the 3-D PNS equations expressed in generalized coordinates and to include Vigneron's technique of splitting the streamwise pressure gradient. The difficulty associated with applying Roe's scheme in the subsonic region is overcome. The second-order upwind differencing of the flux derivatives are obtained by adding FDS to either an original forward or backward differencing of the flux derivative. This approach is used to modify an explicit MacCormack differencing scheme into an upwind differencing scheme. The second order upwind flux approximations, applied with flux limiters, provide a method for numerically capturing shocks without the need for additional artificial damping terms which require adjustment by the user. In addition, a cubic equation is derived for determining Vegneron's pressure splitting coefficient using the updated streamwise flux vector. Decoding the streamwise flux vector with the updated value of Vigneron's pressure splitting improves the stability of the scheme. The new algorithm is applied to 2-D and 3-D supersonic and hypersonic laminar flow test cases. Results are presented for the experimental studies of Holden and of Tracy. In addition, a flow field solution is presented for a generic hypersonic aircraft at a Mach number of 24.5 and angle of attack of 1 degree. The computed results compare well to both experimental data and numerical results from other algorithms. Computational times required

  4. Navier-Stokes computations for circulation controlled airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulliam, T. H.; Jesperen, D. C.; Barth, T. J.

    1986-01-01

    Navier-Stokes computations of subsonic to transonic flow past airfoils with augmented lift due to rearward jet blowing over a curved trailing edge are presented. The approach uses a spiral grid topology. Solutions are obtained using a Navier-Stokes code which employs an implicit finite difference method, an algebraic turbulence model, and developments which improve stability, convergence, and accuracy. Results are compared against experiments for no jet blowing and moderate jet pressures and demonstrate the capability to compute these complicated flows.

  5. Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations with Revised Maxwell's Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuxi; Racke, Reinhard

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the compressible Navier-Stokes equations where the constitutive law for the stress tensor given by Maxwell's law is revised to a system of relaxation equations for two parts of the tensor. The global well-posedness is proved as well as the compatibility with the classical compressible Navier-Stokes system in the sense that, for vanishing relaxation parameters, the solutions to the Maxwell system are shown to converge to solutions of the classical system.

  6. Navier-Stokes computations for circulation control airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulliam, Thomas H.; Jespersen, Dennis C.; Barth, Timothy J.

    1987-01-01

    Navier-Stokes computations of subsonic to transonic flow past airfoils with augmented lift due to rearward jet blowing over a curved trailing edge are presented. The approach uses a spiral grid topology. Solutions are obtained using a Navier-Stokes code which employs an implicit finite difference method, an algebraic turbulence model, and developments which improve stability, convergence, and accuracy. Results are compared against experiments for no jet blowing and moderate jet pressures and demonstrate the capability to compute these complicated flows.

  7. Analysis of regularized Navier-Stokes equations. I, II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ou, Yuh-Roung; Sritharan, S. S.

    1991-01-01

    A regularized form of the conventional Navier-Stokes equations is analyzed. The global existence and uniqueness are established for two classes of generalized solutions. It is shown that the solution of this regularized system converges to the solution of the conventional Navier-Stokes equations for low Reynolds numbers. Particular attention is given to the structure of attractors characterizing the solutions. Both local and global invariant manifolds are found, and the regularity properties of these manifolds are analyzed.

  8. An iterative solver for the 3D Helmholtz equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belonosov, Mikhail; Dmitriev, Maxim; Kostin, Victor; Neklyudov, Dmitry; Tcheverda, Vladimir

    2017-09-01

    We develop a frequency-domain iterative solver for numerical simulation of acoustic waves in 3D heterogeneous media. It is based on the application of a unique preconditioner to the Helmholtz equation that ensures convergence for Krylov subspace iteration methods. Effective inversion of the preconditioner involves the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and numerical solution of a series of boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations. Matrix-by-vector multiplication for iterative inversion of the preconditioned matrix involves inversion of the preconditioner and pointwise multiplication of grid functions. Our solver has been verified by benchmarking against exact solutions and a time-domain solver.

  9. A non-conforming 3D spherical harmonic transport solver

    SciTech Connect

    Van Criekingen, S.

    2006-07-01

    A new 3D transport solver for the time-independent Boltzmann transport equation has been developed. This solver is based on the second-order even-parity form of the transport equation. The angular discretization is performed through the expansion of the angular neutron flux in spherical harmonics (PN method). The novelty of this solver is the use of non-conforming finite elements for the spatial discretization. Such elements lead to a discontinuous flux approximation. This interface continuity requirement relaxation property is shared with mixed-dual formulations such as the ones based on Raviart-Thomas finite elements. Encouraging numerical results are presented. (authors)

  10. Navier-Stokes calculations of transonic flows past cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay; Srinivasan, Shivakumar

    1989-01-01

    A computational investigation of subsonic and transonic flows past 3-D deep transitional cavities is presented. Computational simulations of these self-induced oscillatory flows were generated through time-accurate solutions of the Reynolds averaged full Navier-Stokes equations, using the explicit MacCormack scheme. The Reynolds stresses were included through the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model with certain modifications. Two cases were computed to demonstrate the capability of the numerical scheme in modeling the complex 3-D flow features inside a cavity. The results from an experimental investigation were used not only to benchmark the computations, but also to widen the database used for the discussions and conclusions. The computational results include instantaneous and time averaged flow properties everywhere in the computational zone. Time series analyses were performed for the instantaneous pressure values on the cavity floor. The features of deep and transitional cavity flows, and the effect of the sidewall on the cavity flow flowfield are illustrated through computational graphics.

  11. Singularity of Navier-Stokes Equations Leading to Turbulent Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hua-Shu; Fluid Mechanics Research Team

    2014-11-01

    As is well known, there is discontinuity during the transition from laminar flow to turbulence in the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. In other words, singularity may implicitly exist in the Navier-Stokes equations. Transition of a laminar flow to turbulence must be implemented via the singularity. However, how the singularity of Navier-Stokes equations is related to the turbulent transition is not understood. In this study, the singularity possibly hidden in the Navier-Stokes equation is exactly derived by mathematical treatment. Then, it is found that for pressure driven flows, the singularity of Navier-Stokes equations corresponds to the inflection point on the velocity profile. Since the rate of amplification to a disturbance at the inflection point is infinite, the laminar flow is able to involve into turbulence at this point firstly at a sufficient high Reynolds number. This is the reason why turbulent spot is formed at the location of inflection point. It is further demonstrated that the existence of the singularity in the time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is the necessary and sufficient condition for the turbulent transition in pressure driven flows. These results agrees well with the findings from the recent proposed energy gradient method. Professor in Fluid Mechanics; AIAA Associate Fellow.

  12. Three-Dimensional Navier-Stokes Calculations Using the Modified Space-Time CESE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-lyan

    2007-01-01

    The space-time conservation element solution element (CESE) method is modified to address the robustness issues of high-aspect-ratio, viscous, near-wall meshes. In this new approach, the dependent variable gradients are evaluated using element edges and the corresponding neighboring solution elements while keeping the original flux integration procedure intact. As such, the excellent flux conservation property is retained and the new edge-based gradients evaluation significantly improves the robustness for high-aspect ratio meshes frequently encountered in three-dimensional, Navier-Stokes calculations. The order of accuracy of the proposed method is demonstrated for oblique acoustic wave propagation, shock-wave interaction, and hypersonic flows over a blunt body. The confirmed second-order convergence along with the enhanced robustness in handling hypersonic blunt body flow calculations makes the proposed approach a very competitive CFD framework for 3D Navier-Stokes simulations.

  13. Pseudospectral Algorithms for Navier-Stokes Simulation of Turbulent Flows in Cylindrical Geometry with Coordinate Singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priymak, V. G.

    1995-05-01

    We present a new family of algorithms for incompressible 3D Navier-Stokes equations in cylindrical geometry. A model problem of turbulent flow calculation in an infinite circular pipe {(r, ϕ, z): 0 ≤ r ≤ R, 0 ≤ ϕ < 2π, |z| < ∞} is considered and used for accuracy, stability, and efficiency estimations. Algorithms are based on Galerkin trigonometric approximation for uniform variables ϕ, z, on pseudospectral polynomial approximation in the r -direction (with different sets of collocation nodes) and on implicit and predictor-corrector time advancement schemes. In all cases high (infinite order) spatial accuracy is retained despite the presence of coordinate singularity at r = 0. To achieve this we exploit the behaviour of analytic functions of variables r, ϕ, z in the vicinity of r = 0. We analyze the advantages and disadvantages of four Navier-Stokes algorithms. In method A a new splitting technique is developed which makes use of a second-order predictor-corrector scheme and nontraditional fractional step procedure. Stability and efficiency characteristics of this scheme exceed that of the usually used mixed Adams-Bashforth/Crank-Nicolson time advancement. To minimize errors due to splitting, algorithm B is suggested that has no fractional steps. In this method pressure values are eliminated from discretized Navier-Stokes equations by means of equivalent matrix operations. Although conventional Chebyshev collocation nodes rl = R cos(πl/2Q), l = 0, 1, ..., Q, are used in both methods, the discrete boundary conditions at r = 0-consistent with analytic behaviour of solutions for small r-are fully accessible for the first time. In addition, approximations developed prevent the appearance of various pathological (with, e.g., spurious, parasitic modes, etc.) discretizations of Navier-Stokes operators. In algorithm C we propose a new set of collocation nodes rl = (1 - xl)R/2, l = 0, 1, ..., Q, where xl ɛ (-1, 1), l = 1, 2, ..., Q - 1, are the zeros of

  14. Calculation of AGARD Wing 445.6 Flutter Using Navier-Stokes Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Batina, John T.

    1993-01-01

    The flutter characteristics of the first AGARD standard aeroelastic configuration for dynamic response, Wing 445.6, are studied using an unsteady Navier-Stokes algorithm in order to investigate a previously noted discrepancy between Euler flutter characteristics and the experimental data. The algorithm, which is a three-dimensional, implicit, upwind Euler/Navier-Stokes code (CFL3D Version 2.1), was previously modified for the time-marching, aeroelastic analysis of wings using the unsteady Euler equations. These modifications include the incorporation of a deforming mesh algorithm and the addition of the structural equations of motion for their simultaneous time integration with the governing flow equations. In this paper, the aeroelastic method is extended and evaluated for applications that use the Navier- Stokes aerodynamics. The paper presents a brief description of the aeroelastic method and presents unsteady calculations which verify this method for Navier-Stokes calculations. A linear stability analysis and a time-marching aeroelastic analysis are used to determine the flutter characteristics of the isolated 45 deg. swept-back wing. Effects of fluid viscosity, structural damping, and number of modes in the structural model are investigated. For the linear stability analysis, the unsteady generalized aerodynamic forces of the wing are computed for a range of reduced frequencies using the pulse transfer-function approach. The flutter characteristics of the wing are determined using these unsteady generalized aerodynamic forces in a traditional V-g analysis. This stability analysis is used to determine the flutter characteristics of the wing at free-stream Mach numbers of 0.96 and 1.141 using the generalized aerodynamic forces generated by solving the Euler equations and the Navier-Stokes equations. Time-marching aeroelastic calculations are performed at a free-stream Mach number of 1.141 using the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations to compare with the linear V

  15. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes based ice accretion for aircraft wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkajani, Kazem Hasanzadeh

    This thesis addresses one of the current issues in flight safety towards increasing icing simulation capabilities for prediction of complex 2D and 3D glaze ice shapes over aircraft surfaces. During the 1980's and 1990's, the field of aero-icing was established to support design and certification of aircraft flying in icing conditions. The multidisciplinary technologies used in such codes were: aerodynamics (panel method), droplet trajectory calculations (Lagrangian framework), thermodynamic module (Messinger model) and geometry module (ice accretion). These are embedded in a quasi-steady module to simulate the time-dependent ice accretion process (multi-step procedure). The objectives of the present research are to upgrade the aerodynamic module from Laplace to Reynolds-Average Navier-Stokes equations solver. The advantages are many. First, the physical model allows accounting for viscous effects in the aerodynamic module. Second, the solution of the aero-icing module directly provides the means for characterizing the aerodynamic effects of icing, such as loss of lift and increased drag. Third, the use of a finite volume approach to solving the Partial Differential Equations allows rigorous mesh and time convergence analysis. Finally, the approaches developed in 2D can be easily transposed to 3D problems. The research was performed in three major steps, each providing insights into the overall numerical approaches. The most important realization comes from the need to develop specific mesh generation algorithms to ensure feasible solutions in very complex multi-step aero-icing calculations. The contributions are presented in chronological order of their realization. First, a new framework for RANS based two-dimensional ice accretion code, CANICE2D-NS, is developed. A multi-block RANS code from U. of Liverpool (named PMB) is providing the aerodynamic field using the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. The ICEM-CFD commercial tool is used for the iced airfoil

  16. A staggered space-time discontinuous Galerkin method for the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured tetrahedral meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavelli, Maurizio; Dumbser, Michael

    2016-08-01

    unstructured meshes allows to discretize even complex physical domains with very coarse grids in both, space and time. The proposed method is verified for approximation polynomials of degree up to four in space and time by solving a series of typical 3D test problems and by comparing the obtained numerical results with available exact analytical solutions, or with other numerical or experimental reference data. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first time that a space-time discontinuous Galerkin finite element method is presented for the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on staggered unstructured tetrahedral grids.

  17. CFL3D User's Manual (Version 5.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krist, Sherrie L.; Biedron, Robert T.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    1998-01-01

    This document is the User's Manual for the CFL3D computer code, a thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver for structured multiple-zone grids. Descriptions of the code's input parameters, non-dimensionalizations, file formats, boundary conditions, and equations are included. Sample 2-D and 3-D test cases are also described, and many helpful hints for using the code are provided.

  18. Final Report - High-Order Spectral Volume Method for the Navier-Stokes Equations On Unstructured Tetrahedral Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z J

    2012-12-06

    The overriding objective for this project is to develop an efficient and accurate method for capturing strong discontinuities and fine smooth flow structures of disparate length scales with unstructured grids, and demonstrate its potentials for problems relevant to DOE. More specifically, we plan to achieve the following objectives: 1. Extend the SV method to three dimensions, and develop a fourth-order accurate SV scheme for tetrahedral grids. Optimize the SV partition by minimizing a form of the Lebesgue constant. Verify the order of accuracy using the scalar conservation laws with an analytical solution; 2. Extend the SV method to Navier-Stokes equations for the simulation of viscous flow problems. Two promising approaches to compute the viscous fluxes will be tested and analyzed; 3. Parallelize the 3D viscous SV flow solver using domain decomposition and message passing. Optimize the cache performance of the flow solver by designing data structures minimizing data access times; 4. Demonstrate the SV method with a wide range of flow problems including both discontinuities and complex smooth structures. The objectives remain the same as those outlines in the original proposal. We anticipate no technical obstacles in meeting these objectives.

  19. The novel high-performance 3-D MT inverse solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglyakov, Mikhail; Geraskin, Alexey; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    We present novel, robust, scalable, and fast 3-D magnetotelluric (MT) inverse solver. The solver is written in multi-language paradigm to make it as efficient, readable and maintainable as possible. Separation of concerns and single responsibility concepts go through implementation of the solver. As a forward modelling engine a modern scalable solver extrEMe, based on contracting integral equation approach, is used. Iterative gradient-type (quasi-Newton) optimization scheme is invoked to search for (regularized) inverse problem solution, and adjoint source approach is used to calculate efficiently the gradient of the misfit. The inverse solver is able to deal with highly detailed and contrasting models, allows for working (separately or jointly) with any type of MT responses, and supports massive parallelization. Moreover, different parallelization strategies implemented in the code allow optimal usage of available computational resources for a given problem statement. To parameterize an inverse domain the so-called mask parameterization is implemented, which means that one can merge any subset of forward modelling cells in order to account for (usually) irregular distribution of observation sites. We report results of 3-D numerical experiments aimed at analysing the robustness, performance and scalability of the code. In particular, our computational experiments carried out at different platforms ranging from modern laptops to HPC Piz Daint (6th supercomputer in the world) demonstrate practically linear scalability of the code up to thousands of nodes.

  20. A locally stabilized immersed boundary method for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brehm, C.; Hader, C.; Fasel, H. F.

    2015-08-01

    A higher-order immersed boundary method for solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The distinguishing feature of this new immersed boundary method is that the coefficients of the irregular finite-difference stencils in the vicinity of the immersed boundary are optimized to obtain improved numerical stability. This basic idea was introduced in a previous publication by the authors for the advection step in the projection method used to solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. This paper extends the original approach to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations considering flux vector splitting schemes and viscous wall boundary conditions at the immersed geometry. In addition to the stencil optimization procedure for the convective terms, this paper discusses other key aspects of the method, such as imposing flux boundary conditions at the immersed boundary and the discretization of the viscous flux in the vicinity of the boundary. Extensive linear stability investigations of the immersed scheme confirm that a linearly stable method is obtained. The method of manufactured solutions is used to validate the expected higher-order accuracy and to study the error convergence properties of this new method. Steady and unsteady, 2D and 3D canonical test cases are used for validation of the immersed boundary approach. Finally, the method is employed to simulate the laminar to turbulent transition process of a hypersonic Mach 6 boundary layer flow over a porous wall and subsonic boundary layer flow over a three-dimensional spherical roughness element.

  1. Navier-Stokes Computations for a Spinning Projectile From Subsonic to Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silton, Sidra I.

    2002-09-01

    A computational study has been undertaken to predict the aerodynamic coefficients of a standard spinning projectile using a modem unstructured Navier-Stokes flow solver. Numerical and semi-empirical results have been obtained for a wide range of Mach numbers to include subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flight regimes. Effects of 00, 20, and 50 angles of attack have been investigated. Comparison of computational fluid dynamics results to both experimental range data and semi-empirical aeroprediction code results shows remarkably good agreement. Flow field characteristics of each flight regime are explored.

  2. Simulation of Synthetic Jets in Quiescent Air Using Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Turkel, Eli

    2006-01-01

    We apply an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver for the simulation of a synthetic jet created by a single diaphragm piezoelectric actuator in quiescent air. This configuration was designated as Case 1 for the CFDVAL2004 workshop held at Williamsburg, Virginia, in March 2004. Time-averaged and instantaneous data for this case were obtained at NASA Langley Research Center, using multiple measurement techniques. Computational results for this case using one-equation Spalart-Allmaras and two-equation Menter's turbulence models are presented along with the experimental data. The effect of grid refinement, preconditioning and time-step variation are also examined in this paper.

  3. Upwind relaxation methods for the Navier-Stokes equations using inner iterations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Ng, Wing-Fai; Walters, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    A subsonic and a supersonic problem are respectively treated by an upwind line-relaxation algorithm for the Navier-Stokes equations using inner iterations to accelerate steady-state solution convergence and thereby minimize CPU time. While the ability of the inner iterative procedure to mimic the quadratic convergence of the direct solver method is attested to in both test problems, some of the nonquadratic inner iterative results are noted to have been more efficient than the quadratic. In the more successful, supersonic test case, inner iteration required only about 65 percent of the line-relaxation method-entailed CPU time.

  4. Aerodynamic Design Optimization on Unstructured Meshes Using the Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Anderson, W. Kyle

    1998-01-01

    A discrete adjoint method is developed and demonstrated for aerodynamic design optimization on unstructured grids. The governing equations are the three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with a one-equation turbulence model. A discussion of the numerical implementation of the flow and adjoint equations is presented. Both compressible and incompressible solvers are differentiated and the accuracy of the sensitivity derivatives is verified by comparing with gradients obtained using finite differences. Several simplifying approximations to the complete linearization of the residual are also presented, and the resulting accuracy of the derivatives is examined. Demonstration optimizations for both compressible and incompressible flows are given.

  5. A deflation based parallel algorithm for spectral element solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P.F.

    1996-12-31

    Efficient solution of the Navier-Stokes equations in complex domains is dependent upon the availability of fast solvers for sparse linear systems. For unsteady incompressible flows, the pressure operator is the leading contributor to stiffness, as the characteristic propagation speed is infinite. In the context of operator splitting formulations, it is the pressure solve which is the most computationally challenging, despite its elliptic origins. We seek to improve existing spectral element iterative methods for the pressure solve in order to overcome the slow convergence frequently observed in the presence of highly refined grids or high-aspect ratio elements.

  6. Navier-Stokes calculations with a coupled strongly implicit method. II Spline deferred-corrector solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, S. G.; Khosla, P. K.

    1980-01-01

    The coupled strongly implicit (CSIP) method described previously is combined with a deferred-corrector spline solver for the vorticity-stream function form of the Navier-Stokes equations. Solutions for cavity, channel and cylinder flows are obtained with the fourth-order spline 4 procedure. The strongly coupled spline corrector method converges as rapidly as the finite difference calculations and also allows for arbitrary large time increments for the Reynolds numbers considered (equal to or less than 1000). In some cases fourth-order smoothing or filtering is required in order to suppress high frequency oscillations.

  7. Solution of the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations on embedded structured multiblock meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmelter, J.; Marchant, M. J.; Evans, A.; Weatherill, N. P.

    A cell vertex finite volume Jameson scheme is used to solve the 2D compressible, laminar, viscous fluid flow equations on locally embedded multiblock meshes. The proposed algorithm is applicable to both the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. It is concluded that the adaptivity method is very successful in efficiently improving the accuracy of the solution. Both the mesh generator and the flow equation solver which are based on a quadtree data structure offer good flexibility in the treatment of interfaces. It is concluded that methods under consideration lead to accurate flow solutions.

  8. Continuum Navier-Stokes modelling of water flow past fullerene molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, J. H.; Popadic, A.; Koumoutsakos, P.; Praprotnik, M.

    2015-11-01

    We present continuum simulations of water flow past fullerene molecules. The governing Navier-Stokes equations are complemented with the Navier slip boundary condition with a slip length that is extracted from related molecular dynamics simulations. We find that several quantities of interest as computed by the present model are in good agreement with results from atomistic and atomistic-continuum simulations at a fraction of the computational cost. We simulate the flow past a single fullerene and an array of fullerenes and demonstrate that such nanoscale flows can be computed efficiently by continuum flow solvers, allowing for investigations into spatiotemporal scales inaccessible to atomistic simulations.

  9. Navier-Stokes calculations of scramjet-nozzle-afterbody flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive computational fluid dynamics effort was conducted from 1987 to 1990 to properly design a nozzle and lower aft end of a generic hypersonic vehicle powered by a scramjet engine. The interference of the exhaust on the control surfaces of the vehicle can have adverse effects on its stability. Two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computations were performed, where the exhaust gas was assumed to be air behaving as a perfect gas. Then the exhaust was simulated by a mixture of Freon-12 and argon, which required solving the Navier-Stokes equations for four species: (nitrogen, oxygen, Freon-12, and argon). This allowed gamma to be a field variable during the mixing of the multispecies gases. Two different mixing models were used and comparisons between them as well as the perfect gas air calculations were made to assess their relative merits. Finally, the three dimensional Navier-Stokes computations were made for the full-span scramjet nozzle afterbody module.

  10. Navier-Stokes calculations of scramjet-nozzle-afterbody flowfields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baysal, Oktay

    1991-07-01

    A comprehensive computational fluid dynamics effort was conducted from 1987 to 1990 to properly design a nozzle and lower aft end of a generic hypersonic vehicle powered by a scramjet engine. The interference of the exhaust on the control surfaces of the vehicle can have adverse effects on its stability. Two-dimensional Navier-Stokes computations were performed, where the exhaust gas was assumed to be air behaving as a perfect gas. Then the exhaust was simulated by a mixture of Freon-12 and argon, which required solving the Navier-Stokes equations for four species: (nitrogen, oxygen, Freon-12, and argon). This allowed gamma to be a field variable during the mixing of the multispecies gases. Two different mixing models were used and comparisons between them as well as the perfect gas air calculations were made to assess their relative merits. Finally, the three dimensional Navier-Stokes computations were made for the full-span scramjet nozzle afterbody module.

  11. Numerical solutions of the complete Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, H. A.

    1986-01-01

    Using ideas from the kinetic theory, the Navier-Stokes equations are modified in such a way that they can be cast as a set of first order hyperbolic equations. This is achieved by incorporating time dependent terms into the definition of the stress tensor and the heat flux vectors. The boundary conditions are then determined from the theory of characteristics. Because the resulting equations reduce to the traditional Navier-Stokes equations when the steady state is reached, the present approach provides a straightforward scheme for the determination of inflow and outflow boundary conditions. The method is validated by comparing its predictions with known exact solutions of the steady Navier-Stokes equations.

  12. A Nonlinear Modal Aeroelastic Solver for FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Benjamin D.; Bartels, Robert E.; Biedron, Robert T.; Scott, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    A nonlinear structural solver has been implemented internally within the NASA FUN3D computational fluid dynamics code, allowing for some new aeroelastic capabilities. Using a modal representation of the structure, a set of differential or differential-algebraic equations are derived for general thin structures with geometric nonlinearities. ODEPACK and LAPACK routines are linked with FUN3D, and the nonlinear equations are solved at each CFD time step. The existing predictor-corrector method is retained, whereby the structural solution is updated after mesh deformation. The nonlinear solver is validated using a test case for a flexible aeroshell at transonic, supersonic, and hypersonic flow conditions. Agreement with linear theory is seen for the static aeroelastic solutions at relatively low dynamic pressures, but structural nonlinearities limit deformation amplitudes at high dynamic pressures. No flutter was found at any of the tested trajectory points, though LCO may be possible in the transonic regime.

  13. Recent Enhancements To The FUN3D Flow Solver For Moving-Mesh Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, Robert T,; Thomas, James L.

    2009-01-01

    An unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver for unstructured grids has been extended to handle general mesh movement involving rigid, deforming, and overset meshes. Mesh deformation is achieved through analogy to elastic media by solving the linear elasticity equations. A general method for specifying the motion of moving bodies within the mesh has been implemented that allows for inherited motion through parent-child relationships, enabling simulations involving multiple moving bodies. Several example calculations are shown to illustrate the range of potential applications. For problems in which an isolated body is rotating with a fixed rate, a noninertial reference-frame formulation is available. An example calculation for a tilt-wing rotor is used to demonstrate that the time-dependent moving grid and noninertial formulations produce the same results in the limit of zero time-step size.

  14. Factorization of the Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Thomas W.

    2005-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes equations for a Newtonian ideal gas are examined to determine the factorizable form of the equations relevant to the construction of a factorizable relaxation scheme. The principal linearization of the equations is found by examining the relative magnitude of the terms for short-wavelength errors. The principal part of the operator is then found. Comparison of the factors of the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations differ qualitatively because of the coupling of entropy and pressure through thermal diffusion. Special cases of the factorization are considered.

  15. Algorithm implementation on the Navier-Stokes computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krist, Steven E.; Zang, Thomas A.

    1987-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes Computer is a multi-purpose parallel-processing supercomputer which is currently under development at Princeton University. It consists of multiple local memory parallel processors, called Nodes, which are interconnected in a hypercube network. Details of the procedures involved in implementing an algorithm on the Navier-Stokes computer are presented. The particular finite difference algorithm considered in this analysis was developed for simulation of laminar-turbulent transition in wall bounded shear flows. Projected timing results for implementing this algorithm indicate that operation rates in excess of 42 GFLOPS are feasible on a 128 Node machine.

  16. Navier-Stokes computations useful in aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1990-01-01

    Large scale Navier-Stokes computations about aircraft components as well as reasonably complete aircraft configurations are presented and discussed. Speed and memory requirements are described for various general problem classes, which in some cases are already being used in the industrial design environment. Recent computed results, with experimental comparisons when available, are included to highlight the presentation. Finally, prospects for the future are described and recommendations for areas of concentrated research are indicated. The future of Navier-Stokes computations is seen to be rapidly expanding across a broad front of applications, which includes the entire subsonic-to-hypersonic speed regime.

  17. Error estimation and adaptivity in Navier-Stokes incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Zhu, J. Z.; Szmelter, J.; Zienkiewicz, O. C.

    1990-07-01

    An adaptive remeshing procedure for solving Navier-Stokes incompressible fluid flow problems is presented in this paper. This procedure has been implemented using the error estimator developed by Zienkiewicz and Zhu (1987, 1989) and a semi-implicit time-marching scheme for Navier-Stokes flow problems (Zienkiewicz et al. 1990). Numerical examples are presented, showing that the error estimation and adaptive procedure are capable of monitoring the flow field, updating the mesh when necessary, and providing nearly optimal meshes throughout the calculation, thus making the solution reliable and the computation economical and efficient.

  18. Pseudo-time algorithms for the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Turkel, E.

    1986-01-01

    A pseudo-time method is introduced to integrate the compressible Navier-Stokes equations to a steady state. This method is a generalization of a method used by Crocco and also by Allen and Cheng. We show that for a simple heat equation that this is just a renormalization of the time. For a convection-diffusion equation the renormalization is dependent only on the viscous terms. We implement the method for the Navier-Stokes equations using a Runge-Kutta type algorithm. This permits the time step to be chosen based on the inviscid model only. We also discuss the use of residual smoothing when viscous terms are present.

  19. Navier-Stokes computations useful in aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1990-01-01

    Large scale Navier-Stokes computations about aircraft components as well as reasonably complete aircraft configurations are presented and discussed. Speed and memory requirements are described for various general problem classes, which in some cases are already being used in the industrial design environment. Recent computed results, with experimental comparisons when available, are included to highlight the presentation. Finally, prospects for the future are described and recommendations for areas of concentrated research are indicated. The future of Navier-Stokes computations is seen to be rapidly expanding across a broad front of applications, which includes the entire subsonic-to-hypersonic speed regime.

  20. An efficient and robust algorithm for two dimensional time dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations - High Reynolds number flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for unsteady two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes calculations. This algorithm is based on the fourth order partial differential equation for incompressible fluid flow which uses the streamfunction as the only dependent variable. The algorithm is second order accurate in both time and space. It uses a multigrid solver at each time step. It is extremely efficient with respect to the use of both CPU time and physical memory. It is extremely robust with respect to Reynolds number.

  1. An efficient and robust algorithm for two dimensional time dependent incompressible Navier-Stokes equations: High Reynolds number flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for unsteady two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes calculations. This algorithm is based on the fourth order partial differential equation for incompressible fluid flow which uses the streamfunction as the only dependent variable. The algorithm is second order accurate in both time and space. It uses a multigrid solver at each time step. It is extremely efficient with respect to the use of both CPU time and physical memory. It is extremely robust with respect to Reynolds number.

  2. Cavitation Modeling in Euler and Navier-Stokes Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manish; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    Many previous researchers have modeled sheet cavitation by means of a constant pressure solution in the cavity region coupled with a velocity potential formulation for the outer flow. The present paper discusses the issues involved in extending these cavitation models to Euler or Navier-Stokes codes. The approach taken is to start from a velocity potential model to ensure our results are compatible with those of previous researchers and available experimental data, and then to implement this model in both Euler and Navier-Stokes codes. The model is then augmented in the Navier-Stokes code by the inclusion of the energy equation which allows the effect of subcooling in the vicinity of the cavity interface to be modeled to take into account the experimentally observed reduction in cavity pressures that occurs in cryogenic fluids such as liquid hydrogen. Although our goal is to assess the practicality of implementing these cavitation models in existing three-dimensional, turbomachinery codes, the emphasis in the present paper will center on two-dimensional computations, most specifically isolated airfoils and cascades. Comparisons between velocity potential, Euler and Navier-Stokes implementations indicate they all produce consistent predictions. Comparisons with experimental results also indicate that the predictions are qualitatively correct and give a reasonable first estimate of sheet cavitation effects in both cryogenic and non-cryogenic fluids. The impact on CPU time and the code modifications required suggests that these models are appropriate for incorporation in current generation turbomachinery codes.

  3. Upwind relaxation algorithms for Euler/Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. L.; Walters, R. W.; Rudy, D. H.; Swanson, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    A description of and results from a solution algorithm for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are presented. The main features of the algorithm are second or third order accurate upwind discretization of the convection and pressure derivatives and a relaxation scheme for the unfactored implicit backward Euler time method, implemented in a finite-volume formulation. Upwind methods were successfully used to obtain solutions to the Euler equations for flows with strong shock waves. The particular upwind method being used is based on the flux vector splitting technique developed by Van Leer and both second and third order accurate discretizations were developed. Currently, the most widely used implicit solution technique for the Navier-Stokes equations use approximate factorization (AF) methods to treat multidimensional problems. The time integration scheme being used in the present algorithm corresponds to a line Gauss-Seidel relaxation method. This method produces good convergence rates for steady-state flows, and most of the algorithm was vectorized on the NASA Langley VPS 32 computer. The Navier-Stokes algorithm was tested for several two-dimensional flow problems. Solutions for the problems gave excellent results. The presented effort is directed toward the extension of the scheme to the full three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations.

  4. Analysis of regularized Navier-Stokes equations, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ou, Yuh-Roung; Sritharan, S. S.

    1989-01-01

    A practically important regularization of the Navier-Stokes equations was analyzed. As a continuation of the previous work, the structure of the attractors characterizing the solutins was studied. Local as well as global invariant manifolds were found. Regularity properties of these manifolds are analyzed.

  5. Variational principle for the Navier-Stokes equations.

    PubMed

    Kerswell, R R

    1999-05-01

    A variational principle is presented for the Navier-Stokes equations in the case of a contained boundary-driven, homogeneous, incompressible, viscous fluid. Based upon making the fluid's total viscous dissipation over a given time interval stationary subject to the constraint of the Navier-Stokes equations, the variational problem looks overconstrained and intractable. However, introducing a nonunique velocity decomposition, u(x,t)=phi(x,t) + nu(x,t), "opens up" the variational problem so that what is presumed a single allowable point over the velocity domain u corresponding to the unique solution of the Navier-Stokes equations becomes a surface with a saddle point over the extended domain (phi,nu). Complementary or dual variational problems can then be constructed to estimate this saddle point value strictly from above as part of a minimization process or below via a maximization procedure. One of these reduced variational principles is the natural and ultimate generalization of the upper bounding problem developed by Doering and Constantin. The other corresponds to the ultimate Busse problem which now acts to lower bound the true dissipation. Crucially, these reduced variational problems require only the solution of a series of linear problems to produce bounds even though their unique intersection is conjectured to correspond to a solution of the nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations.

  6. Global solution of the 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in the Besov spaces ${dot{varvec{R}}}_{{varvec{r}}_{varvec{1}},{varvec{r}}_{{varvec{2}}},{varvec{r}}_{{varvec{3}}}}({{varvec{sigma) }},{varvec{1}}}$ R ˙ r 1 , r 2 , r 3 σ , 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, Shaolei; Chen, Jiecheng

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we construct a more general Besov spaces \\dot{R}_{r1,r2,r3}^{σ ,q} and consider the global well-posedness of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with small data in \\dot{R}_{r1,r2,r3}^{σ ,1} for 1/r1+1/r2+1/r3-σ =1, 1≤ ri<∞ and \\max \\limits _{1≤ i≤ 3}ri≤ 2\\min \\limits _{1≤ i≤ 3}ri. In particular, by studying the well-posedness of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in \\dot{R}_{r1,r2,r3}^{σ ,1}, we can explore the relationship between u1(x,t), u2(x,t) and u3(x,t) in u( x, t).

  7. Calculation of AGARD Wing 445.6 Flutter Using Navier-Stokes Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Batina, John T.

    1993-01-01

    An unsteady, 3D, implicit upwind Euler/Navier-Stokes algorithm is here used to compute the flutter characteristics of Wing 445.6, the AGARD standard aeroelastic configuration for dynamic response, with a view to the discrepancy between Euler characteristics and experimental data. Attention is given to effects of fluid viscosity, structural damping, and number of structural model nodes. The flutter characteristics of the wing are determined using these unsteady generalized aerodynamic forces in a traditional V-g analysis. The V-g analysis indicates that fluid viscosity has a significant effect on the supersonic flutter boundary for this wing.

  8. The development of an intelligent interface to a computational fluid dynamics flow-solver code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Anthony D.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Lewis are currently developing an 'intelligent' interface to aid in the development and use of large, computational fluid dynamics flow-solver codes for studying the internal fluid behavior of aerospace propulsion systems. This paper discusses the requirements, design, and implementation of an intelligent interface to Proteus, a general purpose, 3-D, Navier-Stokes flow solver. The interface is called PROTAIS to denote its introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) concepts to the Proteus code.

  9. Development of multiphase Navier-Stokes simulation capability for turbulent gas flow over laminar liquid for Cartesian grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Sha; Hendrickson, Kelli; Liu, Yuming; Subramani, Hariprasad

    2015-11-01

    This work presents a novel and efficient Cartesian-grid based simulation capability for the study of an incompressible, turbulent gas layer over a liquid flow with disparate Reynolds numbers in two phases. This capability couples a turbulent gas-flow solver and a liquid-layer based on a second-order accurate Boundary Data Immersion Method (BDIM) at the deformable interface. The turbulent gas flow solver solves the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations via direct numerical simulation or through turbulence closure (unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Models) for Reynolds numbers O(106). In this application, a laminar liquid layer solution is obtained from depth-integrated Navier-Stokes equations utilizing shallow water wave assumptions. The immersed boundary method (BDIM) enforces the coupling at the deformable interface, the boundary conditions to turbulence closure equations and defines the domain geometry on the Cartesian grid. Validations are made for the turbulent gas channel flow over high-viscosity liquid. This simulation capability can be applied to problems in the oil and industrial sector such as channel and pipe flows with heavy oils as well as wind wave generation in shallow waters. Sponsored by the Chevron Energy Technology Company.

  10. Implementation and Validation of the Chien k-epsilon Turbulence Model in the Wind Navier-Stokes Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis A.; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.

    1999-01-01

    The two equation k-epsilon turbulence model of Chien has been implemented in the WIND Navier-Stokes flow solver. Details of the numerical solution algorithm, initialization procedure, and stability enhancements are described. Results obtained with this version of the model are compared with those from the Chien k-epsilon model in the NPARC Navier-Stokes code and from the WIND SST model for three validation cases: the incompressible flow over a smooth flat plate, the incompressible flow over a backward facing step, and the shock-induced flow separation inside a transonic diffuser. The k-epsilon model results indicate that the WIND model functions very similarly to that in NPARC, though the WIND code appears to he slightly more accurate in the treatment of the near-wall region. Comparisons of the k-epsilon model results with those from the SST model were less definitive, as each model exhibited strengths and weaknesses for each particular case.

  11. Solutions to Three-Dimensional Thin-Layer Navier-Stokes Equations in Rotating Coordinates for Flow Through Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Amrit Raj

    1996-01-01

    The viscous, Navier-Stokes solver for turbomachinery applications, MSUTC has been modified to include the rotating frame formulation. The three-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations have been cast in a rotating Cartesian frame enabling the freezing of grid motion. This also allows the flow-field associated with an isolated rotor to be viewed as a steady-state problem. Consequently, local time stepping can be used to accelerate convergence. The formulation is validated by running NASA's Rotor 67 as the test case. results are compared between the rotating frame code and the absolute frame code. The use of the rotating frame approach greatly enhances the performance of the code with respect to savings in computing time, without degradation of the solution.

  12. A multiple-block multigrid method for the solution of the three-dimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, Harold

    1991-01-01

    A multiple block multigrid method for the solution of the three dimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The basic flow solver is a cell vertex method which employs central difference spatial approximations and Runge-Kutta time stepping. The use of local time stepping, implicit residual smoothing, multigrid techniques and variable coefficient numerical dissipation results in an efficient and robust scheme is discussed. The multiblock strategy places the block loop within the Runge-Kutta Loop such that accuracy and convergence are not affected by block boundaries. This has been verified by comparing the results of one and two block calculations in which the two block grid is generated by splitting the one block grid. Results are presented for both Euler and Navier-Stokes computations of wing/fuselage combinations.

  13. Fast non-symmetric iterations and efficient preconditioning for Navier-Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect

    Silvester, D.; Elman, H.

    1994-12-31

    Discretisation of the steady-state Navier-Stokes equations: (u.grad)u-{nu}{del}{sup 2}u + grad p = 0; div u = 0 [1]. in some flow domain {Omega} {contained_in} IR{sup d}, (d = 2 or 3), gives a system of non-linear algebraic equations for discretised variables u (the velocity), and p (the pressure). The authors assume that appropriate boundary conditions are imposed. The non-linear equation system can be linearised using a fixed-point (Picard) iteration to give a matrix system which must be solved at every iteration. Part of this matrix is block diagonal, and consists of d convection-diffusion operators, one for each component of velocity. Two difficulties arise when solving this matrix equation. Firstly, the block diagonal part is not symmetric, although under certain conditions the symmetric part is positive definite. Secondly, the overall system is indefinite. This makes the design of fast and efficient iterative solvers for discretised Navier-Stokes operators an extremely challenging task.

  14. Tetrahedral Finite-Volume Solutions to the Navier-Stokes Equations on Complex Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    1998-01-01

    A review of the algorithmic features and capabilities of the unstructured-grid flow solver USM3Dns is presented. This code, along with the tetrahedral grid generator, VGRIDns, is being extensively used throughout the U.S. for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on complex aerodynamic problems. Spatial discretization is accomplished by a tetrahedral cell-centered finite-volume formulation using Roe's upwind flux difference splitting. The fluxes are limited by either a Superbee or MinMod limiter. Solution reconstruction within the tetrahedral cells is accomplished with a simple, but novel, multidimensional analytical formula. Time is advanced by an implicit backward-Euler time-stepping scheme. Flow turbulence effects are modeled by the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model, which is coupled with a wall function to reduce the number of cells in the near-wall region of the boundary layer. The issues of accuracy and robustness of USM3Dns Navier-Stokes capabilities are addressed for a flat-plate boundary layer, and a full F-16 aircraft with external stores at transonic speed.

  15. Algorithm and code development for unsteady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, Shigeru

    1994-01-01

    Aeroelastic tests require extensive cost and risk. An aeroelastic wind-tunnel experiment is an order of magnitude more expensive than a parallel experiment involving only aerodynamics. By complementing the wind-tunnel experiments with numerical simulations, the overall cost of the development of aircraft can be considerably reduced. In order to accurately compute aeroelastic phenomenon it is necessary to solve the unsteady Euler/Navier-Stokes equations simultaneously with the structural equations of motion. These equations accurately describe the flow phenomena for aeroelastic applications. At ARC a code, ENSAERO, is being developed for computing the unsteady aerodynamics and aeroelasticity of aircraft, and it solves the Euler/Navier-Stokes equations. The purpose of this cooperative agreement was to enhance ENSAERO in both algorithm and geometric capabilities. During the last five years, the algorithms of the code have been enhanced extensively by using high-resolution upwind algorithms and efficient implicit solvers. The zonal capability of the code has been extended from a one-to-one grid interface to a mismatching unsteady zonal interface. The geometric capability of the code has been extended from a single oscillating wing case to a full-span wing-body configuration with oscillating control surfaces. Each time a new capability was added, a proper validation case was simulated, and the capability of the code was demonstrated.

  16. Navier-Stokes simulation of the flow around an airfoil in Darrieus motion

    SciTech Connect

    Tchon, K.F.; Paraschivoiu, I. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-12-01

    In order to study the dynamic stall phenomenon on a Darrieus wind turbine, the incompressible flow field around a moving airfoil is simulated using a noninertial stream function-vorticity formulation of the two-dimensional unsteady navier-Stokes equations. Spatial discretization is achieved by the streamline upwind Petrov-Galerkin finite element method on a hybrid mesh composed of a structured region of quadrilateral elements in the vicinity of solid boundaries, an unstructured region of triangular elements elsewhere, and a layer of infinite elements surrounding the domain and projecting the external boundary to infinity. Temporal discretization is achieved by an implicit second order finite difference scheme. At each time step, a nonlinear algebraic system is solved by a Newton method. To accelerate computations, the generalized minimum residual method with an incomplete triangular factorization preconditioning is used to solve the linearized Newton systems. The solver is applied to simulate the flow around a NACA 0015 airfoil in Darrieus motion and the results are compared to experimental observations. To the authors' knowledge, it is the first time that the simulation of such a motion has been performed using the Navier-Stokes equations.

  17. Numerical algorithms for steady and unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, Mohammed; Dacles, Jennifer

    1989-01-01

    The numerical analysis of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are becoming important tools in the understanding of some fluid flow problems which are encountered in research as well as in industry. With the advent of the supercomputers, more realistic problems can be studied with a wider choice of numerical algorithms. An alternative formulation is presented for viscous incompressible flows. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are cast in a velocity/vorticity formulation. This formulation consists of solving the Poisson equations for the velocity components and the vorticity transport equation. Two numerical algorithms for the steady two-dimensional laminar flows are presented. The first method is based on the actual partial differential equations. This uses a finite-difference approximation of the governing equations on a staggered grid. The second method uses a finite element discretization with the vorticity transport equation approximated using a Galerkin approximation and the Poisson equations are obtained using a least squares method. The equations are solved efficiently using Newton's method and a banded direct matrix solver (LINPACK). The method is extended to steady three-dimensional laminar flows and applied to a cubic driven cavity using finite difference schemes and a staggered grid arrangement on a Cartesian mesh. The equations are solved iteratively using a plane zebra relaxation scheme. Currently, a two-dimensional, unsteady algorithm is being developed using a generalized coordinate system. The equations are discretized using a finite-volume approach. This work will then be extended to three-dimensional flows.

  18. Adaptively Refined Euler and Navier-Stokes Solutions with a Cartesian-Cell Based Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    A Cartesian-cell based scheme with adaptive mesh refinement for solving the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions has been developed and tested. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies were generated automatically, by recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, N-sided 'cut' cells were created using polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid was stored in a binary-tree data structure which provided a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations were solved on the resulting grids using an upwind, finite-volume formulation. The inviscid fluxes were found in an upwinded manner using a linear reconstruction of the cell primitives, providing the input states to an approximate Riemann solver. The viscous fluxes were formed using a Green-Gauss type of reconstruction upon a co-volume surrounding the cell interface. Data at the vertices of this co-volume were found in a linearly K-exact manner, which ensured linear K-exactness of the gradients. Adaptively-refined solutions for the inviscid flow about a four-element airfoil (test case 3) were compared to theory. Laminar, adaptively-refined solutions were compared to accepted computational, experimental and theoretical results.

  19. Navier-Stokes turbine heat transfer predictions using two-equation turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameri, Ali A.; Arnone, Andrea

    1992-08-01

    Navier-Stokes calculations were carried out in order to predict the heat transfer rates on turbine blades. The calculations were performed using TRAF2D which is a two-dimensional, explicit, finite volume mass-averaged Navier-Stokes solver. Turbulence was modeled using q-omega and k-epsilon two-equation models and the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model. The model equations along with the flow equations were solved explicitly on a non-periodic C grid. Implicit residual smoothing (IRS) or a combination of multigrid technique and IRS was applied to enhance convergence rates. Calculations were performed to predict the Stanton number distributions on the first stage vane and blade row as well as the second stage vane row of the Rocketdyne Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure fuel turbine. The comparison with the experimental results, although generally favorable, serves to highlight the weaknesses of the turbulence models and the possible areas of improving these models for use in turbomachinery heat transfer calculations.

  20. Navier-Stokes turbine heat transfer predictions using two-equation turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali A.; Arnone, Andrea

    1992-01-01

    Navier-Stokes calculations were carried out in order to predict the heat transfer rates on turbine blades. The calculations were performed using TRAF2D which is a two-dimensional, explicit, finite volume mass-averaged Navier-Stokes solver. Turbulence was modeled using q-omega and k-epsilon two-equation models and the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic model. The model equations along with the flow equations were solved explicitly on a non-periodic C grid. Implicit residual smoothing (IRS) or a combination of multigrid technique and IRS was applied to enhance convergence rates. Calculations were performed to predict the Stanton number distributions on the first stage vane and blade row as well as the second stage vane row of the Rocketdyne Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure fuel turbine. The comparison with the experimental results, although generally favorable, serves to highlight the weaknesses of the turbulence models and the possible areas of improving these models for use in turbomachinery heat transfer calculations.

  1. SSME thrust chamber modeling with Navier Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Edwards, J.; Gross, K.

    1986-01-01

    The capability of predicting two-dimensional, compressible and reacting flow in the combustion chamber and nozzle of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is demonstrated. A nonorthogonal body fitted coordinate system has been used to represent the combustor and nozzle geometry. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the entire thrust chamber with the k-epsilon turbulence model accounting for compressibility and large pressure gradients effects. Results of the computational test cases reveal all expected features of the transonic nozzle flows including location of sonic line, internal shock and boundary layer build-up. Calculated performance parameters such as thrust, flow rate, and specific impulse are also in reasonble agreement with available data. The results show promising potential of solving full Navier-Stokes equations with heat transfer and two-phase combustion in truly comprehensive modeling of rocket engines.

  2. On conservation laws of Navier-Stokes Galerkin discretizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnyi, Sergey; Heister, Timo; Olshanskii, Maxim A.; Rebholz, Leo G.

    2017-05-01

    We study conservation properties of Galerkin methods for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, without the divergence constraint strongly enforced. In typical discretizations such as the mixed finite element method, the conservation of mass is enforced only weakly, and this leads to discrete solutions which may not conserve energy, momentum, angular momentum, helicity, or vorticity, even though the physics of the Navier-Stokes equations dictate that they should. We aim in this work to construct discrete formulations that conserve as many physical laws as possible without utilizing a strong enforcement of the divergence constraint, and doing so leads us to a new formulation that conserves each of energy, momentum, angular momentum, enstrophy in 2D, helicity and vorticity (for reference, the usual convective formulation does not conserve most of these quantities). Several numerical experiments are performed, which verify the theory and test the new formulation.

  3. Generalized Damour-Navier-Stokes equation applied to trapping horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Gourgoulhon, Eric

    2005-11-15

    An identity is derived from the Einstein equation for any hypersurface H which can be foliated by spacelike two-dimensional surfaces. In the case where the hypersurface is null, this identity coincides with the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes-like equation obtained by Damour in the membrane approach to a black hole event horizon. In the case where H is spacelike or null and the 2-surfaces are marginally trapped, this identity applies to Hayward's trapping horizons and to the related dynamical horizons recently introduced by Ashtekar and Krishnan. The identity involves a normal fundamental form (normal connection 1-form) of the 2-surface, which can be viewed as a generalization to non-null hypersurfaces of the Hajicek 1-form used by Damour. This 1-form is also used to define the angular momentum of the horizon. The generalized Damour-Navier-Stokes equation leads then to a simple evolution equation for the angular momentum.

  4. Optimal control of thermally coupled Navier Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, Kazufumi; Scroggs, Jeffrey S.; Tran, Hien T.

    1994-01-01

    The optimal boundary temperature control of the stationary thermally coupled incompressible Navier-Stokes equation is considered. Well-posedness and existence of the optimal control and a necessary optimality condition are obtained. Optimization algorithms based on the augmented Lagrangian method with second order update are discussed. A test example motivated by control of transport process in the high pressure vapor transport (HVPT) reactor is presented to demonstrate the applicability of our theoretical results and proposed algorithm.

  5. Dynamic Stall Computations Using a Zonal Navier-Stokes Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    COMPUTATIONS USING A ZONAL NAVIER-STOKES MODEL OfOSONA, AUTWOR(S) Conrovd, Jack H. r. __ _ I, ,3 , iOR co T’M( COVERED DATE Of REPORT (Yea, Month Oy) IS PAGE...48 computer and is used to calculate the flow field about a NACA 0012 airfoil oscillating in pitch. Surface pressure distributions and integrated...lift, pitching moment, and drag coefficient versus angle of attack are compared to existing experimental data for four cases and existing computational

  6. Intermittency in two-dimensional Ekman-Navier-Stokes turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffetta, G.; Celani, A.; Musacchio, S.; Vergassola, M.

    2002-08-01

    We study the statistics of the vorticity field in two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence with linear Ekman friction. We show that the small-scale vorticity fluctuations are intermittent, as conjectured by Bernard [Europhys. Lett. 50, 333 (2000)] and Nam et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 5134 (2000)]. The small-scale statistics of vorticity fluctuations coincide with that of a passive scalar with finite lifetime transported by the velocity field itself.

  7. Navier-Stokes-like equations for traffic flow.

    PubMed

    Velasco, R M; Marques, W

    2005-10-01

    The macroscopic traffic flow equations derived from the reduced Paveri-Fontana equation are closed starting with the maximization of the informational entropy. The homogeneous steady state taken as a reference is obtained for a specific model of the desired velocity and a kind of Chapman-Enskog method is developed to calculate the traffic pressure at the Navier-Stokes level. Numerical solution of the macroscopic traffic equations is obtained and its characteristics are analyzed.

  8. Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on the hyperbolic plane.

    PubMed

    Khesin, Boris; Misiolek, Gerard

    2012-11-06

    We show that nonuniqueness of the Leray-Hopf solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation on the hyperbolic plane (2) observed by Chan and Czubak is a consequence of the Hodge decomposition. We show that this phenomenon does not occur on (n) whenever n ≥ 3. We also describe the corresponding general Hamiltonian framework of hydrodynamics on complete Riemannian manifolds, which includes the hyperbolic setting.

  9. Implicit methods for the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, S.; Kwak, D.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations using explicit schemes can be obtained at the expense of efficiency. Conventional implicit methods which often achieve fast convergence rates suffer high cost per iteration. A new implicit scheme based on lower-upper factorization and symmetric Gauss-Seidel relaxation offers very low cost per iteration as well as fast convergence. High efficiency is achieved by accomplishing the complete vectorizability of the algorithm on oblique planes of sweep in three dimensions.

  10. Local interactions in renormalization methods for Navier-Stokes turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE; Vahala, George

    1992-01-01

    Two distinct renormalization-group (RG) approaches are applied to Navier-Stokes turbulence: epsilon-RG and recursive RG. Epsilon-RG takes into account only nonlocal interactions and utilizes an infinitesimal subgrid (unresolvable scale) shell limit. Recursive RG takes into account both nonlocal and local interactions and does not require an infinitesimal subgrid shell limit to be taken. The role of local interactions and the introduction of RG-induced nonlinearities are discussed and clarified.

  11. Navier-Stokes Simulation of Boundary-Layer Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    AUTHOITY 3 DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY OF REPORT Approved for publlo release, distri but ion unmlioe4 ’ AD-A226 351 5 . MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER...ARJSR 87-0237, "Navier-Stokes Simulation of Boundary-Layer Transition" escrs. 5 w ccessful efforts to computationally model the receptivity of the...3.1 Basic-State Results........................................ 4 3.2 Unsteady-Disturbance Results................................. 5 3.3 Conclusions

  12. Characterization of blowup for the Navier-Stokes equations using vector potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkitani, Koji

    2017-01-01

    We characterize a possible blowup for the 3D Navier-Stokes on the basis of dynamical equations for vector potentials 𝑨 . This is motivated by a known interpolation ∥𝑨∥ BMO≤∥𝒖∥ L3 , together with recent mathematical results. First, by working out an inversion formula for singular integrals that appear in the governing equations, we derive a criterion using the nonlinear term of 𝑨 as ∫0t∗∥∂𝑨/∂t-ν △ 𝑨 ∥ L∞d t =∞ for a blowup at t∗. Second, for a particular form of a scale-invariant singularity of the nonlinear term we show that the vector potential becomes unbounded in its L∞ and BMO norms. Using the stream function, we also consider the 2D Navier-Stokes equations to seek an alternative proof of their known global regularity. It is not yet proven that the BMO norm of vector potentials in 3D (or, the stream function in 2D) serve as a blow up criterion in more general cases.

  13. Navier-Stokes computations of a viscous optimized waverider. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takashima, Naruhisa

    1992-01-01

    The performance of a Mach 6 viscous optimized waverider was calculated using the 3-D Navier-Stokes equations. The Mach 6 viscous optimized waverider was generated using MAXWARP, a code developed at the University of Maryland. The computations were performed using CFL3D, an implicit upwind-biased finite-volume algorithm developed at NASA Langley. Results show that good agreement was found between the calculated performance by MAXWARP and results from the Mach 6 Navier-Stokes computation. Furthermore, off-design performance of the Mach 6 optimized waverider was computed at Mach 4 and 8. The performance at these Mach numbers compared well with the performance of the viscous optimized waveriders specifically designed for these Mach numbers. Finally, contours of different flow parameters in the cross-flow plane were examined for the three calculations. The results indicate that the flow gradients are relatively small within the captured flow, and the variation itself is well behaved; thus, making the waverider configuration a promising choice for an engine/airframe design, especially for cruise-type applications.

  14. A Modular Approach to Model Oscillating Control Surfaces Using Navier Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; Lee, Henry

    2014-01-01

    The use of active controls for rotorcraft is becoming more important for modern aerospace configurations. Efforts to reduce the vibrations of helicopter blades with use of active-controls are in progress. Modeling oscillating control surfaces using the linear aerodynamics theory is well established. However, higher-fidelity methods are needed to account for nonlinear effects, such as those that occur in transonic flow. The aeroelastic responses of a wing with an oscillating control surface, computed using the transonic small perturbation (TSP) theory, have been shown to cause important transonic flow effects such as a reversal of control surface effectiveness that occurs as the shock wave crosses the hinge line. In order to account for flow complexities such as blade-vortex interactions of rotor blades higher-fidelity methods based on the Navier-Stokes equations are used. Reference 6 presents a procedure that uses the Navier-Stokes equations with moving-sheared grids and demonstrates up to 8 degrees of control-surface amplitude, using a single grid. Later, this procedure was extended to accommodate larger amplitudes, based on sliding grid zones. The sheared grid method implemented in EulerlNavier-Stokes-based aeroelastic code ENS AERO was successfully applied to active control design by industry. Recently there are several papers that present results for oscillating control surface using Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. References 9 and 10 report 2-D cases by filling gaps with overset grids. Reference 9 compares integrated forces with the experiment at low oscillating frequencies whereas Ref. 10 reports parametric studies but with no validation. Reference II reports results for a 3D case by modeling the gap region with a deformed grid and compares force results with the experiment only at the mid-span of flap. In Ref. II grid is deformed to match the control surface deflections at the section where the measurements are made. However, there is no

  15. Three-Dimensional Navier-Stokes Method with Two-Equation Turbulence Models for Efficient Numerical Simulation of Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    A new computational efficient 3-D compressible Reynolds-averaged implicit Navier-Stokes method with advanced two equation turbulence models for high speed flows is presented. All convective terms are modeled using an entropy satisfying higher-order Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) scheme based on implicit upwind flux-difference split approximations and arithmetic averaging procedure of primitive variables. This method combines the best features of data management and computational efficiency of space marching procedures with the generality and stability of time dependent Navier-Stokes procedures to solve flows with mixed supersonic and subsonic zones, including streamwise separated flows. Its robust stability derives from a combination of conservative implicit upwind flux-difference splitting with Roe's property U to provide accurate shock capturing capability that non-conservative schemes do not guarantee, alternating symmetric Gauss-Seidel 'method of planes' relaxation procedure coupled with a three-dimensional two-factor diagonal-dominant approximate factorization scheme, TVD flux limiters of higher-order flux differences satisfying realizability, and well-posed characteristic-based implicit boundary-point a'pproximations consistent with the local characteristics domain of dependence. The efficiency of the method is highly increased with Newton Raphson acceleration which allows convergence in essentially one forward sweep for supersonic flows. The method is verified by comparing with experiment and other Navier-Stokes methods. Here, results of adiabatic and cooled flat plate flows, compression corner flow, and 3-D hypersonic shock-wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows are presented. The robust 3-D method achieves a better computational efficiency of at least one order of magnitude over the CNS Navier-Stokes code. It provides cost-effective aerodynamic predictions in agreement with experiment, and the capability of predicting complex flow structures in

  16. Numerics made easy: solving the Navier-Stokes equation for arbitrary channel cross-sections using Microsoft Excel.

    PubMed

    Richter, Christiane; Kotz, Frederik; Giselbrecht, Stefan; Helmer, Dorothea; Rapp, Bastian E

    2016-06-01

    The fluid mechanics of microfluidics is distinctively simpler than the fluid mechanics of macroscopic systems. In macroscopic systems effects such as non-laminar flow, convection, gravity etc. need to be accounted for all of which can usually be neglected in microfluidic systems. Still, there exists only a very limited selection of channel cross-sections for which the Navier-Stokes equation for pressure-driven Poiseuille flow can be solved analytically. From these equations, velocity profiles as well as flow rates can be calculated. However, whenever a cross-section is not highly symmetric (rectangular, elliptical or circular) the Navier-Stokes equation can usually not be solved analytically. In all of these cases, numerical methods are required. However, in many instances it is not necessary to turn to complex numerical solver packages for deriving, e.g., the velocity profile of a more complex microfluidic channel cross-section. In this paper, a simple spreadsheet analysis tool (here: Microsoft Excel) will be used to implement a simple numerical scheme which allows solving the Navier-Stokes equation for arbitrary channel cross-sections.

  17. A Cartesian, cell-based approach for adaptively-refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1994-01-01

    A Cartesian, cell-based approach for adaptively-refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is developed and tested. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, N-sided 'cut' cells are created using polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary-tree structure which provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite-volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded: a gradient-limited, linear reconstruction of the primitive variables is performed, providing input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. The more robust of a series of viscous flux functions is used to provide the viscous fluxes at the cell interfaces. Adaptively-refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations using the Cartesian, cell-based approach are obtained and compared to theory, experiment, and other accepted computational results for a series of low and moderate Reynolds number flows.

  18. A Cartesian, cell-based approach for adaptively-refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coirier, William J.; Powell, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    A Cartesian, cell-based approach for adaptively-refined solutions of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions is developed and tested. Grids about geometrically complicated bodies are generated automatically, by recursive subdivision of a single Cartesian cell encompassing the entire flow domain. Where the resulting cells intersect bodies, N-sided 'cut' cells are created using polygon-clipping algorithms. The grid is stored in a binary-tree data structure which provides a natural means of obtaining cell-to-cell connectivity and of carrying out solution-adaptive mesh refinement. The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are solved on the resulting grids using a finite-volume formulation. The convective terms are upwinded: A gradient-limited, linear reconstruction of the primitive variables is performed, providing input states to an approximate Riemann solver for computing the fluxes between neighboring cells. The more robust of a series of viscous flux functions is used to provide the viscous fluxes at the cell interfaces. Adaptively-refined solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations using the Cartesian, cell-based approach are obtained and compared to theory, experiment and other accepted computational results for a series of low and moderate Reynolds number flows.

  19. Evaluation of a Second-Order Accurate Navier-Stokes Code for Detached Eddy Simulation Past a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Singer, Bart A.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluate the applicability of a production computational fluid dynamics code for conducting detached eddy simulation for unsteady flows. A second-order accurate Navier-Stokes code developed at NASA Langley Research Center, known as TLNS3D, is used for these simulations. We focus our attention on high Reynolds number flow (Re = 5 x 10(sup 4) - 1.4 x 10(sup 5)) past a circular cylinder to simulate flows with large-scale separations. We consider two types of flow situations: one in which the flow at the separation point is laminar, and the other in which the flow is already turbulent when it detaches from the surface of the cylinder. Solutions are presented for two- and three-dimensional calculations using both the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes paradigm and the detached eddy simulation treatment. All calculations use the standard Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model as the base model.

  20. Attractors of three-dimensional fast-rotating Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trahe, Markus

    The three-dimensional (3-D) rotating Navier-Stokes equations describe the dynamics of rotating, incompressible, viscous fluids. In this work, they are considered with smooth, time-independent forces and the original statements implied by the classical "Taylor-Proudman Theorem" of geophysics are rigorously proved. It is shown that fully developed turbulence of 3-D fast-rotating fluids is essentially characterized by turbulence of two-dimensional (2-D) fluids in terms of numbers of degrees of freedom. In this context, the 3-D nonlinear "resonant limit equations", which arise in a non-linear averaging process as the rotation frequency O → infinity, are studied and optimal (2-D-type) upper bounds for fractal box and Hausdorff dimensions of the global attractor as well as upper bounds for box dimensions of exponential attractors are determined. Then, the convergence of exponential attractors for the full 3-D rotating Navier-Stokes equations to exponential attractors for the resonant limit equations as O → infinity in the sense of full Hausdorff-metric distances is established. This provides upper and lower semi-continuity of exponential attractors with respect to the rotation frequency and implies that the number of degrees of freedom (attractor dimension) of 3-D fast-rotating fluids is close to that of 2-D fluids. Finally, the algebraic-geometric structure of the Poincare curves, which control the resonances and small divisor estimates for partial differential equations, is further investigated; the 3-D nonlinear limit resonant operators are characterized by three-wave interactions governed by these curves. A new canonical transformation between those curves is constructed; with far-reaching consequences on the density of the latter.

  1. Shared Memory Parallelism for 3D Cartesian Discrete Ordinates Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, Salli; Dutka-Malen, Ivan; Plagne, Laurent; Ponçot, Angélique; Ramet, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the design and the performance of DOMINO, a 3D Cartesian SN solver that implements two nested levels of parallelism (multicore+SIMD) on shared memory computation nodes. DOMINO is written in C++, a multi-paradigm programming language that enables the use of powerful and generic parallel programming tools such as Intel TBB and Eigen. These two libraries allow us to combine multi-thread parallelism with vector operations in an efficient and yet portable way. As a result, DOMINO can exploit the full power of modern multi-core processors and is able to tackle very large simulations, that usually require large HPC clusters, using a single computing node. For example, DOMINO solves a 3D full core PWR eigenvalue problem involving 26 energy groups, 288 angular directions (S16), 46 × 106 spatial cells and 1 × 1012 DoFs within 11 hours on a single 32-core SMP node. This represents a sustained performance of 235 GFlops and 40:74% of the SMP node peak performance for the DOMINO sweep implementation. The very high Flops/Watt ratio of DOMINO makes it a very interesting building block for a future many-nodes nuclear simulation tool.

  2. Convergence acceleration of rational Runge-Kutta scheme for Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morinishi, Koji; Nobuyuki, Satofuka

    Modifications introduced to improve the performance of the rational-Runge-Kutta Euler/Navier-Stokes solver of Morishini and Satofuka (1987 and 1988) are discussed, summarizing the results of recent investigations. The derivation of the governing equations and the basic numerical procedure are outlined, and the use of the residual-averaging technique and multigrid methods to accelerate convergence is explained. Results are presented in graphs for (1) two-dimensional inviscid flow on a NACA 0012 airfoil at Mach 0.8 and angle of attack alpha = 1.25 deg, (2) two-dimensional viscous flow on an RAE 2822 airfoil at Mach 0.73 and alpha = 2.80 deg, and (3) three-dimensional inviscid flow on the ONERA M6 wing at Mach 0.84 and alpha = 3.06 deg. The steady-state convergence of the method is shown to be comparable to that of diagonalized implicit approximate-factorization schemes.

  3. Simulation of Synthetic Jets in Quiescent Air Using Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Turkel, Eli L.

    2004-01-01

    We report research experience in applying an Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver for the prediction of time-dependent flows in the presence of an active flow control device. The configuration under consideration is a synthetic jet created by a single diaphragm piezoelectric actuator in quiescent air. Time-averaged and instantaneous data for this case were obtained at Langley Research Center, using multiple measurement techniques. Computational results for this case using one-equation Spalart-Allmaras and two-equation Menter s turbulence models are presented here along with comparisons with the experimental data. The effect of grid refinement, preconditioning and time-step variation are also examined.

  4. Time-Accurate Solutions of Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations for Potential Turbopump Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan

    2001-01-01

    Two numerical procedures, one based on artificial compressibility method and the other pressure projection method, are outlined for obtaining time-accurate solutions of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The performance of the two method are compared by obtaining unsteady solutions for the evolution of twin vortices behind a at plate. Calculated results are compared with experimental and other numerical results. For an un- steady ow which requires small physical time step, pressure projection method was found to be computationally efficient since it does not require any subiterations procedure. It was observed that the artificial compressibility method requires a fast convergence scheme at each physical time step in order to satisfy incompressibility condition. This was obtained by using a GMRES-ILU(0) solver in our computations. When a line-relaxation scheme was used, the time accuracy was degraded and time-accurate computations became very expensive.

  5. Numerical methods for the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes equations.

    PubMed

    Bell, John B; Garcia, Alejandro L; Williams, Sarah A

    2007-07-01

    The Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes (LLNS) equations incorporate thermal fluctuations into macroscopic hydrodynamics by using stochastic fluxes. This paper examines explicit Eulerian discretizations of the full LLNS equations. Several computational fluid dynamics approaches are considered (including MacCormack's two-step Lax-Wendroff scheme and the piecewise parabolic method) and are found to give good results for the variance of momentum fluctuations. However, neither of these schemes accurately reproduces the fluctuations in energy or density. We introduce a conservative centered scheme with a third-order Runge-Kutta temporal integrator that does accurately produce fluctuations in density, energy, and momentum. A variety of numerical tests, including the random walk of a standing shock wave, are considered and results from the stochastic LLNS solver are compared with theory, when available, and with molecular simulations using a direct simulation Monte Carlo algorithm.

  6. An Evaluation of Parameters Influencing Jet Mixing Using the WIND Navier-stokes Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dembowski, Mary Ann; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.

    2002-01-01

    The WIND code, a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver used for a variety of aerospace flow simulations, was investigated for a Mach 2 nozzle at a series of nozzle stagnation temperatures. Comparisons of WIND calculations are made to experimental measurements of axial velocity, Mach number, and stagnation temperature along the jet centerline. The primary objective was to investigate the capabilities of the two-equation turbulence models available in WIND, version 4.0, for the analysis of heated supersonic nozzle flows. The models examined were the Menter Shear Stress Transport (SST) model and the Chien k-epsilon model, with and without the compressibility correction due to Sarkar. It was observed that all of the turbulence models investigated produced solutions that did not agree well with the experimental measurements. The effects of freestream Mach number and turbulent Prandtl number specifications were also investigated.

  7. Simulation, characterization and control of forced unsteady viscous flows using Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghia, K. N.; Ghia, U.

    1992-11-01

    A two-and-a-quarter-year multi-tasked research project was pursued by the present investigators to study dynamic stall phenomenon under AFOSR sponsorship between Feb. 1990 - May 1992. The major objective was to predict and control the dynamic stall phenomenon in 2-D and 3-D flows. In the process of achieving these objectives, significant effort was directed towards developing mathematical models and the corresponding computational methods which were made available to interested researchers and organizations involved in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research. The analyses developed included a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes (NS) analysis for a general body undergoing arbitrary three-degree-of-freedom maneuvers; detailed results are provided for this class of flows. For enhancement of accuracy and efficiency, an adaptive-grid time-accurate flow solution technique was developed to enable improved resolution of the various length scales in a vortex-dominated unsteady flow. A multi-block grid generation analysis is developed for a 3-D rectangular planform wing. For the corresponding flow analysis using velocity-vorticity variables and direct-solution philosophy, the difficulties experienced were clearly discussed in the annual report submitted a year ago in November 1991. This 3-D flow analysis was therefore temporarily set aside. It will be pursued further in a subsequent grant, and the progress made on it will be reported in a forthcoming annual report for that grant. In the current grant, the study of 3-D flows was continued, using an iterative solution methodology. Hence, a 3-D unsteady Navier-Stokes analysis, again using velocity-vorticity variables, and an iterative solution technique with multi-grid acceleration were developed.

  8. A semi-implicit augmented IIM for Navier-Stokes equations with open, traction, or free boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhilin; Xiao, Li; Cai, Qin; Zhao, Hongkai; Luo, Ray

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, a new Navier-Stokes solver based on a finite difference approximation is proposed to solve incompressible flows on irregular domains with open, traction, and free boundary conditions, which can be applied to simulations of fluid structure interaction, implicit solvent model for biomolecular applications and other free boundary or interface problems. For some problems of this type, the projection method and the augmented immersed interface method (IIM) do not work well or does not work at all. The proposed new Navier-Stokes solver is based on the local pressure boundary method, and a semi-implicit augmented IIM. A fast Poisson solver can be used in our algorithm which gives us the potential for developing fast overall solvers in the future. The time discretization is based on a second order multi-step method. Numerical tests with exact solutions are presented to validate the accuracy of the method. Application to fluid structure interaction between an incompressible fluid and a compressible gas bubble is also presented.

  9. A semi-implicit augmented IIM for Navier-Stokes equations with open, traction, or free boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhilin; Xiao, Li; Cai, Qin; Zhao, Hongkai; Luo, Ray

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a new Navier-Stokes solver based on a finite difference approximation is proposed to solve incompressible flows on irregular domains with open, traction, and free boundary conditions, which can be applied to simulations of fluid structure interaction, implicit solvent model for biomolecular applications and other free boundary or interface problems. For some problems of this type, the projection method and the augmented immersed interface method (IIM) do not work well or does not work at all. The proposed new Navier-Stokes solver is based on the local pressure boundary method, and a semi-implicit augmented IIM. A fast Poisson solver can be used in our algorithm which gives us the potential for developing fast overall solvers in the future. The time discretization is based on a second order multi-step method. Numerical tests with exact solutions are presented to validate the accuracy of the method. Application to fluid structure interaction between an incompressible fluid and a compressible gas bubble is also presented.

  10. Analysis of a High-Lift Multi-Element Airfoil using a Navier-Stokes Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, Mark E.

    1995-01-01

    A thin-layer Navier-Stokes code, CFL3D, was utilized to compute the flow over a high-lift multi-element airfoil. This study was conducted to improve the prediction of high-lift flowfields using various turbulence models and improved glidding techniques. An overset Chimera grid system is used to model the three element airfoil geometry. The effects of wind tunnel wall modeling, changes to the grid density and distribution, and embedded grids are discussed. Computed pressure and lift coefficients using Spalart-Allmaras, Baldwin-Barth, and Menter's kappa-omega - Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence models are compared with experimental data. The ability of CFL3D to predict the effects on lift coefficient due to changes in Reynolds number changes is also discussed.

  11. The Navier-Stokes Stress Principle for Viscous Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, Ernst

    1942-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes stress principle is checked in the light of Maxwell's mechanism of friction and in connection herewith the possibility of another theorem is indicated. The Navier-Stokes stress principle is in general predicated upon the conception of the plastic body. Hence the process is a purely phenomenological one, which Newton himself followed with his special theorem for one-dimensional flows. It remained for Maxwell to discover the physical mechanism by which the shear inflow direction is developed: According to it, this shear is only 'fictitious' as it merely represents the substitute for a certain transport on macroscopic motion quantity, as conditioned by Brown's moiecular motion and the diffusion, respectively. It is clear that this mechanism is not bound to the special case of the one-dimensioilal flows, but holds for any flow as expression of the diffusion, by which a fluid differs sharply from a plastic body. If it is remembered, on the other hand, that the cause of the stresses on the plastic body lies in a certain cohesion of the molecules, it appears by no means self evident that this difference in the mechanism of friction between fluid and plastic body should not prevail in the stress principle as well, although it certainly is desirable in any case, at least subsequently, to establish the general theorem in the sense of Maxwell. Actually, a different theorem is suggested which, in contrast to that by Navier-Stokes, has the form of an unsymmetrical matrix. Without anticipating a final decision several reasons are advanced by way of a special flow which seem to affirm this new theorem. To make it clear that the problem involved here still awaits its final solution, is the real purpose behind the present article.

  12. Nonlinear relaxation algorithms for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in two and three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Jack Ray

    An efficient new class of implicit algorithms for the computation of steady, two- and three-dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes flow fields is presented. A nonlinear relaxation strategy based on a fully coupled sequence of line or planar Gauss-Seidel sweeps is used to drive the solution toward a steady state. Quasi-Newton techniques are used to accelerate the convergence of the 2-D algorithm and to reduce approximate factorization errors in the 3-D version. Convergence characteristics are further improved through the addition of a coarse-grid correction procedure. The discretization of the Navier-Stokes set is hybrid in nature, with flux-vector splitting utilized for the streamwise inviscid fluxes and central differences with flux-limited artificial dissipation used for the transverse inviscid fluxes. Viscous fluxes are central-differenced. Both laminar and turbulent cases are considered, with turbulent closure provided by a modification of the Baldwin-Barth one-equation model. Convergence histories and comparisons with experimental data are presented for several 2-D and 3-D shock wave-boundary layer interactions. Several numerical simulations of the Mach 10 flow through a generic 3-D sidewall compression scramJet inlet configuration are also presented. For the medium-sized (175,000-325,000 mesh points) 3-D validation cases, the algorithm provides steady-state convergence in 15 to 17 Cray Y-MP CPU minutes. Converged solutions for some of the inlet flow fields (375,000-395,000 mesh points) are obtained in about one CPU hour.

  13. Jet noise predictions from unsteady Navier-Stokes simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Robert E.; Bower, William W.; Chmielewski, Gerald E.; Howe, Michael S.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations are employed to predict the characteristics of round jets at supersonic speeds. The simulations are performed with a finite volume method which is fourth order accurate in space and second order in time. The overall sound pressure level (OASPL) in the near field of a round free jet is over-predicted by roughly 8 dB relative to an experimental correlation. In an impinging jet, shock motion and vortex stretching are identified as noise generation mechanisms in the impingement zone.

  14. Time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations with multigrid acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melson, N. D.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Atkins, Harold L.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient method for calculating unsteady flows is presented, with emphasis on a modified version of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. Fourier stability analysis is used to illustrate the effect of treating the source term implicitly instead of explicity, as well as to illustrate other algorithmic choices. A 2D circular cylinder (with a Reynolds number of 1200 and a Mach number of 0.3) is calculated. The present scheme requires only about 10 percent of the computer time required by global minimum time stepping.

  15. Time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations with multigrid acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melson, N. D.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Atkins, Harold L.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient method for calculating unsteady flows is presented, with emphasis on a modified version of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. Fourier stability analysis is used to illustrate the effect of treating the source term implicitly instead of explicity, as well as to illustrate other algorithmic choices. A 2D circular cylinder (with a Reynolds number of 1200 and a Mach number of 0.3) is calculated. The present scheme requires only about 10 percent of the computer time required by global minimum time stepping.

  16. Navier-Stokes analysis of blunt trailing edge airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanaway, Sharon; Mccroskey, W. J.; Kroo, Ilan

    1992-01-01

    The flow around blunt trailing edge airfoils was studied by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The solution procedure combines a grid around the airfoil with a second grid for the wake so that the time advancement over the domain is fully implicit. This is not only very efficient for the algorithm but also allows implicit solutions of a one equation turbulence model appropriate for both boundary layers and wakes. An algebraic and two one-equation turbulence models are tested for a blunt RAE 2822 airfoil section and detailed comparisons with experimental data are presented in the trailing edge region.

  17. Towards an ideal preconditioner for linearized Navier-Stokes problems

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M.F.

    1996-12-31

    Discretizing certain linearizations of the steady-state Navier-Stokes equations gives rise to nonsymmetric linear systems with indefinite symmetric part. We show that for such systems there exists a block diagonal preconditioner which gives convergence in three GMRES steps, independent of the mesh size and viscosity parameter (Reynolds number). While this {open_quotes}ideal{close_quotes} preconditioner is too expensive to be used in practice, it provides a useful insight into the problem. We then consider various approximations to the ideal preconditioner, and describe the eigenvalues of the preconditioned systems. Finally, we compare these preconditioners numerically, and present our conclusions.

  18. A visual programming environment for the Navier-Stokes computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomboulian, Sherryl; Crockett, Thomas W.; Middleton, David

    1988-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes computer is a high-performance, reconfigurable, pipelined machine designed to solve large computational fluid dynamics problems. Due to the complexity of the architecture, development of effective, high-level language compilers for the system appears to be a very difficult task. Consequently, a visual programming methodology has been developed which allows users to program the system at an architectural level by constructing diagrams of the pipeline configuration. These schematic program representations can then be checked for validity and automatically translated into machine code. The visual environment is illustrated by using a prototype graphical editor to program an example problem.

  19. Implicit multiblock Euler and Navier-Stokes calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenssen, Carl B.

    1994-09-01

    Implicit multiblock computations have been carried out for a large number of blocks using explicit coupling between the blocks. The convergence rate of this method is very sensitive to the block partitioning. For the Navier-Stokes equations the height of the blocks should be greater than the boundary-layer thickness. Also, excessively thin blocks will cause breakdown of the algorithm. For transonic calculations the best convergence rate was obtained using a red-black Gauss-Seidel approach. It is concluded that the method is well suited for massively parallel computers.

  20. Smooth solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect

    Pokhozhaev, S I

    2014-02-28

    We consider smooth solutions of the Cauchy problem for the Navier-Stokes equations on the scale of smooth functions which are periodic with respect to x∈R{sup 3}. We obtain existence theorems for global (with respect to t>0) and local solutions of the Cauchy problem. The statements of these depend on the smoothness and the norm of the initial vector function. Upper bounds for the behaviour of solutions in both classes, which depend on t, are also obtained. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  1. The Navier-Stokes Equations in the Critical Lebesgue Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hongjie; Du, Dapeng

    2009-12-01

    We study regularity criteria for the d-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. We prove in this paper that if {u in L_infty^tLd^x((0,T)× mathbb{R}^d)} is a Leray-Hopf weak solution, then u is smooth and unique in {(0, T)× mathbb{R}^d} . This generalizes a result by Escauriaza, Seregin and Šverák [5]. Additionally, we show that if T = ∞ then u goes to zero as t goes to infinity.

  2. Implicit upwind methods for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    A class of implicit upwind differencing methods for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is described and applied. The methods are based on the use of local eigenvalues or wave speeds to control spatial differencing of inviscid terms and are aimed at increasing the level of accuracy and stability achievable in computation. Techniques for accelerating the rate of convergence to a steady state solution are also used. Applications to inviscid and viscous transonic flows are discussed and compared with other methods and experimental measurements. It is shown that accurate and efficient transonic airfoil calculations can be made on the Cray-l computer in less than 2 min.

  3. Decay characterization of solutions to Navier-Stokes-Voigt equations in terms of the initial datum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niche, César J.

    2016-03-01

    The Navier-Stokes-Voigt equations are a regularization of the Navier-Stokes equations that share some of its asymptotic and statistical properties and have been used in direct numerical simulations of the latter. In this article we characterize the decay rate of solutions to the Navier-Stokes-Voigt equations in terms of the decay character of the initial datum and study the long time behavior of its solutions by comparing them to solutions to the linear part.

  4. CSCM Navier-Stokes thermal/aerodynamic analysis of hypersonic nozzle flows with slot injection and wall cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Codding, William H.; Lombard, C. K.; Yang, J. Y.

    1988-01-01

    The Conservative Supra-Characteristic Method (CSCM) Navier-Stokes solver is applied to ascertain the problems inherent in the design of a nominal Mach 14 nozzle for NASA-Ames' 3.5-ft Hypersonic Wind Tunnel; attention is given to the effects of boundary layer cooling systems on the aerodynamic redesign of the nozzle throat region. Complete nozzle flowfields are calculated with and without slot injection of either hot or cold fluid into the boundary layer just upstream of the throat, as well as with alternatively adiabatic and cold walls. The CSCM method is capable of resolving subtle differences in the flows.

  5. CSCM Navier-Stokes thermal/aerodynamic analysis of hypersonic nozzle flows with slot injection and wall cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Codding, William H.; Lombard, C. K.; Yang, J. Y.

    1988-01-01

    The Conservative Supra-Characteristic Method (CSCM) Navier-Stokes solver is applied to ascertain the problems inherent in the design of a nominal Mach 14 nozzle for NASA-Ames' 3.5-ft Hypersonic Wind Tunnel; attention is given to the effects of boundary layer cooling systems on the aerodynamic redesign of the nozzle throat region. Complete nozzle flowfields are calculated with and without slot injection of either hot or cold fluid into the boundary layer just upstream of the throat, as well as with alternatively adiabatic and cold walls. The CSCM method is capable of resolving subtle differences in the flows.

  6. Navier-Stokes Analysis of a High Wing Transport High-Lift Configuration with Externally Blown Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slotnick, Jeffrey P.; An, Michael Y.; Mysko, Stephen J.; Yeh, David T.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Roth, Karlin; Baker, M.David; Nash, S.

    2000-01-01

    Insights and lessons learned from the aerodynamic analysis of the High Wing Transport (HWT) high-lift configuration are presented. Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes CFD simulations using the OVERFLOW flow solver are compared with high Reynolds test data obtained in the NASA Ames 12 Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel (PWT) facility. Computational analysis of the baseline HWT high-lift configuration with and without Externally Blown Flap (EBF) jet effects is highlighted. Several additional aerodynamic investigations, such as nacelle strake effectiveness and wake vortex studies, are presented. Technical capabilities and shortcomings of the computational method are discussed and summarized.

  7. Error Estimate of the Ares I Vehicle Longitudinal Aerodynamic Characteristics Based on Turbulent Navier-Stokes Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Ghaffari, Farhad

    2011-01-01

    Numerical predictions of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics for the Ares I class of vehicles, along with the associated error estimate derived from an iterative convergence grid refinement, are presented. Computational results are based on the unstructured grid, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver USM3D, with an assumption that the flow is fully turbulent over the entire vehicle. This effort was designed to complement the prior computational activities conducted over the past five years in support of the Ares I Project with the emphasis on the vehicle s last design cycle designated as the A106 configuration. Due to a lack of flight data for this particular design s outer mold line, the initial vehicle s aerodynamic predictions and the associated error estimates were first assessed and validated against the available experimental data at representative wind tunnel flow conditions pertinent to the ascent phase of the trajectory without including any propulsion effects. Subsequently, the established procedures were then applied to obtain the longitudinal aerodynamic predictions at the selected flight flow conditions. Sample computed results and the correlations with the experimental measurements are presented. In addition, the present analysis includes the relevant data to highlight the balance between the prediction accuracy against the grid size and, thus, the corresponding computer resource requirements for the computations at both wind tunnel and flight flow conditions. NOTE: Some details have been removed from selected plots and figures in compliance with the sensitive but unclassified (SBU) restrictions. However, the content still conveys the merits of the technical approach and the relevant results.

  8. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood localization solver

    SciTech Connect

    2016-09-23

    A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with acoustic transmitters and vocalizing marine mammals to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives and support Marine Renewable Energy. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  9. Reliability enhancement of Navier-Stokes codes through convergence acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, Charles L.; Dulikravich, George S.

    1995-01-01

    Methods for enhancing the reliability of Navier-Stokes computer codes through improving convergence characteristics are presented. The improving of these characteristics decreases the likelihood of code unreliability and user interventions in a design environment. The problem referred to as a 'stiffness' in the governing equations for propulsion-related flowfields is investigated, particularly in regard to common sources of equation stiffness that lead to convergence degradation of CFD algorithms. Von Neumann stability theory is employed as a tool to study the convergence difficulties involved. Based on the stability results, improved algorithms are devised to ensure efficient convergence in different situations. A number of test cases are considered to confirm a correlation between stability theory and numerical convergence. The examples of turbulent and reacting flow are presented, and a generalized form of the preconditioning matrix is derived to handle these problems, i.e., the problems involving additional differential equations for describing the transport of turbulent kinetic energy, dissipation rate and chemical species. Algorithms for unsteady computations are considered. The extension of the preconditioning techniques and algorithms derived for Navier-Stokes computations to three-dimensional flow problems is discussed. New methods to accelerate the convergence of iterative schemes for the numerical integration of systems of partial differential equtions are developed, with a special emphasis on the acceleration of convergence on highly clustered grids.

  10. Microscopic statistical description of incompressible Navier-Stokes granular fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessarotto, Massimo; Mond, Michael; Asci, Claudio

    2017-05-01

    Based on the recently established Master kinetic equation and related Master constant H-theorem which describe the statistical behavior of the Boltzmann-Sinai classical dynamical system for smooth and hard spherical particles, the problem is posed of determining a microscopic statistical description holding for an incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid. The goal is reached by introducing a suitable mean-field interaction in the Master kinetic equation. The resulting Modified Master Kinetic Equation (MMKE) is proved to warrant at the same time the condition of mass-density incompressibility and the validity of the Navier-Stokes fluid equation. In addition, it is shown that the conservation of the Boltzmann-Shannon entropy can similarly be warranted. Applications to the plane Couette and Poiseuille flows are considered showing that they can be regarded as final decaying states for suitable non-stationary flows. As a result, it is shown that an arbitrary initial stochastic 1-body PDF evolving in time by means of MMKE necessarily exhibits the phenomenon of Decay to Kinetic Equilibrium (DKE), whereby the same 1-body PDF asymptotically relaxes to a stationary and spatially uniform Maxwellian PDF.

  11. Boussinesq approximation of the Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes equations.

    PubMed

    Vorobev, Anatoliy

    2010-11-01

    We use the Cahn-Hilliard approach to model the slow dissolution dynamics of binary mixtures. An important peculiarity of the Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes equations is the necessity to use the full continuity equation even for a binary mixture of two incompressible liquids due to dependence of mixture density on concentration. The quasicompressibility of the governing equations brings a short time-scale (quasiacoustic) process that may not affect the slow dynamics but may significantly complicate the numerical treatment. Using the multiple-scale method we separate the physical processes occurring on different time scales and, ultimately, derive the equations with the filtered-out quasiacoustics. The derived equations represent the Boussinesq approximation of the Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes equations. This approximation can be further employed as a universal theoretical model for an analysis of slow thermodynamic and hydrodynamic evolution of the multiphase systems with strongly evolving and diffusing interfacial boundaries, i.e., for the processes involving dissolution/nucleation, evaporation/condensation, solidification/melting, polymerization, etc.

  12. Modeling Vortex Generators in a Navier-Stokes Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudek, Julianne C.

    2011-01-01

    A source-term model that simulates the effects of vortex generators was implemented into the Wind-US Navier-Stokes code. The source term added to the Navier-Stokes equations simulates the lift force that would result from a vane-type vortex generator in the flowfield. The implementation is user-friendly, requiring the user to specify only three quantities for each desired vortex generator: the range of grid points over which the force is to be applied and the planform area and angle of incidence of the physical vane. The model behavior was evaluated for subsonic flow in a rectangular duct with a single vane vortex generator, subsonic flow in an S-duct with 22 corotating vortex generators, and supersonic flow in a rectangular duct with a counter-rotating vortex-generator pair. The model was also used to successfully simulate microramps in supersonic flow by treating each microramp as a pair of vanes with opposite angles of incidence. The validation results indicate that the source-term vortex-generator model provides a useful tool for screening vortex-generator configurations and gives comparable results to solutions computed using gridded vanes.

  13. Parallelizing Navier-Stokes Computations on a Variety of Architectural Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayasimha, D. N.; Hayder, M. E.; Pillay, S. K.

    1997-01-01

    We study the computational, communication, and scalability characteristics of a Computational Fluid Dynamics application, which solves the time accurate flow field of a jet using the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, on a variety of parallel architectural platforms. The platforms chosen for this study are a cluster of workstations (the LACE experimental testbed at NASA Lewis), a shared memory multiprocessor (the Cray YMP), distributed memory multiprocessors with different topologies-the IBM SP and the Cray T3D. We investigate the impact of various networks, connecting the cluster of workstations, on the performance of the application and the overheads induced by popular message passing libraries used for parallelization. The work also highlights the importance of matching the memory bandwidth to the processor speed for good single processor performance. By studying the performance of an application on a variety of architectures, we are able to point out the strengths and weaknesses of each of the example computing platforms.

  14. An Evaluation of Architectural Platforms for Parallel Navier-Stokes Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayasimha, D. N.; Hayder, M. E.; Pillay, S. K.

    1996-01-01

    We study the computational, communication, and scalability characteristics of a computational fluid dynamics application, which solves the time accurate flow field of a jet using the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, on a variety of parallel architecture platforms. The platforms chosen for this study are a cluster of workstations (the LACE experimental testbed at NASA Lewis), a shared memory multiprocessor (the Cray YMP), and distributed memory multiprocessors with different topologies - the IBM SP and the Cray T3D. We investigate the impact of various networks connecting the cluster of workstations on the performance of the application and the overheads induced by popular message passing libraries used for parallelization. The work also highlights the importance of matching the memory bandwidth to the processor speed for good single processor performance. By studying the performance of an application on a variety of architectures, we are able to point out the strengths and weaknesses of each of the example computing platforms.

  15. Multigrid solution of the Navier-Stokes equations on highly stretched grids with defect correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sockol, Peter M.

    1993-01-01

    Relaxation-based multigrid solvers for the steady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are examined to determine their computational speed and robustness. Four relaxation methods with a common discretization have been used as smoothers in a single tailored multigrid procedure. The equations are discretized on a staggered grid with first order upwind used for convection in the relaxation process on all grids and defect correction to second order central on the fine grid introduced once per multigrid cycle. A fixed W(1,1) cycle with full weighting of residuals is used in the FAS multigrid process. The resulting solvers have been applied to three 2D flow problems, over a range of Reynolds numbers, on both uniform and highly stretched grids. In all cases the L(sub 2) norm of the velocity changes is reduced to 10(exp -6) in a few 10's of fine grid sweeps. The results from this study are used to draw conclusions on the strengths and weaknesses of the individual relaxation schemes as well as those of the overall multigrid procedure when used as a solver on highly stretched grids.

  16. Novel accurate and scalable 3-D MT forward solver based on a contracting integral equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglyakov, M.; Geraskin, A.; Kuvshinov, A.

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel, open source 3-D MT forward solver based on a method of integral equations (IE) with contracting kernel. Special attention in the solver is paid to accurate calculations of Green's functions and their integrals which are cornerstones of any IE solution. The solver supports massive parallelization and is able to deal with highly detailed and contrasting models. We report results of a 3-D numerical experiment aimed at analyzing the accuracy and scalability of the code.

  17. Investigation of Navier-Stokes Code Verification and Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, Rajkumar

    2004-01-01

    With rapid progress made in employing computational techniques for various complex Navier-Stokes fluid flow problems, design optimization problems traditionally based on empirical formulations and experiments are now being addressed with the aid of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). To be able to carry out an effective CFD-based optimization study, it is essential that the uncertainty and appropriate confidence limits of the CFD solutions be quantified over the chosen design space. The present dissertation investigates the issues related to code verification, surrogate model-based optimization and sensitivity evaluation. For Navier-Stokes (NS) CFD code verification a least square extrapolation (LSE) method is assessed. This method projects numerically computed NS solutions from multiple, coarser base grids onto a freer grid and improves solution accuracy by minimizing the residual of the discretized NS equations over the projected grid. In this dissertation, the finite volume (FV) formulation is focused on. The interplay between the xi concepts and the outcome of LSE, and the effects of solution gradients and singularities, nonlinear physics, and coupling of flow variables on the effectiveness of LSE are investigated. A CFD-based design optimization of a single element liquid rocket injector is conducted with surrogate models developed using response surface methodology (RSM) based on CFD solutions. The computational model consists of the NS equations, finite rate chemistry, and the k-6 turbulence closure. With the aid of these surrogate models, sensitivity and trade-off analyses are carried out for the injector design whose geometry (hydrogen flow angle, hydrogen and oxygen flow areas and oxygen post tip thickness) is optimized to attain desirable goals in performance (combustion length) and life/survivability (the maximum temperatures on the oxidizer post tip and injector face and a combustion chamber wall temperature). A preliminary multi-objective optimization

  18. Aerodynamics of thrust vectoring by Navier-Stokes solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Jing-Biau; Lan, C. Edward

    1991-01-01

    Induced aerodynamics from thrust vectoring are investigated by a computational fluid dynamic method. A thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code with multiblock capability is used. Jet properties are specified on the nozzle exit plane to simulate the jet momentum. Results for a rectangular jet in a cross flow are compared with data to verify the code. Further verification of the calculation is made by comparing the numerical results with transonic data for a wing-body combination. Additional calculations were performed to elucidate the following thrust vectoring effects: the thrust vectoring effect on shock and expansion waves, induced effects on nearby surfaces, and the thrust vectoring effect on the leading edge vortex.

  19. SSME thrust chamber simulation using Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Singhal, A. K.; Tam, L. T.

    1984-01-01

    The capability of the PHOENICS fluid dynamics code in predicting two-dimensional, compressible, and reacting flow in the combustion chamber and nozzle of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) was evaluated. A non-orthogonal body fitted coordinate system was used to represent the nozzle geometry. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved for the entire nozzle with a turbulence model. The wall boundary conditions were calculated based on the wall functions which account for pressure gradients. Results of the demonstration test case reveal all expected features of the transonic nozzle flows. Of particular interest are the locations of normal and barrel shocks, and regions of highest temperature gradients. Calculated performance (global) parameters such as thrust chamber flow rate, thrust, and specific impulse are also in good agreement with available data.

  20. Incompressible Navier-Stokes Computations with Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan; Rogers, Stuart; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The existing pseudocompressibility method for the system of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is extended to heat transfer problems by including the energy equation. The solution method is based on the pseudo compressibility approach and uses an implicit-upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. Current computations use one-equation Baldwin-Barth turbulence model which is derived from a simplified form of the standard k-epsilon model equations. Both forced and natural convection problems are examined. Numerical results from turbulent reattaching flow behind a backward-facing step will be compared against experimental measurements for the forced convection case. The validity of Boussinesq approximation to simplify the buoyancy force term will be investigated. The natural convective flow structure generated by heat transfer in a vertical rectangular cavity will be studied. The numerical results will be compared by experimental measurements by Morrison and Tran.

  1. Incompressible Navier-Stokes computations of rotating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Chang, Leon; Kwak, Dochan; Rogers, Stuart

    1993-01-01

    Flow through pump components, such as an inducer and an impeller, is efficiently simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution method is based on the pseudocompressibility approach and uses an implicit-upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. Current computations use one-equation Baldwin-Barth turbulence model which is derived from a simplified form of the standard k-epsilon model equations. The resulting computer code is applied to the flow analysis inside a generic rocket engine pump inducer, a fuel pump impeller, and SSME high-pressure fuel turbopump impeller. Numerical results of inducer flow are compared with experimental measurements. Flow analyses at 80-, 100-, and 120-percent of design conditions are presented.

  2. Navier-Stokes computations of cavity aeroacoustics with suppression devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay; Yen, Guan-Wei; Fouladi, Kamran

    1992-01-01

    Effectiveness of two devices to suppress the cavity acoustics was computationally investigated. Two dimensional, computational simulations were performed for the transonic, turbulent flows past a cavity, which was first equipped with a rear face ramp and then with a spoiler. The Reynolds-averaged, unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes equations were solved time accurately by a second-order accurate, implicit, upwind, finite-volume method. The effect of turbulence was included through a Baldwin-Lomax model with modifications for the multiple-wall effects and for the highly vortical flow with a shear layer. The results included instantaneous and time-averaged flow properties, and time-series analyses of the pressure inside the cavity, which compared favorably with the available experimental data. These results were also contrasted with the computed aeroacoustics of the same cavity (length-to-depth ratio of 4.5), but without a device, to demonstrate the suppression effectiveness.

  3. Time Integration Schemes for the Unsteady Navier-stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bijl, Hester; Carpenter, Mark H.; Vatsa, Veer N.

    2001-01-01

    The efficiency and accuracy of several time integration schemes are investigated for the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. This study focuses on the efficiency of higher-order Runge-Kutta schemes in comparison with the popular Backward Differencing Formulations. For this comparison an unsteady two-dimensional laminar flow problem is chosen, i.e., flow around a circular cylinder at Re = 1200. It is concluded that for realistic error tolerances (smaller than 10(exp -1)) fourth-and fifth-order Runge-Kutta schemes are the most efficient. For reasons of robustness and computer storage, the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method is recommended. The efficiency of the fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme exceeds that of second-order Backward Difference Formula by a factor of 2.5 at engineering error tolerance levels (10(exp -1) to 10(exp -2)). Efficiency gains are more dramatic at smaller tolerances.

  4. Navier-Stokes Dynamics by a Discrete Boltzmann Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robet

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates the possibility of particle-based algorithms for the Navier-Stokes equations and higher order continuum approximations of the Boltzmann equation; such algorithms would generalize the well-known Pullin scheme for the Euler equations. One such method is proposed in the context of a discrete velocity model of the Boltzmann equation. Preliminary results on shock structure are consistent with the expectation that the shock should be much broader than the near discontinuity predicted by the Pullin scheme, yet narrower than the prediction of the Boltzmann equation. We discuss the extension of this essentially deterministic method to a stochastic particle method that, like DSMC, samples the distribution function rather than resolving it completely.

  5. Computation of turbine flowfields with a Navier-Stokes code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobson, G. V.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1990-01-01

    A new technique has been developed for the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical technique, derived from a pressure substitution method (PSM), overcomes many of the deficiencies of the pressure crrection method. This technique allows for the direct solution of the actual pressure in the form of a Poisson equation which is derived from the pressure weighted substitution of the full momentum equations into the continuity equation. In two-dimensions a turbine flowfield, including heat transfer, has been computed with this method and the prediction of the cascade performance is presented. The extension of the pressure correction method for the solution of three-dimensional flows is also presented for laminar flow in an S-shaped duct and turbulent flow in the end-wall region of a turbine cascade.

  6. Solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabowski, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    Steady solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, in terms of velocity and pressure, for breakdown in an unconfined viscous vortex are obtained numerically using the artificial compressibility technique of Chorin combined with an ADI finite-difference scheme. Axisymmetry is assumed and boundary conditions are carefully applied at the boundaries of a large finite region in an axial plane while resolution near the axis is maintained by a coordinate transformation. The solutions, which are obtained for Reynolds numbers up to 200 based on the free-stream axial velocity and a characteristic core radius, show that breakdown results from the diffusion and convection of vorticity away from the vortex core which, because of the strong coupling between the circumferential and axial velocity fields in strongly swirling flows, can lead to stagnation and reversal of the axial flow near the axis.

  7. Analysis of an Incompressible Navier-Stokes-Maxwell-Stefan System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiuqing; Jüngel, Ansgar

    2015-12-01

    The Maxwell-Stefan equations for the molar fluxes, supplemented by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations governing the fluid velocity dynamics, are analyzed in bounded domains with no-flux boundary conditions. The system models the dynamics of a multicomponent gaseous mixture under isothermal conditions. The global-in-time existence of bounded weak solutions to the strongly coupled model and their exponential decay to the homogeneous steady state are proved. The mathematical difficulties are due to the singular Maxwell-Stefan diffusion matrix, the cross-diffusion terms, and the different molar masses of the fluid components. The key idea of the proof is the use of a new entropy functional and entropy variables, which allows for a proof of positive lower and upper bounds of the mass densities without the use of a maximum principle.

  8. Turbulence modeling methods for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    Turbulence modeling methods for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, including several zero- and two-equation eddy-viscosity models, are described and applied. Advantages and disadvantages of the models are discussed with respect to mathematical simplicity, conformity with physical theory, and numerical compatibility with methods. A new two-equation model is introduced which shows advantages over other two-equation models with regard to numerical compatibility and the ability to predict low-Reynolds-number transitional phenomena. Calculations of various transonic airfoil flows are compared with experimental results. A new implicit upwind-differencing method is used which enhances numerical stability and accuracy, and leads to rapidly convergent steady-state solutions.

  9. Navier-Stokes simulation of real gas flows in nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagaraj, N.; Lombard, C. K.

    1987-01-01

    Air flow in a hypersonic nozzle causes real gas effects due to reaction among the species constituting air. Such reactions may be in chemical equilibrium or in chemical nonequilibrium. Here using the CSCM upwind scheme for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, the real gas flowfield in an arcjet nozzle is computed for both the equilibrium case and the nonequilibrium case. A hypersonic nozzle flow arising from a pebble bed heated plenum is also computed for the equilibrium situation. Between the equilibrium cases, the chemistry is treated by two different schemes and comments are made as to computational complexity. For the nonequilibrium case, a full set of seventeen reactions and full implicit coupling of five species with gasdynamics is employed to compute the flowfield. For all cases considered here the gas is assumed to be a calorically imperfect mixture of ideal gases in thermal equilibrium.

  10. Iterative methods for compressible Navier-Stokes and Euler equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, W.P.; Forsyth, P.A.

    1996-12-31

    This workshop will focus on methods for solution of compressible Navier-Stokes and Euler equations. In particular, attention will be focused on the interaction between the methods used to solve the non-linear algebraic equations (e.g. full Newton or first order Jacobian) and the resulting large sparse systems. Various types of block and incomplete LU factorization will be discussed, as well as stability issues, and the use of Newton-Krylov methods. These techniques will be demonstrated on a variety of model transonic and supersonic airfoil problems. Applications to industrial CFD problems will also be presented. Experience with the use of C++ for solution of large scale problems will also be discussed. The format for this workshop will be four fifteen minute talks, followed by a roundtable discussion.

  11. Perturbation of eigenvalues of preconditioned Navier-Stokes operators

    SciTech Connect

    Elman, H.C.

    1996-12-31

    We study the sensitivity of algebraic eigenvalue problems associated with matrices arising from linearization and discretization of the steady-state Navier-Stokes equations. In particular, for several choices of preconditioners applied to the system of discrete equations, we derive upper bounds on perturbations of eigenvalues as functions of the viscosity and discretization mesh size. The bounds suggest that the sensitivity of the eigenvalues is at worst linear in the inverse of the viscosity and quadratic in the inverse of the mesh size, and that scaling can be used to decrease the sensitivity in some cases. Experimental results supplement these results and confirm the relatively mild dependence on viscosity. They also indicate a dependence on the mesh size of magnitude smaller than the analysis suggests.

  12. Navier-Stokes simulation of real gas flows in nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagaraj, N.; Lombard, C. K.

    1987-01-01

    Air flow in a hypersonic nozzle causes real gas effects due to reaction among the species constituting air. Such reactions may be in chemical equilibrium or in chemical nonequilibrium. Here using the CSCM upwind scheme for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, the real gas flowfield in an arcjet nozzle is computed for both the equilibrium case and the nonequilibrium case. A hypersonic nozzle flow arising from a pebble bed heated plenum is also computed for the equilibrium situation. Between the equilibrium cases, the chemistry is treated by two different schemes and comments are made as to computational complexity. For the nonequilibrium case, a full set of seventeen reactions and full implicit coupling of five species with gasdynamics is employed to compute the flowfield. For all cases considered here the gas is assumed to be a calorically imperfect mixture of ideal gases in thermal equilibrium.

  13. Navier-Stokes computations of cavity aeroacoustics with suppression devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay; Yen, Guan-Wei; Fouladi, Kamran

    1992-01-01

    Effectiveness of two devices to suppress the cavity acoustics was computationally investigated. Two dimensional, computational simulations were performed for the transonic, turbulent flows past a cavity, which was first equipped with a rear face ramp and then with a spoiler. The Reynolds-averaged, unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes equations were solved time accurately by a second-order accurate, implicit, upwind, finite-volume method. The effect of turbulence was included through a Baldwin-Lomax model with modifications for the multiple-wall effects and for the highly vortical flow with a shear layer. The results included instantaneous and time-averaged flow properties, and time-series analyses of the pressure inside the cavity, which compared favorably with the available experimental data. These results were also contrasted with the computed aeroacoustics of the same cavity (length-to-depth ratio of 4.5), but without a device, to demonstrate the suppression effectiveness.

  14. Numerical solutions of the complete Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, H. A.

    1988-01-01

    The physical phenomena within supersonic flows that sustain chemical reactions are investigated. An earlier study to develop accurate physical models for supersonic reacting flowfields focused on 2-D laminar shear layers. The objective is to examine the mixing and subsequent combustion within turbulent reacting shear layers. To conduct this study, a computer program has been written to solve the axisymmetric Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical method uses a cell-centered finite volume approach and a Runge Kutta time stepping scheme. The Reynolds averaged equations are closed using the eddy viscosity concept. Several zero-equation models have been tested by making calculations for an H2-air nonreacting coaxial jet flow. Comparisons made with experimental data show that Cohen's eddy viscosity model provides best agreement. The finite rate chemistry model used in the study of 2-D laminar shear layers is incorporated into the computer program and data is compared from a recent experiment performed at NASA Langley.

  15. Turbulence modeling methods for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coakley, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    Turbulence modeling methods for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, including several zero- and two-equation eddy-viscosity models, are described and applied. Advantages and disadvantages of the models are discussed with respect to mathematical simplicity, conformity with physical theory, and numerical compatibility with methods. A new two-equation model is introduced which shows advantages over other two-equation models with regard to numerical compatibility and the ability to predict low-Reynolds-number transitional phenomena. Calculations of various transonic airfoil flows are compared with experimental results. A new implicit upwind-differencing method is used which enhances numerical stability and accuracy, and leads to rapidly convergent steady-state solutions.

  16. High accuracy solutions of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Murli M.

    1990-01-01

    In recent years, high accuracy finite difference approximations were developed for partial differential equations of elliptic type, with particular emphasis on the convection-diffusion equation. These approximations are of compact type, have a local truncation error of fourth order, and allow the use of standard iterative schemes to solve the resulting systems of algebraic equations. These high accuracy approximations are extended to the solution of Navier-Stokes equations. Solutions are obtained for the model problem of driven cavity and are compared with solutions obtained using other approximations and those obtained by other authors. It is discovered that the high order approximations do indeed produce high accuracy solutions and have a potential for use in solving important problems of viscous fluid flows.

  17. Regularity criterion for solutions of the three-dimensional Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes equations and associated computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbon, John D.; Pal, Nairita; Gupta, Anupam; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-12-01

    We consider the three-dimensional (3D) Cahn-Hilliard equations coupled to, and driven by, the forced, incompressible 3D Navier-Stokes equations. The combination, known as the Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes (CHNS) equations, is used in statistical mechanics to model the motion of a binary fluid. The potential development of singularities (blow-up) in the contours of the order parameter ϕ is an open problem. To address this we have proved a theorem that closely mimics the Beale-Kato-Majda theorem for the 3D incompressible Euler equations [J. T. Beale, T. Kato, and A. J. Majda, Commun. Math. Phys. 94, 61 (1984), 10.1007/BF01212349]. By taking an L∞ norm of the energy of the full binary system, designated as E∞, we have shown that ∫0tE∞(τ ) d τ governs the regularity of solutions of the full 3D system. Our direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of the 3D CHNS equations for (a) a gravity-driven Rayleigh Taylor instability and (b) a constant-energy-injection forcing, with 1283 to 5123 collocation points and over the duration of our DNSs confirm that E∞ remains bounded as far as our computations allow.

  18. Regularity criterion for solutions of the three-dimensional Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes equations and associated computations.

    PubMed

    Gibbon, John D; Pal, Nairita; Gupta, Anupam; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-12-01

    We consider the three-dimensional (3D) Cahn-Hilliard equations coupled to, and driven by, the forced, incompressible 3D Navier-Stokes equations. The combination, known as the Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes (CHNS) equations, is used in statistical mechanics to model the motion of a binary fluid. The potential development of singularities (blow-up) in the contours of the order parameter ϕ is an open problem. To address this we have proved a theorem that closely mimics the Beale-Kato-Majda theorem for the 3D incompressible Euler equations [J. T. Beale, T. Kato, and A. J. Majda, Commun. Math. Phys. 94, 61 (1984)CMPHAY0010-361610.1007/BF01212349]. By taking an L^{∞} norm of the energy of the full binary system, designated as E_{∞}, we have shown that ∫_{0}^{t}E_{∞}(τ)dτ governs the regularity of solutions of the full 3D system. Our direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of the 3D CHNS equations for (a) a gravity-driven Rayleigh Taylor instability and (b) a constant-energy-injection forcing, with 128^{3} to 512^{3} collocation points and over the duration of our DNSs confirm that E_{∞} remains bounded as far as our computations allow.

  19. High-order accurate solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on massively parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henniger, R.; Obrist, D.; Kleiser, L.

    2010-05-01

    The emergence of "petascale" supercomputers requires us to develop today's simulation codes for (incompressible) flows by codes which are using numerical schemes and methods that are better able to exploit the offered computational power. In that spirit, we present a massively parallel high-order Navier-Stokes solver for large incompressible flow problems in three dimensions. The governing equations are discretized with finite differences in space and a semi-implicit time integration scheme. This discretization leads to a large linear system of equations which is solved with a cascade of iterative solvers. The iterative solver for the pressure uses a highly efficient commutation-based preconditioner which is robust with respect to grid stretching. The efficiency of the implementation is further enhanced by carefully setting the (adaptive) termination criteria for the different iterative solvers. The computational work is distributed to different processing units by a geometric data decomposition in all three dimensions. This decomposition scheme ensures a low communication overhead and excellent scaling capabilities. The discretization is thoroughly validated. First, we verify the convergence orders of the spatial and temporal discretizations for a forced channel flow. Second, we analyze the iterative solution technique by investigating the absolute accuracy of the implementation with respect to the different termination criteria. Third, Orr-Sommerfeld and Squire eigenmodes for plane Poiseuille flow are simulated and compared to analytical results. Fourth, the practical applicability of the implementation is tested for transitional and turbulent channel flow. The results are compared to solutions from a pseudospectral solver. Subsequently, the performance of the commutation-based preconditioner for the pressure iteration is demonstrated. Finally, the excellent parallel scalability of the proposed method is demonstrated with a weak and a strong scaling test on up to

  20. Navier-Stokes Aerodynamic Simulation of the V-22 Osprey on the Intel Paragon MPP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadyak, Joseph; Shrewsbury, George E.; Narramore, Jim C.; Montry, Gary; Holst, Terry; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The paper will describe the Development of a general three-dimensional multiple grid zone Navier-Stokes flowfield simulation program (ENS3D-MPP) designed for efficient execution on the Intel Paragon Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) supercomputer, and the subsequent application of this method to the prediction of the viscous flowfield about the V-22 Osprey tiltrotor vehicle. The flowfield simulation code solves the thin Layer or full Navier-Stoke's equation - for viscous flow modeling, or the Euler equations for inviscid flow modeling on a structured multi-zone mesh. In the present paper only viscous simulations will be shown. The governing difference equations are solved using a time marching implicit approximate factorization method with either TVD upwind or central differencing used for the convective terms and central differencing used for the viscous diffusion terms. Steady state or Lime accurate solutions can be calculated. The present paper will focus on steady state applications, although time accurate solution analysis is the ultimate goal of this effort. Laminar viscosity is calculated using Sutherland's law and the Baldwin-Lomax two layer algebraic turbulence model is used to compute the eddy viscosity. The Simulation method uses an arbitrary block, curvilinear grid topology. An automatic grid adaption scheme is incorporated which concentrates grid points in high density gradient regions. A variety of user-specified boundary conditions are available. This paper will present the application of the scalable and superscalable versions to the steady state viscous flow analysis of the V-22 Osprey using a multiple zone global mesh. The mesh consists of a series of sheared cartesian grid blocks with polar grids embedded within to better simulate the wing tip mounted nacelle. MPP solutions will be shown in comparison to equivalent Cray C-90 results and also in comparison to experimental data. Discussions on meshing considerations, wall clock execution time

  1. Navier-Stokes Aerodynamic Simulation of the V-22 Osprey on the Intel Paragon MPP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadyak, Joseph; Shrewsbury, George E.; Narramore, Jim C.; Montry, Gary; Holst, Terry; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The paper will describe the Development of a general three-dimensional multiple grid zone Navier-Stokes flowfield simulation program (ENS3D-MPP) designed for efficient execution on the Intel Paragon Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) supercomputer, and the subsequent application of this method to the prediction of the viscous flowfield about the V-22 Osprey tiltrotor vehicle. The flowfield simulation code solves the thin Layer or full Navier-Stoke's equation - for viscous flow modeling, or the Euler equations for inviscid flow modeling on a structured multi-zone mesh. In the present paper only viscous simulations will be shown. The governing difference equations are solved using a time marching implicit approximate factorization method with either TVD upwind or central differencing used for the convective terms and central differencing used for the viscous diffusion terms. Steady state or Lime accurate solutions can be calculated. The present paper will focus on steady state applications, although time accurate solution analysis is the ultimate goal of this effort. Laminar viscosity is calculated using Sutherland's law and the Baldwin-Lomax two layer algebraic turbulence model is used to compute the eddy viscosity. The Simulation method uses an arbitrary block, curvilinear grid topology. An automatic grid adaption scheme is incorporated which concentrates grid points in high density gradient regions. A variety of user-specified boundary conditions are available. This paper will present the application of the scalable and superscalable versions to the steady state viscous flow analysis of the V-22 Osprey using a multiple zone global mesh. The mesh consists of a series of sheared cartesian grid blocks with polar grids embedded within to better simulate the wing tip mounted nacelle. MPP solutions will be shown in comparison to equivalent Cray C-90 results and also in comparison to experimental data. Discussions on meshing considerations, wall clock execution time

  2. Advanced Fast 3D Electromagnetic Solver for Microwave Tomography Imaging.

    PubMed

    Simonov, Nikolai; Kim, Bo-Ra; Lee, Kwang-Jae; Jeon, Soon-Ik; Son, Seong-Ho

    2017-06-07

    This paper describes a fast forward electromagnetic solver (FFS) for the image reconstruction algorithm of our microwave tomography (MT) system. Our apparatus is a preclinical prototype of a biomedical imaging system, designed for the purpose of early breast cancer detection. It operates in the 3-6 GHz frequency band using a circular array of probe antennas immersed in a matching liquid; it produces image reconstructions of the permittivity and conductivity profiles of the breast under examination. Our reconstruction algorithm solves the electromagnetic inverse problem and takes into account the real electromagnetic properties of the probe antenna array as well as the influence of the patient's body and that of the upper metal screen sheet. This FFS algorithm is much faster than conventional electromagnetic simulation solvers. In comparison, in the same PC, the CST solver takes ~45 min, while the FFS takes ~1 s of effective simulation time for the same electromagnetic model of a numerical breast phantom.

  3. Comparison of Coupled Radiative Navier-Stokes Flow Solutions with the Project Fire II Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olynick, David R.; Henline, William D.; Chambers, Lin Hartung; Candler, Graham V,; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A nonequilibrium, axisymmetric, Navier-Stokes flow solver with coupled radiation has been developed to use in the design of thermal protection systems for vehicles where radiation effects are important. The present method has been compared with an existing flow and radiation solver and with the Project Fire II experimental data. Very good agreement has been obtained over the entire Fire II trajectory with the experimentally determined values of the stagnation radiation intensity in the .2 to 6.2 eV range and with the total stagnation heating. The agreement was significantly better than previous numerical predictions. The effects of a number of flow models are examined to determine which combination of physical models produces the best agreement with the experimental data. These models include radiation coupling, multi-temperature thermal models, finite-rate chemistry, and a quasi-steady-state or Boltzmann assumption for the calculation of the excited electronic states. Finally, the computational efficiency of the present model is evaluated. The radiation properties model developed for this study is shown to offer significant computational savings compared to existing codes.

  4. Solutions of thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations for missile configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtakdoust, Seid Hossein

    1989-12-01

    Solutions of the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations were obtained for two typical missile bodies as well as two complete missile configurations. The finite-differenced three-dimensional equations are solved using a modified NASA Ames solver code on a body-fitted curvi-linear grid system developed in conjunction with the flowfield solver. The grid program is based on the method of algebraic interpolation and is capable of generating three-dimensional grid systems for missile bodies and finned-missiles having up to eight control surfaces. The numerical procedure is based on an implicit approximate factorization algorithm employing a multi-grid approach in the simulation of flow about complex finned-missile configurations. The present procedures are proven effective in dealing with complete missile configurations flying at high angles of attack. The predicted aerodynamic loading coefficients and pressure distributions match the available wind-tunnel data with good accuracy. Flow non-linearities such as shock, streamwise and cross-flow separations, and reverse flow were detected and verified with the available experimental reports. Leading-edge separation and classical patterns of vortical flow were also numerically obtained and studied for interaction effects. The Mach number and Reynolds number effects on the convergence of the numerical process are also discussed.

  5. Higher Order Time Integration Schemes for the Unsteady Navier-Stokes Equations on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jothiprasad, Giridhar; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Caughey, David A.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The efficiency gains obtained using higher-order implicit Runge-Kutta schemes as compared with the second-order accurate backward difference schemes for the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are investigated. Three different algorithms for solving the nonlinear system of equations arising at each timestep are presented. The first algorithm (NMG) is a pseudo-time-stepping scheme which employs a non-linear full approximation storage (FAS) agglomeration multigrid method to accelerate convergence. The other two algorithms are based on Inexact Newton's methods. The linear system arising at each Newton step is solved using iterative/Krylov techniques and left preconditioning is used to accelerate convergence of the linear solvers. One of the methods (LMG) uses Richardson's iterative scheme for solving the linear system at each Newton step while the other (PGMRES) uses the Generalized Minimal Residual method. Results demonstrating the relative superiority of these Newton's methods based schemes are presented. Efficiency gains as high as 10 are obtained by combining the higher-order time integration schemes with the more efficient nonlinear solvers.

  6. Navier-Stokes Simulation of a Heavy Lift Slowed-Rotor Compound Helicopter Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.; Hallissy, Jim B.; Harris, Jerome; Noonan, Kevin W.; Wong, Oliver D.; Jones, Henry E.; Malovrh, Brendon D.; reis, Deane G.; Mace, W. Derry

    2009-01-01

    Time accurate numerical simulations were performed using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver OVERFLOW for a heavy lift, slowed-rotor, compound helicopter configuration, tested at the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The primary purpose of these simulations is to provide support for the development of a large field of view Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) flow measurement technique supported by the Subsonic Rotary Wing (SRW) project under the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics program. These simulations provide a better understanding of the rotor and body wake flows and helped to define PIV measurement locations as well as requirements for validation of flow solver codes. The large field PIV system can measure the three-dimensional velocity flow field in a 0.914m by 1.83m plane. PIV measurements were performed upstream and downstream of the vertical tail section and are compared to simulation results. The simulations are also used to better understand the tunnel wall and body/rotor support effects by comparing simulations with and without tunnel floor/ceiling walls and supports. Comparisons are also made to the experimental force and moment data for the body and rotor.

  7. Relative efficiency and accuracy of two Navier-Stokes codes for simulating attached transonic flow over wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonhaus, Daryl L.; Wornom, Stephen F.

    1991-01-01

    Two codes which solve the 3-D Thin Layer Navier-Stokes (TLNS) equations are used to compute the steady state flow for two test cases representing typical finite wings at transonic conditions. Several grids of C-O topology and varying point densities are used to determine the effects of grid refinement. After a description of each code and test case, standards for determining code efficiency and accuracy are defined and applied to determine the relative performance of the two codes in predicting turbulent transonic wing flows. Comparisons of computed surface pressure distributions with experimental data are made.

  8. A Parallel Newton-Krylov-Schur Algorithm for the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osusky, Michal

    Aerodynamic shape optimization and multidisciplinary optimization algorithms have the potential not only to improve conventional aircraft, but also to enable the design of novel configurations. By their very nature, these algorithms generate and analyze a large number of unique shapes, resulting in high computational costs. In order to improve their efficiency and enable their use in the early stages of the design process, a fast and robust flow solution algorithm is necessary. This thesis presents an efficient parallel Newton-Krylov-Schur flow solution algorithm for the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model. The algorithm employs second-order summation-by-parts (SBP) operators on multi-block structured grids with simultaneous approximation terms (SATs) to enforce block interface coupling and boundary conditions. The discrete equations are solved iteratively with an inexact-Newton method, while the linear system at each Newton iteration is solved using the flexible Krylov subspace iterative method GMRES with an approximate-Schur parallel preconditioner. The algorithm is thoroughly verified and validated, highlighting the correspondence of the current algorithm with several established flow solvers. The solution for a transonic flow over a wing on a mesh of medium density (15 million nodes) shows good agreement with experimental results. Using 128 processors, deep convergence is obtained in under 90 minutes. The solution of transonic flow over the Common Research Model wing-body geometry with grids with up to 150 million nodes exhibits the expected grid convergence behavior. This case was completed as part of the Fifth AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop, with the algorithm producing solutions that compare favourably with several widely used flow solvers. The algorithm is shown to scale well on over 6000 processors. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the SBP-SAT spatial discretization, which can

  9. Time-accurate unstructured grid algorithms for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okong'o, Nora Anyango

    Unstructured grid algorithms for the solution of the finite volume form of the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations have been developed. The algorithms employ triangular cells in two-dimensions and tetrahedral cells in three-dimensions. Cell-averaged values are stored at the centroid of each cell, in a cell-centered storage scheme. Inviscid flux computations are performed by applying a Riemann solver across each face, the values at the points on the faces being obtained by function reconstruction from the cell-averaged values. The viscous fluxes and heat transfer are obtained by application of Gauss' theorem. The first unstructured grid algorithm is a two-dimensional implicit algorithm for laminar flows. Tests using flow into a supersonic compression comer showed that preconditioning in the iterative linear solver dramatically reduced the CPU time. Computations were then performed for a NACA0012 airfoil pitching about the quarter-chord at a freestream Mach number Minfinity=0.2 and Reynolds numbers Rec=104 and 2 x 104 at a dimensionless pitching rate W+o=0.2 . The results for Rec=104 are in excellent agreement with previous computations using an explicit unstructured Navier-Stokes algorithm. New results for Rec=2x104 indicate that the principal effect of increasing Reynolds number is to reduce the angle at which the primary recirculation region appears, and to cause it to form closer to the leading edge. This trend, confirmed by a grid refinement study, is consistent with previous results obtained at Minfinity=0.5 . The second unstructured grid algorithm is a three-dimensional explicit algorithm for turbulent flows. Function reconstruction via a least squares method capable of second- or third-order accuracy was implemented. Tests on the nonlinear propagation of an acoustic wave showed improved accuracy using third-order schemes but a substantial CPU-time cost. However, the second-order least squares is more accurate than the previous second-order scheme

  10. A multi-block multigrid method for the solution of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations for three-dimensional flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, H. L.

    1991-01-01

    A multi-block multigrid method for the solution of the three-dimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The basic flow solver is a cell-vertex method which employs central-difference spatial approximations and Runge-Kutta time stepping. The use of local time stepping, implicit residual smoothing, multigrid techniques, and variable-coefficient numerical smoothing results in an efficient and robust scheme. The multi-block strategy places the block loop within the Runge-Kutta loop such that accuracy and convergence are not affected by block boundaries. This has been verified by comparing the results of one- and two-block calculations in which the two-block grid is generated by splitting the one-block grid. Results are presented for both Euler and Navier-Stokes computations of wings and wing-fuselage combinations.

  11. Navier-Stokes and viscous shock-layer solutions for radiating hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Roop N.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from the Navier-Stokes and viscous shock-layer (VSL) calculations with nonequilibrium and equilibrium chemistry, respectively. These calculations contain coupling to the Aerotherm radiation code RAD. A simplified form of the electron energy equation is used to obtain an electron temperature in the Navier-Stokes calculations. The radiation in the flowfield is calculated using this temperature. The Navier-Stokes code is used at high altitude only, whereas the VSL code is employed for the entire entry period to make estimates of the radiative and convective heating to the Fire II vehicle. Results from the Navier-Stokes code have also been compared with the predictions of Lee and Kawamura, who used gray-gas radiation model and thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. Quite good agreement is obtained between the measured and computed values of radiative and convective heating from the VSL code in th medium-to-low altitude flight regime of the Fire II vehicle. At high altitudes, the Navier-Stokes calculations considerably overpredict the Fire II flight data for radiative intensity. This is attributed to the deficiencies in the Aerotherm radiation model when used for low-density flight conditions. This model contains the thermal equilibrium assumption and precludes accounting for the collision-limiting phenomenon at high altitudes. Present Navier-Stokes calculations highlight the effect of these assumptions on radiative heating calculations for such conditions.

  12. The use of a Navier-Stokes code in the wing design process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillin, S. Naomi

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility was determined of incorporating the Navier-Stokes computational code, CFL3D, into the supersonic wing design process. The approach taken is of two steps. The first step was to calibrate CFL3D against existing experimental data sets obtained on thin sharp edged delta wings. The experimental data identified six flow types which are dependent on the similarity parameters of Mach number and angle of attack normal to the leading edge. The calibration showed CFL3D capable of simulating these various separated and attached flow conditions. The second step was to use CFL3D to study the initial formation of leading edge separation over delta wings at supersonic speeds. This consisted of examining solutions obtained on a 65 deg delta wing at Mach number of 1.6 with varying cross sectional shapes. Reynolds number was held constant at 1000000 and the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model was used. The study showed that through the use of leading edge radius and/or camber, the onset of leading edge separation can be delayed to a higher angle of attack than observed on a flat sharp edged wing. Based on the geometries studied, three wind tunnel models are being designed to verify these results.

  13. A 3-D upwind Euler solver for unstructured meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.

    1991-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-volume upwind Euler solver is developed for unstructured meshes. The finite-volume scheme solves for solution variables at vertices of the mesh and satisfies the integral conservation law on nonoverlapping polyhedral control volumes surrounding vertices of the mesh. The schene achieves improved solution accuracy by assuming a piecewise linear variation of the solution in each control volume. This improved spatial accuracy hinges heavily upon the calculation of the solution gradient in each control volume given pointwise values of the solution at vertices of the mesh. Several algorithms are discussed for obtaining these gradients. Details concerning implementation procedures and data structures are discussed. Sample calculations for inviscid Euler flow about isolated aircraft wings at subsonic and transonic speeds are compared with established Euler solvers as well as experiment.

  14. Numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations about three-dimensional configurations: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1987-01-01

    The numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations about three-dimensional configurations is reviewed. Formulational and computational requirements for the various Navier-Stokes approaches are examined for typical problems including the viscous flow field solution about a complete aerospace vehicle. Recent computed results, with experimental comparisons when available, are presented to highlight the presentation. The future of Navier-Stokes applications in three-dimensions is seen to be rapidly expanding across a broad front including internal and external flows, and flows across the entire speed regime from incompressible to hypersonic applications. Prospects for the future are described and recommendations for areas of concentrated research are indicated.

  15. Mathematical analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations with non standard boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidriri, M. D.

    1995-01-01

    One of the major applications of the domain decomposition time marching algorithm is the coupling of the Navier-Stokes systems with Boltzmann equations in order to compute transitional flows. Another important application is the coupling of a global Navier-Stokes problem with a local one in order to use different modelizations and/or discretizations. Both of these applications involve a global Navier-Stokes system with nonstandard boundary conditions. The purpose of this work is to prove, using the classical Leray-Schauder theory, that these boundary conditions are admissible and lead to a well posed problem.

  16. Stable boundary conditions and difference schemes for Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutt, P.

    1985-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes equations can be viewed as an incompletely elliptic perturbation of the Euler equations. By using the entropy function for the Euler equations as a measure of energy for the Navier-Stokes equations, it was possible to obtain nonlinear energy estimates for the mixed initial boundary value problem. These estimates are used to derive boundary conditions which guarantee L2 boundedness even when the Reynolds number tends to infinity. Finally, a new difference scheme for modelling the Navier-Stokes equations in multidimensions for which it is possible to obtain discrete energy estimates exactly analogous to those we obtained for the differential equation was proposed.

  17. Kinetically reduced local Navier-Stokes equations: an alternative approach to hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Karlin, Iliya V; Tomboulides, Ananias G; Frouzakis, Christos E; Ansumali, Santosh

    2006-09-01

    An alternative approach, the kinetically reduced local Navier-Stokes (KRLNS) equations for the grand potential and the momentum, is proposed for the simulation of low Mach number flows. The Taylor-Green vortex flow is considered in the KRLNS framework, and compared to the results of the direct numerical simulation of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The excellent agreement between the KRLNS equations and the incompressible nonlocal Navier-Stokes equations for this nontrivial time-dependent flow indicates that the former is a viable alternative for computational fluid dynamics at low Mach numbers.

  18. Energy Conservation for the Weak Solutions of the Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Cheng

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we prove the energy conservation for the weak solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for any time t > 0, under certain conditions. The results hold for the renormalized solutions of the equations with constant viscosities, as well as the weak solutions of the equations with degenerate viscosity. Our conditions do not depend on the dimensions. The energy may be conserved on the vacuum for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with constant viscosities. Our results are the first ones on energy conservation for the weak solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  19. Navier-Stokes simulations of unsteady transonic flow phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical simulations of two classes of unsteady flows are obtained via the Navier-Stokes equations: a blast-wave/target interaction problem class and a transonic cavity flow problem class. The method developed for the viscous blast-wave/target interaction problem assumes a laminar, perfect gas implemented in a structured finite-volume framework. The approximately factored implicit scheme uses Newton subiterations to obtain the spatially and temporally second-order accurate time history of the blast-waves with stationary targets. The inviscid flux is evaluated using either of two upwind techniques, while the full viscous terms are computed by central differencing. Comparisons of unsteady numerical, analytical, and experimental results are made in two- and three-dimensions for Couette flows, a starting shock-tunnel, and a shock-tube blockage study. The results show accurate wave speed resolution and nonoscillatory discontinuity capturing of the predominantly inviscid flows. Viscous effects were increasingly significant at large post-interaction times. While the blast-wave/target interaction problem benefits from high-resolution methods applied to the Euler terms, the transonic cavity flow problem requires the use of an efficient scheme implemented in a geometrically flexible overset mesh environment. Hence, the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations implemented in a diagonal form are applied to the cavity flow class of problems. Comparisons between numerical and experimental results are made in two-dimensions for free shear layers and both rectangular and quieted cavities, and in three-dimensions for Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) geometries. The acoustic behavior of the rectangular and three-dimensional cavity flows compare well with experiment in terms of frequency, magnitude, and quieting trends. However, there is a more rapid decrease in computed acoustic energy with frequency than observed experimentally owing to numerical

  20. A taxonomy and comparison of parallel block multi-level preconditioners for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations.

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, John Nicolas; Elman, Howard; Shuttleworth, Robert R.; Howle, Victoria E.; Tuminaro, Raymond Stephen

    2007-04-01

    In recent years, considerable effort has been placed on developing efficient and robust solution algorithms for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations based on preconditioned Krylov methods. These include physics-based methods, such as SIMPLE, and purely algebraic preconditioners based on the approximation of the Schur complement. All these techniques can be represented as approximate block factorization (ABF) type preconditioners. The goal is to decompose the application of the preconditioner into simplified sub-systems in which scalable multi-level type solvers can be applied. In this paper we develop a taxonomy of these ideas based on an adaptation of a generalized approximate factorization of the Navier-Stokes system first presented in [25]. This taxonomy illuminates the similarities and differences among these preconditioners and the central role played by efficient approximation of certain Schur complement operators. We then present a parallel computational study that examines the performance of these methods and compares them to an additive Schwarz domain decomposition (DD) algorithm. Results are presented for two and three-dimensional steady state problems for enclosed domains and inflow/outflow systems on both structured and unstructured meshes. The numerical experiments are performed using MPSalsa, a stabilized finite element code.

  1. A Data Parallel Multizone Navier-Stokes Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jespersen, Dennis C.; Levit, Creon; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a data parallel multizone compressible Navier-Stokes code on the Connection Machine CM-5. The code is set up for implicit time-stepping on single or multiple structured grids. For multiple grids and geometrically complex problems, we follow the "chimera" approach, where flow data on one zone is interpolated onto another in the region of overlap. We will describe our design philosophy and give some timing results for the current code. The design choices can be summarized as: 1. finite differences on structured grids; 2. implicit time-stepping with either distributed solves or data motion and local solves; 3. sequential stepping through multiple zones with interzone data transfer via a distributed data structure. We have implemented these ideas on the CM-5 using CMF (Connection Machine Fortran), a data parallel language which combines elements of Fortran 90 and certain extensions, and which bears a strong similarity to High Performance Fortran (HPF). One interesting feature is the issue of turbulence modeling, where the architecture of a parallel machine makes the use of an algebraic turbulence model awkward, whereas models based on transport equations are more natural. We will present some performance figures for the code on the CM-5, and consider the issues involved in transitioning the code to HPF for portability to other parallel platforms.

  2. Incompressible Navier-Stokes Calculations in Pump Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Chang, Leon; Kwak, Dochan

    1993-01-01

    Flow through pump components, such as the SSME-HPFTP Impeller and an advanced rocket pump impeller, is efficiently simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution method is based on the pseudo compressibility approach and uses an implicit-upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. The equations are solved in steadily rotating reference frames and the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force are added to the equation of motion. Current computations use one-equation Baldwin-Barth turbulence model which is derived from a simplified form of the standard k-epsilon model equations. The resulting computer code is applied to the flow analysis inside an 11-inch SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbopump impeller, and an advanced rocket pump impeller. Numerical results of SSME-HPFTP impeller flow are compared with experimental measurements. In the advanced pump impeller, the effects of exit and shroud cavities are investigated. Flow analyses at design conditions will be presented.

  3. High-lift calculations using Navier-Stokes methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Torbjoern

    Wing sections on an aircraft are designed for optimal cruise performance, whereas during the take-off and landing phase totally different lift-to-drag characteristics are needed. High lift and low drag is essential while taking off, on the other hand high lift and high drag is favorable when landing. The design and shaping of the high-lift system can have a major influence on the overall economy and safety of the aircraft. In a historical perspective experimental investigations have been the only way to gain any deeper knowledge of the performance of a given wing-flap configuration. Today, computational methods for high-lift systems based on the viscid-inviscid interaction approach with integral methods for boundary layers and wakes are quite common. Although fast solutions can be obtained with these methods it is highly desirable to have a numerical method that captures the flow physics in a more detailed and adequate way. The present wotk demonstrates that Navier-Stokes methods can be used with good results for simulating high-lift flow fields, but also points to the area where further research is needed.

  4. Multidimensional Stability of Large-Amplitude Navier-Stokes Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpherys, Jeffrey; Lyng, Gregory; Zumbrun, Kevin

    2017-07-01

    Extending results of Humpherys-Lyng-Zumbrun in the one-dimensional case, we use a combination of asymptotic ODE estimates and numerical Evans-function computations to examine the multidimensional stability of planar Navier-Stokes shocks across the full range of shock amplitudes, including the infinite-amplitude limit, for monatomic or diatomic ideal gas equations of state and viscosity and heat conduction coefficients {μ} , {μ +η} , and {ν=κ/c_v} constant and in the physical ratios predicted by statistical mechanics, and Mach number {M > 1.035} . Our results indicate unconditional stability within the parameter range considered; this agrees with the results of Erpenbeck and Majda for the corresponding inviscid case of Euler shocks. Notably, this study includes the first successful numerical computation of an Evans function associated with the multidimensional stability of a viscous shock wave. The methods introduced can be used in principle to decide stability for shocks in any polytropic gas, or indeed for shocks of other models, including in, particular, viscoelasticity, combustion, and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD).

  5. Navier-Stokes calculations of transonic flows past cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay

    1988-01-01

    A computational investigation of subsonic and transonic flows past three dimensional deep and transitional cavities is presented. Computational simulations of these self induced oscillatory flows were generated through time accurate solutions of the Reynolds averaged full Navier-Stokes equations, using the explicit MacCormack scheme. The Reynolds stresses were included through the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model with certain modifications. Two cases were computed to demonstrate the capability of the numerical scheme in modeling the complex three dimensional flow features inside a cavity. The results from an experimental investigation were used not only to benchmark the computations, but also to widen the database used for the discussions and conclusions. The computational results include instantaneous and time averaged flow properties everywhere in the computational zone. Time series analyses were performed for the instantaneous pressure values on the cavity floor. The features of deep and transitional cavity flows, and the effects of the sidewall on the cavity flow flowfield are illustrated through computational graphics.

  6. Disentangling the triadic interactions in Navier-Stokes equations.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Ganapati; Biferale, Luca

    2015-10-01

    We study the role of helicity in the dynamics of energy transfer in a modified version of the Navier-Stokes equations with explicit breaking of the mirror symmetry. We select different set of triads participating in the dynamics on the basis of their helicity content. In particular, we remove the negative helically polarized Fourier modes at all wave numbers except for those falling on a localized shell of wave number, |k| ~ k(m). Changing k(m) to be above or below the forcing scale, k(f), we are able to assess the energy transfer of triads belonging to different interaction classes. We observe that when the negative helical modes are present only at a wave number smaller than the forced wave numbers, an inverse energy cascade develops with an accumulation of energy on a stationary helical condensate. Vice versa, when negative helical modes are present only at a wave number larger than the forced wave numbers, a transition from backward to forward energy transfer is observed in the regime when the minority modes become energetic enough.

  7. Stochastic solutions of Navier-Stokes equations: an experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Djurek, Ivan; Djurek, Danijel; Petosić, Antonio

    2010-12-01

    An electrodynamic loudspeaker has been operated in anharmonic regime indicated by the nonlinear ordinary differential equation when spring constant γ in restoring term, as well as, viscoelasticity of the membrane material, increases with displacement. For driving currents in the range of 2.8-3.3 A, doubling of the vibration period appears, while for currents in the range of 3.3-3.6 A, multiple sequences of subharmonic vibrations begin with f/4 and 3f/4. An application of currents higher than 3.6 A results in a spectrum, characteristic for the chaotic state. The loudspeaker was then operated in a closed chamber, and subharmonic vibrations disappeared by an evacuation. Subsequent injection of air revoked them again at ∼ 120 mbar (Re(')=476) when air viscous forces dominate the Morse convection. At 430 mbar (Re=538) single vibration state was restored, and the phenomenon is in an agreement with prediction of the five mode truncation procedure applied to the Navier-Stokes equations describing a two-dimensional incompressible fluid. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Hydrodynamics beyond Navier-Stokes: the slip flow model.

    PubMed

    Yudistiawan, Wahyu P; Ansumali, Santosh; Karlin, Iliya V

    2008-07-01

    Recently, analytical solutions for the nonlinear Couette flow demonstrated the relevance of the lattice Boltzmann (LB) models to hydrodynamics beyond the continuum limit [S. Ansumali, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 124502 (2007)]. In this paper, we present a systematic study of the simplest LB kinetic equation-the nine-bit model in two dimensions--in order to quantify it as a slip flow approximation. Details of the aforementioned analytical solution are presented, and results are extended to include a general shear- and force-driven unidirectional flow in confined geometry. Exact solutions for the velocity, as well as for pertinent higher-order moments of the distribution functions, are obtained in both Couette and Poiseuille steady-state flows for all values of rarefaction parameter (Knudsen number). Results are compared with the slip flow solution by Cercignani, and a good quantitative agreement is found for both flow situations. Thus, the standard nine-bit LB model is characterized as a valid and self-consistent slip flow model for simulations beyond the Navier-Stokes approximation.

  9. Reliability enhancement of Navier-Stokes codes through convergence enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, K.-Y.; Dulikravich, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    Reduction of total computing time required by an iterative algorithm for solving Navier-Stokes equations is an important aspect of making the existing and future analysis codes more cost effective. Several attempts have been made to accelerate the convergence of an explicit Runge-Kutta time-stepping algorithm. These acceleration methods are based on local time stepping, implicit residual smoothing, enthalpy damping, and multigrid techniques. Also, an extrapolation procedure based on the power method and the Minimal Residual Method (MRM) were applied to the Jameson's multigrid algorithm. The MRM uses same values of optimal weights for the corrections to every equation in a system and has not been shown to accelerate the scheme without multigriding. Our Distributed Minimal Residual (DMR) method based on our General Nonlinear Minimal Residual (GNLMR) method allows each component of the solution vector in a system of equations to have its own convergence speed. The DMR method was found capable of reducing the computation time by 10-75 percent depending on the test case and grid used. Recently, we have developed and tested a new method termed Sensitivity Based DMR or SBMR method that is easier to implement in different codes and is even more robust and computationally efficient than our DMR method.

  10. Navier-Stokes Computations of Longitudinal Forces and Moments for a Blended Wing Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Biedron, Robert T.; Park, Michael A.; Fremaux, C. Michael; Vicroy, Dan D.

    2005-01-01

    The object of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of applying CFD methods to aerodynamic analyses for aircraft stability and control. The integrated aerodynamic parameters used in stability and control, however, are not necessarily those extensively validated in the state of the art CFD technology. Hence, an exploratory study of such applications and the comparison of the solutions to available experimental data will help to assess the validity of the current computation methods. In addition, this study will also examine issues related to wind tunnel measurements such as measurement uncertainty and support interference effects. Several sets of experimental data from the NASA Langley 14x22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel and the National Transonic Facility are presented. Two Navier-Stokes flow solvers, one using structured meshes and the other unstructured meshes, were used to compute longitudinal static stability derivatives for an advanced Blended Wing Body configuration over a wide range of angles of attack. The computations were performed for two different Reynolds numbers and the resulting forces and moments are compared with the above mentioned wind tunnel data.

  11. Navier-Stokes Computations of Longitudinal Forces and Moments for a Blended Wing Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Biedron, Robert T.; Park, Michael A.; Fremaux, C. Michael; Vicroy, Dan D.

    2004-01-01

    The object of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of applying CFD methods to aerodynamic analyses for aircraft stability and control. The integrated aerodynamic parameters used in stability and control, however, are not necessarily those extensively validated in the state of the art CFD technology. Hence, an exploratory study of such applications and the comparison of the solutions to available experimental data will help to assess the validity of the current computation methods. In addition, this study will also examine issues related to wind tunnel measurements such as measurement uncertainty and support interference effects. Several sets of experimental data from the NASA Langley 14x22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel and the National Transonic Facility are presented. Two Navier-Stokes flow solvers, one using structured meshes and the other unstructured meshes, were used to compute longitudinal static stability derivatives for an advanced Blended Wing Body configuration over a wide range of angles of attack. The computations were performed for two different Reynolds numbers and the resulting forces and moments are compared with the above mentioned wind tunnel data.

  12. Use of Navier-Stokes methods for the calculation of high-speed nozzle flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Yoder, Dennis A.

    1994-01-01

    Flows through three reference nozzles have been calculated to determine the capabilities and limitations of the widely used Navier-Stokes solver, PARC. The nozzles examined have similar dominant flow characteristics as those considered for supersonic transport programs. Flows from an inverted velocity profile (IVP) nozzle, an under expanded nozzle, and an ejector nozzle were examined. PARC calculations were obtained with its standard algebraic turbulence model, Thomas, and the two-equation turbulence model, Chien k-epsilon. The Thomas model was run with the default coefficient of mixing set at both 0.09 and a larger value of 0.13 to improve the mixing prediction. Calculations using the default value substantially underpredicted the mixing for all three flows. The calculations obtained with the higher mixing coefficient better predicted mixing in the IVP and underexpanded nozzle flows but adversely affected PARC's convergence characteristics for the IVP nozzle case. The ejector nozzle case did not converge with the Thomas model and the higher mixing coefficient. The Chien k-epsilon results were in better agreement with the experimental data overall than were those of the Thomas run with the default mixing coefficient, but the default boundary conditions for k and epsilon underestimated the levels of mixing near the nozzle exits.

  13. Comparison of Implicit Schemes for the Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.

    1995-01-01

    For a computational flow simulation tool to be useful in a design environment, it must be very robust and efficient. To develop such a tool for incompressible flow applications, a number of different implicit schemes are compared for several two-dimensional flow problems in the current study. The schemes include Point-Jacobi relaxation, Gauss-Seidel line relaxation, incomplete lower-upper decomposition, and the generalized minimum residual method preconditioned with each of the three other schemes. The efficiency of the schemes is measured in terms of the computing time required to obtain a steady-state solution for the laminar flow over a backward-facing step, the flow over a NACA 4412 airfoil, and the flow over a three-element airfoil using overset grids. The flow solver used in the study is the INS2D code that solves the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations using the method of artificial compressibility and upwind differencing of the convective terms. The results show that the generalized minimum residual method preconditioned with the incomplete lower-upper factorization outperforms all other methods by at least a factor of 2.

  14. Navier-Stokes Flowfield Simulation of Boeing 747-200 as Platform for SOFIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    Steady and unsteady viscous, three-dimensional flowfields are calculated using a thin layer approximation of Navier-Stokes equations in conjunction with Chimera overset grids. The finite-difference numerical scheme uses structured grids and a pentadiagonal flow solver called "OVERFLOW". The configuration of Boeing 747-200 has been chosen as one of configurations to be used as a platform for the SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy). Initially, the steady flowfield of the full aircraft is calculated for the clean configuration (without a cavity to house telescope). This solution is then used to start the unsteady flowfield of a configuration containing cavity housing the observation telescope and its peripheral units. Analysis of unsteady flowfield in the cavity and its influence on the tail empennage, as well as the noise due to turbulence and optical quality of the flow are the main focus of this study. For the configuration considered here, the telescope housing cavity is located slightly downstream of the portwing. The entire flow-field is carefully constructed using 45 overset grids and consists of nearly 4 million grid points. All the computations axe done at one freestream flow condition of M(sub infinity) = 0.85, alpha = 2.5deg, and a Reynolds of Re = 1.85x10deg

  15. A High Order, Locally-Adaptive Method for the Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Daniel

    1998-11-01

    I have extended the FOSLS method of Cai, Manteuffel and McCormick (1997) and implemented it within the framework of a spectral element formulation using the Legendre polynomial basis function. The FOSLS method solves the Navier-Stokes equations as a system of coupled first-order equations and provides the ellipticity that is needed for fast iterative matrix solvers like multigrid to operate efficiently. Each element is treated as an object and its properties are self-contained. Only C^0 continuity is imposed across element interfaces; this design allows local grid refinement and coarsening without the burden of having an elaborate data structure, since only information along element boundaries is needed. With the FORTRAN 90 programming environment, I can maintain a high computational efficiency by employing a hybrid parallel processing model. The OpenMP directives provides parallelism in the loop level which is executed in a shared-memory SMP and the MPI protocol allows the distribution of elements to a cluster of SMP's connected via a commodity network. This talk will provide timing results and a comparison with a second order finite difference method.

  16. Navier-Stokes computation of compressible turbulent flows with a second order closure, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haminh, Hieu; Kollmann, Wolfgang; Vandromme, Dany

    1990-01-01

    A second order closure turbulence model for compressible flows is developed and implemented in a 2D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver. From the beginning where a kappa-epsilon turbulence model was implemented in the bidiagonal implicit method of MACCORMACK (referred to as the MAC3 code) to the final stage of implementing a full second order closure in the efficient line Gauss-Seidel algorithm, numerous work was done, individually and collectively. Besides the collaboration itself, the final product of this work is a second order closure derived from the Launder, Reece, and Rodi model to account for near wall effects, which has been called FRAME model, which stands for FRench-AMerican-Effort. During the reporting period, two different problems were worked out. The first was to provide Ames researchers with a reliable compressible boundary layer code including a wide collection of turbulence models for quick testing of new terms, both in two equations and in second order closure (LRR and FRAME). The second topic was to complete the implementation of the FRAME model in the MAC5 code. The work related to these two different contributions is reported. dilatation in presence of stron shocks. This work, which has been conducted during a work at the Center for Turbulence Research with Zeman aimed also to cros-check earlier assumptions by Rubesin and Vandromme.

  17. Multitasking a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes algorithm on the Cray-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swisshelm, Julie M.

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational aerodynamics algorithm has been multitasked for efficient parallel execution on the Cray-2. It provides a means for examining the multitasking performance of a complete CFD application code. An embedded zonal multigrid scheme is used to solve the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for an internal flow model problem. The explicit nature of each component of the method allows a spatial partitioning of the computational domain to achieve a well-balanced task load for MIMD computers with vector-processing capability. Experiments have been conducted with both two- and three-dimensional multitasked cases. The best speedup attained by an individual task group was 3.54 on four processors of the Cray-2, while the entire solver yielded a speedup of 2.67 on four processors for the three-dimensional case. The multiprocessing efficiency of various types of computational tasks is examined, performance on two Cray-2s with different memory access speeds is compared, and extrapolation to larger problems is discussed.

  18. Towards Exploratory Aerodynamic Design using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, David Tai Shun

    The aerodynamic optimization framework Jetstream is applied to problems involving lift-constrained drag minimization using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A parallel Newton-Krylov algorithm is used to solve the governing equations on multiblock structured meshes; gradients are computed using the discrete-adjoint method. Geometry parameterization and mesh movement are integrated using B-spline control volumes. Drag minimization studies from past works are revisited and strategies are devised to improve optimization convergence. These strategies include linear constraints for geometric feasibility, robust flow solver parameters, and meshing with an O-O topology. The single-point and multi-point optimization of the NASA Common Research Model (CRM) wing geometry is presented. A rectangular NACA0012 wing is optimized with planform design variables, enabling significant changes in span, sweep, taper, and airfoil section. To demonstrate Jetstream's flexibility, a wing based on the B737-900 is optimized with nonplanar winglets, split-tip, and wingtip fence configurations. Finally, the box-wing optimization in subsonic flow is revisited.

  19. Higher Order Time Integration Schemes for the Unsteady Navier-Stokes Equations on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jothiprasad, Giridhar; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Caughey, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The rapid increase in available computational power over the last decade has enabled higher resolution flow simulations and more widespread use of unstructured grid methods for complex geometries. While much of this effort has been focused on steady-state calculations in the aerodynamics community, the need to accurately predict off-design conditions, which may involve substantial amounts of flow separation, points to the need to efficiently simulate unsteady flow fields. Accurate unsteady flow simulations can easily require several orders of magnitude more computational effort than a corresponding steady-state simulation. For this reason, techniques for improving the efficiency of unsteady flow simulations are required in order to make such calculations feasible in the foreseeable future. The purpose of this work is to investigate possible reductions in computer time due to the choice of an efficient time-integration scheme from a series of schemes differing in the order of time-accuracy, and by the use of more efficient techniques to solve the nonlinear equations which arise while using implicit time-integration schemes. This investigation is carried out in the context of a two-dimensional unstructured mesh laminar Navier-Stokes solver.

  20. Study of time-accurate integration of the variable-density Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaoyi; Pantano, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    We present several theoretical elements that affect time-consistent integration of the low-Mach number approximation of variable-density Navier-Stokes equations. The goal is for velocity, pressure, density, and scalars to achieve uniform order of accuracy, consistent with the time integrator being used. We show examples of second-order (using Crank-Nicolson and Adams-Bashforth) and third-order (using additive semi-implicit Runge-Kutta) uniform convergence with the proposed conceptual framework. Furthermore, the consistent approach can be extended to other time integrators. In addition, the method is formulated using approximate/incomplete factorization methods for easy incorporation in existing solvers. One of the observed benefits of the proposed approach is improved stability, even for large density difference, in comparison with other existing formulations. A linearized stability analysis is also carried out for some test problems to better understand the behavior of the approach. This work was supported in part by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, under award no. DE-NA0002382 and the California Institute of Technology.

  1. Investigation of vortex breakdown on a delta wing using Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, S.; Barnett, R. M.; Robinson, B. A.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical investigation of leading edge vortex breakdown in a delta wing at high angles of attack is presented. The analysis was restricted to low speed flows on a flat plate wing with sharp leading edges. Both Euler and Navier-Stokes equations were used and the results were compared with experimental data. Predictions of vortex breakdown progression with angle of attack with both Euler and Navier-Stokes equations are shown to be consistent with the experimental data. However, the Navier-Stokes predictions show significant improvements in breakdown location at angles of attack where the vortex breakdown approaches the wing apex. The predicted trajectories of the primary vortex are in very good agreement with the test data, the laminar solutions providing the overall best comparison. The Euler shows a small displacement of the primary vortex, relative to experiment, due to the lack of secondary vortices. The turbulent Navier-Stokes, in general, fall between the Euler and laminar solutions.

  2. Design efficiency evaluation for transonic airfoil optimization - A case for Navier-Stokes design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, J. O.; Eyi, S.; Lee, K. D.

    1993-01-01

    A constrained-optimization design method which improves the aerodynamic performance of transonic airfoils is evaluated from a design-quality and design-efficiency viewpoint. Design efficiency is a measure of the performance improvement and the design time (CPU time). Total-airfoil design and upper-surface design are performed using the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with several grids, and are evaluated using the Navier-Stokes equations to determine the anticipated physical design response. Even though the cost of the Euler design is lower than Navier-Stokes design, the Navier-Stokes evaluation indicates that the Euler design does not necessarily improve the aerodynamic performance. Therefore, the design optimization should be based on an accurate flow simulation to achieve an actual performance improvement, and the design time is a secondary concern.

  3. Impact of the inherent separation of scales in the Navier-Stokes- alphabeta equations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Yeon; Cassiani, Massimo; Albertson, John D; Dolbow, John E; Fried, Eliot; Gurtin, Morton E

    2009-04-01

    We study the effect of the length scales alpha and beta in the Navier-Stokes- alphabeta equations on the energy spectrum and the alignment between the vorticity and the eigenvectors of the stretching tensor in three-dimensional homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows in a periodic cubic domain, including the limiting cases of the Navier-Stokes- alpha and Navier-Stokes equations. A significant increase in the accuracy of the energy spectrum at large wave numbers arises for betaNavier-Stokes- alphabeta equations also improve as beta decreases away from alpha . However, optimal choices for alpha and beta depend not only on the problem of interest but also on the grid resolution.

  4. Inviscid Limit for Damped and Driven Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in mathbb R^2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, P.; Ramos, F.

    2007-10-01

    We consider the zero viscosity limit of long time averages of solutions of damped and driven Navier-Stokes equations in mathbb R^2 . We prove that the rate of dissipation of enstrophy vanishes. Stationary statistical solutions of the damped and driven Navier-Stokes equations converge to renormalized stationary statistical solutions of the damped and driven Euler equations. These solutions obey the enstrophy balance.

  5. Single-grid spectral collocation for the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernardi, Christine; Canuto, Claudio; Maday, Yvon; Metivet, Brigitte

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to study a collocation spectral method to approximate the Navier-Stokes equations: only one grid is used, which is built from the nodes of a Gauss-Lobatto quadrature formula, either of Legendre or of Chebyshev type. The convergence is proven for the Stokes problem provided with inhomogeneous Dirichlet conditions, then thoroughly analyzed for the Navier-Stokes equations. The practical implementation algorithm is presented, together with numerical results.

  6. Far-Field Boundary Conditions in Numerical Solutions of the Navier-Stokes Equations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    nonlinear system of mixed parabolic- hyperbolic type in two space dimensions and time, with four independent variables must be solved in an exterior...conditions. * III THE NAVIER-STOKES EQUATIONS AND CHARACTERISTIC VARIABLES : We now begin our discussion of the equations of gas dynamics. We will neglect...8217 Far-Field Boundary Conditions in Numerical Solutions of the Navier-Stokes Equations L°O * (. P.J. McKenna LA. DTIC * E.LECTE Final Report AFOSR Grant

  7. Adapting a Navier-Stokes code to the ICL-DAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    The results of an experiment are reported, i.c., to adapt a Navier-Stokes code, originally developed on a serial computer, to concurrent processing on the CL Distributed Array Processor (DAP). The algorithm used in solving the Navier-Stokes equations is briefly described. The architecture of the DAP and DAP FORTRAN are also described. The modifications of the algorithm so as to fit the DAP are given and discussed. Finally, performance results are given and conclusions are drawn.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann model for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with flexible specific-heat ratio.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Takeshi; Tsutahara, Michihisa

    2004-03-01

    We have developed a lattice Boltzmann model for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with a flexible specific-heat ratio. Several numerical results are presented, and they agree well with the corresponding solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. In addition, an explicit finite-difference scheme is proposed for the numerical calculation that can make a stable calculation with a large Courant number.

  9. On the Liouville Type Theorems for Self-Similar Solutions to the Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Dongho; Wolf, Jörg

    2017-07-01

    We prove Liouville type theorems for the self-similar solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations. One of our results generalizes the previous ones by Nečas-Ru˙žička-Šverák and Tsai. Using a Liouville type theorem, we also remove a scenario of asymptotically self-similar blow-up for the Navier-Stokes equations with the profile belonging to {L^{p, ∞} (R^3) with {p > 3/2}.

  10. Remark on compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density-dependent viscosity and discontinuous initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting; Fang, Daoyuan

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we study the free boundary problem for 1D compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density-dependent viscosity. We focus on the case where the viscosity coefficient vanishes on vacuum. We prove the global existence and uniqueness for discontinuous solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations when the initial density is a bounded variation function, and give a decay result for the density as t-->+[infinity].

  11. Partial implicitization. [numerical stability of Burger equation model for Navier-Stokes equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The steady-state solution to the full Navier-Stokes equations for complicated flows is generally difficult to obtain. The Burgers (1948) equation is used as a model of the Navier-Stokes equations. The steady-state solution is obtained by a one-step explicit technique resulting from a partial implicitization of the difference equation. Stability analysis shows that the technique is unconditionally stable, and numerical tests show the technique to be accurate.

  12. Implicit solution of Navier-Stokes equations on staggered curvilinear grids using a Newton-Krylov method with a novel analytical Jacobian.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borazjani, Iman; Asgharzadeh, Hafez

    2015-11-01

    Flow simulations involving complex geometries and moving boundaries suffer from time-step size restriction and low convergence rates with explicit and semi-implicit schemes. Implicit schemes can be used to overcome these restrictions. However, implementing implicit solver for nonlinear equations including Navier-Stokes is not straightforward. Newton-Krylov subspace methods (NKMs) are one of the most advanced iterative methods to solve non-linear equations such as implicit descritization of the Navier-Stokes equation. The efficiency of NKMs massively depends on the Jacobian formation method, e.g., automatic differentiation is very expensive, and matrix-free methods slow down as the mesh is refined. Analytical Jacobian is inexpensive method, but derivation of analytical Jacobian for Navier-Stokes equation on staggered grid is challenging. The NKM with a novel analytical Jacobian was developed and validated against Taylor-Green vortex and pulsatile flow in a 90 degree bend. The developed method successfully handled the complex geometries such as an intracranial aneurysm with multiple overset grids, and immersed boundaries. It is shown that the NKM with an analytical Jacobian is 3 to 25 times faster than the fixed-point implicit Runge-Kutta method, and more than 100 times faster than automatic differentiation depending on the grid (size) and the flow problem. The developed methods are fully parallelized with parallel efficiency of 80-90% on the problems tested.

  13. Comparison of two- and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solutions with NASA experimental data for CAST-10 airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. Charles; Radespiel, Rolf; Mccormick, V. Edward

    1989-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations are solved for flow over a NAE CAST-10 airfoil model. Recently developed finite-volume codes that apply a multistage time stepping scheme in conjunction with steady state acceleration techniques are used to solve the equations. Two-dimensional results are shown for flow conditions uncorrected and corrected for wind tunnel wall interference effects. Predicted surface pressures from 3-D simulations are compared with those from 2-D calculations. The focus of the 3-D computations is the influence of the sidewall boundary layers. Topological features of the 3-D flow fields are indicated. Lift and drag results are compared with experimental measurements.

  14. Global smooth flows for compressible Navier-Stokes-Maxwell equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiang; Cao, Hongmei

    2016-08-01

    Umeda et al. (Jpn J Appl Math 1:435-457, 1984) considered a rather general class of symmetric hyperbolic-parabolic systems: A0zt+sum_{j=1}nAjz_{xj}+Lz=sum_{j,k=1}nB^{jk}z_{xjxk} and showed optimal decay rates with certain dissipative assumptions. In their results, the dissipation matrices {L} and {B^{jk}(j,k=1,ldots,n)} are both assumed to be real symmetric. So far there are no general results in case that {L} and {B^{jk}} are not necessarily symmetric, which is left open now. In this paper, we investigate compressible Navier-Stokes-Maxwell (N-S-M) equations arising in plasmas physics, which is a concrete example of hyperbolic-parabolic composite systems with non-symmetric dissipation. It is observed that the Cauchy problem for N-S-M equations admits the dissipative mechanism of regularity-loss type. Consequently, extra higher regularity is usually needed to obtain the optimal decay rate of {L1({mathbb{R}}^3)}-{L^2({mathbb{R}}^3)} type, in comparison with that for the global-in-time existence of smooth solutions. In this paper, we obtain the minimal decay regularity of global smooth solutions to N-S-M equations, with aid of {L^p({mathbb{R}}^n)}-{Lq({mathbb{R}}^n)}-{Lr({mathbb{R}}^n)} estimates. It is worth noting that the relation between decay derivative orders and the regularity index of initial data is firstly found in the optimal decay estimates.

  15. Computation of aircraft component flow fields at transonic Mach numbers using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrewsbury, George D.; Vadyak, Joseph; Schuster, David M.; Smith, Marilyn J.

    1989-01-01

    A computer analysis was developed for calculating steady (or unsteady) three-dimensional aircraft component flow fields. This algorithm, called ENS3D, can compute the flow field for the following configurations: diffuser duct/thrust nozzle, isolated wing, isolated fuselage, wing/fuselage with or without integrated inlet and exhaust, nacelle/inlet, nacelle (fuselage) afterbody/exhaust jet, complete transport engine installation, and multicomponent configurations using zonal grid generation technique. Solutions can be obtained for subsonic, transonic, or hypersonic freestream speeds. The algorithm can solve either the Euler equations for inviscid flow, the thin shear layer Navier-Stokes equations for viscous flow, or the full Navier-Stokes equations for viscous flow. The flow field solution is determined on a body-fitted computational grid. A fully-implicit alternating direction implicit method is employed for the solution of the finite difference equations. For viscous computations, either a two layer eddy-viscosity turbulence model or the k-epsilon two equation transport model can be used to achieve mathematical closure.

  16. Transonic Navier-Stokes computations of strake-generated vortex interactions for a fighter-like configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reznick, Steve

    1988-01-01

    Transonic Euler/Navier-Stokes computations are accomplished for wing-body flow fields using a computer program called Transonic Navier-Stokes (TNS). The wing-body grids are generated using a program called ZONER, which subdivides a coarse grid about a fighter-like aircraft configuration into smaller zones, which are tailored to local grid requirements. These zones can be either finely clustered for capture of viscous effects, or coarsely clustered for inviscid portions of the flow field. Different equation sets may be solved in the different zone types. This modular approach also affords the opportunity to modify a local region of the grid without recomputing the global grid. This capability speeds up the design optimization process when quick modifications to the geometry definition are desired. The solution algorithm embodied in TNS is implicit, and is capable of capturing pressure gradients associated with shocks. The algebraic turbulence model employed has proven adequate for viscous interactions with moderate separation. Results confirm that the TNS program can successfully be used to simulate transonic viscous flows about complicated 3-D geometries.

  17. Practical Aerodynamic Design Optimization Based on the Navier-Stokes Equations and a Discrete Adjoint Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    Compressible and incompressible versions of a three-dimensional unstructured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver have been differentiated and resulting derivatives have been verified by comparisons with finite differences and a complex-variable approach. In this implementation, the turbulence model is fully coupled with the flow equations in order to achieve this consistency. The accuracy demonstrated in the current work represents the first time that such an approach has been successfully implemented. The accuracy of a number of simplifying approximations to the linearizations of the residual have been examined. A first-order approximation to the dependent variables in both the adjoint and design equations has been investigated. The effects of a "frozen" eddy viscosity and the ramifications of neglecting some mesh sensitivity terms were also examined. It has been found that none of the approximations yielded derivatives of acceptable accuracy and were often of incorrect sign. However, numerical experiments indicate that an incomplete convergence of the adjoint system often yield sufficiently accurate derivatives, thereby significantly lowering the time required for computing sensitivity information. The convergence rate of the adjoint solver relative to the flow solver has been examined. Inviscid adjoint solutions typically require one to four times the cost of a flow solution, while for turbulent adjoint computations, this ratio can reach as high as eight to ten. Numerical experiments have shown that the adjoint solver can stall before converging the solution to machine accuracy, particularly for viscous cases. A possible remedy for this phenomenon would be to include the complete higher-order linearization in the preconditioning step, or to employ a simple form of mesh sequencing to obtain better approximations to the solution through the use of coarser meshes. An efficient surface parameterization based on a free-form deformation technique has been

  18. Practical Aerodynamic Design Optimization Based on the Navier-Stokes Equations and a Discrete Adjoint Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    Compressible and incompressible versions of a three-dimensional unstructured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver have been differentiated and resulting derivatives have been verified by comparisons with finite differences and a complex-variable approach. In this implementation, the turbulence model is fully coupled with the flow equations in order to achieve this consistency. The accuracy demonstrated in the current work represents the first time that such an approach has been successfully implemented. The accuracy of a number of simplifying approximations to the linearizations of the residual have been examined. A first-order approximation to the dependent variables in both the adjoint and design equations has been investigated. The effects of a "frozen" eddy viscosity and the ramifications of neglecting some mesh sensitivity terms were also examined. It has been found that none of the approximations yielded derivatives of acceptable accuracy and were often of incorrect sign. However, numerical experiments indicate that an incomplete convergence of the adjoint system often yield sufficiently accurate derivatives, thereby significantly lowering the time required for computing sensitivity information. The convergence rate of the adjoint solver relative to the flow solver has been examined. Inviscid adjoint solutions typically require one to four times the cost of a flow solution, while for turbulent adjoint computations, this ratio can reach as high as eight to ten. Numerical experiments have shown that the adjoint solver can stall before converging the solution to machine accuracy, particularly for viscous cases. A possible remedy for this phenomenon would be to include the complete higher-order linearization in the preconditioning step, or to employ a simple form of mesh sequencing to obtain better approximations to the solution through the use of coarser meshes. An efficient surface parameterization based on a free-form deformation technique has been

  19. Numerical Solution of the Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations in Three-dimensional Generalized Curvilinear Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, S. E.; Kwak, D.; Chang, J. L. C.

    1986-01-01

    Numerically solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is known to be time consuming and expensive. Testing of the INS3D computers code, which solves these equations with the use of the pseudocompressibility method, shows this method to be an efficient way to obtain the steady state solution. The effects of the waves introduced by the pseudocompressibility method are analyzed and criteria are set and tested for the choice of the pseudocompressibility parameter which governs the artificial sound speed. The code is tested using laminar flow over a two dimensional backward-facing step, and laminar flow over a two dimensional circular cylinder. The results of the computations over the backward-facing step are in excellent agreement with experimental results. The transient solution of the flow over the cylinder impulsively started from rest is in good agreement with experimental results. However, the computed frequency of periodic shedding of vortices behind the cylinder is not in agreement with the experimental value. For a three dimensional test case, computations were conducted for a cylinder end wall junction. The saddle point separation and horseshoe vortex system appear in the computed field. The solution also shows secondary vortex filaments which wrap around the cylinder and spiral up in the wake.

  20. A Reconstructed Discontinuous Galerkin Method for the Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations on Hybrid Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaodong Liu; Lijun Xuan; Hong Luo; Yidong Xia

    2001-01-01

    A reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin (rDG(P1P2)) method, originally introduced for the compressible Euler equations, is developed for the solution of the compressible Navier- Stokes equations on 3D hybrid grids. In this method, a piecewise quadratic polynomial solution is obtained from the underlying piecewise linear DG solution using a hierarchical Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) reconstruction. The reconstructed quadratic polynomial solution is then used for the computation of the inviscid fluxes and the viscous fluxes using the second formulation of Bassi and Reay (Bassi-Rebay II). The developed rDG(P1P2) method is used to compute a variety of flow problems to assess its accuracy, efficiency, and robustness. The numerical results demonstrate that the rDG(P1P2) method is able to achieve the designed third-order of accuracy at a cost slightly higher than its underlying second-order DG method, outperform the third order DG method in terms of both computing costs and storage requirements, and obtain reliable and accurate solutions to the large eddy simulation (LES) and direct numerical simulation (DNS) of compressible turbulent flows.

  1. Convergence Acceleration of Runge-Kutta Schemes for Solving the Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Roy C., Jr.; Turkel, Eli; Rossow, C.-C.

    2007-01-01

    The convergence of a Runge-Kutta (RK) scheme with multigrid is accelerated by preconditioning with a fully implicit operator. With the extended stability of the Runge-Kutta scheme, CFL numbers as high as 1000 can be used. The implicit preconditioner addresses the stiffness in the discrete equations associated with stretched meshes. This RK/implicit scheme is used as a smoother for multigrid. Fourier analysis is applied to determine damping properties. Numerical dissipation operators based on the Roe scheme, a matrix dissipation, and the CUSP scheme are considered in evaluating the RK/implicit scheme. In addition, the effect of the number of RK stages is examined. Both the numerical and computational efficiency of the scheme with the different dissipation operators are discussed. The RK/implicit scheme is used to solve the two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) compressible, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Turbulent flows over an airfoil and wing at subsonic and transonic conditions are computed. The effects of the cell aspect ratio on convergence are investigated for Reynolds numbers between 5:7 x 10(exp 6) and 100 x 10(exp 6). It is demonstrated that the implicit preconditioner can reduce the computational time of a well-tuned standard RK scheme by a factor between four and ten.

  2. Collective molecular dissipation on Navier-Stokes macroscopic scales: Accretion disc viscous modeling in SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzafame, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    In the nonlinear Navier-Stokes viscous flow dynamics, physical damping is mathematically accomplished by a braking term in the momentum equation, corresponding to a heating term in the energy equation, both responsible of the conversion of mechanical energy into heat. In such two terms, it is essential the role of the viscous stress tensor, relative to contiguous macroscopic moving flow components, depending on the macroscopic viscosity coefficient ν. A working formulation for ν can always be found analytically, tuning some arbitrary parameters in the current known formulations, according to the geometry, morphology and physics of the flow. Instead, in this paper, we write an alternative hybrid formulation for ν, where molecular parameters are also included. Our expression for ν has a more physical interpretation of the internal damping in dilute gases because the macroscopic viscosity is related to the small scale molecular dissipation, not strictly dependent on the flow morphology, as well as it is free of any arbitrary parameter. Results for some basic 2D tests are shown in the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) framework. An application to the 3D accretion disc modeling for low mass cataclysmic variables is also discussed. Consequences of the macroscopic viscosity coefficient reformulation in a more strictly physical terms on the thermal conductivity coefficient for dilute gases are also discussed.

  3. Exponential integrators for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations.

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Christopher K.

    2004-07-01

    We provide an algorithm and analysis of a high order projection scheme for time integration of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations (NSE). The method is based on a projection onto the subspace of divergence-free (incompressible) functions interleaved with a Krylov-based exponential time integration (KBEI). These time integration methods provide a high order accurate, stable approach with many of the advantages of explicit methods, and can reduce the computational resources over conventional methods. The method is scalable in the sense that the computational costs grow linearly with problem size. Exponential integrators, used typically to solve systems of ODEs, utilize matrix vector products of the exponential of the Jacobian on a vector. For large systems, this product can be approximated efficiently by Krylov subspace methods. However, in contrast to explicit methods, KBEIs are not restricted by the time step. While implicit methods require a solution of a linear system with the Jacobian, KBEIs only require matrix vector products of the Jacobian. Furthermore, these methods are based on linearization, so there is no non-linear system solve at each time step. Differential-algebraic equations (DAEs) are ordinary differential equations (ODEs) subject to algebraic constraints. The discretized NSE constitute a system of DAEs, where the incompressibility condition is the algebraic constraint. Exponential integrators can be extended to DAEs with linear constraints imposed via a projection onto the constraint manifold. This results in a projected ODE that is integrated by a KBEI. In this approach, the Krylov subspace satisfies the constraint, hence the solution at the advanced time step automatically satisfies the constraint as well. For the NSE, the projection onto the constraint is typically achieved by a projection induced by the L{sup 2} inner product. We examine this L{sup 2} projection and an H{sup 1} projection induced by the H{sup 1} semi-inner product. The H

  4. Practical Aerodynamic Design Optimization Based on the Navier-Stokes Equations and a Discrete Adjoint Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    The technical details are summarized below: Compressible and incompressible versions of a three-dimensional unstructured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver have been differentiated and resulting derivatives have been verified by comparisons with finite differences and a complex-variable approach. In this implementation, the turbulence model is fully coupled with the flow equations in order to achieve this consistency. The accuracy demonstrated in the current work represents the first time that such an approach has been successfully implemented. The accuracy of a number of simplifying approximations to the linearizations of the residual have been examined. A first-order approximation to the dependent variables in both the adjoint and design equations has been investigated. The effects of a "frozen" eddy viscosity and the ramifications of neglecting some mesh sensitivity terms were also examined. It has been found that none of the approximations yielded derivatives of acceptable accuracy and were often of incorrect sign. However, numerical experiments indicate that an incomplete convergence of the adjoint system often yield sufficiently accurate derivatives, thereby significantly lowering the time required for computing sensitivity information. The convergence rate of the adjoint solver relative to the flow solver has been examined. Inviscid adjoint solutions typically require one to four times the cost of a flow solution, while for turbulent adjoint computations, this ratio can reach as high as eight to ten. Numerical experiments have shown that the adjoint solver can stall before converging the solution to machine accuracy, particularly for viscous cases. A possible remedy for this phenomenon would be to include the complete higher-order linearization in the preconditioning step, or to employ a simple form of mesh sequencing to obtain better approximations to the solution through the use of coarser meshes. . An efficient surface parameterization based

  5. Practical Aerodynamic Design Optimization Based on the Navier-Stokes Equations and a Discrete Adjoint Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    The technical details are summarized below: Compressible and incompressible versions of a three-dimensional unstructured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver have been differentiated and resulting derivatives have been verified by comparisons with finite differences and a complex-variable approach. In this implementation, the turbulence model is fully coupled with the flow equations in order to achieve this consistency. The accuracy demonstrated in the current work represents the first time that such an approach has been successfully implemented. The accuracy of a number of simplifying approximations to the linearizations of the residual have been examined. A first-order approximation to the dependent variables in both the adjoint and design equations has been investigated. The effects of a "frozen" eddy viscosity and the ramifications of neglecting some mesh sensitivity terms were also examined. It has been found that none of the approximations yielded derivatives of acceptable accuracy and were often of incorrect sign. However, numerical experiments indicate that an incomplete convergence of the adjoint system often yield sufficiently accurate derivatives, thereby significantly lowering the time required for computing sensitivity information. The convergence rate of the adjoint solver relative to the flow solver has been examined. Inviscid adjoint solutions typically require one to four times the cost of a flow solution, while for turbulent adjoint computations, this ratio can reach as high as eight to ten. Numerical experiments have shown that the adjoint solver can stall before converging the solution to machine accuracy, particularly for viscous cases. A possible remedy for this phenomenon would be to include the complete higher-order linearization in the preconditioning step, or to employ a simple form of mesh sequencing to obtain better approximations to the solution through the use of coarser meshes. . An efficient surface parameterization based

  6. Euler/Navier-Stokes calculations of transonic flow past fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deese, J. E.; Agarwal, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics has an increasingly important role in the design and analysis of aircraft as computer hardware becomes faster and algorithms become more efficient. Progress is being made in two directions: more complex and realistic configurations are being treated and algorithms based on higher approximations to the complete Navier-Stokes equations are being developed. The literature indicates that linear panel methods can model detailed, realistic aircraft geometries in flow regimes where this approximation is valid. As algorithms including higher approximations to the Navier-Stokes equations are developed, computer resource requirements increase rapidly. Generation of suitable grids become more difficult and the number of grid points required to resolve flow features of interest increases. Recently, the development of large vector computers has enabled researchers to attempt more complex geometries with Euler and Navier-Stokes algorithms. The results of calculations for transonic flow about a typical transport and fighter wing-body configuration using thin layer Navier-Stokes equations are described along with flow about helicopter rotor blades using both Euler/Navier-Stokes equations.

  7. A direct discontinuous Galerkin method for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on arbitrary grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jian; Yang, Xiaoquan; Liu, Xiaodong; Liu, Tiegang; Luo, Hong

    2016-12-01

    A Direct Discontinuous Galerkin (DDG) method is developed for solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on arbitrary grids in the framework of DG methods. The DDG method, originally introduced for scalar diffusion problems on structured grids, is extended to discretize viscous and heat fluxes in the Navier-Stokes equations. Two approaches of implementing the DDG method to compute numerical diffusive fluxes for the Navier-Stokes equations are presented: one is based on the conservative variables, and the other is based on the primitive variables. The importance of the characteristic cell size used in the DDG formulation on unstructured grids is examined. The numerical fluxes on the boundary by the DDG method are discussed. A number of test cases are presented to assess the performance of the DDG method for solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Based on our numerical results, we observe that DDG method can achieve the designed order of accuracy and is able to deliver the same accuracy as the widely used BR2 method at a significantly reduced cost, clearly demonstrating that the DDG method provides an attractive alternative for solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on arbitrary grids owning to its simplicity in implementation and its efficiency in computational cost.

  8. Navier-Stokes, flight, and wind tunnel flow analysis for the F/A-18 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffari, Farhad

    1994-01-01

    Computational analysis of flow over the F/A-18 aircraft is presented along with complementary data from both flight and wind tunnel experiments. The computational results are based on the three-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes formulation and are obtained from an accurate surface representation of the fuselage, leading-edge extension (LEX), and the wing geometry. However, the constraints imposed by either the flow solver and/or the complexity associated with the flow-field grid generation required certain geometrical approximations to be implemented in the present numerical model. In particular, such constraints inspired the removal of the empennage and the blocking (fairing) of the inlet face. The results are computed for three different free-stream flow conditions and compared with flight test data of surface pressure coefficients, surface tuft flow, and off-surface vortical flow characteristics that included breakdown phenomena. Excellent surface pressure coefficient correlations, both in terms of magnitude and overall trend, are obtained on the forebody throughout the range of flow conditions. Reasonable pressure agreement was obtained over the LEX; the general correlation tends to improve at higher angles of attack. The surface tuft flow and the off-surface vortex flow structures compared qualitatively well with the flight test results. To evaluate the computational results, a wind tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the effects of existing configurational differences between the flight vehicle and the numerical model on aerodynamic characteristics. In most cases, the geometrical approximations made to the numerical model had very little effect on overall aerodynamic characteristics.

  9. Hybrid Large Eddy Simulation / Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Modeling in Directed Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilberter, Ilya Alexandrovich

    In this work, a hybrid Large Eddy Simulation / Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (LES/RANS) turbulence model is applied to simulate two flows relevant to directed energy applications. The flow solver blends the Menter Baseline turbulence closure near solid boundaries with a Lenormand-type subgrid model in the free-stream with a blending function that employs the ratio of estimated inner and outer turbulent length scales. A Mach 2.2 mixing nozzle/diffuser system representative of a gas laser is simulated under a range of exit pressures to assess the ability of the model to predict the dynamics of the shock train. The simulation captures the location of the shock train responsible for pressure recovery but under-predicts the rate of pressure increase. Predicted turbulence production at the wall is found to be highly sensitive to the behavior of the RANS turbulence model. A Mach 2.3, high-Reynolds number, three-dimensional cavity flow is also simulated in order to compute the wavefront aberrations of an optical beam passing thorough the cavity. The cavity geometry is modeled using an immersed boundary method, and an auxiliary flat plate simulation is performed to replicate the effects of the wind-tunnel boundary layer on the computed optical path difference. Pressure spectra extracted on the cavity walls agree with empirical predictions based on Rossiter's formula. Proper orthogonal modes of the wavefront aberrations in a beam originating from the cavity center agree well with experimental data despite uncertainty about in flow turbulence levels and boundary layer thicknesses over the wind tunnel window. Dynamic mode decomposition of a planar wavefront spanning the cavity reveals that wavefront distortions are driven by shear layer oscillations at the Rossiter frequencies; these disturbances create eddy shocklets that propagate into the free-stream, creating additional optical wavefront distortion.

  10. Hybridizable discontinuous Galerkin projection methods for Navier-Stokes and Boussinesq equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckermann, M. P.; Lermusiaux, P. F. J.

    2016-02-01

    Schemes for the incompressible Navier-Stokes and Boussinesq equations are formulated and derived combining the novel Hybridizable Discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method, a projection method, and Implicit-Explicit Runge-Kutta (IMEX-RK) time-integration schemes. We employ an incremental pressure correction and develop the corresponding HDG finite element discretization including consistent edge-space fluxes for the velocity predictor and pressure correction. We then derive the proper forms of the element-local and HDG edge-space final corrections for both velocity and pressure, including the HDG rotational correction. We also find and explain a consistency relation between the HDG stability parameters of the pressure correction and velocity predictor. We discuss and illustrate the effects of the time-splitting error. We then detail how to incorporate the HDG projection method time-split within standard IMEX-RK time-stepping schemes. Our high-order HDG projection schemes are implemented for arbitrary, mixed-element unstructured grids, with both straight-sided and curved meshes. In particular, we provide a quadrature-free integration method for a nodal basis that is consistent with the HDG method. To prevent numerical oscillations, we develop a selective nodal limiting approach. Its applications show that it can stabilize high-order schemes while retaining high-order accuracy in regions where the solution is sufficiently smooth. We perform spatial and temporal convergence studies to evaluate the properties of our integration and selective limiting schemes and to verify that our solvers are properly formulated and implemented. To complete these studies and to illustrate a range of properties for our new schemes, we employ an unsteady tracer advection benchmark, a manufactured solution for the steady diffusion and Stokes equations, and a standard lock-exchange Boussinesq problem.

  11. Differential formulation of discontinuous Galerkin and related methods for compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Haiyang

    A new approach to high-order accuracy for the numerical solution of conservation laws introduced by Huynh and extended to simplexes by the current work is renamed CPR (correction procedure or collocation penalty via reconstruction). The CPR approach employs the differential form of the equation and accounts for the jumps in flux values at the cell boundaries by a correction procedure. In addition to being simple and economical, it unifies several existing methods including discontinuous Galerkin (DG), staggered grid, spectral volume (SV), and spectral difference (SD). The approach is then extended to diffusion equation and Navier-Stokes equations. In the discretization of the diffusion terms, the BR2 (Bassi and Rebay), interior penalty, compact DG (CDG), and I-continuous approaches are used. The first three of these approaches, originally derived using the integral formulation, were recast here in the CPR framework, whereas the I-continuous scheme, originally derived for a quadrilateral mesh, was extended to a triangular mesh. The current work also includes a study of high-order curve boundaries representations. A new boundary representation based on the Bezier curve is then developed and analyzed, which is shown to have several advantages for complicated geometries. To further enhance the efficiency, the capability of h/p mesh adaptation is developed for the CPR solver. The adaptation is driven by an efficient multi-p a posteriori error estimator. P-adaptation is applied to smooth regions of the flow field while h-adaptation targets the non-smooth regions, identified by accuracy-preserving TVD marker. Several numerical tests are presented to demonstrate the capability of the technique.

  12. Optimization of contoured hypersonic scramjet inlets with a least-squares parabolized Navier-Stokes procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, J. J.; Auslender, A. H.

    1993-01-01

    A new optimization procedure, in which a parabolized Navier-Stokes solver is coupled with a non-linear least-squares optimization algorithm, is applied to the design of a Mach 14, laminar two-dimensional hypersonic subscale flight inlet with an internal contraction ratio of 15:1 and a length-to-throat half-height ratio of 150:1. An automated numerical search of multiple geometric wall contours, which are defined by polynomical splines, results in an optimal geometry that yields the maximum total-pressure recovery for the compression process. Optimal inlet geometry is obtained for both inviscid and viscous flows, with the assumption that the gas is either calorically or thermally perfect. The analysis with a calorically perfect gas results in an optimized inviscid inlet design that is defined by two cubic splines and yields a mass-weighted total-pressure recovery of 0.787, which is a 23% improvement compared with the optimized shock-canceled two-ramp inlet design. Similarly, the design procedure obtains the optimized contour for a viscous calorically perfect gas to yield a mass-weighted total-pressure recovery value of 0.749. Additionally, an optimized contour for a viscous thermally perfect gas is obtained to yield a mass-weighted total-pressure recovery value of 0.768. The design methodology incorporates both complex fluid dynamic physics and optimal search techniques without an excessive compromise of computational speed; hence, this methodology is a practical technique that is applicable to optimal inlet design procedures.

  13. Partially-Averaged Navier Stokes Model for Turbulence: Implementation and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.

    2005-01-01

    Partially-averaged Navier Stokes (PANS) is a suite of turbulence closure models of various modeled-to-resolved scale ratios ranging from Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) to Navier-Stokes (direct numerical simulations). The objective of PANS, like hybrid models, is to resolve large scale structures at reasonable computational expense. The modeled-to-resolved scale ratio or the level of physical resolution in PANS is quantified by two parameters: the unresolved-to-total ratios of kinetic energy (f(sub k)) and dissipation (f(sub epsilon)). The unresolved-scale stress is modeled with the Boussinesq approximation and modeled transport equations are solved for the unresolved kinetic energy and dissipation. In this paper, we first present a brief discussion of the PANS philosophy followed by a description of the implementation procedure and finally perform preliminary evaluation in benchmark problems.

  14. Existence and Regularity of the Pressure for the Stochastic Navier-Stokes Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Langa, Jose A. Real, Jose Simon, Jacques

    2003-10-15

    We prove, on one hand, that for a convenient body force with value sin the distribution space (H{sup -1}(D)){sup d}, where D is the geometric domain of the fluid, there exist a velocity u and a pressure p solution of the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation in dimension 2, 3 or 4. On the other hand, we prove that, for a body force with values in the dual space V' of the divergence free subspace V of (H{sup 1}{sub 0}(D)){sup d},in general it is not possible to solve the stochastic Navier-Stokes equations. More precisely, although such body forces have been considered, there is no topological space in which Navier-Stokes equations could be meaningful for them.

  15. Navier-Stokes Analysis of the Flowfield Characteristics of an Ice Contaminated Aircraft Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, J.; Choo, Y.; Reehorst, A.; Potapczuk, M.; Slater, J.

    1999-01-01

    An analytical study was performed as part of the NASA Lewis support of a National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) aircraft accident investigation. The study was focused on the performance degradation associated with ice contamination on the wing of a commercial turbo-prop-powered aircraft. Based upon the results of an earlier numerical study conducted by the authors, a prominent ridged-ice formation on the subject aircraft wing was selected for detailed flow analysis using 2-dimensional (2-D), as well as, 3-dimensional (3-D) Navier-Stokes computations. This configuration was selected because it caused the largest lift decrease and drag increase among all the ice shapes investigated in the earlier study. A grid sensitivity test was performed to find out the influence of grid spacing on the lift, drag, and associated angle-of-attack for the maximum lift (C(sub lmax)). This study showed that grid resolution is important and a sensitivity analysis is an essential element of the process in order to assure that the final solution is independent of the grid. The 2-D results suggested that a severe stability and control difficulty could have occurred at a slightly higher angle-of-attack (AOA) than the one recorded by the Flight Data Recorder (FDR). This stability and control problem was thought to have resulted from a decreased differential lift on the wings with respect to the normal loading for the configuration. The analysis also indicated that this stability and control problem could have occurred whether or not natural ice shedding took place. Numerical results using an assumed 3-D ice shape showed an increase of the angle at which this phenomena occurred of about 4 degrees. As it occurred with the 2-D case, the trailing edge separation was observed but started only when the AOA was very close to the angle at which the maximum lift occurred.

  16. An inexact Newton method for fully-coupled solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J.N.; Tuminaro, R.S.; Walker, H.F.

    1997-02-01

    The solution of the governing steady transport equations for momentum, heat and mass transfer in flowing fluids can be very difficult. These difficulties arise from the nonlinear, coupled, nonsymmetric nature of the system of algebraic equations that results from spatial discretization of the PDEs. In this manuscript the authors focus on evaluating a proposed nonlinear solution method based on an inexact Newton method with backtracking. In this context they use a particular spatial discretization based on a pressure stabilized Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation of the low Mach number Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport. The discussion considers computational efficiency, robustness and some implementation issues related to the proposed nonlinear solution scheme. Computational results are presented for several challenging CFD benchmark problems as well as two large scale 3D flow simulations.

  17. Pseudo-time stepping methods for space time discontinuous Galerkin discretizations of the compressible Navier Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaij, C. M.; van der Vegt, J. J. W.; van der Ven, H.

    2006-12-01

    The space-time discontinuous Galerkin discretization of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations results in a non-linear system of algebraic equations, which we solve with pseudo-time stepping methods. We show that explicit Runge-Kutta methods developed for the Euler equations suffer from a severe stability constraint linked to the viscous part of the equations and propose an alternative to relieve this constraint while preserving locality. To evaluate its effectiveness, we compare with an implicit-explicit Runge-Kutta method which does not suffer from the viscous stability constraint. We analyze the stability of the methods and illustrate their performance by computing the flow around a 2D airfoil and a 3D delta wing at low and moderate Reynolds numbers.

  18. An efficient nonlinear relaxation technique for the three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Jack R.; Mcrae, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient implicit method for the computation of steady, three-dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes flowfields is presented. A nonlinear iteration strategy based on planar Gauss-Seidel sweeps is used to drive the solution toward a steady state, with approximate factorization errors within a crossflow plane reduced by the application of a quasi-Newton technique. A hybrid discretization approach is employed, with flux-vector splitting utilized in the streamwise direction and central differences with artificial dissipation used for the transverse fluxes. Convergence histories and comparisons with experimental data are presented for several 3-D shock-boundary layer interactions. Both laminar and turbulent cases are considered, with turbulent closure provided by a modification of the Baldwin-Barth one-equation model. For the problems considered (175,000-325,000 mesh points), the algorithm provides steady-state convergence in 900-2000 CPU seconds on a single processor of a Cray Y-MP.

  19. Extension criterion via partial components of vorticity on strong solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations in higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurumi, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-01

    We consider the extension criterion of strong solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations in RN. It is proved that among N (N - 1) / 2 components of the vorticity, [ N / 2 ] components are negligible for the criterion whether the time local solutions can be extended beyond the critical time. Our result may be regarded as generalization to the higher dimensional case of Chae-Choe [4] in the 3D case which showed that only two components in Lq, 3 / 2 < q < ∞, of the vorticity contribute to such an extension criterion. Furthermore, the critical case q = ∞ originally treated by Kato-Ponce [8] in RN is also generalized in such a way that [ N / 2 ] components of vortex matrix are redundant for the extension criterion.

  20. Full Navier-Stokes analysis of a two-dimensional mixer/ejector nozzle for noise suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debonis, James R.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional full Navier-Stokes (FNS) analysis was performed on a mixer/ejector nozzle designed to reduce the jet noise created at takeoff by a future supersonic transport. The PARC3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code was used to study the flow field of the nozzle. The grid that was used in the analysis consisted of approximately 900,000 node points contained in eight grid blocks. Two nozzle configurations were studied: a constant area mixing section and a diverging mixing section. Data are presented for predictions of pressure, velocity, and total temperature distributions and for evaluations of internal performance and mixing effectiveness. The analysis provided good insight into the behavior of the flow.

  1. Performance of a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code on CYBER 205 for high-speed juncture flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshmanan, B.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1987-01-01

    A vectorized 3D Navier-Stokes code has been implemented on CYBER 205 for solving the supersonic laminar flow over a swept fin/flat plate junction. The code extends MacCormack's predictor-corrector finite volume scheme to a generalized coordinate system in a locally one dimensional time split fashion. A systematic parametric study is conducted to examine the effect of fin sweep on the computed flow field. Calculated results for the pressure distribution on the flat plate and fin leading edge are compared with the experimental measurements of a right angle blunt fin/flat plate junction. The decrease in the extent of the separated flow region and peak pressure on the fin leading edge, and weakening of the two reversed supersonic zones with increase in fin sweep have been clearly observed in the numerical simulation.

  2. Performance of a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code on CYBER 205 for high-speed juncture flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshmanan, B.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1987-01-01

    A vectorized 3D Navier-Stokes code has been implemented on CYBER 205 for solving the supersonic laminar flow over a swept fin/flat plate junction. The code extends MacCormack's predictor-corrector finite volume scheme to a generalized coordinate system in a locally one dimensional time split fashion. A systematic parametric study is conducted to examine the effect of fin sweep on the computed flow field. Calculated results for the pressure distribution on the flat plate and fin leading edge are compared with the experimental measurements of a right angle blunt fin/flat plate junction. The decrease in the extent of the separated flow region and peak pressure on the fin leading edge, and weakening of the two reversed supersonic zones with increase in fin sweep have been clearly observed in the numerical simulation.

  3. Stability of plane Couette flow for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with Navier-slip boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Liang; Zhang, Xingwei

    2017-07-01

    This paper is devoted to the stability analysis of the plane Couette flow for the 3D compressible Navier-Stokes equations with Navier-slip boundary condition at the bottom boundary. It is shown that the plane Couette flow is asymptotically stable for small perturbation provided that the slip length, Reynolds and Mach numbers satisfy 3(1 + ν ˜) α γ2/(ν + α)γ0 ≤ 1 and 2 α ν/(ν + α) ≤ 1 for some constant γ0 > 0. In particular, the Reynolds number ν-1 can be large if the slip length α is suitably small. This means that the constraint required in [11] on the Reynolds number to guarantee the stability of the plane Couette flow can be relaxed and improved so long as the slip effect at the boundary is involved.

  4. Static aeroelastic analysis of wings using Euler/Navier-Stokes equations coupled with improved wing-box finite element structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.; MacMurdy, Dale E.; Kapania, Rakesh K.

    1994-01-01

    Strong interactions between flow about an aircraft wing and the wing structure can result in aeroelastic phenomena which significantly impact aircraft performance. Time-accurate methods for solving the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations have matured to the point where reliable results can be obtained with reasonable computational costs for complex non-linear flows with shock waves, vortices and separations. The ability to combine such a flow solver with a general finite element structural model is key to an aeroelastic analysis in these flows. Earlier work involved time-accurate integration of modal structural models based on plate elements. A finite element model was developed to handle three-dimensional wing boxes, and incorporated into the flow solver without the need for modal analysis. Static condensation is performed on the structural model to reduce the structural degrees of freedom for the aeroelastic analysis. Direct incorporation of the finite element wing-box structural model with the flow solver requires finding adequate methods for transferring aerodynamic pressures to the structural grid and returning deflections to the aerodynamic grid. Several schemes were explored for handling the grid-to-grid transfer of information. The complex, built-up nature of the wing-box complicated this transfer. Aeroelastic calculations for a sample wing in transonic flow comparing various simple transfer schemes are presented and discussed.

  5. Determining finite volume elements for the 2D Navier-Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.A. . Dept. of Mathematics); Titi, E.S. . Dept. of Mathematics Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY . Mathematical Sciences Inst.)

    1991-01-01

    We consider the 2D Navier-Stokes equations on a square with periodic boundary conditions. Dividing the square into N equal subsquares, we show that if the asymptotic behavior of the average of solutions on these subsquares (finite volume elements) is known, then the large time behavior of the solution itself is completely determined, provided N is large enough. We also establish a rigorous upper bound for N needed to determine the solutions to the Navier-Stokes equation in terms of the physical parameters of the problem. 34 refs.

  6. A New Approach to Model Order Reduction of the Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balajewicz, Maciej

    A new method of stabilizing low-order, proper orthogonal decomposition based reduced-order models of the Navier-Stokes equations is proposed. Unlike traditional approaches, this method does not rely on empirical turbulence modeling or modification of the Navier-Stokes equations. It provides spatial basis functions different from the usual proper orthogonal decomposition basis function in that, in addition to optimally representing the solution, the new proposed basis functions also provide stable reduced-order models. The proposed approach is illustrated with two test cases: two-dimensional flow inside a square lid-driven cavity and a two-dimensional mixing layer.

  7. Navier-Stokes computations of separated vortical flows past prolate spheroid at incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Tin-Chee; Kandil, Osama A.; Liu, C. H.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of steady incompressible viscous flow past prolate spheroids at incidence is formulated using the unsteady incompressible and compressible thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. The two sets of Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a pseudotime stepping of the implicit flux-difference splitting scheme on a curvilinear grid, which is generated by a transfinite grid generator. The Baldwin and Lomax (1978) algebraic eddy-viscosity model is used to model the turbulent flow. The computational applications cover a 6:1 prolate spheroid at different angles of attack and Reynolds numbers. The results are compared with experimental data.

  8. A dynamically adaptive multigrid algorithm for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations: Validation and model problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. P.; Leaf, G. K.; Vanrosendale, J.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm is described for the solution of the laminar, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The basic algorithm is a multigrid based on a robust, box-based smoothing step. Its most important feature is the incorporation of automatic, dynamic mesh refinement. This algorithm supports generalized simple domains. The program is based on a standard staggered-grid formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations for robustness and efficiency. Special grid transfer operators were introduced at grid interfaces in the multigrid algorithm to ensure discrete mass conservation. Results are presented for three models: the driven-cavity, a backward-facing step, and a sudden expansion/contraction.

  9. A stable penalty method for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. 1: Open boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesthaven, J. S.; Gottlieb, D.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present asymptotically stable open boundary conditions for the numerical approximation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in three spatial dimensions. The treatment uses the conservation form of the Navier-Stokes equations and utilizes linearization and localization at the boundaries based on these variables. The proposed boundary conditions are applied through a penalty procedure, thus ensuring correct behavior of the scheme as the Reynolds number tends to infinity. The versatility of this method is demonstrated for the problem of a compressible flow past a circular cylinder.

  10. Symmetry breaking and uniqueness for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dascaliuc, Radu; Thomann, Enrique; Waymire, Edward C.; Michalowski, Nicholas

    2015-07-15

    The present article establishes connections between the structure of the deterministic Navier-Stokes equations and the structure of (similarity) equations that govern self-similar solutions as expected values of certain naturally associated stochastic cascades. A principle result is that explosion criteria for the stochastic cascades involved in the probabilistic representations of solutions to the respective equations coincide. While the uniqueness problem itself remains unresolved, these connections provide interesting problems and possible methods for investigating symmetry breaking and the uniqueness problem for Navier-Stokes equations. In particular, new branching Markov chains, including a dilogarithmic branching random walk on the multiplicative group (0, ∞), naturally arise as a result of this investigation.

  11. Decoupling the Stationary Navier-Stokes-Darcy System with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman Interface Condition

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, Yong; Chu, Yuchuan; He, Xiaoming; ...

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a domain decomposition method for the coupled stationary Navier-Stokes and Darcy equations with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman interface condition in order to improve the efficiency of the finite element method. The physical interface conditions are directly utilized to construct the boundary conditions on the interface and then decouple the Navier-Stokes and Darcy equations. Newton iteration will be used to deal with the nonlinear systems. Numerical results are presented to illustrate the features of the proposed method.

  12. Falling paper: Navier-Stokes solutions, model of fluid forces, and center of mass elevation.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, Umberto; Wang, Z Jane

    2004-10-01

    We investigate the problem of falling paper by solving the two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations subject to the motion of a free-falling body at Reynolds numbers around 10(3). The aerodynamic lift on a tumbling plate is found to be dominated by the product of linear and angular velocities rather than velocity squared, as appropriate for an airfoil. This coupling between translation and rotation provides a mechanism for a brief elevation of center of mass near the cusplike turning points. The Navier-Stokes solutions further provide the missing quantity in the classical theory of lift, the instantaneous circulation, and suggest a revised model for the fluid forces.

  13. A nonperturbative approximation for the moderate Reynolds number Navier-Stokes equations.

    PubMed

    Roper, Marcus; Brenner, Michael P

    2009-03-03

    The nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations makes predicting the flow of fluid around rapidly moving small bodies highly resistant to all approaches save careful experiments or brute force computation. Here, we show how a linearization of the Navier-Stokes equations captures the drag-determining features of the flow and allows simplified or analytical computation of the drag on bodies up to Reynolds number of order 100. We illustrate the utility of this linearization in 2 practical problems that normally can only be tackled with sophisticated numerical methods: understanding flow separation in the flow around a bluff body and finding drag-minimizing shapes.

  14. Shape Optimization for Navier-Stokes Equations with Algebraic Turbulence Model: Existence Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bulicek, Miroslav Haslinger, Jaroslav Malek, Josef Stebel, Jan

    2009-10-15

    We study a shape optimization problem for the paper machine headbox which distributes a mixture of water and wood fibers in the paper making process. The aim is to find a shape which a priori ensures the given velocity profile on the outlet part. The mathematical formulation leads to an optimal control problem in which the control variable is the shape of the domain representing the header, the state problem is represented by a generalized stationary Navier-Stokes system with nontrivial mixed boundary conditions. In this paper we prove the existence of solutions both to the generalized Navier-Stokes system and to the shape optimization problem.

  15. Symmetry breaking and uniqueness for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations.

    PubMed

    Dascaliuc, Radu; Michalowski, Nicholas; Thomann, Enrique; Waymire, Edward C

    2015-07-01

    The present article establishes connections between the structure of the deterministic Navier-Stokes equations and the structure of (similarity) equations that govern self-similar solutions as expected values of certain naturally associated stochastic cascades. A principle result is that explosion criteria for the stochastic cascades involved in the probabilistic representations of solutions to the respective equations coincide. While the uniqueness problem itself remains unresolved, these connections provide interesting problems and possible methods for investigating symmetry breaking and the uniqueness problem for Navier-Stokes equations. In particular, new branching Markov chains, including a dilogarithmic branching random walk on the multiplicative group (0, ∞), naturally arise as a result of this investigation.

  16. Navier-Stokes computations on swept-tapered wings, including flexibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure to couple the Navier-Stokes solutions with modal structural equations of motion is presented for computing aeroelastic responses of flexible fighter wings. The Navier-Stokes flow equations are solved by a finite-difference scheme with dynamic grids. The coupled aeroelastic equations of motion are solved using the linear-acceleration method. The configuration-adaptive dynamic grids are time-accurately generated using the aeroelastically deformed shape of the wing. The coupled calculations are compared with experiments when available. Effects of flexibility and pitch rate are demonstrated for flows with vortices. Turbulent flow computations are also compared with laminar flow computations.

  17. An Exact Mapping from Navier-Stokes Equation to Schr"odinger Equation via Riccati Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christianto, Vic; Smarandache, Florentin

    2010-03-01

    In the present article we argue that it is possible to write down Schr"odinger representation of Navier-Stokes equation via Riccati equation. The proposed approach, while differs appreciably from other method such as what is proposed by R. M. Kiehn, has an advantage, i.e. it enables us extend further to quaternionic and biquaternionic version of Navier-Stokes equation, for instance via Kravchenko's and Gibbon's route. Further observation is of course recommended in order to refute or verify this proposition.

  18. First-Order System Least-Squares for the Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bochev, P.; Cai, Z.; Manteuffel, T. A.; McCormick, S. F.

    1996-01-01

    This paper develops a least-squares approach to the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variables. As with our earlier work on Stokes equations, we recast the Navier-Stokes equations as a first-order system by introducing a velocity flux variable and associated curl and trace equations. We show that the resulting system is well-posed, and that an associated least-squares principle yields optimal discretization error estimates in the H(sup 1) norm in each variable (including the velocity flux) and optimal multigrid convergence estimates for the resulting algebraic system.

  19. A Liouville Problem for the Stationary Fractional Navier-Stokes-Poisson System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Xiao, J.

    2017-06-01

    This paper deals with a Liouville problem for the stationary fractional Navier-Stokes-Poisson system whose special case k=0 covers the compressible and incompressible time-independent fractional Navier-Stokes systems in R^{N≥2} . An essential difficulty raises from the fractional Laplacian, which is a non-local operator and thus makes the local analysis unsuitable. To overcome the difficulty, we utilize a recently-introduced extension-method in Wang and Xiao (Commun Contemp Math 18(6):1650019, 2016) which develops Caffarelli-Silvestre's technique in Caffarelli and Silvestre (Commun Partial Diff Equ 32:1245-1260, 2007).

  20. On the existence and uniqueness of solution to a stochastic 2D Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachim Medjo, T.

    2017-07-01

    We study in this article a stochastic version of a coupled Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes model in a two dimensional bounded domain. The model consists of the Navier-Stokes equations for the velocity, coupled with a Cahn-Hilliard model for the order (phase) parameter. We prove the existence and the uniqueness of a variational solution.

  1. Adaptive Navier-Stokes calculations for vortical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murman, Earll M.

    1993-03-01

    Brief summaries are given of research performed in the following areas: (1) adaptive Euler equation solvers; (2) adaptation parameters for vortical flow; (3) vortex breakdown calculations; (4) calculations for the F-117A; (5) normal force hysteresis; (6) visualization of vortical flows on unstructured grids; and (7) modeling of vortex breakdown. The reference list gives reports with detailed results.

  2. Numerical Solution of Incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations Using a Fractional-Step Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan

    1999-01-01

    A fractional step method for the solution of steady and unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is outlined. The method is based on a finite volume formulation and uses the pressure in the cell center and the mass fluxes across the faces of each cell as dependent variables. Implicit treatment of convective and viscous terms in the momentum equations enables the numerical stability restrictions to be relaxed. The linearization error in the implicit solution of momentum equations is reduced by using three subiterations in order to achieve second order temporal accuracy for time-accurate calculations. In spatial discretizations of the momentum equations, a high-order (3rd and 5th) flux-difference splitting for the convective terms and a second-order central difference for the viscous terms are used. The resulting algebraic equations are solved with a line-relaxation scheme which allows the use of large time step. A four color ZEBRA scheme is employed after the line-relaxation procedure in the solution of the Poisson equation for pressure. This procedure is applied to a Couette flow problem using a distorted computational grid to show that the method minimizes grid effects. Additional benchmark cases include the unsteady laminar flow over a circular cylinder for Reynolds Numbers of 200, and a 3-D, steady, turbulent wingtip vortex wake propagation study. The solution algorithm does a very good job in resolving the vortex core when 5th-order upwind differencing and a modified production term in the Baldwin-Barth one-equation turbulence model are used with adequate grid resolution.

  3. A frequency domain linearized Navier-Stokes method including acoustic damping by eddy viscosity using RANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmberg, Andreas; Kierkegaard, Axel; Weng, Chenyang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a method for including damping of acoustic energy in regions of strong turbulence is derived for a linearized Navier-Stokes method in the frequency domain. The proposed method is validated and analyzed in 2D only, although the formulation is fully presented in 3D. The result is applied in a study of the linear interaction between the acoustic and the hydrodynamic field in a 2D T-junction, subject to grazing flow at Mach 0.1. Part of the acoustic energy at the upstream edge of the junction is shed as harmonically oscillating disturbances, which are conveyed across the shear layer over the junction, where they interact with the acoustic field. As the acoustic waves travel in regions of strong shear, there is a need to include the interaction between the background turbulence and the acoustic field. For this purpose, the oscillation of the background turbulence Reynold's stress, due to the acoustic field, is modeled using an eddy Newtonian model assumption. The time averaged flow is first solved for using RANS along with a k-ε turbulence model. The spatially varying turbulent eddy viscosity is then added to the spatially invariant kinematic viscosity in the acoustic set of equations. The response of the 2D T-junction to an incident acoustic field is analyzed via a plane wave scattering matrix model, and the result is compared to experimental data for a T-junction of rectangular ducts. A strong improvement in the agreement between calculation and experimental data is found when the modification proposed in this paper is implemented. Discrepancies remaining are likely due to inaccuracies in the selected turbulence model, which is known to produce large errors e.g. for flows with significant rotation, which the grazing flow across the T-junction certainly is. A natural next step is therefore to test the proposed methodology together with more sophisticated turbulence models.

  4. New developments in the method of space-time conservation element and solution element: Applications to the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung

    1993-01-01

    A new numerical framework for solving conservation laws is being developed. This new approach differs substantially in both concept and methodology from the well-established methods--i.e., finite difference, finite volume, finite element, and spectral methods. It is conceptually simple and designed to avoid several key limitations to the above traditional methods. An explicit model scheme for solving a simple 1-D unsteady convection-diffusion equation is constructed and used to illuminate major differences between the current method and those mentioned above. Unexpectedly, its amplification factors for the pure convection and pure diffusion cases are identical to those of the Leapfrog and the DuFort-Frankel schemes, respectively. Also, this explicit scheme and its Navier-Stokes extension have the unusual property that their stabilities are limited only by the CFL condition. Moreover, despite the fact that it does not use any flux-limiter or slope-limiter, the Navier-Stokes solver is capable of generating highly accurate shock tube solutions with shock discontinuities being resolved within one mesh interval. An accurate Euler solver also is constructed through another extension. It has many unusual properties, e.g., numerical diffusion at all mesh points can be controlled by a set of local parameters.

  5. Large-scale 3-D EM modelling with a Block Low-Rank multifrontal direct solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shantsev, Daniil V.; Jaysaval, Piyoosh; de la Kethulle de Ryhove, Sébastien; Amestoy, Patrick R.; Buttari, Alfredo; L'Excellent, Jean-Yves; Mary, Theo

    2017-06-01

    We put forward the idea of using a Block Low-Rank (BLR) multifrontal direct solver to efficiently solve the linear systems of equations arising from a finite-difference discretization of the frequency-domain Maxwell equations for 3-D electromagnetic (EM) problems. The solver uses a low-rank representation for the off-diagonal blocks of the intermediate dense matrices arising in the multifrontal method to reduce the computational load. A numerical threshold, the so-called BLR threshold, controlling the accuracy of low-rank representations was optimized by balancing errors in the computed EM fields against savings in floating point operations (flops). Simulations were carried out over large-scale 3-D resistivity models representing typical scenarios for marine controlled-source EM surveys, and in particular the SEG SEAM model which contains an irregular salt body. The flop count, size of factor matrices and elapsed run time for matrix factorization are reduced dramatically by using BLR representations and can go down to, respectively, 10, 30 and 40 per cent of their full-rank values for our largest system with N = 20.6 million unknowns. The reductions are almost independent of the number of MPI tasks and threads at least up to 90 × 10 = 900 cores. The BLR savings increase for larger systems, which reduces the factorization flop complexity from O(N2) for the full-rank solver to O(Nm) with m = 1.4-1.6. The BLR savings are significantly larger for deep-water environments that exclude the highly resistive air layer from the computational domain. A study in a scenario where simulations are required at multiple source locations shows that the BLR solver can become competitive in comparison to iterative solvers as an engine for 3-D controlled-source electromagnetic Gauss-Newton inversion that requires forward modelling for a few thousand right-hand sides.

  6. Large-scale 3D EM modeling with a Block Low-Rank multifrontal direct solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shantsev, Daniil V.; Jaysaval, Piyoosh; de la Kethulle de Ryhove, Sébastien; Amestoy, Patrick R.; Buttari, Alfredo; L'Excellent, Jean-Yves; Mary, Theo

    2017-03-01

    We put forward the idea of using a Block Low-Rank (BLR) multifrontal direct solver to efficiently solve the linear systems of equations arising from a finite-difference discretization of the frequency-domain Maxwell equations for 3D electromagnetic (EM) problems. The solver uses a low-rank representation for the off-diagonal blocks of the intermediate dense matrices arising in the multifrontal method to reduce the computational load. A numerical threshold, the so called BLR threshold, controlling the accuracy of low-rank representations was optimized by balancing errors in the computed EM fields against savings in floating point operations (flops). Simulations were carried out over large-scale 3D resistivity models representing typical scenarios for marine controlled-source EM surveys, and in particular the SEG SEAM model which contains an irregular salt body. The flop count, size of factor matrices and elapsed run time for matrix factorization are reduced dramatically by using BLR representations and can go down to, respectively, 10%, 30% and 40% of their full rank values for our largest system with N = 20.6 million unknowns. The reductions are almost independent of the number of MPI tasks and threads at least up to 90 × 10 = 900 cores. The BLR savings increase for larger systems, which reduces the factorization flop complexity from O( {{N^2}} ) for the full-rank solver to O( {{N^m}} ) with m = 1.4 - 1.6 . The BLR savings are significantly larger for deep-water environments that exclude the highly resistive air layer from the computational domain. A study in a scenario where simulations are required at multiple source locations shows that the BLR solver can become competitive in comparison to iterative solvers as an engine for 3D CSEM Gauss-Newton inversion that requires forward modelling for a few thousand right-hand sides.

  7. Numerical Experiments in Unsteady Flows Through the Use of Full Navier- Stokes Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Murashige , Hinatsu and Kinoshita (1989) have used a similar method to analyze three cases (K = 5, 7, and 10) at higher Reynolds numbers around 104. The flow... Murashige , S., Hinatsu, M., and Kinoshita, T., 1989, "Direct Calculations of the Navier-Stokes Equations for Forces Acting on a Cylinder in Oscillatory

  8. Relativistic Navier-Stokes equations in the Meixner-Prigogine scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval-Villalbazo, Alfredo; García-Colín, L. S.

    1997-02-01

    Viscous effects are included in the relativistic Meixner-Prigogine scheme (see: A. Sandoval-Villalbazo, L.S. García-Colín, Physica A 234 (1996) 358). A relativistic generalization of the Navier-Stokes equations is obtained within this framework. The system obtained is analyzed and compared with related work.

  9. Weak-strong uniqueness for the isothermal Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lei; Cui, Haibo

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with weak-strong uniqueness results for the isothermal Navier-Stokes equations in two space dimension. Using the methods of relative entropy, we obtain some conditions on a weak solution, such as the ones built up by Plotnikov and Weigant [SIAM J. Math. Anal. 47, 626-653 (2015)], so that it is unique.

  10. A Reconstructed Discontinuous Galerkin Method for the Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations on Arbitrary Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Luo; Luqing Luo; Robert Nourgaliev; Vincent A. Mousseau

    2010-01-01

    A reconstruction-based discontinuous Galerkin (RDG) method is presented for the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on arbitrary grids. The RDG method, originally developed for the compressible Euler equations, is extended to discretize viscous and heat fluxes in the Navier-Stokes equations using a so-called inter-cell reconstruction, where a smooth solution is locally reconstructed using a least-squares method from the underlying discontinuous DG solution. Similar to the recovery-based DG (rDG) methods, this reconstructed DG method eliminates the introduction of ad hoc penalty or coupling terms commonly found in traditional DG methods. Unlike rDG methods, this RDG method does not need to judiciously choose a proper form of a recovered polynomial, thus is simple, flexible, and robust, and can be used on arbitrary grids. The developed RDG method is used to compute a variety of flow problems on arbitrary meshes to demonstrate its accuracy, efficiency, robustness, and versatility. The numerical results indicate that this RDG method is able to deliver the same accuracy as the well-known Bassi-Rebay II scheme, at a half of its computing costs for the discretization of the viscous fluxes in the Navier-Stokes equations, clearly demonstrating its superior performance over the existing DG methods for solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  11. Implementation of multigrid methods for solving Navier-Stokes equations on a multiprocessor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Vijay K.; Taasan, Shlomo

    1987-01-01

    Presented are schemes for implementing multigrid algorithms on message based MIMD multiprocessor systems. To address the various issues involved, a nontrivial problem of solving the 2-D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is considered as the model problem. Three different multigrid algorithms are considered. Results from implementing these algorithms on an Intel iPSC are presented.

  12. An implicit flux-split algorithm for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, James L.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Walters, Robert W.; Van Leer, Bram

    1987-01-01

    An implicit upwind scheme for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is described and applied to the internal flow in a dual-throat nozzle. The method is second-order accurate spatially and naturally dissipative. A spatially-split approximate factorization method is used to obtain efficient steady-state solutions on the NASA Langley VPS-32 (CYBER 205) supercomputer.

  13. Splitting methods for low Mach number Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abarbanel, Saul; Dutt, Pravir; Gottlieb, David

    1987-01-01

    Examined are some splitting techniques for low Mach number Euler flows. Shortcomings of some of the proposed methods are pointed out and an explanation for their inadequacy suggested. A symmetric splitting for both the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations is then presented which removes the stiffness of these equations when the Mach number is small. The splitting is shown to be stable.

  14. Properties of the Residual Stress of the Temporally Filtered Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. D.; Gatski, T. B.; Grosch, C. E.; Thacker, W. D.

    2002-01-01

    The development of a unifying framework among direct numerical simulations, large-eddy simulations, and statistically averaged formulations of the Navier-Stokes equations, is of current interest. Toward that goal, the properties of the residual (subgrid-scale) stress of the temporally filtered Navier-Stokes equations are carefully examined. Causal time-domain filters, parameterized by a temporal filter width 0 less than Delta less than infinity, are considered. For several reasons, the differential forms of such filters are preferred to their corresponding integral forms; among these, storage requirements for differential forms are typically much less than for integral forms and, for some filters, are independent of Delta. The behavior of the residual stress in the limits of both vanishing and in infinite filter widths is examined. It is shown analytically that, in the limit Delta to 0, the residual stress vanishes, in which case the Navier-Stokes equations are recovered from the temporally filtered equations. Alternately, in the limit Delta to infinity, the residual stress is equivalent to the long-time averaged stress, and the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are recovered from the temporally filtered equations. The predicted behavior at the asymptotic limits of filter width is further validated by numerical simulations of the temporally filtered forced, viscous Burger's equation. Finally, finite filter widths are also considered, and a priori analyses of temporal similarity and temporal approximate deconvolution models of the residual stress are conducted.

  15. Numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for unsteady separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankey, W. L.

    By use of the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations, simplifying assumptions are no longer necessary to investigate many classes of unsteady separated flows. The projected advancement of computer capability over the next few years renders questionable the wisdom of supporting basic research on short-cut approximate methods for analyzing unsteady separated flows.

  16. Group-theoretical model of developed turbulence and renormalization of the Navier-Stokes equation.

    PubMed

    Saveliev, V L; Gorokhovski, M A

    2005-07-01

    On the basis of the Euler equation and its symmetry properties, this paper proposes a model of stationary homogeneous developed turbulence. A regularized averaging formula for the product of two fields is obtained. An equation for the averaged turbulent velocity field is derived from the Navier-Stokes equation by renormalization-group transformation.

  17. Entropy density of spacetime and the Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics of null surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, T.

    2011-02-15

    It has been known for several decades that Einstein's field equations, when projected onto a null surface, exhibit a structure very similar to the nonrelativistic Navier-Stokes equation. I show that this result arises quite naturally when gravitational dynamics is viewed as an emergent phenomenon. Extremizing the spacetime entropy density associated with the null surfaces leads to a set of equations which, when viewed in the local inertial frame, becomes identical to the Navier-Stokes equation. This is in contrast to the usual description of the Damour-Navier-Stokes equation in a general coordinate system, in which there appears a Lie derivative rather than a convective derivative. I discuss this difference, its importance, and why it is more appropriate to view the equation in a local inertial frame. The viscous force on fluid, arising from the gradient of the viscous stress-tensor, involves the second derivatives of the metric and does not vanish in the local inertial frame, while the viscous stress-tensor itself vanishes so that inertial observers detect no dissipation. We thus provide an entropy extremization principle that leads to the Damour-Navier-Stokes equation, which makes the hydrodynamical analogy with gravity completely natural and obvious. Several implications of these results are discussed.

  18. High Re Separated Flow Solutions Using the Navier-Stokes and Approximate Equations,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    flow field. In the present study the incremental block-line Gauss- Seidel method proposed in Ref. 17 is used as an efficient numerical tool for solving...Incremental Block-Line-Gauss- Seidel Method for the Navier-Stokes Equations", AIAA Paper 85-0033. 18. Beam, R. M. and Warming, R. F., "An Implicit Factored

  19. A Navier-Stokes Solution for Transonic Flow through a Cascade.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    McDonald (Ref. 13). 25. Thompson , J . F ., F. C. Thames and C. W. Mastin: Boundary Fitted Curvi- linear Coordinate Systems for Solution of Partial...Navier-Stokes Equations with Application to Shock Boundary Layer Inter- actions. AIAA Paper 75-1, 1975. 25. Thompson , J . F ., F. C. Thames and C. W

  20. On spectral multigrid methods for the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, T. A.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1985-01-01

    A splitting scheme is proposed for the numerical solution of the time-dependent, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations by spectral methods. A staggered grid is used for the pressure, improved intermediate boundary conditions are employed in the split step for the velocity, and spectral multigrid techniques are used for the solution of the implicit equations.