Science.gov

Sample records for 3d null points

  1. Observation of a 3D Magnetic Null Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Falco, M.; Guglielmino, S. L.; Murabito, M.

    2017-03-01

    We describe high-resolution observations of a GOES B-class flare characterized by a circular ribbon at the chromospheric level, corresponding to the network at the photospheric level. We interpret the flare as a consequence of a magnetic reconnection event that occurred at a three-dimensional (3D) coronal null point located above the supergranular cell. The potential field extrapolation of the photospheric magnetic field indicates that the circular chromospheric ribbon is cospatial with the fan footpoints, while the ribbons of the inner and outer spines look like compact kernels. We found new interesting observational aspects that need to be explained by models: (1) a loop corresponding to the outer spine became brighter a few minutes before the onset of the flare; (2) the circular ribbon was formed by several adjacent compact kernels characterized by a size of 1″–2″ (3) the kernels with a stronger intensity emission were located at the outer footpoint of the darker filaments, departing radially from the center of the supergranular cell; (4) these kernels started to brighten sequentially in clockwise direction; and (5) the site of the 3D null point and the shape of the outer spine were detected by RHESSI in the low-energy channel between 6.0 and 12.0 keV. Taking into account all these features and the length scales of the magnetic systems involved in the event, we argue that the low intensity of the flare may be ascribed to the low amount of magnetic flux and to its symmetric configuration.

  2. Steady state reconnection at a single 3D magnetic null point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galsgaard, K.; Pontin, D. I.

    2011-05-01

    Aims: We systematically stress a rotationally symmetric 3D magnetic null point by advecting the opposite footpoints of the spine axis in opposite directions. This stress eventually concentrates in the vicinity of the null point, thereby forming a local current sheet through which magnetic reconnection takes place. The aim is to look for a steady state evolution of the current sheet dynamics, which may provide scaling relations for various characteristic parameters of the system. Methods: The evolution is followed by solving numerically the non-ideal MHD equations in a Cartesian domain. The null point is embedded in an initially constant density and temperature plasma. Results: It is shown that a quasi-steady reconnection process can be set up at a 3D null by continuous shear driving. It appears that a true steady state is unlikely to be realised because the current layer tends to grow until it is restricted by the geometry of the computational domain and the imposed driving profile. However, ratios between characteristic quantities clearly settle after some time to stable values, so that the evolution is quasi-steady. The experiments show a number of scaling relations, but they do not provide a clear consensus for extending to lower magnetic resistivity or faster driving velocities. More investigations are needed to fully clarify the properties of current sheets at magnetic null points.

  3. 3D MHD Coronal Oscillations about a Magnetic Null Point: Application of WKB Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, J. A.; Ferguson, J. S. L.; Hood, A. W.

    2008-09-01

    This paper is a demonstration of how the WKB approximation can be used to help solve the linearised 3D MHD equations. Using Charpit’s method and a Runge Kutta numerical scheme, we have demonstrated this technique for a potential 3D magnetic null point, B=[ x, ɛ y,-( ɛ+1) z]. Under our cold-plasma assumption, we have considered two types of wave propagation: fast magnetoacoustic and Alfvén waves. We find that the fast magnetoacoustic wave experiences refraction towards the magnetic null point and that the effect of this refraction depends upon the Alfvén speed profile. The wave and thus the wave energy accumulate at the null point. We have found that current buildup is exponential and the exponent is dependent upon ɛ. Thus, for the fast wave there is preferential heating at the null point. For the Alfvén wave, we find that the wave propagates along the field lines. For an Alfvén wave generated along the fan plane, the wave accumulates along the spine. For an Alfvén wave generated across the spine, the value of ɛ determines where the wave accumulation will occur: fan plane ( ɛ=1), along the x-axis (0< ɛ<1) or along the y-axis ( ɛ>1). We have shown analytically that currents build up exponentially, leading to preferential heating in these areas. The work described here highlights the importance of understanding the magnetic topology of the coronal magnetic field for the location of wave heating.

  4. Non-linear tearing of 3D null point current sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Wyper, P. F. Pontin, D. I.

    2014-08-15

    The manner in which the rate of magnetic reconnection scales with the Lundquist number in realistic three-dimensional (3D) geometries is still an unsolved problem. It has been demonstrated that in 2D rapid non-linear tearing allows the reconnection rate to become almost independent of the Lundquist number (the “plasmoid instability”). Here, we present the first study of an analogous instability in a fully 3D geometry, defined by a magnetic null point. The 3D null current layer is found to be susceptible to an analogous instability but is marginally more stable than an equivalent 2D Sweet-Parker-like layer. Tearing of the sheet creates a thin boundary layer around the separatrix surface, contained within a flux envelope with a hyperbolic structure that mimics a spine-fan topology. Efficient mixing of flux between the two topological domains occurs as the flux rope structures created during the tearing process evolve within this envelope. This leads to a substantial increase in the rate of reconnection between the two domains.

  5. Observation of Magnetic Reconnection at a 3D Null Point Associated with a Solar Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. Q.; Zhang, J.; Yang, K.; Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic null has long been recognized as a special structure serving as a preferential site for magnetic reconnection (MR). However, the direct observational study of MR at null-points is largely lacking. Here, we show the observations of MR around a magnetic null associated with an eruption that resulted in an M1.7 flare and a coronal mass ejection. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites X-ray profile of the flare exhibited two peaks at ∼02:23 UT and ∼02:40 UT on 2012 November 8, respectively. Based on the imaging observations, we find that the first and also primary X-ray peak was originated from MR in the current sheet (CS) underneath the erupting magnetic flux rope (MFR). On the other hand, the second and also weaker X-ray peak was caused by MR around a null point located above the pre-eruption MFR. The interaction of the null point and the erupting MFR can be described as a two-step process. During the first step, the erupting and fast expanding MFR passed through the null point, resulting in a significant displacement of the magnetic field surrounding the null. During the second step, the displaced magnetic field started to move back, resulting in a converging inflow and subsequently the MR around the null. The null-point reconnection is a different process from the current sheet reconnection in this flare; the latter is the cause of the main peak of the flare, while the former is the cause of the secondary peak of the flare and the conspicuous high-lying cusp structure.

  6. General principles of describing second- and higher-order null points of a potential magnetic field in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukashenko, A. T.; Veselovsky, I. S.

    2015-12-01

    General principles of describing secondand higher-order null points of a potential magnetic field are formulated. The potential near a second-order null of the general form can be specified by a linear combination of four basic functions, the list of which is presented. Near secondand higher-order null points, field line equations often cannot be integrated analytically; however, in some cases, it is possible to present a qualitative description of the geometry of null vicinities with consideration of the behavior of field lines near rays outgoing from null, at which the field is radial or equals zero.

  7. Dynamic topology and flux rope evolution during non-linear tearing of 3D null point current sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Wyper, P. F. Pontin, D. I.

    2014-10-15

    In this work, the dynamic magnetic field within a tearing-unstable three-dimensional current sheet about a magnetic null point is described in detail. We focus on the evolution of the magnetic null points and flux ropes that are formed during the tearing process. Generally, we find that both magnetic structures are created prolifically within the layer and are non-trivially related. We examine how nulls are created and annihilated during bifurcation processes, and describe how they evolve within the current layer. The type of null bifurcation first observed is associated with the formation of pairs of flux ropes within the current layer. We also find that new nulls form within these flux ropes, both following internal reconnection and as adjacent flux ropes interact. The flux ropes exhibit a complex evolution, driven by a combination of ideal kinking and their interaction with the outflow jets from the main layer. The finite size of the unstable layer also allows us to consider the wider effects of flux rope generation. We find that the unstable current layer acts as a source of torsional magnetohydrodynamic waves and dynamic braiding of magnetic fields. The implications of these results to several areas of heliophysics are discussed.

  8. Evidence of 3-D Reconnection at Null Point from the Observations of Circular Flares and Homologous Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haimin; Liu, C.

    2012-05-01

    In recent studies by Pariat, Antiochos and DeVore (2009, 2010), fan-separatrix topology and magnetic reconnection at the null-point were simulated and found to produce homologous jets. This motivates us to search for axisymmetric magnetic structure and associated flaring/jetting activity. Using high-resolution ( 0.15" per pixel) and high-cadence ( 15 s) H-alpha center/offband observations obtained from the recently digitized films of Big Bear Solar Observatory, we were able to identify five large circular flares with associated surges. All the events exhibit a central parasite magnetic field surrounded by opposite polarity, forming a circular polarity inversion line (PIL). Consequently, a compact flare kernel at the center is surrounded by a circular ribbon, and together with the upward ejecting dark surge, these seem to depict a dome-like magnetic structure. Very interestingly, (1) the circular ribbon brightens sequentially rather than simultaneously, (2) the central compact flare kernel shows obvious motion, and (3) a remote elongated, co-temporal flare ribbon at a region with the same polarity as the central parasite site is seen in the series of four homologous events on 1991 March 17 and 18. The remote ribbon is 120" away from the jet location. Moreover, magnetic reconnection across the circular PIL is evident from the magnetic flux cancellation. These rarely observed homologous surges with circular as well as central and remote flare ribbons provide valuable evidence concerning the dynamics of magnetic reconnection in a null-point topology. This study is dedicated to Professor Hal Zirin, the founder of Big Bear Solar Observatory, who passed away on January 3, 2012.

  9. Observation of 3-D magnetic null points in the diffusion region at the dayside Magnetopause Boundary and High latitude Cusp region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shiyou

    Magnetic reconnection is a process through which magnetic energy can be converted into kinetic and thermal energy of plasma which is responsible for many dynamic phenomena throughout the universe. Identifying the structure around the point at which the magnetic field lines break and subsequently reform, known as the magnetic null point, is crucial to improving our understanding of reconnection. Here we report the first observation of multiple magnetic nulls structures at the dayside magnetopause boundary and the high latitude cusp region. The topological and dynamic properties of the nulls are revealed by the high-resolution data of the fields, particles and waves. The observation is compared with the recent OpenCCGM simulation results.

  10. NULL Convention Floating Point Multiplier

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation. PMID:25879069

  11. NULL convention floating point multiplier.

    PubMed

    Albert, Anitha Juliette; Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation.

  12. NIF Ignition Target 3D Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O; Marinak, M; Milovich, J; Callahan, D

    2008-11-05

    We have developed an input file for running 3D NIF hohlraums that is optimized such that it can be run in 1-2 days on parallel computers. We have incorporated increasing levels of automation into the 3D input file: (1) Configuration controlled input files; (2) Common file for 2D and 3D, different types of capsules (symcap, etc.); and (3) Can obtain target dimensions, laser pulse, and diagnostics settings automatically from NIF Campaign Management Tool. Using 3D Hydra calculations to investigate different problems: (1) Intrinsic 3D asymmetry; (2) Tolerance to nonideal 3D effects (e.g. laser power balance, pointing errors); and (3) Synthetic diagnostics.

  13. Magnetic Null Points in Kinetic Simulations of Space Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind, and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral nulls are more likely created in space plasmas: in all our simulations except lunar magnetic anomaly (LMA) and quadrupolar mini-magnetosphere the number of spiral nulls prevails over the number of radial nulls by a factor of 3-9. We show that often magnetic nulls do not indicate the regions of intensive energy dissipation. Energy dissipation events caused by topological bifurcations at radial nulls are rather rare and short-lived. The so-called X-lines formed by the radial nulls in the Harris current sheet and LMA simulations are rather stable and do not exhibit any energy dissipation. Energy dissipation is more powerful in the vicinity of spiral nulls enclosed by magnetic flux ropes with strong currents at their axes (their cross sections resemble 2D magnetic islands). These null lines reminiscent of Z-pinches efficiently dissipate magnetic energy due to secondary instabilities such as the two-stream or kinking instability, accompanied by changes in magnetic topology. Current enhancements accompanied by spiral nulls may signal magnetic energy conversion sites in the observational data.

  14. MAGNETIC NULL POINTS IN KINETIC SIMULATIONS OF SPACE PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni; Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind, and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral nulls are more likely created in space plasmas: in all our simulations except lunar magnetic anomaly (LMA) and quadrupolar mini-magnetosphere the number of spiral nulls prevails over the number of radial nulls by a factor of 3–9. We show that often magnetic nulls do not indicate the regions of intensive energy dissipation. Energy dissipation events caused by topological bifurcations at radial nulls are rather rare and short-lived. The so-called X-lines formed by the radial nulls in the Harris current sheet and LMA simulations are rather stable and do not exhibit any energy dissipation. Energy dissipation is more powerful in the vicinity of spiral nulls enclosed by magnetic flux ropes with strong currents at their axes (their cross sections resemble 2D magnetic islands). These null lines reminiscent of Z-pinches efficiently dissipate magnetic energy due to secondary instabilities such as the two-stream or kinking instability, accompanied by changes in magnetic topology. Current enhancements accompanied by spiral nulls may signal magnetic energy conversion sites in the observational data.

  15. Can 3D Point Clouds Replace GCPs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavropoulou, G.; Tzovla, G.; Georgopoulos, A.

    2014-05-01

    Over the past decade, large-scale photogrammetric products have been extensively used for the geometric documentation of cultural heritage monuments, as they combine metric information with the qualities of an image document. Additionally, the rising technology of terrestrial laser scanning has enabled the easier and faster production of accurate digital surface models (DSM), which have in turn contributed to the documentation of heavily textured monuments. However, due to the required accuracy of control points, the photogrammetric methods are always applied in combination with surveying measurements and hence are dependent on them. Along this line of thought, this paper explores the possibility of limiting the surveying measurements and the field work necessary for the production of large-scale photogrammetric products and proposes an alternative method on the basis of which the necessary control points instead of being measured with surveying procedures are chosen from a dense and accurate point cloud. Using this point cloud also as a surface model, the only field work necessary is the scanning of the object and image acquisition, which need not be subject to strict planning. To evaluate the proposed method an algorithm and the complementary interface were produced that allow the parallel manipulation of 3D point clouds and images and through which single image procedures take place. The paper concludes by presenting the results of a case study in the ancient temple of Hephaestus in Athens and by providing a set of guidelines for implementing effectively the method.

  16. 3D scene reconstruction based on 3D laser point cloud combining UAV images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huiyun; Yan, Yangyang; Zhang, Xitong; Wu, Zhenzhen

    2016-03-01

    It is a big challenge capturing and modeling 3D information of the built environment. A number of techniques and technologies are now in use. These include GPS, and photogrammetric application and also remote sensing applications. The experiment uses multi-source data fusion technology for 3D scene reconstruction based on the principle of 3D laser scanning technology, which uses the laser point cloud data as the basis and Digital Ortho-photo Map as an auxiliary, uses 3DsMAX software as a basic tool for building three-dimensional scene reconstruction. The article includes data acquisition, data preprocessing, 3D scene construction. The results show that the 3D scene has better truthfulness, and the accuracy of the scene meet the need of 3D scene construction.

  17. Alignment of continuous video onto 3D point clouds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenyi; Nister, David; Hsu, Steve

    2005-08-01

    We propose a general framework for aligning continuous (oblique) video onto 3D sensor data. We align a point cloud computed from the video onto the point cloud directly obtained from a 3D sensor. This is in contrast to existing techniques where the 2D images are aligned to a 3D model derived from the 3D sensor data. Using point clouds enables the alignment for scenes full of objects that are difficult to model; for example, trees. To compute 3D point clouds from video, motion stereo is used along with a state-of-the-art algorithm for camera pose estimation. Our experiments with real data demonstrate the advantages of the proposed registration algorithm for texturing models in large-scale semiurban environments. The capability to align video before a 3D model is built from the 3D sensor data offers new practical opportunities for 3D modeling. We introduce a novel modeling-through-registration approach that fuses 3D information from both the 3D sensor and the video. Initial experiments with real data illustrate the potential of the proposed approach.

  18. Waves in 3D Magnetic Nulls: some preliminary results in the PPT device and in situ Measurements in the Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chijie; Yang, Xiaoyi; Chen, Yangao; Chen, Yihang; Wang, Xiaogang

    2015-11-01

    Plasma waves and the particle dynamics in the magnetic null are very important to understand the three-dimensional (3D) magnetic reconnection process. A small plasma device, which named PPT device (abbreviated form of PKU Plasma Test device), has setup recently to study the waves and particle dynamics around a magnetic null. Here we will report the first preliminary results, such as the waves along the spines and the fan surfaces, as well as the particle dynamics around it. Furthermore, some wave modes around 3D nulls detected by Cluster mission in the magnetosphere will also be reported to compare. These preliminary results will give more clues to understanding of the magnetic nulls and 3D magnetic reconnection.

  19. Point Cloud Visualization in AN Open Source 3d Globe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Calle, M.; Gómez-Deck, D.; Koehler, O.; Pulido, F.

    2011-09-01

    During the last years the usage of 3D applications in GIS is becoming more popular. Since the appearance of Google Earth, users are familiarized with 3D environments. On the other hand, nowadays computers with 3D acceleration are common, broadband access is widespread and the public information that can be used in GIS clients that are able to use data from the Internet is constantly increasing. There are currently several libraries suitable for this kind of applications. Based on these facts, and using libraries that are already developed and connected to our own developments, we are working on the implementation of a real 3D GIS with analysis capabilities. Since a 3D GIS such as this can be very interesting for tasks like LiDAR or Laser Scanner point clouds rendering and analysis, special attention is given to get an optimal handling of very large data sets. Glob3 will be a multidimensional GIS in which 3D point clouds could be explored and analysed, even if they are consist of several million points.The latest addition to our visualization libraries is the development of a points cloud server that works regardless of the cloud's size. The server receives and processes petitions from a 3d client (for example glob3, but could be any other, such as one based on WebGL) and delivers the data in the form of pre-processed tiles, depending on the required level of detail.

  20. a Fast Method for Measuring the Similarity Between 3d Model and 3d Point Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongliang; Li, Jonathan; Li, Xin; Lin, Yangbin; Zhang, Shanxin; Wang, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a fast method for measuring the partial Similarity between 3D Model and 3D point Cloud (SimMC). It is crucial to measure SimMC for many point cloud-related applications such as 3D object retrieval and inverse procedural modelling. In our proposed method, the surface area of model and the Distance from Model to point Cloud (DistMC) are exploited as measurements to calculate SimMC. Here, DistMC is defined as the weighted distance of the distances between points sampled from model and point cloud. Similarly, Distance from point Cloud to Model (DistCM) is defined as the average distance of the distances between points in point cloud and model. In order to reduce huge computational burdens brought by calculation of DistCM in some traditional methods, we define SimMC as the ratio of weighted surface area of model to DistMC. Compared to those traditional SimMC measuring methods that are only able to measure global similarity, our method is capable of measuring partial similarity by employing distance-weighted strategy. Moreover, our method is able to be faster than other partial similarity assessment methods. We demonstrate the superiority of our method both on synthetic data and laser scanning data.

  1. The Feasibility of 3d Point Cloud Generation from Smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsubaie, N.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a new technique for increasing the accuracy of direct geo-referenced image-based 3D point cloud generated from low-cost sensors in smartphones. The smartphone's motion sensors are used to directly acquire the Exterior Orientation Parameters (EOPs) of the captured images. These EOPs, along with the Interior Orientation Parameters (IOPs) of the camera/ phone, are used to reconstruct the image-based 3D point cloud. However, because smartphone motion sensors suffer from poor GPS accuracy, accumulated drift and high signal noise, inaccurate 3D mapping solutions often result. Therefore, horizontal and vertical linear features, visible in each image, are extracted and used as constraints in the bundle adjustment procedure. These constraints correct the relative position and orientation of the 3D mapping solution. Once the enhanced EOPs are estimated, the semi-global matching algorithm (SGM) is used to generate the image-based dense 3D point cloud. Statistical analysis and assessment are implemented herein, in order to demonstrate the feasibility of 3D point cloud generation from the consumer-grade sensors in smartphones.

  2. 3D Building Reconstruction Using Dense Photogrammetric Point Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malihi, S.; Valadan Zoej, M. J.; Hahn, M.; Mokhtarzade, M.; Arefi, H.

    2016-06-01

    Three dimensional models of urban areas play an important role in city planning, disaster management, city navigation and other applications. Reconstruction of 3D building models is still a challenging issue in 3D city modelling. Point clouds generated from multi view images of UAV is a novel source of spatial data, which is used in this research for building reconstruction. The process starts with the segmentation of point clouds of roofs and walls into planar groups. By generating related surfaces and using geometrical constraints plus considering symmetry, a 3d model of building is reconstructed. In a refinement step, dormers are extracted, and their models are reconstructed. The details of the 3d reconstructed model are in LoD3 level, with respect to modelling eaves, fractions of roof and dormers.

  3. Automatic 3-D Point Cloud Classification of Urban Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    paper, we address the problem of automated interpretation of 3-D point clouds from scenes of urban and natural environments; our analysis is...over 10 km of traverse. We implemented three geometric features com- monly used in spectral analysis of point clouds . We de- fine λ2 ≥ λ1 ≥ λ0 to be

  4. Uniform grid upsampling of 3D lidar point cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurram, Prudhvi; Hu, Shuowen; Chan, Alex

    2013-03-01

    Airborne laser scanning light detection and ranging (LiDAR) systems are used for remote sensing topology and bathymetry. The most common data collection technique used in LiDAR systems employs a linear mode scanning. The resulting scanning data form a non-uniformly sampled 3D point cloud. To interpret and further process the 3D point cloud data, these raw data are usually converted to digital elevation models (DEMs). In order to obtain DEMs in a uniform and upsampled raster format, the elevation information from the available non-uniform 3D point cloud data are mapped onto the uniform grid points. After the mapping is done, the grid points with missing elevation information are lled by using interpolation techniques. In this paper, partial di erential equations (PDE) based approach is proposed to perform the interpolation and to upsample the 3D point cloud onto a uniform grid. Due to the desirable e ects of using higher order PDEs, smoothness is maintained over homogeneous regions, while sharp edge information in the scene well preserved. The proposed algorithm reduces the draping e ects near the edges of distinctive objects in the scene. Such annoying draping e ects are commonly associated with existing point cloud rendering algorithms. Simulation results are presented in this paper to illustrate the advantages of the proposed algorithm.

  5. Mirror Identification and Correction of 3d Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käshammer, P.-F.; Nüchter, A.

    2015-02-01

    In terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), the surface geometry of objects is scanned by laser beams and recorded digitally. This produces a discrete set of scan points, commonly referred to as a point cloud. The coordinates of the scan points are determined by measuring the angles and the time-of-flight relative to the origin (scanner position). However, if it comes to mirror surfaces laser beams are fully reflected, due to the high reflectivity. Mirrors do not appear in the point cloud at all. Instead, for every reflected beam, a incorrect scan point is created behind the actual mirror plane. Consequently, problems arise in multiple derived application fields such as 3D virtual reconstruction of complex architectures. The paper presents a new approach to automatically detect framed rectangular mirrors with known dimensions and to correct the 3D point cloud, using the calculated mirror plane.

  6. Automated Identification of Fiducial Points on 3D Torso Images

    PubMed Central

    Kawale, Manas M; Reece, Gregory P; Crosby, Melissa A; Beahm, Elisabeth K; Fingeret, Michelle C; Markey, Mia K; Merchant, Fatima A

    2013-01-01

    Breast reconstruction is an important part of the breast cancer treatment process for many women. Recently, 2D and 3D images have been used by plastic surgeons for evaluating surgical outcomes. Distances between different fiducial points are frequently used as quantitative measures for characterizing breast morphology. Fiducial points can be directly marked on subjects for direct anthropometry, or can be manually marked on images. This paper introduces novel algorithms to automate the identification of fiducial points in 3D images. Automating the process will make measurements of breast morphology more reliable, reducing the inter- and intra-observer bias. Algorithms to identify three fiducial points, the nipples, sternal notch, and umbilicus, are described. The algorithms used for localization of these fiducial points are formulated using a combination of surface curvature and 2D color information. Comparison of the 3D co-ordinates of automatically detected fiducial points and those identified manually, and geodesic distances between the fiducial points are used to validate algorithm performance. The algorithms reliably identified the location of all three of the fiducial points. We dedicate this article to our late colleague and friend, Dr. Elisabeth K. Beahm. Elisabeth was both a talented plastic surgeon and physician-scientist; we deeply miss her insight and her fellowship. PMID:25288903

  7. ENERGY DISSIPATION IN MAGNETIC NULL POINTS AT KINETIC SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Lapenta, Giovanni; Divin, Andrey; Eriksson, Elin; Markidis, Stefano

    2015-07-10

    We use kinetic particle-in-cell and MHD simulations supported by an observational data set to investigate magnetic reconnection in clusters of null points in space plasma. The magnetic configuration under investigation is driven by fast adiabatic flux rope compression that dissipates almost half of the initial magnetic field energy. In this phase powerful currents are excited producing secondary instabilities, and the system is brought into a state of “intermittent turbulence” within a few ion gyro-periods. Reconnection events are distributed all over the simulation domain and energy dissipation is rather volume-filling. Numerous spiral null points interconnected via their spines form null lines embedded into magnetic flux ropes; null point pairs demonstrate the signatures of torsional spine reconnection. However, energy dissipation mainly happens in the shear layers formed by adjacent flux ropes with oppositely directed currents. In these regions radial null pairs are spontaneously emerging and vanishing, associated with electron streams and small-scale current sheets. The number of spiral nulls in the simulation outweighs the number of radial nulls by a factor of 5–10, in accordance with Cluster observations in the Earth's magnetosheath. Twisted magnetic fields with embedded spiral null points might indicate the regions of major energy dissipation for future space missions such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission.

  8. Disocclusion of 3d LIDAR Point Clouds Using Range Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasutti, P.; Aujol, J.-F.; Brédif, M.; Bugeau, A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel framework for the disocclusion of mobile objects in 3D LiDAR scenes aquired via street-based Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS). Most of the existing lines of research tackle this problem directly in the 3D space. This work promotes an alternative approach by using a 2D range image representation of the 3D point cloud, taking advantage of the fact that the problem of disocclusion has been intensively studied in the 2D image processing community over the past decade. First, the point cloud is turned into a 2D range image by exploiting the sensor's topology. Using the range image, a semi-automatic segmentation procedure based on depth histograms is performed in order to select the occluding object to be removed. A variational image inpainting technique is then used to reconstruct the area occluded by that object. Finally, the range image is unprojected as a 3D point cloud. Experiments on real data prove the effectiveness of this procedure both in terms of accuracy and speed.

  9. The medial scaffold of 3D unorganized point clouds.

    PubMed

    Leymarie, Frederic F; Kimia, Benjamin B

    2007-02-01

    We introduce the notion of the medial scaffold, a hierarchical organization of the medial axis of a 3D shape in the form of a graph constructed from special medial curves connecting special medial points. A key advantage of the scaffold is that it captures the qualitative aspects of shape in a hierarchical and tightly condensed representation. We propose an efficient and exact method for computing the medial scaffold based on a notion of propagation along the scaffold itself, starting from initial sources of the flow and constructing the scaffold during the propagation. We examine this method specifically in the context of an unorganized cloud of points in 3D, e.g., as obtained from laser range finders, which typically involve hundreds of thousands of points, but the ideas are generalizable to data arising from geometrically described surface patches. The computational bottleneck in the propagation-based scheme is in finding the initial sources of the flow. We thus present several ideas to avoid the unnecessary consideration of pairs of points which cannot possibly form a medial point source, such as the "visibility" of a point from another given a third point and the interaction of clusters of points. An application of using the medial scaffold for the representation of point samplings of real-life objects is also illustrated.

  10. 3D matching techniques using OCT fingerprint point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez da Costa, Henrique S.; Silva, Luciano; Bellon, Olga R. P.; Bowden, Audrey K.; Czovny, Raphael K.

    2017-02-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) makes viable acquisition of 3D fingerprints from both dermis and epidermis skin layers and their interfaces, exposing features that can be explored to improve biometric identification such as the curvatures and distinctive 3D regions. Scanned images from eleven volunteers allowed the construction of the first OCT 3D fingerprint database, to our knowledge, containing epidermal and dermal fingerprints. 3D dermal fingerprints can be used to overcome cases of Failure to Enroll (FTE) due to poor ridge image quality and skin alterations, cases that affect 2D matching performance. We evaluate three matching techniques, including the well-established Iterative Closest Points algorithm (ICP), Surface Interpenetration Measure (SIM) and the well-known KH Curvature Maps, all assessed using a 3D OCT fingerprint database, the first one for this purpose. Two of these techniques are based on registration techniques and one on curvatures. These were evaluated, compared and the fusion of matching scores assessed. We applied a sequence of steps to extract regions of interest named (ROI) minutiae clouds, representing small regions around distinctive minutia, usually located at ridges/valleys endings or bifurcations. The obtained ROI is acquired from the epidermis and dermis-epidermis interface by OCT imaging. A comparative analysis of identification accuracy was explored using different scenarios and the obtained results shows improvements for biometric identification. A comparison against 2D fingerprint matching algorithms is also presented to assess the improvements.

  11. Point-of-care testing: applications of 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ho Nam; Tan, Ming Jun Andrew; Wu, Hongkai

    2017-08-08

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) devices fulfil a critical need in the modern healthcare ecosystem, enabling the decentralized delivery of imperative clinical strategies in both developed and developing worlds. To achieve diagnostic utility and clinical impact, POCT technologies are immensely dependent on effective translation from academic laboratories out to real-world deployment. However, the current research and development pipeline is highly bottlenecked owing to multiple restraints in material, cost, and complexity of conventionally available fabrication techniques. Recently, 3D printing technology has emerged as a revolutionary, industry-compatible method enabling cost-effective, facile, and rapid manufacturing of objects. This has allowed iterative design-build-test cycles of various things, from microfluidic chips to smartphone interfaces, that are geared towards point-of-care applications. In this review, we focus on highlighting recent works that exploit 3D printing in developing POCT devices, underscoring its utility in all analytical steps. Moreover, we also discuss key advantages of adopting 3D printing in the device development pipeline and identify promising opportunities in 3D printing technology that can benefit global health applications.

  12. 3-D Object Recognition from Point Cloud Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W.; Walker, A. S.; Zhang, B.

    2011-09-01

    The market for real-time 3-D mapping includes not only traditional geospatial applications but also navigation of unmanned autonomous vehicles (UAVs). Massively parallel processes such as graphics processing unit (GPU) computing make real-time 3-D object recognition and mapping achievable. Geospatial technologies such as digital photogrammetry and GIS offer advanced capabilities to produce 2-D and 3-D static maps using UAV data. The goal is to develop real-time UAV navigation through increased automation. It is challenging for a computer to identify a 3-D object such as a car, a tree or a house, yet automatic 3-D object recognition is essential to increasing the productivity of geospatial data such as 3-D city site models. In the past three decades, researchers have used radiometric properties to identify objects in digital imagery with limited success, because these properties vary considerably from image to image. Consequently, our team has developed software that recognizes certain types of 3-D objects within 3-D point clouds. Although our software is developed for modeling, simulation and visualization, it has the potential to be valuable in robotics and UAV applications. The locations and shapes of 3-D objects such as buildings and trees are easily recognizable by a human from a brief glance at a representation of a point cloud such as terrain-shaded relief. The algorithms to extract these objects have been developed and require only the point cloud and minimal human inputs such as a set of limits on building size and a request to turn on a squaring option. The algorithms use both digital surface model (DSM) and digital elevation model (DEM), so software has also been developed to derive the latter from the former. The process continues through the following steps: identify and group 3-D object points into regions; separate buildings and houses from trees; trace region boundaries; regularize and simplify boundary polygons; construct complex roofs. Several case

  13. Underwater 3d Modeling: Image Enhancement and Point Cloud Filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarakinou, I.; Papadimitriou, K.; Georgoula, O.; Patias, P.

    2016-06-01

    This paper examines the results of image enhancement and point cloud filtering on the visual and geometric quality of 3D models for the representation of underwater features. Specifically it evaluates the combination of effects from the manual editing of images' radiometry (captured at shallow depths) and the selection of parameters for point cloud definition and mesh building (processed in 3D modeling software). Such datasets, are usually collected by divers, handled by scientists and used for geovisualization purposes. In the presented study, have been created 3D models from three sets of images (seafloor, part of a wreck and a small boat's wreck) captured at three different depths (3.5m, 10m and 14m respectively). Four models have been created from the first dataset (seafloor) in order to evaluate the results from the application of image enhancement techniques and point cloud filtering. The main process for this preliminary study included a) the definition of parameters for the point cloud filtering and the creation of a reference model, b) the radiometric editing of images, followed by the creation of three improved models and c) the assessment of results by comparing the visual and the geometric quality of improved models versus the reference one. Finally, the selected technique is tested on two other data sets in order to examine its appropriateness for different depths (at 10m and 14m) and different objects (part of a wreck and a small boat's wreck) in the context of an ongoing research in the Laboratory of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.

  14. Characterizing the Properties of Coronal Magnetic Null Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Graham; DeRosa, Marc; Wagner, Eric

    2015-08-01

    The topology of the coronal magnetic field plays a role in a wide range of phenomena, from Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) through heating of the corona. One fundamental topological feature is the null point, where the magnetic field vanishes. These points are natural sites of magnetic reconnection, and hence the release of energy stored in the magnetic field. We present preliminary results of a study using data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory to characterize the properties and evolution of null points in a Potential Field Source Surface model of the coronal field. The main properties considered are the lifetime of the null points, their distribution with height, and how they form and subsequently vanish.This work is supported by NASA/LWS Grant NNX14AD45G, and by NSF/SHINE grant 1357018.

  15. Performance testing of 3D point cloud software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela-González, M.; González-Jorge, H.; Riveiro, B.; Arias, P.

    2013-10-01

    LiDAR systems are being used widely in recent years for many applications in the engineering field: civil engineering, cultural heritage, mining, industry and environmental engineering. One of the most important limitations of this technology is the large computational requirements involved in data processing, especially for large mobile LiDAR datasets. Several software solutions for data managing are available in the market, including open source suites, however, users often unknown methodologies to verify their performance properly. In this work a methodology for LiDAR software performance testing is presented and four different suites are studied: QT Modeler, VR Mesh, AutoCAD 3D Civil and the Point Cloud Library running in software developed at the University of Vigo (SITEGI). The software based on the Point Cloud Library shows better results in the loading time of the point clouds and CPU usage. However, it is not as strong as commercial suites in working set and commit size tests.

  16. Comparison of 3D interest point detectors and descriptors for point cloud fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, R.; Weber, T.; Hellwich, O.

    2014-08-01

    The extraction and description of keypoints as salient image parts has a long tradition within processing and analysis of 2D images. Nowadays, 3D data gains more and more importance. This paper discusses the benefits and limitations of keypoints for the task of fusing multiple 3D point clouds. For this goal, several combinations of 3D keypoint detectors and descriptors are tested. The experiments are based on 3D scenes with varying properties, including 3D scanner data as well as Kinect point clouds. The obtained results indicate that the specific method to extract and describe keypoints in 3D data has to be carefully chosen. In many cases the accuracy suffers from a too strong reduction of the available points to keypoints.

  17. Evaluation of null-point detection methods on simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Fu, Huishan; Vaivads, Andris; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Lapenta, Giovanni; Markidis, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    We model the measurements of artificial spacecraft that resemble the configuration of CLUSTER propagating in the particle-in-cell simulation of turbulent magnetic reconnection. The simulation domain contains multiple isolated X-type null-points, but the majority are O-type null-points. Simulations show that current pinches surrounded by twisted fields, analogous to laboratory pinches, are formed along the sequences of O-type nulls. In the simulation, the magnetic reconnection is mainly driven by the kinking of the pinches, at spatial scales of several ion inertial lentghs. We compute the locations of magnetic null-points and detect their type. When the satellites are separated by the fractions of ion inertial length, as it is for CLUSTER, they are able to locate both the isolated null-points, and the pinches. We apply the method to the real CLUSTER data and speculate how common are pinches in the magnetosphere, and whether they play a dominant role in the dissipation of magnetic energy.

  18. Magnetoacoustic Waves in Stratified Atmospheres with a Magnetic Null Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarr, Lucas A.; Linton, Mark; Leake, James E.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic fields strongly modify the propagation of MHD waves from the photosphere to the low corona, as can be shown exactly for the most simple case of a uniform magnetic field and isothermally stratrified atmosphere. For slightly more realistic scenarios, where both the atmospheric parameters and the magnetic field vary spatially, the linear MHD equations typically cannot be solved analytically. We use the Lagrangian Remap code--a nonlinear, shock-capturing MHD code--to study the propagation of initially acoustic wavepackets through a model 2D atmosphere that includes a gravitationally stratified chromosphere, transition region, and low corona. The magnetic field is formed by three photospheric concentrations and includes a single magnetic null point, resulting in an inhomogeneous system with a magnetic dome topology. A portion of an introduced wavepacket will refract toward the null due to the varying Alfven speed. Waves incident on the equipartition contour surrounding the null, where the sound and Alfven speeds coincide, partially transmit, reflect, and mode convert between branches of the local dispersion relation. Outward propagating slow modes generated during conversion become strongly concentrated along the set of field lines passing near the null. Acoustic energy is beamed back downwards towards each photospheric foot point, and upwards along one separatrix that exits the top of the numerical domain. Changes in the dominant restoring force for the wavepacket, between the Lorentz and pressure gradient forces, lead to a buildup of current density along topologically important features of the system (the null point and its four separatrices) and can drive reconnection at the null point itself. Ohmic dissipation of the currents locally heats the plasma. We find that the amount of current accumulation depends on where the centroid of a wavepacket initial crosses the photosphere, but does not simply coincide with regions of open versus closed magnetic field or

  19. Null point of discrimination in crustacean polarisation vision.

    PubMed

    How, Martin J; Christy, John; Roberts, Nicholas W; Marshall, N Justin

    2014-07-15

    The polarisation of light is used by many species of cephalopods and crustaceans to discriminate objects or to communicate. Most visual systems with this ability, such as that of the fiddler crab, include receptors with photopigments that are oriented horizontally and vertically relative to the outside world. Photoreceptors in such an orthogonal array are maximally sensitive to polarised light with the same fixed e-vector orientation. Using opponent neural connections, this two-channel system may produce a single value of polarisation contrast and, consequently, it may suffer from null points of discrimination. Stomatopod crustaceans use a different system for polarisation vision, comprising at least four types of polarisation-sensitive photoreceptor arranged at 0, 45, 90 and 135 deg relative to each other, in conjunction with extensive rotational eye movements. This anatomical arrangement should not suffer from equivalent null points of discrimination. To test whether these two systems were vulnerable to null points, we presented the fiddler crab Uca heteropleura and the stomatopod Haptosquilla trispinosa with polarised looming stimuli on a modified LCD monitor. The fiddler crab was less sensitive to differences in the degree of polarised light when the e-vector was at -45 deg than when the e-vector was horizontal. In comparison, stomatopods showed no difference in sensitivity between the two stimulus types. The results suggest that fiddler crabs suffer from a null point of sensitivity, while stomatopods do not. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Asymmetric effects at 3D Ising-like critical points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsypin, M.

    2003-05-01

    The Standard Model of electroweak interactions has a line of first order phase transition in the plane (higgs mass, temperature) that ends in a critical point belonging to the 3D Ising model universality class [K. Rummukainen et al, hep-lat/9805013. Similar critical points are found in finite-temperature QCD [M. Stephanov et al, hep-ph/9806219; F. Karsch et al, hep-lat/0107020. When these critical points are studied by Monte Carlo simulations on the lattice, one observes certain residual deviations from Z2 symmetry (which is exact for the Ising model). Here we study whether such deviations can be attributed to asymmetric corrections to scaling, which are relatively poorly studied. We compute the critical exponents in the local potential approximation (LPA), that is, in the framework of the Wegner-Houghton equation. We find that the exponent for the leading antisymmetric correction to scaling is approximately 1.691 in the LPA. This high value implies that such corrections cannot explain observed asymmetries.

  1. Multiframe image point matching and 3-d surface reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tsai, R Y

    1983-02-01

    This paper presents two new methods, the Joint Moment Method (JMM) and the Window Variance Method (WVM), for image matching and 3-D object surface reconstruction using multiple perspective views. The viewing positions and orientations for these perspective views are known a priori, as is usually the case for such applications as robotics and industrial vision as well as close range photogrammetry. Like the conventional two-frame correlation method, the JMM and WVM require finding the extrema of 1-D curves, which are proved to theoretically approach a delta function exponentially as the number of frames increases for the JMM and are much sharper than the two-frame correlation function for both the JMM and the WVM, even when the image point to be matched cannot be easily distinguished from some of the other points. The theoretical findings have been supported by simulations. It is also proved that JMM and WVM are not sensitive to certain radiometric effects. If the same window size is used, the computational complexity for the proposed methods is about n - 1 times that for the two-frame method where n is the number of frames. Simulation results show that the JMM and WVM require smaller windows than the two-frame correlation method with better accuracy, and therefore may even be more computationally feasible than the latter since the computational complexity increases quadratically as a function of the window size.

  2. Non-linear Tearing and Flux rope Formation in 3D Null Current Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyper, P. F.; Pontin, D. I.

    2014-12-01

    The manner in which small scale structure affects the large scale reconnection process in realistic 3D geometries is still an unsolved problem. With the increase in computational resources and improvements in satellite instrumentation, signatures of flux ropes or "plasmoids" are now observed with increasing regularity, yet their formation and dynamics are poorly understood. It has been demonstrated that even at MHD scales, in 2D rapid non-linear tearing of Sweet-Parker-like layers forms multiple magnetic islands ("plasmoids") and allows the reconnection rate to become almost independent of the Lundquist number (the "plasmoid instability"). This work presents some of our recent theoretical work focussing on an analogous instability in a fully 3D geometry. Using results from a series of 3D high resolution MHD simulations, the formation and evolution of fully three dimensional "flux rope" structures following the 3D plasmoid instability will be presented, and their effects on the manner of the reconnection process as a whole discussed.

  3. Torsional magnetic reconnection at three dimensional null points: A phenomenological study

    SciTech Connect

    Wyper, Peter; Jain, Rekha

    2010-09-15

    Magnetic reconnection around three dimensional (3D) magnetic null points is the natural progression from X-point reconnection in two dimensions. In 3D the separator field lines of the X-point are replaced with the spine line and fan plane (the field lines which asymptotically approach or recede from the null). In this work analytical models are developed for the newly classified torsional spine and torsional fan reconnection regimes by solving the steady state, kinematic, resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations. Reconnection is localized to around the null through the use of a localized field perturbation leading to a localized current while a constant resistivity is assumed. For the torsional spine case current is found to localize around the spine leading to a spiraling slippage of the field around the spine and out along the fan. For the torsional fan case current is found to be localized to the fan plane leading again to a spiraling slippage of the field. In each case no flux is transported across either the spine or the fan. An intermediate twist is then introduced and a link is established between the two regimes. We find that for a general twist plasma flows associated with both torsional spine and fan appear in distinct regions. As such we suggest that the ''pure'' flows of each are extreme cases.

  4. M3D-C1 simulations of the plasma response to RMPs in NSTX-U single-null and snowflake divertor configurations

    DOE PAGES

    Canal, G. P.; Ferraro, N. M.; Evans, T. E.; ...

    2017-04-20

    Here in this work, single- and two-fluid resistive magnetohydrodynamic calculations of the plasma response to n = 3 magnetic perturbations in single-null (SN) and snowflake (SF) divertor configurations are compared with those based on the vacuum approach. The calculations are performed using the code M3D-C1 and are based on simulated NSTX-U plasmas. Significantly different plasma responses were found from these calculations, with the difference between the single- and two-fluid plasma responses being caused mainly by the different screening mechanism intrinsic to each of these models. Although different plasma responses were obtained from these different plasma models, no significant difference betweenmore » the SN and SF plasma responses were found. However, due to their different equilibrium properties, magnetic perturbations cause the SF configuration to develop additional and longer magnetic lobes in the null-point region than the SN, regardless of the plasma model used. The intersection of these longer and additional lobes with the divertor plates are expected to cause more striations in the particle and heat flux target profiles. In addition, the results indicate that the size of the magnetic lobes, in both single-null and snowflake configurations, are more sensitive to resonant magnetic perturbations than to non-resonant magnetic perturbations.« less

  5. The appearance, motion, and disappearance of three-dimensional magnetic null points

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Nicholas A.; Parnell, Clare E.; Haynes, Andrew L.

    2015-10-15

    While theoretical models and simulations of magnetic reconnection often assume symmetry such that the magnetic null point when present is co-located with a flow stagnation point, the introduction of asymmetry typically leads to non-ideal flows across the null point. To understand this behavior, we present exact expressions for the motion of three-dimensional linear null points. The most general expression shows that linear null points move in the direction along which the magnetic field and its time derivative are antiparallel. Null point motion in resistive magnetohydrodynamics results from advection by the bulk plasma flow and resistive diffusion of the magnetic field, which allows non-ideal flows across topological boundaries. Null point motion is described intrinsically by parameters evaluated locally; however, global dynamics help set the local conditions at the null point. During a bifurcation of a degenerate null point into a null-null pair or the reverse, the instantaneous velocity of separation or convergence of the null-null pair will typically be infinite along the null space of the Jacobian matrix of the magnetic field, but with finite components in the directions orthogonal to the null space. Not all bifurcating null-null pairs are connected by a separator. Furthermore, except under special circumstances, there will not exist a straight line separator connecting a bifurcating null-null pair. The motion of separators cannot be described using solely local parameters because the identification of a particular field line as a separator may change as a result of non-ideal behavior elsewhere along the field line.

  6. Virtual and Printed 3D Models for Teaching Crystal Symmetry and Point Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casas, Lluís; Estop, Euge`nia

    2015-01-01

    Both, virtual and printed 3D crystal models can help students and teachers deal with chemical education topics such as symmetry and point groups. In the present paper, two freely downloadable tools (interactive PDF files and a mobile app) are presented as examples of the application of 3D design to study point-symmetry. The use of 3D printing to…

  7. Virtual and Printed 3D Models for Teaching Crystal Symmetry and Point Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casas, Lluís; Estop, Euge`nia

    2015-01-01

    Both, virtual and printed 3D crystal models can help students and teachers deal with chemical education topics such as symmetry and point groups. In the present paper, two freely downloadable tools (interactive PDF files and a mobile app) are presented as examples of the application of 3D design to study point-symmetry. The use of 3D printing to…

  8. The Engelbourg's ruins: from 3D TLS point cloud acquisition to 3D virtual and historic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, Mathieu; Berger, Solveig; Nobile, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    The Castle of Engelbourg was built at the beginning of the 13th century, at the top of the Schlossberg. It is situated on the territory of the municipality of Thann (France), at the crossroads of Alsace and Lorraine, and dominates the outlet of the valley of Thur. Its strategic position was one of the causes of its systematic destructions during the 17th century, and Louis XIV finished his fate by ordering his demolition in 1673. Today only few vestiges remain, of which a section of the main tower from about 7m of diameter and 4m of wide laying on its slice, unique characteristic in the regional castral landscape. It is visible since the valley, was named "the Eye of the witch", and became a key attraction of the region. The site, which extends over approximately one hectare, is for several years the object of numerous archaeological studies and is at the heart of a project of valuation of the vestiges today. It was indeed a key objective, among the numerous planned works, to realize a 3D model of the site in its current state, in other words, a virtual model "such as seized", exploitable as well from a cultural and tourist point of view as by scientists and in archaeological researches. The team of the ICube/INSA lab had in responsibility the realization of this model, the acquisition of the data until the delivery of the virtual model, thanks to 3D TLS and topographic surveying methods. It was also planned to integrate into this 3D model, data of 2D archives, stemming from series of former excavations. The objectives of this project were the following ones: • Acquisition of 3D digital data of the site and 3D modelling • Digitization of the 2D archaeological data and integration in the 3D model • Implementation of a database connected to the 3D model • Virtual Visit of the site The obtained results allowed us to visualize every 3D object individually, under several forms (point clouds, 3D meshed objects and models, etc.) and at several levels of detail

  9. Extension of RCC Topological Relations for 3d Complex Objects Components Extracted from 3d LIDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xu-Feng; Abolfazl Mostafavia, Mir; Wang, Chen

    2016-06-01

    Topological relations are fundamental for qualitative description, querying and analysis of a 3D scene. Although topological relations for 2D objects have been extensively studied and implemented in GIS applications, their direct extension to 3D is very challenging and they cannot be directly applied to represent relations between components of complex 3D objects represented by 3D B-Rep models in R3. Herein we present an extended Region Connection Calculus (RCC) model to express and formalize topological relations between planar regions for creating 3D model represented by Boundary Representation model in R3. We proposed a new dimension extended 9-Intersection model to represent the basic relations among components of a complex object, including disjoint, meet and intersect. The last element in 3*3 matrix records the details of connection through the common parts of two regions and the intersecting line of two planes. Additionally, this model can deal with the case of planar regions with holes. Finally, the geometric information is transformed into a list of strings consisting of topological relations between two planar regions and detailed connection information. The experiments show that the proposed approach helps to identify topological relations of planar segments of point cloud automatically.

  10. From Tls Point Clouds to 3d Models of Trees: a Comparison of Existing Algorithms for 3d Tree Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bournez, E.; Landes, T.; Saudreau, M.; Kastendeuch, P.; Najjar, G.

    2017-02-01

    3D models of tree geometry are important for numerous studies, such as for urban planning or agricultural studies. In climatology, tree models can be necessary for simulating the cooling effect of trees by estimating their evapotranspiration. The literature shows that the more accurate the 3D structure of a tree is, the more accurate microclimate models are. This is the reason why, since 2013, we have been developing an algorithm for the reconstruction of trees from terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) data, which we call TreeArchitecture. Meanwhile, new promising algorithms dedicated to tree reconstruction have emerged in the literature. In this paper, we assess the capacity of our algorithm and of two others -PlantScan3D and SimpleTree- to reconstruct the 3D structure of trees. The aim of this reconstruction is to be able to characterize the geometric complexity of trees, with different heights, sizes and shapes of branches. Based on a specific surveying workflow with a TLS, we have acquired dense point clouds of six different urban trees, with specific architectures, before reconstructing them with each algorithm. Finally, qualitative and quantitative assessments of the models are performed using reference tree reconstructions and field measurements. Based on this assessment, the advantages and the limits of every reconstruction algorithm are highlighted. Anyway, very satisfying results can be reached for 3D reconstructions of tree topology as well as of tree volume.

  11. Unlocking the scientific potential of complex 3D point cloud dataset : new classification and 3D comparison methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lague, D.; Brodu, N.; Leroux, J.

    2012-12-01

    Ground based lidar and photogrammetric techniques are increasingly used to track the evolution of natural surfaces in 3D at an unprecedented resolution and precision. The range of applications encompass many type of natural surfaces with different geometries and roughness characteristics (landslides, cliff erosion, river beds, bank erosion,....). Unravelling surface change in these contexts requires to compare large point clouds in 2D or 3D. The most commonly used method in geomorphology is based on a 2D difference of the gridded point clouds. Yet this is hardly adapted to many 3D natural environments such as rivers (with horizontal beds and vertical banks), while gridding complex rough surfaces is a complex task. On the other hand, tools allowing to perform 3D comparison are scarce and may require to mesh the point clouds which is difficult on rough natural surfaces. Moreover, existing 3D comparison tools do not provide an explicit calculation of confidence intervals that would factor in registration errors, roughness effects and instrument related position uncertainties. To unlock this problem, we developed the first algorithm combining a 3D measurement of surface change directly on point clouds with an estimate of spatially variable confidence intervals (called M3C2). The method has two steps : (1) surface normal estimation and orientation in 3D at a scale consistent with the local roughness ; (2) measurement of mean surface change along the normal direction with explicit calculation of a local confidence interval. Comparison with existing 3D methods based on a closest-point calculation demonstrates the higher precision of the M3C2 method when mm changes needs to be detected. The M3C2 method is also simple to use as it does not require surface meshing or gridding, and is not sensitive to missing data or change in point density. We also present a 3D classification tool (CANUPO) for vegetation removal based on a new geometrical measure: the multi

  12. Filtering method for 3D laser scanning point cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Da; Wang, Li; Hao, Yuncai; Zhang, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, with the rapid development of the hardware and software of the three-dimensional model acquisition, three-dimensional laser scanning technology is utilized in various aspects, especially in space exploration. The point cloud filter is very important before using the data. In the paper, considering both the processing quality and computing speed, an improved mean-shift point cloud filter method is proposed. Firstly, by analyze the relevance of the normal vector between the upcoming processing point and the near points, the iterative neighborhood of the mean-shift is selected dynamically, then the high frequency noise is constrained. Secondly, considering the normal vector of the processing point, the normal vector is updated. Finally, updated position is calculated for each point, then each point is moved in the normal vector according to the updated position. The experimental results show that the large features are retained, at the same time, the small sharp features are also existed for different size and shape of objects, so the target feature information is protected precisely. The computational complexity of the proposed method is not high, it can bring high precision results with fast speed, so it is very suitable for space application. It can also be utilized in civil, such as large object measurement, industrial measurement, car navigation etc. In the future, filter with the help of point strength will be further exploited.

  13. Classification of Aerial Photogrammetric 3d Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, C.; Häni, N.; Rosinskaya, E.; d'Angelo, E.; Strecha, C.

    2017-05-01

    We present a powerful method to extract per-point semantic class labels from aerial photogrammetry data. Labelling this kind of data is important for tasks such as environmental modelling, object classification and scene understanding. Unlike previous point cloud classification methods that rely exclusively on geometric features, we show that incorporating color information yields a significant increase in accuracy in detecting semantic classes. We test our classification method on three real-world photogrammetry datasets that were generated with Pix4Dmapper Pro, and with varying point densities. We show that off-the-shelf machine learning techniques coupled with our new features allow us to train highly accurate classifiers that generalize well to unseen data, processing point clouds containing 10 million points in less than 3 minutes on a desktop computer.

  14. Measuring 3D point configurations in pictorial space

    PubMed Central

    Wagemans, Johan; van Doorn, Andrea J; Koenderink, Jan J

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel method to probe the depth structure of the pictorial space evoked by paintings. The method involves an exocentric pointing paradigm that allows one to find the slope of the geodesic connection between any pair of points in pictorial space. Since the locations of the points in the picture plane are known, this immediately yields the depth difference between the points. A set of depth differences between all pairs of points from an N-point (N > 2) configuration then yields the configuration in depth up to an arbitrary depth offset. Since an N-point configuration implies N(N−1) (ordered) pairs, the number of observations typically far exceeds the number of inferred depths. This yields a powerful check on the geometrical consistency of the results. We report that the remaining inconsistencies are fully accounted for by the spread encountered in repeated observations. This implies that the concept of ‘pictorial space’ indeed has an empirical significance. The method is analyzed and empirically verified in considerable detail. We report large quantitative interobserver differences, though the results of all observers agree modulo a certain affine transformation that describes the basic cue ambiguities. This is expected on the basis of a formal analysis of monocular optical structure. The method will prove useful in a variety of potential applications. PMID:23145227

  15. Extracting Feature Points of the Human Body Using the Model of a 3D Human Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jeongeun; Ozawa, Shinji

    The purpose of this research is to recognize 3D shape features of a human body automatically using a 3D laser-scanning machine. In order to recognize the 3D shape features, we selected the 23 feature points of a body and modeled its 3D features. The set of 23 feature points consists of the motion axis of a joint, the main point for the bone structure of a human body. For extracting feature points of object model, we made 2.5D templates neighbor for each feature points were extracted according to the feature points of the standard model of human body. And the feature points were extracted by the template matching. The extracted feature points can be applied as body measurement, the 3D virtual fitting system for apparel etc.

  16. Fitting a Point Cloud to a 3d Polyhedral Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, E. V.; Rotkov, S. I.

    2017-05-01

    The ability to measure parameters of large-scale objects in a contactless fashion has a tremendous potential in a number of industrial applications. However, this problem is usually associated with an ambiguous task to compare two data sets specified in two different co-ordinate systems. This paper deals with the study of fitting a set of unorganized points to a polyhedral surface. The developed approach uses Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Stretched grid method (SGM) to substitute a non-linear problem solution with several linear steps. The squared distance (SD) is a general criterion to control the process of convergence of a set of points to a target surface. The described numerical experiment concerns the remote measurement of a large-scale aerial in the form of a frame with a parabolic shape. The experiment shows that the fitting process of a point cloud to a target surface converges in several linear steps. The method is applicable to the geometry remote measurement of large-scale objects in a contactless fashion.

  17. Magnetic flipping - Reconnection in three dimensions without null points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, E. R.; Forbes, T. G.

    1992-01-01

    In three dimensions, magnetic reconnection may take place in a sheared magnetic field at any singular field line, where the nearby field has X-type topology in planes perpendicular to the field line and where an electric field is present parallel to the field line. In the ideal region around the singular line there will, in general, be singularities in the plasma flow and electric field, both at the singular line and at 'magnetic flipping layers', which are remnants of local magnetic separatrices. In the absence of a three-dimensional magnetic neutral point or null point, reconnection of field lines can still occur by a process of magnetic flipping, in which the plasma crosses the flipping layers but the field lines rapidly flip along them by magnetic diffusion. Depending on the boundary conditions, there may be two or four flipping layers which converge on the singular line. A boundary layer analysis of a flipping layer is given, in which the magnetic field parallel to the layer decreases as one crosses it while the plasma pressure (or magnetic pressure associated with the field along the singular line) increases. The width of the flipping layer decreases with distance from the singular line.

  18. 3D printed microfluidic mixer for point-of-care diagnosis of anemia.

    PubMed

    Plevniak, Kimberly; Campbell, Matthew; Mei He

    2016-08-01

    3D printing has been an emerging fabrication tool in prototyping and manufacturing. We demonstrated a 3D microfluidic simulation guided computer design and 3D printer prototyping for quick turnaround development of microfluidic 3D mixers, which allows fast self-mixing of reagents with blood through capillary force. Combined with smartphone, the point-of-care diagnosis of anemia from finger-prick blood has been successfully implemented and showed consistent results with clinical measurements. Capable of 3D fabrication flexibility and smartphone compatibility, this work presents a novel diagnostic strategy for advancing personalized medicine and mobile healthcare.

  19. 3D point cloud registration based on the assistant camera and Harris-SIFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Yu, HongYang

    2016-07-01

    3D(Three-Dimensional) point cloud registration technology is the hot topic in the field of 3D reconstruction, but most of the registration method is not real-time and ineffective. This paper proposes a point cloud registration method of 3D reconstruction based on Harris-SIFT and assistant camera. The assistant camera is used to pinpoint mobile 3D reconstruction device, The feature points of images are detected by using Harris operator, the main orientation for each feature point is calculated, and lastly, the feature point descriptors are generated after rotating the coordinates of the descriptors relative to the feature points' main orientations. Experimental results of demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Automated Mosaicking of Multiple 3d Point Clouds Generated from a Depth Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Yoon, W.; Kim, T.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a method for automated mosaicking of multiple 3D point clouds generated from a depth camera. A depth camera generates depth data by using ToF (Time of Flight) method and intensity data by using intensity of returned signal. The depth camera used in this paper was a SR4000 from MESA Imaging. This camera generates a depth map and intensity map of 176 x 44 pixels. Generated depth map saves physical depth data with mm of precision. Generated intensity map contains texture data with many noises. We used texture maps for extracting tiepoints and depth maps for assigning z coordinates to tiepoints and point cloud mosaicking. There are four steps in the proposed mosaicking method. In the first step, we acquired multiple 3D point clouds by rotating depth camera and capturing data per rotation. In the second step, we estimated 3D-3D transformation relationships between subsequent point clouds. For this, 2D tiepoints were extracted automatically from the corresponding two intensity maps. They were converted into 3D tiepoints using depth maps. We used a 3D similarity transformation model for estimating the 3D-3D transformation relationships. In the third step, we converted local 3D-3D transformations into a global transformation for all point clouds with respect to a reference one. In the last step, the extent of single depth map mosaic was calculated and depth values per mosaic pixel were determined by a ray tracing method. For experiments, 8 depth maps and intensity maps were used. After the four steps, an output mosaicked depth map of 454x144 was generated. It is expected that the proposed method would be useful for developing an effective 3D indoor mapping method in future.

  1. Feature point based 3D tracking of multiple fish from multi-view images

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhi-Ming

    2017-01-01

    A feature point based method is proposed for tracking multiple fish in 3D space. First, a simplified representation of the object is realized through construction of two feature point models based on its appearance characteristics. After feature points are classified into occluded and non-occluded types, matching and association are performed, respectively. Finally, the object's motion trajectory in 3D space is obtained through integrating multi-view tracking results. Experimental results show that the proposed method can simultaneously track 3D motion trajectories for up to 10 fish accurately and robustly. PMID:28665966

  2. Segmentation of UAV-based images incorporating 3D point cloud information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrivel, A.; Gerke, M.; Kerle, N.; Vosselman, G.

    2015-03-01

    Numerous applications related to urban scene analysis demand automatic recognition of buildings and distinct sub-elements. For example, if LiDAR data is available, only 3D information could be leveraged for the segmentation. However, this poses several risks, for instance, the in-plane objects cannot be distinguished from their surroundings. On the other hand, if only image based segmentation is performed, the geometric features (e.g., normal orientation, planarity) are not readily available. This renders the task of detecting the distinct sub-elements of the building with similar radiometric characteristic infeasible. In this paper the individual sub-elements of buildings are recognized through sub-segmentation of the building using geometric and radiometric characteristics jointly. 3D points generated from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) images are used for inferring the geometric characteristics of roofs and facades of the building. However, the image-based 3D points are noisy, error prone and often contain gaps. Hence the segmentation in 3D space is not appropriate. Therefore, we propose to perform segmentation in image space using geometric features from the 3D point cloud along with the radiometric features. The initial detection of buildings in 3D point cloud is followed by the segmentation in image space using the region growing approach by utilizing various radiometric and 3D point cloud features. The developed method was tested using two data sets obtained with UAV images with a ground resolution of around 1-2 cm. The developed method accurately segmented most of the building elements when compared to the plane-based segmentation using 3D point cloud alone.

  3. Reconstruction of Consistent 3d CAD Models from Point Cloud Data Using a Priori CAD Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bey, A.; Chaine, R.; Marc, R.; Thibault, G.; Akkouche, S.

    2011-09-01

    We address the reconstruction of 3D CAD models from point cloud data acquired in industrial environments, using a pre-existing 3D model as an initial estimate of the scene to be processed. Indeed, this prior knowledge can be used to drive the reconstruction so as to generate an accurate 3D model matching the point cloud. We more particularly focus our work on the cylindrical parts of the 3D models. We propose to state the problem in a probabilistic framework: we have to search for the 3D model which maximizes some probability taking several constraints into account, such as the relevancy with respect to the point cloud and the a priori 3D model, and the consistency of the reconstructed model. The resulting optimization problem can then be handled using a stochastic exploration of the solution space, based on the random insertion of elements in the configuration under construction, coupled with a greedy management of the conflicts which efficiently improves the configuration at each step. We show that this approach provides reliable reconstructed 3D models by presenting some results on industrial data sets.

  4. Effects of point configuration on the accuracy in 3D reconstruction from biplane images

    SciTech Connect

    Dmochowski, Jacek; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Singh, Vikas; Xu Jinhui; Nazareth, Daryl P.

    2005-09-15

    Two or more angiograms are being used frequently in medical imaging to reconstruct locations in three-dimensional (3D) space, e.g., for reconstruction of 3D vascular trees, implanted electrodes, or patient positioning. A number of techniques have been proposed for this task. In this simulation study, we investigate the effect of the shape of the configuration of the points in 3D (the 'cloud' of points) on reconstruction errors for one of these techniques developed in our laboratory. Five types of configurations (a ball, an elongated ellipsoid (cigar), flattened ball (pancake), flattened cigar, and a flattened ball with a single distant point) are used in the evaluations. For each shape, 100 random configurations were generated, with point coordinates chosen from Gaussian distributions having a covariance matrix corresponding to the desired shape. The 3D data were projected into the image planes using a known imaging geometry. Gaussian distributed errors were introduced in the x and y coordinates of these projected points. Gaussian distributed errors were also introduced into the gantry information used to calculate the initial imaging geometry. The imaging geometries and 3D positions were iteratively refined using the enhanced-Metz-Fencil technique. The image data were also used to evaluate the feasible R-t solution volume. The 3D errors between the calculated and true positions were determined. The effects of the shape of the configuration, the number of points, the initial geometry error, and the input image error were evaluated. The results for the number of points, initial geometry error, and image error are in agreement with previously reported results, i.e., increasing the number of points and reducing initial geometry and/or image error, improves the accuracy of the reconstructed data. The shape of the 3D configuration of points also affects the error of reconstructed 3D configuration; specifically, errors decrease as the 'volume' of the 3D configuration

  5. Fast Probabilistic Fusion of 3d Point Clouds via Occupancy Grids for Scene Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Andreas; Huang, Hai; Drauschke, Martin; Mayer, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    High resolution consumer cameras on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) allow for cheap acquisition of highly detailed images, e.g., of urban regions. Via image registration by means of Structure from Motion (SfM) and Multi View Stereo (MVS) the automatic generation of huge amounts of 3D points with a relative accuracy in the centimeter range is possible. Applications such as semantic classification have a need for accurate 3D point clouds, but do not benefit from an extremely high resolution/density. In this paper, we, therefore, propose a fast fusion of high resolution 3D point clouds based on occupancy grids. The result is used for semantic classification. In contrast to state-of-the-art classification methods, we accept a certain percentage of outliers, arguing that they can be considered in the classification process when a per point belief is determined in the fusion process. To this end, we employ an octree-based fusion which allows for the derivation of outlier probabilities. The probabilities give a belief for every 3D point, which is essential for the semantic classification to consider measurement noise. For an example point cloud with half a billion 3D points (cf. Figure 1), we show that our method can reduce runtime as well as improve classification accuracy and offers high scalability for large datasets.

  6. SEMANTIC3D.NET: a New Large-Scale Point Cloud Classification Benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackel, T.; Savinov, N.; Ladicky, L.; Wegner, J. D.; Schindler, K.; Pollefeys, M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a new 3D point cloud classification benchmark data set with over four billion manually labelled points, meant as input for data-hungry (deep) learning methods. We also discuss first submissions to the benchmark that use deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) as a work horse, which already show remarkable performance improvements over state-of-the-art. CNNs have become the de-facto standard for many tasks in computer vision and machine learning like semantic segmentation or object detection in images, but have no yet led to a true breakthrough for 3D point cloud labelling tasks due to lack of training data. With the massive data set presented in this paper, we aim at closing this data gap to help unleash the full potential of deep learning methods for 3D labelling tasks. Our semantic3D.net data set consists of dense point clouds acquired with static terrestrial laser scanners. It contains 8 semantic classes and covers a wide range of urban outdoor scenes: churches, streets, railroad tracks, squares, villages, soccer fields and castles. We describe our labelling interface and show that our data set provides more dense and complete point clouds with much higher overall number of labelled points compared to those already available to the research community. We further provide baseline method descriptions and comparison between methods submitted to our online system. We hope semantic3D.net will pave the way for deep learning methods in 3D point cloud labelling to learn richer, more general 3D representations, and first submissions after only a few months indicate that this might indeed be the case.

  7. Extracting valley-ridge lines from point-cloud-based 3D fingerprint models.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xufang; Song, Zhan; Xie, Wuyuan

    2013-01-01

    3D fingerprinting is an emerging technology with the distinct advantage of touchless operation. More important, 3D fingerprint models contain more biometric information than traditional 2D fingerprint images. However, current approaches to fingerprint feature detection usually must transform the 3D models to a 2D space through unwrapping or other methods, which might introduce distortions. A new approach directly extracts valley-ridge features from point-cloud-based 3D fingerprint models. It first applies the moving least-squares method to fit a local paraboloid surface and represent the local point cloud area. It then computes the local surface's curvatures and curvature tensors to facilitate detection of the potential valley and ridge points. The approach projects those points to the most likely valley-ridge lines, using statistical means such as covariance analysis and cross correlation. To finally extract the valley-ridge lines, it grows the polylines that approximate the projected feature points and removes the perturbations between the sampled points. Experiments with different 3D fingerprint models demonstrate this approach's feasibility and performance.

  8. Towards semi-automatic rock mass discontinuity orientation and set analysis from 3D point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiateng; Liu, Shanjun; Zhang, Peina; Wu, Lixin; Zhou, Wenhui; Yu, Yinan

    2017-06-01

    Obtaining accurate information on rock mass discontinuities for deformation analysis and the evaluation of rock mass stability is important. Obtaining measurements for high and steep zones with the traditional compass method is difficult. Photogrammetry, three-dimensional (3D) laser scanning and other remote sensing methods have gradually become mainstream methods. In this study, a method that is based on a 3D point cloud is proposed to semi-automatically extract rock mass structural plane information. The original data are pre-treated prior to segmentation by removing outlier points. The next step is to segment the point cloud into different point subsets. Various parameters, such as the normal, dip/direction and dip, can be calculated for each point subset after obtaining the equation of the best fit plane for the relevant point subset. A cluster analysis (a point subset that satisfies some conditions and thus forms a cluster) is performed based on the normal vectors by introducing the firefly algorithm (FA) and the fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm. Finally, clusters that belong to the same discontinuity sets are merged and coloured for visualization purposes. A prototype system is developed based on this method to extract the points of the rock discontinuity from a 3D point cloud. A comparison with existing software shows that this method is feasible. This method can provide a reference for rock mechanics, 3D geological modelling and other related fields.

  9. Convergence of the point vortex method for the 3-D Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Thomas Y.; Lowengrub, John

    1990-11-01

    Consistency, stability, and convergence of a point vortex approximation to the 3-D incompressible Euler equations with smooth solutions. The 3-D algorithm considered is similar to the corresponding 3-D vortex are proved blob algorithm introduced by Beale and Majda; The discretization error is second-order accurate. Then the method is stable in l sup p norm for the particle trajectories and in w sup -1,p norm for discrete vorticity. Consequently, the method converges up to any time for which the Euler equations have a smooth solution. One immediate application of the convergence result is that the vortex filament method without smoothing also converges.

  10. Human Body 3D Posture Estimation Using Significant Points and Two Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Juang, Chia-Feng; Chen, Teng-Chang; Du, Wei-Chin

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional (3D) human posture estimation system that locates 3D significant body points based on 2D body contours extracted from two cameras without using any depth sensors. The 3D significant body points that are located by this system include the head, the center of the body, the tips of the feet, the tips of the hands, the elbows, and the knees. First, a linear support vector machine- (SVM-) based segmentation method is proposed to distinguish the human body from the background in red, green, and blue (RGB) color space. The SVM-based segmentation method uses not only normalized color differences but also included angle between pixels in the current frame and the background in order to reduce shadow influence. After segmentation, 2D significant points in each of the two extracted images are located. A significant point volume matching (SPVM) method is then proposed to reconstruct the 3D significant body point locations by using 2D posture estimation results. Experimental results show that the proposed SVM-based segmentation method shows better performance than other gray level- and RGB-based segmentation approaches. This paper also shows the effectiveness of the 3D posture estimation results in different postures. PMID:24883422

  11. Human body 3D posture estimation using significant points and two cameras.

    PubMed

    Juang, Chia-Feng; Chen, Teng-Chang; Du, Wei-Chin

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional (3D) human posture estimation system that locates 3D significant body points based on 2D body contours extracted from two cameras without using any depth sensors. The 3D significant body points that are located by this system include the head, the center of the body, the tips of the feet, the tips of the hands, the elbows, and the knees. First, a linear support vector machine- (SVM-) based segmentation method is proposed to distinguish the human body from the background in red, green, and blue (RGB) color space. The SVM-based segmentation method uses not only normalized color differences but also included angle between pixels in the current frame and the background in order to reduce shadow influence. After segmentation, 2D significant points in each of the two extracted images are located. A significant point volume matching (SPVM) method is then proposed to reconstruct the 3D significant body point locations by using 2D posture estimation results. Experimental results show that the proposed SVM-based segmentation method shows better performance than other gray level- and RGB-based segmentation approaches. This paper also shows the effectiveness of the 3D posture estimation results in different postures.

  12. Generalized recovery algorithm for 3D super-resolution microscopy using rotating point spread functions

    PubMed Central

    Shuang, Bo; Wang, Wenxiao; Shen, Hao; Tauzin, Lawrence J.; Flatebo, Charlotte; Chen, Jianbo; Moringo, Nicholas A.; Bishop, Logan D. C.; Kelly, Kevin F.; Landes, Christy F.

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy with phase masks is a promising technique for 3D imaging and tracking. Due to the complexity of the resultant point spread functions, generalized recovery algorithms are still missing. We introduce a 3D super-resolution recovery algorithm that works for a variety of phase masks generating 3D point spread functions. A fast deconvolution process generates initial guesses, which are further refined by least squares fitting. Overfitting is suppressed using a machine learning determined threshold. Preliminary results on experimental data show that our algorithm can be used to super-localize 3D adsorption events within a porous polymer film and is useful for evaluating potential phase masks. Finally, we demonstrate that parallel computation on graphics processing units can reduce the processing time required for 3D recovery. Simulations reveal that, through desktop parallelization, the ultimate limit of real-time processing is possible. Our program is the first open source recovery program for generalized 3D recovery using rotating point spread functions. PMID:27488312

  13. Generalized recovery algorithm for 3D super-resolution microscopy using rotating point spread functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuang, Bo; Wang, Wenxiao; Shen, Hao; Tauzin, Lawrence J.; Flatebo, Charlotte; Chen, Jianbo; Moringo, Nicholas A.; Bishop, Logan D. C.; Kelly, Kevin F.; Landes, Christy F.

    2016-08-01

    Super-resolution microscopy with phase masks is a promising technique for 3D imaging and tracking. Due to the complexity of the resultant point spread functions, generalized recovery algorithms are still missing. We introduce a 3D super-resolution recovery algorithm that works for a variety of phase masks generating 3D point spread functions. A fast deconvolution process generates initial guesses, which are further refined by least squares fitting. Overfitting is suppressed using a machine learning determined threshold. Preliminary results on experimental data show that our algorithm can be used to super-localize 3D adsorption events within a porous polymer film and is useful for evaluating potential phase masks. Finally, we demonstrate that parallel computation on graphics processing units can reduce the processing time required for 3D recovery. Simulations reveal that, through desktop parallelization, the ultimate limit of real-time processing is possible. Our program is the first open source recovery program for generalized 3D recovery using rotating point spread functions.

  14. Adaptive noise suppression technique for dense 3D point cloud reconstructions from monocular vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diskin, Yakov; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2012-10-01

    Mobile vision-based autonomous vehicles use video frames from multiple angles to construct a 3D model of their environment. In this paper, we present a post-processing adaptive noise suppression technique to enhance the quality of the computed 3D model. Our near real-time reconstruction algorithm uses each pair of frames to compute the disparities of tracked feature points to translate the distance a feature has traveled within the frame in pixels into real world depth values. As a result these tracked feature points are plotted to form a dense and colorful point cloud. Due to the inevitable small vibrations in the camera and the mismatches within the feature tracking algorithm, the point cloud model contains a significant amount of misplaced points appearing as noise. The proposed noise suppression technique utilizes the spatial information of each point to unify points of similar texture and color into objects while simultaneously removing noise dissociated with any nearby objects. The noise filter combines all the points of similar depth into 2D layers throughout the point cloud model. By applying erosion and dilation techniques we are able to eliminate the unwanted floating points while retaining points of larger objects. To reverse the compression process, we transform the 2D layer back into the 3D model allowing points to return to their original position without the attached noise components. We evaluate the resulting noiseless point cloud by utilizing an unmanned ground vehicle to perform obstacle avoidance tasks. The contribution of the noise suppression technique is measured by evaluating the accuracy of the 3D reconstruction.

  15. The application of iterative closest point (ICP) registration to improve 3D terrain mapping estimates using the flash 3D ladar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Jack; Armstrong, Ernest E.; Armbruster, Walter; Richmond, Richard

    2010-04-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to develop an effective means of creating a 3D terrain map image (point-cloud) in GPS denied regions from a sequence of co-bore sighted visible and 3D LIDAR images. Both the visible and 3D LADAR cameras were hard mounted to a vehicle. The vehicle was then driven around the streets of an abandoned village used as a training facility by the German Army and imagery was collected. The visible and 3D LADAR images were then fused and 3D registration performed using a variation of the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The ICP algorithm is widely used for various spatial and geometric alignment of 3D imagery producing a set of rotation and translation transformations between two 3D images. ICP rotation and translation information obtain from registering the fused visible and 3D LADAR imagery was then used to calculate the x-y plane, range and intensity (xyzi) coordinates of various structures (building, vehicles, trees etc.) along the driven path. The xyzi coordinates information was then combined to create a 3D terrain map (point-cloud). In this paper, we describe the development and application of 3D imaging techniques (most specifically the ICP algorithm) used to improve spatial, range and intensity estimates of imagery collected during urban terrain mapping using a co-bore sighted, commercially available digital video camera with focal plan of 640×480 pixels and a 3D FLASH LADAR. Various representations of the reconstructed point-clouds for the drive through data will also be presented.

  16. Contextual Classification of Point Cloud Data by Exploiting Individual 3d Neigbourhoods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, M.; Schmidt, A.; Mallet, C.; Hinz, S.; Rottensteiner, F.; Jutzi, B.

    2015-03-01

    The fully automated analysis of 3D point clouds is of great importance in photogrammetry, remote sensing and computer vision. For reliably extracting objects such as buildings, road inventory or vegetation, many approaches rely on the results of a point cloud classification, where each 3D point is assigned a respective semantic class label. Such an assignment, in turn, typically involves statistical methods for feature extraction and machine learning. Whereas the different components in the processing workflow have extensively, but separately been investigated in recent years, the respective connection by sharing the results of crucial tasks across all components has not yet been addressed. This connection not only encapsulates the interrelated issues of neighborhood selection and feature extraction, but also the issue of how to involve spatial context in the classification step. In this paper, we present a novel and generic approach for 3D scene analysis which relies on (i) individually optimized 3D neighborhoods for (ii) the extraction of distinctive geometric features and (iii) the contextual classification of point cloud data. For a labeled benchmark dataset, we demonstrate the beneficial impact of involving contextual information in the classification process and that using individual 3D neighborhoods of optimal size significantly increases the quality of the results for both pointwise and contextual classification.

  17. 3D reconstruction method from biplanar radiography using non-stereocorresponding points and elastic deformable meshes.

    PubMed

    Mitton, D; Landry, C; Véron, S; Skalli, W; Lavaste, F; De Guise, J A

    2000-03-01

    Standard 3D reconstruction of bones using stereoradiography is limited by the number of anatomical landmarks visible in more than one projection. The proposed technique enables the 3D reconstruction of additional landmarks that can be identified in only one of the radiographs. The principle of this method is the deformation of an elastic object that respects stereocorresponding and non-stereocorresponding observations available in different projections. This technique is based on the principle that any non-stereocorresponding point belongs to a line joining the X-ray source and the projection of the point in one view. The aim is to determine the 3D position of these points on their line of projection when submitted to geometrical and topological constraints. This technique is used to obtain the 3D geometry of 18 cadaveric upper cervical vertebrae. The reconstructed geometry obtained is compared with direct measurements using a magnetic digitiser. The order of precision determined with the point-to-surface distance between the reconstruction obtained with that technique and reference measurements is about 1 mm, depending on the vertebrae studied. Comparison results indicate that the obtained reconstruction is close to the actual vertebral geometry. This method can therefore be proposed to obtain the 3D geometry of vertebrae.

  18. Why Are Flare Ribbons Associated with the Spines of Magnetic Null Points Generically Elongated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontin, David; Galsgaard, Klaus; Démoulin, Pascal

    2016-08-01

    Coronal magnetic null points exist in abundance, as demonstrated by extrapolations of the coronal field, and have been inferred to be important for a broad range of energetic events. These null points and their associated separatrix and spine field lines represent discontinuities of the field line mapping, making them preferential locations for reconnection. This field line mapping also exhibits strong gradients adjacent to the separatrix (fan) and spine field lines, which can be analysed using the "squashing factor", Q. In this article we analyse in detail the distribution of Q in the presence of magnetic nulls. While Q is formally infinite on both the spine and fan of the null, the decay of Q away from these structures is shown in general to depend strongly on the null-point structure. For the generic case of a non-radially-symmetric null, Q decays most slowly away from the spine or fan in the direction in which |{B}| increases most slowly. In particular, this demonstrates that the extended elliptical high-Q halo around the spine footpoints observed by Masson et al. ( Astrophys. J. 700, 559, 2009) is a generic feature. This extension of the Q halos around the spine or fan footpoints is important for diagnosing the regions of the photosphere that are magnetically connected to any current layer that forms at the null. In light of this, we discuss how our results can be used to interpret the geometry of observed flare ribbons in circular ribbon flares, in which typically a coronal null is implicated. We conclude that both the physics in the vicinity of the null and how this is related to the extension of Q away from the spine or fan can be used in tandem to understand observational signatures of reconnection at coronal null points.

  19. 3DVEM Software Modules for Efficient Management of Point Clouds and Photorealistic 3d Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabado, S.; Seguí, A. E.; Cabrelles, M.; Navarro, S.; García-De-San-Miguel, D.; Lerma, J. L.

    2013-07-01

    Cultural heritage managers in general and information users in particular are not usually used to deal with high-technological hardware and software. On the contrary, information providers of metric surveys are most of the times applying latest developments for real-life conservation and restoration projects. This paper addresses the software issue of handling and managing either 3D point clouds or (photorealistic) 3D models to bridge the gap between information users and information providers as regards the management of information which users and providers share as a tool for decision-making, analysis, visualization and management. There are not many viewers specifically designed to handle, manage and create easily animations of architectural and/or archaeological 3D objects, monuments and sites, among others. 3DVEM - 3D Viewer, Editor & Meter software will be introduced to the scientific community, as well as 3DVEM - Live and 3DVEM - Register. The advantages of managing projects with both sets of data, 3D point cloud and photorealistic 3D models, will be introduced. Different visualizations of true documentation projects in the fields of architecture, archaeology and industry will be presented. Emphasis will be driven to highlight the features of new userfriendly software to manage virtual projects. Furthermore, the easiness of creating controlled interactive animations (both walkthrough and fly-through) by the user either on-the-fly or as a traditional movie file will be demonstrated through 3DVEM - Live.

  20. Database guided detection of anatomical landmark points in 3D images of the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavides, Thomas; Esther Leung, K. Y.; Paclik, Pavel; Hendriks, Emile A.; Bosch, Johan G.

    2010-03-01

    Automated landmark detection may prove invaluable in the analysis of real-time three-dimensional (3D) echocardiograms. By detecting 3D anatomical landmark points, the standard anatomical views can be extracted automatically in apically acquired 3D ultrasound images of the left ventricle, for better standardization of visualization and objective diagnosis. Furthermore, the landmarks can serve as an initialization for other analysis methods, such as segmentation. The described algorithm applies landmark detection in perpendicular planes of the 3D dataset. The landmark detection exploits a large database of expert annotated images, using an extensive set of Haar features for fast classification. The detection is performed using two cascades of Adaboost classifiers in a coarse to fine scheme. The method is evaluated by measuring the distance of detected and manually indicated landmark points in 25 patients. The method can detect landmarks accurately in the four-chamber (apex: 7.9+/-7.1mm, septal mitral valve point: 5.6+/-2.7mm lateral mitral valve point: 4.0+/-2.6mm) and two-chamber view (apex: 7.1+/-6.7mm, anterior mitral valve point: 5.8+/-3.5mm, inferior mitral valve point: 4.5+/-3.1mm). The results compare well to those reported by others.

  1. The fluctuations of the spin state of 3d-ions near the ``triple point''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhitlukhina, E. S.; Lamonova, K. V.; Orel, S. M.; Pashkevich, Yu. G.

    2012-10-01

    The spin states of 3d ions placed in an arbitrarily distorted coordination complex are investigated within the semiempirical modified crystal-field theory. A scheme for constructing spin-state diagrams is presented. Spin-state diagrams are obtained for transition metal ions with electron configurations 3d4, 3d5, and 3d6 placed in a pyramidal environment. The spin-state diagrams for all configurations studied display so-called "triple points", i.e., regions where the spin states are mixed in equal proportions. The spin-state evolution of a five-coordinated Co3+ ion in the layered rare-earth cobaltite GdBaCo2O5.5 is studied. It is found that the intermediate spin state of the Co3+ ion is stabilized by the apex oxygen displacement along the pyramidal axis.

  2. Dense 3d Point Cloud Generation from Uav Images from Image Matching and Global Optimazation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, S.; Kim, T.

    2016-06-01

    3D spatial information from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) images is usually provided in the form of 3D point clouds. For various UAV applications, it is important to generate dense 3D point clouds automatically from over the entire extent of UAV images. In this paper, we aim to apply image matching for generation of local point clouds over a pair or group of images and global optimization to combine local point clouds over the whole region of interest. We tried to apply two types of image matching, an object space-based matching technique and an image space-based matching technique, and to compare the performance of the two techniques. The object space-based matching used here sets a list of candidate height values for a fixed horizontal position in the object space. For each height, its corresponding image point is calculated and similarity is measured by grey-level correlation. The image space-based matching used here is a modified relaxation matching. We devised a global optimization scheme for finding optimal pairs (or groups) to apply image matching, defining local match region in image- or object- space, and merging local point clouds into a global one. For optimal pair selection, tiepoints among images were extracted and stereo coverage network was defined by forming a maximum spanning tree using the tiepoints. From experiments, we confirmed that through image matching and global optimization, 3D point clouds were generated successfully. However, results also revealed some limitations. In case of image-based matching results, we observed some blanks in 3D point clouds. In case of object space-based matching results, we observed more blunders than image-based matching ones and noisy local height variations. We suspect these might be due to inaccurate orientation parameters. The work in this paper is still ongoing. We will further test our approach with more precise orientation parameters.

  3. Current Structure and Nonideal Behavior at Magnetic Null Points in the Turbulent Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendel, D. E.; Adrian, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    The Poincaré index indicates that the Cluster spacecraft tetrahedron entraps a number of 3-D magnetic nulls during an encounter with the turbulent magnetosheath. Previous researchers have found evidence for reconnection at one of the many filamentary current layers observed by Cluster in this region. We find that many of the entrained nulls are also associated with strong currents. We dissect the current structure of a pair of spiral nulls that may be topologically connected. At both nulls, we find a strong current along the spine, accompanied by a somewhat more modest current perpendicular to the spine that tilts the fan toward the axis of the spine. The current along the fan is comparable to the that along the spine. At least one of the nulls manifests a rotational flow pattern in the fan plane that is consistent with torsional spine reconnection as predicted by theory. These results emphasize the importance of examining the magnetic topology in interpreting the nature of currents and reconnection in 3-D turbulence.

  4. Automatic extraction of facial interest points based on 2D and 3D data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdogmus, Nesli; Dugelay, Jean-Luc

    2011-03-01

    Facial feature points are one of the most important clues for many computer vision applications such as face normalization, registration and model-based human face coding. Hence, automating the extraction of these points would have a wide range of usage. In this paper, we aim to detect a subset of Facial Definition Parameters (FDPs) defined in MPEG-4 automatically by utilizing both 2D and 3D face data. The main assumption in this work is that the 2D images and the corresponding 3D scans are taken for frontal faces with neutral expressions. This limitation is realistic with respect to our scenario, in which the enrollment is done in a controlled environment and the detected FDP points are to be used for the warping and animation of the enrolled faces [1] where the choice of MPEG-4 FDP is justified. For the extraction of the points, 2D, 3D data or both is used according to the distinctive information they carry in that particular facial region. As a result, total number of 29 interest points is detected. The method is tested on the neutral set of Bosphorus database that includes 105 subjects with registered 3D scans and color images.

  5. Joint classification and contour extraction of large 3D point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackel, Timo; Wegner, Jan D.; Schindler, Konrad

    2017-08-01

    We present an effective and efficient method for point-wise semantic classification and extraction of object contours of large-scale 3D point clouds. What makes point cloud interpretation challenging is the sheer size of several millions of points per scan and the non-grid, sparse, and uneven distribution of points. Standard image processing tools like texture filters, for example, cannot handle such data efficiently, which calls for dedicated point cloud labeling methods. It turns out that one of the major drivers for efficient computation and handling of strong variations in point density, is a careful formulation of per-point neighborhoods at multiple scales. This allows, both, to define an expressive feature set and to extract topologically meaningful object contours. Semantic classification and contour extraction are interlaced problems. Point-wise semantic classification enables extracting a meaningful candidate set of contour points while contours help generating a rich feature representation that benefits point-wise classification. These methods are tailored to have fast run time and small memory footprint for processing large-scale, unstructured, and inhomogeneous point clouds, while still achieving high classification accuracy. We evaluate our methods on the semantic3d.net benchmark for terrestrial laser scans with >109 points.

  6. Towards 3D Matching of Point Clouds Derived from Oblique and Nadir Airborne Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming

    Because of the low-expense high-efficient image collection process and the rich 3D and texture information presented in the images, a combined use of 2D airborne nadir and oblique images to reconstruct 3D geometric scene has a promising market for future commercial usage like urban planning or first responders. The methodology introduced in this thesis provides a feasible way towards fully automated 3D city modeling from oblique and nadir airborne imagery. In this thesis, the difficulty of matching 2D images with large disparity is avoided by grouping the images first and applying the 3D registration afterward. The procedure starts with the extraction of point clouds using a modified version of the RIT 3D Extraction Workflow. Then the point clouds are refined by noise removal and surface smoothing processes. Since the point clouds extracted from different image groups use independent coordinate systems, there are translation, rotation and scale differences existing. To figure out these differences, 3D keypoints and their features are extracted. For each pair of point clouds, an initial alignment and a more accurate registration are applied in succession. The final transform matrix presents the parameters describing the translation, rotation and scale requirements. The methodology presented in the thesis has been shown to behave well for test data. The robustness of this method is discussed by adding artificial noise to the test data. For Pictometry oblique aerial imagery, the initial alignment provides a rough alignment result, which contains a larger offset compared to that of test data because of the low quality of the point clouds themselves, but it can be further refined through the final optimization. The accuracy of the final registration result is evaluated by comparing it to the result obtained from manual selection of matched points. Using the method introduced, point clouds extracted from different image groups could be combined with each other to build a

  7. Automatic pole-like object modeling via 3D part-based analysis of point cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Liu; Yang, Haoxiang; Huang, Yuchun

    2016-10-01

    Pole-like objects, including trees, lampposts and traffic signs, are indispensable part of urban infrastructure. With the advance of vehicle-based laser scanning (VLS), massive point cloud of roadside urban areas becomes applied in 3D digital city modeling. Based on the property that different pole-like objects have various canopy parts and similar trunk parts, this paper proposed the 3D part-based shape analysis to robustly extract, identify and model the pole-like objects. The proposed method includes: 3D clustering and recognition of trunks, voxel growing and part-based 3D modeling. After preprocessing, the trunk center is identified as the point that has local density peak and the largest minimum inter-cluster distance. Starting from the trunk centers, the remaining points are iteratively clustered to the same centers of their nearest point with higher density. To eliminate the noisy points, cluster border is refined by trimming boundary outliers. Then, candidate trunks are extracted based on the clustering results in three orthogonal planes by shape analysis. Voxel growing obtains the completed pole-like objects regardless of overlaying. Finally, entire trunk, branch and crown part are analyzed to obtain seven feature parameters. These parameters are utilized to model three parts respectively and get signal part-assembled 3D model. The proposed method is tested using the VLS-based point cloud of Wuhan University, China. The point cloud includes many kinds of trees, lampposts and other pole-like posters under different occlusions and overlaying. Experimental results show that the proposed method can extract the exact attributes and model the roadside pole-like objects efficiently.

  8. Dense point-cloud creation using superresolution for a monocular 3D reconstruction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diskin, Yakov; Asari, Vijayan K.

    2012-05-01

    We present an enhanced 3D reconstruction algorithm designed to support an autonomously navigated unmanned aerial system (UAS). The algorithm presented focuses on the 3D reconstruction of a scene using only a single moving camera. In this way, the system can be used to construct a point cloud model of its unknown surroundings. The original reconstruction process, resulting with a point cloud was computed based on feature matching and depth triangulation analysis. Although dense, this original model was hindered due to its low disparity resolution. As feature points were matched from frame to frame, the resolution of the input images and the discrete nature of disparities limited the depth computations within a scene. With the recent addition of the preprocessing steps of nonlinear super resolution, the accuracy of the point cloud which relies on precise disparity measurement has significantly increased. Using a pixel by pixel approach, the super resolution technique computes the phase congruency of each pixel's neighborhood and produces nonlinearly interpolated high resolution input frames. Thus, a feature point travels a more precise discrete disparity. Also, the quantity of points within the 3D point cloud model is significantly increased since the number of features is directly proportional to the resolution and high frequencies of the input image. The contribution of the newly added preprocessing steps is measured by evaluating the density and accuracy of the reconstructed point cloud for autonomous navigation and mapping tasks within unknown environments.

  9. ON THE NATURE OF RECONNECTION AT A SOLAR CORONAL NULL POINT ABOVE A SEPARATRIX DOME

    SciTech Connect

    Pontin, D. I.; Priest, E. R.; Galsgaard, K.

    2013-09-10

    Three-dimensional magnetic null points are ubiquitous in the solar corona and in any generic mixed-polarity magnetic field. We consider magnetic reconnection at an isolated coronal null point whose fan field lines form a dome structure. Using analytical and computational models, we demonstrate several features of spine-fan reconnection at such a null, including the fact that substantial magnetic flux transfer from one region of field line connectivity to another can occur. The flux transfer occurs across the current sheet that forms around the null point during spine-fan reconnection, and there is no separator present. Also, flipping of magnetic field lines takes place in a manner similar to that observed in the quasi-separatrix layer or slip-running reconnection.

  10. Feature relevance assessment for the semantic interpretation of 3D point cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, M.; Jutzi, B.; Mallet, C.

    2013-10-01

    The automatic analysis of large 3D point clouds represents a crucial task in photogrammetry, remote sensing and computer vision. In this paper, we propose a new methodology for the semantic interpretation of such point clouds which involves feature relevance assessment in order to reduce both processing time and memory consumption. Given a standard benchmark dataset with 1.3 million 3D points, we first extract a set of 21 geometric 3D and 2D features. Subsequently, we apply a classifier-independent ranking procedure which involves a general relevance metric in order to derive compact and robust subsets of versatile features which are generally applicable for a large variety of subsequent tasks. This metric is based on 7 different feature selection strategies and thus addresses different intrinsic properties of the given data. For the example of semantically interpreting 3D point cloud data, we demonstrate the great potential of smaller subsets consisting of only the most relevant features with 4 different state-of-the-art classifiers. The results reveal that, instead of including as many features as possible in order to compensate for lack of knowledge, a crucial task such as scene interpretation can be carried out with only few versatile features and even improved accuracy.

  11. Non-Iterative Rigid 2D/3D Point-Set Registration Using Semidefinite Programming.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Yuehaw; Kapoor, Ankur

    2016-07-01

    We describe a convex programming framework for pose estimation in 2D/3D point-set registration with unknown point correspondences. We give two mixed-integer nonlinear program (MINLP) formulations of the 2D/3D registration problem when there are multiple 2D images, and propose convex relaxations for both the MINLPs to semidefinite programs that can be solved efficiently by interior point methods. Our approach to the 2D/3D registration problem is non-iterative in nature as we jointly solve for pose and correspondence. Furthermore, these convex programs can readily incorporate feature descriptors of points to enhance registration results. We prove that the convex programs exactly recover the solution to the MINLPs under certain noiseless condition. We apply these formulations to the registration of 3D models of coronary vessels to their 2D projections obtained from multiple intra-operative fluoroscopic images. For this application, we experimentally corroborate the exact recovery property in the absence of noise and further demonstrate robustness of the convex programs in the presence of noise.

  12. Comparison Between Two Generic 3d Building Reconstruction Approaches - Point Cloud Based VS. Image Processing Based

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlke, D.; Linkiewicz, M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper compares two generic approaches for the reconstruction of buildings. Synthesized and real oblique and vertical aerial imagery is transformed on the one hand into a dense photogrammetric 3D point cloud and on the other hand into photogrammetric 2.5D surface models depicting a scene from different cardinal directions. One approach evaluates the 3D point cloud statistically in order to extract the hull of structures, while the other approach makes use of salient line segments in 2.5D surface models, so that the hull of 3D structures can be recovered. With orders of magnitudes more analyzed 3D points, the point cloud based approach is an order of magnitude more accurate for the synthetic dataset compared to the lower dimensioned, but therefor orders of magnitude faster, image processing based approach. For real world data the difference in accuracy between both approaches is not significant anymore. In both cases the reconstructed polyhedra supply information about their inherent semantic and can be used for subsequent and more differentiated semantic annotations through exploitation of texture information.

  13. Image-Based Airborne LiDAR Point Cloud Encoding for 3d Building Model Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Chen; Lin, Chao-Hung

    2016-06-01

    With the development of Web 2.0 and cyber city modeling, an increasing number of 3D models have been available on web-based model-sharing platforms with many applications such as navigation, urban planning, and virtual reality. Based on the concept of data reuse, a 3D model retrieval system is proposed to retrieve building models similar to a user-specified query. The basic idea behind this system is to reuse these existing 3D building models instead of reconstruction from point clouds. To efficiently retrieve models, the models in databases are compactly encoded by using a shape descriptor generally. However, most of the geometric descriptors in related works are applied to polygonal models. In this study, the input query of the model retrieval system is a point cloud acquired by Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) systems because of the efficient scene scanning and spatial information collection. Using Point clouds with sparse, noisy, and incomplete sampling as input queries is more difficult than that by using 3D models. Because that the building roof is more informative than other parts in the airborne LiDAR point cloud, an image-based approach is proposed to encode both point clouds from input queries and 3D models in databases. The main goal of data encoding is that the models in the database and input point clouds can be consistently encoded. Firstly, top-view depth images of buildings are generated to represent the geometry surface of a building roof. Secondly, geometric features are extracted from depth images based on height, edge and plane of building. Finally, descriptors can be extracted by spatial histograms and used in 3D model retrieval system. For data retrieval, the models are retrieved by matching the encoding coefficients of point clouds and building models. In experiments, a database including about 900,000 3D models collected from the Internet is used for evaluation of data retrieval. The results of the proposed method show a clear superiority

  14. Facets : a Cloudcompare Plugin to Extract Geological Planes from Unstructured 3d Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewez, T. J. B.; Girardeau-Montaut, D.; Allanic, C.; Rohmer, J.

    2016-06-01

    Geological planar facets (stratification, fault, joint…) are key features to unravel the tectonic history of rock outcrop or appreciate the stability of a hazardous rock cliff. Measuring their spatial attitude (dip and strike) is generally performed by hand with a compass/clinometer, which is time consuming, requires some degree of censoring (i.e. refusing to measure some features judged unimportant at the time), is not always possible for fractures higher up on the outcrop and is somewhat hazardous. 3D virtual geological outcrop hold the potential to alleviate these issues. Efficiently segmenting massive 3D point clouds into individual planar facets, inside a convenient software environment was lacking. FACETS is a dedicated plugin within CloudCompare v2.6.2 (http://cloudcompare.org/ ) implemented to perform planar facet extraction, calculate their dip and dip direction (i.e. azimuth of steepest decent) and report the extracted data in interactive stereograms. Two algorithms perform the segmentation: Kd-Tree and Fast Marching. Both divide the point cloud into sub-cells, then compute elementary planar objects and aggregate them progressively according to a planeity threshold into polygons. The boundaries of the polygons are adjusted around segmented points with a tension parameter, and the facet polygons can be exported as 3D polygon shapefiles towards third party GIS software or simply as ASCII comma separated files. One of the great features of FACETS is the capability to explore planar objects but also 3D points with normals with the stereogram tool. Poles can be readily displayed, queried and manually segmented interactively. The plugin blends seamlessly into CloudCompare to leverage all its other 3D point cloud manipulation features. A demonstration of the tool is presented to illustrate these different features. While designed for geological applications, FACETS could be more widely applied to any planar

  15. Interactive Cosmetic Makeup of a 3D Point-Based Face Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Sik; Choi, Soo-Mi

    We present an interactive system for cosmetic makeup of a point-based face model acquired by 3D scanners. We first enhance the texture of a face model in 3D space using low-pass Gaussian filtering, median filtering, and histogram equalization. The user is provided with a stereoscopic display and haptic feedback, and can perform simulated makeup tasks including the application of foundation, color makeup, and lip gloss. Fast rendering is achieved by processing surfels using the GPU, and we use a BSP tree data structure and a dynamic local refinement of the facial surface to provide interactive haptics. We have implemented a prototype system and evaluated its performance.

  16. Critical Point Cancellation in 3D Vector Fields: Robustness and Discussion.

    PubMed

    Skraba, Primoz; Rosen, Paul; Wang, Bei; Chen, Guoning; Bhatia, Harsh; Pascucci, Valerio

    2016-02-29

    Vector field topology has been successfully applied to represent the structure of steady vector fields. Critical points, one of the essential components of vector field topology, play an important role in describing the complexity of the extracted structure. Simplifying vector fields via critical point cancellation has practical merit for interpreting the behaviors of complex vector fields such as turbulence. However, there is no effective technique that allows direct cancellation of critical points in 3D. This work fills this gap and introduces the first framework to directly cancel pairs or groups of 3D critical points in a hierarchical manner with a guaranteed minimum amount of perturbation based on their robustness, a quantitative measure of their stability. In addition, our framework does not require the extraction of the entire 3D topology, which contains non-trivial separation structures, and thus is computationally effective. Furthermore, our algorithm can remove critical points in any subregion of the domain whose degree is zero and handle complex boundary configurations, making it capable of addressing challenging scenarios that may not be resolved otherwise. We apply our method to synthetic and simulation datasets to demonstrate its effectiveness.

  17. An Iterative Closest Points Algorithm for Registration of 3D Laser Scanner Point Clouds with Geometric Features

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bin; Yang, Jun; Li, Shunzhi; He, Jin

    2017-01-01

    The Iterative Closest Points (ICP) algorithm is the mainstream algorithm used in the process of accurate registration of 3D point cloud data. The algorithm requires a proper initial value and the approximate registration of two point clouds to prevent the algorithm from falling into local extremes, but in the actual point cloud matching process, it is difficult to ensure compliance with this requirement. In this paper, we proposed the ICP algorithm based on point cloud features (GF-ICP). This method uses the geometrical features of the point cloud to be registered, such as curvature, surface normal and point cloud density, to search for the correspondence relationships between two point clouds and introduces the geometric features into the error function to realize the accurate registration of two point clouds. The experimental results showed that the algorithm can improve the convergence speed and the interval of convergence without setting a proper initial value. PMID:28800096

  18. An Iterative Closest Points Algorithm for Registration of 3D Laser Scanner Point Clouds with Geometric Features.

    PubMed

    He, Ying; Liang, Bin; Yang, Jun; Li, Shunzhi; He, Jin

    2017-08-11

    The Iterative Closest Points (ICP) algorithm is the mainstream algorithm used in the process of accurate registration of 3D point cloud data. The algorithm requires a proper initial value and the approximate registration of two point clouds to prevent the algorithm from falling into local extremes, but in the actual point cloud matching process, it is difficult to ensure compliance with this requirement. In this paper, we proposed the ICP algorithm based on point cloud features (GF-ICP). This method uses the geometrical features of the point cloud to be registered, such as curvature, surface normal and point cloud density, to search for the correspondence relationships between two point clouds and introduces the geometric features into the error function to realize the accurate registration of two point clouds. The experimental results showed that the algorithm can improve the convergence speed and the interval of convergence without setting a proper initial value.

  19. 3D change detection at street level using mobile laser scanning point clouds and terrestrial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Rongjun; Gruen, Armin

    2014-04-01

    Automatic change detection and geo-database updating in the urban environment are difficult tasks. There has been much research on detecting changes with satellite and aerial images, but studies have rarely been performed at the street level, which is complex in its 3D geometry. Contemporary geo-databases include 3D street-level objects, which demand frequent data updating. Terrestrial images provides rich texture information for change detection, but the change detection with terrestrial images from different epochs sometimes faces problems with illumination changes, perspective distortions and unreliable 3D geometry caused by the lack of performance of automatic image matchers, while mobile laser scanning (MLS) data acquired from different epochs provides accurate 3D geometry for change detection, but is very expensive for periodical acquisition. This paper proposes a new method for change detection at street level by using combination of MLS point clouds and terrestrial images: the accurate but expensive MLS data acquired from an early epoch serves as the reference, and terrestrial images or photogrammetric images captured from an image-based mobile mapping system (MMS) at a later epoch are used to detect the geometrical changes between different epochs. The method will automatically mark the possible changes in each view, which provides a cost-efficient method for frequent data updating. The methodology is divided into several steps. In the first step, the point clouds are recorded by the MLS system and processed, with data cleaned and classified by semi-automatic means. In the second step, terrestrial images or mobile mapping images at a later epoch are taken and registered to the point cloud, and then point clouds are projected on each image by a weighted window based z-buffering method for view dependent 2D triangulation. In the next step, stereo pairs of the terrestrial images are rectified and re-projected between each other to check the geometrical

  20. Automated interpretation of 3D laserscanned point clouds for plant organ segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wahabzada, Mirwaes; Paulus, Stefan; Kersting, Kristian; Mahlein, Anne-Katrin

    2015-08-08

    Plant organ segmentation from 3D point clouds is a relevant task for plant phenotyping and plant growth observation. Automated solutions are required to increase the efficiency of recent high-throughput plant phenotyping pipelines. However, plant geometrical properties vary with time, among observation scales and different plant types. The main objective of the present research is to develop a fully automated, fast and reliable data driven approach for plant organ segmentation. The automated segmentation of plant organs using unsupervised, clustering methods is crucial in cases where the goal is to get fast insights into the data or no labeled data is available or costly to achieve. For this we propose and compare data driven approaches that are easy-to-realize and make the use of standard algorithms possible. Since normalized histograms, acquired from 3D point clouds, can be seen as samples from a probability simplex, we propose to map the data from the simplex space into Euclidean space using Aitchisons log ratio transformation, or into the positive quadrant of the unit sphere using square root transformation. This, in turn, paves the way to a wide range of commonly used analysis techniques that are based on measuring the similarities between data points using Euclidean distance. We investigate the performance of the resulting approaches in the practical context of grouping 3D point clouds and demonstrate empirically that they lead to clustering results with high accuracy for monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plant species with diverse shoot architecture. An automated segmentation of 3D point clouds is demonstrated in the present work. Within seconds first insights into plant data can be deviated - even from non-labelled data. This approach is applicable to different plant species with high accuracy. The analysis cascade can be implemented in future high-throughput phenotyping scenarios and will support the evaluation of the performance of different plant

  1. Shocks and currents in stratified atmospheres with a magnetic null point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarr, Lucas A.; Linton, Mark

    2017-08-01

    We use the resistive MHD code LARE (Arber et al 2001) to inject a compressive MHD wavepacket into a stratified atmosphere that has a single magnetic null point, as recently described in Tarr et al 2017. The 2.5D simulation represents a slice through a small ephemeral region or area of plage. The strong gradients in field strength and connectivity related to the presence of the null produce substantially different dynamics compared to the more slowly varying fields typically used in simple sunspot models. The wave-null interaction produces a fast mode shock that collapses the null into a current sheet and generates a set of outward propagating (from the null) slow mode shocks confined to field lines near each separatrix. A combination of oscillatory reconnection and shock dissipation ultimately raise the plasma's internal energy at the null and along each separatrix by 25-50% above the background. The resulting pressure gradients must be balanced by Lorentz forces, so that the final state has contact discontinuities along each separatrix and a persistent current at the null. The simulation demonstrates that fast and slow mode waves localize currents to the topologically important locations of the field, just as their Alfvenic counterparts do, and also illustrates the necessity of treating waves and reconnection as coupled phenomena.

  2. Magnetoacoustic Waves in a Stratified Atmosphere with a Magnetic Null Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarr, Lucas A.; Linton, Mark; Leake, James

    2017-03-01

    We perform nonlinear MHD simulations to study the propagation of magnetoacoustic waves from the photosphere to the low corona. We focus on a 2D system with a gravitationally stratified atmosphere and three photospheric concentrations of magnetic flux that produce a magnetic null point with a magnetic dome topology. We find that a single wavepacket introduced at the lower boundary splits into multiple secondary wavepackets. A portion of the packet refracts toward the null owing to the varying Alfvén speed. Waves incident on the equipartition contour surrounding the null, where the sound and Alfvén speeds coincide, partially transmit, reflect, and mode-convert between branches of the local dispersion relation. Approximately 15.5% of the wavepacket’s initial energy (E input) converges on the null, mostly as a fast magnetoacoustic wave. Conversion is very efficient: 70% of the energy incident on the null is converted to slow modes propagating away from the null, 7% leaves as a fast wave, and the remaining 23% (0.036E input) is locally dissipated. The acoustic energy leaving the null is strongly concentrated along field lines near each of the null’s four separatrices. The portion of the wavepacket that refracts toward the null, and the amount of current accumulation, depends on the vertical and horizontal wavenumbers and the centroid position of the wavepacket as it crosses the photosphere. Regions that refract toward or away from the null do not simply coincide with regions of open versus closed magnetic field or regions of particular field orientation. We also model wavepacket propagation using a WKB method and find that it agrees qualitatively, though not quantitatively, with the results of the numerical simulation.

  3. Parameter Estimation of Fossil Oysters from High Resolution 3D Point Cloud and Image Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djuricic, Ana; Harzhauser, Mathias; Dorninger, Peter; Nothegger, Clemens; Mandic, Oleg; Székely, Balázs; Molnár, Gábor; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2014-05-01

    A unique fossil oyster reef was excavated at Stetten in Lower Austria, which is also the highlight of the geo-edutainment park 'Fossilienwelt Weinviertel'. It provides the rare opportunity to study the Early Miocene flora and fauna of the Central Paratethys Sea. The site presents the world's largest fossil oyster biostrome formed about 16.5 million years ago in a tropical estuary of the Korneuburg Basin. About 15,000 up to 80-cm-long shells of Crassostrea gryphoides cover a 400 m2 large area. Our project 'Smart-Geology for the World's largest fossil oyster reef' combines methods of photogrammetry, geology and paleontology to document, evaluate and quantify the shell bed. This interdisciplinary approach will be applied to test hypotheses on the genesis of the taphocenosis (e.g.: tsunami versus major storm) and to reconstruct pre- and post-event processes. Hence, we are focusing on using visualization technologies from photogrammetry in geology and paleontology in order to develop new methods for automatic and objective evaluation of 3D point clouds. These will be studied on the basis of a very dense surface reconstruction of the oyster reef. 'Smart Geology', as extension of the classic discipline, exploits massive data, automatic interpretation, and visualization. Photogrammetry provides the tools for surface acquisition and objective, automated interpretation. We also want to stress the economic aspect of using automatic shape detection in paleontology, which saves manpower and increases efficiency during the monitoring and evaluation process. Currently, there are many well known algorithms for 3D shape detection of certain objects. We are using dense 3D laser scanning data from an instrument utilizing the phase shift measuring principle, which provides accurate geometrical basis < 3 mm. However, the situation is difficult in this multiple object scenario where more than 15,000 complete or fragmentary parts of an object with random orientation are found. The goal

  4. Sloped Terrain Segmentation for Autonomous Drive Using Sparse 3D Point Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seoungjae; Kim, Jonghyun; Ikram, Warda; Cho, Kyungeun; Sim, Sungdae

    2014-01-01

    A ubiquitous environment for road travel that uses wireless networks requires the minimization of data exchange between vehicles. An algorithm that can segment the ground in real time is necessary to obtain location data between vehicles simultaneously executing autonomous drive. This paper proposes a framework for segmenting the ground in real time using a sparse three-dimensional (3D) point cloud acquired from undulating terrain. A sparse 3D point cloud can be acquired by scanning the geography using light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensors. For efficient ground segmentation, 3D point clouds are quantized in units of volume pixels (voxels) and overlapping data is eliminated. We reduce nonoverlapping voxels to two dimensions by implementing a lowermost heightmap. The ground area is determined on the basis of the number of voxels in each voxel group. We execute ground segmentation in real time by proposing an approach to minimize the comparison between neighboring voxels. Furthermore, we experimentally verify that ground segmentation can be executed at about 19.31 ms per frame. PMID:25093204

  5. Sloped terrain segmentation for autonomous drive using sparse 3D point cloud.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seoungjae; Kim, Jonghyun; Ikram, Warda; Cho, Kyungeun; Jeong, Young-Sik; Um, Kyhyun; Sim, Sungdae

    2014-01-01

    A ubiquitous environment for road travel that uses wireless networks requires the minimization of data exchange between vehicles. An algorithm that can segment the ground in real time is necessary to obtain location data between vehicles simultaneously executing autonomous drive. This paper proposes a framework for segmenting the ground in real time using a sparse three-dimensional (3D) point cloud acquired from undulating terrain. A sparse 3D point cloud can be acquired by scanning the geography using light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensors. For efficient ground segmentation, 3D point clouds are quantized in units of volume pixels (voxels) and overlapping data is eliminated. We reduce nonoverlapping voxels to two dimensions by implementing a lowermost heightmap. The ground area is determined on the basis of the number of voxels in each voxel group. We execute ground segmentation in real time by proposing an approach to minimize the comparison between neighboring voxels. Furthermore, we experimentally verify that ground segmentation can be executed at about 19.31 ms per frame.

  6. Street curb recognition in 3d point cloud data using morphological operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Cuenca, Borja; Concepción Alonso-Rodríguez, María; García-Cortés, Silverio; Ordóñez, Celestino

    2015-04-01

    Accurate and automatic detection of cartographic-entities saves a great deal of time and money when creating and updating cartographic databases. The current trend in remote sensing feature extraction is to develop methods that are as automatic as possible. The aim is to develop algorithms that can obtain accurate results with the least possible human intervention in the process. Non-manual curb detection is an important issue in road maintenance, 3D urban modeling, and autonomous navigation fields. This paper is focused on the semi-automatic recognition of curbs and street boundaries using a 3D point cloud registered by a mobile laser scanner (MLS) system. This work is divided into four steps. First, a coordinate system transformation is carried out, moving from a global coordinate system to a local one. After that and in order to simplify the calculations involved in the procedure, a rasterization based on the projection of the measured point cloud on the XY plane was carried out, passing from the 3D original data to a 2D image. To determine the location of curbs in the image, different image processing techniques such as thresholding and morphological operations were applied. Finally, the upper and lower edges of curbs are detected by an unsupervised classification algorithm on the curvature and roughness of the points that represent curbs. The proposed method is valid in both straight and curved road sections and applicable both to laser scanner and stereo vision 3D data due to the independence of its scanning geometry. This method has been successfully tested with two datasets measured by different sensors. The first dataset corresponds to a point cloud measured by a TOPCON sensor in the Spanish town of Cudillero. That point cloud comprises more than 6,000,000 points and covers a 400-meter street. The second dataset corresponds to a point cloud measured by a RIEGL sensor in the Austrian town of Horn. That point cloud comprises 8,000,000 points and represents a

  7. Compression of 3D Point Clouds Using a Region-Adaptive Hierarchical Transform.

    PubMed

    De Queiroz, Ricardo; Chou, Philip A

    2016-06-01

    In free-viewpoint video, there is a recent trend to represent scene objects as solids rather than using multiple depth maps. Point clouds have been used in computer graphics for a long time and with the recent possibility of real time capturing and rendering, point clouds have been favored over meshes in order to save computation. Each point in the cloud is associated with its 3D position and its color. We devise a method to compress the colors in point clouds which is based on a hierarchical transform and arithmetic coding. The transform is a hierarchical sub-band transform that resembles an adaptive variation of a Haar wavelet. The arithmetic encoding of the coefficients assumes Laplace distributions, one per sub-band. The Laplace parameter for each distribution is transmitted to the decoder using a custom method. The geometry of the point cloud is encoded using the well-established octtree scanning. Results show that the proposed solution performs comparably to the current state-of-the-art, in many occasions outperforming it, while being much more computationally efficient. We believe this work represents the state-of-the-art in intra-frame compression of point clouds for real-time 3D video.

  8. Mind the Gap: Exploring the Physics of Null Points Using Unconventional Coordinate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, Brendan; Dudson, Ben; Avino, Fabio; Leddy, Jarrod; Hill, Peter; Furno, Ivo

    2015-11-01

    Simulations of instabilities and turbulence in X-point configurations are challenging due to the limitations of field-aligned coordinate systems: X-point dynamics are often interpolated from flux surfaces, which could exclude relevant physics. Here we explore the physics of null regions in multiple geometries using unconventional coordinate systems in BOUT++. Specifically, we have investigated the physics of blob propagation and compared with experimental measurements within the TORPEX device, indicating an increase in inertially limited filament propagation in the null region caused by longer connection lengths. The null point dynamics of filaments crossing the separatrix in tokamak geometry will also be presented using a novel field-aligned coordinate system, with applications to ELM and blob theory. Finally, recent work on implementation and applicability of the Flux Coordinate Independent (FCI) approach to complex magnetic geometry modelling will be discussed.

  9. Quality of 3d Point Clouds from Highly Overlapping Uav Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haala, N.; Cramer, M.; Rothermel, M.

    2013-08-01

    UAVs are becoming standard platforms for photogrammetric data capture especially while aiming at large scale aerial mapping for areas of limited extent. Such applications especially benefit from the very reasonable price of a small light UAS including control system and standard consumer grade digital camera, which is some orders of magnitude lower compared to digital photogrammetric systems. Within the paper the capability of UAV-based data collection will be evaluated for two different consumer camera systems and compared to an aerial survey with a state-of-the-art digital airborne camera system. During this evaluation, the quality of 3D point clouds generated by dense multiple image matching will be used as a benchmark. Also due to recent software developments such point clouds can be generated at a resolution similar to the ground sampling distance of the available imagery and are used for an increasing number of applications. Usually, image matching benefits from the good images quality as provided from digital airborne camera systems, which is frequently not available from the low-cost sensor components used for UAV image collection. Within the paper an investigation on UAV-based 3D data capture will be presented. For this purpose dense 3D point clouds are generated for a test area from three different platforms: first a UAV with a light weight compact camera, second a system using a system camera and finally a medium-format airborne digital camera system. Despite the considerable differences in system costs, suitable results can be derived from all data, especially if large redundancy is available such highly overlapping image blocks are not only beneficial during georeferencing, but are especially advantageous while aiming at a dense and accurate image based 3D surface reconstruction.

  10. Evaluation Model for Pavement Surface Distress on 3d Point Clouds from Mobile Mapping System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Shimamura, H.

    2012-07-01

    This paper proposes a methodology to evaluate the pavement surface distress for maintenance planning of road pavement using 3D point clouds from Mobile Mapping System (MMS). The issue on maintenance planning of road pavement requires scheduled rehabilitation activities for damaged pavement sections to keep high level of services. The importance of this performance-based infrastructure asset management on actual inspection data is globally recognized. Inspection methodology of road pavement surface, a semi-automatic measurement system utilizing inspection vehicles for measuring surface deterioration indexes, such as cracking, rutting and IRI, have already been introduced and capable of continuously archiving the pavement performance data. However, any scheduled inspection using automatic measurement vehicle needs much cost according to the instruments' specification or inspection interval. Therefore, implementation of road maintenance work, especially for the local government, is difficult considering costeffectiveness. Based on this background, in this research, the methodologies for a simplified evaluation for pavement surface and assessment of damaged pavement section are proposed using 3D point clouds data to build urban 3D modelling. The simplified evaluation results of road surface were able to provide useful information for road administrator to find out the pavement section for a detailed examination and for an immediate repair work. In particular, the regularity of enumeration of 3D point clouds was evaluated using Chow-test and F-test model by extracting the section where the structural change of a coordinate value was remarkably achieved. Finally, the validity of the current methodology was investigated by conducting a case study dealing with the actual inspection data of the local roads.

  11. Reconstructing 3D coastal cliffs from airborne oblique photographs without ground control points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewez, T. J. B.

    2014-05-01

    Coastal cliff collapse hazard assessment requires measuring cliff face topography at regular intervals. Terrestrial laser scanner techniques have proven useful so far but are expensive to use either through purchasing the equipment or through survey subcontracting. In addition, terrestrial laser surveys take time which is sometimes incompatible with the time during with the beach is accessible at low-tide. By comparison, structure from motion techniques (SFM) are much less costly to implement, and if airborne, acquisition of several kilometers of coastline can be done in a matter of minutes. In this paper, the potential of GPS-tagged oblique airborne photographs and SFM techniques is examined to reconstruct chalk cliff dense 3D point clouds without Ground Control Points (GCP). The focus is put on comparing the relative 3D point of views reconstructed by Visual SFM with their synchronous Solmeta Geotagger Pro2 GPS locations using robust estimators. With a set of 568 oblique photos, shot from the open door of an airplane with a triplet of synchronized Nikon D7000, GPS and SFM-determined view point coordinates converge to X: ±31.5 m; Y: ±39.7 m; Z: ±13.0 m (LE66). Uncertainty in GPS position affects the model scale, angular attitude of the reference frame (the shoreline ends up tilted by 2°) and absolute positioning. Ground Control Points cannot be avoided to orient such models.

  12. Error analysis in stereo vision for location measurement of 3D point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunting; Zhang, Jun; Tian, Jinwen

    2015-12-01

    Location measurement of 3D point in stereo vision is subjected to different sources of uncertainty that propagate to the final result. For current methods of error analysis, most of them are based on ideal intersection model to calculate the uncertainty region of point location via intersecting two fields of view of pixel that may produce loose bounds. Besides, only a few of sources of error such as pixel error or camera position are taken into account in the process of analysis. In this paper we present a straightforward and available method to estimate the location error that is taken most of source of error into account. We summed up and simplified all the input errors to five parameters by rotation transformation. Then we use the fast algorithm of midpoint method to deduce the mathematical relationships between target point and the parameters. Thus, the expectations and covariance matrix of 3D point location would be obtained, which can constitute the uncertainty region of point location. Afterwards, we turned back to the error propagation of the primitive input errors in the stereo system and throughout the whole analysis process from primitive input errors to localization error. Our method has the same level of computational complexity as the state-of-the-art method. Finally, extensive experiments are performed to verify the performance of our methods.

  13. 3D local feature BKD to extract road information from mobile laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Liu, Yuan; Dong, Zhen; Liang, Fuxun; Li, Bijun; Peng, Xiangyang

    2017-08-01

    Extracting road information from point clouds obtained through mobile laser scanning (MLS) is essential for autonomous vehicle navigation, and has hence garnered a growing amount of research interest in recent years. However, the performance of such systems is seriously affected due to varying point density and noise. This paper proposes a novel three-dimensional (3D) local feature called the binary kernel descriptor (BKD) to extract road information from MLS point clouds. The BKD consists of Gaussian kernel density estimation and binarization components to encode the shape and intensity information of the 3D point clouds that are fed to a random forest classifier to extract curbs and markings on the road. These are then used to derive road information, such as the number of lanes, the lane width, and intersections. In experiments, the precision and recall of the proposed feature for the detection of curbs and road markings on an urban dataset and a highway dataset were as high as 90%, thus showing that the BKD is accurate and robust against varying point density and noise.

  14. Lacunarity analysis of raster datasets and 1D, 2D, and 3D point patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Pinliang

    2009-10-01

    Spatial scale plays an important role in many fields. As a scale-dependent measure for spatial heterogeneity, lacunarity describes the distribution of gaps within a set at multiple scales. In Earth science, environmental science, and ecology, lacunarity has been increasingly used for multiscale modeling of spatial patterns. This paper presents the development and implementation of a geographic information system (GIS) software extension for lacunarity analysis of raster datasets and 1D, 2D, and 3D point patterns. Depending on the application requirement, lacunarity analysis can be performed in two modes: global mode or local mode. The extension works for: (1) binary (1-bit) and grey-scale datasets in any raster format supported by ArcGIS and (2) 1D, 2D, and 3D point datasets as shapefiles or geodatabase feature classes. For more effective measurement of lacunarity for different patterns or processes in raster datasets, the extension allows users to define an area of interest (AOI) in four different ways, including using a polygon in an existing feature layer. Additionally, directionality can be taken into account when grey-scale datasets are used for local lacunarity analysis. The methodology and graphical user interface (GUI) are described. The application of the extension is demonstrated using both simulated and real datasets, including Brodatz texture images, a Spaceborne Imaging Radar (SIR-C) image, simulated 1D points on a drainage network, and 3D random and clustered point patterns. The options of lacunarity analysis and the effects of polyline arrangement on lacunarity of 1D points are also discussed. Results from sample data suggest that the lacunarity analysis extension can be used for efficient modeling of spatial patterns at multiple scales.

  15. Automatic co-registration of 3D multi-sensor point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persad, Ravi Ancil; Armenakis, Costas

    2017-08-01

    We propose an approach for the automatic coarse alignment of 3D point clouds which have been acquired from various platforms. The method is based on 2D keypoint matching performed on height map images of the point clouds. Initially, a multi-scale wavelet keypoint detector is applied, followed by adaptive non-maxima suppression. A scale, rotation and translation-invariant descriptor is then computed for all keypoints. The descriptor is built using the log-polar mapping of Gabor filter derivatives in combination with the so-called Rapid Transform. In the final step, source and target height map keypoint correspondences are determined using a bi-directional nearest neighbour similarity check, together with a threshold-free modified-RANSAC. Experiments with urban and non-urban scenes are presented and results show scale errors ranging from 0.01 to 0.03, 3D rotation errors in the order of 0.2° to 0.3° and 3D translation errors from 0.09 m to 1.1 m.

  16. Biview Learning for Human Posture Segmentation from 3D Points Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Maoying; Cheng, Jun; Bian, Wei; Tao, Dacheng

    2014-01-01

    Posture segmentation plays an essential role in human motion analysis. The state-of-the-art method extracts sufficiently high-dimensional features from 3D depth images for each 3D point and learns an efficient body part classifier. However, high-dimensional features are memory-consuming and difficult to handle on large-scale training dataset. In this paper, we propose an efficient two-stage dimension reduction scheme, termed biview learning, to encode two independent views which are depth-difference features (DDF) and relative position features (RPF). Biview learning explores the complementary property of DDF and RPF, and uses two stages to learn a compact yet comprehensive low-dimensional feature space for posture segmentation. In the first stage, discriminative locality alignment (DLA) is applied to the high-dimensional DDF to learn a discriminative low-dimensional representation. In the second stage, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is used to explore the complementary property of RPF and the dimensionality reduced DDF. Finally, we train a support vector machine (SVM) over the output of CCA. We carefully validate the effectiveness of DLA and CCA utilized in the two-stage scheme on our 3D human points cloud dataset. Experimental results show that the proposed biview learning scheme significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art method for human posture segmentation. PMID:24465721

  17. Biview learning for human posture segmentation from 3D points cloud.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Maoying; Cheng, Jun; Bian, Wei; Tao, Dacheng

    2014-01-01

    Posture segmentation plays an essential role in human motion analysis. The state-of-the-art method extracts sufficiently high-dimensional features from 3D depth images for each 3D point and learns an efficient body part classifier. However, high-dimensional features are memory-consuming and difficult to handle on large-scale training dataset. In this paper, we propose an efficient two-stage dimension reduction scheme, termed biview learning, to encode two independent views which are depth-difference features (DDF) and relative position features (RPF). Biview learning explores the complementary property of DDF and RPF, and uses two stages to learn a compact yet comprehensive low-dimensional feature space for posture segmentation. In the first stage, discriminative locality alignment (DLA) is applied to the high-dimensional DDF to learn a discriminative low-dimensional representation. In the second stage, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is used to explore the complementary property of RPF and the dimensionality reduced DDF. Finally, we train a support vector machine (SVM) over the output of CCA. We carefully validate the effectiveness of DLA and CCA utilized in the two-stage scheme on our 3D human points cloud dataset. Experimental results show that the proposed biview learning scheme significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art method for human posture segmentation.

  18. Detectability limitations with 3-D point reconstruction algorithms using digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Lindgren, Erik

    2015-03-31

    The estimated impact of pores in clusters on component fatigue will be highly conservative when based on 2-D rather than 3-D pore positions. To 3-D position and size defects using digital radiography and 3-D point reconstruction algorithms in general require a lower inspection time and in some cases work better with planar geometries than X-ray computed tomography. However, the increase in prior assumptions about the object and the defects will increase the intrinsic uncertainty in the resulting nondestructive evaluation output. In this paper this uncertainty arising when detecting pore defect clusters with point reconstruction algorithms is quantified using simulations. The simulation model is compared to and mapped to experimental data. The main issue with the uncertainty is the possible masking (detectability zero) of smaller defects around some other slightly larger defect. In addition, the uncertainty is explored in connection to the expected effects on the component fatigue life and for different amount of prior object-defect assumptions made.

  19. Non-rigid registration of 3D point clouds under isometric deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xuming

    2016-11-01

    An algorithm for pairwise non-rigid registration of 3D point clouds is presented in the specific context of isometric deformations. The critical step is registration of point clouds at different epochs captured from an isometric deformation surface within overlapping regions. Based on characteristics invariant under isometric deformation, a variant of the four-point congruent sets algorithm is applied to generate correspondences between two deformed point clouds, and subsequently a RANSAC framework is used to complete cluster extraction in preparation for global optimal alignment. Examples are presented and the results compared with existing approaches to demonstrate the two main contributions of the technique: a success rate for generating true correspondences of 90% and a root mean square error after final registration of 2-3 mm.

  20. Comparative Analysis of 3d Point Clouds Generated from a Freeware and Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, K. R.; Raghavendra, S.; Pande, H.; Tiwari, P. S.; Chauhan, I.

    2017-07-01

    In the recent past, several heritage structures have faced destruction due to both human-made incidents and natural calamities that have caused a great loss to the human race regarding its cultural achievements. In this context, the importance of documenting such structures to create a substantial database cannot be emphasised enough. The Clock Tower of Dehradun, India is one such structure. There is a lack of sufficient information in the digital domain, which justified the need to carry out this study. Thus, an attempt has been made to gauge the possibilities of using open source 3D tools such as VSfM to quickly and easily obtain point clouds of an object and assess its quality. The photographs were collected using consumer grade cameras with reasonable effort to ensure overlap. The sparse reconstruction and dense reconstruction were carried out to generate a 3D point cloud model of the tower. A terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) was also used to obtain a point cloud of the tower. The point clouds obtained from the two methods were analyzed to understand the quality of the information present; TLS acquired point cloud being a benchmark to assess the VSfM point cloud. They were compared to analyze the point density and subjected to a plane-fitting test for sample flat portions on the structure. The plane-fitting test revealed the planarity of the point clouds. A Gauss distribution fit yielded a standard deviation of 0.002 and 0.01 for TLS and VSfM, respectively. For more insight, comparisons with Agisoft Photoscan results were also made.

  1. Fast Semantic Segmentation of 3d Point Clouds with Strongly Varying Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackel, Timo; Wegner, Jan D.; Schindler, Konrad

    2016-06-01

    We describe an effective and efficient method for point-wise semantic classification of 3D point clouds. The method can handle unstructured and inhomogeneous point clouds such as those derived from static terrestrial LiDAR or photogammetric reconstruction; and it is computationally efficient, making it possible to process point clouds with many millions of points in a matter of minutes. The key issue, both to cope with strong variations in point density and to bring down computation time, turns out to be careful handling of neighborhood relations. By choosing appropriate definitions of a point's (multi-scale) neighborhood, we obtain a feature set that is both expressive and fast to compute. We evaluate our classification method both on benchmark data from a mobile mapping platform and on a variety of large, terrestrial laser scans with greatly varying point density. The proposed feature set outperforms the state of the art with respect to per-point classification accuracy, while at the same time being much faster to compute.

  2. Grammar-Supported 3d Indoor Reconstruction from Point Clouds for As-Built Bim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, S.; Peter, M.; Fritsch, D.

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents a grammar-based approach for the robust automatic reconstruction of 3D interiors from raw point clouds. The core of the approach is a 3D indoor grammar which is an extension of our previously published grammar concept for the modeling of 2D floor plans. The grammar allows for the modeling of buildings whose horizontal, continuous floors are traversed by hallways providing access to the rooms as it is the case for most office buildings or public buildings like schools, hospitals or hotels. The grammar is designed in such way that it can be embedded in an iterative automatic learning process providing a seamless transition from LOD3 to LOD4 building models. Starting from an initial low-level grammar, automatically derived from the window representations of an available LOD3 building model, hypotheses about indoor geometries can be generated. The hypothesized indoor geometries are checked against observation data - here 3D point clouds - collected in the interior of the building. The verified and accepted geometries form the basis for an automatic update of the initial grammar. By this, the knowledge content of the initial grammar is enriched, leading to a grammar with increased quality. This higher-level grammar can then be applied to predict realistic geometries to building parts where only sparse observation data are available. Thus, our approach allows for the robust generation of complete 3D indoor models whose quality can be improved continuously as soon as new observation data are fed into the grammar-based reconstruction process. The feasibility of our approach is demonstrated based on a real-world example.

  3. Articulated Non-Rigid Point Set Registration for Human Pose Estimation from 3D Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Song; Fan, Guoliang

    2015-01-01

    We propose a generative framework for 3D human pose estimation that is able to operate on both individual point sets and sequential depth data. We formulate human pose estimation as a point set registration problem, where we propose three new approaches to address several major technical challenges in this research. First, we integrate two registration techniques that have a complementary nature to cope with non-rigid and articulated deformations of the human body under a variety of poses. This unique combination allows us to handle point sets of complex body motion and large pose variation without any initial conditions, as required by most existing approaches. Second, we introduce an efficient pose tracking strategy to deal with sequential depth data, where the major challenge is the incomplete data due to self-occlusions and view changes. We introduce a visible point extraction method to initialize a new template for the current frame from the previous frame, which effectively reduces the ambiguity and uncertainty during registration. Third, to support robust and stable pose tracking, we develop a segment volume validation technique to detect tracking failures and to re-initialize pose registration if needed. The experimental results on both benchmark 3D laser scan and depth datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework when compared with state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:26131673

  4. - and Graph-Based Point Cloud Segmentation of 3d Scenes Using Perceptual Grouping Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Hoegner, L.; Tuttas, S.; Stilla, U.

    2017-05-01

    Segmentation is the fundamental step for recognizing and extracting objects from point clouds of 3D scene. In this paper, we present a strategy for point cloud segmentation using voxel structure and graph-based clustering with perceptual grouping laws, which allows a learning-free and completely automatic but parametric solution for segmenting 3D point cloud. To speak precisely, two segmentation methods utilizing voxel and supervoxel structures are reported and tested. The voxel-based data structure can increase efficiency and robustness of the segmentation process, suppressing the negative effect of noise, outliers, and uneven points densities. The clustering of voxels and supervoxel is carried out using graph theory on the basis of the local contextual information, which commonly conducted utilizing merely pairwise information in conventional clustering algorithms. By the use of perceptual laws, our method conducts the segmentation in a pure geometric way avoiding the use of RGB color and intensity information, so that it can be applied to more general applications. Experiments using different datasets have demonstrated that our proposed methods can achieve good results, especially for complex scenes and nonplanar surfaces of objects. Quantitative comparisons between our methods and other representative segmentation methods also confirms the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposals.

  5. Object recognition and localization from 3D point clouds by maximum-likelihood estimation.

    PubMed

    Dantanarayana, Harshana G; Huntley, Jonathan M

    2017-08-01

    We present an algorithm based on maximum-likelihood analysis for the automated recognition of objects, and estimation of their pose, from 3D point clouds. Surfaces segmented from depth images are used as the features, unlike 'interest point'-based algorithms which normally discard such data. Compared to the 6D Hough transform, it has negligible memory requirements, and is computationally efficient compared to iterative closest point algorithms. The same method is applicable to both the initial recognition/pose estimation problem as well as subsequent pose refinement through appropriate choice of the dispersion of the probability density functions. This single unified approach therefore avoids the usual requirement for different algorithms for these two tasks. In addition to the theoretical description, a simple 2 degrees of freedom (d.f.) example is given, followed by a full 6 d.f. analysis of 3D point cloud data from a cluttered scene acquired by a projected fringe-based scanner, which demonstrated an RMS alignment error as low as 0.3 mm.

  6. Geometric Features and Their Relevance for 3d Point Cloud Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, M.; Jutzi, B.; Mallet, C.; Weinmann, M.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we focus on the automatic interpretation of 3D point cloud data in terms of associating a class label to each 3D point. While much effort has recently been spent on this research topic, little attention has been paid to the influencing factors that affect the quality of the derived classification results. For this reason, we investigate fundamental influencing factors making geometric features more or less relevant with respect to the classification task. We present a framework which consists of five components addressing point sampling, neighborhood recovery, feature extraction, classification and feature relevance assessment. To analyze the impact of the main influencing factors which are represented by the given point sampling and the selected neighborhood type, we present the results derived with different configurations of our framework for a commonly used benchmark dataset for which a reference labeling with respect to three structural classes (linear structures, planar structures and volumetric structures) as well as a reference labeling with respect to five semantic classes (Wire, Pole/Trunk, Façade, Ground and Vegetation) is available.

  7. Robust affine-invariant feature points matching for 3D surface reconstruction of complex landslide scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, André; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Allemand, Pascal; Skupinski, Grzegorz; Deseilligny, Marc-Pierrot

    2013-04-01

    Multi-view stereo surface reconstruction from dense terrestrial photographs is being increasingly applied for geoscience applications such as quantitative geomorphology, and a number of different software solution and processing streamlines have been suggested. For image matching, camera self-calibration and bundle block adjustment, most approaches make use of scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) to identify homologous points in multiple images. SIFT-like point matching is robust to apparent translation, rotation, and scaling of objects in multiple viewing geometries but the number of correctly identified matching points typically declines drastically with increasing angles between the viewpoints. For the application of multi-view stereo of complex landslide scenes, the viewing geometry is often constrained by the local topography and barriers such as rocks and vegetation occluding the target. Under such conditions it is not uncommon to encounter view angle differences of > 30% that hinder the image matching and eventually prohibit the joint estimation of the camera parameters from all views. Recently an affine invariant extension of the SIFT detector (ASIFT) has been demonstrated to provide more robust matches when large view-angle differences become an issue. In this study the ASIFT detector was adopted to detect homologous points in terrestrial photographs preceding 3D reconstruction of different parts (main scarp, toe) of the Super-Sauze landslide (Southern French Alps). 3D surface models for different time periods and different parts of the landslide were derived using the multi-view stereo framework implemented in MicMac (©IGN). The obtained 3D models were compared with reconstructions using the traditional SIFT detectors as well as alternative structure-from-motion implementations. An estimate of the absolute accuracy of the photogrammetric models was obtained through co-registration and comparison with high-resolution terrestrial LiDAR scans.

  8. Automated Coarse Registration of Point Clouds in 3d Urban Scenes Using Voxel Based Plane Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Boerner, R.; Yao, W.; Hoegner, L.; Stilla, U.

    2017-09-01

    For obtaining a full coverage of 3D scans in a large-scale urban area, the registration between point clouds acquired via terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is normally mandatory. However, due to the complex urban environment, the automatic registration of different scans is still a challenging problem. In this work, we propose an automatic marker free method for fast and coarse registration between point clouds using the geometric constrains of planar patches under a voxel structure. Our proposed method consists of four major steps: the voxelization of the point cloud, the approximation of planar patches, the matching of corresponding patches, and the estimation of transformation parameters. In the voxelization step, the point cloud of each scan is organized with a 3D voxel structure, by which the entire point cloud is partitioned into small individual patches. In the following step, we represent points of each voxel with the approximated plane function, and select those patches resembling planar surfaces. Afterwards, for matching the corresponding patches, a RANSAC-based strategy is applied. Among all the planar patches of a scan, we randomly select a planar patches set of three planar surfaces, in order to build a coordinate frame via their normal vectors and their intersection points. The transformation parameters between scans are calculated from these two coordinate frames. The planar patches set with its transformation parameters owning the largest number of coplanar patches are identified as the optimal candidate set for estimating the correct transformation parameters. The experimental results using TLS datasets of different scenes reveal that our proposed method can be both effective and efficient for the coarse registration task. Especially, for the fast orientation between scans, our proposed method can achieve a registration error of less than around 2 degrees using the testing datasets, and much more efficient than the classical baseline methods.

  9. Surface feature based classification of plant organs from 3D laserscanned point clouds for plant phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Laserscanning recently has become a powerful and common method for plant parameterization and plant growth observation on nearly every scale range. However, 3D measurements with high accuracy, spatial resolution and speed result in a multitude of points that require processing and analysis. The primary objective of this research has been to establish a reliable and fast technique for high throughput phenotyping using differentiation, segmentation and classification of single plants by a fully automated system. In this report, we introduce a technique for automated classification of point clouds of plants and present the applicability for plant parameterization. Results A surface feature histogram based approach from the field of robotics was adapted to close-up laserscans of plants. Local geometric point features describe class characteristics, which were used to distinguish among different plant organs. This approach has been proven and tested on several plant species. Grapevine stems and leaves were classified with an accuracy of up to 98%. The proposed method was successfully transferred to 3D-laserscans of wheat plants for yield estimation. Wheat ears were separated with an accuracy of 96% from other plant organs. Subsequently, the ear volume was calculated and correlated to the ear weight, the kernel weights and the number of kernels. Furthermore the impact of the data resolution was evaluated considering point to point distances between 0.3 and 4.0 mm with respect to the classification accuracy. Conclusion We introduced an approach using surface feature histograms for automated plant organ parameterization. Highly reliable classification results of about 96% for the separation of grapevine and wheat organs have been obtained. This approach was found to be independent of the point to point distance and applicable to multiple plant species. Its reliability, flexibility and its high order of automation make this method well suited for the demands of

  10. An adaptive learning approach for 3-D surface reconstruction from point clouds.

    PubMed

    Junior, Agostinho de Medeiros Brito; Neto, Adrião Duarte Dória; de Melo, Jorge Dantas; Goncalves, Luiz Marcos Garcia

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a multiresolution approach for surface reconstruction from clouds of unorganized points representing an object surface in 3-D space. The proposed method uses a set of mesh operators and simple rules for selective mesh refinement, with a strategy based on Kohonen's self-organizing map (SOM). Basically, a self-adaptive scheme is used for iteratively moving vertices of an initial simple mesh in the direction of the set of points, ideally the object boundary. Successive refinement and motion of vertices are applied leading to a more detailed surface, in a multiresolution, iterative scheme. Reconstruction was experimented on with several point sets, including different shapes and sizes. Results show generated meshes very close to object final shapes. We include measures of performance and discuss robustness.

  11. 3D reconstruction of wooden member of ancient architecture from point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruiju; Wang, Yanmin; Li, Deren; Zhao, Jun; Song, Daixue

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents a 3D reconstruction method to model wooden member of ancient architecture from point clouds based on improved deformable model. Three steps are taken to recover the shape of wooden member. Firstly, Hessian matrix is adopted to compute the axe of wooden member. Secondly, an initial model of wooden member is made by contour orthogonal to its axis. Thirdly, an accurate model is got through the coupling effect between the initial model and the point clouds of the wooden member according to the theory of improved deformable model. Every step and algorithm is studied and described in the paper. Using the point clouds captured from Forbidden City of China, shaft member and beam member are taken as examples to test the method proposed in the paper. Results show the efficiency and robustness of the method addressed in the literature to model the wooden member of ancient architecture.

  12. A new approach for semi-automatic rock mass joints recognition from 3D point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Adrián J.; Abellán, A.; Tomás, R.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2014-07-01

    Rock mass characterization requires a deep geometric understanding of the discontinuity sets affecting rock exposures. Recent advances in Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) instrumentation currently allow quick and accurate 3D data acquisition, yielding on the development of new methodologies for the automatic characterization of rock mass discontinuities. This paper presents a methodology for the identification and analysis of flat surfaces outcropping in a rocky slope using the 3D data obtained with LiDAR. This method identifies and defines the algebraic equations of the different planes of the rock slope surface by applying an analysis based on a neighbouring points coplanarity test, finding principal orientations by Kernel Density Estimation and identifying clusters by the Density-Based Scan Algorithm with Noise. Different sources of information - synthetic and 3D scanned data - were employed, performing a complete sensitivity analysis of the parameters in order to identify the optimal value of the variables of the proposed method. In addition, raw source files and obtained results are freely provided in order to allow to a more straightforward method comparison aiming to a more reproducible research.

  13. On concise 3-D simple point characterizations: a marching cubes paradigm.

    PubMed

    Huang, Adam; Liu, Hon-Man; Lee, Chung-Wei; Yang, Chung-Yi; Tsang, Yuk-Ming

    2009-01-01

    The centerlines of tubular structures are useful for medical image visualization and computer-aided diagnosis applications. They can be effectively extracted by using a thinning algorithm that erodes an object layer by layer until only a skeleton is left. An object point is "simple" and can be safely deleted only if the resultant image is topologically equivalent to the original. Numerous characterizations of 3-D simple points based on digital topology already exist. However, little work has been done in the context of marching cubes (MC). This paper reviews several concise 3-D simple point characterizations in a MC paradigm. By using the Euler characteristic and a few newly observed properties in the context of connectivity-consistent MC, we present concise and more self-explanatory proofs. We also present an efficient method for computing the Euler characteristic locally for MC surfaces. Performance evaluations on different implementations are conducted on synthetic data and multidetector computed tomography examination of virtual colonoscopy and angiography.

  14. PointCloudExplore 2: Visual exploration of 3D gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    International Research Training Group Visualization of Large and Unstructured Data Sets, University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Institute for Data Analysis and Visualization, University of California, Davis, CA; Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory , Berkeley, CA; Genomics Division, LBNL; Computer Science Department, University of California, Irvine, CA; Computer Science Division,University of California, Berkeley, CA; Life Sciences Division, LBNL; Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology and the Center for Integrative Genomics, University of California, Berkeley, CA; Ruebel, Oliver; Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Huang, Min-Yu; Bethel, E. Wes; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Fowlkes, Charless C.; Hendriks, Cris L. Luengo; DePace, Angela H.; Simirenko, L.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hagen, Hand; Malik, Jitendra; Knowles, David W.; Hamann, Bernd

    2008-03-31

    To better understand how developmental regulatory networks are defined inthe genome sequence, the Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project (BDNTP)has developed a suite of methods to describe 3D gene expression data, i.e.,the output of the network at cellular resolution for multiple time points. To allow researchersto explore these novel data sets we have developed PointCloudXplore (PCX).In PCX we have linked physical and information visualization views via the concept ofbrushing (cell selection). For each view dedicated operations for performing selectionof cells are available. In PCX, all cell selections are stored in a central managementsystem. Cells selected in one view can in this way be highlighted in any view allowingfurther cell subset properties to be determined. Complex cell queries can be definedby combining different cell selections using logical operations such as AND, OR, andNOT. Here we are going to provide an overview of PointCloudXplore 2 (PCX2), thelatest publicly available version of PCX. PCX2 has shown to be an effective tool forvisual exploration of 3D gene expression data. We discuss (i) all views available inPCX2, (ii) different strategies to perform cell selection, (iii) the basic architecture ofPCX2., and (iv) illustrate the usefulness of PCX2 using selected examples.

  15. Go-ICP: A Globally Optimal Solution to 3D ICP Point-Set Registration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiaolong; Li, Hongdong; Campbell, Dylan; Jia, Yunde

    2016-11-01

    The Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm is one of the most widely used methods for point-set registration. However, being based on local iterative optimization, ICP is known to be susceptible to local minima. Its performance critically relies on the quality of the initialization and only local optimality is guaranteed. This paper presents the first globally optimal algorithm, named Go-ICP, for Euclidean (rigid) registration of two 3D point-sets under the L2 error metric defined in ICP. The Go-ICP method is based on a branch-and-bound scheme that searches the entire 3D motion space SE(3). By exploiting the special structure of SE(3) geometry, we derive novel upper and lower bounds for the registration error function. Local ICP is integrated into the BnB scheme, which speeds up the new method while guaranteeing global optimality. We also discuss extensions, addressing the issue of outlier robustness. The evaluation demonstrates that the proposed method is able to produce reliable registration results regardless of the initialization. Go-ICP can be applied in scenarios where an optimal solution is desirable or where a good initialization is not always available.

  16. Automated extraction and analysis of rock discontinuity characteristics from 3D point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchetti, Matteo; Villa, Alberto; Agliardi, Federico; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2016-04-01

    A reliable characterization of fractured rock masses requires an exhaustive geometrical description of discontinuities, including orientation, spacing, and size. These are required to describe discontinuum rock mass structure, perform Discrete Fracture Network and DEM modelling, or provide input for rock mass classification or equivalent continuum estimate of rock mass properties. Although several advanced methodologies have been developed in the last decades, a complete characterization of discontinuity geometry in practice is still challenging, due to scale-dependent variability of fracture patterns and difficult accessibility to large outcrops. Recent advances in remote survey techniques, such as terrestrial laser scanning and digital photogrammetry, allow a fast and accurate acquisition of dense 3D point clouds, which promoted the development of several semi-automatic approaches to extract discontinuity features. Nevertheless, these often need user supervision on algorithm parameters which can be difficult to assess. To overcome this problem, we developed an original Matlab tool, allowing fast, fully automatic extraction and analysis of discontinuity features with no requirements on point cloud accuracy, density and homogeneity. The tool consists of a set of algorithms which: (i) process raw 3D point clouds, (ii) automatically characterize discontinuity sets, (iii) identify individual discontinuity surfaces, and (iv) analyse their spacing and persistence. The tool operates in either a supervised or unsupervised mode, starting from an automatic preliminary exploration data analysis. The identification and geometrical characterization of discontinuity features is divided in steps. First, coplanar surfaces are identified in the whole point cloud using K-Nearest Neighbor and Principal Component Analysis algorithms optimized on point cloud accuracy and specified typical facet size. Then, discontinuity set orientation is calculated using Kernel Density Estimation and

  17. 3D registration method based on scattered point cloud from B-model ultrasound image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lei; Xu, Xiaojun; Wang, Lifeng; Guo, Na; Xie, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The paper proposes a registration method on 3D point cloud of the bone tissue surface extracted by B-mode ultrasound image and the CT model . The B-mode ultrasound is used to get two-dimensional images of the femur tissue . The binocular stereo vision tracker is used to obtain spatial position and orientation of the optical positioning device fixed on the ultrasound probe. The combining of the two kind of data generates 3D point cloud of the bone tissue surface. The pixel coordinates of the bone surface are automatically obtained from ultrasound image using an improved local phase symmetry (phase symmetry, PS) . The mapping of the pixel coordinates on the ultrasound image and 3D space is obtained through a series of calibration methods. In order to detect the effect of registration, six markers are implanted on a complete fresh pig femoral .The actual coordinates of the marks are measured with two methods. The first method is to get the coordinates with measuring tools under a coordinate system. The second is to measure the coordinates of the markers in the CT model registered with 3D point cloud using the ICP registration algorithm under the same coordinate system. Ten registration experiments are carried out in the same way. Error results are obtained by comparing the two sets of mark point coordinates obtained by two different methods. The results is that a minimum error is 1.34mm, the maximum error is 3.22mm,and the average error of 2.52mm; ICP registration algorithm calculates the average error of 0.89mm and a standard deviation of 0.62mm.This evaluation standards of registration accuracy is different from the average error obtained by the ICP registration algorithm. It can be intuitive to show the error caused by the operation of clinical doctors. Reference to the accuracy requirements of different operation in the Department of orthopedics, the method can be apply to the bone reduction and the anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

  18. ELECTRIC CURRENT FILAMENTATION AT A NON-POTENTIAL MAGNETIC NULL-POINT DUE TO PRESSURE PERTURBATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jelínek, P.; Karlický, M.; Murawski, K.

    2015-10-20

    An increase of electric current densities due to filamentation is an important process in any flare. We show that the pressure perturbation, followed by an entropy wave, triggers such a filamentation in the non-potential magnetic null-point. In the two-dimensional (2D), non-potential magnetic null-point, we generate the entropy wave by a negative or positive pressure pulse that is launched initially. Then, we study its evolution under the influence of the gravity field. We solve the full set of 2D time dependent, ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations numerically, making use of the FLASH code. The negative pulse leads to an entropy wave with a plasma density greater than in the ambient atmosphere and thus this wave falls down in the solar atmosphere, attracted by the gravity force. In the case of the positive pressure pulse, the plasma becomes evacuated and the entropy wave propagates upward. However, in both cases, owing to the Rayleigh–Taylor instability, the electric current in a non-potential magnetic null-point is rapidly filamented and at some locations the electric current density is strongly enhanced in comparison to its initial value. Using numerical simulations, we find that entropy waves initiated either by positive or negative pulses result in an increase of electric current densities close to the magnetic null-point and thus the energy accumulated here can be released as nanoflares or even flares.

  19. THE NATURE OF FLARE RIBBONS IN CORONAL NULL-POINT TOPOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, S.; Aulanier, G.; Pariat, E.; Schrijver, C. J.

    2009-07-20

    Flare ribbons are commonly attributed to the low-altitude impact, along the footprints of separatrices or quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs), of particle beams accelerated through magnetic reconnection. If reconnection occurs at a three-dimensional coronal magnetic null point, the footprint of the dome-shaped fan surface would map a closed circular ribbon. This paper addresses the following issues: does the entire circular ribbon brighten simultaneously, as expected because all fan field lines pass through the null point? And since the spine separatrices are singular field lines, do spine-related ribbons look like compact kernels? What can we learn from these observations about current sheet formation and magnetic reconnection in a null-point topology? The present study addresses these questions by analyzing Transition Region and Coronal Explorer and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager observations of a confined flare presenting a circular ribbon. Using a potential field extrapolation, we linked the circular shape of the ribbon with the photospheric mapping of the fan field lines originating from a coronal null point. Observations show that the flare ribbon outlining the fan lines brightens sequentially along the counterclockwise direction and that the spine-related ribbons are elongated. Using the potential field extrapolation as initial condition, we conduct a low-{beta} resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulation of this observed event. We drive the coronal evolution by line-tied diverging boundary motions, so as to emulate the observed photospheric flow pattern associated with some magnetic flux emergence. The numerical analysis allows us to explain several observed features of the confined flare. The vorticity induced in the fan by the prescribed motions causes the spines to tear apart along the fan. This leads to formation of a thin current sheet and induces null-point reconnection. We also find that the null point and its associated

  20. PointCloudXplore: a visualization tool for 3D gene expressiondata

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther H.; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Fowlkes,Charles C.; Luengo Hendriks, Cristian L.; Simirenko, Lisa; Shah, NameetaY.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggn, Mark D.; Hagen, Hans; Sudar, Damir J.; Malik, Jitendra; Knowles, David W.; Hamann, Bernd

    2006-10-01

    The Berkeley Drosophila Transcription Network Project (BDTNP) has developed a suite of methods that support quantitative, computational analysis of three-dimensional (3D) gene expression patterns with cellular resolution in early Drosophila embryos, aiming at a more in-depth understanding of gene regulatory networks. We describe a new tool, called PointCloudXplore (PCX), that supports effective 3D gene expression data exploration. PCX is a visualization tool that uses the established visualization techniques of multiple views, brushing, and linking to support the analysis of high-dimensional datasets that describe many genes' expression. Each of the views in PointCloudXplore shows a different gene expression data property. Brushing is used to select and emphasize data associated with defined subsets of embryo cells within a view. Linking is used to show in additional views the expression data for a group of cells that have first been highlighted as a brush in a single view, allowing further data subset properties to be determined. In PCX, physical views of the data are linked to abstract data displays such as parallel coordinates. Physical views show the spatial relationships between different genes' expression patterns within an embryo. Abstract gene expression data displays on the other hand allow for an analysis of relationships between different genes directly in the gene expression space. We discuss on parallel coordinates as one example abstract data view currently available in PCX. We have developed several extensions to standard parallel coordinates to facilitate brushing and the visualization of 3D gene expression data.

  1. A successive three-point scheme for fast ray tracing in complex 3D geological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Xu, T.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Z.

    2013-12-01

    We present a new 3D ray-tracing method that can be applied to computations of traveltime and ray-paths of seismic transmitted, reflected and turning waves in complex geologic models, which consist of arbitrarily shaped blocks whose boundaries are matched by triangulated interfaces for computational efficiency. The new ray-tracing scheme combines the segmentally iterative ray tracing (SIRT) method and the pseudo-bending scheme so as to become a robust and fast ray-tracing method for seismic waves. The new method is extension of our previous constant block models and constant gradient block models to generally heterogeneous block models, and incorporates triangulated interfaces defining boundaries of complex geological bodies, so that it becomes applicable for practical problems. A successive three-point perturbation scheme is formulated that iteratively updates the midpoints of a segment based on an initial ray-path. The corrections of the midpoints are accomplished by first-order analytic formulae according to locations of the midpoint inside the block or on the boundaries of the blocks, to which the updating formulae of the pseudo-bending method and SIRT algorithm are applied instead of the traditional iterative methods. Numerical experiments, including an example in the Bohemian Massif, demonstrate that successive three-point scheme is effective and capable for kinematic ray tracing in complex 3D heterogeneous media.

  2. Unconventional superconductivity at mesoscopic point contacts on the 3D Dirac semimetal Cd3As2.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Leena; Gaurav, Abhishek; Thakur, Gohil S; Haque, Zeba; Ganguli, Ashok K; Sheet, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetals exist close to topological phase boundaries which, in principle, should make it possible to drive them into exotic new phases, such as topological superconductivity, by breaking certain symmetries. A practical realization of this idea has, however, hitherto been lacking. Here we show that the mesoscopic point contacts between pure silver (Ag) and the 3D Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 (ref. ) exhibit unconventional superconductivity with a critical temperature (onset) greater than 6 K whereas neither Cd3As2 nor Ag are superconductors. A gap amplitude of 6.5 meV is measured spectroscopically in this phase that varies weakly with temperature and survives up to a remarkably high temperature of 13 K, indicating the presence of a robust normal-state pseudogap. The observations indicate the emergence of a new unconventional superconducting phase that exists in a quantum mechanically confined region under a point contact between a Dirac semimetal and a normal metal.

  3. Unconventional superconductivity at mesoscopic point contacts on the 3D Dirac semimetal Cd3As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Leena; Gaurav, Abhishek; Thakur, Gohil S.; Haque, Zeba; Ganguli, Ashok K.; Sheet, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetals exist close to topological phase boundaries which, in principle, should make it possible to drive them into exotic new phases, such as topological superconductivity, by breaking certain symmetries. A practical realization of this idea has, however, hitherto been lacking. Here we show that the mesoscopic point contacts between pure silver (Ag) and the 3D Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 (ref. ) exhibit unconventional superconductivity with a critical temperature (onset) greater than 6 K whereas neither Cd3As2 nor Ag are superconductors. A gap amplitude of 6.5 meV is measured spectroscopically in this phase that varies weakly with temperature and survives up to a remarkably high temperature of 13 K, indicating the presence of a robust normal-state pseudogap. The observations indicate the emergence of a new unconventional superconducting phase that exists in a quantum mechanically confined region under a point contact between a Dirac semimetal and a normal metal.

  4. 3D Modeling of Building Indoor Spaces and Closed Doors from Imagery and Point Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Vilariño, Lucía; Khoshelham, Kourosh; Martínez-Sánchez, Joaquín; Arias, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    3D models of indoor environments are increasingly gaining importance due to the wide range of applications to which they can be subjected: from redesign and visualization to monitoring and simulation. These models usually exist only for newly constructed buildings; therefore, the development of automatic approaches for reconstructing 3D indoors from imagery and/or point clouds can make the process easier, faster and cheaper. Among the constructive elements defining a building interior, doors are very common elements and their detection can be very useful either for knowing the environment structure, to perform an efficient navigation or to plan appropriate evacuation routes. The fact that doors are topologically connected to walls by being coplanar, together with the unavoidable presence of clutter and occlusions indoors, increases the inherent complexity of the automation of the recognition process. In this work, we present a pipeline of techniques used for the reconstruction and interpretation of building interiors based on point clouds and images. The methodology analyses the visibility problem of indoor environments and goes in depth with door candidate detection. The presented approach is tested in real data sets showing its potential with a high door detection rate and applicability for robust and efficient envelope reconstruction. PMID:25654723

  5. 3D modeling of building indoor spaces and closed doors from imagery and point clouds.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Vilariño, Lucía; Khoshelham, Kourosh; Martínez-Sánchez, Joaquín; Arias, Pedro

    2015-02-03

    3D models of indoor environments are increasingly gaining importance due to the wide range of applications to which they can be subjected: from redesign and visualization to monitoring and simulation. These models usually exist only for newly constructed buildings; therefore, the development of automatic approaches for reconstructing 3D indoors from imagery and/or point clouds can make the process easier, faster and cheaper. Among the constructive elements defining a building interior, doors are very common elements and their detection can be very useful either for knowing the environment structure, to perform an efficient navigation or to plan appropriate evacuation routes. The fact that doors are topologically connected to walls by being coplanar, together with the unavoidable presence of clutter and occlusions indoors, increases the inherent complexity of the automation of the recognition process. In this work, we present a pipeline of techniques used for the reconstruction and interpretation of building interiors based on point clouds and images. The methodology analyses the visibility problem of indoor environments and goes in depth with door candidate detection. The presented approach is tested in real data sets showing its potential with a high door detection rate and applicability for robust and efficient envelope reconstruction.

  6. Railway Tunnel Clearance Inspection Method Based on 3D Point Cloud from Mobile Laser Scanning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuhui; Wang, Shaohua; Mei, Xi; Yin, Wangling; Lin, Chunfeng; Hu, Qingwu; Mao, Qingzhou

    2017-09-07

    Railway tunnel clearance is directly related to the safe operation of trains and upgrading of freight capacity. As more and more railway are put into operation and the operation is continuously becoming faster, the railway tunnel clearance inspection should be more precise and efficient. In view of the problems existing in traditional tunnel clearance inspection methods, such as low density, slow speed and a lot of manual operations, this paper proposes a tunnel clearance inspection approach based on 3D point clouds obtained by a mobile laser scanning system (MLS). First, a dynamic coordinate system for railway tunnel clearance inspection has been proposed. A rail line extraction algorithm based on 3D linear fitting is implemented from the segmented point cloud to establish a dynamic clearance coordinate system. Second, a method to seamlessly connect all rail segments based on the railway clearance restrictions, and a seamless rail alignment is formed sequentially from the middle tunnel section to both ends. Finally, based on the rail alignment and the track clearance coordinate system, different types of clearance frames are introduced for intrusion operation with the tunnel section to realize the tunnel clearance inspection. By taking the Shuanghekou Tunnel of the Chengdu-Kunming Railway as an example, when the clearance inspection is carried out by the method mentioned herein, its precision can reach 0.03 m, and difference types of clearances can be effectively calculated. This method has a wide application prospects.

  7. Railway Tunnel Clearance Inspection Method Based on 3D Point Cloud from Mobile Laser Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuhui; Wang, Shaohua; Mei, Xi; Yin, Wangling; Lin, Chunfeng; Mao, Qingzhou

    2017-01-01

    Railway tunnel clearance is directly related to the safe operation of trains and upgrading of freight capacity. As more and more railway are put into operation and the operation is continuously becoming faster, the railway tunnel clearance inspection should be more precise and efficient. In view of the problems existing in traditional tunnel clearance inspection methods, such as low density, slow speed and a lot of manual operations, this paper proposes a tunnel clearance inspection approach based on 3D point clouds obtained by a mobile laser scanning system (MLS). First, a dynamic coordinate system for railway tunnel clearance inspection has been proposed. A rail line extraction algorithm based on 3D linear fitting is implemented from the segmented point cloud to establish a dynamic clearance coordinate system. Second, a method to seamlessly connect all rail segments based on the railway clearance restrictions, and a seamless rail alignment is formed sequentially from the middle tunnel section to both ends. Finally, based on the rail alignment and the track clearance coordinate system, different types of clearance frames are introduced for intrusion operation with the tunnel section to realize the tunnel clearance inspection. By taking the Shuanghekou Tunnel of the Chengdu–Kunming Railway as an example, when the clearance inspection is carried out by the method mentioned herein, its precision can reach 0.03 m, and difference types of clearances can be effectively calculated. This method has a wide application prospects. PMID:28880232

  8. Indoor Navigation from Point Clouds: 3d Modelling and Obstacle Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Vilariño, L.; Boguslawski, P.; Khoshelham, K.; Lorenzo, H.; Mahdjoubi, L.

    2016-06-01

    In the recent years, indoor modelling and navigation has become a research of interest because many stakeholders require navigation assistance in various application scenarios. The navigational assistance for blind or wheelchair people, building crisis management such as fire protection, augmented reality for gaming, tourism or training emergency assistance units are just some of the direct applications of indoor modelling and navigation. Navigational information is traditionally extracted from 2D drawings or layouts. Real state of indoors, including opening position and geometry for both windows and doors, and the presence of obstacles is commonly ignored. In this work, a real indoor-path planning methodology based on 3D point clouds is developed. The value and originality of the approach consist on considering point clouds not only for reconstructing semantically-rich 3D indoor models, but also for detecting potential obstacles in the route planning and using these for readapting the routes according to the real state of the indoor depictured by the laser scanner.

  9. Multidirectional hybrid algorithm for the split common fixed point problem and application to the split common null point problem.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Guo, Meifang; Su, Yongfu

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a new multidirectional monotone hybrid iteration algorithm for finding a solution to the split common fixed point problem is presented for two countable families of quasi-nonexpansive mappings in Banach spaces. Strong convergence theorems are proved. The application of the result is to consider the split common null point problem of maximal monotone operators in Banach spaces. Strong convergence theorems for finding a solution of the split common null point problem are derived. This iteration algorithm can accelerate the convergence speed of iterative sequence. The results of this paper improve and extend the recent results of Takahashi and Yao (Fixed Point Theory Appl 2015:87, 2015) and many others .

  10. Automatic extraction of discontinuity orientation from rock mass surface 3D point cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianqin; Zhu, Hehua; Li, Xiaojun

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a new method for extracting discontinuity orientation automatically from rock mass surface 3D point cloud. The proposed method consists of four steps: (1) automatic grouping of discontinuity sets using an improved K-means clustering method, (2) discontinuity segmentation and optimization, (3) discontinuity plane fitting using Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC) method, and (4) coordinate transformation of discontinuity plane. The method is first validated by the point cloud of a small piece of a rock slope acquired by photogrammetry. The extracted discontinuity orientations are compared with measured ones in the field. Then it is applied to a publicly available LiDAR data of a road cut rock slope at Rockbench repository. The extracted discontinuity orientations are compared with the method proposed by Riquelme et al. (2014). The results show that the presented method is reliable and of high accuracy, and can meet the engineering needs.

  11. Implicit Shape Models for Object Detection in 3d Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velizhev, A.; Shapovalov, R.; Schindler, K.

    2012-07-01

    We present a method for automatic object localization and recognition in 3D point clouds representing outdoor urban scenes. The method is based on the implicit shape models (ISM) framework, which recognizes objects by voting for their center locations. It requires only few training examples per class, which is an important property for practical use. We also introduce and evaluate an improved version of the spin image descriptor, more robust to point density variation and uncertainty in normal direction estimation. Our experiments reveal a significant impact of these modifications on the recognition performance. We compare our results against the state-of-the-art method and get significant improvement in both precision and recall on the Ohio dataset, consisting of combined aerial and terrestrial LiDAR scans of 150,000 m2 of urban area in total.

  12. 3D Printed Molecules and Extended Solid Models for Teaching Symmetry and Point Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Vaid, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    Tangible models help students and researchers visualize chemical structures in three dimensions (3D). 3D printing offers a unique and straightforward approach to fabricate plastic 3D models of molecules and extended solids. In this article, we prepared a series of digital 3D design files of molecular structures that will be useful for teaching…

  13. 3D Printed Molecules and Extended Solid Models for Teaching Symmetry and Point Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalfani, Vincent F.; Vaid, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    Tangible models help students and researchers visualize chemical structures in three dimensions (3D). 3D printing offers a unique and straightforward approach to fabricate plastic 3D models of molecules and extended solids. In this article, we prepared a series of digital 3D design files of molecular structures that will be useful for teaching…

  14. Cartesia: automated 3-point setup for metrology instruments in 3D CAD space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierre, Pierre

    2005-02-01

    CAD-driven metrology applications using laser guns, scanners or cameras require situating the instruments in CAD coordinates, both positionally and rotationally. The new Cartesia instrument setup technique overcomes the requirement for surveying skill. The CAD coordinate system is pinned to the site by emplacing point emitters or retroreflectors at 3 CAD-specified reference points. Then, instruments may be set out at unknown locations and orientations. No leveling is required. An instrument interacts directionally with each reference point, acquiring raw, instrument-based polar angles. The Cartesia algorithm processes these observations to solve for the instrument's 3D position and rotational attitude. These data enable the instrument to think and work in CAD coordinates for data acquisition and point shooting. Correlation of data from multiple instruments may be solved elegantly at the outset, by setting up on a common reference pointset. This work uses recent advances in algorithmic geometry. The Cartesia system shifts the role of surveying expertise toward one-time emplacement of optical reference points, and away from daily instrument operation. The major benefit is that future automated metrology instruments can be designed for less technically skilled workers, lowering daily operational costs, and serving a broader base of users and applications.

  15. A multi-resolution fractal additive scheme for blind watermarking of 3D point data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmes, Mark; Wilder, Kathy; Fox, Kevin

    2013-05-01

    We present a fractal feature space for 3D point watermarking to make geospatial systems more secure. By exploiting the self similar nature of fractals, hidden information can be spatially embedded in point cloud data in an acceptable manner as described within this paper. Our method utilizes a blind scheme which provides automatic retrieval of the watermark payload without the need of the original cover data. Our method for locating similar patterns and encoding information in LiDAR point cloud data is accomplished through a look-up table or code book. The watermark is then merged into the point cloud data itself resulting in low distortion effects. With current advancements in computing technologies, such as GPGPUs, fractal processing is now applicable for processing of big data which is present in geospatial as well as other systems. This watermarking technique described within this paper can be important for systems where point data is handled by numerous aerial collectors including analysts use for systems such as a National LiDAR Data Layer.

  16. Commissioning a small-field biological irradiator using point, 2D, and 3D dosimetry techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Joseph; Oldham, Mark; Thomas, Andrew; Li Yifan; Adamovics, John; Kirsch, David G.; Das, Shiva

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To commission a small-field biological irradiator, the XRad225Cx from Precision x-Ray, Inc., for research use. The system produces a 225 kVp x-ray beam and is equipped with collimating cones that produce both square and circular radiation fields ranging in size from 1 to 40 mm. This work incorporates point, 2D, and 3D measurements to determine output factors (OF), percent-depth-dose (PDD) and dose profiles at multiple depths. Methods: Three independent dosimetry systems were used: ion-chambers (a farmer chamber and a micro-ionisation chamber), 2D EBT2 radiochromic film, and a novel 3D dosimetry system (DLOS/PRESAGE registered ). Reference point dose rates and output factors were determined from in-air ionization chamber measurements for fields down to {approx}13 mm using the formalism of TG61. PDD, profiles, and output factors at three separate depths (0, 0.5, and 2 cm), were determined for all field sizes from EBT2 film measurements in solid water. Several film PDD curves required a scaling correction, reflecting the challenge of accurate film alignment in very small fields. PDDs, profiles, and output factors were also determined with the 3D DLOS/PRESAGE registered system which generated isotropic 0.2 mm data, in scan times of 20 min. Results: Surface output factors determined by ion-chamber were observed to gradually drop by {approx}9% when the field size was reduced from 40 to 13 mm. More dramatic drops were observed for the smallest fields as determined by EBT{approx}18% and {approx}42% for the 2.5 mm and 1 mm fields, respectively. PRESAGE registered and film output factors agreed well for fields <20 mm (where 3D data were available) with mean deviation of 2.2% (range 1%-4%). PDD values at 2 cm depth varied from {approx}72% for the 40 mm field, down to {approx}55% for the 1 mm field. EBT and PRESAGE registered PDDs agreed within {approx}3% in the typical therapy region (1-4 cm). At deeper depths the EBT curves were slightly steeper (2.5% at 5 cm

  17. Deriving 3d Point Clouds from Terrestrial Photographs - Comparison of Different Sensors and Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederheiser, Robert; Mokroš, Martin; Lange, Julia; Petschko, Helene; Prasicek, Günther; Oude Elberink, Sander

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial photogrammetry nowadays offers a reasonably cheap, intuitive and effective approach to 3D-modelling. However, the important choice, which sensor and which software to use is not straight forward and needs consideration as the choice will have effects on the resulting 3D point cloud and its derivatives. We compare five different sensors as well as four different state-of-the-art software packages for a single application, the modelling of a vegetated rock face. The five sensors represent different resolutions, sensor sizes and price segments of the cameras. The software packages used are: (1) Agisoft PhotoScan Pro (1.16), (2) Pix4D (2.0.89), (3) a combination of Visual SFM (V0.5.22) and SURE (1.2.0.286), and (4) MicMac (1.0). We took photos of a vegetated rock face from identical positions with all sensors. Then we compared the results of the different software packages regarding the ease of the workflow, visual appeal, similarity and quality of the point cloud. While PhotoScan and Pix4D offer the user-friendliest workflows, they are also "black-box" programmes giving only little insight into their processing. Unsatisfying results may only be changed by modifying settings within a module. The combined workflow of Visual SFM, SURE and CloudCompare is just as simple but requires more user interaction. MicMac turned out to be the most challenging software as it is less user-friendly. However, MicMac offers the most possibilities to influence the processing workflow. The resulting point-clouds of PhotoScan and MicMac are the most appealing.

  18. Evaluation of a 3D point cloud tetrahedral tomographic reconstruction method

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, N F; Sitek, A

    2011-01-01

    Tomographic reconstruction on an irregular grid may be superior to reconstruction on a regular grid. This is achieved through an appropriate choice of the image space model, the selection of an optimal set of points and the use of any available prior information during the reconstruction process. Accordingly, a number of reconstruction-related parameters must be optimized for best performance. In this work, a 3D point cloud tetrahedral mesh reconstruction method is evaluated for quantitative tasks. A linear image model is employed to obtain the reconstruction system matrix and five point generation strategies are studied. The evaluation is performed using the recovery coefficient, as well as voxel- and template-based estimates of bias and variance measures, computed over specific regions in the reconstructed image. A similar analysis is performed for regular grid reconstructions that use voxel basis functions. The maximum likelihood expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm is used. For the tetrahedral reconstructions, of the five point generation methods that are evaluated, three use image priors. For evaluation purposes, an object consisting of overlapping spheres with varying activity is simulated. The exact parallel projection data of this object are obtained analytically using a parallel projector, and multiple Poisson noise realizations of these exact data are generated and reconstructed using the different point generation strategies. The unconstrained nature of point placement in some of the irregular mesh-based reconstruction strategies has superior activity recovery for small, low-contrast image regions. The results show that, with an appropriately generated set of mesh points, the irregular grid reconstruction methods can out-perform reconstructions on a regular grid for mathematical phantoms, in terms of the performance measures evaluated. PMID:20736496

  19. Feature-constrained surface reconstruction approach for point cloud data acquired with 3D laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongbo; Sheng, Yehua; Lu, Guonian; Tian, Peng; Zhang, Kai

    2008-04-01

    Surface reconstruction is an important task in the field of 3d-GIS, computer aided design and computer graphics (CAD & CG), virtual simulation and so on. Based on available incremental surface reconstruction methods, a feature-constrained surface reconstruction approach for point cloud is presented. Firstly features are extracted from point cloud under the rules of curvature extremes and minimum spanning tree. By projecting local sample points to the fitted tangent planes and using extracted features to guide and constrain the process of local triangulation and surface propagation, topological relationship among sample points can be achieved. For the constructed models, a process named consistent normal adjustment and regularization is adopted to adjust normal of each face so that the correct surface model is achieved. Experiments show that the presented approach inherits the convenient implementation and high efficiency of traditional incremental surface reconstruction method, meanwhile, it avoids improper propagation of normal across sharp edges, which means the applicability of incremental surface reconstruction is greatly improved. Above all, appropriate k-neighborhood can help to recognize un-sufficient sampled areas and boundary parts, the presented approach can be used to reconstruct both open and close surfaces without additional interference.

  20. Recognizing objects in 3D point clouds with multi-scale local features.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min; Guo, Yulan; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Yanxin; Lei, Yinjie

    2014-12-15

    Recognizing 3D objects from point clouds in the presence of significant clutter and occlusion is a highly challenging task. In this paper, we present a coarse-to-fine 3D object recognition algorithm. During the phase of offline training, each model is represented with a set of multi-scale local surface features. During the phase of online recognition, a set of keypoints are first detected from each scene. The local surfaces around these keypoints are further encoded with multi-scale feature descriptors. These scene features are then matched against all model features to generate recognition hypotheses, which include model hypotheses and pose hypotheses. Finally, these hypotheses are verified to produce recognition results. The proposed algorithm was tested on two standard datasets, with rigorous comparisons to the state-of-the-art algorithms. Experimental results show that our algorithm was fully automatic and highly effective. It was also very robust to occlusion and clutter. It achieved the best recognition performance on all of these datasets, showing its superiority compared to existing algorithms.

  1. Recognizing Objects in 3D Point Clouds with Multi-Scale Local Features

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min; Guo, Yulan; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Yanxin; Lei, Yinjie

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing 3D objects from point clouds in the presence of significant clutter and occlusion is a highly challenging task. In this paper, we present a coarse-to-fine 3D object recognition algorithm. During the phase of offline training, each model is represented with a set of multi-scale local surface features. During the phase of online recognition, a set of keypoints are first detected from each scene. The local surfaces around these keypoints are further encoded with multi-scale feature descriptors. These scene features are then matched against all model features to generate recognition hypotheses, which include model hypotheses and pose hypotheses. Finally, these hypotheses are verified to produce recognition results. The proposed algorithm was tested on two standard datasets, with rigorous comparisons to the state-of-the-art algorithms. Experimental results show that our algorithm was fully automatic and highly effective. It was also very robust to occlusion and clutter. It achieved the best recognition performance on all of these datasets, showing its superiority compared to existing algorithms. PMID:25517694

  2. Point scanning confocal microscopy facilitates 3D human hair follicle imaging in tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Kloepper, Jennifer E; Bíró, Tamás; Paus, Ralf; Cseresnyés, Zoltán

    2010-07-01

    Efficiency is a key factor in determining whether a scientific method becomes widely accepted in practical applications. In dermatology, morphological characterisation of intact hair follicles by traditional methods can be rather inefficient. Samples are embedded, sliced, imaged and digitally reconstructed, which can be time-consuming. Confocal microscopy, on the other hand, is more efficient and readily applicable to study intact hair follicles. Modern confocal microscopes deliver and collect light very efficiently and thus allow high spatial resolution imaging of relatively thick samples. In this letter, we report that we successfully imaged entire intact human hair follicles using point scanning confocal microscopy. Light delivery and light-collection were further improved by preparing the samples in 2,2'-Thiodiethanol (TDE), thus reducing refractive index gradients. The relatively short total scan times and the high quality of the acquired 3D images make confocal microscopy a desirable method for studying intact hair follicles under normal and pathological conditions.

  3. Weakly Supervised Segmentation-Aided Classification of Urban Scenes from 3d LIDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinard, S.; Landrieu, L.

    2017-05-01

    We consider the problem of the semantic classification of 3D LiDAR point clouds obtained from urban scenes when the training set is limited. We propose a non-parametric segmentation model for urban scenes composed of anthropic objects of simple shapes, partionning the scene into geometrically-homogeneous segments which size is determined by the local complexity. This segmentation can be integrated into a conditional random field classifier (CRF) in order to capture the high-level structure of the scene. For each cluster, this allows us to aggregate the noisy predictions of a weakly-supervised classifier to produce a higher confidence data term. We demonstrate the improvement provided by our method over two publicly-available large-scale data sets.

  4. Processing 3D flash LADAR point-clouds in real-time for flight applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, R.; Gravseth, I.; Earhart, R. P.; Bladt, J.; Barnhill, S.; Ruppert, L.; Centamore, C.

    2007-04-01

    Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. has demonstrated real-time processing of 3D imaging LADAR point-cloud data to produce the industry's first time-of-flight (TOF) 3D video capability. This capability is uniquely suited to the rigorous demands of space and airborne flight applications and holds great promise in the area of autonomous navigation. It will provide long-range, three dimensional video information to autonomous flight software or pilots for immediate use in rendezvous and docking, proximity operations, landing, surface vision systems, and automatic target recognition and tracking. This is enabled by our new generation of FPGA based "pixel-tube" processors, coprocessors and their associated algorithms which have led to a number of advancements in high-speed wavefront processing along with additional advances in dynamic camera control, and space laser designs based on Ball's CALIPSO LIDAR. This evolution in LADAR is made possible by moving the mechanical complexity required for a scanning system into the electronics, where production, integration, testing and life-cycle costs can be significantly reduced. This technique requires a state of the art TOF read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) attached to a sensor array to collect high resolution temporal data, which is then processed through FPGAs. The number of calculations required to process the data is greatly reduced thanks to the fact that all points are captured at the same time and thus correlated. This correlation allows extremely efficient FPGA processing. This capability has been demonstrated in prototype form at both Marshal Space Flight Center and Langley Research Center on targets that represent docking and landing scenarios. This report outlines many aspects of this work as well as aspects of our recent testing at Marshall's Flight Robotics Laboratory.

  5. Automatic 3D Building Detection and Modeling from Airborne LiDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shaohui

    Urban reconstruction, with an emphasis on man-made structure modeling, is an active research area with broad impact on several potential applications. Urban reconstruction combines photogrammetry, remote sensing, computer vision, and computer graphics. Even though there is a huge volume of work that has been done, many problems still remain unsolved. Automation is one of the key focus areas in this research. In this work, a fast, completely automated method to create 3D watertight building models from airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) point clouds is presented. The developed method analyzes the scene content and produces multi-layer rooftops, with complex rigorous boundaries and vertical walls, that connect rooftops to the ground. The graph cuts algorithm is used to separate vegetative elements from the rest of the scene content, which is based on the local analysis about the properties of the local implicit surface patch. The ground terrain and building rooftop footprints are then extracted, utilizing the developed strategy, a two-step hierarchical Euclidean clustering. The method presented here adopts a "divide-and-conquer" scheme. Once the building footprints are segmented from the terrain and vegetative areas, the whole scene is divided into individual pendent processing units which represent potential points on the rooftop. For each individual building region, significant features on the rooftop are further detected using a specifically designed region-growing algorithm with surface smoothness constraints. The principal orientation of each building rooftop feature is calculated using a minimum bounding box fitting technique, and is used to guide the refinement of shapes and boundaries of the rooftop parts. Boundaries for all of these features are refined for the purpose of producing strict description. Once the description of the rooftops is achieved, polygonal mesh models are generated by creating surface patches with outlines defined by detected

  6. Feature extraction from 3D lidar point clouds using image processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ling; Shortridge, Ashton; Lusch, David; Shi, Ruoming

    2011-10-01

    Airborne LiDAR data have become cost-effective to produce at local and regional scales across the United States and internationally. These data are typically collected and processed into surface data products by contractors for state and local communities. Current algorithms for advanced processing of LiDAR point cloud data are normally implemented in specialized, expensive software that is not available for many users, and these users are therefore unable to experiment with the LiDAR point cloud data directly for extracting desired feature classes. The objective of this research is to identify and assess automated, readily implementable GIS procedures to extract features like buildings, vegetated areas, parking lots and roads from LiDAR data using standard image processing tools, as such tools are relatively mature with many effective classification methods. The final procedure adopted employs four distinct stages. First, interpolation is used to transfer the 3D points to a high-resolution raster. Raster grids of both height and intensity are generated. Second, multiple raster maps - a normalized surface model (nDSM), difference of returns, slope, and the LiDAR intensity map - are conflated to generate a multi-channel image. Third, a feature space of this image is created. Finally, supervised classification on the feature space is implemented. The approach is demonstrated in both a conceptual model and on a complex real-world case study, and its strengths and limitations are addressed.

  7. Integration of Libration Point Orbit Dynamics into a Universal 3-D Autonomous Formation Flying Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The autonomous formation flying control algorithm developed by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for the New Millennium Program (NMP) Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) mission is investigated for applicability to libration point orbit formations. In the EO-1 formation-flying algorithm, control is accomplished via linearization about a reference transfer orbit with a state transition matrix (STM) computed from state inputs. The effect of libration point orbit dynamics on this algorithm architecture is explored via computation of STMs using the flight proven code, a monodromy matrix developed from a N-body model of a libration orbit, and a standard STM developed from the gravitational and coriolis effects as measured at the libration point. A comparison of formation flying Delta-Vs calculated from these methods is made to a standard linear quadratic regulator (LQR) method. The universal 3-D approach is optimal in the sense that it can be accommodated as an open-loop or closed-loop control using only state information.

  8. High-frequency waves in the corona due to null points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, I. C.; Khomenko, E.; Collados, M.; de Vicente, A.

    2017-06-01

    This work aims to understand the behavior of non-linear waves in the vicinity of a coronal null point. In previous works we have shown that high-frequency waves are generated in such a magnetic configuration. This paper studies those waves in detail in order to provide a plausible explanation of their generation. We demonstrate that slow magneto-acoustic shock waves generated in the chromosphere propagate through the null point and produce a train of secondary shocks that escape along the field lines. A particular combination of the shock wave speeds generates waves at a frequency of 80 mHz. We speculate that this frequency may be sensitive to the atmospheric parameters in the corona and therefore can be used to probe the structure of this solar layer. Movies attached to Figs 2 and 4 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Numerical Simulations of Solar Spicule Jets at a Magnetic Null-Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, V.; Konkol, P. M.; Solov'ev, A. A.; Murawski, K.

    2016-11-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations of jet-like structures in the solar atmosphere are performed. These structures result from a pressure pulse that is launched at the null point of a potential magnetic arcade. The plasma jet exhibits a double structure with two components: (a) dense, cool, and short vertical stream and (b) a less dense, hot and tall part of the jet. The upper part of the hot and tall jet may represent a direct response of the system to the pressure pulse launched at the null point, and the second, slower cool and dense part of the jet is formed later through the stretching up of the stream as a result of plasma evacuation from the top of the magnetic arcade. Numerical results show that jet-like structures mimic some properties of both type I and type II spicules, according to the classification provided by De Pontieu et al. ( Publ. Astron. Soc. Japan 59, S655, 2007).

  10. Comparison of clinical bracket point registration with 3D laser scanner and coordinate measuring machine

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Mahtab; Farzan, Arash; Baghban, Ali Reza Akbarzadeh; Massudi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic value of a laser scanner developed to determine the coordinates of clinical bracket points and to compare with the results of a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). METHODS: This diagnostic experimental study was conducted on maxillary and mandibular orthodontic study casts of 18 adults with normal Class I occlusion. First, the coordinates of the bracket points were measured on all casts by a CMM. Then, the three-dimensional coordinates (X, Y, Z) of the bracket points were measured on the same casts by a 3D laser scanner designed at Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran. The validity and reliability of each system were assessed by means of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Dahlberg's formula. RESULTS: The difference between the mean dimension and the actual value for the CMM was 0.0066 mm. (95% CI: 69.98340, 69.99140). The mean difference for the laser scanner was 0.107 ± 0.133 mm (95% CI: -0.002, 0.24). In each method, differences were not significant. The ICC comparing the two methods was 0.998 for the X coordinate, and 0.996 for the Y coordinate; the mean difference for coordinates recorded in the entire arch and for each tooth was 0.616 mm. CONCLUSION: The accuracy of clinical bracket point coordinates measured by the laser scanner was equal to that of CMM. The mean difference in measurements was within the range of operator errors. PMID:25741826

  11. Knowledge guided object detection and identification in 3D point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmacharya, A.; Boochs, F.; Tietz, B.

    2015-05-01

    Modern instruments like laser scanner and 3D cameras or image based techniques like structure from motion produce huge point clouds as base for further object analysis. This has considerably changed the way of data compilation away from selective manually guided processes towards automatic and computer supported strategies. However it's still a long way to achieve the quality and robustness of manual processes as data sets are mostly very complex. Looking at existing strategies 3D data processing for object detections and reconstruction rely heavily on either data driven or model driven approaches. These approaches come with their limitation on depending highly on the nature of data and inability to handle any deviation. Furthermore, the lack of capabilities to integrate other data or information in between the processing steps further exposes their limitations. This restricts the approaches to be executed with strict predefined strategy and does not allow deviations when and if new unexpected situations arise. We propose a solution that induces intelligence in the processing activities through the usage of semantics. The solution binds the objects along with other related knowledge domains to the numerical processing to facilitate the detection of geometries and then uses experts' inference rules to annotate them. The solution was tested within the prototypical application of the research project "Wissensbasierte Detektion von Objekten in Punktwolken für Anwendungen im Ingenieurbereich (WiDOP)". The flexibility of the solution is demonstrated through two entirely different USE Case scenarios: Deutsche Bahn (German Railway System) for the outdoor scenarios and Fraport (Frankfort Airport) for the indoor scenarios. Apart from the difference in their environments, they provide different conditions, which the solution needs to consider. While locations of the objects in Fraport were previously known, that of DB were not known at the beginning.

  12. Calibration of an Outdoor Distributed Camera Network with a 3D Point Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Agustín; Silva, Manuel; Teniente, Ernesto H.; Ferreira, Ricardo; Bernardino, Alexandre; Gaspar, José; Andrade-Cetto, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor camera networks are becoming ubiquitous in critical urban areas of the largest cities around the world. Although current applications of camera networks are mostly tailored to video surveillance, recent research projects are exploiting their use to aid robotic systems in people-assisting tasks. Such systems require precise calibration of the internal and external parameters of the distributed camera network. Despite the fact that camera calibration has been an extensively studied topic, the development of practical methods for user-assisted calibration that minimize user intervention time and maximize precision still pose significant challenges. These camera systems have non-overlapping fields of view, are subject to environmental stress, and are likely to suffer frequent recalibration. In this paper, we propose the use of a 3D map covering the area to support the calibration process and develop an automated method that allows quick and precise calibration of a large camera network. We present two cases of study of the proposed calibration method: one is the calibration of the Barcelona Robot Lab camera network, which also includes direct mappings (homographies) between image coordinates and world points in the ground plane (walking areas) to support person and robot detection and localization algorithms. The second case consist of improving the GPS positioning of geo-tagged images taken with a mobile device in the Facultat de Matemàtiques i Estadística (FME) patio at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC). PMID:25076221

  13. Walsh-Hadamard Based 3D Steganography for Protecting Sensitive Information in Point-of-Care.

    PubMed

    Abuadbba, Alsharif; Khalil, Ibrahim

    2016-11-29

    Remote points-of-care has recently had a lot of attention for their advantages such as saving lives and cost reduction. The transmitted streams usually contain (1) normal biomedical signals (e.g. ECG) and (2) highly private information (e.g. patient identity). Despite the obvious advantages, the primary concerns are privacy and authenticity of the transferred data. Therefore, this paper introduces a novel steganographic mechanism that ensures (1) strong privacy preservation of private information by random concealing inside the transferred signals employing a key, and (2) evidence of originality for the biomedical signals. To maximize hiding, Fast Walsh-Hadamard Transform is utilized to transform the signals into a group of coefficients. To ensure the lowest distortion, only less-significant values of coefficients are employed. To strengthen security, the key is utilized in a 3-Dimensional random coefficients' reform to produce a 3D order employed in the concealing process. The resultant distortion has been thoroughly measured in all stages. After extensive experiments on three types of signals, it has been proven that the algorithm has little impact on the genuine signals (< 1 %). The security evaluation also confirms that unlawful retrieval of the hidden information within rational time is mightily improbable.

  14. Calibration of an outdoor distributed camera network with a 3D point cloud.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Agustín; Silva, Manuel; Teniente, Ernesto H; Ferreira, Ricardo; Bernardino, Alexandre; Gaspar, José; Andrade-Cetto, Juan

    2014-07-29

    Outdoor camera networks are becoming ubiquitous in critical urban areas of the largest cities around the world. Although current applications of camera networks are mostly tailored to video surveillance, recent research projects are exploiting their use to aid robotic systems in people-assisting tasks. Such systems require precise calibration of the internal and external parameters of the distributed camera network. Despite the fact that camera calibration has been an extensively studied topic, the development of practical methods for user-assisted calibration that minimize user intervention time and maximize precision still pose significant challenges. These camera systems have non-overlapping fields of view, are subject to environmental stress, and are likely to suffer frequent recalibration. In this paper, we propose the use of a 3D map covering the area to support the calibration process and develop an automated method that allows quick and precise calibration of a large camera network. We present two cases of study of the proposed calibration method: one is the calibration of the Barcelona Robot Lab camera network, which also includes direct mappings (homographies) between image coordinates and world points in the ground plane (walking areas) to support person and robot detection and localization algorithms. The second case consist of improving the GPS positioning of geo-tagged images taken with a mobile device in the Facultat de Matemàtiques i Estadística (FME) patio at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC).

  15. Estimability of thrusting trajectories in 3-D from a single passive sensor with unknown launch point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ting; Bar-Shalom, Yaakov; Willett, Peter; Ben-Dov, R.; Pollak, S.

    2013-09-01

    The problem of estimating the state of thrusting/ballistic endoatmospheric projectiles moving in 3-dimensional (3-D) space using 2-dimensional (2-D) measurements from a single passive sensor is investigated. The location of projectile's launch point (LP) is unavailable and this could significantly affect the performance of the estimation and the IPP. The LP altitude is then an unknown target parameter. The estimability is analyzed based on the Fisher Information Matrix (FIM) of the target parameter vector, comprising the initial launch (azimuth and elevation) angles, drag coefficient, thrust and the LP altitude, which determine the trajectory according to a nonlinear motion equation. The full rank of the FIM ensures that one has an estimable target parameters. The corresponding Craḿer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) quantifies the estimation performance of the estimator that is statistically efficient and can be used for IPP. In view of the inherent nonlinearity of the problem, the maximum likelihood (ML) estimate of the target parameter vector is found by using a mixed (partially grid-based) search approach. For a selected grid in the drag-coefficient-thrust-altitude subspace, the proposed parallelizable approach is shown to have reliable estimation performance and further leads to the final IPP of high accuracy.

  16. A continuous surface reconstruction method on point cloud captured from a 3D surface photogrammetry system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenyang; Cheung, Yam; Sabouri, Pouya; Arai, Tatsuya J.; Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan

    2015-01-01

    achieved submillimeter reconstruction RMSE under different configurations, demonstrating quantitatively the faith of the proposed method in preserving local structural properties of the underlying surface in the presence of noise and missing measurements, and its robustness toward variations of such characteristics. On point clouds from the human subject, the proposed method successfully reconstructed all patient surfaces, filling regions where raw point coordinate readings were missing. Within two comparable regions of interest in the chest area, similar mean curvature distributions were acquired from both their reconstructed surface and CT surface, with mean and standard deviation of (μrecon = − 2.7 × 10−3 mm−1, σrecon = 7.0 × 10−3 mm−1) and (μCT = − 2.5 × 10−3 mm−1, σCT = 5.3 × 10−3 mm−1), respectively. The agreement of local geometry properties between the reconstructed surfaces and the CT surface demonstrated the ability of the proposed method in faithfully representing the underlying patient surface. Conclusions: The authors have integrated and developed an accurate level-set based continuous surface reconstruction method on point clouds acquired by a 3D surface photogrammetry system. The proposed method has generated a continuous representation of the underlying phantom and patient surfaces with good robustness against noise and missing measurements. It serves as an important first step for further development of motion tracking methods during radiotherapy. PMID:26520747

  17. A continuous surface reconstruction method on point cloud captured from a 3D surface photogrammetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenyang; Cheung, Yam; Sabouri, Pouya; Arai, Tatsuya J.; Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan

    2015-11-15

    achieved submillimeter reconstruction RMSE under different configurations, demonstrating quantitatively the faith of the proposed method in preserving local structural properties of the underlying surface in the presence of noise and missing measurements, and its robustness toward variations of such characteristics. On point clouds from the human subject, the proposed method successfully reconstructed all patient surfaces, filling regions where raw point coordinate readings were missing. Within two comparable regions of interest in the chest area, similar mean curvature distributions were acquired from both their reconstructed surface and CT surface, with mean and standard deviation of (μ{sub recon} = − 2.7 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup −1}, σ{sub recon} = 7.0 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup −1}) and (μ{sub CT} = − 2.5 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup −1}, σ{sub CT} = 5.3 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup −1}), respectively. The agreement of local geometry properties between the reconstructed surfaces and the CT surface demonstrated the ability of the proposed method in faithfully representing the underlying patient surface. Conclusions: The authors have integrated and developed an accurate level-set based continuous surface reconstruction method on point clouds acquired by a 3D surface photogrammetry system. The proposed method has generated a continuous representation of the underlying phantom and patient surfaces with good robustness against noise and missing measurements. It serves as an important first step for further development of motion tracking methods during radiotherapy.

  18. Evaluation of Methods for Coregistration and Fusion of Rpas-Based 3d Point Clouds and Thermal Infrared Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoegner, L.; Tuttas, S.; Xu, Y.; Eder, K.; Stilla, U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper discusses the automatic coregistration and fusion of 3d point clouds generated from aerial image sequences and corresponding thermal infrared (TIR) images. Both RGB and TIR images have been taken from a RPAS platform with a predefined flight path where every RGB image has a corresponding TIR image taken from the same position and with the same orientation with respect to the accuracy of the RPAS system and the inertial measurement unit. To remove remaining differences in the exterior orientation, different strategies for coregistering RGB and TIR images are discussed: (i) coregistration based on 2D line segments for every single TIR image and the corresponding RGB image. This method implies a mainly planar scene to avoid mismatches; (ii) coregistration of both the dense 3D point clouds from RGB images and from TIR images by coregistering 2D image projections of both point clouds; (iii) coregistration based on 2D line segments in every single TIR image and 3D line segments extracted from intersections of planes fitted in the segmented dense 3D point cloud; (iv) coregistration of both the dense 3D point clouds from RGB images and from TIR images using both ICP and an adapted version based on corresponding segmented planes; (v) coregistration of both image sets based on point features. The quality is measured by comparing the differences of the back projection of homologous points in both corrected RGB and TIR images.

  19. Towards free 3D end-point control for robotic-assisted human reaching using binocular eye tracking.

    PubMed

    Maimon-Dror, Roni O; Fernandez-Quesada, Jorge; Zito, Giuseppe A; Konnaris, Charalambos; Dziemian, Sabine; Faisal, A Aldo

    2017-07-01

    Eye-movements are the only directly observable behavioural signals that are highly correlated with actions at the task level, and proactive of body movements and thus reflect action intentions. Moreover, eye movements are preserved in many movement disorders leading to paralysis (or amputees) from stroke, spinal cord injury, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and muscular dystrophy among others. Despite this benefit, eye tracking is not widely used as control interface for robotic interfaces in movement impaired patients due to poor human-robot interfaces. We demonstrate here how combining 3D gaze tracking using our GT3D binocular eye tracker with custom designed 3D head tracking system and calibration method enables continuous 3D end-point control of a robotic arm support system. The users can move their own hand to any location of the workspace by simple looking at the target and winking once. This purely eye tracking based system enables the end-user to retain free head movement and yet achieves high spatial end point accuracy in the order of 6 cm RMSE error in each dimension and standard deviation of 4 cm. 3D calibration is achieved by moving the robot along a 3 dimensional space filling Peano curve while the user is tracking it with their eyes. This results in a fully automated calibration procedure that yields several thousand calibration points versus standard approaches using a dozen points, resulting in beyond state-of-the-art 3D accuracy and precision.

  20. Development of a 3D rockfall simulation model for point cloud topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, François; Wyser, Emmanuel; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Clouthier, Catherine; Locat, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    Rockfall simulations are generally used, for example, as input data to generate rockfall susceptibility map, to evaluate the reach probability of an infrastructure or to define input parameter values for mitigation designs. During the simulations, the lateral and vertical deviations of the particle and the change of velocity happening during the impacts have to be evaluated. Numerous factors control rockfall paths and velocities, like the particle's and terrain's shapes and compositions. Some models, especially the ones using discrete element methods, can consider a lot of physical factors. However, a compromise often has to be done between the time needed to produce a sufficient amount of 2D or 3D rockfall trajectories and the level of complexity of the model. In this presentation, the current version of our rockfall model in development is detailed and the compromises that were made are explained. For example, it is hard to predict the sizes and shapes of the components that could fall from a developing rock instability, or if they will break after the first impact or stay as massive blocks. For this reason, we decided for now to simplify the particle's shape to a sphere which can vary in size and to use a cubical shape to compute the 3D rotational inertia. In contrast to the particle's characteristics, the terrain's shape is known and can be acquired in detail using current topographical acquisition methods, e.g. airborne and terrestrial laser scans and aerial based structure from motion. We made no sacrifice on that side and developed our model so it can simulate rockfalls directly on 3D point clouds topographical data. It is also been shown that calibrating velocity weighting factors, often called restitution coefficients, is not an easy task. Divergent results could be obtained by different users using the same simulation program simply because they use different weighting factors, which are hard to evaluate and quantify from field work. Moreover, the normal

  1. Comparison of 3D point clouds produced by LIDAR and UAV photoscan in the Rochefort cave (Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watlet, Arnaud; Triantafyllou, Antoine; Kaufmann, Olivier; Le Mouelic, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Amongst today's techniques that are able to produce 3D point clouds, LIDAR and UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) photogrammetry are probably the most commonly used. Both methods have their own advantages and limitations. LIDAR scans create high resolution and high precision 3D point clouds, but such methods are generally costly, especially for sporadic surveys. Compared to LIDAR, UAV (e.g. drones) are cheap and flexible to use in different kind of environments. Moreover, the photogrammetric processing workflow of digital images taken with UAV becomes easier with the rise of many affordable software packages (e.g. Agisoft, PhotoModeler3D, VisualSFM). We present here a challenging study made at the Rochefort Cave Laboratory (South Belgium) comprising surface and underground surveys. The site is located in the Belgian Variscan fold-and-thrust belt, a region that shows many karstic networks within Devonian limestone units. A LIDAR scan has been acquired in the main chamber of the cave (~ 15000 m³) to spatialize 3D point cloud of its inner walls and infer geological beds and structures. Even if the use of LIDAR instrument was not really comfortable in such caving environment, the collected data showed a remarkable precision according to few control points geometry. We also decided to perform another challenging survey of the same cave chamber by modelling a 3D point cloud using photogrammetry of a set of DSLR camera pictures taken from the ground and UAV pictures. The aim was to compare both techniques in terms of (i) implementation of data acquisition and processing, (ii) quality of resulting 3D points clouds (points density, field vs cloud recovery and points precision), (iii) their application for geological purposes. Through Rochefort case study, main conclusions are that LIDAR technique provides higher density point clouds with slightly higher precision than photogrammetry method. However, 3D data modeled by photogrammetry provide visible light spectral information

  2. Observation of superconductivity induced by a point contact on 3D Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 crystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Wang, Huichao; Liu, Haiwen; Lu, Hong; Yang, Wuhao; Jia, Shuang; Liu, Xiong-Jun; Xie, X C; Wei, Jian; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetals, which possess 3D linear dispersion in the electronic structure as a bulk analogue of graphene, have lately generated widespread interest in both materials science and condensed matter physics. Recently, crystalline Cd3As2 has been proposed and proved to be a 3D Dirac semimetal that can survive in the atmosphere. Here, by using point contact spectroscopy measurements, we observe exotic superconductivity around the point contact region on the surface of Cd3As2 crystals. The zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) and double conductance peaks (DCPs) symmetric around zero bias suggest p-wave-like unconventional superconductivity. Considering the topological properties of 3D Dirac semimetals, our findings may indicate that Cd3As2 crystals under certain conditions could be topological superconductors, which are predicted to support Majorana zero modes or gapless Majorana edge/surface modes in the boundary depending on the dimensionality of the material.

  3. The importance of topographically corrected null models for analyzing ecological point processes.

    PubMed

    McDowall, Philip; Lynch, Heather J

    2017-07-01

    Analyses of point process patterns and related techniques (e.g., MaxEnt) make use of the expected number of occurrences per unit area and second-order statistics based on the distance between occurrences. Ecologists working with point process data often assume that points exist on a two-dimensional x-y plane or within a three-dimensional volume, when in fact many observed point patterns are generated on a two-dimensional surface existing within three-dimensional space. For many surfaces, however, such as the topography of landscapes, the projection from the surface to the x-y plane preserves neither area nor distance. As such, when these point patterns are implicitly projected to and analyzed in the x-y plane, our expectations of the point pattern's statistical properties may not be met. When used in hypothesis testing, we find that the failure to account for the topography of the generating surface may bias statistical tests that incorrectly identify clustering and, furthermore, may bias coefficients in inhomogeneous point process models that incorporate slope as a covariate. We demonstrate the circumstances under which this bias is significant, and present simple methods that allow point processes to be simulated with corrections for topography. These point patterns can then be used to generate "topographically corrected" null models against which observed point processes can be compared. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  4. Evolution of the photospheric magnetic field and coronal null points before solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshina, I. V.; Somov, B. V.

    2009-03-01

    Based on a topological model for the magnetic field of a solar active region (AR), we suggest a criterion for the existence of magnetic null points on the separators in the corona. With the problem of predicting solar flares in mind, we have revealed a model parameter whose decrease means that the AR evolves toward a major eruptive flare. We analyze the magnetic field evolution for AR 9077 within two days before the Bastille Day flare on July 14, 2000. The coronal conditions are shown to have become more favorable for magnetic reconnection, which led to a 3B/X5.7 eruptive flare.

  5. Comparison of 2d and 3d Approaches for the Alignment of Uav and LIDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persad, R. A.; Armenakis, C.

    2017-08-01

    The automatic alignment of 3D point clouds acquired or generated from different sensors is a challenging problem. The objective of the alignment is to estimate the 3D similarity transformation parameters, including a global scale factor, 3 rotations and 3 translations. To do so, corresponding anchor features are required in both data sets. There are two main types of alignment: i) Coarse alignment and ii) Refined Alignment. Coarse alignment issues include lack of any prior knowledge of the respective coordinate systems for a source and target point cloud pair and the difficulty to extract and match corresponding control features (e.g., points, lines or planes) co-located on both point cloud pairs to be aligned. With the increasing use of UAVs, there is a need to automatically co-register their generated point cloud-based digital surface models with those from other data acquisition systems such as terrestrial or airborne lidar point clouds. This works presents a comparative study of two independent feature matching techniques for addressing 3D conformal point cloud alignment of UAV and lidar data in different 3D coordinate systems without any prior knowledge of the seven transformation parameters.

  6. Low cost digital photogrammetry: From the extraction of point clouds by SFM technique to 3D mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michele, Mangiameli; Giuseppe, Mussumeci; Salvatore, Zito

    2017-07-01

    The Structure From Motion (SFM) is a technique applied to a series of photographs of an object that returns a 3D reconstruction made up by points in the space (point clouds). This research aims at comparing the results of the SFM approach with the results of a 3D laser scanning in terms of density and accuracy of the model. The experience was conducted by detecting several architectural elements (walls and portals of historical buildings) both with a 3D laser scanner of the latest generation and an amateur photographic camera. The point clouds acquired by laser scanner and those acquired by the photo camera have been systematically compared. In particular we present the experience carried out on the "Don Diego Pappalardo Palace" site in Pedara (Catania, Sicily).

  7. A Lidar Point Cloud Based Procedure for Vertical Canopy Structure Analysis And 3D Single Tree Modelling in Forest

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunsheng; Weinacker, Holger; Koch, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    A procedure for both vertical canopy structure analysis and 3D single tree modelling based on Lidar point cloud is presented in this paper. The whole area of research is segmented into small study cells by a raster net. For each cell, a normalized point cloud whose point heights represent the absolute heights of the ground objects is generated from the original Lidar raw point cloud. The main tree canopy layers and the height ranges of the layers are detected according to a statistical analysis of the height distribution probability of the normalized raw points. For the 3D modelling of individual trees, individual trees are detected and delineated not only from the top canopy layer but also from the sub canopy layer. The normalized points are resampled into a local voxel space. A series of horizontal 2D projection images at the different height levels are then generated respect to the voxel space. Tree crown regions are detected from the projection images. Individual trees are then extracted by means of a pre-order forest traversal process through all the tree crown regions at the different height levels. Finally, 3D tree crown models of the extracted individual trees are reconstructed. With further analyses on the 3D models of individual tree crowns, important parameters such as crown height range, crown volume and crown contours at the different height levels can be derived. PMID:27879916

  8. A Lidar Point Cloud Based Procedure for Vertical Canopy Structure Analysis And 3D Single Tree Modelling in Forest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunsheng; Weinacker, Holger; Koch, Barbara

    2008-06-12

    A procedure for both vertical canopy structure analysis and 3D single tree modelling based on Lidar point cloud is presented in this paper. The whole area of research is segmented into small study cells by a raster net. For each cell, a normalized point cloud whose point heights represent the absolute heights of the ground objects is generated from the original Lidar raw point cloud. The main tree canopy layers and the height ranges of the layers are detected according to a statistical analysis of the height distribution probability of the normalized raw points. For the 3D modelling of individual trees, individual trees are detected and delineated not only from the top canopy layer but also from the sub canopy layer. The normalized points are resampled into a local voxel space. A series of horizontal 2D projection images at the different height levels are then generated respect to the voxel space. Tree crown regions are detected from the projection images. Individual trees are then extracted by means of a pre-order forest traversal process through all the tree crown regions at the different height levels. Finally, 3D tree crown models of the extracted individual trees are reconstructed. With further analyses on the 3D models of individual tree crowns, important parameters such as crown height range, crown volume and crown contours at the different height levels can be derived.

  9. KINETIC MODELING OF PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN A SOLAR NULL-POINT RECONNECTION REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, G.; Haugbolle, T.; Nordlund, A.

    2013-07-10

    The primary focus of this paper is on the particle acceleration mechanism in solar coronal three-dimensional reconnection null-point regions. Starting from a potential field extrapolation of a Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) magnetogram taken on 2002 November 16, we first performed magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with horizontal motions observed by SOHO applied to the photospheric boundary of the computational box. After a build-up of electric current in the fan plane of the null point, a sub-section of the evolved MHD data was used as initial and boundary conditions for a kinetic particle-in-cell model of the plasma. We find that sub-relativistic electron acceleration is mainly driven by a systematic electric field in the current sheet. A non-thermal population of electrons with a power-law distribution in energy forms in the simulated pre-flare phase, featuring a power-law index of about -1.78. This work provides a first step toward bridging the gap between macroscopic scales on the order of hundreds of Mm and kinetic scales on the order of centimeter in the solar corona, and explains how to achieve such a cross-scale coupling by utilizing either physical modifications or (equivalent) modifications of the constants of nature. With their exceptionally high resolution-up to 135 billion particles and 3.5 billion grid cells of size 17.5 km-these simulations offer a new opportunity to study particle acceleration in solar-like settings.

  10. Kinetic Modeling of Particle Acceleration in a Solar Null-point Reconnection Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, G.; Haugbølle, T.; Nordlund, Å.

    2013-07-01

    The primary focus of this paper is on the particle acceleration mechanism in solar coronal three-dimensional reconnection null-point regions. Starting from a potential field extrapolation of a Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) magnetogram taken on 2002 November 16, we first performed magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with horizontal motions observed by SOHO applied to the photospheric boundary of the computational box. After a build-up of electric current in the fan plane of the null point, a sub-section of the evolved MHD data was used as initial and boundary conditions for a kinetic particle-in-cell model of the plasma. We find that sub-relativistic electron acceleration is mainly driven by a systematic electric field in the current sheet. A non-thermal population of electrons with a power-law distribution in energy forms in the simulated pre-flare phase, featuring a power-law index of about -1.78. This work provides a first step toward bridging the gap between macroscopic scales on the order of hundreds of Mm and kinetic scales on the order of centimeter in the solar corona, and explains how to achieve such a cross-scale coupling by utilizing either physical modifications or (equivalent) modifications of the constants of nature. With their exceptionally high resolution—up to 135 billion particles and 3.5 billion grid cells of size 17.5 km—these simulations offer a new opportunity to study particle acceleration in solar-like settings.

  11. Automated 3D motion tracking using Gabor filter bank, robust point matching, and deformable models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Wang, Xiaoxu; Chung, Sohae; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2010-01-01

    Tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tagged MRI or tMRI) provides a means of directly and noninvasively displaying the internal motion of the myocardium. Reconstruction of the motion field is needed to quantify important clinical information, e.g., the myocardial strain, and detect regional heart functional loss. In this paper, we present a three-step method for this task. First, we use a Gabor filter bank to detect and locate tag intersections in the image frames, based on local phase analysis. Next, we use an improved version of the robust point matching (RPM) method to sparsely track the motion of the myocardium, by establishing a transformation function and a one-to-one correspondence between grid tag intersections in different image frames. In particular, the RPM helps to minimize the impact on the motion tracking result of 1) through-plane motion and 2) relatively large deformation and/or relatively small tag spacing. In the final step, a meshless deformable model is initialized using the transformation function computed by RPM. The model refines the motion tracking and generates a dense displacement map, by deforming under the influence of image information, and is constrained by the displacement magnitude to retain its geometric structure. The 2D displacement maps in short and long axis image planes can be combined to drive a 3D deformable model, using the moving least square method, constrained by the minimization of the residual error at tag intersections. The method has been tested on a numerical phantom, as well as on in vivo heart data from normal volunteers and heart disease patients. The experimental results show that the new method has a good performance on both synthetic and real data. Furthermore, the method has been used in an initial clinical study to assess the differences in myocardial strain distributions between heart disease (left ventricular hypertrophy) patients and the normal control group. The final results show that the proposed method

  12. Joint angle variability in 3D bimanual pointing: uncontrolled manifold analysis.

    PubMed

    Domkin, Dmitry; Laczko, Jozsef; Djupsjöbacka, Mats; Jaric, Slobodan; Latash, Mark L

    2005-05-01

    The structure of joint angle variability and its changes with practice were investigated using the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) computational approach. Subjects performed fast and accurate bimanual pointing movements in 3D space, trying to match the tip of a pointer, held in the right hand, with the tip of one of three different targets, held in the left hand during a pre-test, several practice sessions and a post-test. The prediction of the UCM approach about the structuring of joint angle variance for selective stabilization of important task variables was tested with respect to selective stabilization of time series of the vectorial distance between the pointer and aimed target tips (bimanual control hypothesis) and with respect to selective stabilization of the endpoint trajectory of each arm (unimanual control hypothesis). The components of the total joint angle variance not affecting (V(COMP)) and affecting (V(UN)) the value of a selected task variable were computed for each 10% of the normalized movement time. The ratio of these two components R(V)=V(COMP)/V(UN) served as a quantitative index of selective stabilization. Both the bimanual and unimanual control hypotheses were supported, however the R(V) values for the bimanual hypothesis were significantly higher than those for the unimanual hypothesis applied to the left and right arm both prior to and after practice. This suggests that the CNS stabilizes the relative trajectory of one endpoint with respect to the other more than it stabilizes the trajectories of each of the endpoints in the external space. Practice-associated improvement in both movement speed and accuracy was accompanied by counter-intuitive lack of changes in R(V). Both V(COMP) and V(UN) variance components decreased such that their ratio remained constant prior to and after practice. We conclude that the UCM approach offers a unique and under-explored opportunity to track changes in the organization of multi-effector systems with practice

  13. Automated 3D Motion Tracking using Gabor Filter Bank, Robust Point Matching, and Deformable Models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Chung, Sohae; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2013-01-01

    Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging (tagged MRI or tMRI) provides a means of directly and noninvasively displaying the internal motion of the myocardium. Reconstruction of the motion field is needed to quantify important clinical information, e.g., the myocardial strain, and detect regional heart functional loss. In this paper, we present a three-step method for this task. First, we use a Gabor filter bank to detect and locate tag intersections in the image frames, based on local phase analysis. Next, we use an improved version of the Robust Point Matching (RPM) method to sparsely track the motion of the myocardium, by establishing a transformation function and a one-to-one correspondence between grid tag intersections in different image frames. In particular, the RPM helps to minimize the impact on the motion tracking result of: 1) through-plane motion, and 2) relatively large deformation and/or relatively small tag spacing. In the final step, a meshless deformable model is initialized using the transformation function computed by RPM. The model refines the motion tracking and generates a dense displacement map, by deforming under the influence of image information, and is constrained by the displacement magnitude to retain its geometric structure. The 2D displacement maps in short and long axis image planes can be combined to drive a 3D deformable model, using the Moving Least Square method, constrained by the minimization of the residual error at tag intersections. The method has been tested on a numerical phantom, as well as on in vivo heart data from normal volunteers and heart disease patients. The experimental results show that the new method has a good performance on both synthetic and real data. Furthermore, the method has been used in an initial clinical study to assess the differences in myocardial strain distributions between heart disease (left ventricular hypertrophy) patients and the normal control group. The final results show that the proposed method

  14. Establishing point correspondence of 3D faces via sparse facial deformable model.

    PubMed

    Pan, Gang; Zhang, Xiaobo; Wang, Yueming; Hu, Zhenfang; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Wu, Zhaohui

    2013-11-01

    Establishing a dense vertex-to-vertex anthropometric correspondence between 3D faces is an important and fundamental problem in 3D face research, which can contribute to most applications of 3D faces. This paper proposes a sparse facial deformable model to automatically achieve this task. For an input 3D face, the basic idea is to generate a new 3D face that has the same mesh topology as a reference face and the highly similar shape to the input face, and whose vertices correspond to those of the reference face in an anthropometric sense. Two constraints: 1) the shape constraint and 2) correspondence constraint are modeled in our method to satisfy the three requirements. The shape constraint is solved by a novel face deformation approach in which a normal-ray scheme is integrated to the closest-vertex scheme to keep high-curvature shapes in deformation. The correspondence constraint is based on an assumption that if the vertices on 3D faces are corresponded, their shape signals lie on a manifold and each face signal can be represented sparsely by a few typical items in a dictionary. The dictionary can be well learnt and contains the distribution information of the corresponded vertices. The correspondence information can be conveyed to the sparse representation of the generated 3D face. Thus, a patch-based sparse representation is proposed as the correspondence constraint. By solving the correspondence constraint iteratively, the vertices of the generated face can be adjusted to correspondence positions gradually. At the early iteration steps, smaller sparsity thresholds are set that yield larger representation errors but better globally corresponded vertices. At the later steps, relatively larger sparsity thresholds are used to encode local shapes. By this method, the vertices in the new face approach the right positions progressively until the final global correspondence is reached. Our method is automatic, and the manual work is needed only in training procedure

  15. SOLAR CYCLE VARIATIONS OF CORONAL NULL POINTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE MAGNETIC BREAKOUT MODEL OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G. R.; Mackay, D. H.; Nandy, Dibyendu E-mail: duncan@mcs.st-and.ac.u

    2009-10-20

    In this paper, we investigate the solar cycle variation of coronal null points and magnetic breakout configurations in spherical geometry, using a combination of magnetic flux transport and potential field source surface models. Within the simulations, a total of 2843 coronal null points and breakout configurations are found over two solar cycles. It is found that the number of coronal nulls present at any time varies cyclically throughout the solar cycle, in phase with the flux emergence rate. At cycle maximum, peak values of 15-17 coronal nulls per day are found. No significant variation in the number of nulls is found from the rising to the declining phase. This indicates that the magnetic breakout model is applicable throughout both phases of the solar cycle. In addition, it is shown that when the simulations are used to construct synoptic data sets, such as those produced by Kitt Peak, the number of coronal nulls drops by a factor of 1/6. The vast majority of the coronal nulls are found to lie above the active latitudes and are the result of the complex nature of the underlying active region fields. Only 8% of the coronal nulls are found to be connected to the global dipole. Another interesting feature is that 18% of coronal nulls are found to lie above the equator due to cross-equatorial interactions between bipoles lying in the northern and southern hemispheres. As the majority of coronal nulls form above active latitudes, their average radial extent is found to be in the low corona below 1.25 R {sub sun} (175, 000 km above the photosphere). Through considering the underlying photospheric flux, it is found that 71% of coronal nulls are produced though quadrupolar flux distributions resulting from bipoles in the same hemisphere interacting. When the number of coronal nulls present in each rotation is compared to the number of bipoles emerging, a wide scatter is found. The ratio of coronal nulls to emerging bipoles is found to be approximately 1/3. Overall

  16. On the Estimation of Forest Resources Using 3D Remote Sensing Techniques and Point Cloud Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjalainen, Mika; Karila, Kirsi; Liang, Xinlian; Yu, Xiaowei; Huang, Guoman; Lu, Lijun

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, 3D capable remote sensing techniques have shown great potential in forest biomass estimation because of their ability to measure the forest canopy structure, tree height and density. The objective of the Dragon3 forest resources research project (ID 10667) and the supporting ESA young scientist project (ESA contract NO. 4000109483/13/I-BG) was to study the use of satellite based 3D techniques in forest tree height estimation, and consequently in forest biomass and biomass change estimation, by combining satellite data with terrestrial measurements. Results from airborne 3D techniques were also used in the project. Even though, forest tree height can be estimated from 3D satellite SAR data to some extent, there is need for field reference plots. For this reason, we have also been developing automated field plot measurement techniques based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning data, which can be used to train and calibrate satellite based estimation models. In this paper, results of canopy height models created from TerraSAR-X stereo and TanDEM-X INSAR data are shown as well as preliminary results from TLS field plot measurement system. Also, results from the airborne CASMSAR system to measure forest canopy height from P- and X- band INSAR are presented.

  17. Semi-automated extraction and delineation of 3D roads of street scene from mobile laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Fang, Lina; Li, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Accurate 3D road information is important for applications such as road maintenance and virtual 3D modeling. Mobile laser scanning (MLS) is an efficient technique for capturing dense point clouds that can be used to construct detailed road models for large areas. This paper presents a method for extracting and delineating roads from large-scale MLS point clouds. The proposed method partitions MLS point clouds into a set of consecutive "scanning lines", which each consists of a road cross section. A moving window operator is used to filter out non-ground points line by line, and curb points are detected based on curb patterns. The detected curb points are tracked and refined so that they are both globally consistent and locally similar. To evaluate the validity of the proposed method, experiments were conducted using two types of street-scene point clouds captured by Optech's Lynx Mobile Mapper System. The completeness, correctness, and quality of the extracted roads are over 94.42%, 91.13%, and 91.3%, respectively, which proves the proposed method is a promising solution for extracting 3D roads from MLS point clouds.

  18. A 3-D numerical study of pinhole diffraction to predict the accuracy of EUV point diffraction interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K.A. |; Tejnil, E.; Bokor, J. |

    1995-12-01

    A 3-D electromagnetic field simulation is used to model the propagation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV), 13-nm, light through sub-1500 {Angstrom} dia pinholes in a highly absorptive medium. Deviations of the diffracted wavefront phase from an ideal sphere are studied within 0.1 numerical aperture, to predict the accuracy of EUV point diffraction interferometersused in at-wavelength testing of nearly diffraction-limited EUV optical systems. Aberration magnitudes are studied for various 3-D pinhole models, including cylindrical and conical pinhole bores.

  19. Slow-Mode MHD Wave Penetration into a Coronal Null Point due to the Mode Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Andrey N.; Uralov, Arkadiy M.

    2016-11-01

    Recent observations of magnetohydrodynamic oscillations and waves in solar active regions revealed their close link to quasi-periodic pulsations in flaring light curves. The nature of that link has not yet been understood in detail. In our analytical modelling we investigate propagation of slow magnetoacoustic waves in a solar active region, taking into account wave refraction and transmission of the slow magnetoacoustic mode into the fast one. The wave propagation is analysed in the geometrical acoustics approximation. Special attention is paid to the penetration of waves in the vicinity of a magnetic null point. The modelling has shown that the interaction of slow magnetoacoustic waves with the magnetic reconnection site is possible due to the mode transmission at the equipartition level where the sound speed is equal to the Alfvén speed. The efficiency of the transmission is also calculated.

  20. Attribute-based point cloud visualization in support of 3-D classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlinszky, András; Otepka, Johannes; Kania, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Despite the rich information available in LIDAR point attributes through full waveform recording, radiometric calibration and advanced texture metrics, LIDAR-based classification is mostly done in the raster domain. Point-based analyses such as noise removal or terrain filtering are often carried out without visual investigation of the point cloud attributes used. This is because point cloud visualization software usually handle only a limited number of pre-defined point attributes and only allow colorizing the point cloud with one of these at a time. Meanwhile, point cloud classification is rapidly evolving, and uses not only the individual attributes but combinations of these. In order to understand input data and output results better, more advanced methods for visualization are needed. Here we propose an algorithm of the OPALS software package that handles visualization of the point cloud together with its attributes. The algorithm is based on the .odm (OPALS data manager) file format that efficiently handles a large number of pre-defined point attributes and also allows the user to generate new ones. Attributes of interest can be visualized individually, by applying predefined or user-generated palettes in a simple .xml format. The colours of the palette are assigned to the points by setting the respective Red, Green and Blue attributes of the point to result in the colour pre-defined by the palette for the corresponding attribute value. The algorithm handles scaling and histogram equalization based on the distribution of the point attribute to be considered. Additionally, combinations of attributes can be visualized based on RBG colour mixing. The output dataset can be in any standard format where RGB attributes are supported and visualized with conventional point cloud viewing software. Viewing the point cloud together with its attributes allows efficient selection of filter settings and classification parameters. For already classified point clouds, a large

  1. Modeling the Decay in AN Hbim Starting from 3d Point Clouds. a Followed Approach for Cultural Heritage Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiabrando, F.; Lo Turco, M.; Rinaudo, F.

    2017-08-01

    The recent trends in architectural data management imply the scientific and professional collaborations of several disciplines involved in the design, restoration and maintenance. It seems an achieved concept that, in the next future, all the information connected to new interventions or conservation activities on historical buildings will be managed by using a BIM platform. Nowadays the actual range or image based metric survey techniques (mainly produced by using Terrestrial Laser Scanner or photogrammetric platform today more based on projective geometry) allow to generate 3D point clouds, 3D models, orthophotos and other outputs with assessed accuracy. The subsequent conversion of 3D information into parametric components, especially in an historical environment, is not easy and has a lot of open issues. According to the actual BIM commercial software and to the embedded tools or plugin, the paper deals with the methodology followed for the realization of two parametric 3D models (Palazzo Sarmatoris and Smistamento RoundHouse, two historical building in the north-west part of Italy). The paper describes the proposed workflow according to the employed plug-in for automatic reconstruction and to the solution adopted for the well-known problems connected to the modeling phase such as the vaults realization or the 3D irregular surfaces modeling. Finally, the studied strategy for mapping the decay in a BIM environment and the connected results with the conclusions and future perspectives are critically discussed.

  2. a Semi-Automated Point Cloud Processing Methodology for 3d Cultural Heritage Documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kıvılcım, C. Ö.; Duran, Z.

    2016-06-01

    The preliminary phase in any architectural heritage project is to obtain metric measurements and documentation of the building and its individual elements. On the other hand, conventional measurement techniques require tremendous resources and lengthy project completion times for architectural surveys and 3D model production. Over the past two decades, the widespread use of laser scanning and digital photogrammetry have significantly altered the heritage documentation process. Furthermore, advances in these technologies have enabled robust data collection and reduced user workload for generating various levels of products, from single buildings to expansive cityscapes. More recently, the use of procedural modelling methods and BIM relevant applications for historic building documentation purposes has become an active area of research, however fully automated systems in cultural heritage documentation still remains open. In this paper, we present a semi-automated methodology, for 3D façade modelling of cultural heritage assets based on parametric and procedural modelling techniques and using airborne and terrestrial laser scanning data. We present the contribution of our methodology, which we implemented in an open source software environment using the example project of a 16th century early classical era Ottoman structure, Sinan the Architect's Şehzade Mosque in Istanbul, Turkey.

  3. Comparison of 48-point 3-D anechoic and diffuse sound field measurements of directivity index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scicluna, Ron; Killion, Mead; Haapapuro, Andy; Julstrom, Stephen

    2005-09-01

    The directivity index (DI) as the single best descriptor of directional hearing aid performance at a given frequency has been agreed to in ANSI Standard S3.35-2005. The standard specifies that the in situ directivity index of a hearing aid is not to be measured in a diffuse field (as in a reverberation chamber), as implied by the traditional definition, but in an anechoic chamber, where the rms average of measurements taken with the loudspeaker oriented at 48 locations spread out over an imaginary sphere is used to approximate the diffuse-field directivity index. The corresponding directivity index estimates can be labeled diffuse field and 3D, respectively. These two measurements are theoretically equivalent to within 0.2 dB for a first-order directional microphone. A round-robin series among several laboratories found three laboratories that obtained the same DI within an average of 0.13 dB between 500 and 4000 Hz. Nonetheless, no direct comparison between the 3-D and reverberation-chamber methods has been published. We will present data obtained using both methods, and speculate as to why no one likes the simpler reverberation method.

  4. Nonrigid Point Registration for 2D Curves and 3D Surfaces and its Applications in Small Animal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hesheng; Fei, Baowei

    2013-01-01

    A nonrigid B-spline based point-matching method (BPM) is proposed to match dense surface points. The method solves both the point correspondence and nonrigid transformation without features extraction. The registration method integrates a motion model, which combines a global transformation and a B-spline based local deformation, into a robust point-matching framework. The point correspondence and deformable transformation are estimated simultaneously by fuzzy correspondence and by a deterministic annealing technique. Prior information about global translation, rotation and scaling is incorporated into the optimization. A local B-spline motion model decreases the degrees of freedom for optimization and thus enables the registration of a larger number of feature points. The performance of the BPM method has been demonstrated and validated using synthesized 2D and 3D data, mouse MRI, and micro-CT images. The proposed B-spline point-matching method can be used to register feature point sets, 2D curves, 3D surfaces, and various image data. PMID:23732538

  5. Sparsity-based fast CGH generation using layer-based approach for 3D point cloud model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hak Gu; Jeong, Hyunwook; Ro, Yong Man

    2017-03-01

    Computer generated hologram (CGH) is becoming increasingly important for a 3-D display in various applications including virtual reality. In the CGH, holographic fringe patterns are generated by numerically calculating them on computer simulation systems. However, a heavy computational cost is required to calculate the complex amplitude on CGH plane for all points of 3D objects. This paper proposes a new fast CGH generation based on the sparsity of CGH for 3D point cloud model. The aim of the proposed method is to significantly reduce computational complexity while maintaining the quality of the holographic fringe patterns. To that end, we present a new layer-based approach for calculating the complex amplitude distribution on the CGH plane by using sparse FFT (sFFT). We observe the CGH of a layer of 3D objects is sparse so that dominant CGH is rapidly generated from a small set of signals by sFFT. Experimental results have shown that the proposed method is one order of magnitude faster than recently reported fast CGH generation.

  6. Interactive Classification of Construction Materials: Feedback Driven Framework for Annotation and Analysis of 3d Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, M. R.; Petrovic, V.; Kuester, F.

    2017-08-01

    Digital documentation of cultural heritage structures is increasingly more common through the application of different imaging techniques. Many works have focused on the application of laser scanning and photogrammetry techniques for the acquisition of threedimensional (3D) geometry detailing cultural heritage sites and structures. With an abundance of these 3D data assets, there must be a digital environment where these data can be visualized and analyzed. Presented here is a feedback driven visualization framework that seamlessly enables interactive exploration and manipulation of massive point cloud data. The focus of this work is on the classification of different building materials with the goal of building more accurate as-built information models of historical structures. User defined functions have been tested within the interactive point cloud visualization framework to evaluate automated and semi-automated classification of 3D point data. These functions include decisions based on observed color, laser intensity, normal vector or local surface geometry. Multiple case studies are presented here to demonstrate the flexibility and utility of the presented point cloud visualization framework to achieve classification objectives.

  7. Evaluating the Potential of Rtk-Uav for Automatic Point Cloud Generation in 3d Rapid Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazeli, H.; Samadzadegan, F.; Dadrasjavan, F.

    2016-06-01

    During disaster and emergency situations, 3D geospatial data can provide essential information for decision support systems. The utilization of geospatial data using digital surface models as a basic reference is mandatory to provide accurate quick emergency response in so called rapid mapping activities. The recipe between accuracy requirements and time restriction is considered critical in this situations. UAVs as alternative platforms for 3D point cloud acquisition offer potentials because of their flexibility and practicability combined with low cost implementations. Moreover, the high resolution data collected from UAV platforms have the capabilities to provide a quick overview of the disaster area. The target of this paper is to experiment and to evaluate a low-cost system for generation of point clouds using imagery collected from a low altitude small autonomous UAV equipped with customized single frequency RTK module. The customized multi-rotor platform is used in this study. Moreover, electronic hardware is used to simplify user interaction with the UAV as RTK-GPS/Camera synchronization, and beside the synchronization, lever arm calibration is done. The platform is equipped with a Sony NEX-5N, 16.1-megapixel camera as imaging sensor. The lens attached to camera is ZEISS optics, prime lens with F1.8 maximum aperture and 24 mm focal length to deliver outstanding images. All necessary calibrations are performed and flight is implemented over the area of interest at flight height of 120 m above the ground level resulted in 2.38 cm GSD. Earlier to image acquisition, 12 signalized GCPs and 20 check points were distributed in the study area and measured with dualfrequency GPS via RTK technique with horizontal accuracy of σ = 1.5 cm and vertical accuracy of σ = 2.3 cm. results of direct georeferencing are compared to these points and experimental results show that decimeter accuracy level for 3D points cloud with proposed system is achievable, that is suitable

  8. Examination about Influence for Precision of 3d Image Measurement from the Ground Control Point Measurement and Surface Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anai, T.; Kochi, N.; Yamada, M.; Sasaki, T.; Otani, H.; Sasaki, D.; Nishimura, S.; Kimoto, K.; Yasui, N.

    2015-05-01

    As the 3D image measurement software is now widely used with the recent development of computer-vision technology, the 3D measurement from the image is now has acquired the application field from desktop objects as wide as the topography survey in large geographical areas. Especially, the orientation, which used to be a complicated process in the heretofore image measurement, can be now performed automatically by simply taking many pictures around the object. And in the case of fully textured object, the 3D measurement of surface features is now done all automatically from the orientated images, and greatly facilitated the acquisition of the dense 3D point cloud from images with high precision. With all this development in the background, in the case of small and the middle size objects, we are now furnishing the all-around 3D measurement by a single digital camera sold on the market. And we have also developed the technology of the topographical measurement with the air-borne images taken by a small UAV [1~5]. In this present study, in the case of the small size objects, we examine the accuracy of surface measurement (Matching) by the data of the experiments. And as to the topographic measurement, we examine the influence of GCP distribution on the accuracy by the data of the experiments. Besides, we examined the difference of the analytical results in each of the 3D image measurement software. This document reviews the processing flow of orientation and the 3D measurement of each software and explains the feature of the each software. And as to the verification of the precision of stereo-matching, we measured the test plane and the test sphere of the known form and assessed the result. As to the topography measurement, we used the air-borne image data photographed at the test field in Yadorigi of Matsuda City, Kanagawa Prefecture JAPAN. We have constructed Ground Control Point which measured by RTK-GPS and Total Station. And we show the results of analysis made

  9. Correlation and 3D-tracking of objects by pointing sensors

    DOEpatents

    Griesmeyer, J. Michael

    2017-04-04

    A method and system for tracking at least one object using a plurality of pointing sensors and a tracking system are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, the tracking system is configured to receive a series of observation data relative to the at least one object over a time base for each of the plurality of pointing sensors. The observation data may include sensor position data, pointing vector data and observation error data. The tracking system may further determine a triangulation point using a magnitude of a shortest line connecting a line of sight value from each of the series of observation data from each of the plurality of sensors to the at least one object, and perform correlation processing on the observation data and triangulation point to determine if at least two of the plurality of sensors are tracking the same object. Observation data may also be branched, associated and pruned using new incoming observation data.

  10. Multiple Uses of a 3d Point Cloud: the Castle of Franchimont (province of LIÈGE, Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luczfalvy Jancsó, A.; Jonlet, B.; Hallot, P.; Hoffsummer, P.; Billen, R.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the identified obstacles, needs and selected solutions for the study of the medieval castle of Franchimont, located in the province of Liège (Belgium). After taking into account the requirements from all the disciplines at work as well as the problems that would have to be tackled, the creation of a 3D point cloud was decided. This solution would be able to deal with the characteristics and needs of a research involving building archaeology and related fields. The decision was made in order to manage all of the available data and to provide a common working tool for every involved cultural heritage actor. To achieve this, the elaboration of an Archaeological Information System based on 3D point clouds as a common virtual workspace is being taken into consideration.

  11. SigVox - A 3D feature matching algorithm for automatic street object recognition in mobile laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinhu; Lindenbergh, Roderik; Menenti, Massimo

    2017-06-01

    Urban road environments contain a variety of objects including different types of lamp poles and traffic signs. Its monitoring is traditionally conducted by visual inspection, which is time consuming and expensive. Mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems sample the road environment efficiently by acquiring large and accurate point clouds. This work proposes a methodology for urban road object recognition from MLS point clouds. The proposed method uses, for the first time, shape descriptors of complete objects to match repetitive objects in large point clouds. To do so, a novel 3D multi-scale shape descriptor is introduced, that is embedded in a workflow that efficiently and automatically identifies different types of lamp poles and traffic signs. The workflow starts by tiling the raw point clouds along the scanning trajectory and by identifying non-ground points. After voxelization of the non-ground points, connected voxels are clustered to form candidate objects. For automatic recognition of lamp poles and street signs, a 3D significant eigenvector based shape descriptor using voxels (SigVox) is introduced. The 3D SigVox descriptor is constructed by first subdividing the points with an octree into several levels. Next, significant eigenvectors of the points in each voxel are determined by principal component analysis (PCA) and mapped onto the appropriate triangle of a sphere approximating icosahedron. This step is repeated for different scales. By determining the similarity of 3D SigVox descriptors between candidate point clusters and training objects, street furniture is automatically identified. The feasibility and quality of the proposed method is verified on two point clouds obtained in opposite direction of a stretch of road of 4 km. 6 types of lamp pole and 4 types of road sign were selected as objects of interest. Ground truth validation showed that the overall accuracy of the ˜170 automatically recognized objects is approximately 95%. The results demonstrate

  12. Incremental Refinement of FAÇADE Models with Attribute Grammar from 3d Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehbi, Y.; Staat, C.; Mandtler, L.; Pl¨umer, L.

    2016-06-01

    Data acquisition using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has gotten more and more attention over the last years. Especially in the field of building reconstruction the incremental interpretation of such data is a demanding task. In this context formal grammars play an important role for the top-down identification and reconstruction of building objects. Up to now, the available approaches expect offline data in order to parse an a-priori known grammar. For mapping on demand an on the fly reconstruction based on UAV data is required. An incremental interpretation of the data stream is inevitable. This paper presents an incremental parser of grammar rules for an automatic 3D building reconstruction. The parser enables a model refinement based on new observations with respect to a weighted attribute context-free grammar (WACFG). The falsification or rejection of hypotheses is supported as well. The parser can deal with and adapt available parse trees acquired from previous interpretations or predictions. Parse trees derived so far are updated in an iterative way using transformation rules. A diagnostic step searches for mismatches between current and new nodes. Prior knowledge on façades is incorporated. It is given by probability densities as well as architectural patterns. Since we cannot always assume normal distributions, the derivation of location and shape parameters of building objects is based on a kernel density estimation (KDE). While the level of detail is continuously improved, the geometrical, semantic and topological consistency is ensured.

  13. Non-magnetic photospheric bright points in 3D simulations of the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, F.; Steiner, O.; Freytag, B.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Small-scale bright features in the photosphere of the Sun, such as faculae or G-band bright points, appear in connection with small-scale magnetic flux concentrations. Aims: Here we report on a new class of photospheric bright points that are free of magnetic fields. So far, these are visible in numerical simulations only. We explore conditions required for their observational detection. Methods: Numerical radiation (magneto-)hydrodynamic simulations of the near-surface layers of the Sun were carried out. The magnetic field-free simulations show tiny bright points, reminiscent of magnetic bright points, only smaller. A simple toy model for these non-magnetic bright points (nMBPs) was established that serves as a base for the development of an algorithm for their automatic detection. Basic physical properties of 357 detected nMBPs were extracted and statistically evaluated. We produced synthetic intensity maps that mimic observations with various solar telescopes to obtain hints on their detectability. Results: The nMBPs of the simulations show a mean bolometric intensity contrast with respect to their intergranular surroundings of approximately 20%, a size of 60-80 km, and the isosurface of optical depth unity is at their location depressed by 80-100 km. They are caused by swirling downdrafts that provide, by means of the centripetal force, the necessary pressure gradient for the formation of a funnel of reduced mass density that reaches from the subsurface layers into the photosphere. Similar, frequently occurring funnels that do not reach into the photosphere, do not produce bright points. Conclusions: Non-magnetic bright points are the observable manifestation of vertically extending vortices (vortex tubes) in the photosphere. The resolving power of 4-m-class telescopes, such as the DKIST, is needed for an unambiguous detection of them. The movie associated to Fig. 1 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  14. 3-D Localization of Virtual Sound Sources: Effects of Visual Environment, Pointing Method, and Training

    PubMed Central

    Majdak, Piotr; Goupell, Matthew J.; Laback, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    The ability to localize sound sources in three-dimensional space was tested in humans. In experiment 1, naive subjects listened to noises filtered with subject-specific head-related transfer functions. The tested conditions included the pointing method (head or manual pointing) and the visual environment (VE) (darkness or virtual VE). The localization performance was not significantly different between the pointing methods. The virtual VE significantly improved the horizontal precision and reduced the number of front-back confusions. These results show the benefit of using a virtual VE in sound localization tasks. In experiment 2, subjects were provided sound localization training. Over the course of training, the performance improved for all subjects, with the largest improvements occurring during the first 400 trials. The improvements beyond the first 400 trials were smaller. After the training, there was still no significant effect of pointing method, showing that the choice of either head- or manual-pointing method plays a minor role in sound localization performance. The results of experiment 2 reinforce the importance of perceptual training for at least 400 trials in sound localization studies. PMID:20139459

  15. Assessment of Iterative Closest Point Registration Accuracy for Different Phantom Surfaces Captured by an Optical 3D Sensor in Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Walke, Mathias; Gademann, Günther

    2017-01-01

    An optical 3D sensor provides an additional tool for verification of correct patient settlement on a Tomotherapy treatment machine. The patient's position in the actual treatment is compared with the intended position defined in treatment planning. A commercially available optical 3D sensor measures parts of the body surface and estimates the deviation from the desired position without markers. The registration precision of the in-built algorithm and of selected ICP (iterative closest point) algorithms is investigated on surface data of specially designed phantoms captured by the optical 3D sensor for predefined shifts of the treatment table. A rigid body transform is compared with the actual displacement to check registration reliability for predefined limits. The curvature type of investigated phantom bodies has a strong influence on registration result which is more critical for surfaces of low curvature. We investigated the registration accuracy of the optical 3D sensor for the chosen phantoms and compared the results with selected unconstrained ICP algorithms. Safe registration within the clinical limits is only possible for uniquely shaped surface regions, but error metrics based on surface normals improve translational registration. Large registration errors clearly hint at setup deviations, whereas small values do not guarantee correct positioning. PMID:28163773

  16. A closed-form expression of the positional uncertainty for 3D point clouds.

    PubMed

    Bae, Kwang-Ho; Belton, David; Lichti, Derek D

    2009-04-01

    We present a novel closed-form expression of positional uncertainty measured by a near-monostatic and time-of-flight laser range finder with consideration of its measurement uncertainties. An explicit form of the angular variance of the estimated surface normal vector is also derived. This expression is useful for the precise estimation of the surface normal vector and the outlier detection for finding correspondence in order to register multiple three-dimensional point clouds. Two practical algorithms using these expressions are presented: a method for finding optimal local neighbourhood size which minimizes the variance of the estimated normal vector and a resampling method of point clouds.

  17. Effects of cyclone diameter on performance of 1D3D cyclones: Cut point and slope

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cyclones are a commonly used air pollution abatement device for separating particulate matter (PM) from air streams in industrial processes. Several mathematical models have been proposed to predict the cut point of cyclones as cyclone diameter varies. The objective of this research was to determine...

  18. A 3D forward stratigraphic model of fluvial meander-bend evolution for prediction of point-bar lithofacies architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Na; Mountney, Nigel P.; Colombera, Luca; Dorrell, Robert M.

    2017-08-01

    Although fundamental types of fluvial meander-bend transformations - expansion, translation, rotation, and combinations thereof - are widely recognised, the relationship between the migratory behaviour of a meander bend, and its resultant accumulated sedimentary architecture and lithofacies distribution remains relatively poorly understood. Three-dimensional data from both currently active fluvial systems and from ancient preserved successions known from outcrop and subsurface settings are limited. To tackle this problem, a 3D numerical forward stratigraphic model - the Point-Bar Sedimentary Architecture Numerical Deduction (PB-SAND) - has been devised as a tool for the reconstruction and prediction of the complex spatio-temporal migratory evolution of fluvial meanders, their generated bar forms and the associated lithofacies distributions that accumulate as heterogeneous fluvial successions. PB-SAND uses a dominantly geometric modelling approach supplemented by process-based and stochastic model components, and is constrained by quantified sedimentological data derived from modern point bars or ancient successions that represent suitable analogues. The model predicts the internal architecture and geometry of fluvial point-bar elements in three dimensions. The model is applied to predict the sedimentary lithofacies architecture of ancient preserved point-bar and counter-point-bar deposits of the middle Jurassic Scalby Formation (North Yorkshire, UK) to demonstrate the predictive capabilities of PB-SAND in modelling 3D architectures of different types of meander-bend transformations. PB-SAND serves as a practical tool with which to predict heterogeneity in subsurface hydrocarbon reservoirs and water aquifers.

  19. Off-axis phase-only holograms of 3D objects using accelerated point-based Fresnel diffraction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhenxiang; Zheng, Huadong; Yu, Yingjie; Asundi, Anand K.

    2017-06-01

    A method for calculating off-axis phase-only holograms of three-dimensional (3D) object using accelerated point-based Fresnel diffraction algorithm (PB-FDA) is proposed. The complex amplitude of the object points on the z-axis in hologram plane is calculated using Fresnel diffraction formula, called principal complex amplitudes (PCAs). The complex amplitudes of those off-axis object points of the same depth can be obtained by 2D shifting of PCAs. In order to improve the calculating speed of the PB-FDA, the convolution operation based on fast Fourier transform (FFT) is used to calculate the holograms rather than using the point-by-point spatial 2D shifting of the PCAs. The shortest recording distance of the PB-FDA is analyzed in order to remove the influence of multiple-order images in reconstructed images. The optimal recording distance of the PB-FDA is also analyzed to improve the quality of reconstructed images. Numerical reconstructions and optical reconstructions with a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) show that holographic 3D display is feasible with the proposed algorithm. The proposed PB-FDA can also avoid the influence of the zero-order image introduced by SLM in optical reconstructed images.

  20. 3D point cloud analysis of structured light registration in computer-assisted navigation in spinal surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shaurya; Guha, Daipayan; Jakubovic, Raphael; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2017-02-01

    Computer-assisted navigation is used by surgeons in spine procedures to guide pedicle screws to improve placement accuracy and in some cases, to better visualize patient's underlying anatomy. Intraoperative registration is performed to establish a correlation between patient's anatomy and the pre/intra-operative image. Current algorithms rely on seeding points obtained directly from the exposed spinal surface to achieve clinically acceptable registration accuracy. Registration of these three dimensional surface point-clouds are prone to various systematic errors. The goal of this study was to evaluate the robustness of surgical navigation systems by looking at the relationship between the optical density of an acquired 3D point-cloud and the corresponding surgical navigation error. A retrospective review of a total of 48 registrations performed using an experimental structured light navigation system developed within our lab was conducted. For each registration, the number of points in the acquired point cloud was evaluated relative to whether the registration was acceptable, the corresponding system reported error and target registration error. It was demonstrated that the number of points in the point cloud neither correlates with the acceptance/rejection of a registration or the system reported error. However, a negative correlation was observed between the number of the points in the point-cloud and the corresponding sagittal angular error. Thus, system reported total registration points and accuracy are insufficient to gauge the accuracy of a navigation system and the operating surgeon must verify and validate registration based on anatomical landmarks prior to commencing surgery.

  1. Buoyancy effects on the 3D MHD stagnation-point flow of a Newtonian fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrelli, A.; Giantesio, G.; Patria, M. C.; Roşca, N. C.; Roşca, A. V.; Pop, I.

    2017-02-01

    This work examines the steady three-dimensional stagnation-point flow of an electrically conducting Newtonian fluid in the presence of a uniform external magnetic field H0 under the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation. We neglect the induced magnetic field and examine the three possible directions of H0 which coincide with the directions of the axes. In all cases it is shown that the governing nonlinear partial differential equations admit similarity solutions. We find that the flow has to satisfy an ordinary differential problem whose solution depends on the Hartmann number M, the buoyancy parameter λ and the Prandtl number Pr. The skin-friction components along the axes are computed and the stagnation-point is classified. The numerical integration shows the existence of dual solutions and the occurrence of the reverse flow for some values of the parameters.

  2. Historical Buildings Models and Their Handling via 3d Survey: from Points Clouds to User-Oriented Hbim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiabrando, F.; Sammartano, G.; Spanò, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper retraces some research activities and application of 3D survey techniques and Building Information Modelling (BIM) in the environment of Cultural Heritage. It describes the diffusion of as-built BIM approach in the last years in Heritage Assets management, the so-called Built Heritage Information Modelling/Management (BHIMM or HBIM), that is nowadays an important and sustainable perspective in documentation and administration of historic buildings and structures. The work focuses the documentation derived from 3D survey techniques that can be understood like a significant and unavoidable knowledge base for the BIM conception and modelling, in the perspective of a coherent and complete management and valorisation of CH. It deepens potentialities, offered by 3D integrated survey techniques, to acquire productively and quite easilymany 3D information, not only geometrical but also radiometric attributes, helping the recognition, interpretation and characterization of state of conservation and degradation of architectural elements. From these data, they provide more and more high descriptive models corresponding to the geometrical complexity of buildings or aggregates in the well-known 5D (3D + time and cost dimensions). Points clouds derived from 3D survey acquisition (aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry, LiDAR and their integration) are reality-based models that can be use in a semi-automatic way to manage, interpret, and moderately simplify geometrical shapes of historical buildings that are examples, as is well known, of non-regular and complex geometry, instead of modern constructions with simple and regular ones. In the paper, some of these issues are addressed and analyzed through some experiences regarding the creation and the managing of HBIMprojects on historical heritage at different scales, using different platforms and various workflow. The paper focuses on LiDAR data handling with the aim to manage and extract geometrical information; on

  3. 3 d - 4 d hybridization anomaly in NixPd1-x alloys at quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, P.; Srivastava, Sanjeev K.; Srivastava, Suneel K.

    2017-07-01

    First-principles density functional theory computations of electronic structure and local magnetic properties of the non-fluctuating ground state of NixPd1-x alloy system around its quantum critical point xc=0.026 have been performed. The density of states at the Fermi energy and certain other parameters characterizing the Ni 3 d - Pd 4 d hybridization apparently follow power-laws with x similar to that obeyed by the reported ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition temperature. The width of Pd 4 d density of states (DOS) and centroid of Ni 3 d DOS show peak-like anomalies in the neighbourhood of xc, and so indicate a possible scenario of the existence of a definite relation between the orbital hybridization and the emergence of quantum fluctuations in the system.

  4. A 3D clustering approach for point clouds to detect and quantify changes at a rock glacier front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheletti, Natan; Tonini, Marj; Lane, Stuart N.

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanners (TLS) are extensively used in geomorphology to remotely-sense landforms and surfaces of any type and to derive digital elevation models (DEMs). Modern devices are able to collect many millions of points, so that working on the resulting dataset is often troublesome in terms of computational efforts. Indeed, it is not unusual that raw point clouds are filtered prior to DEM creation, so that only a subset of points is retained and the interpolation process becomes less of a burden. Whilst this procedure is in many cases necessary, it implicates a considerable loss of valuable information. First, and even without eliminating points, the common interpolation of points to a regular grid causes a loss of potentially useful detail. Second, it inevitably causes the transition from 3D information to only 2.5D data where each (x,y) pair must have a unique z-value. Vector-based DEMs (e.g. triangulated irregular networks) partially mitigate these issues, but still require a set of parameters to be set and a considerable burden in terms of calculation and storage. Because of the reasons above, being able to perform geomorphological research directly on point clouds would be profitable. Here, we propose an approach to identify erosion and deposition patterns on a very active rock glacier front in the Swiss Alps to monitor sediment dynamics. The general aim is to set up a semiautomatic method to isolate mass movements using 3D-feature identification directly from LiDAR data. An ultra-long range LiDAR RIEGL VZ-6000 scanner was employed to acquire point clouds during three consecutive summers. In order to isolate single clusters of erosion and deposition we applied the Density-Based Scan Algorithm with Noise (DBSCAN), previously successfully employed by Tonini and Abellan (2014) in a similar case for rockfall detection. DBSCAN requires two input parameters, strongly influencing the number, shape and size of the detected clusters: the minimum number of

  5. Design point variation of 3-D loss and deviation for axial compressor middle stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, William B.; Serovy, George K.; Sandercock, Donald M.

    1988-01-01

    The available data on middle-stage research compressors operating near design point are used to derive simple empirical models for the spanwise variation of three-dimensional viscous loss coefficients for middle-stage axial compressor blading. The models make it possible to quickly estimate the total loss and deviation across the blade span when the three-dimensional distribution is superimposed on the two-dimensional variation calculated for each blade element. It is noted that extrapolated estimates should be used with caution since the correlations have been derived from a limited data base.

  6. A Registration Method Based on Contour Point Cloud for 3D Whole-Body PET and CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiyao; Wang, Zhiguo; Zhang, Guoxu

    2017-01-01

    The PET and CT fusion image, combining the anatomical and functional information, has important clinical meaning. An effective registration of PET and CT images is the basis of image fusion. This paper presents a multithread registration method based on contour point cloud for 3D whole-body PET and CT images. Firstly, a geometric feature-based segmentation (GFS) method and a dynamic threshold denoising (DTD) method are creatively proposed to preprocess CT and PET images, respectively. Next, a new automated trunk slices extraction method is presented for extracting feature point clouds. Finally, the multithread Iterative Closet Point is adopted to drive an affine transform. We compare our method with a multiresolution registration method based on Mattes Mutual Information on 13 pairs (246~286 slices per pair) of 3D whole-body PET and CT data. Experimental results demonstrate the registration effectiveness of our method with lower negative normalization correlation (NC = −0.933) on feature images and less Euclidean distance error (ED = 2.826) on landmark points, outperforming the source data (NC = −0.496, ED = 25.847) and the compared method (NC = −0.614, ED = 16.085). Moreover, our method is about ten times faster than the compared one. PMID:28316979

  7. 3-D earthquake surface displacements from differencing pre- and post-event LiDAR point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, A. K.; Nissen, E.; Arrowsmith, R.; Saripalli, S.

    2012-12-01

    The explosion in aerial LiDAR surveying along active faults across the western United States and elsewhere provides a high-resolution topographic baseline against which to compare repeat LiDAR datasets collected after future earthquakes. We present a new method for determining 3-D coseismic surface displacements and rotations by differencing pre- and post-earthquake LiDAR point clouds using an adaptation of the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, a point set registration technique widely used in medical imaging, computer vision and graphics. There is no need for any gridding or smoothing of the LiDAR data and the method works well even with large mismatches in the density of the two point clouds. To explore the method's performance, we simulate pre- and post-event point clouds using real ("B4") LiDAR data on the southern San Andreas Fault perturbed with displacements of known magnitude. For input point clouds with ~2 points per square meter, we are able to reproduce displacements with a 50 m grid spacing and with horizontal and vertical accuracies of ~20 cm and ~4 cm. In the future, finer grids and improved precisions should be possible with higher shot densities and better survey geo-referencing. By capturing near-fault deformation in 3-D, LiDAR differencing with ICP will complement satellite-based techniques such as InSAR which map only certain components of the surface deformation and which often break down close to surface faulting or in areas of dense vegetation. It will be especially useful for mapping shallow fault slip and rupture zone deformation, helping inform paleoseismic studies and better constrain fault zone rheology. Because ICP can image rotations directly, the technique will also help resolve the detailed kinematics of distributed zones of faulting where block rotations may be common.

  8. Absence of Critical Points of Solutions to the Helmholtz Equation in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Giovanni S.

    2016-11-01

    The focus of this paper is to show the absence of critical points for the solutions to the Helmholtz equation in a bounded domain {Ωsubset{R}3} , given by { div(a nabla u_{ω}g)-ω qu_{ω}g=0&quad{in Ω,} u_{ω}g=g quad{on partialΩ.} We prove that for an admissible g there exists a finite set of frequencies K in a given interval and an open cover {overline{Ω}=\\cup_{ωin K} Ω_{ω}} such that {|nabla u_{ω}g(x)| > 0} for every {ωin K} and {xinΩ_{ω}} . The set K is explicitly constructed. If the spectrum of this problem is simple, which is true for a generic domain {Ω} , the admissibility condition on g is a generic property.

  9. 3D granulometry: grain-scale shape and size distribution from point cloud dataset of river environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Philippe; Lague, Dimitri; Gourdon, Aurélie; Croissant, Thomas; Crave, Alain

    2016-04-01

    The grain-scale morphology of river sediments and their size distribution are important factors controlling the efficiency of fluvial erosion and transport. In turn, constraining the spatial evolution of these two metrics offer deep insights on the dynamics of river erosion and sediment transport from hillslopes to the sea. However, the size distribution of river sediments is generally assessed using statistically-biased field measurements and determining the grain-scale shape of river sediments remains a real challenge in geomorphology. Here we determine, with new methodological approaches based on the segmentation and geomorphological fitting of 3D point cloud dataset, the size distribution and grain-scale shape of sediments located in river environments. Point cloud segmentation is performed using either machine-learning algorithms or geometrical criterion, such as local plan fitting or curvature analysis. Once the grains are individualized into several sub-clouds, each grain-scale morphology is determined using a 3D geometrical fitting algorithm applied on the sub-cloud. If different geometrical models can be conceived and tested, only ellipsoidal models were used in this study. A phase of results checking is then performed to remove grains showing a best-fitting model with a low level of confidence. The main benefits of this automatic method are that it provides 1) an un-biased estimate of grain-size distribution on a large range of scales, from centimeter to tens of meters; 2) access to a very large number of data, only limited by the number of grains in the point-cloud dataset; 3) access to the 3D morphology of grains, in turn allowing to develop new metrics characterizing the size and shape of grains. The main limit of this method is that it is only able to detect grains with a characteristic size greater than the resolution of the point cloud. This new 3D granulometric method is then applied to river terraces both in the Poerua catchment in New-Zealand and

  10. A robust real-time surface reconstruction method on point clouds captured from a 3D surface photogrammetry system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenyang; Cheung, Yam; Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a robust and real-time surface reconstruction method on point clouds captured from a 3D surface photogrammetry system. Methods: The authors have developed a robust and fast surface reconstruction method on point clouds acquired by the photogrammetry system, without explicitly solving the partial differential equation required by a typical variational approach. Taking advantage of the overcomplete nature of the acquired point clouds, their method solves and propagates a sparse linear relationship from the point cloud manifold to the surface manifold, assuming both manifolds share similar local geometry. With relatively consistent point cloud acquisitions, the authors propose a sparse regression (SR) model to directly approximate the target point cloud as a sparse linear combination from the training set, assuming that the point correspondences built by the iterative closest point (ICP) is reasonably accurate and have residual errors following a Gaussian distribution. To accommodate changing noise levels and/or presence of inconsistent occlusions during the acquisition, the authors further propose a modified sparse regression (MSR) model to model the potentially large and sparse error built by ICP with a Laplacian prior. The authors evaluated the proposed method on both clinical point clouds acquired under consistent acquisition conditions and on point clouds with inconsistent occlusions. The authors quantitatively evaluated the reconstruction performance with respect to root-mean-squared-error, by comparing its reconstruction results against that from the variational method. Results: On clinical point clouds, both the SR and MSR models have achieved sub-millimeter reconstruction accuracy and reduced the reconstruction time by two orders of magnitude to a subsecond reconstruction time. On point clouds with inconsistent occlusions, the MSR model has demonstrated its advantage in achieving consistent and robust performance despite the introduced

  11. A robust real-time surface reconstruction method on point clouds captured from a 3D surface photogrammetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenyang; Cheung, Yam; Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a robust and real-time surface reconstruction method on point clouds captured from a 3D surface photogrammetry system. Methods: The authors have developed a robust and fast surface reconstruction method on point clouds acquired by the photogrammetry system, without explicitly solving the partial differential equation required by a typical variational approach. Taking advantage of the overcomplete nature of the acquired point clouds, their method solves and propagates a sparse linear relationship from the point cloud manifold to the surface manifold, assuming both manifolds share similar local geometry. With relatively consistent point cloud acquisitions, the authors propose a sparse regression (SR) model to directly approximate the target point cloud as a sparse linear combination from the training set, assuming that the point correspondences built by the iterative closest point (ICP) is reasonably accurate and have residual errors following a Gaussian distribution. To accommodate changing noise levels and/or presence of inconsistent occlusions during the acquisition, the authors further propose a modified sparse regression (MSR) model to model the potentially large and sparse error built by ICP with a Laplacian prior. The authors evaluated the proposed method on both clinical point clouds acquired under consistent acquisition conditions and on point clouds with inconsistent occlusions. The authors quantitatively evaluated the reconstruction performance with respect to root-mean-squared-error, by comparing its reconstruction results against that from the variational method. Results: On clinical point clouds, both the SR and MSR models have achieved sub-millimeter reconstruction accuracy and reduced the reconstruction time by two orders of magnitude to a subsecond reconstruction time. On point clouds with inconsistent occlusions, the MSR model has demonstrated its advantage in achieving consistent and robust performance despite the introduced

  12. A robust real-time surface reconstruction method on point clouds captured from a 3D surface photogrammetry system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenyang; Cheung, Yam; Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan

    2016-05-01

    To develop a robust and real-time surface reconstruction method on point clouds captured from a 3D surface photogrammetry system. The authors have developed a robust and fast surface reconstruction method on point clouds acquired by the photogrammetry system, without explicitly solving the partial differential equation required by a typical variational approach. Taking advantage of the overcomplete nature of the acquired point clouds, their method solves and propagates a sparse linear relationship from the point cloud manifold to the surface manifold, assuming both manifolds share similar local geometry. With relatively consistent point cloud acquisitions, the authors propose a sparse regression (SR) model to directly approximate the target point cloud as a sparse linear combination from the training set, assuming that the point correspondences built by the iterative closest point (ICP) is reasonably accurate and have residual errors following a Gaussian distribution. To accommodate changing noise levels and/or presence of inconsistent occlusions during the acquisition, the authors further propose a modified sparse regression (MSR) model to model the potentially large and sparse error built by ICP with a Laplacian prior. The authors evaluated the proposed method on both clinical point clouds acquired under consistent acquisition conditions and on point clouds with inconsistent occlusions. The authors quantitatively evaluated the reconstruction performance with respect to root-mean-squared-error, by comparing its reconstruction results against that from the variational method. On clinical point clouds, both the SR and MSR models have achieved sub-millimeter reconstruction accuracy and reduced the reconstruction time by two orders of magnitude to a subsecond reconstruction time. On point clouds with inconsistent occlusions, the MSR model has demonstrated its advantage in achieving consistent and robust performance despite the introduced occlusions. The authors have

  13. Pose-invariant face-head identification using a bank of neural networks and the 3D neck reference point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hild, Michael; Yoshida, Kazunobu; Hashimoto, Motonobu

    2003-03-01

    A method for recognizing faces in relativley unconstrained environments, such as offices, is described. It can recognize faces occurring over an extended range of orientations and distances relative to the camera. As the pattern recognition mechanism, a bank of small neural networks of the multilayer perceptron type is used, where each perceptron has the task of recognizing only a single person's face. The perceptrons are trained with a set of nine face images representing the nine main facial orientations of the person to be identified, and a set face images from various other persons. The center of the neck is determined as the reference point for face position unification. Geometric normalization and reference point determination utilizes 3-D data point measurements obtained with a stereo camera. The system achieves a recognition rate of about 95%.

  14. Interactive PDF files with embedded 3D designs as support material to study the 32 crystallographic point groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arribas, Victor; Casas, Lluís; Estop, Eugènia; Labrador, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Crystallography and X-ray diffraction techniques are essential topics in geosciences and other solid-state sciences. Their fundamentals, which include point symmetry groups, are taught in the corresponding university courses. In-depth meaningful learning of symmetry concepts is difficult and requires capacity for abstraction and spatial vision. Traditionally, wooden crystallographic models are used as support material. In this paper, we describe a new interactive tool, freely available, inspired in such models. Thirty-two PDF files containing embedded 3D models have been created. Each file illustrates a point symmetry group and can be used to teach/learn essential symmetry concepts and the International Hermann-Mauguin notation of point symmetry groups. Most interactive computer-aided tools devoted to symmetry deal with molecular symmetry and disregard crystal symmetry so we have developed a tool that fills the existing gap.

  15. Detection of Single Tree Stems in Forested Areas from High Density ALS Point Clouds Using 3d Shape Descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, N.; Polewski, P.; Yao, W.; Krzystek, P.; Skidmore, A. K.

    2017-09-01

    Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) is a widespread method for forest mapping and management purposes. While common ALS techniques provide valuable information about the forest canopy and intermediate layers, the point density near the ground may be poor due to dense overstory conditions. The current study highlights a new method for detecting stems of single trees in 3D point clouds obtained from high density ALS with a density of 300 points/m2. Compared to standard ALS data, due to lower flight height (150-200 m) this elevated point density leads to more laser reflections from tree stems. In this work, we propose a three-tiered method which works on the point, segment and object levels. First, for each point we calculate the likelihood that it belongs to a tree stem, derived from the radiometric and geometric features of its neighboring points. In the next step, we construct short stem segments based on high-probability stem points, and classify the segments by considering the distribution of points around them as well as their spatial orientation, which encodes the prior knowledge that trees are mainly vertically aligned due to gravity. Finally, we apply hierarchical clustering on the positively classified segments to obtain point sets corresponding to single stems, and perform ℓ1-based orthogonal distance regression to robustly fit lines through each stem point set. The ℓ1-based method is less sensitive to outliers compared to the least square approaches. From the fitted lines, the planimetric tree positions can then be derived. Experiments were performed on two plots from the Hochficht forest in Oberösterreich region located in Austria.We marked a total of 196 reference stems in the point clouds of both plots by visual interpretation. The evaluation of the automatically detected stems showed a classification precision of 0.86 and 0.85, respectively for Plot 1 and 2, with recall values of 0.7 and 0.67.

  16. Binocular and Monocular Depth Cues in Online Feedback Control of 3-D Pointing Movement

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo; Knill, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has shown that humans continuously use visual feedback of the hand to control goal-directed movements online. In most studies, visual error signals were predominantly in the image plane and thus were available in an observer’s retinal image. We investigate how humans use visual feedback about finger depth provided by binocular and monocular depth cues to control pointing movements. When binocularly viewing a scene in which the hand movement was made in free space, subjects were about 60 ms slower in responding to perturbations in depth than in the image plane. When monocularly viewing a scene designed to maximize the available monocular cues to finger depth (motion, changing size and cast shadows), subjects showed no response to perturbations in depth. Thus, binocular cues from the finger are critical to effective online control of hand movements in depth. An optimal feedback controller that takes into account of the low peripheral stereoacuity and inherent ambiguity in cast shadows can explain the difference in response time in the binocular conditions and lack of response in monocular conditions. PMID:21724567

  17. Binocular and monocular depth cues in online feedback control of 3D pointing movement.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Knill, David C

    2011-06-30

    Previous work has shown that humans continuously use visual feedback of the hand to control goal-directed movements online. In most studies, visual error signals were predominantly in the image plane and, thus, were available in an observer's retinal image. We investigate how humans use visual feedback about finger depth provided by binocular and monocular depth cues to control pointing movements. When binocularly viewing a scene in which the hand movement was made in free space, subjects were about 60 ms slower in responding to perturbations in depth than in the image plane. When monocularly viewing a scene designed to maximize the available monocular cues to finger depth (motion, changing size, and cast shadows), subjects showed no response to perturbations in depth. Thus, binocular cues from the finger are critical to effective online control of hand movements in depth. An optimal feedback controller that takes into account the low peripheral stereoacuity and inherent ambiguity in cast shadows can explain the difference in response time in the binocular conditions and lack of response in monocular conditions.

  18. Registration of 3D point clouds and meshes: a survey from rigid to nonrigid.

    PubMed

    Tam, Gary K L; Cheng, Zhi-Quan; Lai, Yu-Kun; Langbein, Frank C; Liu, Yonghuai; Marshall, David; Martin, Ralph R; Sun, Xian-Fang; Rosin, Paul L

    2013-07-01

    Three-dimensional surface registration transforms multiple three-dimensional data sets into the same coordinate system so as to align overlapping components of these sets. Recent surveys have covered different aspects of either rigid or nonrigid registration, but seldom discuss them as a whole. Our study serves two purposes: 1) To give a comprehensive survey of both types of registration, focusing on three-dimensional point clouds and meshes and 2) to provide a better understanding of registration from the perspective of data fitting. Registration is closely related to data fitting in which it comprises three core interwoven components: model selection, correspondences and constraints, and optimization. Study of these components 1) provides a basis for comparison of the novelties of different techniques, 2) reveals the similarity of rigid and nonrigid registration in terms of problem representations, and 3) shows how overfitting arises in nonrigid registration and the reasons for increasing interest in intrinsic techniques. We further summarize some practical issues of registration which include initializations and evaluations, and discuss some of our own observations, insights and foreseeable research trends.

  19. A 3D printed smartphone optosensing platform for point-of-need food safety inspection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhonggang; Zhang, Yali; Xu, Shujia; Zhang, Heng; Tan, Yixun; Ma, Chenming; Song, Rong; Jiang, Lelun; Yi, Changqing

    2017-05-08

    The deficiency in rapid and in-field detection methods and portable devices that are reliable, easy-to-use, and low cost, results in the difficulties to uphold the high safety standards in China. In this study, we introduce a rapid and cost-effective smartphone-based method for point-of-need food safety inspection, which employs aptamer-conjugated AuNPs as the colorimetric indicator, and a battery-powered optosensing accessory attached to the camera of a smartphone for transmission images capture. A user-friendly and easy-to-use Android application is developed for automatic digital image processing and result reporting. Streptomycin (STR) is selected as the proof-of-concept target, and its specific quantitation can be realized with a LOD of 12.3 nM (8.97 μg kg(-1)) using the reported smartphone-based method. The quantitation of STR in honey, milk and tap water confirm the reliability and applicability of the reported method. The extremely high acceptance of smartphone in remote and metropolitan areas of China and ease-of-use of the reported method facilitate active food contaminant and toxicant screening, thus making the implementation of the whole food supply chain monitoring and surveillance possible and hence significantly improving the current Chinese food safety control system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 3D Elastic Solutions for Laterally Loaded Discs: Generalised Brazilian and Point Load Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serati, Mehdi; Alehossein, Habib; Williams, David J.

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates the application of a double Fourier series technique to the construction of an elastic stress field in a cylindrical bar subject to lateral boundary loads. The lateral loads, including the constant load boundary conditions, are represented by two Fourier series: one on the perimeter of the circular section ( r 0, θ) and the other on the longitudinal curved surface parallel to the bar axis ( z). The technique invokes acceptable potential functions of the Papkovich-Neuber displacement field, satisfying the governing partial differential equations, to assign appropriate odd and even trigonometric Fourier terms in cylindrical coordinates ( r, θ, z). The generic solution decomposes the problem of interest to a state of stress caused by two independent boundary conditions along the z axis and θ-polar angle, both superimposed on a solution for which these potentials are the product of the trigonometric terms of the independent variables ( θ, z). Constants appearing in the resultant second-order partial differential equations are determined from the generally mixed (tractions and/or displacements) boundary conditions. While the solutions are satisfied exactly at the ends of an infinite bar, they are satisfied weakly on average, in the light of Saint Venant's approximation at the two ends of a finite bar. The application of the proposed analysis is verified against available elastic solutions for axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric engineering problems such as the indirect Brazilian Tensile Strength and Point Load Strength tests.

  1. Well log analysis to assist the interpretation of 3-D seismic data at Milne Point, north slope of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2005-01-01

    In order to assess the resource potential of gas hydrate deposits in the North Slope of Alaska, 3-D seismic and well data at Milne Point were obtained from BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc. The well-log analysis has three primary purposes: (1) Estimate gas hydrate or gas saturations from the well logs; (2) predict P-wave velocity where there is no measured P-wave velocity in order to generate synthetic seismograms; and (3) edit P-wave velocities where degraded borehole conditions, such as washouts, affected the P-wave measurement significantly. Edited/predicted P-wave velocities were needed to map the gas-hydrate-bearing horizons in the complexly faulted upper part of 3-D seismic volume. The estimated gas-hydrate/gas saturations from the well logs were used to relate to seismic attributes in order to map regional distribution of gas hydrate inside the 3-D seismic grid. The P-wave velocities were predicted using the modified Biot-Gassmann theory, herein referred to as BGTL, with gas-hydrate saturations estimated from the resistivity logs, porosity, and clay volume content. The effect of gas on velocities was modeled using the classical Biot-Gassman theory (BGT) with parameters estimated from BGTL.

  2. Analytical and numerical investigations on the accuracy and robustness of geometric features extracted from 3D point cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, André; Weinmann, Martin; Hinz, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    In photogrammetry, remote sensing, computer vision and robotics, a topic of major interest is represented by the automatic analysis of 3D point cloud data. This task often relies on the use of geometric features amongst which particularly the ones derived from the eigenvalues of the 3D structure tensor (e.g. the three dimensionality features of linearity, planarity and sphericity) have proven to be descriptive and are therefore commonly involved for classification tasks. Although these geometric features are meanwhile considered as standard, very little attention has been paid to their accuracy and robustness. In this paper, we hence focus on the influence of discretization and noise on the most commonly used geometric features. More specifically, we investigate the accuracy and robustness of the eigenvalues of the 3D structure tensor and also of the features derived from these eigenvalues. Thereby, we provide both analytical and numerical considerations which clearly reveal that certain features are more susceptible to discretization and noise whereas others are more robust.

  3. Comparison of 3D point clouds obtained by photogrammetric UAVs and TLS to determine the attitude of dolerite outcrops discontinuities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, João; Gonçalves, Gil; Duarte, Diogo; Figueiredo, Fernando; Mira, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Photogrammetric Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and Terrestrial Laser Scanners (TLS) are two emerging technologies that allows the production of dense 3D point clouds of the sensed topographic surfaces. Although image-based stereo-photogrammetric point clouds could not, in general, compete on geometric quality over TLS point clouds, fully automated mapping solutions based on ultra-light UAVs (or drones) have recently become commercially available at very reasonable accuracy and cost for engineering and geological applications. The purpose of this paper is to compare the two point clouds generated by these two technologies, in order to automatize the manual process tasks commonly used to detect and represent the attitude of discontinuities (Stereographic projection: Schmidt net - Equal area). To avoid the difficulties of access and guarantee the data survey security conditions, this fundamental step in all geological/geotechnical studies, applied to the extractive industry and engineering works, has to be replaced by a more expeditious and reliable methodology. This methodology will allow, in a more actuated clear way, give answers to the needs of evaluation of rock masses, by mapping the structures present, which will reduce considerably the associated risks (investment, structures dimensioning, security, etc.). A case study of a dolerite outcrop locate in the center of Portugal (the dolerite outcrop is situated in the volcanic complex of Serra de Todo-o-Mundo, Casais Gaiola, intruded in Jurassic sandstones) will be used to assess this methodology. The results obtained show that the 3D point cloud produced by the Photogrammetric UAV platform has the appropriate geometric quality for extracting the parameters that define the discontinuities of the dolerite outcrops. Although, they are comparable to the manual extracted parameters, their quality is inferior to parameters extracted from the TLS point cloud.

  4. What's the Point of a Raster ? Advantages of 3D Point Cloud Processing over Raster Based Methods for Accurate Geomorphic Analysis of High Resolution Topography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lague, D.

    2014-12-01

    High Resolution Topographic (HRT) datasets are predominantly stored and analyzed as 2D raster grids of elevations (i.e., Digital Elevation Models). Raster grid processing is common in GIS software and benefits from a large library of fast algorithms dedicated to geometrical analysis, drainage network computation and topographic change measurement. Yet, all instruments or methods currently generating HRT datasets (e.g., ALS, TLS, SFM, stereo satellite imagery) output natively 3D unstructured point clouds that are (i) non-regularly sampled, (ii) incomplete (e.g., submerged parts of river channels are rarely measured), and (iii) include 3D elements (e.g., vegetation, vertical features such as river banks or cliffs) that cannot be accurately described in a DEM. Interpolating the raw point cloud onto a 2D grid generally results in a loss of position accuracy, spatial resolution and in more or less controlled interpolation. Here I demonstrate how studying earth surface topography and processes directly on native 3D point cloud datasets offers several advantages over raster based methods: point cloud methods preserve the accuracy of the original data, can better handle the evaluation of uncertainty associated to topographic change measurements and are more suitable to study vegetation characteristics and steep features of the landscape. In this presentation, I will illustrate and compare Point Cloud based and Raster based workflows with various examples involving ALS, TLS and SFM for the analysis of bank erosion processes in bedrock and alluvial rivers, rockfall statistics (including rockfall volume estimate directly from point clouds) and the interaction of vegetation/hydraulics and sedimentation in salt marshes. These workflows use 2 recently published algorithms for point cloud classification (CANUPO) and point cloud comparison (M3C2) now implemented in the open source software CloudCompare.

  5. Quasi-periodic Radio Bursts Associated with Fast-mode Waves near a Magnetic Null Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an observation of quasi-periodic rapidly propagating waves observed in the Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) 171/193 Å channels during the impulsive phase of an M1.9 flare that occurred on 2012 May 7. The instant period was found to decrease from 240 to 120 s, and the speed of the wavefronts was in the range of ˜664-1416 km s-1. Almost simultaneously, quasi-periodic bursts with similar instant periods, ˜70 and ˜140 s, occur in the microwave emission and in decimetric type IV and type III radio bursts, and in the soft X-ray emission. The magnetic field configuration of the flare site was consistent with a breakout topology, i.e., a quadrupolar field along with a magnetic null point. The quasi-periodic rapidly propagating wavefronts of the EUV emission are interpreted as a fast magnetoacoustic wave train. The observations suggest that the fast-mode waves are generated during the quasi-periodic magnetic reconnection in the cusp region above the flare arcade loops. For the first time, we provide evidence of a tadpole wavelet signature at about 70-140 s in decimetric (245/610 MHz) radio bursts, along with the direct observation of a coronal fast-mode wave train in EUV. In addition, at AIA 131/193 Å we observed quasi-periodic EUV disturbances with periods of 95 and 240 s propagating downward at apparent speeds of 172-273 km s-1. The nature of these downward propagating disturbances is not revealed, but they could be connected to magnetoacoustic waves or periodically shrinking loops.

  6. Multiple Null Point Reconnections in a limb faint cool jet ejection event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavabi, E.; Koutchmy, S.

    2016-09-01

    Giant spicules and macro- spicules are an important extended rather cool structure between the solar surface and the corona, partly filling the space inside the chromosphere and surrounded by a transition thin region. Their formation and dynamical properties are still mysterious. In order to explain solar limb and disc periodic recurrences of these events, a simulation model assuming quasi- random positions of spicules above the solar limb was studied. We allow a set number of spicules with different physical properties (such as height, lifetime and tilt angle as shown by an individual spicule) randomly occurring. It is assumed that after reaching a maximum length, the spicules are less rapidly falling back to the solar surface. This kind of limb event was often reported in the literature (spike; giant spicule; Ha ejection event; spray etc) but no serious quantitative analysis could be done. Indeed from ground-based observations, it is impossible to deduce precised parameters because the earth atmospheric turbulent effects makes impossible to make small scale measurements. SOT space-borne observations we use are unique in providing well reproducible observations permitting very precise measurements. The study of X-ray jets is an important topic to understand the heating of the solar corona and the origin of the fast wind. The recently launched Hinode mission permitted to observe the cool proxies of these jets with an unprecedented high spatial resolution of 120 km on the Sun. We selected a high cadence sequence of SOT (Hinode) observations taken with both the HCaII and the Hα filter to look at the details of the dynamics revealed by a large jet event. Both wavelet and amplitude spectra analysis were used to analyze the observed kink wave and the time variations of intensities during the event. The results are discussed in the frame of different models implying reconnections with the inference of the dynamical phenomena occurring in the vicinity of several null

  7. THE ROLE OF THE INNER CORONAL NULL POINT IN THE FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF SOLAR QUIESCENT PROMINENCES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. Z.

    2015-02-10

    Using a 2.5-dimensional MHD simulation, we investigate the role played by the inner coronal null point in the formation and evolution of solar quiescent prominences. The flux rope is characterized by its magnetic fluxes, the toroidal magnetic flux Φ {sub p} and the poloidal flux Φ{sub ψ}. It is found that for a given Φ {sub p}, the catastrophe does not occur in the flux rope system until Φ{sub ψ} increases to a critical point. Moreover, the magnetic flux of the null point is the maximum value of the magnetic flux in the quadrupole background magnetic field, and represented by ψ {sub N}. The results show that the bigger ψ {sub N} usually corresponds to the smaller catastrophic point, the lower magnetic energy of the flux rope system, and the lesser magnetic energy inside the flux rope. Our results confirm that catastrophic disruption of the prominence occurs more easily when there is a bigger ψ {sub N}. However, ψ {sub N} has little influence on the maximum speed of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with an erupted prominence. Thus we argue that a topological configuration with the inner coronal null point is a necessary structure for the formation and evolution of solar quiescent prominences. In conclusion, it is easier for the prominences to form and to erupt as a core part of the CMEs in the magnetic structure with a greater ψ {sub N}.

  8. A Comprehensive Automated 3D Approach for Building Extraction, Reconstruction, and Regularization from Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds.

    PubMed

    Dorninger, Peter; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2008-11-17

    Three dimensional city models are necessary for supporting numerous management applications. For the determination of city models for visualization purposes, several standardized workflows do exist. They are either based on photogrammetry or on LiDAR or on a combination of both data acquisition techniques. However, the automated determination of reliable and highly accurate city models is still a challenging task, requiring a workflow comprising several processing steps. The most relevant are building detection, building outline generation, building modeling, and finally, building quality analysis. Commercial software tools for building modeling require, generally, a high degree of human interaction and most automated approaches described in literature stress the steps of such a workflow individually. In this article, we propose a comprehensive approach for automated determination of 3D city models from airborne acquired point cloud data. It is based on the assumption that individual buildings can be modeled properly by a composition of a set of planar faces. Hence, it is based on a reliable 3D segmentation algorithm, detecting planar faces in a point cloud. This segmentation is of crucial importance for the outline detection and for the modeling approach. We describe the theoretical background, the segmentation algorithm, the outline detection, and the modeling approach, and we present and discuss several actual projects.

  9. A Comprehensive Automated 3D Approach for Building Extraction, Reconstruction, and Regularization from Airborne Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Dorninger, Peter; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional city models are necessary for supporting numerous management applications. For the determination of city models for visualization purposes, several standardized workflows do exist. They are either based on photogrammetry or on LiDAR or on a combination of both data acquisition techniques. However, the automated determination of reliable and highly accurate city models is still a challenging task, requiring a workflow comprising several processing steps. The most relevant are building detection, building outline generation, building modeling, and finally, building quality analysis. Commercial software tools for building modeling require, generally, a high degree of human interaction and most automated approaches described in literature stress the steps of such a workflow individually. In this article, we propose a comprehensive approach for automated determination of 3D city models from airborne acquired point cloud data. It is based on the assumption that individual buildings can be modeled properly by a composition of a set of planar faces. Hence, it is based on a reliable 3D segmentation algorithm, detecting planar faces in a point cloud. This segmentation is of crucial importance for the outline detection and for the modeling approach. We describe the theoretical background, the segmentation algorithm, the outline detection, and the modeling approach, and we present and discuss several actual projects. PMID:27873931

  10. Identification of damage in buildings based on gaps in 3D point clouds from very high resolution oblique airborne images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrivel, Anand; Gerke, Markus; Kerle, Norman; Vosselman, George

    2015-07-01

    Point clouds generated from airborne oblique images have become a suitable source for detailed building damage assessment after a disaster event, since they provide the essential geometric and radiometric features of both roof and façades of the building. However, they often contain gaps that result either from physical damage or from a range of image artefacts or data acquisition conditions. A clear understanding of those reasons, and accurate classification of gap-type, are critical for 3D geometry-based damage assessment. In this study, a methodology was developed to delineate buildings from a point cloud and classify the present gaps. The building delineation process was carried out by identifying and merging the roof segments of single buildings from the pre-segmented 3D point cloud. This approach detected 96% of the buildings from a point cloud generated using airborne oblique images. The gap detection and classification methods were tested using two other data sets obtained with Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) images with a ground resolution of around 1-2 cm. The methods detected all significant gaps and correctly identified the gaps due to damage. The gaps due to damage were identified based on the surrounding damage pattern, applying Gabor wavelets and a histogram of gradient orientation features. Two learning algorithms - SVM and Random Forests were tested for mapping the damaged regions based on radiometric descriptors. The learning model based on Gabor features with Random Forests performed best, identifying 95% of the damaged regions. The generalization performance of the supervised model, however, was less successful: quality measures decreased by around 15-30%.

  11. A quantitative study of 3D-scanning frequency and Δd of tracking points on the tooth surface

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Lyu, Peijun; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong; Liang, Xiaoyue

    2015-01-01

    Micro-movement of human jaws in the resting state might influence the accuracy of direct three-dimensional (3D) measurement. Providing a reference for sampling frequency settings of intraoral scanning systems to overcome this influence is important. In this study, we measured micro-movement, or change in distance (∆d), as the change in position of a single tracking point from one sampling time point to another in five human subjects. ∆d of tracking points on incisors at 7 sampling frequencies was judged against the clinical accuracy requirement to select proper sampling frequency settings. The curve equation was then fit quantitatively between ∆d median and the sampling frequency to predict the trend of ∆d with increasing f. The difference of ∆d among the subjects and the difference between upper and lower incisor feature points of the same subject were analyzed by a non-parametric test (α = 0.05). Significant differences of incisor feature points were noted among different subjects and between upper and lower jaws of the same subject (P < 0.01). Overall, ∆d decreased with increasing frequency. When the frequency was 60 Hz, ∆d nearly reached the clinical accuracy requirement. Frequencies higher than 60 Hz did not significantly decrease Δd further. PMID:26400112

  12. Causality and entropic arguments pointing to a null Big Bag hypersurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, E.

    2011-09-01

    I propose a causality argument in order to solve the homogeneity (horizon) problem and the entropy problem of cosmology. The solution is based on the replacement of the spacelike Big Bang boundary with a null boundary behind which stays a chronology violating region. This solution requires a tilting of the light cones near the null boundary and thus it is based more on the behavior of the light cones and hence on causality than on the behavior of the scale factor (expansion). The connection of this picture with Augustine of Hippo famous philosophical discussion on time and creation is mentioned.

  13. a New Approach for Progressive Dense Reconstruction from Consecutive Images Based on Prior Low-Density 3d Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lari, Z.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, the increasing incidence of climate-related disasters has tremendously affected our environment. In order to effectively manage and reduce dramatic impacts of such events, the development of timely disaster management plans is essential. Since these disasters are spatial phenomena, timely provision of geospatial information is crucial for effective development of response and management plans. Due to inaccessibility of the affected areas and limited budget of first-responders, timely acquisition of the required geospatial data for these applications is usually possible only using low-cost imaging and georefencing sensors mounted on unmanned platforms. Despite rapid collection of the required data using these systems, available processing techniques are not yet capable of delivering geospatial information to responders and decision makers in a timely manner. To address this issue, this paper introduces a new technique for dense 3D reconstruction of the affected scenes which can deliver and improve the needed geospatial information incrementally. This approach is implemented based on prior 3D knowledge of the scene and employs computationally-efficient 2D triangulation, feature descriptor, feature matching and point verification techniques to optimize and speed up 3D dense scene reconstruction procedure. To verify the feasibility and computational efficiency of the proposed approach, an experiment using a set of consecutive images collected onboard a UAV platform and prior low-density airborne laser scanning over the same area is conducted and step by step results are provided. A comparative analysis of the proposed approach and an available image-based dense reconstruction technique is also conducted to prove the computational efficiency and competency of this technique for delivering geospatial information with pre-specified accuracy.

  14. Quantifying 3D ice cliff evolution with multi-temporal point clouds on the debris-covered Khumbu Glacier, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, C. Scott; Quincey, Duncan; Smith, Mark; Carrivick, Jonathan; Rowan, Ann

    2017-04-01

    Observations of ice cliff retreat on debris-covered glaciers have until recently focused on point ablation stake measurements, which may not be representative of the melt rates across a heterogeneous cliff face. Here we present the first fully 3D assessment of spatio-temporal ice cliff evolution on Khumbu Glacier in the Everest region of Nepal. During three field campaigns (Nov 2015, May 2016, Oct 2016), nine ice cliffs were surveyed to enable 3D point cloud generation following a Structure-from-Motion with Multi-View Stereo (SfM-MVS) workflow. Multi-temporal point clouds were differenced using the M3C2 algorithm in Cloud Compare to calculate statistically significant 3D topographic change. Four out of nine cliffs persisted over the study, whereas five became buried under a layer of debris. The spatio-temporal evolution of ice cliffs was found to be dependent upon cliff-scale characteristics (e.g. height and aspect) and their topographic context (e.g. presence of a supraglacial pond and the back slope of the cliff). Thermal undercutting by a supraglacial pond maintained the cliff angle during retreat, which delayed burial by debris. The back slope of an ice cliff also determined its potential longevity, with a low back slope promoting continued retreat and a high back slope promoting burial under debris. Retreat rates Oct-2015 to May-2016 ranged from 0.46 - 1.50 cm d-1 (mean of 0.8 cm d-1) compared to 0.74 - 5.18 cm d-1 (mean of 2.5 cm d-1) during May-2016 to Oct-2016. Within a year, cliff retreat exceeded 8 m in several instances. Additionally, new cliffs formed and supraglacial ponds both expanded and drained. Quantifying these glacier surface dynamics therefore requires annual to sub-annual resolution assessments. These data will be used towards the parameterisation of ice cliff retreat into dynamic glacier models, which is essential to forecast the rates of glacier mass loss and subsequent effect on river discharge.

  15. On the augmented reproducibility in measurements on 3D orthodontic digital dental models and the definition of feature points.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Wolfgang; Nyssen, Edgard; Ibel, Gabriele; Vannet, Bart Vande

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to explore digital measurement methodology on 3-dimensional (3D) dental models. Standardised manipulation and practices have lead to reliable measurements on plaster casts. Identifying landmarks on digital models or digitised plaster casts is fundamentally different from actual measurements. Three-dimensional models are represented on flat screens and landmarks are individually indentified. A procedure is proposed that resolves the deficiencies associated with a 2-dimensional (2D) display through an appropriate model representation and through local optimisation. Fifteen models (OrthoProof) were exported to a locally developed 3D point indication software package, in which two measurement approaches were implemented involving standard projection with and without local search. Nine linear measurements were obtained from plaster casts and digital models. Statistical analysis included correlation and Friedman s nonparametric analysis of variance (ANOVA). For five out of nine linear measurements, digital indications yielded results significantly different from manual measurements (p = 0.05). Local search considerably improved measurement accuracy and reliability. Measurements on plaster casts can differ significantly from those obtained through digital identification methods. These differences prove to be clinically relevant. Standardisation and optimisation resulted in improved and extremely reliable digital measurements.

  16. Combination of Tls Point Clouds and 3d Data from Kinect v2 Sensor to Complete Indoor Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachat, E.; Landes, T.; Grussenmeyer, P.

    2016-06-01

    The combination of data coming from multiple sensors is more and more applied for remote sensing issues (multi-sensor imagery) but also in cultural heritage or robotics, since it often results in increased robustness and accuracy of the final data. In this paper, the reconstruction of building elements such as window frames or door jambs scanned thanks to a low cost 3D sensor (Kinect v2) is presented. Their combination within a global point cloud of an indoor scene acquired with a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) is considered. If the added elements acquired with the Kinect sensor enable to reach a better level of detail of the final model, an adapted acquisition protocol may also provide several benefits as for example time gain. The paper aims at analyzing whether the two measurement techniques can be complementary in this context. The limitations encountered during the acquisition and reconstruction steps are also investigated.

  17. Vaginal dose point reporting in cervical cancer patients treated with combined 2D/3D external beam radiotherapy and 2D/3D brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Westerveld, Henrike; Pötter, Richard; Berger, Daniel; Dankulchai, Pittaya; Dörr, Wolfgang; Sora, Mircea-Constantin; Pötter-Lang, Sarah; Kirisits, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Traditionally, vaginal dose points have been defined at the vaginal source level, thus not providing dose information for the entire vagina. Since reliable vaginal dose volume/surface histograms are unavailable, a strategy for comprehensive vaginal dose reporting for combined EBRT and BT was established and investigated. An anatomical vaginal reference point was defined at the level of the Posterior-Inferior Border of Symphysis (PIBS), plus two points ±2 cm (mid/introitus vagina). For BT extra points were selected for the upper vagina at 12/3/6/9 o'clock, at the vaginal surface and 5 mm depth. A vaginal reference length (VRL) was defined from ring centre to PIBS. Fifty-nine patients treated for cervical cancer were included in this retrospective feasibility study. The method was applicable to all patients. Total EQD2 doses at PIBS and ±2 cm were 36.7 Gy (3.1-68.2), 49.6 Gy (32.1-89.6) and 4.3 Gy (1.0-46.6). At the vaginal surface at ring level doses were respectively 266.1 Gy (67.6-814.5)/225.9 Gy (61.5-610.5) at 3/9 o'clock, and 85.1 Gy (55.4-140.3)/72.0 Gy (49.1-108.9) at 12/6 o'clock. Mean VRL on MRI was 5.6 cm (2.0-9.4). With this novel system, a comprehensive reporting of vaginal doses is feasible. The present study has demonstrated large dose variations between patients observed in all parts of the vagina, resulting from different contributions from EBRT and BT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Atypical late-time singular regimes accurately diagnosed in stagnation-point-type solutions of 3D Euler flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulungye, Rachel M.; Lucas, Dan; Bustamante, Miguel D.

    2016-02-01

    We revisit, both numerically and analytically, the finite-time blowup of the infinite-energy solution of 3D Euler equations of stagnation-point-type introduced by Gibbon et al. (1999). By employing the method of mapping to regular systems, presented in Bustamante (2011) and extended to the symmetry-plane case by Mulungye et al. (2015), we establish a curious property of this solution that was not observed in early studies: before but near singularity time, the blowup goes from a fast transient to a slower regime that is well resolved spectrally, even at mid-resolutions of $512^2.$ This late-time regime has an atypical spectrum: it is Gaussian rather than exponential in the wavenumbers. The analyticity-strip width decays to zero in a finite time, albeit so slowly that it remains well above the collocation-point scale for all simulation times $t < T^* - 10^{-9000}$, where $T^*$ is the singularity time. Reaching such a proximity to singularity time is not possible in the original temporal variable, because floating point double precision ($\\approx 10^{-16}$) creates a `machine-epsilon' barrier. Due to this limitation on the \\emph{original} independent variable, the mapped variables now provide an improved assessment of the relevant blowup quantities, crucially with acceptable accuracy at an unprecedented closeness to the singularity time: $T^*- t \\approx 10^{-140}.$

  19. Direct local building inundation depth determination in 3-D point clouds generated from user-generated flood images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesbaum, Luisa; Marx, Sabrina; Höfle, Bernhard

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, the number of people affected by flooding caused by extreme weather events has increased considerably. In order to provide support in disaster recovery or to develop mitigation plans, accurate flood information is necessary. Particularly pluvial urban floods, characterized by high temporal and spatial variations, are not well documented. This study proposes a new, low-cost approach to determining local flood elevation and inundation depth of buildings based on user-generated flood images. It first applies close-range digital photogrammetry to generate a geo-referenced 3-D point cloud. Second, based on estimated camera orientation parameters, the flood level captured in a single flood image is mapped to the previously derived point cloud. The local flood elevation and the building inundation depth can then be derived automatically from the point cloud. The proposed method is carried out once for each of 66 different flood images showing the same building façade. An overall accuracy of 0.05 m with an uncertainty of ±0.13 m for the derived flood elevation within the area of interest as well as an accuracy of 0.13 m ± 0.10 m for the determined building inundation depth is achieved. Our results demonstrate that the proposed method can provide reliable flood information on a local scale using user-generated flood images as input. The approach can thus allow inundation depth maps to be derived even in complex urban environments with relatively high accuracies.

  20. See-Through Imaging of Laser-Scanned 3d Cultural Heritage Objects Based on Stochastic Rendering of Large-Scale Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Hasegawa, K.; Okamoto, N.; Umegaki, R.; Wang, S.; Uemura, M.; Okamoto, A.; Koyamada, K.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method for the precise 3D see-through imaging, or transparent visualization, of the large-scale and complex point clouds acquired via the laser scanning of 3D cultural heritage objects. Our method is based on a stochastic algorithm and directly uses the 3D points, which are acquired using a laser scanner, as the rendering primitives. This method achieves the correct depth feel without requiring depth sorting of the rendering primitives along the line of sight. Eliminating this need allows us to avoid long computation times when creating natural and precise 3D see-through views of laser-scanned cultural heritage objects. The opacity of each laser-scanned object is also flexibly controllable. For a laser-scanned point cloud consisting of more than 107 or 108 3D points, the pre-processing requires only a few minutes, and the rendering can be executed at interactive frame rates. Our method enables the creation of cumulative 3D see-through images of time-series laser-scanned data. It also offers the possibility of fused visualization for observing a laser-scanned object behind a transparent high-quality photographic image placed in the 3D scene. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by applying it to festival floats of high cultural value. These festival floats have complex outer and inner 3D structures and are suitable for see-through imaging.

  1. Determination of Auxin-Dependent pH Changes in Coleoptile Cell Walls by a Null-Point Method.

    PubMed Central

    Schopfer, P.

    1993-01-01

    The present debate on the validity of the "acid-growth theory" of auxin (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA) action concentrates on the question of whether IAA-induced proton excretion into the cell wall is quantitatively sufficient to provide the shift in pH that is required to explain IAA-induced growth (see D.L. Rayle, R.E. Cleland [1992] Plant Physiol 99:1271-1274 for a recent apologetic review of the acid-growth theory). In the present paper a null-point method has been employed for determining the growth-effective cell-wall pH in the presence and absence of IAA after 60 min of treatment. Elongation of abraded maize (Zea mays L.) and oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptile segments was measured with the high resolution of a displacement transducer. The abrasion method employed for rendering the outer epidermal cell wall permeable for buffer ions was checked with a dye-uptake method. Evidence is provided demonstrating that externally applied solutes rapidly and homogeneously penetrate into the epidermal wall, whereas penetration into the inner tissue walls is strongly retarded. "Titration" curves of IAA-induced and basal elongation were determined by measuring the promoting/inhibiting effect of medium pH under iso-osmotic conditions in the range of pH 4.5 to 6.0. In maize, the null point (no pH-dependent change in elongation rate after 5-10 min of treatment with 10 mmol L-1 citrate buffer) was pH 5.00 after 60 min of IAA-induced growth, and the null-point pH determined similarly in IAA-depleted tissue (10 times smaller elongation rate) was 5.25. Corresponding titration curves with Avena segments led to slightly lower null-point pH values both in the presence and absence of IAA-induced growth. After induction of acid-mediated extension by 1 [mu]mol L-1 fusicoccin (FC) in maize, the null-point pH shifted to 3.9. At 0.5 [mu]mol L-1, FC induced the same elongation rate as IAA but a 9-fold larger rate of proton excretion. At 0.033 [mu]mol L-1, FC induced the same rate of proton

  2. Ideal starting point and trajectory for C2 pedicle screw placement: a 3D computed tomography analysis using perioperative measurements.

    PubMed

    Chin, Kingsley R; Mills, Michael V; Seale, Jason; Cumming, Vanessa

    2014-04-01

    C2 pedicle screws provide stable fixation for posterior cervical fusion. Placing C2 pedicle screws is fraught with risks, and a misplaced screw can result in cortical breach of the pedicle, resulting in injury to the vertebral artery or spinal cord. We sought to identify a reproducible starting point and trajectory for C2 pedicle screw placement using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) imaging. Our aims included identifying correct cephalad and mediolateral angles used for determining the most accurate trajectory through the C2 pedicle. A radiographic analysis of the anatomy of the C2 pedicle using CT. A random sample of 34 cervical spine CT scans in patients without medical or surgical pathology of the cervical spine. Normal anatomic measurements made in the axial and sagittal planes of the CT scans. Angles and measures in millimeters were recorded. The C2 pedicles were evaluated using CT scanning with a 3D imaging application. The ideal trajectory through each pedicle was plotted. The mediolateral and cephalad angles were measured using the midline sagittal plane and the inferior vertebral body border as references. Other measurements made were the distances through the pedicle and vertebral bodies, and the surface distances along the laminae between the isthmus and the starting point of the chosen trajectories. Other measurements involving the height of the laminae were also made. The mean values, standard deviations, and intraobserver variations are presented. CT scans from 34 patients were reviewed. The sex of the patient did not predict angle measurements (p=.2038), so combined male and female patient measures are presented. The mean mediolateral angle measured was 29.2°, and the mean cephalad angle was 23.0°. The mean distance along the lamina surface between the isthmus and the starting point was 8.1 mm. The mean distance from the superior border of the lamina to the starting point was 5.7 mm. There were no statistically significant

  3. Semi-automatic characterization of fractured rock masses using 3D point clouds: discontinuity orientation, spacing and SMR geomechanical classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Adrian; Tomas, Roberto; Abellan, Antonio; Cano, Miguel; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Investigation of fractured rock masses for different geological applications (e.g. fractured reservoir exploitation, rock slope instability, rock engineering, etc.) requires a deep geometric understanding of the discontinuity sets affecting rock exposures. Recent advances in 3D data acquisition using photogrammetric and/or LiDAR techniques currently allow a quick and an accurate characterization of rock mass discontinuities. This contribution presents a methodology for: (a) use of 3D point clouds for the identification and analysis of planar surfaces outcropping in a rocky slope; (b) calculation of the spacing between different discontinuity sets; (c) semi-automatic calculation of the parameters that play a capital role in the Slope Mass Rating geomechanical classification. As for the part a) (discontinuity orientation), our proposal identifies and defines the algebraic equations of the different discontinuity sets of the rock slope surface by applying an analysis based on a neighbouring points coplanarity test. Additionally, the procedure finds principal orientations by Kernel Density Estimation and identifies clusters (Riquelme et al., 2014). As a result of this analysis, each point is classified with a discontinuity set and with an outcrop plane (cluster). Regarding the part b) (discontinuity spacing) our proposal utilises the previously classified point cloud to investigate how different outcropping planes are linked in space. Discontinuity spacing is calculated for each pair of linked clusters within the same discontinuity set, and then spacing values are analysed calculating their statistic values. Finally, as for the part c) the previous results are used to calculate parameters F_1, F2 and F3 of the Slope Mass Rating geomechanical classification. This analysis is carried out for each discontinuity set using their respective orientation extracted in part a). The open access tool SMRTool (Riquelme et al., 2014) is then used to calculate F1 to F3 correction

  4. Correlating Intravital Multi-Photon Microscopy to 3D Electron Microscopy of Invading Tumor Cells Using Anatomical Reference Points

    PubMed Central

    Karreman, Matthia A.; Mercier, Luc; Schieber, Nicole L.; Shibue, Tsukasa; Schwab, Yannick; Goetz, Jacky G.

    2014-01-01

    Correlative microscopy combines the advantages of both light and electron microscopy to enable imaging of rare and transient events at high resolution. Performing correlative microscopy in complex and bulky samples such as an entire living organism is a time-consuming and error-prone task. Here, we investigate correlative methods that rely on the use of artificial and endogenous structural features of the sample as reference points for correlating intravital fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. To investigate tumor cell behavior in vivo with ultrastructural accuracy, a reliable approach is needed to retrieve single tumor cells imaged deep within the tissue. For this purpose, fluorescently labeled tumor cells were subcutaneously injected into a mouse ear and imaged using two-photon-excitation microscopy. Using near-infrared branding, the position of the imaged area within the sample was labeled at the skin level, allowing for its precise recollection. Following sample preparation for electron microscopy, concerted usage of the artificial branding and anatomical landmarks enables targeting and approaching the cells of interest while serial sectioning through the specimen. We describe here three procedures showing how three-dimensional (3D) mapping of structural features in the tissue can be exploited to accurately correlate between the two imaging modalities, without having to rely on the use of artificially introduced markers of the region of interest. The methods employed here facilitate the link between intravital and nanoscale imaging of invasive tumor cells, enabling correlating function to structure in the study of tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:25479106

  5. Detecting and Analyzing Corrosion Spots on the Hull of Large Marine Vessels Using Colored 3d LIDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aijazi, A. K.; Malaterre, L.; Tazir, M. L.; Trassoudaine, L.; Checchin, P.

    2016-06-01

    This work presents a new method that automatically detects and analyzes surface defects such as corrosion spots of different shapes and sizes, on large ship hulls. In the proposed method several scans from different positions and viewing angles around the ship are registered together to form a complete 3D point cloud. The R, G, B values associated with each scan, obtained with the help of an integrated camera are converted into HSV space to separate out the illumination invariant color component from the intensity. Using this color component, different surface defects such as corrosion spots of different shapes and sizes are automatically detected, within a selected zone, using two different methods depending upon the level of corrosion/defects. The first method relies on a histogram based distribution whereas the second on adaptive thresholds. The detected corrosion spots are then analyzed and quantified to help better plan and estimate the cost of repair and maintenance. Results are evaluated on real data using different standard evaluation metrics to demonstrate the efficacy as well as the technical strength of the proposed method.

  6. Factors influencing superimposition error of 3D cephalometric landmarks by plane orientation method using 4 reference points: 4 point superimposition error regression model.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Joon; Kim, Kee-Deog; Park, Hyok; Park, Chang Seo; Jeong, Ho-Gul

    2014-01-01

    Superimposition has been used as a method to evaluate the changes of orthodontic or orthopedic treatment in the dental field. With the introduction of cone beam CT (CBCT), evaluating 3 dimensional changes after treatment became possible by superimposition. 4 point plane orientation is one of the simplest ways to achieve superimposition of 3 dimensional images. To find factors influencing superimposition error of cephalometric landmarks by 4 point plane orientation method and to evaluate the reproducibility of cephalometric landmarks for analyzing superimposition error, 20 patients were analyzed who had normal skeletal and occlusal relationship and took CBCT for diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder. The nasion, sella turcica, basion and midpoint between the left and the right most posterior point of the lesser wing of sphenoidal bone were used to define a three-dimensional (3D) anatomical reference co-ordinate system. Another 15 reference cephalometric points were also determined three times in the same image. Reorientation error of each landmark could be explained substantially (23%) by linear regression model, which consists of 3 factors describing position of each landmark towards reference axes and locating error. 4 point plane orientation system may produce an amount of reorientation error that may vary according to the perpendicular distance between the landmark and the x-axis; the reorientation error also increases as the locating error and shift of reference axes viewed from each landmark increases. Therefore, in order to reduce the reorientation error, accuracy of all landmarks including the reference points is important. Construction of the regression model using reference points of greater precision is required for the clinical application of this model.

  7. Factors Influencing Superimposition Error of 3D Cephalometric Landmarks by Plane Orientation Method Using 4 Reference Points: 4 Point Superimposition Error Regression Model

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Joon; Kim, Kee-Deog; Park, Hyok; Park, Chang Seo; Jeong, Ho-Gul

    2014-01-01

    Superimposition has been used as a method to evaluate the changes of orthodontic or orthopedic treatment in the dental field. With the introduction of cone beam CT (CBCT), evaluating 3 dimensional changes after treatment became possible by superimposition. 4 point plane orientation is one of the simplest ways to achieve superimposition of 3 dimensional images. To find factors influencing superimposition error of cephalometric landmarks by 4 point plane orientation method and to evaluate the reproducibility of cephalometric landmarks for analyzing superimposition error, 20 patients were analyzed who had normal skeletal and occlusal relationship and took CBCT for diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder. The nasion, sella turcica, basion and midpoint between the left and the right most posterior point of the lesser wing of sphenoidal bone were used to define a three-dimensional (3D) anatomical reference co-ordinate system. Another 15 reference cephalometric points were also determined three times in the same image. Reorientation error of each landmark could be explained substantially (23%) by linear regression model, which consists of 3 factors describing position of each landmark towards reference axes and locating error. 4 point plane orientation system may produce an amount of reorientation error that may vary according to the perpendicular distance between the landmark and the x-axis; the reorientation error also increases as the locating error and shift of reference axes viewed from each landmark increases. Therefore, in order to reduce the reorientation error, accuracy of all landmarks including the reference points is important. Construction of the regression model using reference points of greater precision is required for the clinical application of this model. PMID:25372707

  8. [An automatic extraction algorithm for individual tree crown projection area and volume based on 3D point cloud data].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Heng; Feng, Zhong-Ke; Su, Zhi-Fang; Xu, Hui; Jiao, You-Quan; Deng, Ou

    2014-02-01

    fixed angles to estimate crown projections, and (2) different regular volume formula to simulate crown volume according to the tree crown shapes. Based on the high-resolution 3D LIDAR point cloud data of individual tree, tree crown structure was reconstructed at a high rate of speed with high accuracy, and crown projection and volume of individual tree were extracted by this automatical untouched method, which can provide a reference for tree crown structure studies and be worth to popularize in the field of precision forestry.

  9. An OpenGL-based Interface to 3D PowerPoint-like Presentations of OpenGL Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhov, Serguei A.; Song, Miao

    We present a multimedia 3D interface to powerpoint-like presentations in OpenGL. The presentations of such kind are useful to demonstrate projects or conference talks with the demonstration results of a 3D animation, effects, and others alongside the presentation 'in situ' instead of switching between a regular presentation software to the demo and back - the demo and the presentation can be one and the same, embedded together.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic wave propagation from the subphotosphere to the corona in an arcade-shaped magnetic field with a null point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, I. C.; Khomenko, E.; Collados, M.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to study the energy transport by means of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves propagating in quiet-Sun magnetic topology from layers below the surface to the corona. Upwardly propagating waves find obstacles, such as the equipartition layer with plasma β = 1, the transition region, and null points, and they get transmitted, converted, reflected, and refracted. Understanding the mechanisms by which MHD waves can reach the corona can give us information about the solar atmosphere and the magnetic structures. Methods: We carried out two-dimensional numerical simulations of wave propagation in a magnetic field structure that consists of two vertical flux tubes with the same polarity separated by an arcade-shaped magnetic field. This configuration contains a null point in the corona, which significantly modifies the behavior of the waves as they pass near it. Results: We describe in detail the wave propagation through the atmosphere under different driving conditions. We also present the spatial distribution of the mean acoustic and magnetic energy fluxes for the cases where these calculations are possible, as well as the spatial distribution of the dominant frequencies in the whole domain. Conclusions: We conclude that the energy reaches the corona preferably along almost vertical magnetic fields, that is, inside the vertical flux tubes. This energy is acoustic in nature. Most of the magnetic energy stays concentrated below the transition region owing to the refraction of the magnetic waves and the continuous conversion of acoustic-like waves into fast magnetic waves in the equipartition layer located in the photosphere where plasma β = 1. However, part of the magnetic energy reaches the low corona when propagating in the region where the arcades are located, but waves are sent back downward into the lower atmosphere at the null-point surroundings. This phenomenon, together with the reflection and refraction of waves in the TR and the lower

  11. Synthetic phase-shifting for optical testing: Point-diffraction interferometry without null optics or phase shifters

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ryeojin; Kim, Dae Wook; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2013-01-01

    An innovative iterative search method called the synthetic phase-shifting (SPS) algorithm is proposed. This search algorithm is used for maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation of a wavefront that is described by a finite set of Zernike Fringe polynomials. In this paper, we estimate the coefficient, or parameter, values of the wavefront using a single interferogram obtained from a point-diffraction interferometer (PDI). In order to find the estimates, we first calculate the squared-difference between the measured and simulated interferograms. Under certain assumptions, this squared-difference image can be treated as an interferogram showing the phase difference between the true wavefront deviation and simulated wavefront deviation. The wavefront deviation is the difference between the reference and the test wavefronts. We calculate the phase difference using a traditional phase-shifting technique without physical phase-shifters. We present a detailed forward model for the PDI interferogram, including the effect of the finite size of a detector pixel. The algorithm was validated with computational studies and its performance and constraints are discussed. A prototype PDI was built and the algorithm was also experimentally validated. A large wavefront deviation was successfully estimated without using null optics or physical phase-shifters. The experimental result shows that the proposed algorithm has great potential to provide an accurate tool for non-null testing. PMID:24216862

  12. Point mutations and deletion responsible for the Bombay H null and the Reunion H weak blood groups.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Mateos, P; Cailleau, A; Henry, S; Costache, M; Elmgren, A; Svensson, L; Larson, G; Samuelsson, B E; Oriol, R; Mollicone, R

    1998-01-01

    Definition of the molecular basis of the Reunion and the Bombay red cell and salivary H-deficient phenotypes. Sequence and expression of FUT1 and FUT2 genes from H-deficient individuals. Family segregation analysis of the mutations responsible for the fucosyltransferase defects of H, secretor and Lewis systems. The Indian red cell H null Bombay phenotype depends on a new mutation of the FUT1 gene. T725-->G changing Leu242-->Arg. Their salivary nonsecretor phenotype is secondary to a complete deletion of the FUT2 gene. The red cell H weak Reunion phenotype depends on another new mutation of FUT1, C349-->T which induces a change of His117-->Tyr. Their salivary nonsecretor phenotype is due to the known Caucasian inactivating mutation G428-->A. Single prevalent FUT1 and FUT2 point mutations and a deletion are responsible for the Indian Bombay H null and the Reunion H weak phenotypes found on Reunion island. This is in contrast with other H-deficient phenotypes where sporadic nonprevalent inactivating mutations are the rule.

  13. Null test fourier domain alignment technique for phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2000-01-01

    Alignment technique for calibrating a phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer involves three independent steps where the first two steps independently align the image points and pinholes in rotation and separation to a fixed reference coordinate system, e.g, CCD. Once the two sub-elements have been properly aligned to the reference in two parameters (separation and orientation), the third step is to align the two sub-element coordinate systems to each other in the two remaining parameters (x,y) using standard methods of locating the pinholes relative to some easy to find reference point.

  14. 3-D Surface Visualization of pH Titration "Topos": Equivalence Point Cliffs, Dilution Ramps, and Buffer Plateaus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Garon C.; Hossain, Md Mainul; MacCarthy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    3-D topographic surfaces ("topos") can be generated to visualize how pH behaves during titration and dilution procedures. The surfaces are constructed by plotting computed pH values above a composition grid with volume of base added in one direction and overall system dilution on the other. What emerge are surface features that…

  15. Visualization of Buffer Capacity with 3-D "Topo" Surfaces: Buffer Ridges, Equivalence Point Canyons and Dilution Ramps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Garon C.; Hossain, Md Mainul

    2016-01-01

    BufCap TOPOS is free software that generates 3-D topographical surfaces ("topos") for acid-base equilibrium studies. It portrays pH and buffer capacity behavior during titration and dilution procedures. Topo surfaces are created by plotting computed pH and buffer capacity values above a composition grid with volume of NaOH as the x axis…

  16. Visualization of Buffer Capacity with 3-D "Topo" Surfaces: Buffer Ridges, Equivalence Point Canyons and Dilution Ramps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Garon C.; Hossain, Md Mainul

    2016-01-01

    BufCap TOPOS is free software that generates 3-D topographical surfaces ("topos") for acid-base equilibrium studies. It portrays pH and buffer capacity behavior during titration and dilution procedures. Topo surfaces are created by plotting computed pH and buffer capacity values above a composition grid with volume of NaOH as the x axis…

  17. 3-D Surface Visualization of pH Titration "Topos": Equivalence Point Cliffs, Dilution Ramps, and Buffer Plateaus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Garon C.; Hossain, Md Mainul; MacCarthy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    3-D topographic surfaces ("topos") can be generated to visualize how pH behaves during titration and dilution procedures. The surfaces are constructed by plotting computed pH values above a composition grid with volume of base added in one direction and overall system dilution on the other. What emerge are surface features that…

  18. Dynamics of charged particle motion in the vicinity of three dimensional magnetic null points: Energization and chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Gascoyne, Andrew

    2015-03-15

    Using a full orbit test particle approach, we analyse the motion of a single proton in the vicinity of magnetic null point configurations which are solutions to the kinematic, steady state, resistive magnetohydrodynamics equations. We consider two magnetic configurations, namely, the sheared and torsional spine reconnection regimes [E. R. Priest and D. I. Pontin, Phys. Plasmas 16, 122101 (2009); P. Wyper and R. Jain, Phys. Plasmas 17, 092902 (2010)]; each produce an associated electric field and thus the possibility of accelerating charged particles to high energy levels, i.e., > MeV, as observed in solar flares [R. P. Lin, Space Sci. Rev. 124, 233 (2006)]. The particle's energy gain is strongly dependent on the location of injection and is characterised by the angle of approach β, with optimum angle of approach β{sub opt} as the value of β which produces the maximum energy gain. We examine the topological features of each regime and analyse the effect on the energy gain of the proton. We also calculate the complete Lyapunov spectrum for the considered dynamical systems in order to correctly quantify the chaotic nature of the particle orbits. We find that the sheared model is a good candidate for the acceleration of particles, and for increased shear, we expect a larger population to be accelerated to higher energy levels. In the strong electric field regime (E{sub 0}=1500 V/m), the torsional model produces chaotic particle orbits quantified by the calculation of multiple positive Lyapunov exponents in the spectrum, whereas the sheared model produces chaotic orbits only in the neighbourhood of the null point.

  19. Successful gas hydrate prospecting using 3D seismic - A case study for the Mt. Elbert prospect, Milne Point, North Slope Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Inks, T.L.; Agena, W.F.

    2008-01-01

    In February 2007, the Mt. Elbert Prospect stratigraphic test well, Milne Point, North Slope Alaska encountered thick methane gas hydrate intervals, as predicted by 3D seismic interpretation and modeling. Methane gas hydrate-saturated sediment was found in two intervals, totaling more than 100 ft., identified and mapped based on seismic character and wavelet modeling.

  20. Single-breath clinical imaging of hyperpolarized (129)Xe in the airspaces, barrier, and red blood cells using an interleaved 3D radial 1-point Dixon acquisition.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, S Sivaram; Robertson, Scott H; Freeman, Matthew S; He, Mu; Kelly, Kevin T; Roos, Justus E; Rackley, Craig R; Foster, W Michael; McAdams, H Page; Driehuys, Bastiaan

    2016-04-01

    We sought to develop and test a clinically feasible 1-point Dixon, three-dimensional (3D) radial acquisition strategy to create isotropic 3D MR images of (129)Xe in the airspaces, barrier, and red blood cells (RBCs) in a single breath. The approach was evaluated in healthy volunteers and subjects with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). A calibration scan determined the echo time at which (129)Xe in RBCs and barrier were 90° out of phase. At this TE, interleaved dissolved and gas-phase images were acquired using a 3D radial acquisition and were reconstructed separately using the NUFFT algorithm. The dissolved-phase image was phase-shifted to cast RBC and barrier signal into the real and imaginary channels such that the image-derived RBC:barrier ratio matched that from spectroscopy. The RBC and barrier images were further corrected for regional field inhomogeneity using a phase map created from the gas-phase (129)Xe image. Healthy volunteers exhibited largely uniform (129)Xe-barrier and (129)Xe-RBC images. By contrast, (129)Xe-RBC images in IPF subjects exhibited significant signal voids. These voids correlated qualitatively with regions of fibrosis visible on CT. This study illustrates the feasibility of acquiring single-breath, 3D isotropic images of (129)Xe in the airspaces, barrier, and RBCs using a 1-point Dixon 3D radial acquisition. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Joint detection of anatomical points on surface meshes and color images for visual registration of 3D dental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destrez, Raphaël.; Albouy-Kissi, Benjamin; Treuillet, Sylvie; Lucas, Yves

    2015-04-01

    Computer aided planning for orthodontic treatment requires knowing occlusion of separately scanned dental casts. A visual guided registration is conducted starting by extracting corresponding features in both photographs and 3D scans. To achieve this, dental neck and occlusion surface are firstly extracted by image segmentation and 3D curvature analysis. Then, an iterative registration process is conducted during which feature positions are refined, guided by previously found anatomic edges. The occlusal edge image detection is improved by an original algorithm which follows Canny's poorly detected edges using a priori knowledge of tooth shapes. Finally, the influence of feature extraction and position optimization is evaluated in terms of the quality of the induced registration. Best combination of feature detection and optimization leads to a positioning average error of 1.10 mm and 2.03°.

  2. Geometry and dynamics of fast magnetosonic wavefronts near magnetic null points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Manuel

    2017-02-01

    The behavior of two-dimensional fast magnetosonic waves in the vicinity of isolated points where the magnetic field vanishes is studied analytically. The geometry of rays and wavefronts is described, and the curvature of both is found using conformal mapping techniques. These results are applied to the formation of shock waves, obtaining that shock formation is guaranteed at a finite time for any initial condition of the perturbation when the wavefront is concave and the rays tend to focus, whereas otherwise shocks occur only for a certain range of initial conditions.

  3. Evaluation of the Convergence Region of an Automated Registration Method for 3D Laser Scanner Point Clouds.

    PubMed

    Bae, Kwang-Ho

    2009-01-01

    Using three dimensional point clouds from both simulated and real datasets from close and terrestrial laser scanners, the rotational and translational convergence regions of Geometric Primitive Iterative Closest Points (GP-ICP) are empirically evaluated. The results demonstrate the GP-ICP has a larger rotational convergence region than the existing methods, e.g., the Iterative Closest Point (ICP).

  4. Evaluation of the Convergence Region of an Automated Registration Method for 3D Laser Scanner Point Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kwang-Ho

    2009-01-01

    Using three dimensional point clouds from both simulated and real datasets from close and terrestrial laser scanners, the rotational and translational convergence regions of Geometric Primitive Iterative Closest Points (GP-ICP) are empirically evaluated. The results demonstrate the GP-ICP has a larger rotational convergence region than the existing methods, e.g., the Iterative Closest Point (ICP). PMID:22389603

  5. Registration of overlapping 3D point clouds using extracted line segments. (Polish Title: Rejestracja chmur punktów 3D w oparciu o wyodrębnione krawędzie)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poręba, M.; Goulette, F.

    2014-12-01

    The registration of 3D point clouds collected from different scanner positions is necessary in order to avoid occlusions, ensure a full coverage of areas, and collect useful data for analyzing and documenting the surrounding environment. This procedure involves three main stages: 1) choosing appropriate features, which can be reliably extracted; 2) matching conjugate primitives; 3) estimating the transformation parameters. Currently, points and spheres are most frequently chosen as the registration features. However, due to limited point cloud resolution, proper identification and precise measurement of a common point within the overlapping laser data is almost impossible. One possible solution to this problem may be a registration process based on the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm or its variation. Alternatively, planar and linear feature-based registration techniques can also be applied. In this paper, we propose the use of line segments obtained from intersecting planes modelled within individual scans. Such primitives can be easily extracted even from low-density point clouds. Working with synthetic data, several existing line-based registration methods are evaluated according to their robustness to noise and the precision of the estimated transformation parameters. For the purpose of quantitative assessment, an accuracy criterion based on a modified Hausdorff distance is defined. Since an automated matching of segments is a challenging task that influences the correctness of the transformation parameters, a correspondence-finding algorithm is developed. The tests show that our matching algorithm provides a correct p airing with an accuracy of 99 % at least, and about 8% of omitted line pairs.

  6. Formation Dirac point and the topological surface states for HgCdTe-QW and mixed 3D HgCdTe TI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchewka, Michał

    2016-12-01

    In this paper the results of numerical calculations based on the finite difference method (FDM) for the 2D and 3D TI with and without uniaxial tensile strain for mixed Hg1-xCdxTe structures are presented. The numerical calculations were made using the 8×8 model for x from 0 up to 0.155 and for the wide range for the thickness from a few nm for 2D up to 150 nm for 3D TI as well as for different mismatch of the lattice constant and different barrier potential in the case of the QW. For the investigated region of the Cd composition (x value) the negative energy gap (Eg=Γ8-Γ6) in the Hg1-xCdxTe is smaller than in the case of pure HgTe which, as it turns out, has a significant influence on the topological surface states (TSS) and the position of the Dirac point for QW as well as for 3D TI. The results show that the strained gap and the position of the Dirac point against the Γ8 is a function of the x-Cd compounds in the case of the 3D TI as well as the critical width of the mixed Hg1-xCdxTe QW.

  7. Very-high-resolution pseudo 3-D seismic volume of a submarine mass movement deposit: an example from the Pointe-du-Fort area, Upper Saguenay Fjord, Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchesne, M. J.; Hart, B.; Riedel, M.

    2003-04-01

    In the last few years, 3-D seismic has grown beyond the petroleum geology field in a variety of domains such as environmental and mining geology. However, very-high-resolution 3-D seismic volumes have not yet been used extensively in marine geology to reconstitute the evolution in space of a submarine landslide. The Upper Saguenay Fjord region has been recently struck, by various natural disasters including earthquakes, landslides and flash floods. This region represents a unique site to study the internal structure of modern mass wasting deposits. The Pointe-du-Fort mass movement deposits were chosen to adapt and apply 3-D seismic technology utilized in the petroleum industry. Its small size has helped to overcome the scale characterization problems often encountered within the study of larger submarine slides. Some authors have proposed that these deposits represent the spread of a failed mass coming from the south fjord wall triggered by an earthquake. A very-high resolution pseudo 3-D seismic volume was produced to provide a better understanding of the Pointe-du-Fort failed mass. The volume was generated by merging 38 closely spaced 2-D single channel seismic profiles and has permitted to image the internal structure of the mass movement deposits. The seismic data reveal surfaces within the failure lobe that divide it up into smaller units. These observations are consistent with either: a) the stacking of multiple debris flows rather than a single spread event, or b) internal deformation/shear within a failing mass.

  8. Formation Dirac point and the topological surface states for HgCdTe-QW and mixed 3D HgCdTe TI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchewka, Michał

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the results of numerical calculations based on the finite difference method (FDM) for the 2D and 3D TI with and without uniaxial tensile strain for mixed Hg1-xCdxTe structures are presented. The numerical calculations were made using the 8×8 model for x from 0 up to 0.155 and for the wide range for the thickness from a few nm for 2D up to 150 nm for 3D TI as well as for different mismatch of the lattice constant and different barrier potential in the case of the QW. For the investigated region of the Cd composition (x value) the negative energy gap (Eg=Γ8-Γ6) in the Hg1-xCdxTe is smaller than in the case of pure HgTe which, as it turns out, has a significant influence on the topological surface states (TSS) and the position of the Dirac point for QW as well as for 3D TI. The results show that the strained gap and the position of the Dirac point against the Γ8 is a function of the x-Cd compounds in the case of the 3D TI as well as the critical width of the mixed Hg1-xCdxTe QW.

  9. Terrestrial laser scanning point clouds time series for the monitoring of slope movements: displacement measurement using image correlation and 3D feature tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornemann, Pierrick; Jean-Philippe, Malet; André, Stumpf; Anne, Puissant; Julien, Travelletti

    2016-04-01

    Dense multi-temporal point clouds acquired with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) have proved useful for the study of structure and kinematics of slope movements. Most of the existing deformation analysis methods rely on the use of interpolated data. Approaches that use multiscale image correlation provide a precise and robust estimation of the observed movements; however, for non-rigid motion patterns, these methods tend to underestimate all the components of the movement. Further, for rugged surface topography, interpolated data introduce a bias and a loss of information in some local places where the point cloud information is not sufficiently dense. Those limits can be overcome by using deformation analysis exploiting directly the original 3D point clouds assuming some hypotheses on the deformation (e.g. the classic ICP algorithm requires an initial guess by the user of the expected displacement patterns). The objective of this work is therefore to propose a deformation analysis method applied to a series of 20 3D point clouds covering the period October 2007 - October 2015 at the Super-Sauze landslide (South East French Alps). The dense point clouds have been acquired with a terrestrial long-range Optech ILRIS-3D laser scanning device from the same base station. The time series are analyzed using two approaches: 1) a method of correlation of gradient images, and 2) a method of feature tracking in the raw 3D point clouds. The estimated surface displacements are then compared with GNSS surveys on reference targets. Preliminary results tend to show that the image correlation method provides a good estimation of the displacement fields at first order, but shows limitations such as the inability to track some deformation patterns, and the use of a perspective projection that does not maintain original angles and distances in the correlated images. Results obtained with 3D point clouds comparison algorithms (C2C, ICP, M3C2) bring additional information on the

  10. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; ...

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  11. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  12. Uav-Based Acquisition of 3d Point Cloud - a Comparison of a Low-Cost Laser Scanner and Sfm-Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, D.; Blaskow, R.; Westfeld, P.; Maas, H.-G.

    2015-08-01

    The Project ADFEX (Adaptive Federative 3D Exploration of Multi Robot System) pursues the goal to develop a time- and cost-efficient system for exploration and monitoring task of unknown areas or buildings. A fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles equipped with appropriate sensors (laser scanner, RGB camera, near infrared camera, thermal camera) were designed and built. A typical operational scenario may include the exploration of the object or area of investigation by an UAV equipped with a laser scanning range finder to generate a rough point cloud in real time to provide an overview of the object on a ground station as well as an obstacle map. The data about the object enables the path planning for the robot fleet. Subsequently, the object will be captured by a RGB camera mounted on the second flying robot for the generation of a dense and accurate 3D point cloud by using of structure from motion techniques. In addition, the detailed image data serves as basis for a visual damage detection on the investigated building. This paper focuses on our experience with use of a low-cost light-weight Hokuyo laser scanner onboard an UAV. The hardware components for laser scanner based 3D point cloud acquisition are discussed, problems are demonstrated and analyzed, and a quantitative analysis of the accuracy potential is shown as well as in comparison with structure from motion-tools presented.

  13. 2-D and 3-D Heliospheric Imaging from LEO, L1 and L5: Instruments, Vantage Points, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeForest, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Heliospheric imaging has come of age scientifically, and multiple heliospheric imagers are either operating or being built to operate on scientific missions. Much study and effort has been put into the advantages of solar wind imaging for space weather prediction. For example, CME tracking (either in 3-D with polarization, or in an image plane from a vantage far from Earth) has the potential to greatly increase arrival time predictions. Likewise, higher spatial and temporal resolution could provide critical clues about the important N/S component of the entrained magnetic field, by connecting signed surface magnetograms of the Sun to particular structures observed in the corona and, later, in the ICME. I will discuss the current state of understanding of polarized and/or high resolution heliospheric imaging as it relates to space weather forecasting, the relative advantages of an instrument at LEO, L1, or L5, and desiderata to exploit currently-validated and under-consideration techniques in an operational, prototype, or scientific next-generation solar wind imaging experiment.

  14. Correlation of Point B and Lymph Node Dose in 3D-Planned High-Dose-Rate Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Larissa J.; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Russell, Anthony; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To compare high dose rate (HDR) point B to pelvic lymph node dose using three-dimensional-planned brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with FIGO Stage IB-IIIB cervical cancer received 70 tandem HDR applications using CT-based treatment planning. The obturator, external, and internal iliac lymph nodes (LN) were contoured. Per fraction (PF) and combined fraction (CF) right (R), left (L), and bilateral (Bil) nodal doses were analyzed. Point B dose was compared with LN dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters by paired t test and Pearson correlation coefficients. Results: Mean PF and CF doses to point B were R 1.40 Gy +- 0.14 (CF: 7 Gy), L 1.43 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.15 Gy), and Bil 1.41 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.05 Gy). The correlation coefficients between point B and the D100, D90, D50, D2cc, D1cc, and D0.1cc LN were all less than 0.7. Only the D2cc to the obturator and the D0.1cc to the external iliac nodes were not significantly different from the point B dose. Significant differences between R and L nodal DVHs were seen, likely related to tandem deviation from irregular tumor anatomy. Conclusions: With HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer, per fraction nodal dose approximates a dose equivalent to teletherapy. Point B is a poor surrogate for dose to specific nodal groups. Three-dimensional defined nodal contours during brachytherapy provide a more accurate reflection of delivered dose and should be part of comprehensive planning of the total dose to the pelvic nodes, particularly when there is evidence of pathologic involvement.

  15. 3D point cloud data from laser scanning along the 2014 South Napa Earthquake surface rupture, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Point cloud data collected along a 500 meter portion of the 2014 South Napa Earthquake surface rupture near Cuttings Wharf Road, Napa, CA, USA. The data include 7 point cloud files (.laz). The files are named with the location and date of collection and either ALSM for airborne laser scanner data or TLS for terrestrial laser scanner data. The ALSM data re previously released but are included here because they have been precisely aligned with the TLS data as described in the processing section of this metadata. 

  16. The sensitivity of training image and integration of airborne 3D electromagnetic data in multiple-point geostatistical simulation and the impact on groundwater modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K. H.; He, X.; Sonnenborg, T. O.; Jørgensen, F.

    2016-12-01

    Multiple-point geostatistical simulation (MPS) of the geological structure has become popular in recent years in groundwater modeling. The method derives multi-point based structural information from a training image (TI) and as such is superior to the traditional two-point based geostatistical approach. Its application in 3D simulations has been constrained by the difficulty of constructing 3D TI. High resolution 3D electromagnetic data can be used for defining a TI but the data can also be used as secondary data for soft conditioning. An alternative approach for derived a TI is to use the object-based unconditional simulation program TiGenerator. In this study we present different MPS simulations of the geological structure for a site in Denmark based on different scenarios regarding TI and soft conditioning. The generated geostatistical realizations are used for developing groundwater models based on MODFLOW and each of these models is calibrated against hydraulic head measurements using the inversion code PEST. Based on the calibrated flow models the particle tracking code MODPATH is used to simulate probabilistic capture zones for abstraction wells. By comparing simulations of groundwater flow and probabilistic capture zone, comparable results are obtained based on TI directly derived from high resolution geophysical data and generated by theTiGenerator even for the probabilistic capture zones, which are highly sensitive to the geological structure. The study further suggests that soft conditioning in MPS is an effective way of integrating secondary data such as 3D airborne electromagnetic data (SkyTEM) leading to improved estimations of the geological structure as evidenced by the resulting hydraulic parameter values. However, care should be taken when the same data source is used for defining the TI and for soft conditioning as this may lead reduction in the uncertainty estimation.

  17. One-point functions of non-protected operators in the SO(5) symmetric D3-D7 dCFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leeuw, Marius; Kristjansen, Charlotte; Linardopoulos, Georgios

    2017-06-01

    We study tree level one-point functions of non-protected scalar operators in the defect CFT, based on { N}=4 SYM, which is dual to the SO(5) symmetric D3-D7 probe brane system with non-vanishing instanton number. Whereas symmetries prevent operators from the SU(2) and SU(3) sub-sectors from having non-vanishing one-point functions, more general scalar conformal operators, which in particular constitute Bethe eigenstates of the integrable SO(6) spin chain, are allowed to have non-trivial one-point functions. For a series of operators with a small number of excitations we find closed expressions in terms of Bethe roots for these one-point functions, valid for any value of the instanton number. In addition, we present some numerical results for operators with more excitations.

  18. A Parallel Product-Convolution approach for representing the depth varying Point Spread Functions in 3D widefield microscopy based on principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Arigovindan, Muthuvel; Shaevitz, Joshua; McGowan, John; Sedat, John W; Agard, David A

    2010-03-29

    We address the problem of computational representation of image formation in 3D widefield fluorescence microscopy with depth varying spherical aberrations. We first represent 3D depth-dependent point spread functions (PSFs) as a weighted sum of basis functions that are obtained by principal component analysis (PCA) of experimental data. This representation is then used to derive an approximating structure that compactly expresses the depth variant response as a sum of few depth invariant convolutions pre-multiplied by a set of 1D depth functions, where the convolving functions are the PCA-derived basis functions. The model offers an efficient and convenient trade-off between complexity and accuracy. For a given number of approximating PSFs, the proposed method results in a much better accuracy than the strata based approximation scheme that is currently used in the literature. In addition to yielding better accuracy, the proposed methods automatically eliminate the noise in the measured PSFs.

  19. SU-C-18A-04: 3D Markerless Registration of Lung Based On Coherent Point Drift: Application in Image Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nasehi Tehrani, J; Wang, J; Guo, X; Yang, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated a new probabilistic non-rigid registration method called coherent point drift for real time 3D markerless registration of the lung motion during radiotherapy. Method: 4DCT image datasets Dir-lab (www.dir-lab.com) have been used for creating 3D boundary element model of the lungs. For the first step, the 3D surface of the lungs in respiration phases T0 and T50 were segmented and divided into a finite number of linear triangular elements. Each triangle is a two dimensional object which has three vertices (each vertex has three degree of freedom). One of the main features of the lungs motion is velocity coherence so the vertices that creating the mesh of the lungs should also have features and degree of freedom of lung structure. This means that the vertices close to each other tend to move coherently. In the next step, we implemented a probabilistic non-rigid registration method called coherent point drift to calculate nonlinear displacement of vertices between different expiratory phases. Results: The method has been applied to images of 10-patients in Dir-lab dataset. The normal distribution of vertices to the origin for each expiratory stage were calculated. The results shows that the maximum error of registration between different expiratory phases is less than 0.4 mm (0.38 SI, 0.33 mm AP, 0.29 mm RL direction). This method is a reliable method for calculating the vector of displacement, and the degrees of freedom (DOFs) of lung structure in radiotherapy. Conclusions: We evaluated a new 3D registration method for distribution set of vertices inside lungs mesh. In this technique, lungs motion considering velocity coherence are inserted as a penalty in regularization function. The results indicate that high registration accuracy is achievable with CPD. This method is helpful for calculating of displacement vector and analyzing possible physiological and anatomical changes during treatment.

  20. Evaluation of the Quantitative Accuracy of 3D Reconstruction of Edentulous Jaw Models with Jaw Relation Based on Reference Point System Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiwei; Yuan, Fusong; Lv, Peijun; Wang, Yong; Sun, Yuchun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To apply contact measurement and reference point system (RPS) alignment techniques to establish a method for 3D reconstruction of the edentulous jaw models with centric relation and to quantitatively evaluate its accuracy. Methods Upper and lower edentulous jaw models were clinically prepared, 10 pairs of resin cylinders with same size were adhered to axial surfaces of upper and lower models. The occlusal bases and the upper and lower jaw models were installed in the centric relation position. Faro Edge 1.8m was used to directly obtain center points of the base surface of the cylinders (contact method). Activity 880 dental scanner was used to obtain 3D data of the cylinders and the center points were fitted (fitting method). 3 pairs of center points were used to align the virtual model to centric relation. An observation coordinate system was interactively established. The straight-line distances in the X (horizontal left/right), Y (horizontal anterior/posterior), and Z (vertical) between the remaining 7 pairs of center points derived from contact method and fitting method were measured respectively and analyzed using a paired t-test. Results The differences of the straight-line distances of the remaining 7 pairs of center points between the two methods were X: 0.074 ± 0.107 mm, Y: 0.168 ± 0.176 mm, and Z: −0.003± 0.155 mm. The results of paired t-test were X and Z: p >0.05, Y: p <0.05. Conclusion By using contact measurement and the reference point system alignment technique, highly accurate reconstruction of the vertical distance and centric relation of a digital edentulous jaw model can be achieved, which meets the design and manufacturing requirements of the complete dentures. The error of horizontal anterior/posterior jaw relation was relatively large. PMID:25659133

  1. Comparison of T1-weighted 2D TSE, 3D SPGR, and two-point 3D Dixon MRI for automated segmentation of visceral adipose tissue at 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Fallah, Faezeh; Machann, Jürgen; Martirosian, Petros; Bamberg, Fabian; Schick, Fritz; Yang, Bin

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate and compare conventional T1-weighted 2D turbo spin echo (TSE), T1-weighted 3D volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE), and two-point 3D Dixon-VIBE sequences for automatic segmentation of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volume at 3 Tesla by measuring and compensating for errors arising from intensity nonuniformity (INU) and partial volume effects (PVE). The body trunks of 28 volunteers with body mass index values ranging from 18 to 41.2 kg/m(2) (30.02 ± 6.63 kg/m(2)) were scanned at 3 Tesla using three imaging techniques. Automatic methods were applied to reduce INU and PVE and to segment VAT. The automatically segmented VAT volumes obtained from all acquisitions were then statistically and objectively evaluated against the manually segmented (reference) VAT volumes. Comparing the reference volumes with the VAT volumes automatically segmented over the uncorrected images showed that INU led to an average relative volume difference of -59.22 ± 11.59, 2.21 ± 47.04, and -43.05 ± 5.01 % for the TSE, VIBE, and Dixon images, respectively, while PVE led to average differences of -34.85 ± 19.85, -15.13 ± 11.04, and -33.79 ± 20.38 %. After signal correction, differences of -2.72 ± 6.60, 34.02 ± 36.99, and -2.23 ± 7.58 % were obtained between the reference and the automatically segmented volumes. A paired-sample two-tailed t test revealed no significant difference between the reference and automatically segmented VAT volumes of the corrected TSE (p = 0.614) and Dixon (p = 0.969) images, but showed a significant VAT overestimation using the corrected VIBE images. Under similar imaging conditions and spatial resolution, automatically segmented VAT volumes obtained from the corrected TSE and Dixon images agreed with each other and with the reference volumes. These results demonstrate the efficacy of the signal correction methods and the similar accuracy of TSE and Dixon imaging for automatic volumetry of VAT at 3 Tesla.

  2. A null-steering viewpoint of interferometric SAR

    SciTech Connect

    BICKEL,DOUGLAS L.

    2000-05-02

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) extends the two-dimensional imaging capability of traditional synthetic aperture radar to three-dimensions by using an aperture in the elevation plane to estimate the 3-D structure of the target. The operation of this additional aperture can be viewed from a null-steering point of view, rather than the traditional phase determination point of view. Knowing that IFSAR can be viewed from the null-steering perspective allows one to take advantage of the mathematical foundation developed for null-steering arrays. In addition, in some problems of interest in IFSAR the null-steering perspective provides better intuition and suggests alternative solutions. One example is the problem of estimating building height where layover is present.

  3. Documenting a Complex Modern Heritage Building Using Multi Image Close Range Photogrammetry and 3d Laser Scanned Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianna Baptista, M. L.

    2013-07-01

    Integrating different technologies and expertises help fill gaps when optimizing documentation of complex buildings. Described below is the process used in the first part of a restoration project, the architectural survey of Theatre Guaira Cultural Centre in Curitiba, Brazil. To diminish time on fieldwork, the two-person-field-survey team had to juggle, during three days, the continuous artistic activities and performers' intense schedule. Both technologies (high definition laser scanning and close-range photogrammetry) were used to record all details in the least amount of time without disturbing the artists' rehearsals and performances. Laser Scanning was ideal to record the monumental stage structure with all of its existing platforms, light fixtures, scenery walls and curtains. Although scanned with high-definition, parts of the exterior façades were also recorded using Close Range Photogrammetry. Tiny cracks on the marble plaques and mosaic tiles, not visible in the point clouds, were then able to be precisely documented in order to create the exterior façades textures and damages mapping drawings. The combination of technologies and the expertise of service providers, knowing how and what to document, and what to deliver to the client, enabled maximum benefits to the following restoration project.

  4. Advancement in PET quantification using 3D-OP-OSEM point spread function reconstruction with the HRRT.

    PubMed

    Varrone, Andrea; Sjöholm, Nils; Eriksson, Lars; Gulyás, Balazs; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars

    2009-10-01

    Image reconstruction including the modelling of the point spread function (PSF) is an approach improving the resolution of the PET images. This study assessed the quantitative improvements provided by the implementation of the PSF modelling in the reconstruction of the PET data using the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT). Measurements were performed on the NEMA-IEC/2001 (Image Quality) phantom for image quality and on an anthropomorphic brain phantom (STEPBRAIN). PSF reconstruction was also applied to PET measurements in two cynomolgus monkeys examined with [(18)F]FE-PE2I (dopamine transporter) and with [11C]MNPA (D2 receptor), and in one human subject examined with [11C]raclopride (D2 receptor). PSF reconstruction increased the recovery coefficient (RC) in the NEMA phantom by 11-40% and the grey to white matter ratio in the STEPBRAIN phantom by 17%. PSF reconstruction increased binding potential (BP (ND)) in the striatum and midbrain by 14 and 18% in the [18F]FE-PE2I study, and striatal BP (ND) by 6 and 10% in the [11C]MNPA and [11C]raclopride studies. PSF reconstruction improved quantification by increasing the RC and thus reducing the partial volume effect. This method provides improved conditions for PET quantification in clinical studies with the HRRT system, particularly when targeting receptor populations in small brain structures.

  5. 3D-Modeling of Vegetation from Lidar Point Clouds and Assessment of its Impact on Façade Solar Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peronato, G.; Rey, E.; Andersen, M.

    2016-10-01

    The presence of vegetation can significantly affect the solar irradiation received on building surfaces. Due to the complex shape and seasonal variability of vegetation geometry, this topic has gained much attention from researchers. However, existing methods are limited to rooftops as they are based on 2.5D geometry and use simplified radiation algorithms based on view-sheds. This work contributes to overcoming some of these limitations, providing support for 3D geometry to include facades. Thanks to the use of ray-tracing-based simulations and detailed characterization of the 3D surfaces, we can also account for inter-reflections, which might have a significant impact on façade irradiation. In order to construct confidence intervals on our results, we modeled vegetation from LiDAR point clouds as 3D convex hulls, which provide the biggest volume and hence the most conservative obstruction scenario. The limits of the confidence intervals were characterized with some extreme scenarios (e.g. opaque trees and absence of trees). Results show that uncertainty can vary significantly depending on the characteristics of the urban area and the granularity of the analysis (sensor, building and group of buildings). We argue that this method can give us a better understanding of the uncertainties due to vegetation in the assessment of solar irradiation in urban environments, and therefore, the potential for the installation of solar energy systems.

  6. Comparison of UAV-Enabled Photogrammetry-Based 3D Point Clouds and Interpolated DSMs of Sloping Terrain for Rockfall Hazard Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manousakis, J.; Zekkos, D.; Saroglou, F.; Clark, M.

    2016-10-01

    UAVs are expected to be particularly valuable to define topography for natural slopes that may be prone to geological hazards, such as landslides or rockfalls. UAV-enabled imagery and aerial mapping can lead to fast and accurate qualitative and quantitative results for photo documentation as well as basemap 3D analysis that can be used for geotechnical stability analyses. In this contribution, the case study of a rockfall near Ponti village that was triggered during the November 17th 2015 Mw 6.5 earthquake in Lefkada, Greece is presented with a focus on feature recognition and 3D terrain model development for use in rockfall hazard analysis. A significant advantage of the UAV was the ability to identify from aerial views the rockfall trajectory along the terrain, the accuracy of which is crucial to subsequent geotechnical back-analysis. Fast static GPS control points were measured for optimizing internal and external camera parameters and model georeferencing. Emphasis is given on an assessment of the error associated with the basemap when fewer and poorly distributed ground control points are available. Results indicate that spatial distribution and image occurrences of control points throughout the mapped area and image block is essential in order to produce accurate geospatial data with minimum distortions.

  7. Disentangling the history of complex multi-phased shell beds based on the analysis of 3D point cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzhauser, Mathias; Djuricic, Ana; Mandic, Oleg; Dorninger, Peter; Nothegger, Clemens; Székely, Balázs; Molnár, Gábor; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    Shell beds are key features in sedimentary records throughout the Phanerozoic. The interplay between burial rates and population productivity is reflected in distinct degrees of shelliness. Consequently, shell beds may provide informations on various physical processes, which led to the accumulation and preservation of hard parts. Many shell beds pass through a complex history of formation being shaped by more than one factor. In shallow marine settings, the composition of shell beds is often strongly influenced by winnowing, reworking and transport. These processes may cause considerable time averaging and the accumulation of specimens, which have lived thousands of years apart. In the best case, the environment remained stable during that time span and the mixing does not mask the overall composition. A major obstacle for the interpretation of shell beds, however, is the amalgamation of shell beds of several depositional units in a single concentration, as typically for tempestites and tsunamites. Disentangling such mixed assemblages requires deep understanding of the ecological requirements of the taxa involved - which is achievable for geologically young shell beds with living relatives - and a statistic approach to quantify the contribution by the various death assemblages. Furthermore it requires understanding of sedimentary processes potentially involved into their formation. Here we present the first attempt to describe and decipher such a multi-phase shell-bed based on a high resolution digital surface model (1 mm) combined with ortho-photos with a resolution of 0.5 mm per pixel. Documenting the oyster reef requires precisely georeferenced data; owing to high redundancy of the point cloud an accuracy of a few mm was achieved. The shell accumulation covers an area of 400 m2 with thousands of specimens, which were excavated by a three months campaign at Stetten in Lower Austria. Formed in an Early Miocene estuary of the Paratethys Sea it is mainly composed

  8. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; ...

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  9. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  10. A color-reaction-based rapid screening for null activity of butyrylcholinesterase: a step toward point-of-care screening for succinylcholine apnea.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Nitish; Chowdhary, Sheemona; Bhattacharyya, Rajasri; Banerjee, Dibyajyoti

    2015-01-01

    Succinylcholine apnea happens in cases of null butyrylcholinesterase activity after administration of preintubation succinylcholine. So far, there is no such popular test that can rapidly screen null butyrylcholinesterase activity from plasma. Development of a novel method for rapid screening of null butyrylcholinesterase activity of plasma samples was the objective of the current work. Dichromate reagent was added to 1-naphthol, 2-naphthol, phenol, and para-nitrophenol in separate aliquots and watched for the color formation. Plasma samples preincubated with and without selective butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor were mixed with 1-naphthylacetate and watched for color development after addition of dichromate reagent. Fitting of 1-naphthylacetate at the active site of butyrylcholinesterase was analyzed by using tools of computational biology. It was seen that 1-naphthol formed color with dichromate reagent in a concentration-dependent manner. Other phenols did not form color with dichromate reagent even at 500-µm concentrations. Plasma sample with and without selective butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor (tetra isopropyl pyrophosphoramide) was distinguishable by color formation when incubated with 1-naphthylacetate, followed by the addition of dichromate reagent. In silico analysis also showed that 1-naphthylacetate fitted well at the active site of butyrylcholinesterase. The developed method may be used for rapid screening for null butyrylcholinesterase activity at point of care.

  11. A new type of color-coded light structures for an adapted and rapid determination of point correspondences for 3D reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulier, Yannick; Bernhard, Luc; Spinnler, Klaus

    2011-05-01

    This paper proposes a new type of color coded light structures for the inspection of complex moving objects. The novelty of the methods relies on the generation of free-form color patterns permitting the projection of color structures adapted to the geometry of the surfaces to be characterized. The point correspondence determination algorithm consists of a stepwise procedure involving simple and computationally fast methods. The algorithm is therefore robust against varying recording conditions typically arising in real-time quality control environments and can be further integrated for industrial inspection purposes. The proposed approach is validated and compared on the basis of different experimentations concerning the 3D surface reconstruction by projecting adapted spatial color coded patterns. It is demonstrated that in case of certain inspection requirements, the method permits to code more reference points that similar color coded matrix methods.

  12. Blob dynamics in TORPEX poloidal null configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, B. W.; Dudson, B. D.

    2016-12-01

    3D blob dynamics are simulated in X-point magnetic configurations in the TORPEX device via a non-field-aligned coordinate system, using an isothermal model which evolves density, vorticity, parallel velocity and parallel current density. By modifying the parallel gradient operator to include perpendicular perturbations from poloidal field coils, numerical singularities associated with field aligned coordinates are avoided. A comparison with a previously developed analytical model (Avino 2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 105001) is performed and an agreement is found with minimal modification. Experimental comparison determines that the null region can cause an acceleration of filaments due to increasing connection length, but this acceleration is small relative to other effects, which we quantify. Experimental measurements (Avino 2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 105001) are reproduced, and the dominant acceleration mechanism is identified as that of a developing dipole in a moving background. Contributions from increasing connection length close to the null point are a small correction.

  13. Nondestructive testing and monitoring of stiff large-scale structures by measuring 3D coordinates of cardinal points using electronic distance measurements in a trilateration architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, David H.

    2017-04-01

    By using three, or more, electronic distance measurement (EDM) instruments, such as commercially available laser trackers, in an unconventional trilateration architecture, 3-D coordinates of specialized retroreflector targets attached to cardinal points on a structure can be measured with absolute uncertainty of less than one part-permillion. For example, 3-D coordinates of a structure within a 100 meter cube can be measured within a volume of a 0.1 mm cube (the thickness of a sheet of paper). Relative dynamic movements, such as vibrations at 30 Hz, are typically measured 10 times better, i.e., within a 0.01 mm cube. Measurements of such accuracy open new areas for nondestructive testing and finite element model confirmation of stiff, large-scale structures, such as: buildings, bridges, cranes, boilers, tank cars, nuclear power plant containment buildings, post-tensioned concrete, and the like by measuring the response to applied loads, changes over the life of the structure, or changes following an accident, fire, earthquake, modification, etc. The sensitivity of these measurements makes it possible to measure parameters such as: linearity, hysteresis, creep, symmetry, damping coefficient, and the like. For example, cracks exhibit a highly non-linear response when strains are reversed from compression to tension. Due to the measurements being 3-D, unexpected movements, such as transverse motion produced by an axial load, could give an indication of an anomaly-such as an asymmetric crack or materials property in a beam, delamination of concrete, or other asymmetry due to failures. Details of the specialized retroreflector are included.

  14. Formation of Dirac point and the topological surface states inside the strained gap for mixed 3D Hg1-xCdx Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchewka, Michał

    2016-10-01

    In this paper the results of the numerical calculation obtained for the three-dimensional (3D) strained Hg1-xCdx Te layers for the x-Cd composition from 0.1 to 0.155 and a different mismatch of the lattice constant are presented. For the investigated region of the Cd composition (x value) the negative energy gap (Eg =Γ8 -Γ6) in the Hg1-xCdx Te is smaller than in the case of pure HgTe which, as it turns out, has a significant influence on the topological surface states (TSS) and the position of the Dirac point. The numerical calculation based on the finite difference method applied for the 8×8 kp model with the in-plane tensile strain for (001) growth oriented structure shows that the Dirac cone inside the induced insulating band gap for non zero of the Cd composition and a bigger strain caused by the bigger lattice mismatch (than for the 3D HgTe TI) can be obtained. It was also shown how different x-Cd compounds move the Dirac cone from the valence band into the band gap. The presented results show that 75 nm wide 3D Hg1-xCdx Te structures with x ≈ 0.155 and 1.6% lattice mismatch make the system a true topological insulator with the dispersion of the topological surface states similar to those ones obtained for the strained CdTe/HgTe QW.

  15. Individual 3D region-of-interest atlas of the human brain: automatic training point extraction for neural-network-based classification of brain tissue types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Kaiser, Hans-Juergen; Obladen, Thorsten; Sabri, Osama; Buell, Udalrich

    2000-04-01

    Individual region-of-interest atlas extraction consists of two main parts: T1-weighted MRI grayscale images are classified into brain tissues types (gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), scalp/bone (SB), background (BG)), followed by class image analysis to define automatically meaningful ROIs (e.g., cerebellum, cerebral lobes, etc.). The purpose of this algorithm is the automatic detection of training points for neural network-based classification of brain tissue types. One transaxial slice of the patient data set is analyzed. Background separation is done by simple region growing. A random generator extracts spatially uniformly distributed training points of class BG from that region. For WM training point extraction (TPE), the homogeneity operator is the most important. The most homogeneous voxels define the region for WM TPE. They are extracted by analyzing the cumulative histogram of the homogeneity operator response. Assuming a Gaussian gray value distribution in WM, a random number is used as a probabilistic threshold for TPE. Similarly, non-white matter and non-background regions are analyzed for GM and CSF training points. For SB TPE, the distance from the BG region is an additional feature. Simulated and real 3D MRI images are analyzed and error rates for TPE and classification calculated.

  16. On the randomness of pulsar nulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.; Rankin, Joanna M.

    2009-05-01

    Pulsar nulling is not always a random process; most pulsars, in fact, null non-randomly. The Wald-Wolfowitz statistical runs test is a simple diagnostic that pulsar astronomers can use to identify pulsars that have non-random nulls. It is not clear at this point how the dichotomy in pulsar nulling randomness is related to the underlying nulling phenomenon, but its nature suggests that there are at least two distinct reasons that pulsars null.

  17. 3-D Resistivity Tomography for Cliff Stability Study at the D-Day Pointe du Hoc Historic Site in Normandy, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udphuay, S.; Everett, M. E.; Guenther, T.; Warden, R. R.

    2007-12-01

    The D-Day invasion site at Pointe du Hoc in Normandy, France is one of the most important World War II battlefields. The site remains today a valuable historic cultural resource. However the site is vulnerable to cliff collapses that could endanger the observation post building and U.S. Ranger memorial located just landward of the sea stack, and an anti-aircraft gun emplacement, Col. Rudder's command post, located on the cliff edge about 200 m east of the observation post. A 3-D resistivity tomography incorporating extreme topography is used in this study to provide a detailed site stability assessment with special attention to these two buildings. Multi-electrode resistivity measurements were made across the cliff face and along the top of the cliff around the two at-risk buildings to map major subsurface fracture zones and void spaces that could indicate possible accumulations and pathways of groundwater. The ingress of acidic groundwater through the underlying carbonate formations enlarges pre-existing tectonic fractures via limestone dissolution and weakens the overall structural integrity of the cliff. The achieved 3-D resistivity tomograms provide diagnostic subsurface resistivity distributions. Resistive zones associated with subsurface void spaces have been located. These void spaces constitute a stability geohazard as they become significant drainage routes during and after periods of heavy rainfalls.

  18. Proton acceleration by 3D magnetic reconnection in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, P. K.; Dalla, S.

    2007-05-01

    High energy charged particles are an important feature of solar activity such as flares, and indeed non thermal particles play a significant role in flare energy balance. Magnetic reconnection is the primary energy release mechanism in flares, and the strong DC electric fields associated with this reconnection may well be the origin of the high energy charged particles. Whilst particle acceleration has been widely studied for 2D configurations, little is known about 3D configurations. We investigate particle acceleration using a test particle approach, in the simplest 3D reconnection configuration, a 3D magnetic null point. Two modes of reconnection are possible: with a strong current filament along the "spine" field line connecting to the null, or with a sheet current at the "fan" plane of field lines emerging from the null. Using simple model fields, incorporating intiially only thee ideal reconnection region outside the current sheet (or filament), particle trajectories are investigated and the energy spectra and spatial distribution of accelerated particles are determined. We consider and compare fan and spine reconnection, and determine how the properties of the accelerated particles depend on the parameters of the reonnecting field. We also present preliminary results using more realistic, self consistent model fields.

  19. Two-dimensional full particle simulation of the flow patterns in the scrape-off-layer plasma for upper- and lower-null point divertor configurations in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizuka, T.; Shimizu, K.; Hayashi, N.; Hosokawa, M.; Yagi, M.

    2009-07-01

    The plasma flow in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) plays an important role in particle control in magnetic fusion reactors. The flow is expected to expel helium ashes and to retain impurities in the divertor region, if it is directed towards the divertor plate. It has been experimentally observed, however, that the flow direction is sometimes opposite; from the outer plate side to the SOL middle side in the outer SOL region of tokamaks. In order to study these SOL flow patterns by fully taking account of the kinetic effects, a full particle code, PARASOL, is applied to a tokamak plasma with the upper-null point (UN) or lower-null point (LN) divertor configuration for the downward ion ∇B drift. PARASOL simulations for the medium aspect ratio (A = 5.5) reveal the variation of the flow pattern. For the UN case with the ion ∇B drift away from the null point, the flow velocity Vpar parallel to the magnetic field is formed almost in-out symmetrically. In the inner SOL region Vpar is directed to the inner divertor plate and in the outer SOL Vpar is directed to the outer plate. The stagnation point (Vpar = 0) is located symmetrically at the bottom. On the other hand for the LN case with the ion ∇B drift towards the null point, Vpar in the outer SOL region has a backward flow pattern. The stagnation point moves below the mid-plane of the outer SOL and Vpar in the mid-plane outer SOL is directed to the inner plate. These simulation results are very similar to the experimental results. Simulations are carried out by changing the aspect ratio and by artificially cutting the electric field. It is found that the banana motion of trapped ions is very important for the formation of the flow pattern in addition to the self-consistent electric field. The trapped-ion effects can be stronger than the electric-field effects for the standard tokamaks with A < 5.

  20. 3-D Deformation Field Of The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah (Mexico) Earthquake From Matching Before To After Aerial Lidar Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa-Corona, A.; Nissen, E.; Arrowsmith, R.; Krishnan, A. K.; Saripalli, S.; Oskin, M. E.; Arregui, S. M.; Limon, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    The Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake (EMCE) of 4 April 2010 generated a ~110 km long, NW-SE trending rupture, with normal and right-lateral slip in the order of 2-3m in the Sierra Cucapah, the northern half, where the surface rupture has the most outstanding expression. Vertical and horizontal surface displacements produced by the EMCE have been addressed separately by other authors with a variety of aerial and satellite remote sensing techniques. Slip variation along fault and post-seismic scarp erosion and diffusion have been estimated in other studies using terrestrial LiDAR (TLS) on segments of the rupture. To complement these other studies, we computed the 3D deformation field by comparing pre- to post-event point clouds from aerial LiDAR surveys. The pre-event LiDAR with lower point density (0.013-0.033 pts m-2) required filtering and post-processing before comparing with the denser (9-18 pts m-2) more accurate post event dataset. The 3-dimensional surface displacement field was determined using an adaptation of the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, implemented in the open source Point Cloud Library (PCL). The LiDAR datasets are first split into a grid of windows, and for each one, ICP iteratively converges on the rigid body transformation (comprising a translation and a rotation) that best aligns the pre- to post-event points. Testing on synthetic datasets perturbed with displacements of known magnitude showed that windows with dimensions of 100-200m gave the best results for datasets with these densities. Here we present the deformation field with detailed displacements in segments of the surface rupture where its expression was recognized by ICP from the point cloud matching, mainly the scarcely vegetated Sierra Cucapah with the Borrego and Paso Superior fault segments the most outstanding, where we are able to compare our results with values measured in the field and results from TLS reported in other works. EMC simulated displacement field for a

  1. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of

  2. Nulling Breadboard for DARWIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatscher, Reinhold; Johann, Ulrich; Sodnik, Zoran

    2003-02-01

    This work is funded by ESA under ESTEC/Contract No. 14827/00/NL/CK. Astrium Germany has been awarded this first ESA breadboarding towards nulling interferometry. Interferometric nulling devices are essential ingredients in the TPF and DARWIN missions for suppressing the star light by a factor of 106 over a wide wavelength range in the mid infrared. The current DARWIN baseline concept comprises six telescopes. The coherent combination scheme in the nulling mode operation foresees three nulling assemblies in parallel. The breadboard serves to demonstrate the deep and stable null required for an operational instrument. The demonstrator operates in the near infrared to save costs but its principle is fully applicable to the mid infrared. The nulling device is based on an autobalancing Sagnac core offering just one critical beam combiner. Two different ways of achieving the required π phase shift are implemented: a) arbitrary phase shift by dispersive phase shifter plates b) phase shift of π using periscopes (image flip) The target simulator features two point sources of adjustable radiometry and angular separation, representing a strong star and a weak planet. In addition, the sources can be also used to simulate a double star for demonstrating the basic DARWIN imaging mode. The simulator can be operated in two styles, namely as wavefront dividing star/planet source and, alternatively, as an amplitude dividing source, providing highly symmetric wavefronts to both interferometer arms. Because of its representativity for the DARWIN situation, the latter mode is the preferred simulator for quantitative nulling experiments. The breadboard design has been finalized in January 2002 and verified by detailed simulations. The entire hardware has been manufactured by end of July. Currently, nulling and imaging measurements are in progress to validate the per-formance of the selected approach. The project is part of ESA´s technology preparatory program for DARWIN, paving the

  3. How to Find Magnetic Nulls and Reconstruct Field Topology with MMS Data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, H.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Olshevsky, V.; Andre, M.; Cao, J.; Huang, S.; Retino, A.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we apply a new method—the first-order Taylor expansion (FOTE)—to find magnetic nulls and reconstruct magnetic field topology, in order to use it with the data from the forth-coming MMS mission. We compare this method with the previously used Poincare index (PI), and find that they are generally consistent, except that the PI method can only find a null inside the spacecraft (SC) tetrahedron, while the FOTE method can find a null both inside and outside the tetrahedron and also deduce its drift velocity. In addition, the FOTE method can (1) avoid limitations of the PI method such as data resolution, instrument uncertainty (Bz offset), and SC separation; (2) identify 3D null types (A, B, As, and Bs) and determine whether these types can degenerate into 2D (X and O); (3) reconstruct the magnetic field topology. We quantitively test the accuracy of FOTE in positioning magnetic nulls and reconstructing field topology, by using the data from 3D kinetic simulations. The influences of SC separation (0.05~1 di) and null-SC distance (0~1 di) on the accuracy are both considered. We find that: (1) for an isolated null, the method is accurate when the SC separation is smaller than 1 di, and the null-SC distance is smaller than 0.25~0.5 di; (2) for a null pair, the accuracy is same as in the isolated-null situation, except at the separator line, where the field is nonlinear. We define a parameter in terms of the eigenvalues of the null to quantify the quality of our method—the smaller this parameter the better the results. Comparing to the previously used one, this parameter is more relevant for null identification. Using the new method, we reconstruct the magnetic field topology around a radial-type null and a spiral-type null, and find that the topologies are well consistent with those predicted in theory. We therefore suggest using this method to find magnetic nulls and reconstruct field topology with four-point measurements, particularly from Cluster and

  4. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  5. Novel 3D light microscopic analysis of IUGR placentas points to a morphological correlate of compensated ischemic placental disease in humans

    PubMed Central

    Haeussner, Eva; Schmitz, Christoph; Frank, Hans-Georg; Edler von Koch, Franz

    2016-01-01

    The villous tree of the human placenta is a complex three-dimensional (3D) structure with branches and nodes at the feto-maternal border in the key area of gas and nutrient exchange. Recently we introduced a novel, computer-assisted 3D light microscopic method that enables 3D topological analysis of branching patterns of the human placental villous tree. In the present study we applied this novel method to the 3D architecture of peripheral villous trees of placentas from patients with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR placentas), a severe obstetric syndrome. We found that the mean branching angle of branches in terminal positions of the villous trees was significantly different statistically between IUGR placentas and clinically normal placentas. Furthermore, the mean tortuosity of branches of villous trees in directly preterminal positions was significantly different statistically between IUGR placentas and clinically normal placentas. We show that these differences can be interpreted as consequences of morphological adaptation of villous trees between IUGR placentas and clinically normal placentas, and may have important consequences for the understanding of the morphological correlates of the efficiency of the placental villous tree and their influence on fetal development. PMID:27045698

  6. Invariant joint distribution of a stationary random field and its derivatives: Euler characteristic and critical point counts in 2 and 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Pogosyan, Dmitry; Gay, Christophe; Pichon, Christophe

    2009-10-15

    The full moments expansion of the joint probability distribution of an isotropic random field, its gradient, and invariants of the Hessian are presented in 2 and 3D. It allows for explicit expression for the Euler characteristic in ND and computation of extrema counts as functions of the excursion set threshold and the spectral parameter, as illustrated on model examples.

  7. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  8. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  9. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  10. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  11. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  12. A 3d-3d appetizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke

    2016-11-01

    We test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 "Lens space theory" T [ L( p, 1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L( p, 1). In particular, for p = 1, we show how the familiar S 3 partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[ L( p, 1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[ L( p, 1)] on the squashed three-sphere S b 3 . This enables us to see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent G ℂ complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.

  13. Point-by-point pulmonary vein antrum isolation guided by intracardiac echocardiography and 3D mapping and duty-cycled multipolar AF ablation: effect of multipolar ablation on procedure duration and fluoroscopy time.

    PubMed

    Khaykin, Yaariv; Zarnett, Lauren; Friedlander, Daniel; Wulffhart, Zaev A; Whaley, Bonnie; Giewercer, David; Tsang, Bernice; Verma, Atul

    2012-09-01

    Pulmonary vein antrum isolation (PVAI) guided by intracardiac echocardiography and a roaming circular mapping catheter is an effective treatment modality for atrial fibrillation. Unfortunately, the complexity of this technique leads to long procedure times and high fluoroscopy exposure. Single-catheter multipolar ablation holds the promise to reduce these parameters. This study examined the effect of the conventional point-by-point PVAI with that of single-catheter multipolar ablation on the procedural characteristics and clinical outcomes of atrial fibrillation ablation. Referred patients underwent PVAI guided by a magnetic-based 3D mapping (CARTO 3(®) System; group 1) or duty-cycled multipolar AF ablation using the pulmonary vein ablation catheter (PVAC, group 2) between June 2010 and May 2011. Data were analyzed from 19 patients in group 1 and 31 patients in group 2. There was no significant difference in the length of the procedure between the two groups (135 ± 26 vs 125 ± 25 min, P = 0.20). Patients who underwent ablation using PVAC spent significantly less time in the procedure room pre- and post-procedure than those who underwent conventional PVAI (205 ± 38 vs 179 ± 30 min, P = 0.02) and had a significantly shorter fluoroscopy exposure (50 ± 16 vs 36 ± 14 min, P = 0.003) and radiofrequency energy delivery time (54 ± 26 vs 32 ± 33 min, P = 0.02). No differences in safety and efficacy were seen between the groups. Single-catheter multipolar AF ablation was associated with significantly lower fluoroscopy duration, radiofrequency energy delivery time, and the time the patient spent in the procedure room before and after ablation, although measured short-term clinical outcomes were similar.

  14. Towards an Accurate Measurement of Thermal Contact Resistance at Chemical Vapor Deposition-Grown Graphene/SiO2 Interface Through Null Point Scanning Thermal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jaehun; Hwang, Gwangseok; Kim, Hyeongkeun; Yang, Wooseok; Kwon, Ohmyoung

    2015-11-01

    In the development of graphene-based electronic devices, it is crucial to characterize the thermal contact resistance between the graphene and the substrate precisely. In this study, we demonstrate that the thermal contact resistance between CVD-grown graphene and SiO2 substrate can be obtained by measuring the temperature drop occurring at the graphene/SiO2 interface with null point scanning thermal microscopy (NP SThM), which profiles the temperature distribution quantitatively with nanoscale spatial resolution (-50 nm) without the shortcomings of the conventional SThM. The thermal contact resistance between the CVD-grown graphene and SiO2 substrate is measured as (1.7 ± 0.27) x 10(-6) M2K/W. This abnormally large thermal contact resistance seems to be caused by extrinsic factors such as ripples and metal-based contamination, which inevitably form in CVD-grown graphene during the production and transfer processes.

  15. Expedient Gap Definition Using 3D LADAR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Research and Development Center (ERDC), ASI has developed an algorithm to reduce the 3D point cloud acquired with the LADAR system into sets of 2D ...developed an algorithm to extract from this 3D point cloud any user-defined number of 2D slices. ASI has incorporated this sensor and algorithm into...direction, ASI has developed an algorithm to condense the 3D point cloud acquired with the LADAR system into sets of 2D profiles that describe the

  16. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  17. Refined 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alday, Luis F.; Genolini, Pietro Benetti; Bullimore, Mathew; van Loon, Mark

    2017-04-01

    We explore aspects of the correspondence between Seifert 3-manifolds and 3d N = 2 supersymmetric theories with a distinguished abelian flavour symmetry. We give a prescription for computing the squashed three-sphere partition functions of such 3d N = 2 theories constructed from boundary conditions and interfaces in a 4d N = 2∗ theory, mirroring the construction of Seifert manifold invariants via Dehn surgery. This is extended to include links in the Seifert manifold by the insertion of supersymmetric Wilson-'t Hooft loops in the 4d N = 2∗ theory. In the presence of a mass parameter cfor the distinguished flavour symmetry, we recover aspects of refined Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group, and in particular construct an analytic continuation of the S-matrix of refined Chern-Simons theory.

  18. A 3d-3d appetizer

    DOE PAGES

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke

    2016-11-02

    Here, we test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 “Lens space theory” T [L(p, 1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L(p, 1). In particular, for p = 1, we show how the familiar S3 partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[L(p, 1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[L(p, 1)] on the squashed three-sphere Sb3. This enables us tomore » see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent GC complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.« less

  19. A 3d-3d appetizer

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke

    2016-11-02

    Here, we test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 “Lens space theory” T [L(p, 1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L(p, 1). In particular, for p = 1, we show how the familiar S3 partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[L(p, 1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[L(p, 1)] on the squashed three-sphere Sb3. This enables us to see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent GC complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.

  20. Evaluation of a 3D point spread function (PSF) model derived from Monte Carlo simulation for a small animal PET scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Rutao; Ramachandra, Ranjith M.; Panse, Ashish; Balla, Deepika; Yan, Jianhua; Carson, Richard E.

    2010-04-01

    We previously designed a component based 3-D PSF model to obtain a compact yet accurate system matrix for a dedicated human brain PET scanner. In this work, we adapted the model to a small animal PET scanner. Based on the model, we derived the system matrix for back-to-back gamma source in air, fluorine-18 and iodine-124 source in water by Monte Carlo simulation. The characteristics of the PSF model were evaluated and the performance of the newly derived system matrix was assessed by comparing its reconstructed images with the established reconstruction program provided on the animal PET scanner. The new system matrix showed strong PSF dependency on the line-of-response (LOR) incident angle and LOR depth. This confirmed the validity of the two components selected for the model. The effect of positron range on the system matrix was observed by comparing the PSFs of different isotopes. A simulated and an experimental hot-rod phantom study showed that the reconstruction with the proposed system matrix achieved better resolution recovery as compared to the algorithm provided by the manufacturer. Quantitative evaluation also showed better convergence to the expected contrast value at similar noise level. In conclusion, it has been shown that the system matrix derivation method is applicable to the animal PET system studied, suggesting that the method may be used for other PET systems and different isotope applications.

  1. Intraoral 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  2. Enabling low-noise null-point scanning thermal microscopy by the optimization of scanning thermal microscope probe through a rigorous theory of quantitative measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Gwangseok; Chung, Jaehun; Kwon, Ohmyoung

    2014-11-01

    The application of conventional scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) is severely limited by three major problems: (i) distortion of the measured signal due to heat transfer through the air, (ii) the unknown and variable value of the tip-sample thermal contact resistance, and (iii) perturbation of the sample temperature due to the heat flux through the tip-sample thermal contact. Recently, we proposed null-point scanning thermal microscopy (NP SThM) as a way of overcoming these problems in principle by tracking the thermal equilibrium between the end of the SThM tip and the sample surface. However, in order to obtain high spatial resolution, which is the primary motivation for SThM, NP SThM requires an extremely sensitive SThM probe that can trace the vanishingly small heat flux through the tip-sample nano-thermal contact. Herein, we derive a relation between the spatial resolution and the design parameters of a SThM probe, optimize the thermal and electrical design, and develop a batch-fabrication process. We also quantitatively demonstrate significantly improved sensitivity, lower measurement noise, and higher spatial resolution of the fabricated SThM probes. By utilizing the exceptional performance of these fabricated probes, we show that NP SThM can be used to obtain a quantitative temperature profile with nanoscale resolution independent of the changing tip-sample thermal contact resistance and without perturbation of the sample temperature or distortion due to the heat transfer through the air.

  3. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  4. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  5. Diamond in 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-08-20

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called Diamond Jenness was taken after NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time. 3D glasses are necessary.

  6. Volumetric (3D) bladder dose parameters are more reproducible than point (2D) dose parameters in vaginal vault high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sapienza, Lucas Gomes; Flosi, Adriana; Aiza, Antonio; de Assis Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio; Chojniak, Rubens; Baiocchi, Glauco

    2016-01-01

    There is no consensus on the use of computed tomography in vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB) planning. The purpose of this study was to prospectively determine the reproducibility of point bladder dose parameters (DICRU and maximum dose), compared with volumetric-based parameters. Twenty-two patients who were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) VCB underwent simulation by computed tomography (CT-scan) with a Foley catheter at standard tension (position A) and extra tension (position B). CT-scan determined the bladder ICRU dose point in both positions and compared the displacement and recorded dose. Volumetric parameters (D0.1cc, D1.0cc, D2.0cc, D4.0cc and D50%) and point dose parameters were compared. The average spatial shift in ICRU dose point in the vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions was 2.91 mm (range: 0.10–9.00), 12.04 mm (range: 4.50–24.50) and 2.65 mm (range: 0.60–8.80), respectively. The DICRU ratio for positions A and B was 1.64 (p < 0.001). Moreover, a decrease in Dmax was observed (p = 0.016). Tension level of the urinary catheter did not affect the volumetric parameters. Our data suggest that point parameters (DICRU and Dmax) are not reproducible and are not the ideal choice for dose reporting. PMID:27296459

  7. 3D Modeling By Consolidation Of Independent Geometries Extracted From Point Clouds - The Case Of The Modeling Of The Turckheim's Chapel (Alsace, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, M.; Fabre, Ph.; Schlussel, B.

    2014-06-01

    Turckheim is a small town located in Alsace, north-east of France. In the heart of the Alsatian vineyard, this city has many historical monuments including its old church. To understand the effectiveness of the project described in this paper, it is important to have a look at the history of this church. Indeed there are many historical events that explain its renovation and even its partial reconstruction. The first mention of a christian sanctuary in Turckheim dates back to 898. It will be replaced in the 12th century by a roman church (chapel), which subsists today as the bell tower. Touched by a lightning in 1661, the tower then was enhanced. In 1736, it was repaired following damage sustained in a tornado. In 1791, the town installs an organ to the church. Last milestone, the church is destroyed by fire in 1978. The organ, like the heart of the church will then have to be again restored (1983) with a simplified architecture. From this heavy and rich past, it unfortunately and as it is often the case, remains only very few documents and information available apart from facts stated in some sporadic writings. And with regard to the geometry, the positioning, the physical characteristics of the initial building, there are very little indication. Some assumptions of positions and right-of-way were well issued by different historians or archaeologists. The acquisition and 3D modeling project must therefore provide the current state of the edifice to serve as the basis of new investigations and for the generation of new hypotheses on the locations and historical shapes of this church and its original chapel (Fig. 1)

  8. The Nullness Analyser of julia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoto, Fausto

    This experimental paper describes the implementation and evaluation of a static nullness analyser for single-threaded Java and Java bytecode programs, built inside the julia tool. Nullness analysis determines, at compile-time, those program points where the null value might be dereferenced, leading to a run-time exception. In order to improve the quality of software, it is important to prove that such situation does not occur. Our analyser is based on a denotational abstract interpretation of Java bytecode through Boolean logical formulas, strengthened with a set of denotational and constraint-based supporting analyses for locally non-null fields and full arrays and collections. The complete integration of all such analyses results in a correct system of very high precision whose time of analysis remains in the order of minutes, as we show with some examples of analysis of large software.

  9. B4 2 After, 3D Deformation Field From Matching Pre- To Post-Event Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds, The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah M7.2 Earthquake Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa-Corona, A.; Nissen, E.; Limon-Tirado, J. F.; Arrowsmith, R.; Krishnan, A.; Saripalli, S.; Oskin, M. E.; Glennie, C. L.; Arregui, S. M.; Fletcher, J. M.; Teran, O. J.

    2013-05-01

    Aerial LiDAR surveys reconstruct with amazing fidelity the sinuosity of terrain relief. In this research we explore the 3D deformation field at the surface after a big earthquake (M7.2) by comparing pre- to post-event aerial LiDAR point clouds. The April 4 2010 earthquake produced a NW-SE surface rupture ~110km long with right-lateral normal slip up to 3m in magnitude over a very favorable target: scarcely vegetated and unaltered desert mountain range, sierras El Mayor and Cucapah, in northern Baja California, close to the US-México border. It is a plate boundary region between the Pacific and North American plates. The pre-event LiDAR with lower point density (0.013-0.033 pts m-2) required filtering and post-processing before comparing with the denser (9-18 pts m-2) more accurate post event dataset. The 3D surface displacement field was determined using an adaptation of the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, implemented in the open source Point Cloud Library (PCL). The LiDAR datasets are first split into a grid of windows, and for each one, ICP iteratively converges on the rigid body transformation (comprising translations and rotations) that best aligns the pre- to post-event points. Perturbing the pre- and post-event point clouds independently with a synthetic right lateral inverse displacements of known magnitude along a proposed fault, ICP recovered the synthetically introduced translations. Windows with dimensions of 100-200m gave the best results for datasets with these densities. The simplified surface rupture photo interpreted and mapped in the field, delineates very well the vertical displacements patterns unveiled by ICP. The method revealed block rotations, some with clockwise and others counter clockwise direction along the simplified surface rupture. As ground truth, displacements from ICP have similar values as those measured in the field along the main rupture by Fletcher and collaborators. The vertical component was better estimated than the

  10. 3D Plasmon Ruler

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    In this animation of a 3D plasmon ruler, the plasmonic assembly acts as a transducer to deliver optical information about the structural dynamics of an attached protein. (courtesy of Paul Alivisatos group)

  11. Prominent Rocks - 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-13

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image from NASA Mars Pathfinder. Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

  12. 3D Laser System

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-09-16

    NASA Glenn's Icing Research Tunnel 3D Laser System used for digitizing ice shapes created in the wind tunnel. The ice shapes are later utilized for characterization, analysis, and software development.

  13. AE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  14. A theoretical investigation into the 3D point spreading situation of a scanning holographic imaging system based on random phase encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-jing, Xiao; Xin, Zhou; Jian-ping, Hu; Jian, Xie; Yun, Wang; Xue-fan, Guo

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, by analyzing variance and noise probability distribution of the reconstructed image, a point spreading situation of adjacent section under the conventional optical scanning holography (OSH) method and a new one based on random-phase encoding (RPE) are studied. Simulation results show that, compared to the conventional OSH at the same de-focus distance, the RPE-OSH can lead the distribution of reconstructed adjacent sections to be more homogeneous and manifested as a speckle-like pattern on the in-focus image. Further study shows that the complex amplitude probability distribution of adjacent section meets the shape of Gaussian curve, and noise can be filtered out by some corresponding filters. So aliasing and interference on the in-focus image can be removed.

  15. Automatic determination of trunk diameter, crown base and height of scots pine (Pinus Sylvestris L.) Based on analysis of 3D point clouds gathered from multi-station terrestrial laser scanning. (Polish Title: Automatyczne okreslanie srednicy pnia, podstawy korony oraz wysokosci sosny zwyczajnej (Pinus Silvestris L.) Na podstawie analiz chmur punktow 3D pochodzacych z wielostanowiskowego naziemnego skanowania laserowego)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, M.; Wężyk, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid development of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in recent years resulted in its recognition and implementation in many industries, including forestry and nature conservation. The use of the 3D TLS point clouds in the process of inventory of trees and stands, as well as in the determination of their biometric features (trunk diameter, tree height, crown base, number of trunk shapes), trees and lumber size (volume of trees) is slowly becoming a practice. In addition to the measurement precision, the primary added value of TLS is the ability to automate the processing of the clouds of points 3D in the direction of the extraction of selected features of trees and stands. The paper presents the original software (GNOM) for the automatic measurement of selected features of trees, based on the cloud of points obtained by the ground laser scanner FARO. With the developed algorithms (GNOM), the location of tree trunks on the circular research surface was specified and the measurement was performed; the measurement covered the DBH (l: 1.3m), further diameters of tree trunks at different heights of the tree trunk, base of the tree crown and volume of the tree trunk (the selection measurement method), as well as the tree crown. Research works were performed in the territory of the Niepolomice Forest in an unmixed pine stand (Pinussylvestris L.) on the circular surface with a radius of 18 m, within which there were 16 pine trees (14 of them were cut down). It was characterized by a two-storey and even-aged construction (147 years old) and was devoid of undergrowth. Ground scanning was performed just before harvesting. The DBH of 16 pine trees was specified in a fully automatic way, using the algorithm GNOM with an accuracy of +2.1%, as compared to the reference measurement by the DBH measurement device. The medium, absolute measurement error in the cloud of points - using semi-automatic methods "PIXEL" (between points) and PIPE (fitting the cylinder) in the FARO Scene 5.x

  16. Coupling high resolution 3D point clouds from terrestrial LiDAR with high precision displacement time series from GB-InSAR to understand landslide kinematic: example of the La Perraire instability, Swiss Alps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michoud, Clément; Baillifard, François; Harald Blikra, Lars; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Kristensen, Lene; Leva, Davide; Metzger, Richard; Rivolta, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Ground-Based Radar Interferometry have changed our perception and interpretation of slope activities for the last 20 years and are now routinely used for monitoring and even early warning purposes. Terrestrial LiDAR allows indeed to model topography with very high point density, even in steep slopes, and to extract 3D displacements of rock masses by comparing successive datasets. GB-InSAR techniques are able to detect mm displacements over large areas. Nevertheless, both techniques suffer of some limitations. The precision of LiDAR devices actually limits its ability to monitor very slow-moving landslides, as well as by the dam resolution and the particular geometry (in azimuth/range) of GB-InSAR data may complicate their interpretations. To overcome those limitations, tools were produced to truly combine strong advantages of both techniques, by coupling high resolution geometrical data from terrestrial LiDAR or photogrammetry with high precision displacement time series from GB-InSAR. We thus developed a new exportation module into the processing chain of LiSAmobile (GB-InSAR) devices in order to wrap radar results from their particular geometry on high resolution 3D point clouds with cm mean point spacing. Furthermore, we also added new importation and visualization functionalities into Coltop3D (software for geological interpretations of laser scanning data) to display those results in 3D and even analyzing displacement time series. This new method has also been optimized to create as few and small files as possible and for time processing. Advantages of coupling terrestrial LiDAR and GB-InSAR data will be illustrated on the La Perraire instability, an active large rockslide involving frequent rockfalls and threatening inhabitant within the Val de Bagnes in the Swiss Alps. This rock mass, monitored by LiDAR and GPS since 2006, is huge enough and long-term movements are big (up to 1.6 m in 6 years) and complex enough to make

  17. Extracting full-field dynamic strain on a wind turbine rotor subjected to arbitrary excitations using 3D point tracking and a modal expansion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baqersad, Javad; Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Health monitoring of rotating structures such as wind turbines and helicopter rotors is generally performed using conventional sensors that provide a limited set of data at discrete locations near or on the hub. These sensors usually provide no data on the blades or inside them where failures might occur. Within this paper, an approach was used to extract the full-field dynamic strain on a wind turbine assembly subject to arbitrary loading conditions. A three-bladed wind turbine having 2.3-m long blades was placed in a semi-built-in boundary condition using a hub, a machining chuck, and a steel block. For three different test cases, the turbine was excited using (1) pluck testing, (2) random impacts on blades with three impact hammers, and (3) random excitation by a mechanical shaker. The response of the structure to the excitations was measured using three-dimensional point tracking. A pair of high-speed cameras was used to measure displacement of optical targets on the structure when the blades were vibrating. The measured displacements at discrete locations were expanded and applied to the finite element model of the structure to extract the full-field dynamic strain. The results of the paper show an excellent correlation between the strain predicted using the proposed approach and the strain measured with strain-gages for each of the three loading conditions. The approach used in this paper to predict the strain showed higher accuracy than the digital image correlation technique. The new expansion approach is able to extract dynamic strain all over the entire structure, even inside the structure beyond the line of sight of the measurement system. Because the method is based on a non-contacting measurement approach, it can be readily applied to a variety of structures having different boundary and operating conditions, including rotating blades.

  18. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  19. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  20. Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, F.; Aristidi, E.; Abe, L.; Lopez, B.

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes a method of beam-combination in the so-called hypertelescope imaging technique recently introduced by Labeyrie in optical interferometry. The method we propose is an alternative to the Michelson pupil reconfiguration that suffers from the loss of the classical object-image convolution relation. From elementary theory of Fourier optics we demonstrate that this problem can be solved by reconfiguring images instead of pupils. Imaging is performed in a combined pupil-plane where the point-source intensity distribution (PSID by comparison to the more commonly quoted point-spread function, PSF) tends towards a pseudo Airy disc for a sufficiently large number of telescopes. Our method is applicable to snap-shot imaging of extended sources with a field limited to the Airy pattern of single telescopes operated in a co-phased multi-aperture interferometric array. It thus allows to apply conveniently pupil plane coronagraphy. Our technique called Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling (IRAN) is particularly suitable for high dynamic imaging of extra-solar planetary companions or extra-galactic objects where long baseline interferometry would closely probe the central regions of AGNs for instance. We also discuss the application of IRAN to improve the performances of imaging and/or nulling interferometers like the full-fledged VLTI array or the DARWIN space-borne mission.

  1. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  2. Medical 3-D Printing.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional printing is used in the manufacturing industry, medical and pharmaceutical research, drug production, clinical medicine, and dentistry, with implications for precision and personalized medicine. This technology is advancing the development of patient-specific prosthetics, stents, splints, and fixation devices and is changing medical education, treatment decision making, and surgical planning. Diagnostic imaging modalities play a fundamental role in the creation of 3-D printed models. Although most 3-D printed objects are rigid, flexible soft-tissue-like prosthetics also can be produced. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  3. Venus in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    1993-01-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  4. 3D Point Cloud Tree Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    tree models............................................................................ 1 2.2 Extracting and exporting the models...vicinity of RAAF Tindal, Northern Territory [1], while the overall appearance was based on photos of poplar box ( Eucalyptus populnea) from woodlands... Extracting and exporting the models To export the Maya models to MATLAB for further manipulation, a procedure was developed which made use of Z

  5. 3-D Grab!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connors, M. G.; Schofield, I. S.

    2012-12-01

    Modern technologies in imaging greatly extend the potential to present visual information. With recently developed software tools, the perception of the third dimension can not only dramatically enhance presentation, but also allow spatial data to be better encoded. 3-D images can be taken for many subjects with only one camera, carefully moved to generate a stereo pair. Color anaglyph viewing now can be very effective using computer screens, and active filter technologies can enhance visual effects with ever-decreasing cost. We will present various novel results of 3-D imaging, including those from the auroral observations of the new twinned Athabasca University Geophysical Observatories.; Single camera stereo image for viewing with red/cyan glasses.

  6. Unoriented 3d TFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Lakshya

    2017-05-01

    This paper generalizes two facts about oriented 3d TFTs to the unoriented case. On one hand, it is known that oriented 3d TFTs having a topological boundary condition admit a state-sum construction known as the Turaev-Viro construction. This is related to the string-net construction of fermionic phases of matter. We show how Turaev-Viro construction can be generalized to unoriented 3d TFTs. On the other hand, it is known that the "fermionic" versions of oriented TFTs, known as Spin-TFTs, can be constructed in terms of "shadow" TFTs which are ordinary oriented TFTs with an anomalous ℤ 2 1-form symmetry. We generalize this correspondence to Pin+-TFTs by showing that they can be constructed in terms of ordinary unoriented TFTs with anomalous ℤ 2 1-form symmetry having a mixed anomaly with time-reversal symmetry. The corresponding Pin+-TFT does not have any anomaly for time-reversal symmetry however and hence it can be unambiguously defined on a non-orientable manifold. In case a Pin+-TFT admits a topological boundary condition, one can combine the above two statements to obtain a Turaev-Viro-like construction of Pin+-TFTs. As an application of these ideas, we construct a large class of Pin+-SPT phases.

  7. 3D change detection - Approaches and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Rongjun; Tian, Jiaojiao; Reinartz, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Due to the unprecedented technology development of sensors, platforms and algorithms for 3D data acquisition and generation, 3D spaceborne, airborne and close-range data, in the form of image based, Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) based point clouds, Digital Elevation Models (DEM) and 3D city models, become more accessible than ever before. Change detection (CD) or time-series data analysis in 3D has gained great attention due to its capability of providing volumetric dynamics to facilitate more applications and provide more accurate results. The state-of-the-art CD reviews aim to provide a comprehensive synthesis and to simplify the taxonomy of the traditional remote sensing CD techniques, which mainly sit within the boundary of 2D image/spectrum analysis, largely ignoring the particularities of 3D aspects of the data. The inclusion of 3D data for change detection (termed 3D CD), not only provides a source with different modality for analysis, but also transcends the border of traditional top-view 2D pixel/object-based analysis to highly detailed, oblique view or voxel-based geometric analysis. This paper reviews the recent developments and applications of 3D CD using remote sensing and close-range data, in support of both academia and industry researchers who seek for solutions in detecting and analyzing 3D dynamics of various objects of interest. We first describe the general considerations of 3D CD problems in different processing stages and identify CD types based on the information used, being the geometric comparison and geometric-spectral analysis. We then summarize relevant works and practices in urban, environment, ecology and civil applications, etc. Given the broad spectrum of applications and different types of 3D data, we discuss important issues in 3D CD methods. Finally, we present concluding remarks in algorithmic aspects of 3D CD.

  8. Null Killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukács, B.; Perjés, Z.; Sebestyén, Á.

    1981-06-01

    Space-times admitting a null Killing vector are studied, using the Newman-Penrose spin coefficient formalism. The properties of the eigenrays (principal null curves of the Killing bivector) are shown to be related to the twist of the null Killing vector. Among the electrovacs, the ones containing a null Maxwell field turn out to belong to the twist-free class. An electrovac solution is obtained for which the null Killing vector is twisting and has geodesic and shear-free eigenrays. This solution is parameterless and appears to be the field of a zero-mass, spinning, and charged source.

  9. Dosimetric Analysis of 3D Image-Guided HDR Brachytherapy Planning for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer: Is Point A-Based Dose Prescription Still Valid in Image-Guided Brachytherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hayeon; Beriwal, Sushil; Houser, Chris; Huq, M. Saiful

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the dosimetric outcome of 3D image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer treatment and compare dose coverage of high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) to traditional Point A dose. Thirty-two patients with stage IA2-IIIB cervical cancer were treated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging-based image-guided HDR brachytherapy (IGBT). Brachytherapy dose prescription was 5.0-6.0 Gy per fraction for a total 5 fractions. The HRCTV and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated following the GYN GEC/ESTRO guidelines. Total doses for HRCTV, OARs, Point A, and Point T from external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy were summated and normalized to a biologically equivalent dose of 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2). The total planned D90 for HRCTV was 80-85 Gy, whereas the dose to 2 mL of bladder, rectum, and sigmoid was limited to 85 Gy, 75 Gy, and 75 Gy, respectively. The mean D90 and its standard deviation for HRCTV was 83.2 {+-} 4.3 Gy. This is significantly higher (p < 0.0001) than the mean value of the dose to Point A (78.6 {+-} 4.4 Gy). The dose levels of the OARs were within acceptable limits for most patients. The mean dose to 2 mL of bladder was 78.0 {+-} 6.2 Gy, whereas the mean dose to rectum and sigmoid were 57.2 {+-} 4.4 Gy and 66.9 {+-} 6.1 Gy, respectively. Image-based 3D brachytherapy provides adequate dose coverage to HRCTV, with acceptable dose to OARs in most patients. Dose to Point A was found to be significantly lower than the D90 for HRCTV calculated using the image-based technique. Paradigm shift from 2D point dose dosimetry to IGBT in HDR cervical cancer treatment needs advanced concept of evaluation in dosimetry with clinical outcome data about whether this approach improves local control and/or decreases toxicities.

  10. Dosimetric analysis of 3D image-guided HDR brachytherapy planning for the treatment of cervical cancer: is point A-based dose prescription still valid in image-guided brachytherapy?

    PubMed

    Kim, Hayeon; Beriwal, Sushil; Houser, Chris; Huq, M Saiful

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the dosimetric outcome of 3D image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer treatment and compare dose coverage of high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) to traditional Point A dose. Thirty-two patients with stage IA2-IIIB cervical cancer were treated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging-based image-guided HDR brachytherapy (IGBT). Brachytherapy dose prescription was 5.0-6.0 Gy per fraction for a total 5 fractions. The HRCTV and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated following the GYN GEC/ESTRO guidelines. Total doses for HRCTV, OARs, Point A, and Point T from external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy were summated and normalized to a biologically equivalent dose of 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2). The total planned D90 for HRCTV was 80-85 Gy, whereas the dose to 2 mL of bladder, rectum, and sigmoid was limited to 85 Gy, 75 Gy, and 75 Gy, respectively. The mean D90 and its standard deviation for HRCTV was 83.2 ± 4.3 Gy. This is significantly higher (p < 0.0001) than the mean value of the dose to Point A (78.6 ± 4.4 Gy). The dose levels of the OARs were within acceptable limits for most patients. The mean dose to 2 mL of bladder was 78.0 ± 6.2 Gy, whereas the mean dose to rectum and sigmoid were 57.2 ± 4.4 Gy and 66.9 ± 6.1 Gy, respectively. Image-based 3D brachytherapy provides adequate dose coverage to HRCTV, with acceptable dose to OARs in most patients. Dose to Point A was found to be significantly lower than the D90 for HRCTV calculated using the image-based technique. Paradigm shift from 2D point dose dosimetry to IGBT in HDR cervical cancer treatment needs advanced concept of evaluation in dosimetry with clinical outcome data about whether this approach improves local control and/or decreases toxicities.

  11. SU-E-T-157: Evaluation and Comparison of Doses to Pelvic Lymph Nodes and to Point B with 3D Image Guided Treatment Planning for High Dose Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandare, N.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate and compare the doses received by the obturator, external and internal iliac lymph nodes and point Methods: CT-MR fused image sets of 15 patients obtained for each of 5 fractions of HDR brachytherapy using tandem and ring applicator, were used to generate treatment plans optimized to deliver a prescription dose to HRCTV-D90 and to minimize the doses to organs at risk (OARs). For each set of image, target volume (GTV, HRCTV) OARs (Bladder, Rectum, Sigmoid), and both left and right pelvic lymph nodes (obturator, external and internal iliac lymph nodes) were delineated. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were generated for pelvic nodal groups (left and right obturator group, internal and external iliac chains) Per fraction DVH parameters used for dose comparison included dose to 100% volume (D100), and dose received by 2cc (D2cc), 1cc (D1cc) and 0.1 cc (D0.1cc) of nodal volume. Dose to point B was compared with each DVH parameter using 2 sided t-test. Pearson correlation were determined to examine relationship of point B dose with nodal DVH parameters. Results: FIGO clinical stage varied from 1B1 to IIIB. The median pretreatment tumor diameter measured on MRI was 4.5 cm (2.7– 6.4cm).The median dose to bilateral point B was 1.20 Gy ± 0.12 or 20% of the prescription dose. The correlation coefficients were all <0.60 for all nodal DVH parameters indicating low degree of correlation. Only 2 cc of obturator nodes was not significantly different from point B dose on t-test. Conclusion: Dose to point B does not adequately represent the dose to any specific pelvic nodal group. When using image guided 3D dose-volume optimized treatment nodal groups should be individually identified and delineated to obtain the doses received by pelvic nodes.

  12. Radiant Temperature Nulling Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A self-calibrating nulling radiometer for non-contact temperature measurement of an object, such as a body of water, employs a black body source as a temperature reference, an optomechanical mechanism, e.g., a chopper, to switch back and forth between measuring the temperature of the black body source and that of a test source, and an infrared detection technique. The radiometer functions by measuring radiance of both the test and the reference black body sources; adjusting the temperature of the reference black body so that its radiance is equivalent to the test source; and, measuring the temperature of the reference black body at this point using a precision contact-type temperature sensor, to determine the radiative temperature of the test source. The radiation from both sources is detected by an infrared detector that converts the detected radiation to an electrical signal that is fed with a chopper reference signal to an error signal generator, such as a synchronous detector, that creates a precision rectified signal that is approximately proportional to the difference between the temperature of the reference black body and that of the test infrared source. This error signal is then used in a feedback loop to adjust the reference black body temperature until it equals that of the test source, at which point the error signal is nulled to zero. The chopper mechanism operates at one or more Hertz allowing minimization of l/f noise. It also provides pure chopping between the black body and the test source and allows continuous measurements.

  13. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  14. Twin Peaks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The two hills in the distance, approximately one to two kilometers away, have been dubbed the 'Twin Peaks' and are of great interest to Pathfinder scientists as objects of future study. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The white areas on the left hill, called the 'Ski Run' by scientists, may have been formed by hydrologic processes.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  15. 3D and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. C.

    1995-05-01

    This conference on physiology and function covers a wide range of subjects, including the vasculature and blood flow, the flow of gas, water, and blood in the lung, the neurological structure and function, the modeling, and the motion and mechanics of organs. Many technologies are discussed. I believe that the list would include a robotic photographer, to hold the optical equipment in a precisely controlled way to obtain the images for the user. Why are 3D images needed? They are to achieve certain objectives through measurements of some objects. For example, in order to improve performance in sports or beauty of a person, we measure the form, dimensions, appearance, and movements.

  16. Case study of 3D fingerprints applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Liang, Jinrong; Shen, Linlin; Yang, Meng; Zhang, David; Lai, Zhihui

    2017-01-01

    Human fingers are 3D objects. More information will be provided if three dimensional (3D) fingerprints are available compared with two dimensional (2D) fingerprints. Thus, this paper firstly collected 3D finger point cloud data by Structured-light Illumination method. Additional features from 3D fingerprint images are then studied and extracted. The applications of these features are finally discussed. A series of experiments are conducted to demonstrate the helpfulness of 3D information to fingerprint recognition. Results show that a quick alignment can be easily implemented under the guidance of 3D finger shape feature even though this feature does not work for fingerprint recognition directly. The newly defined distinctive 3D shape ridge feature can be used for personal authentication with Equal Error Rate (EER) of ~8.3%. Also, it is helpful to remove false core point. Furthermore, a promising of EER ~1.3% is realized by combining this feature with 2D features for fingerprint recognition which indicates the prospect of 3D fingerprint recognition.

  17. Incorporating a Semi-Empirical Point Source Discharge Mixing Model into a 3D Nested-Grid Hydrodynamic Model to Examine Residence Time Scales on the Shallow Shelf of a Large Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowen, E. A.; King, A. T.

    2016-12-01

    Cayuga Lake is long (65km), narrow (3km), and deep (130m max). A shallow shelf (<6m deep) extends 2km north from the southern end. Concern about phosphorous and sediment loading has initiated an effort to understand the physical processes controlling water residence time on the shelf. Of particular interest are the influence of a deep lake cooling facility that discharges onto the shelf and internal waves impacting the shelf from the lake basin. To assess the impact of various physical processes on residence time we have employed the three-dimensional hydrodynamic model Si3D, forcing a fine-grid (25m x 25m x 0.1m) simulation of the shelf with output from a coarse-grid (125m x 125m x 0.1m) simulation of the entire lake, and developing an empirically-based near-field point source mixing model for the cooling facility outfall. Si3D solves the continuity equation, the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (employing the hydrostatic assumption for pressure and an eddy viscosity closure for Reynolds stresses), the transport equation for temperature (employing an eddy diffusivity closure), and an equation of state. Vertical eddy viscosity/diffusivity are represented using level 2.5 Mellor-Yamada. Horizontal eddy viscosity/diffusivity are typically set to constants, but we use these to enforce the correct near field dynamics of the cooling facility discharge. The cooling facility outfall is a 23m-long array of nozzles pointed north and discharging with sufficient velocity to induce significant back entrainment (order 10x the 1.5m3/s discharge) and rapid lateral diffusion of momentum and scalars for hundreds of meters downstream. Once the negatively buoyant effluent has lost sufficient momentum, it plunges and spreads under the influence of both momentum and gravity. In the near field, we specify horizontal eddy viscosity/diffusivity within Si3D such that evolution of momentum and scalar fields match semi-empirical predictions for a jet in shallow water with friction

  18. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  19. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  20. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  1. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  2. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  3. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  4. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  5. Evaluation of the monocular depth cue in 3D displays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Kyu; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kwon, Yong Moo; Son, Jung-Young

    2008-12-22

    Binocular disparity and monocular depth information are the principal functions of ideal 3D displays. 3D display systems such as stereoscopic or multi-view, super multi-view (SMV), and multi-focus (MF) displays were considered for the testing of the satisfaction level with the monocular accommodation of three different depths of 3D object points. The numerical simulation and experimental results show that the MF 3D display gives a monocular depth cue. In addition, the experimental results of the monocular MF 3D display show clear monocular focus on four different depths. Therefore, we can apply the MF 3D display to monocular 3D displays.

  6. Integration (Phase 3D),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    tension rods will be drilled prior to assembly. fixing AFA Point 10 gap 30 grillage 35 Detail at floor floor User cabinet ANS&A to consider providing...duplicate mount for AFA connector panels. ANS&A would remove AFA panel and mount in user cabinet. Termination panels AFA propose mounting points on...clearance holes in the boom divider for AFA . boom divider At the centre of the arm, the cable trays terminate against the drive box. Three cable support rails

  7. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  8. Pluto in 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-10-23

    Global stereo mapping of Pluto surface is now possible, as images taken from multiple directions are downlinked from NASA New Horizons spacecraft. Stereo images will eventually provide an accurate topographic map of most of the hemisphere of Pluto seen by New Horizons during the July 14 flyby, which will be key to understanding Pluto's geological history. This example, which requires red/blue stereo glasses for viewing, shows a region 180 miles (300 kilometers) across, centered near longitude 130 E, latitude 20 N (the red square in the global context image). North is to the upper left. The image shows an ancient, heavily cratered region of Pluto, dotted with low hills and cut by deep fractures, which indicate extension of Pluto's crust. Analysis of these stereo images shows that the steep fracture in the upper left of the image is about 1 mile (1.6 kilometers) deep, and the craters in the lower right part of the image are up to 1.3 miles (2.1 km) deep. Smallest visible details are about 0.4 miles (0.6 kilometers) across. You will need 3D glasses to view this image showing an ancient, heavily cratered region of Pluto. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20032

  9. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  10. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  11. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics. PMID:28952542

  12. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-07-13

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  13. Topology and Dynamics of Reconnection in 3D Pair Plasma Without Guide Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollica, F.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fox, W.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate fast reconnection in 3D pair plasma without a guide field using the Particle Simulation Code (PSC), beginning from a Harris sheet with a neutral line, which is a continuum of nulls and is structurally unstable in 3D. The neutral line is shown to break up into a sequence of discrete nulls of the A- and B-type, which are joined by null-null lines that constitute an AB-web, and provide an underlying topological skeleton for 3D reconnection. The current density distribution in such a system is shown to correspond to recent 3D models of ``spine reconnection.'' The sheet current density is unstable with respect to the kink instability which introduces folding as well as plasmoid instabilities that introduce complex structure formation, while supporting fast time-dependent reconnection.

  14. On grating nulls in adaptive arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishide, A.; Compton, R. T., Jr.

    1980-07-01

    The effect of element patterns on grating nulls in adaptive arrays is considered. Two simple array models, a two-element and a three-element array with dipole element patterns, are used to study this question. The element patterns are assumed unequal (i.e., the beam maxima point in different directions). It is shown that element patterns greatly affect the occurrence of grating nulls in the array. Unequal element patterns cause extra grating nulls ('sign reversal grating nulls') to occur, in addition to conventional grating nulls. These sign reversal grating nulls can occur even with element spacing less than a half-wavelength. For a two-element array with dipole element patterns, it turns out that grating nulls cannot be avoided if the spacing is greater than a half-wavelength. However, with more than two elements, the situation is not so bleak. An example is given of a three-element array with dipole patterns and one-wavelength spacing in which all grating nulls are eliminated.

  15. On grating nulls in adaptive arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishide, A.; Compton, R. T., Jr.

    1980-03-01

    This report considers the effect of element patterns on grating nulls in adaptive arrays. Two simple array models, a two-element and a three-element array with dipole element patterns, are used to study this question. The element patterns are assumed unequal (i.e., the beam maxima point in different directions). It is shown that element patterns greatly affect the occurrence of grating nulls in the array. Unequal element patterns cause extra grating nulls (sign reversal grating nulls) to occur, in addition to conventional grating nulls. These sign reversal grating nulls can occur even with element spacing less than a half-wavelength. For a two-element array with dipole element patterns, it turns out that grating nulls cannot be avoided if the spacing is greater than a half wavelength. However, with more than two elements, the situation is not so bleak. An example is given of a three-element array with dipole patterns and one wavelength spacing in which all grating nulls are eliminated.

  16. Probabilistic point source inversion of strong-motion data in 3-D media using pattern recognition: A case study for the 2008 Mw 5.4 Chino Hills earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käufl, Paul; Valentine, Andrew P.; Trampert, Jeannot

    2016-08-01

    Despite the ever increasing availability of computational power, real-time source inversions based on physical modeling of wave propagation in realistic media remain challenging. We investigate how a nonlinear Bayesian approach based on pattern recognition and synthetic 3-D Green's functions can be used to rapidly invert strong-motion data for point source parameters by means of a case study for a fault system in the Los Angeles Basin. The probabilistic inverse mapping is represented in compact form by a neural network which yields probability distributions over source parameters. It can therefore be evaluated rapidly and with very moderate CPU and memory requirements. We present a simulated real-time inversion of data for the 2008 Mw 5.4 Chino Hills event. Initial estimates of epicentral location and magnitude are available ˜14 s after origin time. The estimate can be refined as more data arrive: by ˜40 s, fault strike and source depth can also be determined with relatively high certainty.

  17. Localisation expérimentale des effets 3D et transitoires en pointe de fissure pour différentes vitesses de propagation sur des matériaux fragiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedan, Stéphen; Valle, Valéry; Cottron, Mario

    2007-04-01

    We propose to use an optical method to define the area of the 3D effects and transient zone near the crack tip during crack propagation in brittle materials (PMMA). For the experimental data, we measure the out-of-plane displacements field by using the interferometry on SEN (Single Edge Notch) specimens loaded in mode I with a constant loading σ. We compare the experimental data of out-of-plane displacements with a theoretical 2D solution and we propose a 3D formulation. The 2D solution characterizes out-of-plane displacements in plane stress. The proposed 3D expression is based on works of the literature relating to the presence of the 3D effects for stationary cracks. In our case, during crack propagation, the 3D effects are always present, but it is also necessary to take into account of the transient effects. The presence of 3D and transient effects results in a progressive gap between the 2D solution and the 3D formulation when we approach the crack tip. So, by a study of the detachment between the both expressions, we can determine the area of the 3D and transient effects zone according to the crack propagation velocity. Results are shown for one static test and two dynamic tests. The analysis of the results shows that the detachment zone of the two expressions is large and proportional to the crack propagation velocity. To cite this article: S. Hedan et al., C. R. Mecanique 335 (2007).

  18. Origin of chaos in 3-d Bohmian trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzemos, Athanasios C.; Contopoulos, George; Efthymiopoulos, Christos

    2016-11-01

    We study the 3-d Bohmian trajectories of a quantum system of three harmonic oscillators. We focus on the mechanism responsible for the generation of chaotic trajectories. We demonstrate the existence of a 3-d analogue of the mechanism found in earlier studies of 2-d systems [1,2], based on moving 2-d 'nodal point-X-point complexes'. In the 3-d case, we observe a foliation of nodal point-X-point complexes, forming a '3-d structure of nodal and X-points'. Chaos is generated when the Bohmian trajectories are scattered at one or more close encounters with such a structure.

  19. Auto convergence for stereoscopic 3D cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Buyue; Kothandaraman, Sreenivas; Batur, Aziz Umit

    2012-03-01

    Viewing comfort is an important concern for 3-D capable consumer electronics such as 3-D cameras and TVs. Consumer generated content is typically viewed at a close distance which makes the vergence-accommodation conflict particularly pronounced, causing discomfort and eye fatigue. In this paper, we present a Stereo Auto Convergence (SAC) algorithm for consumer 3-D cameras that reduces the vergence-accommodation conflict on the 3-D display by adjusting the depth of the scene automatically. Our algorithm processes stereo video in realtime and shifts each stereo frame horizontally by an appropriate amount to converge on the chosen object in that frame. The algorithm starts by estimating disparities between the left and right image pairs using correlations of the vertical projections of the image data. The estimated disparities are then analyzed by the algorithm to select a point of convergence. The current and target disparities of the chosen convergence point determines how much horizontal shift is needed. A disparity safety check is then performed to determine whether or not the maximum and minimum disparity limits would be exceeded after auto convergence. If the limits would be exceeded, further adjustments are made to satisfy the safety limits. Finally, desired convergence is achieved by shifting the left and the right frames accordingly. Our algorithm runs real-time at 30 fps on a TI OMAP4 processor. It is tested using an OMAP4 embedded prototype stereo 3-D camera. It significantly improves 3-D viewing comfort.

  20. Balloon Exoplanet Nulling Interferometer (BENI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Ford, Holland; Petro, Larry; Herman, Jay; Rinehart, Stephen; Carpenter, Kenneth; Marzouk, Joe

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of using a balloon-borne nulling interferometer to detect and characterize exosolar planets and debris disks. The existing instrument consists of a 3-telescope Fizeau imaging interferometer with 3 fast steering mirrors and 3 delay lines operating at 800 Hz for closed-loop control of wavefront errors and fine pointing. A compact visible nulling interferometer is under development which when coupled to the imaging interferometer would in-principle allow deep suppression of starlight. We have conducted atmospheric simulations of the environment above 100,000 feet and believe balloons are a feasible path forward towards detection and characterization of a limited set of exoplanets and their debris disks. Herein we will discuss the BENI instrument, the balloon environment and the feasibility of such as mission.

  1. Balloon exoplanet nulling interferometer (BENI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Ford, Holland; Petro, Larry; Herman, Jay; Rinehart, Stephen; Carpenter, Kenneth; Marzouk, Joe

    2009-08-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of a balloon-borne nulling interferometer to detect and characterize an exosolar planet and the surrounding debris disk. The existing instrument consists of a three-telescope Fizeau imaging interferometer with thre fast steering mirrors and three delay lines operating at 800 Hz for closed-loop control of wavefront errors and fine pointing. A compact visible nulling interferometer would be coupled to the imaging interferometer and in principle, allows deep starlight suppression. Atmospheric simulations of the environment above 100,000 feet show that balloonborne payloads are a possible path towards the direct detection and characterization of a limited set of exoplanets and debris disks. Furthermore, rapid development of lower cost balloon payloads provide a path towards advancement of NASA technology readiness levels for future space-based exoplanet missions. Discussed are the BENI mission and instrument, the balloon environment and the feasibility of such a balloon-borne mission.

  2. Massively parallel implementation of 3D-RISM calculation with volumetric 3D-FFT.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yutaka; Yoshida, Norio; Tadano, Hiroto; Takahashi, Daisuke; Sato, Mitsuhisa; Hirata, Fumio

    2014-07-05

    A new three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) program for massively parallel machines combined with the volumetric 3D fast Fourier transform (3D-FFT) was developed, and tested on the RIKEN K supercomputer. The ordinary parallel 3D-RISM program has a limitation on the number of parallelizations because of the limitations of the slab-type 3D-FFT. The volumetric 3D-FFT relieves this limitation drastically. We tested the 3D-RISM calculation on the large and fine calculation cell (2048(3) grid points) on 16,384 nodes, each having eight CPU cores. The new 3D-RISM program achieved excellent scalability to the parallelization, running on the RIKEN K supercomputer. As a benchmark application, we employed the program, combined with molecular dynamics simulation, to analyze the oligomerization process of chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2 mutant. The results demonstrate that the massive parallel 3D-RISM program is effective to analyze the hydration properties of the large biomolecular systems.

  3. Interior Reconstruction Using the 3d Hough Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, R.-C.; Borrmann, D.; Nüchter, A.

    2013-02-01

    Laser scanners are often used to create accurate 3D models of buildings for civil engineering purposes, but the process of manually vectorizing a 3D point cloud is time consuming and error-prone (Adan and Huber, 2011). Therefore, the need to characterize and quantify complex environments in an automatic fashion arises, posing challenges for data analysis. This paper presents a system for 3D modeling by detecting planes in 3D point clouds, based on which the scene is reconstructed at a high architectural level through removing automatically clutter and foreground data. The implemented software detects openings, such as windows and doors and completes the 3D model by inpainting.

  4. A vacuum spacetime with closed null geodesics

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Debojit Patgiri, Mahadev Ahmed, Faiz Uddin

    2013-02-15

    Here we present a vacuum spacetime with closed null geodesics (CNGs). These CNGs are obtained by analytically solving the geodesic equations. This spacetime is locally isometric to the plane wave spacetime and has very different global properties from metrics of the latter type. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Closed null geodesics are found in a vacuum spacetime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These are obtained by analytically solving the geodesic equations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nature of the spacetime is fully analysed.

  5. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  6. Spherical 3D isotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in spherical coordinates is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. Aims: The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the SFB decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. Methods: We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. (2006). We also present a new fast discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and find we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. Results: We have described a new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, ideally suited to analyse and denoise future 3D spherical cosmological surveys, which uses a novel DSFBT. We illustrate its potential use for denoising using a toy model. All the algorithms presented in this paper are available for download as a public code called MRS3D at http://jstarck.free.fr/mrs3d.html

  7. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  8. 3-D Scene Reconstruction from Aerial Imagery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    or CloudCompare to view results [8, 4]. D.2 PMVS2/CMVS This effort used a version of PMVS2/CMVS specifically modified for the Microsoft Window’s...Calibration Homepage. Available at http : //www.vision.caltech.edu/bouguetj/calib doc/. [4] “ CloudCompare , 3D point cloudl and mesh processing

  9. Spatioangular Prefiltering for Multiview 3D Displays.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, Vikas; Hirakawa, Keigo; Zwicker, Matthias; Nguyen, Truong

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze the reproduction of light fields on multiview 3D displays. A three-way interaction between the input light field signal (which is often aliased), the joint spatioangular sampling grids of multiview 3D displays, and the interview light leakage in modern multiview 3D displays is characterized in the joint spatioangular frequency domain. Reconstruction of light fields by all physical 3D displays is prone to light leakage, which means that the reconstruction low-pass filter implemented by the display is too broad in the angular domain. As a result, 3D displays excessively attenuate angular frequencies. Our analysis shows that this reduces sharpness of the images shown in the 3D displays. In this paper, stereoscopic image recovery is recast as a problem of joint spatioangular signal reconstruction. The combination of the 3D display point spread function and human visual system provides the narrow-band low-pass filter which removes spectral replicas in the reconstructed light field on the multiview display. The nonideality of this filter is corrected with the proposed prefiltering. The proposed light field reconstruction method performs light field antialiasing as well as angular sharpening to compensate for the nonideal response of the 3D display. The union of cosets approach which has been used earlier by others is employed here to model the nonrectangular spatioangular sampling grids on a multiview display in a generic fashion. We confirm the effectiveness of our approach in simulation and in physical hardware, and demonstrate improvement over existing techniques.

  10. Effect of viewing distance on 3D fatigue caused by viewing mobile 3D content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Sungchul; Lee, Dong-Su; Park, Min-Chul; Yano, Sumio

    2013-05-01

    With an advent of autostereoscopic display technique and increased needs for smart phones, there has been a significant growth in mobile TV markets. The rapid growth in technical, economical, and social aspects has encouraged 3D TV manufacturers to apply 3D rendering technology to mobile devices so that people have more opportunities to come into contact with many 3D content anytime and anywhere. Even if the mobile 3D technology leads to the current market growth, there is an important thing to consider for consistent development and growth in the display market. To put it briefly, human factors linked to mobile 3D viewing should be taken into consideration before developing mobile 3D technology. Many studies have investigated whether mobile 3D viewing causes undesirable biomedical effects such as motion sickness and visual fatigue, but few have examined main factors adversely affecting human health. Viewing distance is considered one of the main factors to establish optimized viewing environments from a viewer's point of view. Thus, in an effort to determine human-friendly viewing environments, this study aims to investigate the effect of viewing distance on human visual system when exposing to mobile 3D environments. Recording and analyzing brainwaves before and after watching mobile 3D content, we explore how viewing distance affects viewing experience from physiological and psychological perspectives. Results obtained in this study are expected to provide viewing guidelines for viewers, help ensure viewers against undesirable 3D effects, and lead to make gradual progress towards a human-friendly mobile 3D viewing.

  11. RELAP5-3D Restart and Backup Verification Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. George L Mesina

    2013-09-01

    Existing testing methodology for RELAP5-3D employs a set of test cases collected over two decades to test a variety of code features and run on a Linux or Windows platform. However, this set has numerous deficiencies in terms of code coverage, detail of comparison, running time, and testing fidelity of RELAP5-3D restart and backup capabilities. The test suite covers less than three quarters of the lines of code in the relap directory and just over half those in the environmental library. Even in terms of code features, many are not covered. Moreover, the test set runs many problems long past the point necessary to test the relevant features. It requires standard problems to run to completion. This is unnecessary for features can be tested in a short-running problem. For example, many trips and controls can be tested in the first few time steps, as can a number of fluid flow options. The testing system is also inaccurate. For the past decade, the diffem script has been the primary tool for checking that printouts from two different RELAP5-3D executables agree. This tool compares two output files to verify that all characters are the same except for those relating to date, time and a few other excluded items. The variable values printed on the output file are accurate to no more than eight decimal places. Therefore, calculations with errors in decimal places beyond those printed remain undetected. Finally, fidelity of restart is not tested except in the PVM sub-suite and backup is not specifically tested at all. When a restart is made from any midway point of the base-case transient, the restart must produce the same values. When a backup condition occurs, the code repeats advancements with the same time step. A perfect backup can be tested by forcing RELAP5 to perform a backup by falsely setting a backup condition flag at a user-specified-time. Comparison of the calculations of that run and those produced by the same input w/o the spurious condition should be

  12. CASTLE3D - A Computer Aided System for Labelling Archaeological Excavations in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houshiar, H.; Borrmann, D.; Elseberg, J.; Nüchter, A.; Näth, F.; Winkler, S.

    2015-08-01

    Documentation of archaeological excavation sites with conventional methods and tools such as hand drawings, measuring tape and archaeological notes is time consuming. This process is prone to human errors and the quality of the documentation depends on the qualification of the archaeologist on site. Use of modern technology and methods in 3D surveying and 3D robotics facilitate and improve this process. Computer-aided systems and databases improve the documentation quality and increase the speed of data acquisition. 3D laser scanning is the state of the art in modelling archaeological excavation sites, historical sites and even entire cities or landscapes. Modern laser scanners are capable of data acquisition of up to 1 million points per second. This provides a very detailed 3D point cloud of the environment. 3D point clouds and 3D models of an excavation site provide a better representation of the environment for the archaeologist and for documentation. The point cloud can be used both for further studies on the excavation and for the presentation of results. This paper introduces a Computer aided system for labelling archaeological excavations in 3D (CASTLE3D). Consisting of a set of tools for recording and georeferencing the 3D data from an excavation site, CASTLE3D is a novel documentation approach in industrial archaeology. It provides a 2D and 3D visualisation of the data and an easy-to-use interface that enables the archaeologist to select regions of interest and to interact with the data in both representations. The 2D visualisation and a 3D orthogonal view of the data provide cuts of the environment that resemble the traditional hand drawings. The 3D perspective view gives a realistic view of the environment. CASTLE3D is designed as an easy-to-use on-site semantic mapping tool for archaeologists. Each project contains a predefined set of semantic information that can be used to label findings in the data. Multiple regions of interest can be joined under

  13. All supersymmetric solutions of 3D U(1)3 gauged supergravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgáin, Eoin Ó.

    2015-11-01

    D3-branes wrapping constant curvature Riemann surfaces give rise to 2D N=(0,2) SCFTs, where the superconformal fixed-points are mapped to vacua of 3D N=2 U(1)3 gauged supergravity. In this work we determine the fermionic supersymmetry variations of the theory and present all supersymmetric solutions. For spacetimes with a timelike Killing vector, we identify new timelike warped AdS3 (Gödel) and timelike warped dS3 fixed-points. We outline the construction of numerical solutions interpolating between fixed-points, demonstrate that these flows are driven by an irrelevant scalar operator in the SCFT and identify the inverse of the superpotential as a candidate c-function. We further classify all spacetimes with a null Killing vector, in the process producing loci in parameter space where null-warped AdS3 vacua with Schrödinger z = 2 symmetry exist. We construct non-supersymmetric spacelike warped AdS3 geometries based on D3-branes.

  14. Design of 3d Topological Data Structure for 3d Cadastre Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkifli, N. A.; Rahman, A. Abdul; Hassan, M. I.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the design of 3D modelling and topological data structure for cadastre objects based on Land Administration Domain Model (LADM) specifications. Tetrahedral Network (TEN) is selected as a 3D topological data structure for this project. Data modelling is based on the LADM standard and it is used five classes (i.e. point, boundary face string, boundary face, tetrahedron and spatial unit). This research aims to enhance the current cadastral system by incorporating 3D topology model based on LADM standard.

  15. Perception of 3D spatial relations for 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Paul; Pizlo, Zygmunt; Hoffmann, Christoph; Popescu, Voicu S.

    2004-05-01

    We test perception of 3D spatial relations in 3D images rendered by a 3D display (Perspecta from Actuality Systems) and compare it to that of a high-resolution flat panel display. 3D images provide the observer with such depth cues as motion parallax and binocular disparity. Our 3D display is a device that renders a 3D image by displaying, in rapid succession, radial slices through the scene on a rotating screen. The image is contained in a glass globe and can be viewed from virtually any direction. In the psychophysical experiment several families of 3D objects are used as stimuli: primitive shapes (cylinders and cuboids), and complex objects (multi-story buildings, cars, and pieces of furniture). Each object has at least one plane of symmetry. On each trial an object or its "distorted" version is shown at an arbitrary orientation. The distortion is produced by stretching an object in a random direction by 40%. This distortion must eliminate the symmetry of an object. The subject's task is to decide whether or not the presented object is distorted under several viewing conditions (monocular/binocular, with/without motion parallax, and near/far). The subject's performance is measured by the discriminability d', which is a conventional dependent variable in signal detection experiments.

  16. 3D printed diffractive terahertz lenses.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Walter D; Ferrando, Vicente; Monsoriu, Juan A; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Czerwińska, Elżbieta; Szustakowski, Mieczysław

    2016-04-15

    A 3D printer was used to realize custom-made diffractive THz lenses. After testing several materials, phase binary lenses with periodic and aperiodic radial profiles were designed and constructed in polyamide material to work at 0.625 THz. The nonconventional focusing properties of such lenses were assessed by computing and measuring their axial point spread function (PSF). Our results demonstrate that inexpensive 3D printed THz diffractive lenses can be reliably used in focusing and imaging THz systems. Diffractive THz lenses with unprecedented features, such as extended depth of focus or bifocalization, have been demonstrated.

  17. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  18. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  19. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  20. 3D Buckligami: Digital Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hecke, Martin; de Reus, Koen; Florijn, Bastiaan; Coulais, Corentin

    2014-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit collective buckling in 3D, and create these by a 3D printing/moulding technique. Our structures consist of cubic lattice of anisotropic unit cells, and we show that their mechanical properties are programmable via the orientation of these unit cells.

  1. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  2. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  3. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  4. 3D vision system assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Edmondson, Richard; Vaden, Justin; Hyatt, Bryan; Chenault, David B.; Kingston, David; Geulen, Vanilynmae; Newell, Scott; Pettijohn, Brad

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of a 3D vision system consisting of a flat panel stereoscopic display and auto-converging stereo camera and an assessment of the system's use for robotic driving, manipulation, and surveillance operations. The 3D vision system was integrated onto a Talon Robot and Operator Control Unit (OCU) such that direct comparisons of the performance of a number of test subjects using 2D and 3D vision systems were possible. A number of representative scenarios were developed to determine which tasks benefited most from the added depth perception and to understand when the 3D vision system hindered understanding of the scene. Two tests were conducted at Fort Leonard Wood, MO with noncommissioned officers ranked Staff Sergeant and Sergeant First Class. The scenarios; the test planning, approach and protocols; the data analysis; and the resulting performance assessment of the 3D vision system are reported.

  5. Tracking earthquake source evolution in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennett, B. L. N.; Gorbatov, A.; Spiliopoulos, S.

    2014-08-01

    Starting from the hypocentre, the point of initiation of seismic energy, we seek to estimate the subsequent trajectory of the points of emission of high-frequency energy in 3-D, which we term the `evocentres'. We track these evocentres as a function of time by energy stacking for putative points on a 3-D grid around the hypocentre that is expanded as time progresses, selecting the location of maximum energy release as a function of time. The spatial resolution in the neighbourhood of a target point can be simply estimated by spatial mapping using the properties of isochrons from the stations. The mapping of a seismogram segment to space is by inverse slowness, and thus more distant stations have a broader spatial contribution. As in hypocentral estimation, the inclusion of a wide azimuthal distribution of stations significantly enhances 3-D capability. We illustrate this approach to tracking source evolution in 3-D by considering two major earthquakes, the 2007 Mw 8.1 Solomons islands event that ruptured across a plate boundary and the 2013 Mw 8.3 event 610 km beneath the Sea of Okhotsk. In each case we are able to provide estimates of the evolution of high-frequency energy that tally well with alternative schemes, but also to provide information on the 3-D characteristics that is not available from backprojection from distant networks. We are able to demonstrate that the major characteristics of event rupture can be captured using just a few azimuthally distributed stations, which opens the opportunity for the approach to be used in a rapid mode immediately after a major event to provide guidance for, for example tsunami warning for megathrust events.

  6. Methods for comparing 3D surface attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Alex; Freeman, Adam

    1996-03-01

    A common task in data analysis is to compare two or more sets of data, statistics, presentations, etc. A predominant method in use is side-by-side visual comparison of images. While straightforward, it burdens the user with the task of discerning the differences between the two images. The user if further taxed when the images are of 3D scenes. This paper presents several methods for analyzing the extent, magnitude, and manner in which surfaces in 3D differ in their attributes. The surface geometry are assumed to be identical and only the surface attributes (color, texture, etc.) are variable. As a case in point, we examine the differences obtained when a 3D scene is rendered progressively using radiosity with different form factor calculation methods. The comparison methods include extensions of simple methods such as mapping difference information to color or transparency, and more recent methods including the use of surface texture, perturbation, and adaptive placements of error glyphs.

  7. A Hybrid 3D Indoor Space Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Ali; Rahman, Alias Abdul; Boguslawski, Pawel

    2016-10-01

    GIS integrates spatial information and spatial analysis. An important example of such integration is for emergency response which requires route planning inside and outside of a building. Route planning requires detailed information related to indoor and outdoor environment. Indoor navigation network models including Geometric Network Model (GNM), Navigable Space Model, sub-division model and regular-grid model lack indoor data sources and abstraction methods. In this paper, a hybrid indoor space model is proposed. In the proposed method, 3D modeling of indoor navigation network is based on surveying control points and it is less dependent on the 3D geometrical building model. This research proposes a method of indoor space modeling for the buildings which do not have proper 2D/3D geometrical models or they lack semantic or topological information. The proposed hybrid model consists of topological, geometrical and semantical space.

  8. Robin Laurance nulling interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Anders; Mennesson, Bertrand P.

    2000-07-01

    In the DARWIN study, the European Space Agency has for several years investigated the possibilities for a mission, dedicated to direct detection of earth-like life on extra- solar planets. The detection technique is based on nulling interferometry, i.e. suppression of the on-axis star, such that only light from orbiting planet(s) remains. The concept of Generalized Angel's Cross (GAC) is introduced. A GAC is a nulling interferometer made up of four telescopes, all at equal distance from the interferometer's center and flown in one plane perpendicular to the common optical axis.

  9. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  10. Bioprinting of 3D hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Stanton, M M; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2015-08-07

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has recently emerged as an extension of 3D material printing, by using biocompatible or cellular components to build structures in an additive, layer-by-layer methodology for encapsulation and culture of cells. These 3D systems allow for cell culture in a suspension for formation of highly organized tissue or controlled spatial orientation of cell environments. The in vitro 3D cellular environments simulate the complexity of an in vivo environment and natural extracellular matrices (ECM). This paper will focus on bioprinting utilizing hydrogels as 3D scaffolds. Hydrogels are advantageous for cell culture as they are highly permeable to cell culture media, nutrients, and waste products generated during metabolic cell processes. They have the ability to be fabricated in customized shapes with various material properties with dimensions at the micron scale. 3D hydrogels are a reliable method for biocompatible 3D printing and have applications in tissue engineering, drug screening, and organ on a chip models.

  11. 3D Scan Systems Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 5 Feb 98 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 3D Scan Systems Integration REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED...2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-1 298-102 [ EDO QUALITY W3PECTEDI DLA-ARN Final Report for US Defense Logistics Agency on DDFG-T2/P3: 3D...SCAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION Contract Number SPO100-95-D-1014 Contractor Ohio University Delivery Order # 0001 Delivery Order Title 3D Scan Systems

  12. 3D-GNOME: an integrated web service for structural modeling of the 3D genome.

    PubMed

    Szalaj, Przemyslaw; Michalski, Paul J; Wróblewski, Przemysław; Tang, Zhonghui; Kadlof, Michal; Mazzocco, Giovanni; Ruan, Yijun; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-07-08

    Recent advances in high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology, such as Hi-C and ChIA-PET, have demonstrated the importance of 3D genome organization in development, cell differentiation and transcriptional regulation. There is now a widespread need for computational tools to generate and analyze 3D structural models from 3C data. Here we introduce our 3D GeNOme Modeling Engine (3D-GNOME), a web service which generates 3D structures from 3C data and provides tools to visually inspect and annotate the resulting structures, in addition to a variety of statistical plots and heatmaps which characterize the selected genomic region. Users submit a bedpe (paired-end BED format) file containing the locations and strengths of long range contact points, and 3D-GNOME simulates the structure and provides a convenient user interface for further analysis. Alternatively, a user may generate structures using published ChIA-PET data for the GM12878 cell line by simply specifying a genomic region of interest. 3D-GNOME is freely available at http://3dgnome.cent.uw.edu.pl/. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Superplot3d: an open source GUI tool for 3d trajectory visualisation and elementary processing.

    PubMed

    Whitehorn, Luke J; Hawkes, Frances M; Dublon, Ian An

    2013-09-30

    When acquiring simple three-dimensional (3d) trajectory data it is common to accumulate large coordinate data sets. In order to examine integrity and consistency of object tracking, it is often necessary to rapidly visualise these data. Ordinarily, to achieve this the user must either execute 3d plotting functions in a numerical computing environment or manually inspect data in two dimensions, plotting each individual axis.Superplot3d is an open source MATLAB script which takes tab delineated Cartesian data points in the form x, y, z and time and generates an instant visualization of the object's trajectory in free-rotational three dimensions. Whole trajectories may be instantly presented, allowing for rapid inspection. Executable from the MATLAB command line (or deployable as a compiled standalone application) superplot3d also provides simple GUI controls to obtain rudimentary trajectory information, allow specific visualization of trajectory sections and perform elementary processing.Superplot3d thus provides a framework for non-programmers and programmers alike, to recreate recently acquired 3d object trajectories in rotatable 3d space. It is intended, via the use of a preference driven menu to be flexible and work with output from multiple tracking software systems. Source code and accompanying GUIDE .fig files are provided for deployment and further development.

  14. 3D-GNOME: an integrated web service for structural modeling of the 3D genome

    PubMed Central

    Szalaj, Przemyslaw; Michalski, Paul J.; Wróblewski, Przemysław; Tang, Zhonghui; Kadlof, Michal; Mazzocco, Giovanni; Ruan, Yijun; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology, such as Hi-C and ChIA-PET, have demonstrated the importance of 3D genome organization in development, cell differentiation and transcriptional regulation. There is now a widespread need for computational tools to generate and analyze 3D structural models from 3C data. Here we introduce our 3D GeNOme Modeling Engine (3D-GNOME), a web service which generates 3D structures from 3C data and provides tools to visually inspect and annotate the resulting structures, in addition to a variety of statistical plots and heatmaps which characterize the selected genomic region. Users submit a bedpe (paired-end BED format) file containing the locations and strengths of long range contact points, and 3D-GNOME simulates the structure and provides a convenient user interface for further analysis. Alternatively, a user may generate structures using published ChIA-PET data for the GM12878 cell line by simply specifying a genomic region of interest. 3D-GNOME is freely available at http://3dgnome.cent.uw.edu.pl/. PMID:27185892

  15. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  16. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  17. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  18. PLOT3D/AMES, DEC VAX VMS VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  19. Aspects of 3D shape reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiller, Peter F.; Arnold, Gregory; Ferrara, Matthew

    2009-02-01

    The ability to reconstruct the three dimensional (3D) shape of an object from multiple images of that object is an important step in certain computer vision and object recognition tasks. The images in question can range from 2D optical images to 1D radar range profiles. In each case, the goal is to use the information (primarily invariant geometric information) contained in several images to reconstruct the 3D data. In this paper we apply a blend of geometric, computational, and statistical techniques to reconstruct the 3D geometry, specifically the shape, from multiple images of an object. Specifically, we deal with a collection of feature points that have been tracked from image (or range profile) to image (or range profile) and we reconstruct the 3D point cloud up to certain transformations-affine transformations in the case of our optical sensor and rigid motions (translations and rotations) in the radar case. Our paper discusses the theory behind the method, outlines the computational algorithm, and illustrates the reconstruction for some simple examples.

  20. ASI/MET - 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-13

    The Atmospheric Structure Instrument/Meteorology Package ASI/MET is the mast and windsocks at the center of this stereo image from NASA Mars Pathfinder. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

  1. 3D Models of Immunotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    This collaborative grant is developing 3D models of both mouse and human biology to investigate aspects of therapeutic vaccination in order to answer key questions relevant to human cancer immunotherapy.

  2. 3D polymer scaffold arrays.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl G; Yang, Yanyin; Dorsey, Shauna M; Ramalingam, Murugan; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a combinatorial platform for fabricating tissue scaffold arrays that can be used for screening cell-material interactions. Traditional research involves preparing samples one at a time for characterization and testing. Combinatorial and high-throughput (CHT) methods lower the cost of research by reducing the amount of time and material required for experiments by combining many samples into miniaturized specimens. In order to help accelerate biomaterials research, many new CHT methods have been developed for screening cell-material interactions where materials are presented to cells as a 2D film or surface. However, biomaterials are frequently used to fabricate 3D scaffolds, cells exist in vivo in a 3D environment and cells cultured in a 3D environment in vitro typically behave more physiologically than those cultured on a 2D surface. Thus, we have developed a platform for fabricating tissue scaffold libraries where biomaterials can be presented to cells in a 3D format.

  3. Accepting the T3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

    1994-10-01

    In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

  4. [Tridimensional (3D) endoscopic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Varas Lorenzo, M J; Muñoz Agel, F; Abad Belando, R

    2007-01-01

    A review and update on 3D endoscopic ultrasonography is included regarding all of this technique s aspects, technical details, and current indications. Images from our own clinical experience are presented.

  5. Heterodyne 3D ghost imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Chenghua; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three dimensional (3D) ghost imaging measures range of target based on pulse fight time measurement method. Due to the limit of data acquisition system sampling rate, range resolution of the conventional 3D ghost imaging is usually low. In order to take off the effect of sampling rate to range resolution of 3D ghost imaging, a heterodyne 3D ghost imaging (HGI) system is presented in this study. The source of HGI is a continuous wave laser instead of pulse laser. Temporal correlation and spatial correlation of light are both utilized to obtain the range image of target. Through theory analysis and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that HGI can obtain high range resolution image with low sampling rate.

  6. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  7. GestAction3D: A Platform for Studying Displacements and Deformations of 3D Objects Using Hands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingrand, Diane; Renevier, Philippe; Pinna-Déry, Anne-Marie; Cremaschi, Xavier; Lion, Stevens; Rouel, Jean-Guilhem; Jeanne, David; Cuisinaud, Philippe; Soula*, Julien

    We present a low-cost hand-based device coupled with a 3D motion recovery engine and 3D visualization. This platform aims at studying ergonomic 3D interactions in order to manipulate and deform 3D models by interacting with hands on 3D meshes. Deformations are done using different modes of interaction that we will detail in the paper. Finger extremities are attached to vertices, edges or facets. Switching from one mode to another or changing the point of view is done using gestures. The determination of the more adequate gestures is part of the work

  8. Laboratory Study of Magnetic Reconnection in 3D Geometry Relevant to Magnetopause and Magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Y.; Lu, Q.; Ji, H.; Mao, A.; Wang, X.; E, P.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, Q.; Ding, W.; Zheng, J.

    2015-12-01

    Laboratory Study of Magnetic Reconnection in 3D Geometry Relevant to Magnetopause and Magnetotail Y. Ren1,2, Quaming Lu3, Hantao Ji1,2, Aohua Mao1, Xiaogang Wang1, Peng E1, Zhibin Wang1, Qingmei Xiao1, Weixing Ding4, Jinxing Zheng51 Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China2 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 3University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China 4University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 90095 5ASIPP, Hefei, China A new magnetic reconnection experiment, Harbin reconnection eXperiment (HRX), is currently being designed as a key part of Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF) at Harbin Institute of Technology in Harbin, China. HRX aims to provide a unique experimental platform for studying reconnections in 3D geometry relevant to magnetopause and magnetotail to address: the role of electron and ion-scale dynamics in the current sheet; particle and energy transfer from magnetosheath to magnetosphere; particle energization/heating mechanisms during magnetic reconnection; 3D effects in fast reconnection, e.g. the role of 3D magnetic null point. HRX employs a unique set of coils to generate the required 3D magnetic geometry and provides a wide range of plasma parameters. Here, important motivating scientific problems are reviewed and the physics design of HRX is presented, including plasma parameters determined from Vlasov scaling law, reconnection scenarios explored using vacuum magnetic field calculations and numerical simulations of HRX using hybrid and MHD codes. Plasma diagnostics plan and engineering design of important coils will also be briefly presented.

  9. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  10. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  11. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  12. PLOT3D/AMES, GENERIC UNIX VERSION USING DISSPLA (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  13. A 2D driven 3D vessel segmentation algorithm for 3D digital subtraction angiography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegel, M.; Redel, T.; Struffert, T.; Hornegger, J.; Doerfler, A.

    2011-10-01

    Cerebrovascular disease is among the leading causes of death in western industrial nations. 3D rotational angiography delivers indispensable information on vessel morphology and pathology. Physicians make use of this to analyze vessel geometry in detail, i.e. vessel diameters, location and size of aneurysms, to come up with a clinical decision. 3D segmentation is a crucial step in this pipeline. Although a lot of different methods are available nowadays, all of them lack a method to validate the results for the individual patient. Therefore, we propose a novel 2D digital subtraction angiography (DSA)-driven 3D vessel segmentation and validation framework. 2D DSA projections are clinically considered as gold standard when it comes to measurements of vessel diameter or the neck size of aneurysms. An ellipsoid vessel model is applied to deliver the initial 3D segmentation. To assess the accuracy of the 3D vessel segmentation, its forward projections are iteratively overlaid with the corresponding 2D DSA projections. Local vessel discrepancies are modeled by a global 2D/3D optimization function to adjust the 3D vessel segmentation toward the 2D vessel contours. Our framework has been evaluated on phantom data as well as on ten patient datasets. Three 2D DSA projections from varying viewing angles have been used for each dataset. The novel 2D driven 3D vessel segmentation approach shows superior results against state-of-the-art segmentations like region growing, i.e. an improvement of 7.2% points in precision and 5.8% points for the Dice coefficient. This method opens up future clinical applications requiring the greatest vessel accuracy, e.g. computational fluid dynamic modeling.

  14. MAP3D: a media processor approach for high-end 3D graphics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darsa, Lucia; Stadnicki, Steven; Basoglu, Chris

    1999-12-01

    Equator Technologies, Inc. has used a software-first approach to produce several programmable and advanced VLIW processor architectures that have the flexibility to run both traditional systems tasks and an array of media-rich applications. For example, Equator's MAP1000A is the world's fastest single-chip programmable signal and image processor targeted for digital consumer and office automation markets. The Equator MAP3D is a proposal for the architecture of the next generation of the Equator MAP family. The MAP3D is designed to achieve high-end 3D performance and a variety of customizable special effects by combining special graphics features with high performance floating-point and media processor architecture. As a programmable media processor, it offers the advantages of a completely configurable 3D pipeline--allowing developers to experiment with different algorithms and to tailor their pipeline to achieve the highest performance for a particular application. With the support of Equator's advanced C compiler and toolkit, MAP3D programs can be written in a high-level language. This allows the compiler to successfully find and exploit any parallelism in a programmer's code, thus decreasing the time to market of a given applications. The ability to run an operating system makes it possible to run concurrent applications in the MAP3D chip, such as video decoding while ex