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Sample records for 3d photonic crystal

  1. 3D holographic polymer photonic crystal for superprism application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiaqi; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Xiaonan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Sasa; Chen, Ray T.

    2007-02-01

    Photonic crystal based superprism offers a new way to design new optical components for beam steering and DWDM application. 3D photonic crystals are especially attractive as they could offer more control of the light beam based on the needs. A polygonal prism based holographic fabrication method has been demonstrated for a three-dimensional face-centered-cubic (FCC)-type submicron polymer photonic crystal using SU8 as the photo-sensitive material. Therefore antivibration equipment and complicated optical alignment system are not needed and the requirement for the coherence of the laser source is relaxed compared with the traditional holographic setup. By changing the top-cut prism structure, the polarization of the laser beam, the exposure and development conditions we can achieve different kinds of triclinic or orthorhombic photonic crystals on demand. Special fabrication treatments have been introduced to ensure the survivability of the fabricated large area (cm2) nano-structures. Scanning electron microscopy and diffraction results proved the good uniformity of the fabricated structures. With the proper design of the refraction prism we have achieved a partial bandgap for S+C band (1460-1565nm) in the [111] direction. The transmission and reflection spectra obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are in good agreement with simulated band structure. The superprism effects around 1550nm wavelength for the fabricated 3D polymer photonic crystal have been theoretically calculated and such effects can be used for beam steering purpose.

  2. Large Area Printing of 3D Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, James J.; Beaulieu, Michael R.; Hendricks, Nicholas R.; Kothari, Rohit

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a readily scalable print, lift, and stack approach for producing large area, 3D photonic crystal (PC) structures. UV-assisted nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) was used to pattern grating structures comprised of highly filled nanoparticle polymer composite resists with tune-able refractive indices (RI). The gratings were robust and upon release from a support substrate were oriented and stacked to yield 3D PCs. The RI of the composite resists was tuned between 1.58 and 1.92 at 800 nm while maintaining excellent optical transparency. The grating structure dimensions, line width, depth, and pitch, were easily varied by simply changing the imprint mold. For example, a 6 layer log-pile stack was prepared using a composite resist a RI of 1.72 yielding 72 % reflection at 900 nm. The process is scalable for roll-to-roll (R2R) production. Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing - an NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center.

  3. FEM modeling of 3D photonic crystals and photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Sven; Klose, Roland; Schaedle, Achim; Schmidt, Frank; Zschiedrich, Lin W.

    2005-03-01

    We present a finite-element simulation tool for calculating light fields in 3D nano-optical devices. This allows to solve challenging problems on a standard personal computer. We present solutions to eigenvalue problems, like Bloch-type eigenvalues in photonic crystals and photonic crystal waveguides, and to scattering problems, like the transmission through finite photonic crystals. The discretization is based on unstructured tetrahedral grids with an adaptive grid refinement controlled and steered by an error-estimator. As ansatz functions we use higher order, vectorial elements (Nedelec, edge elements). For a fast convergence of the solution we make use of advanced multi-grid algorithms adapted for the vectorial Maxwell's equations.

  4. 3-D rare earth-doped colloidal photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clara Gonçalves, M.; Fortes, Luis M.; Almeida, Rui M.; Chiasera, Alessandro; Chiappini, Andrea; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2009-07-01

    Three-dimensional photonic bandgap structures have been synthesized by a colloidal/sol-gel route, starting with the self-organization of polystyrene microspheres into opal structures by vertical convective self-assembly, followed by sol-gel infiltration of the interstices with silica or titania doped with Er 3+ and Yb 3+ ions and the removal of the polymeric template by heat treatment. The structural and optical properties of the opals and inverse opals prepared by this method have been studied by scanning electron microscopy and near infra-red spectroscopy. The SEM images show that the photonic crystals contain ordered domains up to ˜600 μm 2. Variable incidence reflectivity spectra have been measured for the opals, infiltrated opals and inverse opals. The corresponding effective refractive indices ( neff) were calculated based on effective-medium approaches. Photoluminescence measurements of the emission of Er 3+ ions at ˜1.5 μm from titania inverse opal structures were performed and are compared with those characteristic of the same ions in bulk titania material in the absence of a photonic bandgap structure.

  5. Template-Directed Directionally Solidified 3D Mesostructured AgCl-KCl Eutectic Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinwoo; Aagesen, Larry K; Choi, Jun Hee; Choi, Jaewon; Kim, Ha Seong; Liu, Jinyun; Cho, Chae-Ryong; Kang, Jin Gu; Ramazani, Ali; Thornton, Katsuyo; Braun, Paul V

    2015-08-19

    3D mesostructured AgCl-KCl photonic crystals emerge from colloidal templating of eutectic solidification. Solvent removal of the KCl phase results in a mesostructured AgCl inverse opal. The 3D-template-induced confinement leads to the emergence of a complex microstructure. The 3D mesostructured eutectic photonic crystals have a large stop band ranging from the near-infrared to the visible tuned by the processing. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Spherical 3D photonic crystal with conducting nanoshell and particle core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamudio-Lara, A.; Sánchez-Mondragón, J.; Escobedo-Alatorre, J.; Pérez-Careta, E.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; Tecpoyotl-Torres, Margarita; Vázquez-Buenos Aires, O.

    2009-06-01

    We discuss a structured 3D Dielectric Photonic Crystal with both a metallic core and a metallic shell. We discuss the role of each one, the stack, the core as well as the cavity formed between the core and the shell. The low frequency metallic core features becomes much more significant as it gets smaller and get diluted by the cavity.

  7. Globular and Optically Transparent Photonic Crystals Based on 3D-opal Matrix and REE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivicheva, S. N.; Kargin, Yu. F.; Gorelik, V. S.

    By repeatedly filling the octahedral and tetrahedral pores of 3D-silica opal matrices with silica sol doped with rare-earth elements with subsequent heat treatment globular photonic crystals filled with mesoporous glass and optically transparent photonic crystals (quantytes) containing 10-30 ppm REE were produced, depending on the annealing temperature. Voids of fcc lattice formed by amorphous spherical globules of SiO2 in globular photonic crystals are filled (up to 70%) by mesoporous glass doped with rare earth elements. Pores in the transparent photonic crystals disappear during sintering of globules of silica and mesoporous glass, but the periodic arrangement of REE-enriched silica areas (quantum dots) is retained. The reflection and luminescence spectra of photonic crystals filled with sols doped with europium Eu3+ and terbium Tb3+ were experimentally studied. A significant increase in the photoluminescence intensity of Eu3+ ions at the approach of the spectral position of the transition 5D0 → 7F2 to the edge of the bandgaps of the photonic crystal was determined. The authors come to the conclusion that a lowering of the threshold for lasing transitions in ions of rare elements is possible.

  8. Bottom-up Fabrication of Multilayer Stacks of 3D Photonic Crystals from Titanium Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Kubrin, Roman; Pasquarelli, Robert M; Waleczek, Martin; Lee, Hooi Sing; Zierold, Robert; do Rosário, Jefferson J; Dyachenko, Pavel N; Montero Moreno, Josep M; Petrov, Alexander Yu; Janssen, Rolf; Eich, Manfred; Nielsch, Kornelius; Schneider, Gerold A

    2016-04-27

    A strategy for stacking multiple ceramic 3D photonic crystals is developed. Periodically structured porous films are produced by vertical convective self-assembly of polystyrene (PS) microspheres. After infiltration of the opaline templates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of titania and thermal decomposition of the polystyrene matrix, a ceramic 3D photonic crystal is formed. Further layers with different sizes of pores are deposited subsequently by repetition of the process. The influence of process parameters on morphology and photonic properties of double and triple stacks is systematically studied. Prolonged contact of amorphous titania films with warm water during self-assembly of the successive templates is found to result in exaggerated roughness of the surfaces re-exposed to ALD. Random scattering on rough internal surfaces disrupts ballistic transport of incident photons into deeper layers of the multistacks. Substantially smoother interfaces are obtained by calcination of the structure after each infiltration, which converts amorphous titania into the crystalline anatase before resuming the ALD infiltration. High quality triple stacks consisting of anatase inverse opals with different pore sizes are demonstrated for the first time. The elaborated fabrication method shows promise for various applications demanding broadband dielectric reflectors or titania photonic crystals with a long mean free path of photons.

  9. Fluorescence Enhancement on Large Area Self-Assembled Plasmonic-3D Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guojian; Wang, Dongzhu; Hong, Wei; Sun, Lu; Zhu, Yongxiang; Chen, Xudong

    2017-03-01

    Discontinuous plasmonic-3D photonic crystal hybrid structures are fabricated in order to evaluate the coupling effect of surface plasmon resonance and the photonic stop band. The nanostructures are prepared by silver sputtering deposition on top of hydrophobic 3D photonic crystals. The localized surface plasmon resonance of the nanostructure has a symbiotic relationship with the 3D photonic stop band, leading to highly tunable characteristics. Fluorescence enhancements of conjugated polymer and quantum dot based on these hybrid structures are studied. The maximum fluorescence enhancement for the conjugated polymer of poly(5-methoxy-2-(3-sulfopropoxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) potassium salt by a factor of 87 is achieved as compared with that on a glass substrate due to the enhanced near-field from the discontinuous plasmonic structures, strong scattering effects from rough metal surface with photonic stop band, and accelerated decay rates from metal-coupled excited state of the fluorophore. It is demonstrated that the enhancement induced by the hybrid structures has a larger effective distance (optimum thickness ≈130 nm) than conventional plasmonic systems. It is expected that this approach has tremendous potential in the field of sensors, fluorescence-imaging, and optoelectronic applications.

  10. Fabrication of 3-D Photonic Band Gap Crystals Via Colloidal Self-Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramaniam, Girija; Blank, Shannon

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of photons in a Photonic Crystals, PCs, is like that of electrons in a semiconductor in that, it prohibits light propagation over a band of frequencies, called Photonic Band Gap, PBG. Photons cannot exist in these band gaps like the forbidden bands of electrons. Thus, PCs lend themselves as potential candidates for devices based on the gap phenomenon. The popular research on PCs stem from their ability to confine light with minimal losses. Large scale 3-D PCs with a PBG in the visible or near infra red region will make optical transistors and sharp bent optical fibers. Efforts are directed to use PCs for information processing and it is not long before we can have optical integrated circuits in the place of electronic ones.

  11. 3D printed low-loss THz waveguide based on Kagome photonic crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zhao, Jiayu; Gong, Cheng; Tian, Haolin; Sun, Lu; Chen, Ping; Lin, Lie; Liu, Weiwei

    2016-10-03

    A low-loss hollow core terahertz waveguide based on Kagome photonic crystal structure has been designed and fabricated by 3D printing. The 3D printed waveguide has been characterized by using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that the obtained waveguide features average power propagation loss of 0.02 cm-1 for 0.2-1.0 THz (the minimum is about 0.002 cm-1 at 0.75 THz). More interesting, it could be simply mechanically spliced without any additional alignment, while maintaining the excellent performance. The 3D printing technique will be a promising solution to fabricate Kagome THz waveguide with well controllable characteristics and low cost.

  12. Fabrication of 3D polymer photonic crystals for near-IR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Peng; Qiu, Liang; Shi, Shouyuan; Schneider, Garrett J.; Prather, Dennis W.; Sharkawy, Ahmed; Kelmelis, Eric

    2008-02-01

    Photonic crystals[1, 2] have stirred enormous research interest and became a growing enterprise in the last 15 years. Generally, PhCs consist of periodic structures that possess periodicity comparable with the wavelength that the PhCs are designed to modulate. If material and periodic pattern are properly selected, PhCs can be applied to many applications based on their unique properties, including photonic band gaps (PBG)[3], self-collimation[4], super prism[5], etc. Strictly speaking, PhCs need to possess periodicity in three dimensions to maximize their advantageous capabilities. However, many current research is based on scaled two-dimensional PhCs, mainly due to the difficulty of fabrication such three-dimensional PhCs. Many approaches have been explored for the fabrication of 3D photonic crystals, including layer-by-layer surface micromachining[6], glancing angle deposition[7], 3D micro-sculpture method[8], self-assembly[9] and lithographical methods[10-12]. Among them, lithographic methods became increasingly accepted due to low costs and precise control over the photonic crystal structure. There are three mostly developed lithographical methods, namely X-ray lithography[10], holographic lithography[11] and two-photon polymerization[12]. Although significant progress has been made in developing these lithography-based technologies, these approaches still suffer from significant disadvantages. X-ray lithography relies on an expensive radiation source. Holographic lithography lacks the flexibility to create engineered defects, and multi-photon polymerization is not suitable for parallel fabrication. In our previous work, we developed a multi-layer photolithography processes[13, 14] that is based on multiple resist application and enhanced absorption upon exposure. Using a negative lift-off resist (LOR) and 254nm DUV source, we have demonstrated fabrication of 3D arbitrary structures with feature size of several microns. However, severe intermixing problem

  13. 3D integration of photonic crystal devices: vertical coupling with a silicon waveguide.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, L; Romeo, P Rojo; Letartre, X; Drouard, E; Viktorovitch, P

    2010-07-19

    Two integrated devices based on the vertical coupling between a photonic crystal microcavity and a silicon (Si) ridge waveguide are presented in this paper. When the resonator is coupled to a single waveguide, light can be spectrally extracted from the waveguide to free space through the far field emission of the resonator. When the resonator is vertically coupled to two waveguides, a vertical add-drop filter can be realized. The dropping efficiency of these devices relies on a careful design of the resonator. In this paper, we use a Fabry-Perot (FP) microcavity composed of two photonic crystal (PhC) slab mirrors. Thanks to the unique dispersion properties of slow Bloch modes (SBM) at the flat extreme of the dispersion curve, it is possible to design a FP cavity exhibiting two quasi-degenerate modes. This specific configuration allows for a coupling efficiency that can theoretically achieve 100%. Using 3D FDTD calculations, we discuss the design of such devices and show that high dropping efficiency can be achieved between the Si waveguides and the PhC microcavity.

  14. Photonic liquid crystal fibers tuning by four electrode system produced with 3D printing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertman, Slawomir; Bednarska, Karolina; Czapla, Aleksandra; Woliński, Tomasz R.

    2015-09-01

    Photonic liquid crystal fiber has been intensively investigated in last few years. It has been proved that guiding properties of such fibers could be tuned with an electric field. In particular efficient tuning could be obtained if multi-electrode system allowing for dynamic change of not only intensity of the electric field, but also its direction. In this work we report a simple to build four electrode system, which is based on a precisely aligned four cylindrical microelectrodes. As an electrodes we use enameled copper wire with diameter adequate to the diameter of the fiber to be tuned. To ensure uniform and parallel alignment of the wires a special micro-profiles has been designed and then produced with filament 3D printer. The possibility of the dynamic change of the electric field direction in such scalable and cost effective electrode assembly has been experimentally confirmed.

  15. Structural Color for Additive Manufacturing: 3D-Printed Photonic Crystals from Block Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Bret M; French, Tracy A; Pearson, Ryan M; McCarthy, Blaine G; Miyake, Garret M

    2017-03-28

    The incorporation of structural color into 3D printed parts is reported, presenting an alternative to the need for pigments or dyes for colored parts produced through additive manufacturing. Thermoplastic build materials composed of dendritic block copolymers were designed, synthesized, and used to additively manufacture plastic parts exhibiting structural color. The reflection properties of the photonic crystals arise from the periodic nanostructure formed through block copolymer self-assembly during polymer processing. The wavelength of reflected light could be tuned across the visible spectrum by synthetically controlling the block copolymer molecular weight and manufacture parts that reflected violet, green, or orange light with the capacity to serve as selective optical filters and light guides.

  16. Polymer based 3D photonic crystals applied on the surface of LEDs and photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudiš, Dušan; Goraus, Matej; Tłaczała, Marek; Gašo, Peter; Kováč, Jaroslav; Dawidowski, Wojciech; Jandura, Daniel; Å ušlik, Ľuboš; Durišová, Jana; Lettrichová, Ivana; Ściana, Beata

    2017-05-01

    Progress in nanotechnologies accelerated the polymer based photonics, where simple and cheap solutions often bring comparable and sometimes also novel interesting results. Good candidates are polymer photoresists and siloxane materials with unique mechanical and optical properties. We present laser lithography as efficient tool for fabrication of different three-dimensional (3D) structures embedded in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes. Presented concept of PDMS based thin membranes with 3D structures works as an effective diffraction element for modification of radiation pattern diagram of light emitting diodes and changes also the angular photoresponse of photodiodes. All these results were demonstrated on two types of 3D structures - spheres arranged in cubic lattice and woodpile structure.

  17. Probing the intrinsic optical Bloch-mode emission from a 3D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Mei-Li; Bur, James A.; Du, Qingguo; John, Sajeev; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2016-10-01

    We report experimental observation of intrinsic Bloch-mode emission from a 3D tungsten photonic crystal at low thermal excitation. After the successful removal of conventional metallic emission (normal emission), it is possible to make an accurate comparison of the Bloch-mode and the normal emission. For all biases, we found that the emission intensity of the Bloch-mode is higher than that of the normal emission. The Bloch-mode emission also exhibits a slower dependence on (\\hslash ω /{k}bT) than that of the normal emission. The observed higher emission intensity and a different T-dependence is attributed to Bloch-mode assisted emission where emitters have been located into a medium having local density of states different than the isotropic case. Furthermore, our finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation shows the presence of localized spots at metal-air boundaries and corners, having intense electric field. The enhanced plasmonic field and local non-equilibrium could induce a strong thermally stimulated emission and may be the cause of our unusual observation.

  18. Compact 3D photonic crystals sensing platform with 45 degree angle polished fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuqing; Chen, Lu; Zhu, Jiali; Ni, Haibin; Xia, Wei; Wang, Ming

    2017-07-01

    Three dimensional photonic crystals are a kind of promising sensing materials in biology and chemistry. A compact structure, consists of planner colloidal crystals and 45 degree angle polished fiber, is proposed as a platform for accurate, fast, reliable three dimensional photonic crystals sensing in practice. This structure show advantages in compact size for integration and it is ease for large scale manufacture. Reflectivity of the 45 degree angle polished surface with and without a layer of Ag film are simulated by FDTD simulation. Refractive index sensing properties as well as mode distribution of this structure consists of both polystyrene opal and silica inverse opal film is investigated, and an experimental demonstration of silica inverse opal film is performed, which shows a sensitivity of 733 nm/RIU. Different kinds of three dimensional photonic crystals can also be applied in this structure for particular purpose.

  19. Fabrication of fully undercut ZnO-based photonic crystal membranes with 3D optical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Sandro Phil; Albert, Maximilian; Meier, Cedrik

    2016-09-01

    For studying nonlinear photonics, a highly controllable emission of photons with specific properties is essential. Two-dimensional photonic crystals (PhCs) have proven to be an excellent candidate for manipulating photon emission due to resonator-based effects. Additionally, zinc oxide (ZnO) has high susceptibility coefficients and therefore shows pronounced nonlinear effects. However, in order to fabricate such a cavity, a fully undercut ZnO membrane is required, which is a challenging problem due to poor selectivity of the known etching chemistry for typical substrates such as sapphire or ZnO. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate and characterize fully undercut photonic crystal membranes based on a thin ZnO film sandwiched between two layers of silicon dioxide (SiO2) on silicon substrates, from the initial growth of the heterostructure throughout the entire fabrication process. This process leads to a fully undercut ZnO-based membrane with adjustable optical confinement in all three dimensions. Finally, photonic resonances within the tailored photonic band gap are achieved due to optimized PhC-design (in-plane) and total internal reflection in the z-direction. The presented approach enables a variety of photon based resonator structures in the UV regime for studying nonlinear effects, including photon-exciton coupling and all-optical switching.

  20. 2D and 3D photonic crystal materials for photocatalysis and electrochemical energy storage and conversion

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Gillian; Armstrong, Eileen; McNulty, David; O’Hanlon, Sally; Geaney, Hugh; O’Dwyer, Colm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This perspective reviews recent advances in inverse opal structures, how they have been developed, studied and applied as catalysts, catalyst support materials, as electrode materials for batteries, water splitting applications, solar-to-fuel conversion and electrochromics, and finally as photonic photocatalysts and photoelectrocatalysts. Throughout, we detail some of the salient optical characteristics that underpin recent results and form the basis for light-matter interactions that span electrochemical energy conversion systems as well as photocatalytic systems. Strategies for using 2D as well as 3D structures, ordered macroporous materials such as inverse opals are summarized and recent work on plasmonic–photonic coupling in metal nanoparticle-infiltrated wide band gap inverse opals for enhanced photoelectrochemistry are provided. PMID:27877904

  1. Experimental studies of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles doped silica matrix 3D magneto-photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Diwan, E.; Royer, F.; Kekesi, R.; Jamon, D.; Blanc-Mignon, M. F.; Neveu, S.; Rousseau, J. J.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present the synthesis and the optical properties of 3D magneto-photonic structures. The elaboration process consists in firstly preparing then infiltrating polystyrene direct opals with a homogeneous solution of sol-gel silica precursors doped by cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, and finally dissolving the polystyrene spheres. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of the prepared samples clearly evidence a periodic arrangement. Using a home-made polarimetric optical bench, the transmittance as a function of the wavelength, the Faraday rotation as a function of the applied magnetic field, and the Faraday ellipticity as a function of the wavelength and as a function of the applied magnetic field were measured. The existence of deep photonic band gaps (PBG), the unambiguous magnetic character of the samples and the qualitative modification of the Faraday ellipticity in the area of the PBG are evidenced.

  2. 2D and 3D photonic crystal materials for photocatalysis and electrochemical energy storage and conversion.

    PubMed

    Collins, Gillian; Armstrong, Eileen; McNulty, David; O'Hanlon, Sally; Geaney, Hugh; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2016-01-01

    This perspective reviews recent advances in inverse opal structures, how they have been developed, studied and applied as catalysts, catalyst support materials, as electrode materials for batteries, water splitting applications, solar-to-fuel conversion and electrochromics, and finally as photonic photocatalysts and photoelectrocatalysts. Throughout, we detail some of the salient optical characteristics that underpin recent results and form the basis for light-matter interactions that span electrochemical energy conversion systems as well as photocatalytic systems. Strategies for using 2D as well as 3D structures, ordered macroporous materials such as inverse opals are summarized and recent work on plasmonic-photonic coupling in metal nanoparticle-infiltrated wide band gap inverse opals for enhanced photoelectrochemistry are provided.

  3. Efficient Design Tool for 2D and 3D NIMS Photonic Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-28

    Nationality    Year of  Birth   China  Singapore  N.A.  1961  Country of Origin/ Birth   Country of Citizenship  Singapore  Permanent  Resident? (Yes/No... lithography   and  reactive  ion  etching processes. The photonic  crystal patterns were written by  the  electron beam writing, followed by a lift‐off

  4. Quantum dot based 3D photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakellari, Ioanna; Kabouraki, Elmina; Gray, David; Vamvakaki, Maria; Farsari, Maria

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we present our most recent results on the fabrication of 3D high-resolution woodpile photonic crystals containing an organic-inorganic silicon-zirconium (Si-Zr) composite and cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots (QDs). The structures are fabricated by combining 3D Direct Laser Writing by two-photon absorption and in-situ synthesis of CdS nanoparticles inside the 3D photonic matrix. The CdS-Zr-Si composite material exhibits a high nonlinear refractive index value measured by means of Z-scan method. 3D woodpile photonic structures with varying inlayer periodicity from 600nm to 500nm show clear photonic stop bands in the wavelength region between 1000nm to 450nm.

  5. 3D photonic crystal-based biosensor functionalized with quantum dot-based aptamer for thrombine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chae Young; Choi, Eunpyo; Park, Youngkyu; Park, Jungyul

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a new technique for protein detection by using the enhancement of intensity in quantum dots (Qdot) whose emission is guided by 3D photonic crystal (PC) structures. For easy to use, we design the emitted light from the sensor can be recovered, when the chemical antibody (aptamer) conjugated with guard DNA (g-DNA) labeled with a quencher (Black FQ) hybridizes with the target proteins. In detail, we synthesis a Qdot-aptamer complex and then immobilize these complex on the PC surfaces. Next, we perform the hybridization of the Qdot-aptamer complex with g-DNA labeled with the quencher. It induces the quenching effect of fluoresce intensity in the Qdot-aptamer. In presence of target protein (thrombin), the Qdot-aptamer complex prefers to form the thrombin-aptamer complex: this results in the release of Black FQ-g-DNA and the quenched light intensity recovers into the original high intensity with Qdot. The intensity recovery varies quantitatively according to the level of the target protein concentration. This proposed sensor shows much higher detection sensitivity than the general fluorescent detection mechanism, which is functionalized on the flat surfaces because of the light guiding effect from 3D photonic crystal structures.

  6. Large Area 2D and 3D Colloidal Photonic Crystals Fabricated by a Roll-to-Roll Langmuir-Blodgett Method.

    PubMed

    Parchine, Mikhail; McGrath, Joe; Bardosova, Maria; Pemble, Martyn E

    2016-06-14

    We present our results on the fabrication of large area colloidal photonic crystals on flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film using a roll-to-roll Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) colloidal photonic crystals from silica nanospheres (250 and 550 nm diameter) with a total area of up to 340 cm(2) have been fabricated in a continuous manner compatible with high volume manufacturing. In addition, the antireflective properties and structural integrity of the films have been enhanced via the use of a second roll-to-roll process, employing a slot-die coating of an optical adhesive over the photonic crystal films. Scanning electron microscopy images, atomic force microscopy images, and UV-vis optical transmission and reflection spectra of the fabricated photonic crystals are analyzed. This analysis confirms the high quality of the 2D and 3D photonic crystals fabricated by the roll-to-roll LB technique. Potential device applications of the large area 2D and 3D colloidal photonic crystals on flexible PET film are briefly reviewed.

  7. Holographic fabrication of 3D photonic crystal templates with 4, 5, and 6-fold rotational symmetry using a single beam and single exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, David; George, David; Lutkenhaus, Jeffery; Philipose, Usha; Zhang, Hualiang; Lin, Yuankun

    2016-03-01

    A method of fabricating large-volume three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal and quasicrystal templates using holographic lithography is presented. Fabrication is accomplished using a single-beam and single exposure by a reflective optical element (ROE). The ROE is 3D printed support structure which holds reflecting surfaces composed of silicon or gallium arsenide. Large-volume 3D photonic crystal and quasicrystal templates with 4-fold, 5-fold, and 6-fold symmetry were fabricated and found to be in good agreement with simulation. Although the reflective surfaces were setup away from the Brewster's angle, the interference among the reflected s and p-polarizations still generated bicontinuous structures, demonstrating the flexibility of the ROE. The ROE, being a compact and inexpensive alternative to diffractive optical elements and top-cut prisms, facilitates the large-scale integration of holographically fabricated photonic structures into on-chip applications.

  8. Final LDRD report : enhanced spontaneous emission rate in visible III-nitride LEDs using 3D photonic crystal cavities.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Arthur Joseph; Subramania, Ganapathi S.; Coley, Anthony J.; Lee, Yun-Ju; Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Luk, Ting Shan; Koleske, Daniel David; Fullmer, Kristine Wanta

    2009-09-01

    The fundamental spontaneous emission rate for a photon source can be modified by placing the emitter inside a periodic dielectric structure allowing the emission to be dramatically enhanced or suppressed depending on the intended application. We have investigated the relatively unexplored realm of interaction between semiconductor emitters and three dimensional photonic crystals in the visible spectrum. Although this interaction has been investigated at longer wavelengths, very little work has been done in the visible spectrum. During the course of this LDRD, we have fabricated TiO{sub 2} logpile photonic crystal structures with the shortest wavelength band gap ever demonstrated. A variety of different emitters with emission between 365 nm and 700 nm were incorporated into photonic crystal structures. Time-integrated and time-resolved photoluminescence measurements were performed to measure changes to the spontaneous emission rate. Both enhanced and suppressed emission were demonstrated and attributed to changes to the photonic density of states.

  9. Photonic bandgap extension of surface-disordered 3D photonic crystals based on the TiO2 inverse opal architecture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aijun; Liu, Wenfang; Tang, Junjie; Chen, Sheng-Li; Dong, Peng

    2014-04-15

    A photonic bandgap (PBG) extension of surface-disordered 3D photonic crystals (PCs) based on the TiO2 inverse opal (TiO2-IO) architecture has been demonstrated. By using a liquid phase deposition (LPD) process based on the controlled hydrolysis of ammonium hexafluorotitanate and boric acid, an extra layer of TiO2 nanoparticles were deposited onto the internal surface of the air voids in the TiO2-IOs to increase their surface roughness, thereby introducing surface disorder in the 3D order structures. The PBG relative width of surface-disordered TiO2-IOs has been broadened significantly, and, compared to the original TiO2-IO, its largest rate of increase (27%) has been obtained. It was found that the PBG relative width increased rapidly at first and then to a much slower rate of change with increase of the duration of the LPD time. A possible cause for this finding is discussed in this Letter.

  10. Self-Assembly of 3-D Multifunctional Ceramic Composites for Photonics and Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-02

    active single crystal III-V heterostructured 3-D photonic crystals; 3) demonstrating the holographic patterning of 3-D photonic crystals in IR...single crystal III-V heterostructured 3-D photonic crystals; 3) demonstrating the holographic patterning of 3-D photonic crystals in IR transparent...Refractive Index over a Broad Bandwidth, Physical Review Letters, 102, 093903 (2009). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.093903 K. A. Arpin, A. Mihi, H. T

  11. Dynamical behavior of atom-photon entanglement for a four-level atom near the band edge of a 3D-anisotropic photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahrai, M.; Boroojerdi, V. Tahmoorian Askari

    2017-06-01

    Time evolution of the entanglement between a four-level atom near the band edge of a photonic crystal and its spontaneous emission field is investigated. It is shown that the quantum entropy has a faster oscillator behavior as the upper levels move further into the band gap. Entanglement oscillations can be controlled by the intensity and the detuning of the coupling field. An enhanced entanglement is achieved in the presence of quantum interference resulting from the two possible decay channels. In addition, the atom-photon entanglement will be influenced noticeably by the reservoir coupling constant, intensity of coupling field, and the detuning.

  12. Pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} on amorphous dielectric layers towards monolithic 3D photonic integration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haofeng; Brouillet, Jeremy; Wang, Xiaoxin; Liu, Jifeng

    2014-11-17

    We demonstrate pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} crystallized on amorphous layers at <450 °C towards 3D Si photonic integration. We developed two approaches to seed the lateral single crystal growth: (1) utilize the Gibbs-Thomson eutectic temperature depression at the tip of an amorphous GeSn nanotaper for selective nucleation; (2) laser-induced nucleation at one end of a GeSn strip. Either way, the crystallized Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} is dominated by a single grain >18 μm long that forms optoelectronically benign twin boundaries with others grains. These pseudo single crystal, direct-band-gap Ge{sub 0.89}Sn{sub 0.11} patterns are suitable for monolithic 3D integration of active photonic devices on Si.

  13. Melting Mechanisms of 3D Colloidal Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsayed, A. M.

    2005-03-01

    We study the melting mechanisms of 3D colloidal crystals using aqueous suspensions of thermally responsive NIPA microgel colloidal particles. Below 32 ^oC, the particle radius decreases approximately linearly with increasing temperature. We use this effect to tune the volume fraction of nearly hard-sphere aqueous NIPA colloidal suspensions from 0.74 to 0.54. Using video tracking microscopy, we measured the Lindemann parameter of particles within the crystal as a function of temperature. Interestingly, we find that melting of the 3D colloidal crystals starts at grain boundaries and free surfaces, rather than isolated vacancies or dislocations. Very near the melting temperature, the Lindemann parameter for particles near the grain boundaries and free surfaces was ˜0.16; the parameter decreased approximately exponentially with distance into the bulk crystal. These works has been partially supported by NSF through MRSEC DMR-0203378 and DMR-079909 and by NASA grant NAG8- 2172.

  14. Optically rewritable 3D liquid crystal displays.

    PubMed

    Sun, J; Srivastava, A K; Zhang, W; Wang, L; Chigrinov, V G; Kwok, H S

    2014-11-01

    Optically rewritable liquid crystal display (ORWLCD) is a concept based on the optically addressed bi-stable display that does not need any power to hold the image after being uploaded. Recently, the demand for the 3D image display has increased enormously. Several attempts have been made to achieve 3D image on the ORWLCD, but all of them involve high complexity for image processing on both hardware and software levels. In this Letter, we disclose a concept for the 3D-ORWLCD by dividing the given image in three parts with different optic axis. A quarter-wave plate is placed on the top of the ORWLCD to modify the emerging light from different domains of the image in different manner. Thereafter, Polaroid glasses can be used to visualize the 3D image. The 3D image can be refreshed, on the 3D-ORWLCD, in one-step with proper ORWLCD printer and image processing, and therefore, with easy image refreshing and good image quality, such displays can be applied for many applications viz. 3D bi-stable display, security elements, etc.

  15. 3D photon counting integral imaging with unknown sensor positions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiao; Javidi, Bahram

    2012-05-01

    Photon counting techniques have been introduced with integral imaging for three-dimensional (3D) imaging applications. The previous reports in this area assumed a priori knowledge of exact sensor positions for 3D image reconstruction, which may be difficult to satisfy in certain applications. In this paper, we extend the photon counting 3D imaging system to situations where sensor positions are unknown. To estimate sensor positions in photon counting integral imaging, scene details of photon counting images are needed for image correspondences matching. Therefore, an iterative method based on the total variation maximum a posteriori expectation maximization (MAP-EM) algorithm is used to restore photon counting images. Experimental results are presented to show the feasibility of the method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3D photon counting integral imaging with unknown sensor positions. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  16. 2D and 3D heterogeneous photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    2014-03-01

    Exponential increases in the amount of data that need to be sensed, communicated, and processed are continuing to drive the complexity of our computing, networking, and sensing systems. High degrees of integration is essential in scalable, practical, and cost-effective microsystems. In electronics, high-density 2D integration has naturally evolved towards 3D integration by stacking of memory and processor chips with through-silicon-vias. In photonics, too, we anticipate highdegrees of 3D integration of photonic components to become a prevailing method in realizing future microsystems for information and communication technologies. However, compared to electronics, photonic 3D integration face a number of challenges. This paper will review two methods of 3D photonic integration --- fs laser inscription and layer stacking, and discuss applications and future prospects.

  17. Photonic crystal light source

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G [Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Shawn-Yu [Albuquerque, NM; Bur, James A [Corrales, NM

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  18. Polarimetric 3D integral imaging in photon-starved conditions.

    PubMed

    Carnicer, Artur; Javidi, Bahram

    2015-03-09

    We develop a method for obtaining 3D polarimetric integral images from elemental images recorded in low light illumination conditions. Since photon-counting images are very sparse, calculation of the Stokes parameters and the degree of polarization should be handled carefully. In our approach, polarimetric 3D integral images are generated using the Maximum Likelihood Estimation and subsequently reconstructed by means of a Total Variation Denoising filter. In this way, polarimetric results are comparable to those obtained in conventional illumination conditions. We also show that polarimetric information retrieved from photon starved images can be used in 3D object recognition problems. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3D polarimetric photon counting integral imaging.

  19. Fabrication of 2D and 3D photonic structures using laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaso, P.; Jandura, D.; Pudis, D.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we demonstrate possibilities of three-dimensional (3D) printing technology based on two photon polymerization. We used three-dimensional dip-in direct-laser-writing (DLW) optical lithography to fabricate 2D and 3D optical structures for optoelectronics and for optical sensing applications. DLW lithography allows us use a non conventional way how to couple light into the waveguide structure. We prepared ring resonator and we investigated its transmission spectral characteristic. We present 3D inverse opal structure from its design to printing and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging. Finally, SEM images of some prepared photonic crystal structures were performed.

  20. Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    passive and active versions of each fiber designed under this task. Crystal Fibre shall provide characteristics of the fiber fabricated to include core...passive version of multicore fiber iteration 2. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Laser physics, Fibre Lasers, Photonic Crystal, Multicore, Fiber Laser 16...9 00* 0 " CRYSTAL FIBRE INT ODUCTION This report describes the photonic crystal fibers developed under agreement No FA8655-o5-a- 3046. All

  1. Creating bio-inspired hierarchical 3D-2D photonic stacks via planar lithography on self-assembled inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Ian B; Aizenberg, Joanna; Lončar, Marko

    2013-12-01

    Structural hierarchy and complex 3D architecture are characteristics of biological photonic designs that are challenging to reproduce in synthetic materials. Top-down lithography allows for designer patterning of arbitrary shapes, but is largely restricted to planar 2D structures. Self-assembly techniques facilitate easy fabrication of 3D photonic crystals, but controllable defect-integration is difficult. In this paper we combine the advantages of top-down and bottom-up fabrication, developing two techniques to deposit 2D-lithographically-patterned planar layers on top of or in between inverse-opal 3D photonic crystals and creating hierarchical structures that resemble the architecture of the bright green wing scales of the butterfly, Parides sesostris. These fabrication procedures, combining advantages of both top-down and bottom-up fabrication, may prove useful in the development of omnidirectional coloration elements and 3D-2D photonic crystal devices.

  2. Dispersion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzens, Jeremy

    2005-11-01

    Investigations on the dispersive properties of photonic crystals, modified scattering in ring-resonators, monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method are presented. Photonic crystals are periodic mesoscopic arrays of scatterers that modify the propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in a similar way as "natural" crystals modify the properties of electrons in solid-state physics. In this thesis photonic crystals are implemented as planar photonic crystals, i.e., optically thin semiconductor films with periodic arrays of holes etched into them, with a hole-to-hole spacing of the order of the wavelength of light in the dielectric media. Photonic crystals can feature forbidden frequency ranges (the band-gaps) in which light cannot propagate. Even though most work on photonic crystals has focused on these band-gaps for application such as confinement and guiding of light, this thesis focuses on the allowed frequency regions (the photonic bands) and investigates how the propagation of light is modified by the crystal lattice. In particular the guiding of light in bulk photonic crystals in the absence of lattice defects (the self-collimation effect) and the angular steering of light in photonic crystals (the superprism effect) are investigated. The latter is used to design a planar lightwave circuit for frequency domain demultiplexion. Difficulties such as efficient insertion of light into the crystal are resolved and previously predicted limitations on the resolution are circumvented. The demultiplexer is also fabricated and characterized. Monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by means of resonantly enhanced grating couplers is investigated. The grating coupler is designed to bend light through a ninety-degree angle and is characterized with the finite-difference time-domain method. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers are

  3. Understanding Crystal Populations; Looking Towards 3D Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerram, D. A.; Morgan, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    In order to understand volcanic systems, the potential record held within crystal populations needs to be revealed. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that the crystal populations that arrive at the surface in volcanic eruptions are commonly mixtures of crystals, which may be representative of simple crystallization, recycling of crystals and incorporation of alien crystals. If we can quantify the true 3D population within a sample then we will be able to separate crystals with different histories and begin to interrogate the true and complex plumbing within the volcanic system. Modeling crystal populations is one area where we can investigate the best methodologies to use when dealing with sections through 3D populations. By producing known 3D shapes and sizes with virtual textures and looking at the statistics of shape and size when such populations are sectioned, we are able to gain confidence about what our 2D information is telling us about the population. We can also use this approach to test the size of population we need to analyze. 3D imaging through serial sectioning or x-ray CT, provides a complete 3D quantification of a rocks texture. Individual phases can be identified and in principle the true 3D statistics of the population can be interrogated. In practice we need to develop strategies (as with 2D-3D transformations), that enable a true characterization of the 3D data, and an understanding of the errors and pitfalls that exist. Ultimately, the reproduction of true 3D textures and the wealth of information they hold, is now within our reach.

  4. Reduction of Thermal Conductivity by Nanoscale 3D Phononic Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lina; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2013-01-01

    We studied how the period length and the mass ratio affect the thermal conductivity of isotopic nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) phononic crystal of Si. Simulation results by equilibrium molecular dynamics show isotopic nanoscale 3D phononic crystals can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of bulk Si at high temperature (1000 K), which leads to a larger ZT than unity. The thermal conductivity decreases as the period length and mass ratio increases. The phonon dispersion curves show an obvious decrease of group velocities in 3D phononic crystals. The phonon's localization and band gap is also clearly observed in spectra of normalized inverse participation ratio in nanoscale 3D phononic crystal. PMID:23378898

  5. Reduction of thermal conductivity by nanoscale 3D phononic crystal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lina; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2013-01-01

    We studied how the period length and the mass ratio affect the thermal conductivity of isotopic nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) phononic crystal of Si. Simulation results by equilibrium molecular dynamics show isotopic nanoscale 3D phononic crystals can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of bulk Si at high temperature (1000 K), which leads to a larger ZT than unity. The thermal conductivity decreases as the period length and mass ratio increases. The phonon dispersion curves show an obvious decrease of group velocities in 3D phononic crystals. The phonon's localization and band gap is also clearly observed in spectra of normalized inverse participation ratio in nanoscale 3D phononic crystal.

  6. High resolution 3D fluorescence tomography using ballistic photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie; Nouizi, Farouk; Cho, Jaedu; Kwong, Jessica; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2015-03-01

    We are developing a ballistic-photon based approach for improving the spatial resolution of fluorescence tomography using time-domain measurements. This approach uses early photon information contained in measured time-of-fight distributions originating from fluorescence emission. The time point spread functions (TPSF) from both excitation light and emission light are acquired with gated single photon Avalanche detector (SPAD) and time-correlated single photon counting after a short laser pulse. To determine the ballistic photons for reconstruction, the lifetime of the fluorophore and the time gate from the excitation profiles will be used for calibration, and then the time gate of the fluorescence profile can be defined by a simple time convolution. By mimicking first generation CT data acquisition, the sourcedetector pair will translate across and also rotate around the subject. The measurement from each source-detector position will be reshaped into a histogram that can be used by a simple back-projection algorithm in order to reconstruct high resolution fluorescence images. Finally, from these 2D sectioning slides, a 3D inclusion can be reconstructed accurately. To validate the approach, simulation of light transport is performed for biological tissue-like media with embedded fluorescent inclusion by solving the diffusion equation with Finite Element Method using COMSOL Multiphysics simulation. The reconstruction results from simulation studies have confirmed that this approach drastically improves the spatial resolution of fluorescence tomography. Moreover, all the results have shown the feasibility of this technique for high resolution small animal imaging up to several centimeters.

  7. High Time Resolution Photon Counting 3D Imaging Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Ertley, C.; Vallerga, J.

    2016-09-01

    Novel sealed tube microchannel plate (MCP) detectors using next generation cross strip (XS) anode readouts and high performance electronics have been developed to provide photon counting imaging sensors for Astronomy and high time resolution 3D remote sensing. 18 mm aperture sealed tubes with MCPs and high efficiency Super-GenII or GaAs photocathodes have been implemented to access the visible/NIR regimes for ground based research, astronomical and space sensing applications. The cross strip anode readouts in combination with PXS-II high speed event processing electronics can process high single photon counting event rates at >5 MHz ( 80 ns dead-time per event), and time stamp events to better than 25 ps. Furthermore, we are developing a high speed ASIC version of the electronics for low power/low mass spaceflight applications. For a GaAs tube the peak quantum efficiency has degraded from 30% (at 560 - 850 nm) to 25% over 4 years, but for Super-GenII tubes the peak quantum efficiency of 17% (peak at 550 nm) has remained unchanged for over 7 years. The Super-GenII tubes have a uniform spatial resolution of <30 μm FWHM ( 1 x106 gain) and single event timing resolution of 100 ps (FWHM). The relatively low MCP gain photon counting operation also permits longer overall sensor lifetimes and high local counting rates. Using the high timing resolution, we have demonstrated 3D object imaging with laser pulse (630 nm 45 ps jitter Pilas laser) reflections in single photon counting mode with spatial and depth sensitivity of the order of a few millimeters. A 50 mm Planacon sealed tube was also constructed, using atomic layer deposited microchannel plates which potentially offer better overall sealed tube lifetime, quantum efficiency and gain stability. This tube achieves standard bialkali quantum efficiency levels, is stable, and has been coupled to the PXS-II electronics and used to detect and image fast laser pulse signals.

  8. One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical calculations indicate that it should be possible for one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystals (see figure) to exhibit giant dispersions known as the superprism effect. Previously, three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal superprisms have demonstrated strong wavelength dispersion - about 500 times that of conventional prisms and diffraction gratings. Unlike diffraction gratings, superprisms do not exhibit zero-order transmission or higher-order diffraction, thereby eliminating cross-talk problems. However, the fabrication of these 3D photonic crystals requires complex electron-beam substrate patterning and multilayer thin-film sputtering processes. The proposed 1D superprism is much simpler in structural complexity and, therefore, easier to design and fabricate. Like their 3D counterparts, the 1D superprisms can exhibit giant dispersions over small spectral bands that can be tailored by judicious structure design and tuned by varying incident beam direction. Potential applications include miniature gas-sensing devices.

  9. Manipulation of photons at the surface of three-dimensional photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Kenji; Noda, Susumu

    2009-07-16

    In three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals, refractive-index variations with a periodicity comparable to the wavelength of the light passing through the crystal give rise to so-called photonic bandgaps, which are analogous to electronic bandgaps for electrons moving in the periodic electrostatic potential of a material's crystal structure. Such 3D photonic bandgap crystals are envisioned to become fundamental building blocks for the control and manipulation of photons in optical circuits. So far, such schemes have been pursued by embedding artificial defects and light emitters inside the crystals, making use of 3D bandgap directional effects. Here we show experimentally that photons can be controlled and manipulated even at the 'surface' of 3D photonic crystals, where 3D periodicity is terminated, establishing a new and versatile route for photon manipulation. By making use of an evanescent-mode coupling technique, we demonstrate that 3D photonic crystals possess two-dimensional surface states, and we map their band structure. We show that photons can be confined and propagate through these two-dimensional surface states, and we realize their localization at arbitrary surface points by designing artificial surface-defect structures through the formation of a surface-mode gap. Surprisingly, the quality factors of the surface-defect mode are the largest reported for 3D photonic crystal nanocavities (Q up to approximately 9,000). In addition to providing a new approach for photon manipulation by photonic crystals, our findings are relevant for the generation and control of plasmon-polaritons in metals and the related surface photon physics. The absorption-free nature of the 3D photonic crystal surface may enable new sensing applications and provide routes for the realization of efficient light-matter interactions.

  10. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  11. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    PubMed Central

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-01-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation. PMID:27683066

  12. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser.

    PubMed

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-29

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M(2) reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the "photonic crystal microchip laser", a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  13. Photonic crystal microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailevicius, D.; Koliadenko, V.; Purlys, V.; Peckus, M.; Taranenko, V.; Staliunas, K.

    2017-02-01

    The microchip lasers, being sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam, strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here we propose that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. We experimentally show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by factor of 2, and thus increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 4. This comprises a new kind of laser, the "photonic crystal microchip laser", a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial high brightness radiation.

  14. 3D Vectorial Time Domain Computational Integrated Photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, J S; Bond, T C; Koning, J M; Stowell, M L

    2007-02-16

    The design of integrated photonic structures poses considerable challenges. 3D-Time-Domain design tools are fundamental in enabling technologies such as all-optical logic, photonic bandgap sensors, THz imaging, and fast radiation diagnostics. Such technologies are essential to LLNL and WFO sponsors for a broad range of applications: encryption for communications and surveillance sensors (NSA, NAI and IDIV/PAT); high density optical interconnects for high-performance computing (ASCI); high-bandwidth instrumentation for NIF diagnostics; micro-sensor development for weapon miniaturization within the Stockpile Stewardship and DNT programs; and applications within HSO for CBNP detection devices. While there exist a number of photonics simulation tools on the market, they primarily model devices of interest to the communications industry. We saw the need to extend our previous software to match the Laboratory's unique emerging needs. These include modeling novel material effects (such as those of radiation induced carrier concentrations on refractive index) and device configurations (RadTracker bulk optics with radiation induced details, Optical Logic edge emitting lasers with lateral optical inputs). In addition we foresaw significant advantages to expanding our own internal simulation codes: parallel supercomputing could be incorporated from the start, and the simulation source code would be accessible for modification and extension. This work addressed Engineering's Simulation Technology Focus Area, specifically photonics. Problems addressed from the Engineering roadmap of the time included modeling the Auston switch (an important THz source/receiver), modeling Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs, which had been envisioned as part of fast radiation sensors), and multi-scale modeling of optical systems (for a variety of applications). We proposed to develop novel techniques to numerically solve the 3D multi-scale propagation problem for both the microchip

  15. Exchange charge model of crystal field for 3d ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brik, M. G.; Avram, N. M.; Avram, C. N.

    In the second chapter of the book the authors present the results of theoretical studies ofthe energy levels schemes of all 3dn (n=1, 9) ionsin various crystals at the substitutionalsites. Systematic calculations are described in all details; they include the overlap integrals between the impurityions' and ligands' wave functions; the crystal field parameters calculations, and diagonalization of the crystal field Hamiltonians for each considered case. The calculated results arediscussed and compared with experimental data and with similar results from literature. The chapter also contains a comprehensive literature review on the properties of 3d-ions doped crystals.

  16. Multispectral photon counting integral imaging system for color visualization of photon limited 3D scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Inkyu

    2014-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of a colorful photon-counting integral imaging system using Bayer elemental images for 3D visualization of photon limited scenes. The color image sensor with a format of Bayer color filter array, i.e., a red, a green, or a blue filter in a repeating pattern, captures elemental image set of a photon limited three-dimensional (3D) scene. It is assumed that the observed photon count in each channel (red, green or blue) follows Poisson statistics. The reconstruction of 3D scene with a format of Bayer is obtained by applying computational geometrical ray back propagation algorithm and parametric maximum likelihood estimator to the photon-limited Bayer elemental images. Finally, several standard demosaicing algorithms are applied in order to convert the 3D reconstruction with a Bayer format into a RGB per pixel format. Experimental results demonstrate that the gradient corrected linear interpolation technique achieves better performance in regard with acceptable PSNR and less computational complexity.

  17. 3D plasmonic crystal metamaterials for ultra-sensitive biosensing

    PubMed Central

    Aristov, Andrey I.; Manousidaki, Maria; Danilov, Artem; Terzaki, Konstantina; Fotakis, Costas; Farsari, Maria; Kabashin, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the excitation of plasmons in 3D plasmon crystal metamaterials and report the observation of a delocalized plasmon mode, which provides extremely high spectral sensitivity (>2600 nm per refractive index unit (RIU) change), outperforming all plasmonic counterparts excited in 2D nanoscale geometries, as well as a prominent phase-sensitive response (>3*104 deg. of phase per RIU). Combined with a large surface for bioimmobilization provided by the 3D matrix, the proposed sensor architecture promises a new important landmark in the advancement of plasmonic biosensing technology. PMID:27151104

  18. 3D plasmonic crystal metamaterials for ultra-sensitive biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, Andrey I.; Manousidaki, Maria; Danilov, Artem; Terzaki, Konstantina; Fotakis, Costas; Farsari, Maria; Kabashin, Andrei V.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the excitation of plasmons in 3D plasmon crystal metamaterials and report the observation of a delocalized plasmon mode, which provides extremely high spectral sensitivity (>2600 nm per refractive index unit (RIU) change), outperforming all plasmonic counterparts excited in 2D nanoscale geometries, as well as a prominent phase-sensitive response (>3*104 deg. of phase per RIU). Combined with a large surface for bioimmobilization provided by the 3D matrix, the proposed sensor architecture promises a new important landmark in the advancement of plasmonic biosensing technology.

  19. Slotted photonic crystal biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullion, Mark Gerard

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them result in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This thesis presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which engender higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the peak of optical mode within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. High sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than most competing devices in the literature. Initial tests with cellular material for real applications was also performed, and shown to be of promise. In addition, groundwork to make an integrated device that includes the spectrometer function was also carried out showing that slotted photonic crystals themselves can be used for on-chip wavelength specific filtering and spectroscopy, whilst gas-free microvalves for automation were also developed. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study.

  20. Slotted Photonic Crystal Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  1. 3D passive photon counting automatic target recognition using advanced correlation filters.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myungjin; Mahalanobis, Abhijit; Javidi, Bahram

    2011-03-15

    In this Letter, we present results for detecting and recognizing 3D objects in photon counting images using integral imaging with maximum average correlation height filters. We show that even under photon starved conditions objects may be automatically recognized in passively sensed 3D images using advanced correlation filters. We show that the proposed filter synthesized with ideal training images can detect and recognize a 3D object in photon counting images, even in the presence of occlusions and obscuration.

  2. Microfabricated Optical Cavities and Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lončar, Marko; Scherer, Axel

    Microfabricated periodic structures with a high refractive index contrast have recently become very interesting geometries for the manipulation of light. The existence of a photonic bandgap, a frequency range within which propagation of light is prevented in all directions, is very useful where spatial localization of light is required. Ideally, by constructing three-dimensional confinement geometries, light propagation can be controlled in all three dimensions. However, since the fabrication of 3D photonic crystals is difficult, a more manufacturable approach is based on the use of one- or two-dimensional geometries. Here we describe the evolution of microcavities from 1D Bragg reflectors to 2D photonic crystals. The 1D microcavity laser (VCSEL) has already found widespread commercial use in data communications, and the equivalent 2D geometry has recently attracted a lot of research attention. 2D photonic crystal lasers, fabricated within a thin dielectric membrane and perforated with a two-dimensional lattice of holes, are very appealing for dense integration of photonic devices in telecommunications and optical sensing systems. In this chapter, we describe theory and experiments of planar photonic crystals as well as their applications towards lasers and super-dispersive elements. Low-threshold 2D photonic crystal lasers were recently demonstrated both in air and in different chemical solutions and can now be used to perform spectroscopic tests on ultra-small volumes of analyte.

  3. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-05-21

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optical mode in an all-dielectric structure, eliminating the need for metals and their characteristic losses at optical frequencies. We discuss several geometries of photonic crystal accelerator structures. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) are optical fibers which can confine a speed-of-light optical mode in vacuum. Planar structures, both two- and three-dimensional, can also confine such a mode, and have the additional advantage that they can be manufactured using common microfabrication techniques such as those used for integrated circuits. This allows for a variety of possible materials, so that dielectrics with desirable optical and radiation-hardness properties can be chosen. We discuss examples of simulated photonic crystal structures to demonstrate the scaling laws and trade-offs involved, and touch on potential fabrication processes.

  4. Natural photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneron, Jean Pol; Simonis, Priscilla

    2012-10-01

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  5. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-05-31

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter {approx}200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  6. Photonic crystal optofluidic biolaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozaffari, Mohammad Hazhir; Ebnali-Heidari, Majid; Abaeiani, Gholamreza; Moravvej-Farshi, Mohammad Kazem

    2017-09-01

    Optofluidic biolasers are recently being considered in bioanalytical applications due to their advantages over the conventional biosensing methods Exploiting a photonic crystal slab with selectively dye-infiltrated air holes, we propose a new optofluidic heterostructure biolaser, with a power conversion efficiency of 25% and the spectral linewidth of 0.24 nm. Simulations show that in addition to these satisfactory lasing characteristics, the proposed lab-on-a-chip biolaser is highly sensitive to the minute biological changes that may occur in its cavity and can detect a single virus with a radius as small as 13 nm.

  7. Photonic crystal microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhokhov, A. A.; Masalov, V. M.; Sukhinina, N. S.; Matveev, D. V.; Dolganov, P. V.; Dolganov, V. K.; Emelchenko, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    Spherical samples of photonic crystals formed by colloidal SiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized. Synthesis of microspheres from 160 nm, 200 nm and 430 nm diameter colloidal nanoparticles was performed over a wide size range, from 5 μm to 50 μm. The mechanism of formation of void microparticles exceeding 50 μm is discussed. The spectral measurements verified the association of the spectra with the peaks of selective reflection from the cubic lattice planes. The microparticle morphology is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  8. Metallic photonic crystals for thermophotovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Timothy A.

    Since the idea of a photonic bandgap was proposed over two decades ago, photonic crystals have been the subject of significant interest due to their novel optical properties which enable new and varied applications. In this research, the photonic bandgap effect is exploited to tailor the thermal radiation spectrum to a narrow range of wavelengths determined by the lattice symmetry and dimensions of the photonic crystal structure. This sharp emission peak can be matched to the electronic bandgap energy of a p-n junction photovoltaic cell for high efficiency thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. This thesis explores aspects of photonic crystal design, materials considerations, and manufacture for thermophotovoltaic applications. Photonic crystal structures come in many forms, exhibiting various types of 1D, 2D, and 3D lattice symmetry. In this work, the "woodpile" 3D photonic crystal is studied. One advantage of the woodpile lattice is that it can be readily fabricated on a large scale using common integrated circuit manufacturing techniques. Additionally this structure lends itself to efficient and accurate modeling with the use of a plane-wave expansion based transfer matrix method to calculate the scattering properties and band structure of the photonic crystal. This method is used to explore the geometric design parameters of the woodpile structure. Optimal geometric proportions for the structure are found which yield the highest narrowband absorption peak possible. By Kirchoffs law of thermal emission, this strong and sharp absorptance will yield high power and narrowband thermal radiation. The photonic crystal thermal emission spectrum is then evaluated in a TPV system model to evaluate the electrical power density and system efficiency achievable. The results produced by the photonic crystal emitter are compared with the results assuming a blackbody thermal radiation spectrum. The blackbody represents a universal standard against which any selective emitter

  9. Hexagonal liquid crystal lens array for 3D endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Hassanfiroozi, Amir; Huang, Yi-Pai; Javidi, Bahram; Shieh, Han-Ping D

    2015-01-26

    A liquid crystal lens array with a hexagonal arrangement is investigated experimentally. The uniqueness of this study exists in the fact that using convex-ring electrode provides a smooth and controllable applied potential profile across the aperture to manage the phase profile. We observed considerable differences between flat electrode and convex-ring electrode; in particular the lens focal length is variable in a wider range from 2.5cm to infinity. This study presents several noteworthy characteristics such as low driving voltage; 30 μm cell gap and the lens is electrically switchable between 2D/3D modes. We demonstrate a hexagonal LC-lens array for capturing 3D images by using single sensor using integral imaging.

  10. Better photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J. C.

    2008-11-01

    The development of optical fibers with two-dimensional patterns of air holes running down their length has reinvigorated research in the field of fiber optics. It has greatly - and fundamentally - broadened the range of specialty optical fibers, by demonstrating that optical fibers can be more 'special" than previously thought. Applications of such special fibers have not been hard to find. Fibers with air cores have made it possible to deliver energetic femtosecond-scale optical pulses, transform limited, as solitons, using single-mode fiber. Other fibers with anomalous dispersion at visible wavelengths have spawned a new generation of single-mode optical supercontinuum sources, spanning visible and near-infrared wavelengths and based on compact pump sources. A third example is in the field of fiber lasers, where the use of photonic crystal fiber concepts has led to a new hybrid laser technology, in which the very high numerical aperture available using air holes have enabled fibers so short they are more naturally held straight than bent. However, commercial success demands more than just a fiber and an application. The useful properties of the fibers need to be optimized for the specific application. This tutorial will describe some of the basic physics and technology behind these photonic crystal fibers (PCF's), illustrated with some of the impressive demonstrations of the past 18 months.

  11. Photon counting passive 3D image sensing for automatic target recognition.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Seokwon; Javidi, Bahram; Watson, Edward

    2005-11-14

    In this paper, we propose photon counting three-dimensional (3D) passive sensing and object recognition using integral imaging. The application of this approach to 3D automatic target recognition (ATR) is investigated using both linear and nonlinear matched filters. We find there is significant potential of the proposed system for 3D sensing and recognition with a low number of photons. The discrimination capability of the proposed system is quantified in terms of discrimination ratio, Fisher ratio, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on photon counting 3D passive sensing and ATR with integral imaging.

  12. 3-D phononic crystals with ultra-wide band gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan; Yang, Yang; Guest, James K.; Srivastava, Ankit

    2017-02-01

    In this paper gradient based topology optimization (TO) is used to discover 3-D phononic structures that exhibit ultra-wide normalized all-angle all-mode band gaps. The challenging computational task of repeated 3-D phononic band-structure evaluations is accomplished by a combination of a fast mixed variational eigenvalue solver and distributed Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) parallel computations. The TO algorithm utilizes the material distribution-based approach and a gradient-based optimizer. The design sensitivity for the mixed variational eigenvalue problem is derived using the adjoint method and is implemented through highly efficient vectorization techniques. We present optimized results for two-material simple cubic (SC), body centered cubic (BCC), and face centered cubic (FCC) crystal structures and show that in each of these cases different initial designs converge to single inclusion network topologies within their corresponding primitive cells. The optimized results show that large phononic stop bands for bulk wave propagation can be achieved at lower than close packed spherical configurations leading to lighter unit cells. For tungsten carbide - epoxy crystals we identify all angle all mode normalized stop bands exceeding 100%, which is larger than what is possible with only spherical inclusions.

  13. 3-D phononic crystals with ultra-wide band gaps

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Yang, Yang; Guest, James K.; Srivastava, Ankit

    2017-01-01

    In this paper gradient based topology optimization (TO) is used to discover 3-D phononic structures that exhibit ultra-wide normalized all-angle all-mode band gaps. The challenging computational task of repeated 3-D phononic band-structure evaluations is accomplished by a combination of a fast mixed variational eigenvalue solver and distributed Graphic Processing Unit (GPU) parallel computations. The TO algorithm utilizes the material distribution-based approach and a gradient-based optimizer. The design sensitivity for the mixed variational eigenvalue problem is derived using the adjoint method and is implemented through highly efficient vectorization techniques. We present optimized results for two-material simple cubic (SC), body centered cubic (BCC), and face centered cubic (FCC) crystal structures and show that in each of these cases different initial designs converge to single inclusion network topologies within their corresponding primitive cells. The optimized results show that large phononic stop bands for bulk wave propagation can be achieved at lower than close packed spherical configurations leading to lighter unit cells. For tungsten carbide - epoxy crystals we identify all angle all mode normalized stop bands exceeding 100%, which is larger than what is possible with only spherical inclusions. PMID:28233812

  14. 1024 pixels single photon imaging array for 3D ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellisai, S.; Guerrieri, F.; Tisa, S.; Zappa, F.; Tosi, A.; Giudice, A.

    2011-01-01

    Three dimensions (3D) acquisition systems are driving applications in many research field. Nowadays 3D acquiring systems are used in a lot of applications, such as cinema industry or in automotive (for active security systems). Depending on the application, systems present different features, for example color sensitivity, bi-dimensional image resolution, distance measurement accuracy and acquisition frame rate. The system we developed acquires 3D movie using indirect Time of Flight (iTOF), starting from phase delay measurement of a sinusoidally modulated light. The system acquires live movie with a frame rate up to 50frame/s in a range distance between 10 cm up to 7.5 m.

  15. Extended-Range Ultrarefractive 1D Photonic Crystal Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal has been made to exploit the special wavelength-dispersive characteristics of devices of the type described in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Superprisms (NPO-30232) NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 4 (April 2005), page 10a. A photonic crystal is an optical component that has a periodic structure comprising two dielectric materials with high dielectric contrast (e.g., a semiconductor and air), with geometrical feature sizes comparable to or smaller than light wavelengths of interest. Experimental superprisms have been realized as photonic crystals having three-dimensional (3D) structures comprising regions of amorphous Si alternating with regions of SiO2, fabricated in a complex process that included sputtering. A photonic crystal of the type to be exploited according to the present proposal is said to be one-dimensional (1D) because its contrasting dielectric materials would be stacked in parallel planar layers; in other words, there would be spatial periodicity in one dimension only. The processes of designing and fabricating 1D photonic crystal superprisms would be simpler and, hence, would cost less than do those for 3D photonic crystal superprisms. As in 3D structures, 1D photonic crystals may be used in applications such as wavelength-division multiplexing. In the extended-range configuration, it is also suitable for spectrometry applications. As an engineered structure or artificially engineered material, a photonic crystal can exhibit optical properties not commonly found in natural substances. Prior research had revealed several classes of photonic crystal structures for which the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is forbidden in certain frequency ranges, denoted photonic bandgaps. It had also been found that in narrow frequency bands just outside the photonic bandgaps, the angular wavelength dispersion of electromagnetic waves propagating in photonic crystal superprisms is much stronger than is the angular wavelength dispersion obtained

  16. Polymeric photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Yoel

    Two novel and practical methods for controlling the propagation of light are presented: First, a design criterion that permits truly omnidirectional reflectivity for all polarizations of incident light over a wide selectable range of frequencies is derived and used in fabricating an alldielectric omnidirectional reflector consisting of multilayer films. Because the omnidirectionality criterion is general, it can be used to design omnidirectional reflectors in many frequency ranges of interest. Potential uses depend on the geometry of the system. For example, coating of an enclosure will result in an optical cavity. A hollow tube will produce a low-loss, broadband waveguide, planar film could be used as an efficient radiative heat barrier or collector in thermoelectric devices. A comprehensive framework for creating one-, two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals out of self- assembling block copolymers has been formulated. In order to form useful band gaps in the visible regime, periodic dielectric structures made of typical block copolymers need to be modified to obtain appropriate characteristic distances and dielectric constants. Moreover, the absorption and defect concentration must also be controlled. This affords the opportunity to tap into the large structural repertoire, the flexibility and intrinsic tunability that these self-assembled block copolymer systems offer. A block copolymer was used to achieve a self assembled photonic band gap in the visible regime. By swelling the diblock copolymer with lower molecular weight constituents control over the location of the stop band across the visible regime is achieved. One and three- dimensional crystals have been formed by changing the volume fraction of the swelling media. Methods for incorporating defects of prescribed dimensions into the self-assembled structures have been explored leading to the construction of a self assembled microcavity light- emitting device. (Copies available exclusively from MIT

  17. Photonic crystal enhanced cytokine immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Patrick C; Ganesh, Nikhil; Cunningham, Brian T

    2009-01-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces are demonstrated as a means for enhancing the detection sensitivity and resolution for assays that use a fluorescent tag to quantify the concentration of an analyte protein molecule in a liquid test sample. Computer modeling of the spatial distribution of resonantly coupled electromagnetic fields on the photonic crystal surface are used to estimate the magnitude of enhancement factor compared to performing the same fluorescent assay on a plain glass surface, and the photonic crystal structure is fabricated and tested to experimentally verify the performance using a sandwich immunoassay for the protein Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The demonstrated photonic crystal fabrication method utilizes a nanoreplica molding technique that allows for large-area inexpensive fabrication of the structure in a format that is compatible with confocal microarray laser scanners. The signal-to-noise ratio for fluorescent spots on the photonic crystal is increased by at least five-fold relative to the glass slide, allowing a TNF-alpha concentration of 1.6 pg/ml to be distinguished from noise on a photonic crystal surface. In addition, the minimum quantitative limit of detection on the photonic crystal surface is one-third the limit on the glass slide - a decrease from 18 pg/ml to 6 pg/ml. The increased performance of the immunoassay allows for more accurate quantitation of physiologically relevant concentrations of TNF-alpha in a protein microarray format that can be expanded to multiple cytokines.

  18. X-ray Laue Diffraction Microscopy in 3D at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Zschack, P.; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Ice, Gene E; Larson, Ben C

    2011-01-01

    Studies of materials on mesoscopic length-scales require a penetrating structural probe with submicron point-to-point spatial resolution. The principle research activities at beamline 34-ID-E of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) involve development of exciting new micro-/nano-diffraction techniques for characterization and microscopy in support of both applied engineering and fundamental materials research. Taking advantage of the high brightness of the source, advanced focusing mirrors, a novel depth profiling technique, and high-speed area detectors, three-dimensional scanning Laue diffraction microscopy provides detailed local structural information of crystalline materials, such as crystallographic orientation, orientation gradients, and strain tensors. It is general and applicable to single-crystal, polycrystalline, composite, deformed, and functionally graded materials. Applications include 3D diffraction investigations for a diverse and growing user community with interests in materials deformation, electro-migration, recrystallization, fatigue, solid-solution precipitation, high-pressure environments, and condensed matter physics.

  19. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Colloidal photonic crystals (PhCs), periodically arranged monodisperse nanoparticles, have emerged as one of the most promising materials for light manipulation because of their photonic band gaps (PBGs), which affect photons in a manner similar to the effect of semiconductor energy band gaps on electrons. The PBGs arise due to the periodic modulation of the refractive index between the building nanoparticles and the surrounding medium in space with subwavelength period. This leads to light with certain wavelengths or frequencies located in the PBG being prohibited from propagating. Because of this special property, the fabrication and application of colloidal PhCs have attracted increasing interest from researchers. The most simple and economical method for fabrication of colloidal PhCs is the bottom-up approach of nanoparticle self-assembly. Common colloidal PhCs from this approach in nature are gem opals, which are made from the ordered assembly and deposition of spherical silica nanoparticles after years of siliceous sedimentation and compression. Besides naturally occurring opals, a variety of manmade colloidal PhCs with thin film or bulk morphology have also been developed. In principle, because of the effect of Bragg diffraction, these PhC materials show different structural colors when observed from different angles, resulting in brilliant colors and important applications. However, this angle dependence is disadvantageous for the construction of some optical materials and devices in which wide viewing angles are desired. Recently, a series of colloidal PhC materials with spherical macroscopic morphology have been created. Because of their spherical symmetry, the PBGs of spherical colloidal PhCs are independent of rotation under illumination of the surface at a fixed incident angle of the light, broadening the perspective of their applications. Based on droplet templates containing colloidal nanoparticles, these spherical colloidal PhCs can be

  20. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-23

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  1. Multicolor photonic crystal laser array

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jeremy B; Brener, Igal; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2015-04-28

    A multicolor photonic crystal laser array comprises pixels of monolithically grown gain sections each with a different emission center wavelength. As an example, two-dimensional surface-emitting photonic crystal lasers comprising broad gain-bandwidth III-nitride multiple quantum well axial heterostructures were fabricated using a novel top-down nanowire fabrication method. Single-mode lasing was obtained in the blue-violet spectral region with 60 nm of tuning (or 16% of the nominal center wavelength) that was determined purely by the photonic crystal geometry. This approach can be extended to cover the entire visible spectrum.

  2. Liquid crystal devices for photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigrinov, Vladimir G.

    2007-11-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) devices for Photonics applications is a hot topic of research. Such elements begin to appear in Photonics market. Passive elements for fiber optical communication systems (DWDM components) based on LC cells can successfully compete with the other elements used for the purpose, such as micro electromechanical (MEM), thermo-optical, opto-mechanical or acousto-optical devices. Application of nematic and ferroelectric LC for high speed communication systems, producing elements that are extremely fast, stable, durable, of low loss, operable over a wide temperature range, and that require small operating voltages and extremely low power consumption. The known LC applications in fiber optics enable to produce switches, filters, attenuators, equalizers, polarization controllers, phase emulators and other fiber optical components. Good robustness due to the absence of moving parts and compatibility with VLSI technology, excellent parameters in a large photonic wavelength range, whereas the complexity of the design and the cost of the device are equivalent to regular passive matrix LC displays makes LC fiber optical devices very attractive for mass production. We have already successfully fabricated certain prototypes of the optical switches based on ferroelectric and nematic LC materials. The electrooptical modes used for the purpose included the light polarization rotation, voltage controllable diffraction and fast switching of the LC refractive index. We used the powerful software to optimize the LC modulation characteristics. Use of photo-alignment technique pioneered by us makes it possible to develop new LC fiber components. Almost all the criteria of perfect LC alignment are met in case of azo-dye layers. We have already used azo-dye materials to align LC in superthin photonic holes, curved and 3D surfaces and as cladding layers in microring silicon based resonators. The prototypes of new LC efficient Photonics devices are envisaged. Controllable

  3. Spatial filtering with photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maigyte, Lina; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2015-03-15

    Photonic crystals are well known for their celebrated photonic band-gaps—the forbidden frequency ranges, for which the light waves cannot propagate through the structure. The frequency (or chromatic) band-gaps of photonic crystals can be utilized for frequency filtering. In analogy to the chromatic band-gaps and the frequency filtering, the angular band-gaps and the angular (spatial) filtering are also possible in photonic crystals. In this article, we review the recent advances of the spatial filtering using the photonic crystals in different propagation regimes and for different geometries. We review the most evident configuration of filtering in Bragg regime (with the back-reflection—i.e., in the configuration with band-gaps) as well as in Laue regime (with forward deflection—i.e., in the configuration without band-gaps). We explore the spatial filtering in crystals with different symmetries, including axisymmetric crystals; we discuss the role of chirping, i.e., the dependence of the longitudinal period along the structure. We also review the experimental techniques to fabricate the photonic crystals and numerical techniques to explore the spatial filtering. Finally, we discuss several implementations of such filters for intracavity spatial filtering.

  4. Patterned Colloidal Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jue; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin

    2017-09-11

    Colloidal photonic crystals (PCs) have been well developed because they are easy-to-prepare, cost-effective, and versatile to be modified and functionalized. Patterned colloidal PCs contributes a novel approach to constructing high-performance PC devices with unique structures and specific functions. In this review, an overview of the strategies for fabricating patterned colloidal PCs, including patterned substrate induced assembly, inkjet printing, and selective immobilization and modification is presented. The advantages of patterned PC devices are also discussed in detail, for example, the detection sensitivity and response speed of sensors can be improved; the flow direction and wicking rate of the microfluidic channel can be well controlled; cross-reactive molecules can be recognized through array patterned microchip; the display devices with tunable pattern, well-arranged RGB unit, and wide viewing-angle can be fabricated; and several anti-counterfeiting devices with different security strategies can be constructed. Finally, the perspective of future developments and challenges is presented and widely exhibited. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Photon Scattering in 3D Radiative MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Wolfgang

    2009-09-01

    Recent results from 3D time-dependent radiative hydrodynamic simulations of stellar atmospheres are presented, which include the effects of coherent scattering in the radiative transfer treatment. Rayleigh scattering and electron scattering are accounted for in the source function, requiring an iterative solution of the transfer equation. Opacities and scattering coefficients are treated in the multigroup opacity approximation. The impact of scattering on the horizontal mean temperature structure is investigated, which is an important diagnostic for model atmospheres, with implications for line formation and stellar abundance measurements. We find that continuum scattering is not important for the atmosphere of a metal-poor Sun with metailicity [Fe/H] = -3.0, similar to the previously investigated photosphere at solar metallicity.

  6. Cotton-yarn/TiO {2} dispersed resin photonic crystals with straight and wavy structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Kirihara, S.; Miyamoto, Y.; Sakoda, K.

    2004-06-01

    The feasibility of three-dimensional (3-D) photonic crystals made using textile technology was investigated. Three different textures consisting of the cotton-yarn and TiO2 dispersed resin; a crossed linear-yarn laminated fabric, a multi layered woven fabric, and a 3-D woven fabric, were fabricated. The microwave attenuation of the transmission amplitude through these photonic crystals was measured. The straight cotton-yarn as well as the wavy cotton-yarn/TiO2 dispersed resin photonic crystals exhibited band gaps in the 6 to 15 GHz range. Thus, we could fabricate successfully 3-D photonic crystals using textile technology.

  7. Photonic crystal fiber nanospectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimlinger, Mark; Battinelli, Emily; Wynne, Rosalind

    2012-04-01

    A silica-based steering wheel core photonic crystal fiber (SW-PCF) with a nano-featured spectrometer chemical agent detection configuration is presented. The spectrometer chip acquired from Nano-Optic DevicesTM can reduce the size of the spectrometer down to a coin. Results are provided for PCF structures filled with sample materials for spectroscopic identification. Portable and compact spectroscopic detectors with long interaction lengths (> few mm) specially outfitted for extreme environmental conditions are of interest to both military and civil institutions who wish to monitor air/water composition. The featured PCF spectrometer has the potential to measure optical absorption spectra in order to detect trace amounts of contaminants in gaseous or aqueous samples. The absorption spectrum of the SW-PCF detection system was measured as a function of the fiber interaction length and material volume. The SW-PCF measured spectra agreed with reference spectra. The SW-PCF has a core diameter of 3.9μm, outer diameter of 132.5μm. A nearly 5 cm length of the SW-PCF was coupled to the surface of a thin nanofeatured chip. The remaining end of the SW-PCF section is coupled to a laser light source centered at λ=635nm. The diffraction pattern produced by the nano-featured chip is captured by an objective lens and CCD camera for image analysis. The position of the intensity pattern extracted from the analyzed image indicates the spectral components of the absorption characteristics for the detected sample. This nano-featured spectrometer offers spectral resolution down to 0.1nm that makes it possible to detect substances with very detailed spectral features.

  8. Manufacturing method of photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In Sung; Lee, Tae Ho; Ahn, Jin Ho; Biswas, Rana; Constant, Kristen P.; Ho, Kai-Ming; Lee, Jae-Hwang

    2013-01-29

    A manufacturing method of a photonic crystal is provided. In the method, a high-refractive-index material is conformally deposited on an exposed portion of a periodic template composed of a low-refractive-index material by an atomic layer deposition process so that a difference in refractive indices or dielectric constants between the template and adjacent air becomes greater, which makes it possible to form a three-dimensional photonic crystal having a superior photonic bandgap. Herein, the three-dimensional structure may be prepared by a layer-by-layer method.

  9. Spectral selectivity of 3D magnetophotonic crystal film fabricated from single butterfly wing scales.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wenhong; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Wang; Yang, Qingqing; Zhang, Di; Chen, Zhixin

    2014-06-07

    3D magnetophotonic crystal (3D-MPC) film is an excellent platform for tailoring the magneto-optical response of magnetic materials. However, its fabrication is a great challenge due to the limitation of commonly used artificial synthesis methods. Inspired by the unique structures of biospecies, we hereby manipulate the pristine single wing scales of Morpho didius precisely and successfully fabricate Fe3O4 films with photonic structure. The synthesis strategy involves the fabrication of Fe2O3 film from a single wing scale using an improved sol-gel method followed by a subsequent reduction. The intrinsic hierarchical photonic structures as well as the anisotropic optical properties of the pristine butterfly wing scale have been retained in the obtained Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 films. When investigated under an external magnetic field, a spectral blue shift about 43 nm is observed in the designated orientation of the Fe3O4 film, which is useful for the design and creation of novel magnetic-optical modulator devices. Furthermore, these single scales can be used as building blocks to fabricate designable and more complicated assembled nano systems. This biomimetic technique combined with the variety of structures of butterfly wing scales provides an effective approach to produce magneto-photonic films with desired structure, paving a new way for theoretical research and practical applications.

  10. Mechanically tunable photonic crystal lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.; Tamma, V. A.; Lee, J.-B.; Park, W.

    2010-08-01

    We designed, fabricated and characterized MEMS-enabled mechanically-tunable photonic crystal lens comprised of 2D photonic crystal and symmetrical electro-thermal actuators. The 2D photonic crystal was made of a honeycomb-lattice of 340 nm thick, 260 nm diameter high-index silicon rods embedded in low-index 10 μm thick SU-8 cladding. Silicon input waveguide and deflection block were also fabricated for light in-coupling and monitoring of focused spot size, respectively. When actuated, the electro-thermal actuators induced mechanical strain which changed the lattice constant of the photonic crystal and consequently modified the photonic band structure. This in turn modified the focal-length of the photonic crystal lens. The fabricated device was characterized using a tunable laser (1400~1602 nm) and an infrared camera during actuation. At the wavelength of 1450 nm, the lateral light spot size observed at the deflection block gradually decreased 40%, as applied current increased from 0 to 0.7 A, indicating changes in focal length in response to the mechanical stretching.

  11. Phase singularities in 3D plasmonic crystal metamaterials for ultra-sensitive biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, Artem; Aristov, Andrey I.; Manousidaki, Maria; Terzaki, Konstantina; Fotakis, Costas; Farsari, Maria; Kabashin, Andrei V.

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic biosensors form the core label-free technology for studies of biomolecular interactions, but they still need a drastic improvement of sensitivity and novel nano-architectural implementations to match modern trends of nanobiotechnology. Here, we consider the generation of resonances in light reflected from 3D woodpile plasmonic crystal metamaterials fabricated by Direct Laser Writing by Multi-Photon Polymerization, followed by silver electroless plating. We show that the generation of these resonances is accompanied by the appearance of singularities of phase of reflected light and examine the response of phase characteristics to refractive index variations inside the metamaterial matrix. The recorded phase sensitivity (3*104 deg. of phase shift per RIU change) outperforms most plasmonic counterparts and is attributed to particular conditions of plasmon excitation in 3D plasmonic crystal geometry. Combined with a large surface for biomolecular immobilizations offered by the 3D woodpile matrix, the proposed sensor architecture promises a new important landmark in the advancement of plasmonic biosensing technology.

  12. From optical MEMS to photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sukhan; Kim, Jideog; Lee, Hong-Seok; Moon, Il-Kwon; Won, JongHwa; Ku, Janam; Choi, Hyung; Shin, Hyungjae

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents the emergence of photonic crystals as significant optomechatronics components, following optical MEMS. It is predicted that, in the coming years, optical MEMS and photonic crystals may go through dynamic interactions leading to synergy as well as competition. First, we present the Structured Defect Photonic Crystal (SDPCTM) devised by the authors for providing the freedom of designing photonic bandgap structures, such that the application of photonic crystals be greatly extended. Then, we present the applications of optical MEMS and photonic crystals to displays and telecommunications. It is shown that many of the applications that optical MEMS can contribute to telecommunications and displays may be implemented by photonic crystals.

  13. Radiating dipoles in photonic crystals

    PubMed

    Busch; Vats; John; Sanders

    2000-09-01

    The radiation dynamics of a dipole antenna embedded in a photonic crystal are modeled by an initially excited harmonic oscillator coupled to a non-Markovian bath of harmonic oscillators representing the colored electromagnetic vacuum within the crystal. Realistic coupling constants based on the natural modes of the photonic crystal, i.e., Bloch waves and their associated dispersion relation, are derived. For simple model systems, well-known results such as decay times and emission spectra are reproduced. This approach enables direct incorporation of realistic band structure computations into studies of radiative emission from atoms and molecules within photonic crystals. We therefore provide a predictive and interpretative tool for experiments in both the microwave and optical regimes.

  14. Transient Plasma Photonic Crystals for High-Power Lasers.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, G; Spatschek, K H

    2016-06-03

    A new type of transient photonic crystals for high-power lasers is presented. The crystal is produced by counterpropagating laser beams in plasma. Trapped electrons and electrically forced ions generate a strong density grating. The lifetime of the transient photonic crystal is determined by the ballistic motion of ions. The robustness of the photonic crystal allows one to manipulate high-intensity laser pulses. The scheme of the crystal is analyzed here by 1D Vlasov simulations. Reflection or transmission of high-power laser pulses are predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a transient plasma photonic crystal may act as a tunable mirror for intense laser pulses. Generalizations to 2D and 3D configurations are possible.

  15. Denoising for 3-d photon-limited imaging data using nonseparable filterbanks.

    PubMed

    Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Bildea, Teodor Stefan; Tan, Shan; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we present a novel frame-based denoising algorithm for photon-limited 3-D images. We first construct a new 3-D nonseparable filterbank by adding elements to an existing frame in a structurally stable way. In contrast with the traditional 3-D separable wavelet system, the new filterbank is capable of using edge information in multiple directions. We then propose a data-adaptive hysteresis thresholding algorithm based on this new 3-D nonseparable filterbank. In addition, we develop a new validation strategy for denoising of photon-limited images containing sparse structures, such as neurons (the structure of interest is less than 5% of total volume). The validation method, based on tubular neighborhoods around the structure, is used to determine the optimal threshold of the proposed denoising algorithm. We compare our method with other state-of-the-art methods and report very encouraging results on applications utilizing both synthetic and real data.

  16. Three-dimensional photonic crystals created by single-step multi-directional plasma etching.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsuyoshi; Kitano, Keisuke; Ishizaki, Kenji; Noda, Susumu

    2014-07-14

    We fabricate 3D photonic nanostructures by simultaneous multi-directional plasma etching. This simple and flexible method is enabled by controlling the ion-sheath in reactive-ion-etching equipment. We realize 3D photonic crystals on single-crystalline silicon wafers and show high reflectance (>95%) and low transmittance (<-15dB) at optical communication wavelengths, suggesting the formation of a complete photonic bandgap. Moreover, our method simply demonstrates Si-based 3D photonic crystals that show the photonic bandgap effect in a shorter wavelength range around 0.6 μm, where further fine structures are required.

  17. Photonic crystals as optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevi, P.; Krokhin, A. A.; Arriaga, J.

    1999-11-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have already found numerous applications associated with the photonic band gap. We point out that PCs could be also employed as custom-made optical components in the linear region well below the photonic gap. As an example, we discuss a birefringent PC lens that acts as a polarizing beam splitter. This idea is supported by a precise method of calculation of the optical constants of a transparent two-dimensional (2D) PC. Such a process of homogenization is performed for hexagonal arrays of polymer-based PCs and also for the mammalian cornea. Finally, 2D PCs are classified as optically uniaxial or biaxial.

  18. Photonic crystal surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, Song Liang; Lu, Ling; Soljacic, Marin

    2015-06-23

    A photonic-crystal surface-emitting laser (PCSEL) includes a gain medium electromagnetically coupled to a photonic crystal whose energy band structure exhibits a Dirac cone of linear dispersion at the center of the photonic crystal's Brillouin zone. This Dirac cone's vertex is called a Dirac point; because it is at the Brillouin zone center, it is called an accidental Dirac point. Tuning the photonic crystal's band structure (e.g., by changing the photonic crystal's dimensions or refractive index) to exhibit an accidental Dirac point increases the photonic crystal's mode spacing by orders of magnitudes and reduces or eliminates the photonic crystal's distributed in-plane feedback. Thus, the photonic crystal can act as a resonator that supports single-mode output from the PCSEL over a larger area than is possible with conventional PCSELs, which have quadratic band edge dispersion. Because output power generally scales with output area, this increase in output area results in higher possible output powers.

  19. Virtual and Printed 3D Models for Teaching Crystal Symmetry and Point Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casas, Lluís; Estop, Euge`nia

    2015-01-01

    Both, virtual and printed 3D crystal models can help students and teachers deal with chemical education topics such as symmetry and point groups. In the present paper, two freely downloadable tools (interactive PDF files and a mobile app) are presented as examples of the application of 3D design to study point-symmetry. The use of 3D printing to…

  20. Virtual and Printed 3D Models for Teaching Crystal Symmetry and Point Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casas, Lluís; Estop, Euge`nia

    2015-01-01

    Both, virtual and printed 3D crystal models can help students and teachers deal with chemical education topics such as symmetry and point groups. In the present paper, two freely downloadable tools (interactive PDF files and a mobile app) are presented as examples of the application of 3D design to study point-symmetry. The use of 3D printing to…

  1. Two-Photon Excitation and Relaxation of the 3d-4d Resonance in Atomic Kr

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, M.; Cubaynes, D.; Richardson, V.; Costello, J. T.; Radcliffe, P.; Li, W. B.; Duesterer, S.; Fritzsche, S.; Mihelic, A.; Papamihail, K. G.; Lambropoulos, P.

    2010-05-28

    Two-photon excitation of a single-photon forbidden Auger resonance has been observed and investigated using the intense extreme ultraviolet radiation from the free electron laser in Hamburg. At the wavelength 26.9 nm (46 eV) two photons promoted a 3d core electron to the outer 4d shell. The subsequent Auger decay, as well as several nonlinear above threshold ionization processes, were studied by electron spectroscopy. The experimental data are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and analysis of the underlying multiphoton processes.

  2. Review on recent progress of three-dimensional optical photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Mei-Li; Kuang, Ping; Bur, James A.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; John, Sajeev

    2014-03-31

    Over the past two decades, the field of photonic-crystals has become one of the most influential realms of contemporary optics. In this paper, we will review two recent experimental progresses in three-dimensional photonic-crystal operating in optical wavelengths. The first is the observation of anomalous light-refraction, an acutely negative refraction, in a 3D photonic-crystal for light trapping, guiding and near-unity absorption. The second is the observation of quasi-coherent thermal emission from an all-metallic 3D photonic-crystal at elevated temperatures.

  3. Flexible photonic crystals for strain sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, Luís M.; Gonçalves, M. Clara; Almeida, Rui M.

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) photonic crystals (PCs) have been studied as possible strain sensing materials, based on strain-induced stop band frequency shifting. Self-assembly of polystyrene microspheres, achieved by sedimentation over a flexible polyimide tape substrate whose surface hydrophilicity was optimized in order to achieve maximum wettability, led to an organized 3-D direct opal template. This was infiltrated with a silica sol-gel solution by dip-coating or by chemical vapour deposition and an inverse opal structure was ultimately obtained by chemical dissolution of the polymer template. The structural and optical properties of these PCs have been studied by scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and UV/visible spectroscopy under variable degrees of strain. FE-SEM showed the presence of ordered domains up to ∼30 μm2. A mechano-optical effect was evidenced by strain-induced shifting of the photonic stop band peak wavelength of the direct, infiltrated and inverse opals up to 50 nm in transmission mode, due to changes in interplanar spacing upon bending the flexible PCs. Optical response strain cycles were studied, suggesting the possible use of these structures in reversible photonic strain sensors integrated in sensor/actuator devices.

  4. Dispersion compensation in slot photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plastun, Alexander; Konyukhov, Andrey

    2015-03-01

    Dispersion tailoring using photonic crystal cladding for slot waveguide is proposed. Numerical modeling based on the Maxwell equation for Te and TM modes of the photonic crystal is performed. Slot waveguide provide high intencity at the central area. Photonic crystal cladding of the slot waveguide allow us to compensate high values of the host glass dispersion.

  5. Tuning and Freezing Disorder in Photonic Crystals using Percolation Lithography

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Ian B.; Abedzadeh, Navid; Kay, Theresa M.; Shneidman, Anna V.; Cranshaw, Derek J.; Lončar, Marko; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Although common in biological systems, synthetic self-assembly routes to complex 3D photonic structures with tailored degrees of disorder remain elusive. Here we show how liquids can be used to finely control disorder in porous 3D photonic crystals, leading to complex and hierarchical geometries. In these optofluidic crystals, dynamically tunable disorder is superimposed onto the periodic optical structure through partial wetting or evaporation. In both cases, macroscopic symmetry breaking is driven by subtle sub-wavelength variations in the pore geometry. These variations direct site-selective infiltration of liquids through capillary interactions. Incorporating cross-linkable resins into our liquids, we developed methods to freeze in place the filling patterns at arbitrary degrees of partial wetting and intermediate stages of drying. These percolation lithography techniques produced permanent photonic structures with adjustable disorder. By coupling strong changes in optical properties to subtle differences in fluid behavior, optofluidic crystals may also prove useful in rapid analysis of liquids. PMID:26790372

  6. Tuning and Freezing Disorder in Photonic Crystals using Percolation Lithography.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Ian B; Abedzadeh, Navid; Kay, Theresa M; Shneidman, Anna V; Cranshaw, Derek J; Lončar, Marko; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-01-21

    Although common in biological systems, synthetic self-assembly routes to complex 3D photonic structures with tailored degrees of disorder remain elusive. Here we show how liquids can be used to finely control disorder in porous 3D photonic crystals, leading to complex and hierarchical geometries. In these optofluidic crystals, dynamically tunable disorder is superimposed onto the periodic optical structure through partial wetting or evaporation. In both cases, macroscopic symmetry breaking is driven by subtle sub-wavelength variations in the pore geometry. These variations direct site-selective infiltration of liquids through capillary interactions. Incorporating cross-linkable resins into our liquids, we developed methods to freeze in place the filling patterns at arbitrary degrees of partial wetting and intermediate stages of drying. These percolation lithography techniques produced permanent photonic structures with adjustable disorder. By coupling strong changes in optical properties to subtle differences in fluid behavior, optofluidic crystals may also prove useful in rapid analysis of liquids.

  7. Photonic quantum well composed of photonic crystal and quasicrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shaohui; Zhu, Yiping; Wang, Lianwei; Yang, Pingxiong; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-02-01

    A photonic quantum well structure composed of photonic crystal and Fibonacci quasicrystal is investigated by analyzing the transmission spectra and electric field distributions. The defect band in the photonic well can form confined quantized photonic states that can change in the band-gap of the photonic barriers by varying the thickness ratio of the two stacking layers. The number of confined states can be tuned by adjusting the period of the photonic well. The photons traverse the photonic quantum well by resonance tunneling and the coupling effect leads to the high transmission intensity of the confined photonic states.

  8. Tuning and Freezing Disorder in Photonic Crystals using Percolation Lithography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-21

    chemistry and physics under controlled conditions to make and break symmetries in tailored ways30. Inspired by these biological exam- ples, we studied how...simple capillary phenomena driven by interfacial physics can be used to create complex and hierarchical 3D photonic structures with a tunable degree...149 (1997). 3. Inoue, K. & Ohtaka, K. (Eds) Photonic Crystals: Physics , Fabrication and Applications (Springer, 2004). 4. Johnson, S. G. & Joannopoulos

  9. A real-time noise filtering strategy for photon counting 3D imaging lidar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijing; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Long; Su, Jianzhong

    2013-04-22

    For a direct-detection 3D imaging lidar, the use of Geiger mode avalanche photodiode (Gm-APD) could greatly enhance the detection sensitivity of the lidar system since each range measurement requires a single detected photon. Furthermore, Gm-APD offers significant advantages in reducing the size, mass, power and complexity of the system. However the inevitable noise, including the background noise, the dark count noise and so on, remains a significant challenge to obtain a clear 3D image of the target of interest. This paper presents a smart strategy, which can filter out false alarms in the stage of acquisition of raw time of flight (TOF) data and obtain a clear 3D image in real time. As a result, a clear 3D image is taken from the experimental system despite the background noise of the sunny day.

  10. A naturally grown three-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianxiang; Lu, Dazhi; Yu, Haohai Zhang, Huaijin Wang, Jiyang; Zhang, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Nonlinear frequency conversion via three-dimensional (3D) quasi-phase matching (QPM) process is experimentally realized based on a Ba{sub 0.77}Ca{sub 0.23}TiO{sub 3} (BCT) crystal. The ferroelectric domains in BCT crystal are observed, and the results reveal that the antiparallel domains distribute in three dimensions and can provide 3D reciprocal lattice vectors for QPM processes. Broadband petal-like second-harmonic patterns are achieved, which are well consistent with the theoretical quasi-cubic model of 3D nonlinear photonic crystals. Our work not only promotes the development of QPM technique but also builds a platform for 3D nonlinear optics and quantum optics.

  11. Controllable liquid crystal gratings for an adaptive 2D/3D auto-stereoscopic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. A.; Jin, T.; He, L. C.; Chu, Z. H.; Guo, T. L.; Zhou, X. T.; Lin, Z. X.

    2017-02-01

    2D/3D switchable, viewpoint controllable and 2D/3D localizable auto-stereoscopic displays based on controllable liquid crystal gratings are proposed in this work. Using the dual-layer staggered structure on the top substrate and bottom substrate as driven electrodes within a liquid crystal cell, the ratio between transmitting region and shielding region can be selectively controlled by the corresponding driving circuit, which indicates that 2D/3D switch and 3D video sources with different disparity images can reveal in the same auto-stereoscopic display system. Furthermore, the controlled region in the liquid crystal gratings presents 3D model while other regions maintain 2D model in the same auto-stereoscopic display by the corresponding driving circuit. This work demonstrates that the controllable liquid crystal gratings have potential applications in the field of auto-stereoscopic display.

  12. A full field, 3-D velocimeter for microgravity crystallization experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodkey, Robert S.; Russ, Keith M.

    1991-01-01

    The programming and algorithms needed for implementing a full-field, 3-D velocimeter for laminar flow systems and the appropriate hardware to fully implement this ultimate system are discussed. It appears that imaging using a synched pair of video cameras and digitizer boards with synched rails for camera motion will provide a viable solution to the laminar tracking problem. The algorithms given here are simple, which should speed processing. On a heavily loaded VAXstation 3100 the particle identification can take 15 to 30 seconds, with the tracking taking less than one second. It seeems reasonable to assume that four image pairs can thus be acquired and analyzed in under one minute.

  13. Holographically Defined Nanoparticle Placement in 3D Colloidal Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Yoonho; Yu, Dongguk; George, Matthew C.; Braun, Paul V.

    2010-06-30

    We demonstrate an optical interference-based photochemical method for the high-resolution localization of nanoparticles inside colloidal crystals or other porous structures. The method specifically relies on photoinduced inversion of the colloidal crystal surface charge to drive the localized deposition of charged gold nanoparticles. 4-Bromomethyl-3-nitrobenzoic acid (BNBA) was used as a photocleavable linker, and dansylamide was attached to BNBA to increase the absorption at 351 nm. Two-beam interference lithography was used for high-resolution optical patterning of the colloidal crystals; the resulting pattern was then decorated with functional nanoparticles. The periodicity of the pattern was 400 nm, and the width of the gold nanoparticle decorated region was ~200 nm. Our strategy of using photoswitching in a refractive-index-matched porous medium followed by the attachment of nanoparticles to the photoswitched region should be applicable to wide classes of charged nanoparticles.

  14. Near-isotropic 3D optical nanoscopy with photon-limited chromophores

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianyong; Akerboom, Jasper; Vaziri, Alipasha; Looger, Loren L.; Shank, Charles V.

    2010-01-01

    Imaging approaches based on single molecule localization break the diffraction barrier of conventional fluorescence microscopy, allowing for bioimaging with nanometer resolution. It remains a challenge, however, to precisely localize photon-limited single molecules in 3D. We have developed a new localization-based imaging technique achieving almost isotropic subdiffraction resolution in 3D. A tilted mirror is used to generate a side view in addition to the front view of activated single emitters, allowing their 3D localization to be precisely determined for superresolution imaging. Because both front and side views are in focus, this method is able to efficiently collect emitted photons. The technique is simple to implement on a commercial fluorescence microscope, and especially suitable for biological samples with photon-limited chromophores such as endogenously expressed photoactivatable fluorescent proteins. Moreover, this method is relatively resistant to optical aberration, as it requires only centroid determination for localization analysis. Here we demonstrate the application of this method to 3D imaging of bacterial protein distribution and neuron dendritic morphology with subdiffraction resolution. PMID:20472826

  15. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals.

    PubMed

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-06-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states.

  16. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals

    PubMed Central

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states. PMID:27877676

  17. Optical Magnetometer Incorporating Photonic Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulikov, Igor; Florescu, Lucia

    2007-01-01

    According to a proposal, photonic crystals would be used to greatly increase the sensitivities of optical magnetometers that are already regarded as ultrasensitive. The proposal applies, more specifically, to a state-of-the-art type of quantum coherent magnetometer that exploits the electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) method for determining a small change in a magnetic field indirectly via measurement of the shift, induced by that change, in the hyperfine levels of resonant atoms exposed to the field.

  18. Hybrid colloidal plasmonic-photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Sergei G; Korovin, Alexander V; Regensburger, Alois; Peschel, Ulf

    2011-06-17

    We review the recently emerged class of hybrid metal-dielectric colloidal photonic crystals. The hybrid approach is understood as the combination of a dielectric photonic crystal with a continuous metal film. It allows to achieve a strong modification of the optical properties of photonic crystals by involving the light scattering at electronic excitations in the metal component into moulding of the light flow in series to the diffraction resonances occurring in the body of the photonic crystal. We consider different realizations of hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystals based on two- and three-dimensional colloidal photonic crystals in association with flat and corrugated metal films. In agreement with model calculations, different resonance phenomena determine the optical response of hybrid crystals leading to a broadly tuneable functionality of these crystals.

  19. IR Sensor Synchronizing Active Shutter Glasses for 3D HDTV with Flexible Liquid Crystal Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jeong In

    2013-01-01

    IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses for three-dimensional high definition television (3D HDTV) were developed using a flexible liquid crystal (FLC) lens. The FLC lens was made on a polycarbonate (PC) substrate using conventional liquid crystal display (LCD) processes. The flexible liquid crystal lens displayed a maximum transmission of 32% and total response time of 2.56 ms. The transmittance, the contrast ratio and the response time of the flexible liquid crystal lens were superior to those of glass liquid crystal lenses. Microcontroller unit and drivers were developed as part of a reception module with power supply for the IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses with the flexible liquid crystal lens prototypes. IR sensor synchronizing active shutter glasses for 3D HDTV with flexible liquid crystal lenses produced excellent 3D images viewing characteristics.

  20. 3D photografting with aromatic azides: A comparison between three-photon and two-photon case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiquan; Ajami, Aliasghar; Stankevičius, Evaldas; Husinsky, Wolfgang; Račiukaitis, Gediminas; Stampfl, Jürgen; Liska, Robert; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr

    2013-08-01

    Photografting is a method utilizing light activation for covalent incorporation of functional molecules into a polymer surface or polymer matrix. It has been widely applied as a simple and versatile method for tailoring physical-chemical properties of various surfaces. Grafting induced via multi-photon absorption provides additional advantages of spatial and temporal control of the process. Here, a novel fluoroaryl azide photografting compound (AFA) was synthesized and compared with the commercially available azide BAC-M. Using Z-scan technique, it was determined that AFA is a two-photon absorber at 798 nm, whereas BAC-M is a three-photon absorber at this wavelength. Both azides were employed for 3D photografting within a PEG-based matrix using femtosecond laser pulses. Both Z-scan measurements and 3D photografting tests indicated that, the intensity threshold for nonlinear absorption and photografting process is lower for AFA. As a result the processing window of AFA is much broader than that of BAC-M. But on the other hand, since BAC-M is characterized by the three-photon absorption (3PA) process, patterns with finer features can be produced using this molecule. The choice of the appropriate compound for 3D grafting will depend on the final application and the requirements associated with the resolution and post-modification protocol.

  1. Gold Nanoparticles in Photonic Crystals Applications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Venditti, Iole

    2017-01-01

    This review concerns the recently emerged class of composite colloidal photonic crystals (PCs), in which gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are included in the photonic structure. The use of composites allows achieving a strong modification of the optical properties of photonic crystals by involving the light scattering with electronic excitations of the gold component (surface plasmon resonance, SPR) realizing a combination of absorption bands with the diffraction resonances occurring in the body of the photonic crystals. Considering different preparations of composite plasmonic-photonic crystals, based on 3D-PCs in presence of AuNPs, different resonance phenomena determine the optical response of hybrid crystals leading to a broadly tunable functionality of these crystals. Several chemical methods for fabrication of opals and inverse opals are presented together with preparations of composites plasmonic-photonic crystals: the influence of SPR on the optical properties of PCs is also discussed. Main applications of this new class of composite materials are illustrated with the aim to offer the reader an overview of the recent advances in this field. PMID:28772458

  2. Gold Nanoparticles in Photonic Crystals Applications: A Review.

    PubMed

    Venditti, Iole

    2017-01-24

    This review concerns the recently emerged class of composite colloidal photonic crystals (PCs), in which gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are included in the photonic structure. The use of composites allows achieving a strong modification of the optical properties of photonic crystals by involving the light scattering with electronic excitations of the gold component (surface plasmon resonance, SPR) realizing a combination of absorption bands with the diffraction resonances occurring in the body of the photonic crystals. Considering different preparations of composite plasmonic-photonic crystals, based on 3D-PCs in presence of AuNPs, different resonance phenomena determine the optical response of hybrid crystals leading to a broadly tunable functionality of these crystals. Several chemical methods for fabrication of opals and inverse opals are presented together with preparations of composites plasmonic-photonic crystals: the influence of SPR on the optical properties of PCs is also discussed. Main applications of this new class of composite materials are illustrated with the aim to offer the reader an overview of the recent advances in this field.

  3. Photonic Crystal Hydrogel Enhanced Plasmonic Staining for Multiplexed Protein Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mu, Zhongde; Zhao, Xiangwei; Huang, Yin; Lu, Meng; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-12-02

    Plasmonic nanoparticles are commonly used as optical transducers in sensing applications. The optical signals resulting from the interaction of analytes and plamsonic nanoparticles are influenced by surrounding physical structures where the nanoparticles are located. This paper proposes inverse opal photonic crystal hydrogel as 3D structure to improve Raman signals from plasmonic staining. By hybridization of the plasmonic nanoparticles and photonic crystal, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) analysis of multiplexed protein is realized. It benefits the Raman analysis by providing high-density "hot spots" in 3D and extra enhancement of local electromagnetic field at the band edge of PhC with periodic refractive index distribution. The strong interaction of light and the hybrid 3D nanostructure offers new insights into plasmonic nanoparticle applications and biosensor design.

  4. 3D high-resolution two-photon crosslinked hydrogel structures for biological studies.

    PubMed

    Brigo, Laura; Urciuolo, Anna; Giulitti, Stefano; Giustina, Gioia Della; Tromayer, Maximilian; Liska, Robert; Elvassore, Nicola; Brusatin, Giovanna

    2017-03-25

    Hydrogels are widely used as matrices for cell growth due to the their tuneable chemical and physical properties, which mimic the extracellular matrix of natural tissue. The microfabrication of hydrogels into arbitrarily complex 3D structures is becoming essential for numerous biological applications, and in particular for investigating the correlation between cell shape and cell function in a 3D environment. Micrometric and sub-micrometric resolution hydrogel scaffolds are required to deeply investigate molecular mechanisms behind cell-matrix interaction and downstream cellular processes. We report the design and development of high resolution 3D gelatin hydrogel woodpile structures by two-photon crosslinking. Hydrated structures of lateral linewidth down to 0.5 µm, lateral and axial resolution down to a few µm are demonstrated. According to the processing parameters, different degrees of polymerization are obtained, resulting in hydrated scaffolds of variable swelling and deformation. The 3D hydrogels are biocompatible and promote cell adhesion and migration. Interestingly, according to the polymerization degree, 3D hydrogel woodpile structures show variable extent of cell adhesion and invasion. Human BJ cell lines show capability of deforming 3D micrometric resolved hydrogel structures.

  5. Holographic multi-focus 3D two-photon polymerization with real-time calculated holograms.

    PubMed

    Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton; Kelemen, Lóránd; Ormos, Pál

    2014-10-06

    Two-photon polymerization enables the fabrication of micron sized structures with submicron resolution. Spatial light modulators (SLM) have already been used to create multiple polymerizing foci in the photoresist by holographic beam shaping, thus enabling the parallel fabrication of multiple microstructures. Here we demonstrate the parallel two-photon polymerization of single 3D microstructures by multiple holographically translated foci. Multiple foci were created by phase holograms, which were calculated real-time on an NVIDIA CUDA GPU, and displayed on an electronically addressed SLM. A 3D demonstrational structure was designed that is built up from a nested set of dodecahedron frames of decreasing size. Each individual microstructure was fabricated with the parallel and coordinated motion of 5 holographic foci. The reproducibility and the high uniformity of features of the microstructures were verified by scanning electron microscopy.

  6. Functionalized 3D Architected Materials via Thiol-Michael Addition and Two-Photon Lithography.

    PubMed

    Yee, Daryl W; Schulz, Michael D; Grubbs, Robert H; Greer, Julia R

    2017-04-01

    Fabrication of functionalized 3D architected materials is achieved by a facile method using functionalized acrylates synthesized via thiol-Michael addition, which are then polymerized using two-photon lithography. A wide variety of functional groups can be attached, from Boc-protected amines to fluoroalkanes. Modification of surface wetting properties and conjugation with fluorescent tags are demonstrated to highlight the potential applications of this technique. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. 3D Monte Carlo model with direct photon flux recording for optimal optogenetic light delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Younghoon; Kim, Dongmok; Lee, Jihoon; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2017-02-01

    Configuring the light power emitted from the optical fiber is an essential first step in planning in-vivo optogenetic experiments. However, diffusion theory, which was adopted for optogenetic research, precluded accurate estimates of light intensity in the semi-diffusive region where the primary locus of the stimulation is located. We present a 3D Monte Carlo model that provides an accurate and direct solution for light distribution in this region. Our method directly records the photon trajectory in the separate volumetric grid planes for the near-source recording efficiency gain, and it incorporates a 3D brain mesh to support both homogeneous and heterogeneous brain tissue. We investigated the light emitted from optical fibers in brain tissue in 3D, and we applied the results to design optimal light delivery parameters for precise optogenetic manipulation by considering the fiber output power, wavelength, fiber-to-target distance, and the area of neural tissue activation.

  8. Investigations and improvements of digital holographic tomography applied for 3D studies of transmissive photonics microelements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Jozwicka, Agata; Kozacki, Tomasz

    2008-08-01

    In order to control performance of photonics microelements it is necessary to receive 3D information about their amplitude and phase distributions. To perform this task we propose to apply tomography based on projections gather by digital holography (DH). Specifically the DH capability to register several angular views of the object during a single hologram capture is employed, which may in future shorten significantly the measurement time or even allow for tomographic analysis of dynamic media. However such a new approach brings a lot of new issues to be considered. Therefore, in this paper the method limitations, with special emphasis on holographic reconstruction process, are investigated through extensive numerical experiments with special focus on 3D refractive index distribution determination.. The main errors and means of their elimination are presented. The possibility of 3D refractive index distribution determination by means of DHT is proved numerically and experimentally.

  9. Resonant photonic States in coupled heterostructure photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jd; Sabarinathan, J; Singh, Mr

    2010-02-09

    In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors.

  10. Resonant Photonic States in Coupled Heterostructure Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study the photonic resonance states and transmission spectra of coupled waveguides made from heterostructure photonic crystals. We consider photonic crystal waveguides made from three photonic crystals A, B and C, where the waveguide heterostructure is denoted as B/A/C/A/B. Due to the band structure engineering, light is confined within crystal A, which thus act as waveguides. Here, photonic crystal C is taken as a nonlinear photonic crystal, which has a band gap that may be modified by applying a pump laser. We have found that the number of bound states within the waveguides depends on the width and well depth of photonic crystal A. It has also been found that when both waveguides are far away from each other, the energies of bound photons in each of the waveguides are degenerate. However, when they are brought close to each other, the degeneracy of the bound states is removed due to the coupling between them, which causes these states to split into pairs. We have also investigated the effect of the pump field on photonic crystal C. We have shown that by applying a pump field, the system may be switched between a double waveguide to a single waveguide, which effectively turns on or off the coupling between degenerate states. This reveals interesting results that can be applied to develop new types of nanophotonic devices such as nano-switches and nano-transistors. PMID:20672066

  11. Fabrication of three-dimensional terahertz photonic crystals with diamond structure by particle manipulation assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Kenta; Kawasaki, Akira

    2009-01-01

    We reported the fabrication of terahertz photonic crystals by three-dimensional (3D) particle manipulation assembly. Our method, which is based on pick-and-place manipulation and interparticle laser welding, enabled accurate assembling of an arbitrary 3D structure, regardless of particle polydispersity. By using this method, we fabricated a diamond crystal from ZrO2/polyethylene composite particles (diameter of 400 μm). The obtained crystal exhibited a photonic stop gap in the ⟨111⟩ direction; this result was in good agreement with the theoretical result, suggesting that the crystal has a full photonic bandgap at around 0.2 THz.

  12. Production of photonic nanojets by using pupil-masked 3D dielectric cuboid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Liyang; Yan, Bing; Monks, James N.; Wang, Zengbo; Thanh Tung, Nguyen; Dinh Lam, Vu; Minin, Oleg; Minin, Igor

    2017-05-01

    Photonic nanojets can be created via plane wave irradiation of multi-shaped mesoscale dielectric particles, and a waist of full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) smaller than the diffraction limit can be achieved in this process. In this paper, photonic nanojet produced by a pupil-masked 3D dielectric cuboid lens is numerically investigated under the irradiation of 532 nm wavelength plane wave. It is found that a pupil-masked cuboid lens is not only able to produce photonic nanojets with shorter FWHMs, but also increase its maximal intensity at certain masking ratios on the receiving surface. This phenomenon is different from the result of the spherical-lens reported in previous publications, and is attributed to the convergence of power flow and near-field numerical aperture (NA) increase after analysis of simulated power flow diagrams.

  13. Two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Jing; Liang, Yu; Ma, Ji; Zhang, Si-Qi; Li, Hong; Wu, Xiang-Yao; Wu, Yi-Heng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied two-dimensional function photonic crystals, in which the dielectric constants of medium columns are the functions of space coordinates , that can become true easily by electro-optical effect and optical kerr effect. We calculated the band gap structures of TE and TM waves, and found the TE (TM) wave band gaps of function photonic crystals are wider (narrower) than the conventional photonic crystals. For the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, when the dielectric constant functions change, the band gaps numbers, width and position should be changed, and the band gap structures of two-dimensional function photonic crystals can be adjusted flexibly, the needed band gap structures can be designed by the two-dimensional function photonic crystals, and it can be of help to design optical devices.

  14. Silicon-based photonic crystals fabricated using proton beam writing combined with electrochemical etching method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A method for fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) silicon nanostructures based on selective formation of porous silicon using ion beam irradiation of bulk p-type silicon followed by electrochemical etching is shown. It opens a route towards the fabrication of two-dimensional (2D) and 3D silicon-based photonic crystals with high flexibility and industrial compatibility. In this work, we present the fabrication of 2D photonic lattice and photonic slab structures and propose a process for the fabrication of 3D woodpile photonic crystals based on this approach. Simulated results of photonic band structures for the fabricated 2D photonic crystals show the presence of TE or TM gap in mid-infrared range. PMID:22824206

  15. Silicon-based photonic crystals fabricated using proton beam writing combined with electrochemical etching method.

    PubMed

    Dang, Zhiya; Breese, Mark Bh; Recio-Sánchez, Gonzalo; Azimi, Sara; Song, Jiao; Liang, Haidong; Banas, Agnieszka; Torres-Costa, Vicente; Martín-Palma, Raúl José

    2012-07-23

    A method for fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) silicon nanostructures based on selective formation of porous silicon using ion beam irradiation of bulk p-type silicon followed by electrochemical etching is shown. It opens a route towards the fabrication of two-dimensional (2D) and 3D silicon-based photonic crystals with high flexibility and industrial compatibility. In this work, we present the fabrication of 2D photonic lattice and photonic slab structures and propose a process for the fabrication of 3D woodpile photonic crystals based on this approach. Simulated results of photonic band structures for the fabricated 2D photonic crystals show the presence of TE or TM gap in mid-infrared range.

  16. Bulletlike light pulses in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanhong; Gong, Qian; Yao, Peijun; Zhao, Deyin; Jiang, Xunya

    2008-08-01

    We report the bulletlike propagation of light pulse in a particularly designed two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal. Unlike traditional light bullet supported by nonlinear materials, this bulletlike propagation is achieved only by 2D photonic crystal, where the diffraction and the group velocity dispersion of a light pulse are eliminated naturally by combining two distinct properties of photonic crystal, i.e., self-collimation and zero group velocity dispersion. Moreover, we studied the influence of third order dispersion on the propagation of light bullet and found that it can be greatly suppressed by an improved structure of photonic crystal.

  17. Parallel 3D FDTD Simulator for Photonic Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    an The outermost layer of grid cells is defined as a perfect absorbing boundary condition (ABC) developed by electric conductor ( PEG ) by setting the...limitation can be overcome by using a new impeinn f th o kown as Ns A alternate-direction implicit ( ADI ) approach that has been comparison of the...implicit formulation of the discretized Maxwell’s found to be limited by a number of shared-memory equations, called the ADI -FDTD method, results in a

  18. Higher order modes in photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Gansch, Roman; Kalchmair, Stefan; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron M; Klang, Pavel; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2011-08-15

    We present a detailed investigation of higher order modes in photonic crystal slabs. In such structures the resonances exhibit a blue-shift compared to an ideal two-dimensional photonic crystal, which depends on the order of the slab mode and the polarization. By fabricating a series of photonic crystal slab photo detecting devices, with varying ratios of slab thickness to photonic crystal lattice constant, we are able to distinguish between 0th and 1st order slab modes as well as the polarization from the shift of resonances in the photocurrent spectra. This method complements the photonic band structure mapping technique for characterization of photonic crystal slabs. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  19. Bulk crystal growth and electronic characterization of the 3D Dirac semimetal Na3Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Satya K.; Krizan, Jason W.; Feldman, Benjamin E.; Gyenis, András; Randeria, Mallika T.; Xiong, Jun; Xu, Su-Yang; Alidoust, Nasser; Belopolski, Ilya; Liang, Tian; Zahid Hasan, M.; Ong, N. P.; Yazdani, A.; Cava, R. J.

    2015-04-01

    High quality hexagon plate-like Na3Bi crystals with large (001) plane surfaces were grown from a molten Na flux. The freshly cleaved crystals were analyzed by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, allowing for the characterization of the three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetal (TDS) behavior and the observation of the topological surface states. Landau levels were observed, and the energy-momentum relations exhibited a linear dispersion relationship, characteristic of the 3D TDS nature of Na3Bi. In transport measurements on Na3Bi crystals, the linear magnetoresistance and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillations are observed for the first time.

  20. Preparation, structural, and calorimetric characterization of bicomponent metallic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, M. E.; Murthy, N. S.; Udod, I.; Khayrullin, I. I.; Baughman, R. H.; Zakhidov, A. A.

    2007-03-01

    We report preparation and characterization of novel bicomponent metal-based photonic crystals having submicron three-dimensional (3D) periodicity. Fabricated photonic crystals include SiO2 sphere lattices infiltrated interstitially with metals, carbon inverse lattices filled with metal or metal alloy spheres, Sb inverse lattices, and Sb inverse lattices filled with Bi spheres. Starting from a face centered SiO2 lattice template, these materials were obtained by sequences of either templating and template extraction or templating, template extraction, and retemplating. Surprising high fidelity was obtained for all templating and template extraction steps. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to characterize the structure and the effects of the structure on calorimetric properties. To the best of our knowledge, SAXS data on metallic photonic crystals were collected for first time.

  1. Self-assembled photonic crystals for a chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdillon, C.; Gam Derouich, S.; Daney de Marcillac, W.; Coolen, L.; Maître, A.; Mangeney, C.; Schwob, C.

    2016-03-01

    As they allow the control of light propagation, photonic crystals find many fields of application. Among them, self-assembled 3D-photonic crystals are ordered at the nanometric scale over centrimetric areas. Furthermore, self-assembly allows the design of complexes structures leading, for example, to the controlled disruption of the crystal periodicity (called defect) and the appearance of permitted optical frequency bands within the photonic bandgap. Light frequencies included in the corresponding passband are then localized in the defect allowing manipulation of nano-emitters fluorescence. We present the fabrication and the optical characterization of a heterostructure composed of a sputtered silica layer sandwiched between two silica opals. We show by photoluminescence measurements than this structure strongly modifies the transmitted fluorescence of nanocrystals.

  2. 3D-modeling of deformed halite hopper crystals by Object Based Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Christoph; Hofmann, Peter; Marschallinger, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Object Based Image Analysis (OBIA) is an established method for analyzing multiscale and multidimensional imagery in a range of disciplines. In the present study this method was used for the 3D reconstruction of halite hopper crystals in a mudrock sample, based on Computed Tomography data. To quantitatively assess the reliability of OBIA results, they were benchmarked against a corresponding "gold standard", a reference 3D model of the halite crystals that was derived by manual expert digitization of the CT images. For accuracy assessment, classical per-scene statistics were extended to per-object statistics. The strength of OBIA was to recognize all objects similar to halite hopper crystals and in particular to eliminate cracks. Using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier on top of OBIA, unsuitable objects like halite crystal clusters, polyhalite-coated crystals and spherical halite crystals were effectively dismissed, but simultaneously the number of well-shaped halites was reduced.

  3. Direct laser-writing of ferroelectric single-crystal waveguide architectures in glass for 3D integrated optics.

    PubMed

    Stone, Adam; Jain, Himanshu; Dierolf, Volkmar; Sakakura, Masaaki; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki; Lapointe, Jerome; Kashyap, Raman

    2015-05-19

    Direct three-dimensional laser writing of amorphous waveguides inside glass has been studied intensely as an attractive route for fabricating photonic integrated circuits. However, achieving essential nonlinear-optic functionality in such devices will also require the ability to create high-quality single-crystal waveguides. Femtosecond laser irradiation is capable of crystallizing glass in 3D, but producing optical-quality single-crystal structures suitable for waveguiding poses unique challenges that are unprecedented in the field of crystal growth. In this work, we use a high angular-resolution electron diffraction method to obtain the first conclusive confirmation that uniform single crystals can be grown inside glass by femtosecond laser writing under optimized conditions. We confirm waveguiding capability and present the first quantitative measurement of power transmission through a laser-written crystal-in-glass waveguide, yielding loss of 2.64 dB/cm at 1530 nm. We demonstrate uniformity of the crystal cross-section down the length of the waveguide and quantify its birefringence. Finally, as a proof-of-concept for patterning more complex device geometries, we demonstrate the use of dynamic phase modulation to grow symmetric crystal junctions with single-pass writing.

  4. Direct laser-writing of ferroelectric single-crystal waveguide architectures in glass for 3D integrated optics

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Adam; Jain, Himanshu; Dierolf, Volkmar; Sakakura, Masaaki; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki; Lapointe, Jerome; Kashyap, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Direct three-dimensional laser writing of amorphous waveguides inside glass has been studied intensely as an attractive route for fabricating photonic integrated circuits. However, achieving essential nonlinear-optic functionality in such devices will also require the ability to create high-quality single-crystal waveguides. Femtosecond laser irradiation is capable of crystallizing glass in 3D, but producing optical-quality single-crystal structures suitable for waveguiding poses unique challenges that are unprecedented in the field of crystal growth. In this work, we use a high angular-resolution electron diffraction method to obtain the first conclusive confirmation that uniform single crystals can be grown inside glass by femtosecond laser writing under optimized conditions. We confirm waveguiding capability and present the first quantitative measurement of power transmission through a laser-written crystal-in-glass waveguide, yielding loss of 2.64 dB/cm at 1530 nm. We demonstrate uniformity of the crystal cross-section down the length of the waveguide and quantify its birefringence. Finally, as a proof-of-concept for patterning more complex device geometries, we demonstrate the use of dynamic phase modulation to grow symmetric crystal junctions with single-pass writing. PMID:25988599

  5. Application of two-photon 3D lithography for the fabrication of embedded ORMOCER waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, V.; Kuna, L.; Satzinger, V.; Houbertz, R.; Jakopic, G.; Leising, G.

    2007-02-01

    The idea of applying the two-photon 3D lithography (2P-3DL) to an industrial printed wiring board (PWB) fabrication process is quite pioneering. Taking advantage of the unique rapid prototyping properties of 2P-3DL--its particularly inherent true 3D capability and its high flexibility in processing- this lithographic method can be adapted and optimized concerning the direct laser-writing of integrated optical interconnects with tens of microns in diameter. This will push the method forward towards industrial fabrication of next generation PWBs with integrated optical layers, and put it on the leading edge of printed circuit board (PCB) technology. In this context, the concept of a direct laser-written embedded waveguide is based on the local increase of the refractive index of the exposed material, which is triggered by two-photon absorption (TPA) at the laser focus. The laser induced refractive index difference forms the core of the waveguide, whereas the unexposed surrounding material forms the cladding. Thus, only one optical material is required to form the waveguide using true 3D lithographic process compared to other devices, which significantly simplifies processes. The material is subject to stringent requirements concerning the PWB production process: beside its high refractive index change, a low optical loss of the fabricated optical interconnect is required. The integration of the waveguide into the volume of the material also requires thick films up to 500 microns on the PWB substrate, and the material has to withstand the complete PWB fabrication process, where the board is chemically treated and exposed to high temperatures as well as high pressure during the lamination processes of subsequent metal layers. For this application, an inorganic-organic hybrid polymer (ORMOCER) film is applied, casted onto a PWB substrate, and the two-photon 3D lithography system parameters and optics are tuned such that waveguides with a diameter of approx. 30 microns

  6. Liquid crystal lens array for 3D microscopy and endoscope application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Pai; Hsieh, Po-Yuan; Hassanfiroozi, Amir; Chu, Chao-Yu; Hsuan, Yun; Martinez, Manuel; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate two liquid crystal (LC) lens array devices for 3D microscope and 3D endoscope applications respectively. Compared with the previous 3D biomedical system, the proposed LC lens arrays are not only switchable between 2D and 3D modes, but also are able to adjust focus in both modes. The multi-function liquid crystal lens (MFLC-lens) array with dual layer electrode has diameter 1.42 mm, which is much smaller than the conventional 3D endoscope with double fixed lenses. The hexagonal liquid crystal micro-lens array (HLC-MLA) instead of fixed micro-lens array in 3D light field microscope can extend the effective depth of field from 60 um to 780 um. To achieve the LC lens arrays, a high-resistance layer needs to be coated on the electrodes to generate an ideal gradient electric-field distribution, which can induce a lens-like form of LC molecules. The parameters and characteristics of high-resistance layer are investigated and discussed with an aim to optimize the performance of liquid crystal lens arrays.

  7. Two-Photon Microscopy Analysis of Gold Nanoparticle Uptake in 3D Cell Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Tushar D.; Armani, Andrea M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials can be synthesized from a wide range of material systems in numerous morphologies, creating an extremely diverse portfolio. As result of this tunability, these materials are emerging as a new class of nanotherapeutics and imaging agents. One particularly interesting nanomaterial is the gold nanoparticle. Due to its inherent biocompatibility and tunable photothermal behavior, it has made a rapid transition from the lab setting to in vivo testing. In most nanotherapeutic applications, the efficacy of the agent is directly related to the target of interest. However, the optimization of the AuNP size and shape for efficacy in vitro, prior to testing in in vivo models of a disease, has been largely limited to two dimensional monolayers of cells. Two dimensional cell cultures are unable to reproduce conditions experienced by AuNP in the body. In this article, we systematically investigate the effect of different properties of AuNP on the penetration depth into 3D cell spheroids using two-photon microscopy. The 3D spheroids are formed from the HCT116 cell line, a colorectal carcinoma cell line. In addition to studying different sizes and shapes of AuNPs, we also study the effect of an oligo surface chemistry. There is a significant difference between AuNP uptake profiles in the 2D monolayers of cells as compared to the 3D cell spheroids. Additionally, the range of sizes and shapes studied here also exhibit marked differences in uptake penetration depth and efficacy. Finally, our results demonstrate that two-photon microscopy enables quantitative AuNP localization and concentration data to be obtained at the single spheroid level without fluorescent labeling of the AuNP, thus, providing a viable technique for large scale screening of AuNP properties in 3D cell spheroids as compared to tedious and time consuming techniques like electron microscopy. PMID:27936027

  8. Two-Photon Lithography of 3D Nanocomposite Piezoelectric Scaffolds for Cell Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Marino, Attilio; Barsotti, Jonathan; de Vito, Giuseppe; Filippeschi, Carlo; Mazzolai, Barbara; Piazza, Vincenzo; Labardi, Massimiliano; Mattoli, Virgilio; Ciofani, Gianni

    2015-11-25

    In this letter, we report on the fabrication, the characterization, and the in vitro testing of structures suitable for cell culturing, prepared through two-photon polymerization of a nanocomposite resist. More in details, commercially available Ormocomp has been doped with piezoelectric barium titanate nanoparticles, and bioinspired 3D structures resembling trabeculae of sponge bone have been fabricated. After an extensive characterization, preliminary in vitro testing demonstrated that both the topographical and the piezoelectric cues of these scaffolds are able to enhance the differentiation process of human SaOS-2 cells.

  9. Photonic Crystal Devices for Quantum and Nanoscale Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    2005-03-01

    Photonic crystal structures can be built to operate in two opposite regimes: one is a suppression of photon states inside the photonic band gap, and the other is a large enhancement of the density of photon states. Both regimes are of consequence to a number of applications in nanoscale and nonlinear optics, as well as to photonic quantum information technologies. Our work on the employment of photonic crystals to build hardware of solid-state photonic quantum information systems, as well as to construct miniaturized optical devices will be reviewed in this talk. We have demonstrated sources of single photons on demand based on quantum dots in micropost microcavities that exhibit a large spontaneous emission rate enhancement (Purcell factor of five) together with a small multi-photon probability (2% compared to a Poisson-distributed source of the same intensity). We have also tested the indistinguishability of emitted single photons from such a source through a Hong-Ou-Mandel-type two-photon interference experiment, and found that consecutive photons exhibit a mean wave-packet overlap as large as 0.81, making this source useful in a variety of experiments in quantum optics and quantum information. The applications of such a device include secure quantum cryptography and linear optical quantum computation. We have also developed two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavities of finite depth with embedded quantum dots that exhibit large quality factors (˜3000) together with small mode volumes (˜0.5(λ/n)^3) and with a maximum field intensity in the high-index region, which is of importance for enhanced interaction with quantum dot excitons. We have performed spectroscopy on a single quantum dot coupled to such a cavity, and demonstrated a very strong modification of its radiative properties, as well as a single-photon generation on demand. A strong interaction between a quantum dot exciton and the field enabled by such a microcavity is of importance for

  10. 3D imaging using combined neutron-photon fan-beam tomography: A Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Hartman, J; Yazdanpanah, A Pour; Barzilov, A; Regentova, E

    2016-05-01

    The application of combined neutron-photon tomography for 3D imaging is examined using MCNP5 simulations for objects of simple shapes and different materials. Two-dimensional transmission projections were simulated for fan-beam scans using 2.5MeV deuterium-deuterium and 14MeV deuterium-tritium neutron sources, and high-energy X-ray sources, such as 1MeV, 6MeV and 9MeV. Photons enable assessment of electron density and related mass density, neutrons aid in estimating the product of density and material-specific microscopic cross section- the ratio between the two provides the composition, while CT allows shape evaluation. Using a developed imaging technique, objects and their material compositions have been visualized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 3D fabrication of all-polymer conductive microstructures by two photon polymerization.

    PubMed

    Kurselis, Kestutis; Kiyan, Roman; Bagratashvili, Victor N; Popov, Vladimir K; Chichkov, Boris N

    2013-12-16

    A technique to fabricate electrically conductive all-polymer 3D microstructures is reported. Superior conductivity, high spatial resolution and three-dimensionality are achieved by successive application of two-photon polymerization and in situ oxidative polymerization to a bi-component formulation, containing a photosensitive host matrix and an intrinsically conductive polymer precursor. By using polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEG-DA) and 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT), the conductivity of 0.04 S/cm is reached, which is the highest value for the two-photon polymerized all-polymer microstructures to date. The measured electrical conductivity dependency on the EDOT concentration indicates percolation phenomenon and a three-dimensional nature of the conductive pathways. Tunable conductivity, biocompatibility, and environmental stability are the characteristics offered by PEG-DA/EDOT blends which can be employed in biomedicine, MEMS, microfluidics, and sensorics.

  12. Square spiral photonic crystal with visible bandgap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbe, Joshua D.; Leontyev, Viktor; Taschuk, Michael T.; Kovalenko, Andriy; Brett, Michael J.

    2012-03-01

    Nanoimprint lithography was combined with glancing angle deposition (GLAD) of titanium dioxide to fabricate a square spiral columnar film with a bandgap in the visible spectral range. Nanoimprint stamps were fabricated with seed spacing ranging from 80 to 400 nm, and four periods of square spiral film were deposited on top of the 320 nm array of seeds. The ratio of lattice spacing, vertical pitch and spiral arm swing was chosen as a : P : A = 1 : 1.35 : 0.7 and the deposition angle was fixed at 86° to maximize the square spiral film's bandgap. Reflectivity measurements show that the fabricated structure exhibit a pseudo-gap centered at around 600 nm wavelength, in good agreement with finite difference electromagnetic simulations. The absence of a full 3D bandgap is due the deviation of GLAD columns' cross-section from the optimal one, which has to be highly elongated in the deposition plane. However, simulations show that a geometry close to the fabricated one will produce a full 3D bandgap, if the structure is inverted. The material refractive index in such an inverted photonic crystal can be as low as n = 2.15.

  13. Photonic crystal fibers for food quality analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinin, A. V.; Zanishevskaja, A. A.; Tuchin, V. V.; Skibina, Yu. S.; Silokhin, I. Y.

    2012-06-01

    The aspects of application of the hollow core photonic crystal waveguides for spectroscopic analysis of liquid medium were considered. The possibility of using these structures for analysis of a fruit juice was evaluated. The principles of processing of photonic crystal waveguide transmission spectra, which is sensitive to quality of juice, its composition, and main component concentration, were revealed.

  14. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  15. Chalcogenide glass photonic crystals: progress and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillet, Christian; Lee, Michael W.; Gai, Xin; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana; Monat, Christelle; Mägi, Eric; Moss, David J.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Madden, Steve; Choi, Duk-Yong; Bulla, Douglas; Luther-Davies, Barry

    2010-02-01

    In this review, we discuss the progress and prospects offered by chalcogenide glass photonic crystals. We show that by making photonic crystals from a highly-nonlinear chalcogenide glass, we have the potential to integrate a variety of active devices into a photonic chip. We describe the testing of two-dimensional Ge33As12Se55 chalcogenide glass photonic crystal membrane devices (waveguides and microcavities). We then demonstrate the ability to not only post-tune the devices properties but also create high Q cavities by using the material photosensitivity.

  16. Photonic Paint Developed with Metallic Three-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Po; Williams, John D.

    2012-01-01

    This work details the design and simulation of an inconspicuous photonic paint that can be applied onto an object for anticounterfeit and tag, track, and locate (TTL) applications. The paint consists of three-dimensional metallic tilted woodpile photonic crystals embedded into a visible and infrared transparent polymer film, which can be applied to almost any surface. The tilted woodpile photonic crystals are designed with a specific pass band detectable at nearly all incident angles of light. When painted onto a surface, these crystals provide a unique reflective infra-red optical signature that can be easily observed and recorded to verify the location or contents of a package.

  17. Luminescence spectra of a cholesteric photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolganov, P. V.

    2017-05-01

    The transmission and luminescence spectra of a cholesteric photonic crystal doped with an organic dye are measured. The density of photon states is calculated using the material parameters obtained from the comparison of the experimental and theoretical spectra. The shape of the luminescence spectra is modified with respect to the density of photon states owing to the difference in the structure of the normal modes of the photonic crystal near the short-wavelength and long-wavelength edges of the photonic quasi-band gap upon the "pushing" of the photon states from the gap and to the nonvanishing orientation ordering of the luminescent molecules. The luminescence spectrum calculated taking into account the chiral structure of the photonic crystal agrees with the experimental spectrum.

  18. Preliminary study of the dosimetric characteristics of 3D-printed materials with megavoltage photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Seonghoon; Yoon, Myonggeun; Chung, Weon Kuu; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-07-01

    These days, 3D-printers are on the rise in various fields including radiation therapy. This preliminary study aimed to estimate the dose characteristics of 3D-printer materials that could be used as compensators or immobilizers in radiation treatment. The cubes with length of 5 cm and different densities of 50%, 75% and 100% were printed by using a 3D-printer. Planning CT scans of the cubes were performed by using a CT simulator (Brilliance CT, Philips Medical System, Netherlands). Dose distributions behind the cube were calculated after a 6 MV photon beam had passed through the cube. The dose responses for the 3D-printed cube, air and water were measured by using EBT3 film and a 2D array detector. When the results of air case were normalized to 100, the dose calculated by the TPS and the measured doses to 50% and 75% cube were of the 96 ~ 99. The measured and the calculated doses to water and to 100% of the cube were 82 ~ 84. The HU values for the 50%, 75% and 100% density cases were -910, -860 and -10, respectively. The dose characteristics of the 50% and the 75% products were similar to that of air while the 100% product seemed to be similar to that of water. This information will provide guidelines for making an immobilization tool that can play the role of a compensator and for making a real human phantom that can exactly describe the inside of the human body. This study was necessary for Poly Lactic Acid (PLA) based 3D-printer users who are planning to make something related to radiation therapy.

  19. Photonic crystal technology for terahertz system integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Masayuki; Nagatsuma, Tadao

    2016-04-01

    Developing terahertz integration technology is essential for practical use of terahertz electromagnetic waves (0.1-10 THz) in various applications including broadband wireless communication, spectroscopic sensing, and nondestructive imaging. In this paper, we present our recent challenges towards terahertz system integration based on photonic crystal technology such as the development of terahertz transceivers. We use photonic-crystal slabs consisting of a twodimensional lattice of air holes formed in a silicon slab to develop low loss compact terahertz components in planar structures. The demonstration of ultralow loss (< 0.1 dB/cm) waveguides and integrated transceiver devices in the 0.3 THz band shows the potential for the application of photonic crystals to terahertz integration technology. Improving the coupling efficiency between the photonic crystal waveguide and resonant tunneling diode is important to take full advantage of the ultralow loss photonic crystal waveguides.

  20. Effects of multiple-interaction photon events in a high-resolution PET system that uses 3-D positioning detectors

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yi; Pratx, Guillem; Lau, Frances W. Y.; Levin, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The authors’ laboratory is developing a dual-panel, breast-dedicated PET system. The detector panels are built from dual-LSO-position-sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) modules—units holding two 8×8 arrays of 1 mm3 LSO crystals, where each array is coupled to a PSAPD. When stacked to form an imaging volume, these modules are capable of recording the 3-D coordinates of individual interactions of a multiple-interaction photon event (MIPE). The small size of the scintillation crystal elements used increases the likelihood of photon scattering between crystal arrays. In this article, the authors investigate how MIPEs impact the system photon sensitivity, the data acquisition scheme, and the quality and quantitative accuracy of reconstructed PET images. Methods: A Monte Carlo simulated PET scan using the dual-panel system was performed on a uniformly radioactive phantom for the photon sensitivity study. To establish the impact of MIPEs on a proposed PSAPD multiplexing scheme, experimental data were collected from a dual-LSO-PSAPD module edge-irradiated with a 22Na point source, the data were compared against simulation data based on an identical setup. To assess the impact of MIPEs on the dual-panel PET images, a simulated PET of a phantom comprising a matrix of hot spherical radiation sources of varying diameters immersed in a warm background was performed. The list-mode output data were used for image reconstruction, where various methods were used for estimating the location of the first photon interaction in MIPEs for more accurate line of response positioning. The contrast recovery coefficient (CRC), contrast to noise ratio (CNR), and the full width at half maximum spatial resolution of the spheres in the reconstructed images were used as figures of merit to facilitate comparison. Results: Compared to image reconstruction employing only events with interactions confined to one LSO array, a potential single photon sensitivity gain of >46.9% (>115

  1. Effects of multiple-interaction photon events in a high-resolution PET system that uses 3-D positioning detectors.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yi; Pratx, Guillem; Lau, Frances W Y; Levin, Craig S

    2010-10-01

    The authors' laboratory is developing a dual-panel, breast-dedicated PET system. The detector panels are built from dual-LSO-position-sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) modules-units holding two 8 x 8 arrays of 1 mm3 LSO crystals, where each array is coupled to a PSAPD. When stacked to form an imaging volume, these modules are capable of recording the 3-D coordinates of individual interactions of a multiple-interaction photon event (MIPE). The small size of the scintillation crystal elements used increases the likelihood of photon scattering between crystal arrays. In this article, the authors investigate how MIPEs impact the system photon sensitivity, the data acquisition scheme, and the quality and quantitative accuracy of reconstructed PET images. A Monte Carlo simulated PET scan using the dual-panel system was performed on a uniformly radioactive phantom for the photon sensitivity study. To establish the impact of MIPEs on a proposed PSAPD multiplexing scheme, experimental data were collected from a dual-LSO-PSAPD module edge-irradiated with a 22Na point source, the data were compared against simulation data based on an identical setup. To assess the impact of MIPEs on the dual-panel PET images, a simulated PET of a phantom comprising a matrix of hot spherical radiation sources of varying diameters immersed in a warm background was performed. The list-mode output data were used for image reconstruction, where various methods were used for estimating the location of the first photon interaction in MIPEs for more accurate line of response positioning. The contrast recovery coefficient (CRC), contrast to noise ratio (CNR), and the full width at half maximum spatial resolution of the spheres in the reconstructed images were used as figures of merit to facilitate comparison. Compared to image reconstruction employing only events with interactions confined to one LSO array, a potential single photon sensitivity gain of > 46.9% (> 115.7% for coincidence) was noted

  2. Effects of multiple-interaction photon events in a high-resolution PET system that uses 3-D positioning detectors.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yi; Pratx, Guillem; Lau, Frances W Y; Levin, Craig S

    2010-10-01

    The authors' laboratory is developing a dual-panel, breast-dedicated PET system. The detector panels are built from dual-LSO-position-sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) modules-units holding two8×8 arrays of 1mm3 LSO crystals, where each array is coupled to a PSAPD. When stacked to form an imaging volume, these modules are capable of recording the 3-D coordinates of individual interactions of a multiple-interaction photon event (MIPE). The small size of the scintillation crystal elements used increases the likelihood of photon scattering between crystal arrays. In this article, the authors investigate how MIPEs impact the system photon sensitivity, the data acquisition scheme, and the quality and quantitative accuracy of reconstructed PET images. A Monte Carlo simulated PET scan using the dual-panel system was performed on a uniformly radioactive phantom for the photon sensitivity study. To establish the impact of MIPEs on a proposed PSAPD multiplexing scheme, experimental data were collected from a dual-LSO-PSAPD module edge-irradiated with aN22a point source, the data were compared against simulation data based on an identical setup. To assess the impact of MIPEs on the dual-panel PET images, a simulated PET of a phantom comprising a matrix of hot spherical radiation sources of varying diameters immersed in a warm background was performed. The list-mode output data were used for image reconstruction, where various methods were used for estimating the location of the first photon interaction in MIPEs for more accurate line of response positioning. The contrast recovery coefficient (CRC), contrast to noise ratio (CNR), and the full width at half maximum spatial resolution of the spheres in the reconstructed images were used as figures of merit to facilitate comparison. Compared to image reconstruction employing only events with interactions confined to one LSO array, a potential single photon sensitivity gain of>46.9% (>115.7% for coincidence) was noted for a

  3. Light-directing chiral liquid crystal nanostructures: from 1D to 3D.

    PubMed

    Bisoyi, Hari Krishna; Li, Quan

    2014-10-21

    Endowing external, remote, and dynamic control to self-organized superstructures with desired functionalities is a principal driving force in the bottom-up nanofabrication of molecular devices. Light-driven chiral molecular switches or motors in liquid crystal (LC) media capable of self-organizing into optically tunable one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) superstructures represent such an elegant system. As a consequence, photoresponsive cholesteric LCs (CLCs), i.e., self-organized 1D helical superstructures, and LC blue phases (BPs), i.e., self-organized 3D periodic cubic lattices, are emerging as a new generation of multifunctional supramolecular 1D and 3D photonic materials in their own right because of their fundamental academic interest and technological significance. These smart stimuli-responsive materials can be facilely fabricated from achiral LC hosts by the addition of a small amount of a light-driven chiral molecular switch or motor. The photoresponsiveness of these materials is a result of both molecular interaction and geometry changes in the chiral molecular switch upon light irradiation. The doped photoresponsive CLCs undergo light-driven pitch modulation and/or helix inversion, which has many applications in color filters, polarizers, all-optical displays, optical lasers, sensors, energy-saving smart devices, and so on. Recently, we have conceptualized and rationally synthesized different light-driven chiral molecular switches that have very high helical twisting powers (HTPs) and exhibit large changes in HTP in different states, thereby enabling wide phototunability of the systems by the addition of very small amounts of the molecular switches into commercially available achiral LCs. The light-driven chiral molecular switches are based on well-recognized azobenzene, dithienylcyclopentene, and spirooxazine derivatives. We have demonstrated high-resolution and lightweight photoaddressable displays without patterned electronics on

  4. Fractional relaxations in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldi, Filippo; Petruccione, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    A quantum dot interacting with the radiation field of a photonic crystal is considered. An analytical description of the dynamics and the coherence between the two states of the quantum dot is provided. Besides the well-known trapping, a fractional nature of the dynamics appears via relaxations of the Mittag-Leffler type. Furthermore, coherence exhibits a transition from the decay {{t}-3/2} to {{t}-1/2} if the transition frequency of the quantum dot is exactly in the middle of the band gap. Similarly, the population of the excited level undergoes a transition from the relaxation 1/{{t}3} to 1/t. These resonances and transitions belong also to the context of matter-wave emissions in optical lattices.

  5. A device that operates within a self-assembled 3D DNA crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yudong; Kristiansen, Martin; Sha, Ruojie; Birktoft, Jens J.; Hernandez, Carina; Mao, Chengde; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2017-08-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology finds applications in numerous areas, but the construction of objects, 2D and 3D crystalline lattices and devices is prominent among them. Each of these components has been developed individually, and most of them have been combined in pairs. However, to date there are no reports of independent devices contained within 3D crystals. Here we report a three-state 3D device whereby we change the colour of the crystals by diffusing strands that contain dyes in or out of the crystals through the mother-liquor component of the system. Each colouring strand is designed to pair with an extended triangle strand by Watson-Crick base pairing. The arm that contains the dyes is quite flexible, but it is possible to establish the presence of the duplex proximal to the triangle by X-ray crystallography. We modelled the transition between the red and blue states through a simple kinetic model.

  6. 3D nano surface profilometry by combining the photonic nanojet with interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, P. C.; Lecler, S.; Leong-Hoï, A.; Pfeiffer, P.

    2017-01-01

    Interference microscopy has become a standard technique for measuring microscopic surface roughness, being rapid, non-contact and having a high nanometric axial resolution. Nonetheless, a limitation is the lateral resolution of λ/2 due to diffraction. Amongst the many recently developed techniques for improving the lateral resolution in unlabelled far field imaging, the use of microspheres placed on the sample has recently been extended from 2D imaging to 3D measurement by combining it with interferometry. In the present work, results are shown of combining the high lateral resolution of the photonic nanojet produced by the microsphere with interference microscopy to achieve sub-diffraction limited lateral resolution with nanometric axial resolution. This is achieved by imaging through a microsphere placed on top of the sample in front of the interference objective in a Linnik setup. Results of the 3D measurements of narrow gratings through the microsphere are presented, that are not observable with the same objective in air since they are below the resolution limit. Simulations of the interaction between the photonic jet and the grating leads to a basic understanding of the image formation. This new technique opens new possibilities for high resolution characterization in nanomaterials and the biological sciences.

  7. Photonic crystal negative refractive optics.

    PubMed

    Baba, Toshihiko; Abe, Hiroshi; Asatsuma, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) are multi-dimensional periodic gratings, in which the light propagation is dominated by Bragg diffraction that appears to be refraction at the flat surfaces of the PC. The refraction angle from positive to negative, perfectly or only partially obeying Snell's law, can be tailored using photonic band theory. The negative refraction enables novel prism, collimation, and lens effects. Because PCs usually consist of two transparent media, these effects occur at absorption-free frequencies, affording significant design flexibility for free-space optics. The PC slab, a high-index membrane with a two-dimensional airhole array, must be carefully designed to avoid reflection and diffraction losses. Light focusing based on negative refraction forms a parallel image of a light source, facilitating optical couplers and condenser lenses for wavelength demultiplexing. A compact wavelength demultiplexer can be designed by combining the prism and lens effects. The collimation effect is obtainable not only inside but also outside of the PC by optimizing negative refractive condition.

  8. Optimization of photonic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Smajic, Jasmin; Hafner, Christian; Erni, Daniel

    2004-11-01

    We report on the numerical structural optimization of two-dimensional photonic crystal (PhC) power dividers by using two different classes of optimization algorithms, namely, a modified truncated Newton (TN) gradient search as deterministic local optimization scheme and an evolutionary optimization representing the probabilistic global search strategies. Because of the severe accuracy requirements during optimization, the proper PhC device has been simulated by using the multiple-multipole program that is contained in the MaX-1 software package. With both optimizer classes, we found reliable and promising solutions that provide vanishing power reflection and perfect power balance at any specified frequency within the photonic bandgap. This outcome is astonishing in light of the discrete nature inherent in the underlying PhC structure, especially when the optimizer is allowed to intervene only within a very small volume of the device. Even under such limiting constraints structural optimization is not only feasible but has proven to be highly successful.

  9. Photonic crystals with topological defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Seng Fatt; Knitter, Sebastian; Xiong, Wen; Cao, Hui

    2015-02-01

    We introduce topological defects to a square lattice of elliptical cylinders. Despite the broken translational symmetry, the long-range positional order of the cylinders leads to a residual photonic band gap in the local density of optical states. However, the band-edge modes are strongly modified by the spatial variation of the ellipse orientation. The Γ -X band-edge mode splits into four regions of high intensity and the output flux becomes asymmetric due to the formation of crystalline domains with different orientation. The Γ -M band-edge mode has the energy flux circulating around the topological defect center, creating an optical vortex. By removing the elliptical cylinders at the center, we create localized defect states, which are dominated by either clockwise or counterclockwise circulating waves. The flow direction can be switched by changing the ellipse orientation. The deterministic aperiodic variation of the unit cell orientation adds another dimension to the control of light in photonic crystals, enabling the creation of a diversified field pattern and energy flow landscape.

  10. Phase matching in three-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Junjie; Chen Xianfeng

    2009-07-15

    The coupled-wave equations of three-wave interactions are generalized into three dimensions. The reciprocal lattice vectors (RLVs) of three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear photonic crystals (NPCs) which show some unique properties are analyzed in detail as compared to those in one- and two-dimensional cases. It is proposed as an example that the cross-distributing conical harmonic beams can be obtained from the 3D NPC by intentionally using the proper RLVs. Some other possible applications are suggested at the end of discussion.

  11. Photon propagation correction in 3D photoacoustic image reconstruction using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Yaw Jye; Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a new 3-D iterative Monte Carlo algorithm to recover the heterogeneous distribution of molecular absorbers with a solid tumor. Introduction: Spectroscopic imaging (PCT-S) has the potential to identify a molecular species and quantify its concentration with high spatial fidelity. To accomplish this task, tissue attenuation losses during photon propagation in heterogeneous 3D objects is necessary. An iterative recovery algorithm has been developed to extract 3D heterogeneous parametric maps of absorption coefficients implementing a MC algorithm based on a single source photoacoustic scanner and to determine the influence of the reduced scattering coefficient on the uncertainty of recovered absorption coefficient. Material and Methods: This algorithm is tested for spheres and ellipsoids embedded in simulated mouse torso with optical absorption values ranging from 0.01-0.5/cm, for the same objects where the optical scattering is unknown (μs'=7-13/cm), and for a heterogeneous distribution of absorbers. Results: Systemic and statistical errors in ma with a priori knowledge of μs' and g are <2% (sphere) and <4% (ellipsoid) for all ma and without a priori knowledge of ms' is <3% and <6%. For heterogenenous distributions of ma, errors are <4% and <5.5% for each object with a prior knowledge of ms' and g, and to 7 and 14% when μs' varied from 7-13/cm. Conclusions: A Monte Carlo code has been successfully developed and used to correct for photon propagation effects in simulated objects consistent with tumors.

  12. Butterfly wing color: A photonic crystal demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proietti Zaccaria, Remo

    2016-01-01

    We have theoretically modeled the optical behavior of a natural occurring photonic crystal, as defined by the geometrical characteristics of the Teinopalpus Imperialis butterfly. In particular, following a genetic algorithm approach, we demonstrate how its wings follow a triclinic crystal geometry with a tetrahedron unit base. By performing both photonic band analysis and transmission/reflection simulations, we are able to explain the characteristic colors emerging by the butterfly wings, thus confirming their crystal form.

  13. Geiger-mode APD camera system for single-photon 3D LADAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entwistle, Mark; Itzler, Mark A.; Chen, Jim; Owens, Mark; Patel, Ketan; Jiang, Xudong; Slomkowski, Krystyna; Rangwala, Sabbir

    2012-06-01

    The unparalleled sensitivity of 3D LADAR imaging sensors based on single photon detection provides substantial benefits for imaging at long stand-off distances and minimizing laser pulse energy requirements. To obtain 3D LADAR images with single photon sensitivity, we have demonstrated focal plane arrays (FPAs) based on InGaAsP Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GmAPDs) optimized for use at either 1.06 μm or 1.55 μm. These state-of-the-art FPAs exhibit excellent pixel-level performance and the capability for 100% pixel yield on a 32 x 32 format. To realize the full potential of these FPAs, we have recently developed an integrated camera system providing turnkey operation based on FPGA control. This system implementation enables the extremely high frame-rate capability of the GmAPD FPA, and frame rates in excess of 250 kHz (for 0.4 μs range gates) can be accommodated using an industry-standard CameraLink interface in full configuration. Real-time data streaming for continuous acquisition of 2 μs range gate point cloud data with 13-bit time-stamp resolution at 186 kHz frame rates has been established using multiple solid-state storage drives. Range gate durations spanning 4 ns to 10 μs provide broad operational flexibility. The camera also provides real-time signal processing in the form of multi-frame gray-scale contrast images and single-frame time-stamp histograms, and automated bias control has been implemented to maintain a constant photon detection efficiency in the presence of ambient temperature changes. A comprehensive graphical user interface has been developed to provide complete camera control using a simple serial command set, and this command set supports highly flexible end-user customization.

  14. Photonic crystal based polarization insensitive flat lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turduev, M.; Bor, E.; Kurt, H.

    2017-07-01

    The paper proposes a new design of an inhomogeneous artificially created photonic crystal lens structure consisting of annular dielectric rods to efficiently focus both transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations of light into the same focal point. The locations of each individual cell that contains the annular dielectric rods are determined according to a nonlinear distribution function. The inner and outer radii of the annular photonic dielectric rods are optimized with respect to the polarization insensitive frequency response of the transmission spectrum of the lens structure. The physical background of the polarization insensitive focusing mechanism is investigated in both spatial and frequency domains. Moreover, polarization independent wavefront transformation/focusing has been explored in detail by investigating the dispersion relation of the structure. Corresponding phase index distribution of the lens is attained for polarization insensitive normalized frequency range of a/λ  =  0.280 and a/λ  =  0.300, where a denotes the lattice constant of the designed structure and λ denotes the wavelength of the incident light. We show the wave transformation performance and focal point movement dynamics for both polarizations of the lens structure by specially adjusting the length of the structure. The 3D finite-difference time domain numerical analysis is also performed to verifiy that the proposed design is able to focus the wave regardless of polarization into approximately the same focal point (difference between focal distances of both polarizations stays below 0.25λ) with an operating bandwidth of 4.30% between 1476 nm and 1541 nm at telecom wavelengths. The main superiorities of the proposed lens structure are being all dielectric and compact, and having flat front and back surfaces, rendering the proposed lens design more practical in the photonic integration process in various applications such as optical switch

  15. 3D localized photoactivation of pa-GFP in living cells using two-photon interactions.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Testa, Ilaria; Faretta, Mario; Magrassi, Raffaella; Barozzi, Sara; Parazzoli, Dario; Vicidomini, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    We report about two-photon activation of a photoactivatable derivative of the Aequorea Victoria green fluorescent protein (paGFP). This special form of the molecule increases its fluorescence intensity when excited by 488 nm after irradiation with high intensity light at 413 nm. The aim in this work was to evaluate the use of two-photon interactions for confining the molecular switching of pa-GFP in the bright state. Therefore experiments were performed using fixed and living cells which were expressing the paGFP fluorophore and microspheres whose surface was modified by specific adsorption of the chromophores. The molecular switches were activated in a range of wavelength from 720 nm to 840 nm. The optimal wavelength for activation was then chosen for cell imaging. A comparison between the conventional activation and two-photon mode demonstrates clearly the better three- dimensional (3D) confinement and the possibility of selection of cell volumes of interest. This enables molecular trafficking studies at high signal to noise ratio.

  16. Photonic Crystal Fiber Based Entangled Photon Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    shifted-fiber ( DSF ) and a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF) can be cooled at the liquid nitrogen temperature (77K). The advantage of the HNLF is a larger......signal for one of the photon-pair generated in four-wave mixing process. χ : the Kerr nonlinearity. k : wave vector. DSF : dispersion shifted fiber

  17. Fast-response liquid-crystal lens for 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yifan; Ren, Hongwen; Xu, Su; Li, Yan; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2014-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) display has become an increasingly important technology trend for information display applications. Dozens of different 3D display solutions have been proposed. The autostereoscopic 3D display based on lenticular microlens array is a promising approach, and fast-switching microlens array enables this system to display both 3D and conventional 2D images. Here we report two different fast-response microlens array designs. The first one is a blue phase liquid crystal lens driven by the Pedot: PSS resistive film electrodes. This BPLC lens exhibits several attractive features, such as polarization insensitivity, fast response time, simple driving scheme, and relatively low driving voltage, as compared to other BPLC lens designs. The second lens design has a double-layered structure. The first layer is a polarization dependent polymer microlens array, and the second layer is a thin twisted-nematic (TN) liquid crystal cell. When the TN cell is switched on/off, the traversing light through the polymeric lens array is either focused or defocused, so that 2D/3D images are displayed correspondingly. This lens design has low driving voltage, fast response time, and simple driving scheme. Simulation and experiment demonstrate that the performance of both switchable lenses meet the requirement of 3D display system design.

  18. SPADAS: a high-speed 3D single-photon camera for advanced driver assistance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronzi, D.; Zou, Y.; Bellisai, S.; Villa, F.; Tisa, S.; Tosi, A.; Zappa, F.

    2015-02-01

    Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) are the most advanced technologies to fight road accidents. Within ADAS, an important role is played by radar- and lidar-based sensors, which are mostly employed for collision avoidance and adaptive cruise control. Nonetheless, they have a narrow field-of-view and a limited ability to detect and differentiate objects. Standard camera-based technologies (e.g. stereovision) could balance these weaknesses, but they are currently not able to fulfill all automotive requirements (distance range, accuracy, acquisition speed, and frame-rate). To this purpose, we developed an automotive-oriented CMOS single-photon camera for optical 3D ranging based on indirect time-of-flight (iTOF) measurements. Imagers based on Single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) arrays offer higher sensitivity with respect to CCD/CMOS rangefinders, have inherent better time resolution, higher accuracy and better linearity. Moreover, iTOF requires neither high bandwidth electronics nor short-pulsed lasers, hence allowing the development of cost-effective systems. The CMOS SPAD sensor is based on 64 × 32 pixels, each able to process both 2D intensity-data and 3D depth-ranging information, with background suppression. Pixel-level memories allow fully parallel imaging and prevents motion artefacts (skew, wobble, motion blur) and partial exposure effects, which otherwise would hinder the detection of fast moving objects. The camera is housed in an aluminum case supporting a 12 mm F/1.4 C-mount imaging lens, with a 40°×20° field-of-view. The whole system is very rugged and compact and a perfect solution for vehicle's cockpit, with dimensions of 80 mm × 45 mm × 70 mm, and less that 1 W consumption. To provide the required optical power (1.5 W, eye safe) and to allow fast (up to 25 MHz) modulation of the active illumination, we developed a modular laser source, based on five laser driver cards, with three 808 nm lasers each. We present the full characterization of

  19. Photonic crystal slab quantum well infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchmair, S.; Detz, H.; Cole, G. D.; Andrews, A. M.; Klang, P.; Nobile, M.; Gansch, R.; Ostermaier, C.; Schrenk, W.; Strasser, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this letter we present a quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP), which is fabricated as a photonic crystal slab (PCS). With the PCS it is possible to enhance the absorption efficiency by increasing photon lifetime in the detector active region. To understand the optical properties of the device we simulate the PCS photonic band structure, which differs significantly from a real two-dimensional photonic crystal. By fabricating a PCS-QWIP with 100x less quantum well doping, compared to a standard QWIP, we are able to see strong absorption enhancement and sharp resonance peaks up to temperatures of 170 K.

  20. Steady state design of photonic transistor to achieve a switching gain>=3 dB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, V.; Chen, Yijing; Ho, S. T.

    2013-12-01

    A recently proposed two-staged photonic transistor that provides switching gain is based on the directional coupler with an active arm and a passive arm in each stage. The manipulation of optical interference through optically-controlled gain caused the switching. In the first stage, a long wavelength input signal pulse depletes carriers to change absorption and switch a short wavelength beam into the second stage. In the second stage, the switched short wavelength beam fills the conduction band with carriers to increase the gain seen by another long wavelength pump beam to switch it as the output signal. Through a suitable design of intensity and wavelength of the interacting beams and the length of each stage, photonic transistor exhibits switching gain and hence can drive multiple stages (high fan-out and cascadability). The smaller the detuning of wavelength between the interacting optical fields or shorter the photonic transistor length, smaller is the cumulative change in linear absorption/gain, manifesting in a smaller switching gain. Since the short wavelength beam fills the conduction band with carriers, its intensity depends on the ground state absorption of the medium, α0. And, since the long wavelength beam depletes carriers filled by the short wavelength beam, its wavelength depends on the gain of the pumped medium, g0. In this paper, we show that the operational intensities of photonic transistor must be such that |α0L1|>27 and g0L2>3.2 to achieve a gain>3dB, where L1 and L2 are the length of 1st and 2nd stages respectively.

  1. Novel photonic crystal cavities and related structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, Ting Shan

    2007-11-01

    The key accomplishment of this project is to achieve a much more in-depth understanding of the thermal emission physics of metallic photonic crystal through theoretical modeling and experimental measurements. An improved transfer matrix technique was developed to enable incorporation of complex dielectric function. Together with microscopic theory describing emitter radiative and non-radiative relaxation dynamics, a non-equilibrium thermal emission model is developed. Finally, experimental methodology was developed to measure absolute emissivity of photonic crystal at high temperatures with accuracy of +/-2%. Accurate emissivity measurements allow us to validate the procedure to treat the effect of the photonic crystal substrate.

  2. Time lapse microscopy of temperature control during self-assembly of 3D DNA crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn, Fiona W.; Jong, Michael Alexander; Tan, Andre; Tseng, Robert; Park, Eunice; Ohayon, Yoel P.; Sha, Ruojie; Mao, Chengde; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2017-10-01

    DNA nanostructures are created by exploiting the high fidelity base-pairing interactions of double-stranded branched DNA molecules. These structures present a convenient medium for the self-assembly of macroscopic 3D crystals. In some self-assemblies in this system, crystals can be formed by lowering the temperature, and they can be dissolved by raising it. The ability to monitor the formation and melting of these crystals yields information that can be used to monitor crystal formation and growth. Here, we describe the development of an inexpensive tool that enables direct observation of the crystal growth process as a function of both time and temperature. Using the hanging-drop crystallization of the well-characterized 2-turn DNA tensegrity triangle motif for our model system, its response to temperature has been characterized visually.

  3. Two-photon polymerization of 3-D zirconium oxide hybrid scaffolds for long-term stem cell growth.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Shelby A; Nguyen, Alexander K; Kumar, Girish; Zheng, Jiwen; Goering, Peter L; Koroleva, Anastasia; Chichkov, Boris N; Narayan, Roger J

    2014-06-01

    Two-photon polymerization is a technique that involves simultaneous absorption of two photons from a femtosecond laser for selective polymerization of a photosensitive material. In this study, two-photon polymerization was used for layer-by-layer fabrication of 3-D scaffolds composed of an inorganic-organic zirconium oxide hybrid material. Four types of scaffold microarchitectures were created, which exhibit layers of parallel line features at various orientations as well as pores between the line features. Long-term cell culture studies involving human bone marrow stromal cells were conducted using these 3-D scaffolds. Cellular adhesion and proliferation were demonstrated on all of the scaffold types; tissuelike structure was shown to span the pores. This study indicates that two-photon polymerization may be used to create microstructured scaffolds out of an inorganic-organic zirconium oxide hybrid material for use in 3-D tissue culture systems.

  4. Evaluation of single photon and Geiger mode Lidar for the 3D Elevation Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoker, Jason M.; Abdullah, Qassim; Nayegandhi, Amar; Winehouse, Jayna

    2016-01-01

    Data acquired by Harris Corporation’s (Melbourne, FL, USA) Geiger-mode IntelliEarth™ sensor and Sigma Space Corporation’s (Lanham-Seabrook, MD, USA) Single Photon HRQLS sensor were evaluated and compared to accepted 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) data and survey ground control to assess the suitability of these new technologies for the 3DEP. While not able to collect data currently to meet USGS lidar base specification, this is partially due to the fact that the specification was written for linear-mode systems specifically. With little effort on part of the manufacturers of the new lidar systems and the USGS Lidar specifications team, data from these systems could soon serve the 3DEP program and its users. Many of the shortcomings noted in this study have been reported to have been corrected or improved upon in the next generation sensors.

  5. Photonics crystal fiber Raman sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xuan; Bond, Tiziana C.; Zhang, Jin Z.; Li, Yat; Gu, Claire

    2012-11-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) employs a guiding mechanism fundamentally different from that in conventional index guiding fibers. In an HCPCF, periodic air channels in a glass matrix act as reflectors to confine light in an empty core. As a result, the interaction between light and glass can be very small. Therefore, HCPCF has been used in applications that require extremely low non-linearity, high breakdown threshold, and zero dispersion. However, their applications in optical sensing, especially in chemical and biological sensing, have only been extensively explored recently. Besides their well-recognized optical properties the hollow cores of the fibers can be easily filled with liquid or gas, providing an ideal sampling mechanism in sensors. Recently, we have demonstrated that by filling up a HCPCF with gas or liquid samples, it is possible to significantly increase the sensitivity of the sensors in either regular Raman or surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications. This is because the confinement of both light and sample inside the hollow core enables direct interaction between the propagating wave and the analyte. In this paper, we report our recent work on using HCPCF as a platform for Raman or SERS in the detection of low concentration greenhouse gas (ambient CO2), biomedically significant molecules (e.g., glucose), and bacteria. We have demonstrated that by filling up a HCPCF with gas or liquid samples, it is possible to significantly increase the sensitivity of the sensors in either regular Raman or SERS applications.

  6. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres.

    PubMed

    Russell, P St J; Beravat, R; Wong, G K L

    2017-02-28

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic 'space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of 'numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Authors.

  7. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    PubMed Central

    Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic ‘space’, cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of ‘numerical experiments’ based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069771

  8. Helically twisted photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, P. St. J.; Beravat, R.; Wong, G. K. L.

    2017-02-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental work on helically twisted photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) is reviewed. Helical Bloch theory is introduced, including a new formalism based on the tight-binding approximation. It is used to explore and explain a variety of unusual effects that appear in a range of different twisted PCFs, including fibres with a single core and fibres with N cores arranged in a ring around the fibre axis. We discuss a new kind of birefringence that causes the propagation constants of left- and right-spinning optical vortices to be non-degenerate for the same order of orbital angular momentum (OAM). Topological effects, arising from the twisted periodic `space', cause light to spiral around the fibre axis, with fascinating consequences, including the appearance of dips in the transmission spectrum and low loss guidance in coreless PCF. Discussing twisted fibres with a single off-axis core, we report that optical activity in a PCF is opposite in sign to that seen in a step-index fibre. Fabrication techniques are briefly described and emerging applications reviewed. The analytical results of helical Bloch theory are verified by an extensive series of `numerical experiments' based on finite-element solutions of Maxwell's equations in a helicoidal frame. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  9. 3D visualization of XFEL beam focusing properties using LiF crystal X-ray detector

    PubMed Central

    Pikuz, Tatiana; Faenov, Anatoly; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ozaki, Norimasa; Albertazzi, Bruno; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Sato, Yuya; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Pikuz, Sergei; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N.; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report, that by means of direct irradiation of lithium fluoride a (LiF) crystal, in situ 3D visualization of the SACLA XFEL focused beam profile along the propagation direction is realized, including propagation inside photoluminescence solid matter. High sensitivity and large dynamic range of the LiF crystal detector allowed measurements of the intensity distribution of the beam at distances far from the best focus as well as near the best focus and evaluation of XFEL source size and beam quality factor M2. Our measurements also support the theoretical prediction that for X-ray photons with energies ~10 keV the radius of the generated photoelectron cloud within the LiF crystal reaches about 600 nm before thermalization. The proposed method has a spatial resolution ~ 0.4–2.0 μm for photons with energies 6–14 keV and potentially could be used in a single shot mode for optimization of different focusing systems developed at XFEL and synchrotron facilities. PMID:26634431

  10. Coupled External Cavity Photonic Crystal Enhanced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Ge, Chun; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    We report a fundamentally new approach to enhance fluorescence in which surface adsorbed fluorophore-tagged biomolecules are excited on a photonic crystal surface that functions as a narrow bandwidth and tunable mirror of an external cavity laser. This scheme leads to ~10× increase in the electromagnetic enhancement factor compared to ordinary photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence. In our experiments, the cavity automatically tunes its lasing wavelength to the resonance wavelength of the photonic crystal, ensuring optimal on-resonance coupling even in the presence of variable device parameters and variations in the density of surface-adsorbed capture molecules. We achieve ~105× improvement in the limit of detection of a fluorophore-tagged protein compared to its detection on an unpatterned glass substrate. The enhanced fluorescence signal and easy optical alignment make cavity-coupled photonic crystals a viable approach for further reducing detection limits of optically-excited light emitters that are used in biological assays. PMID:23129575

  11. Coupled external cavity photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Ge, Chun; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-05-01

    We report a fundamentally new approach to enhance fluorescence in which surface adsorbed fluorophore-tagged biomolecules are excited on a photonic crystal surface that functions as a narrow bandwidth and tunable mirror of an external cavity laser. This scheme leads to ∼10× increase in the electromagnetic enhancement factor compared to ordinary photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence. In our experiments, the cavity automatically tunes its lasing wavelength to the resonance wavelength of the photonic crystal, ensuring optimal on-resonance coupling even in the presence of variable device parameters and variations in the density of surface-adsorbed capture molecules. We achieve ∼10(5) × improvement in the limit of detection of a fluorophore-tagged protein compared to its detection on an unpatterned glass substrate. The enhanced fluorescence signal and easy optical alignment make cavity-coupled photonic crystals a viable approach for further reducing detection limits of optically-excited light emitters that are used in biological assays.

  12. Optical analysis of nanoparticles via enhanced backscattering facilitated by 3-D photonic nanojets.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Chen, Zhigang; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2005-01-24

    We report the phenomenon of ultra-enhanced backscattering of visible light by nanoparticles facilitated by the 3-D photonic nanojet - a sub-diffraction light beam appearing at the shadow side of a plane-waveilluminated dielectric microsphere. Our rigorous numerical simulations show that backscattering intensity of nanoparticles can be enhanced up to eight orders of magnitude when locating in the nanojet. As a result, the enhanced backscattering from a nanoparticle with diameter on the order of 10 nm is well above the background signal generated by the dielectric microsphere itself. We also report that nanojet-enhanced backscattering is extremely sensitive to the size of the nanoparticle, permitting in principle resolving sub-nanometer size differences using visible light. Finally, we show how the position of a nanoparticle could be determined with subdiffractional accuracy by recording the angular distribution of the backscattered light. These properties of photonic nanojets promise to make this phenomenon a useful tool for optically detecting, differentiating, and sorting nanoparticles.

  13. Optical analysis of nanoparticles via enhanced backscattering facilitated by 3-D photonic nanojets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xu; Chen, Zhigang; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2005-01-01

    We report the phenomenon of ultra-enhanced backscattering of visible light by nanoparticles facilitated by the 3-D photonic nanojet a sub-diffraction light beam appearing at the shadow side of a plane-waveilluminated dielectric microsphere. Our rigorous numerical simulations show that backscattering intensity of nanoparticles can be enhanced up to eight orders of magnitude when locating in the nanojet. As a result, the enhanced backscattering from a nanoparticle with diameter on the order of 10 nm is well above the background signal generated by the dielectric microsphere itself. We also report that nanojet-enhanced backscattering is extremely sensitive to the size of the nanoparticle, permitting in principle resolving sub-nanometer size differences using visible light. Finally, we show how the position of a nanoparticle could be determined with subdiffractional accuracy by recording the angular distribution of the backscattered light. These properties of photonic nanojets promise to make this phenomenon a useful tool for optically detecting, differentiating, and sorting nanoparticles.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of photon migration in 3D turbid media accelerated by graphics processing units.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qianqian; Boas, David A

    2009-10-26

    We report a parallel Monte Carlo algorithm accelerated by graphics processing units (GPU) for modeling time-resolved photon migration in arbitrary 3D turbid media. By taking advantage of the massively parallel threads and low-memory latency, this algorithm allows many photons to be simulated simultaneously in a GPU. To further improve the computational efficiency, we explored two parallel random number generators (RNG), including a floating-point-only RNG based on a chaotic lattice. An efficient scheme for boundary reflection was implemented, along with the functions for time-resolved imaging. For a homogeneous semi-infinite medium, good agreement was observed between the simulation output and the analytical solution from the diffusion theory. The code was implemented with CUDA programming language, and benchmarked under various parameters, such as thread number, selection of RNG and memory access pattern. With a low-cost graphics card, this algorithm has demonstrated an acceleration ratio above 300 when using 1792 parallel threads over conventional CPU computation. The acceleration ratio drops to 75 when using atomic operations. These results render the GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation a practical solution for data analysis in a wide range of diffuse optical imaging applications, such as human brain or small-animal imaging.

  15. Respiratory gating for proton beam scanning versus photon 3D-CRT for breast cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Flejmer, Anna M; Edvardsson, Anneli; Dohlmar, Frida; Josefsson, Dan; Nilsson, Mats; Witt Nyström, Petra; Dasu, Alexandru

    2016-05-01

    Background Respiratory gating and proton therapy have both been proposed to reduce the cardiopulmonary burden in breast cancer radiotherapy. This study aims to investigate the additional benefit of proton radiotherapy for breast cancer with and without respiratory gating. Material and methods Twenty left-sided patients were planned on computed tomography (CT)-datasets acquired during enhanced inspiration gating (EIG) and free-breathing (FB), using photon three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and scanned proton beams. Ten patients received treatment to the whole breast only (WBO) and 10 were treated to the breast and the regional lymph nodes (BRN). Dosimetric parameters characterizing the coverage of target volumes and the cardiopulmonary burden were compared using a paired, two-tailed Student's t-test. Results Protons ensured comparable or better target coverage than photons in all patients during both EIG and FB. The heterogeneity index decreased from 12% with photons to about 5% with protons. The mean dose to the ipsilateral lung was reduced in BRN patients from 12 Gy to 7 Gy  (RBE) in EIG and from 14 Gy to 6-7 Gy (RBE) in FB, while for WBO patients all values were about 5-6 Gy (RBE). The mean dose to heart decreased by a factor of four in WBO patients [from 1.1 Gy to 0.3 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 2.1 Gy to 0.5 Gy (RBE) in FB] and 10 in BRN patients [from 2.1 Gy to 0.2 Gy (RBE) in EIG and from 3.4 Gy to 0.3 Gy (RBE) in FB]. Similarly, the mean and the near maximum dose to the left anterior descending artery (LAD) were significantly lower (p < 0.05) with protons in comparison with photons. Conclusion Proton spot scanning has a high potential to reduce the irradiation of organs at risk and other normal tissues for most patients, beyond what could be achieved with EIG and photon therapy. The largest dose sparing has been seen for BRN patients, both in terms of cardiopulmonary burden and integral dose.

  16. Observation of solid–solid transitions in 3D crystals of colloidal superballs

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Janne-Mieke; Pal, Antara; Ouhajji, Samia; Lekkerkerker, Henk N. W.; Philipse, Albert P.; Petukhov, Andrei V.

    2017-01-01

    Self-organization in anisotropic colloidal suspensions leads to a fascinating range of crystal and liquid crystal phases induced by shape alone. Simulations predict the phase behaviour of a plethora of shapes while experimental realization often lags behind. Here, we present the experimental phase behaviour of superball particles with a shape in between that of a sphere and a cube. In particular, we observe the formation of a plastic crystal phase with translational order and orientational disorder, and the subsequent transformation into rhombohedral crystals. Moreover, we uncover that the phase behaviour is richer than predicted, as we find two distinct rhombohedral crystals with different stacking variants, namely hollow-site and bridge-site stacking. In addition, for slightly softer interactions we observe a solid–solid transition between the two. Our investigation brings us one step closer to ultimately controlling the experimental self-assembly of superballs into functional materials, such as photonic crystals. PMID:28186101

  17. Observation of solid-solid transitions in 3D crystals of colloidal superballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, Janne-Mieke; Pal, Antara; Ouhajji, Samia; Lekkerkerker, Henk N. W.; Philipse, Albert P.; Petukhov, Andrei V.

    2017-02-01

    Self-organization in anisotropic colloidal suspensions leads to a fascinating range of crystal and liquid crystal phases induced by shape alone. Simulations predict the phase behaviour of a plethora of shapes while experimental realization often lags behind. Here, we present the experimental phase behaviour of superball particles with a shape in between that of a sphere and a cube. In particular, we observe the formation of a plastic crystal phase with translational order and orientational disorder, and the subsequent transformation into rhombohedral crystals. Moreover, we uncover that the phase behaviour is richer than predicted, as we find two distinct rhombohedral crystals with different stacking variants, namely hollow-site and bridge-site stacking. In addition, for slightly softer interactions we observe a solid-solid transition between the two. Our investigation brings us one step closer to ultimately controlling the experimental self-assembly of superballs into functional materials, such as photonic crystals.

  18. Photonic crystal: energy-related applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Zhuo; Park, Joong-Mok; Constant, Kristen; Kim, Tae-Geun; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2012-06-08

    We review recent work on photonic-crystal fabrication using soft-lithography techniques. We consider applications of the resulting structures in energy-related areas such as lighting and solar-energy harvesting. In general, our aim is to introduce the reader to the concepts of photonic crystals, describe their history, development, and fabrication techniques and discuss a selection of energy-related applications.

  19. Intrinsic spatial resolution evaluation of the X'tal cube PET detector based on a 3D crystal block segmented by laser processing.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Inadama, Naoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Moriya, Takahiro; Omura, Tomohide; Watanabe, Mitsuo; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2013-01-01

    The X'tal cube is a depth-of-interaction (DOI)-PET detector which is aimed at obtaining isotropic resolution by effective readout of scintillation photons from the six sides of a crystal block. The X'tal cube is composed of the 3D crystal block with isotropic resolution and arrays of multi-pixel photon counters (MPPCs). In this study, to fabricate the 3D crystal block efficiently and precisely, we applied a sub-surface laser engraving (SSLE) technique to a monolithic crystal block instead of gluing segmented small crystals. The SSLE technique provided micro-crack walls which carve a groove into a monolithic scintillator block. Using the fabricated X'tal cube, we evaluated its intrinsic spatial resolution to show a proof of concept of isotropic resolution. The 3D grids of 2 mm pitch were fabricated into an 18 × 18 × 18 mm(3) monolithic lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) crystal by the SSLE technique. 4 × 4 MPPCs were optically coupled to each surface of the crystal block. The X'tal cube was uniformly irradiated by (22)Na gamma rays, and all of the 3D grids on the 3D position histogram were separated clearly by an Anger-type calculation from the 96-channel MPPC signals. Response functions of the X'tal cube were measured by scanning with a (22)Na point source. The gamma-ray beam with a 1.0 mm slit was scanned in 0.25 mm steps by positioning of the X'tal cube at vertical and 45° incident angles. The average FWHM resolution at both incident angles was 2.1 mm. Therefore, we confirmed the isotropic spatial resolution performance of the X'tal cube.

  20. Rigorous analysis of an electric-field-driven liquid crystal lens for 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bong-Sik; Lee, Seung-Chul; Park, Woo-Sang

    2014-08-01

    We numerically analyzed the optical performance of an electric field driven liquid crystal (ELC) lens adopted for 3-dimensional liquid crystal displays (3D-LCDs) through rigorous ray tracing. For the calculation, we first obtain the director distribution profile of the liquid crystals by using the Erickson-Leslie motional equation; then, we calculate the transmission of light through the ELC lens by using the extended Jones matrix method. The simulation was carried out for a 9view 3D-LCD with a diagonal of 17.1 inches, where the ELC lens was slanted to achieve natural stereoscopic images. The results show that each view exists separately according to the viewing position at an optimum viewing distance of 80 cm. In addition, our simulation results provide a quantitative explanation for the ghost or blurred images between views observed from a 3D-LCD with an ELC lens. The numerical simulations are also shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The present simulation method is expected to provide optimum design conditions for obtaining natural 3D images by rigorously analyzing the optical functionalities of an ELC lens.

  1. Electrically Driven Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Brown-Goebeler, J. L. Jewell, and J. V. Hove, “Top- surface-emitting GaAs four- quantum - well lasers emitting at 0.85 μm,” Electorn. Lett., vol. 26, pp...modulation, lasers , light-emitting diodes, modulation, photodetectors, photonic bandgap materials, quantum dots (QDs). I. INTRODUCTION PHOTONIC...improved versus similar quantum well (QW) systems [32]. Fig. 2 shows a simplified schematic diagram of the lateral junction photonic crystal fabrication

  2. Photonic crystal waveguide created by selective infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas Bedoya, A.; Domachuk, P.; Grillet, C.; Monat, C.; Mägi, E. C.; Li, E.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2012-06-01

    The marriage of photonics and microfluidics ("optofluidics") uses the inherent mobility of fluids to reversibly tune photonic structures beyond traditional fabrication methods by infiltrating voids in said structures. Photonic crystals (PhCs) strongly control light on the wavelength scale and are well suited to optofluidic tuning because their periodic airhole microstructure is a natural candidate for housing liquids. The infiltration of a single row of holes in the PhC matrix modifies the effective refractive index allowing optical modes to be guided by the PhC bandgap. In this work we present the first experimental demonstration of a reconfigurable single mode W1 photonic crystal defect waveguide created by selective liquid infiltration. We modified a hexagonal silicon planar photonic crystal membrane by selectively filling a single row of air holes with ~300nm resolution, using high refractive index ionic liquid. The modification creates optical confinement in the infiltrated region and allows propagation of a single optical waveguide mode. We describe the challenges arising from the infiltration process and the liquid/solid surface interaction in the photonic crystal. We include a detailed comparison between analytic and numerical modeling and experimental results, and introduce a new approach to create an offset photonic crystal cavity by varying the nature of the selective infiltration process.

  3. Optical trapping apparatus, methods and applications using photonic crystal resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, David; Chen, Yih-Fan

    2015-06-16

    A plurality of photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatuses and a plurality optical trapping methods using the plurality of photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatuses include located and formed over a substrate a photonic waveguide that is coupled (i.e., either separately coupled or integrally coupled) with a photonic crystal resonator. In a particular embodiment, the photonic waveguide and the photonic crystal resonator comprise a monocrystalline silicon (or other) photonic material absent any chemical functionalization. In another particular embodiment, the photonic waveguide and the photonic crystal resonator comprise a silicon nitride material which when actuating the photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatus with a 1064 nanometer resonant photonic radiation wavelength (or other resonant photonic radiation wavelength in a range from about 700 to about 1200 nanometers) provides no appreciable heating of an aqueous sample fluid that is analyzed by the photonic crystal resonator optical trapping apparatus.

  4. 3D inverted colloidal crystals in realistic cell migration assays for drug screening applications.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Joakim; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Kuo, Cheng-Hwa R; Guck, Jochen; Sivaniah, Easan

    2011-12-01

    Screening drugs for their specific impact on cell mechanics, in addition to targeting adhesion and proteolysis, will be important for successfully moderating migration in infiltrative disorders including cancer metastasis. We present 3D inverted colloidal crystals made of hydrogel as a realistic cell migration assay, where the geometry and stiffness can be set independently to mimic the tissue requirements in question. We show the utility of this 3D assay for drug screening purposes, specifically in contrast to conventional 2D migration studies, by surveying the effects of commonly used cytoskeletal toxins that impact cell mechanics. This assay allows studying large cell numbers for good statistics but at single-cell resolution.

  5. Modelling clumpy photon-dominated regions in 3D. Understanding the Orion Bar stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andree-Labsch, S.; Ossenkopf-Okada, V.; Röllig, M.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Models of photon-dominated regions (PDRs) still fail to fully reproduce some of the observed properties. In particular they do not reproduce the combination of the intensities of different PDR cooling lines together with the chemical stratification, as observed for example for the Orion Bar PDR. Aims: We aim to construct a numerical PDR model, KOSMA-τ 3D, to simulate full spectral cubes of line emission from arbitrary PDRs in three dimensions (3D). The model will reproduce the intensity of the main cooling lines from the Orion Bar PDR and the observed layered structure of the different transitions. Methods: We built up a 3D compound, made of voxels (3D pixels) that contain a discrete mass distribution of spherical "clumpy" structures, approximating the fractal ISM. To analyse each individual clump the new code was combined with the KOSMA-τ PDR model. Probabilistic algorithms were used to calculate the local FUV flux for each voxel as well as the voxel-averaged line emissivities and optical depths, based on the properties of the individual clumps. Finally, the computation of the radiative transfer through the compound provided full spectral cubes. To test the new model we tried to simulate the structure of the Orion Bar PDR and compared the results to observations from HIFI/Herschel and from the Caltech Submillimetre Observatory (CSO). In this context new Herschel data from the HEXOS guaranteed-time key program is presented. Results: Our model is able to reproduce the line-integrated intensities within a factor of 2.5 and the observed stratification pattern within 0.016 pc for the [Cii] 158 μm and different 12/13CO and HCO+ transitions, based on the representation of the Orion Bar PDR by a clumpy edge-on cavity wall. In the cavity wall, a large fraction of the total mass needs to be contained in clumps. The mass of the interclump medium is constrained by the FUV penetration. Furthermore, the stratification profile cannot be reproduced by a model that has

  6. Design and performance of a fiber array coupled multi-channel photon counting, 3D imaging, airborne lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Genghua; Shu, Rong; Hou, Libing; Li, Ming

    2014-06-01

    Photon counting lidar has an ultra-high sensitivity which can be hundreds even thousands of times higher than the linear detection lidar. It can significantly increase the system's capability of detection rang and imaging density, saving size and power consumings in airborne or space-borne applications. Based on Geiger-mode Si avalanche photodiodes (Si-APD), a prototype photon counting lidar which used 8 APDs coupled with a 1×8-pixel fiber array has been made in June, 2011. The experiments with static objects showed that the photon counting lidar could operate in strong solar background with 0.04 receiving photoelectrons on average. Limited by less counting times in moving platforms, the probability of detection and the 3D imaging density would be lower than that in static platforms. In this paper, a latest fiber array coupled multi-channel photon counting, 3D imaging, airborne lidar system is introduced. The correlation range receiver algorithm of photon counting 3D imaging is improved for airborne signal photon events extraction and noise filter. The 3D imaging experiments in the helicopter shows that the false alarm rate is less than 6×10-7, and the correct rate is better than 99.9% with 4 received photoelectrons and 0.7MHz system noise on average.

  7. Photonic crystal biosensors towards on-chip integration.

    PubMed

    Threm, Daniela; Nazirizadeh, Yousef; Gerken, Martina

    2012-08-01

    Photonic crystal technology has attracted large interest in the last years. The possibility to generate highly sensitive sensor elements with photonic crystal structures is very promising for medical or environmental applications. The low-cost fabrication on the mass scale is as advantageous as the compactness and reliability of photonic crystal biosensors. The possibility to integrate microfluidic channels together with photonic crystal structures allows for highly compact devices. This article reviews different types of photonic crystal sensors including 1D photonic crystal biosensors, biosensors with photonic crystal slabs, photonic crystal waveguide biosensors and biosensors with photonic crystal microcavities. Their applications in biomolecular and pathogen detection are highlighted. The sensitivities and the detection limits of the different biosensors are compared. The focus is on the possibilities to integrate photonic crystal biosensors on-chip. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Three-dimensional control of light in a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab.

    PubMed

    Chow, E; Lin, S Y; Johnson, S G; Villeneuve, P R; Joannopoulos, J D; Wendt, J R; Vawter, G A; Zubrzycki, W; Hou, H; Alleman, A

    2000-10-26

    Optoelectronic devices are increasingly important in communication and information technology. To achieve the necessary manipulation of light (which carries information in optoelectronic devices), considerable efforts are directed at the development of photonic crystals--periodic dielectric materials that have so-called photonic bandgaps, which prohibit the propagation of photons having energies within the bandgap region. Straightforward application of the bandgap concept is generally thought to require three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals; their two-dimensional (2D) counterparts confine light in the crystal plane, but not in the perpendicular z direction, which inevitably leads to diffraction losses. Nonetheless, 2D photonic crystals still attract interest because they are potentially more amenable to fabrication by existing techniques and diffraction losses need not seriously impair utility. Here we report the fabrication of a waveguide-coupled photonic crystal slab (essentially a free-standing 2D photonic crystal) with a strong 2D bandgap at wavelengths of about 1.5 microm, yet which is capable of fully controlling light in all three dimensions. These features confirm theoretical calculations on the possibility of achieving 3D light control using 2D bandgaps, with index guiding providing control in the third dimension, and raise the prospect of being able to realize unusual photonic-crystal devices, such as thresholdless lasers.

  9. Controlling spontaneous emission in bioreplica photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Matthew R.; Butler, Elizabeth S.; Bartl, Michael H.

    2012-04-01

    Sophisticated methods have been created by nature to produce structure-based colors as a way to address the need of a wide variety of organisms. This pallet of available structures presents a unique opportunity for the investigation of new photonic crystal designs. Low-temperature sol-gel biotemplating methods were used to transform a single biotemplate into a variety of inorganic oxide structures. The density of optical states was calculated for a diamond-based natural photonic crystal, as well as several structures templated from it. Calculations were experimentally probed by spontaneous emission studies using time correlated single photon counting measurements.

  10. Enhancement of nonlinear effects using photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Soljacić, Marin; Joannopoulos, J D

    2004-04-01

    The quest for all-optical signal processing is generally deemed to be impractical because optical nonlinearities are usually weak. The emerging field of nonlinear photonic crystals seems destined to change this view dramatically. Theoretical considerations show that all-optical devices using photonic crystal designs promise to be smaller than the wavelength of light, and to operate with bandwidths that are very difficult to achieve electronically. When created in commonly used materials, these devices could operate at powers of only a few milliwatts. Moreover, if these designs are combined with materials and systems that support electromagnetically induced transparency, operation at single-photon power levels could be feasible.

  11. Chalcogenide Photonic Crystal Filters For Optical Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Suthar, B.; Bhargava, A.

    2011-12-12

    A proper arrangement of photonic crystal waveguide and a point defect cavity gives an important application of photonic filter device in optical communications. We have studied a narrow band filter and a channel drop filter device using 2-D photonic crystal with square lattice structure. A narrow band filter is applied to select a narrow frequency band signal from incoming light, while a channel drop filter is used to drop a particular frequency signal from incoming light. Chalcogenide As{sub 2}S{sub 3} is compared with conventional Si material regarding applications as feasible material for optical devices.

  12. Interferometry based multispectral photon-limited 2D and 3D integral image encryption employing the Hartley transform.

    PubMed

    Muniraj, Inbarasan; Guo, Changliang; Lee, Byung-Geun; Sheridan, John T

    2015-06-15

    We present a method of securing multispectral 3D photon-counted integral imaging (PCII) using classical Hartley Transform (HT) based encryption by employing optical interferometry. This method has the simultaneous advantages of minimizing complexity by eliminating the need for holography recording and addresses the phase sensitivity problem encountered when using digital cameras. These together with single-channel multispectral 3D data compactness, the inherent properties of the classical photon counting detection model, i.e. sparse sensing and the capability for nonlinear transformation, permits better authentication of the retrieved 3D scene at various depth cues. Furthermore, the proposed technique works for both spatially and temporally incoherent illumination. To validate the proposed technique simulations were carried out for both the 2D and 3D cases. Experimental data is processed and the results support the feasibility of the encryption method.

  13. Plasmonic photonic crystals realized through DNA-programmable assembly

    PubMed Central

    Park, Daniel J.; Zhang, Chuan; Ku, Jessie C.; Zhou, Yu; Schatz, George C.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional dielectric photonic crystals have well-established enhanced light–matter interactions via high Q factors. Their plasmonic counterparts based on arrays of nanoparticles, however, have not been experimentally well explored owing to a lack of available synthetic routes for preparing them. However, such structures should facilitate these interactions based on the small mode volumes associated with plasmonic polarization. Herein we report strong light-plasmon interactions within 3D plasmonic photonic crystals that have lattice constants and nanoparticle diameters that can be independently controlled in the deep subwavelength size regime by using a DNA-programmable assembly technique. The strong coupling within such crystals is probed with backscattering spectra, and the mode splitting (0.10 and 0.24 eV) is defined based on dispersion diagrams. Numerical simulations predict that the crystal photonic modes (Fabry–Perot modes) can be enhanced by coating the crystals with a silver layer, achieving moderate Q factors (∼102) over the visible and near-infrared spectrum. PMID:25548175

  14. Plasmonic photonic crystals realized through DNA-programmable assembly

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Daniel J.; Zhang, Chuan; Ku, Jessie C.; ...

    2014-12-29

    Three-dimensional dielectric photonic crystals have well-established enhanced light-matter interactions via high Q factors. Their plasmonic counterparts based on arrays of nanoparticles, however, have not been experimentally well explored owing to a lack of available synthetic routes for preparing them. However, such structures should facilitate these interactions based on the small mode volumes associated with plasmonic polarization. Herein we report strong light-plasmon interactions within 3D plasmonic photonic crystals that have lattice constants and nanoparticle diameters that can be independently controlled in the deep subwavelength size regime by using a DNA-programmable assembly technique. The strong coupling within such crystals is probed withmore » backscattering spectra, and the mode splitting (0.10 and 0.24 eV) is defined based on dispersion diagrams. Numerical simulations predict that the crystal photonic modes (Fabry-Perot modes) can be enhanced by coating the crystals with a silver layer, achieving moderate Q factors (~102) over the visible and near-infrared spectrum.« less

  15. Plasmonic photonic crystals realized through DNA-programmable assembly.

    PubMed

    Park, Daniel J; Zhang, Chuan; Ku, Jessie C; Zhou, Yu; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-01-27

    Three-dimensional dielectric photonic crystals have well-established enhanced light-matter interactions via high Q factors. Their plasmonic counterparts based on arrays of nanoparticles, however, have not been experimentally well explored owing to a lack of available synthetic routes for preparing them. However, such structures should facilitate these interactions based on the small mode volumes associated with plasmonic polarization. Herein we report strong light-plasmon interactions within 3D plasmonic photonic crystals that have lattice constants and nanoparticle diameters that can be independently controlled in the deep subwavelength size regime by using a DNA-programmable assembly technique. The strong coupling within such crystals is probed with backscattering spectra, and the mode splitting (0.10 and 0.24 eV) is defined based on dispersion diagrams. Numerical simulations predict that the crystal photonic modes (Fabry-Perot modes) can be enhanced by coating the crystals with a silver layer, achieving moderate Q factors (∼10(2)) over the visible and near-infrared spectrum.

  16. Etched distributed Bragg reflectors as three-dimensional photonic crystals: photonic bands and density of states.

    PubMed

    Pavarini, E; Andreani, L C

    2002-09-01

    The photonic band dispersion and density of states (DOS) are calculated for the three-dimensional (3D) hexagonal structure corresponding to a distributed Bragg reflector patterned with a 2D triangular lattice of circular holes. Results for the Si/SiO(2) and GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As systems determine the optimal parameters for which a gap in the 2D plane occurs and overlaps the 1D gap of the multilayer. The DOS is considerably reduced in correspondence with the overlap of 2D and 1D gaps. Also, the local density of states (i.e., the DOS weighted with the squared electric field at a given point) has strong variations depending on the position. Both results imply substantial changes of spontaneous emission rates and patterns for a local emitter embedded in the structure and make this system attractive for the fabrication of a 3D photonic crystal with controlled radiative properties.

  17. Preparation of metallo-dielectric photonic crystals by multi-photon direct laser writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuebler, Stephen M.; Tal, Amir; Chen, Yun-Sheng

    2008-02-01

    Metallo-dielectric photonic crystals (MDPCs) can exhibit intriguing and potentially useful optical properties, including ultra-wide photonic bandgaps, engineered thermal emission, and negative refractive index. But access to such materials has been limited by the lack of suitable methods for their preparation. We have developed a route to three-dimensional (3D) MDPCs that involves fabricating a polymeric pre-form by multi-photon direct laser writing and then conformally depositing metal onto the pre-form by electroless metallization. We use the approach to prepare silver- and copper-plated "woodpile" PCs having face-centered tetragonal symmetry and unit-cell period of several micrometers. The resulting 3D metallized structures exhibit mid-infrared reflectance that is consistent with theory and experimental observations obtained for MDPCs prepared by other routes. These data indicate that multi-photon direct laser writing coupled with electroless metallization is a viable route to complex 3D MDPCs of many symmetries and basis sets and provides a path for integrating such structures with other micron-scale optical elements.

  18. Amplified Photon Upconversion by Photonic Shell of Cholesteric Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2017-04-26

    As an effective platform to exploit triplet-triplet-annihilation-based photon upconversion (TTA-UC), microcapsules composed of a fluidic UC core and photonic shell are microfluidically prepared using a triple emulsion as the template. The photonic shell consists of cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) with a periodic helical structure, exhibiting a photonic band gap. Combined with planar anchoring at the boundaries, the shell serves as a resonance cavity for TTA-UC emission and enables spectral tuning of the UC under low-power-density excitation. The CLC shell can be stabilized by introducing a polymerizable mesogen in the LC host. Because of the microcapsule spherical symmetry, spontaneous emission of the delayed fluorescence is omnidirectionally amplified at the edge of the stop band. These results demonstrate the range of opportunities provided by TTA-UC systems for the future design of low-threshold photonic devices.

  19. 3D Magnetohydrodynamic Models of Nonthermal Photon Emission in the Binary System γ 2 Velorum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitberger, K.; Kissmann, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.

    2017-09-01

    Recent reports claiming an association of the massive star binary system {γ }2 Velorum (WR 11) with a high-energy γ-ray source observed by Fermi-LAT contrast the so far exclusive role of η Carinae as the hitherto only detected γ-ray emitter in the source class of particle-accelerating colliding-wind binary (CWB) systems. We offer support to this claim of association by providing dedicated model predictions for the nonthermal photon emission spectrum of {γ }2 Velorum. We use 3D magnetohydrodynamic modeling (MHD) to investigate the structure and conditions of the wind-collision region (WCR) of {γ }2 Velorum including the important effect of radiative braking in the stellar winds. A transport equation is then solved for the entire computational domain to study the propagation of relativistic electrons and protons. The resulting distributions of particles are subsequently used to compute nonthermal photon emission components. In agreement with observation in X-ray spectroscopy, our simulations yield a large shock-cone opening angle. We find the nonthermal γ-ray emission of {γ }2 Velorum to be of hadronic origin owing to the strong radiation fields in the binary system, which inhibit the acceleration of electrons to energies sufficiently high for efficient inverse-Compton radiation. We also discuss the strong dependence of a hadronic γ-ray component on the energy-dependent diffusion used in the simulations. Of two mass-loss rates for the WR star found in literature, only the higher rate is able to accommodate the observed γ-ray spectrum with reasonable values for important simulation parameters such as the injection ratio of high-energy particles within the WCR.

  20. Crystallization-modulated nanoporous polymeric materials with hierarchical patterned surfaces and 3D interpenetrated internal channels.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lijun; Shi, Xianchun; Ye, Cuicui; Chen, Zhouli; Zeng, Mengmeng; You, Jichun; Li, Yongjin

    2015-04-01

    Poly(oxymethylene)/poly(L-lactic acid) (POM/PLLA) blends are typical melt-miscible binary systems. During isothermal crystallization at various temperatures, in the presence of amorphous PLLA chains, POM crystallizes into banded spherulites with different band spaces, which forms a continuous crystalline phase and serves as a sturdy frame in the final porous materials. On the other hand, the amorphous PLLA chains are simultaneously expelled out from POM crystal lamellae to generate the other continuous phase during the crystallization of POM. Consequently, the interpenetration of the POM lamellae and the amorphous PLLA phase construct a cocontinuous phase structure. All the PLLA constituents are fully included in the interlamellar or interfibrillar of POM crystals. Thus, nanoporous POM materials with hierarchical patterned surface and 3D interpenetrated internal channels have been successfully obtained by extracting the amorphous PLLA phase. It is further found that the POM crystal morphologies in the blends are much dependent on the crystallization conditions. Therefore, the hierarchical patterned structure and the size of internal channels (pore size) can be modulated by adjusting the crystallization conditions.

  1. 3D position determination in monolithic crystals coupled to SiPMs for PET.

    PubMed

    Etxebeste, Ane; Barrio, John; Muñoz, Enrique; Oliver, Josep F; Solaz, Carles; Llosá, Gabriela

    2016-05-21

    The interest in using continuous monolithic crystals in positron emission tomography (PET) has grown in the last years. Coupled to silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), the detector can combine high sensitivity and high resolution, the two main factors to be maximized in a positron emission tomograph. In this work, the position determination capability of a detector comprised of a [Formula: see text] mm(3) LYSO crystal coupled to an [Formula: see text]-pixel array of SiPMs is evaluated. The 3D interaction position of γ-rays is estimated using an analytical model of the light distribution including reflections on the facets of the crystal. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to evaluate different crystal reflectors and geometries. The method has been characterized and applied to different cases. Intrinsic resolution obtained with the position estimation method used in this work, applied to experimental data, achieves sub-millimetre resolution values. Average resolution over the detector surface for 5 mm thick crystal is  ∼0.9 mm FWHM and  ∼1.2 mm FWHM for 10 mm thick crystal. Depth of interaction resolution is close to 2 mm FWHM in both cases, while the FWTM is  ∼5.3 mm for 5 mm thick crystal and  ∼9.6 mm for 10 mm thick crystal.

  2. Optically switchable liquid crystal photonic structures.

    PubMed

    Urbas, Augustine; Tondiglia, Vincent; Natarajan, Lalgudi; Sutherland, Richard; Yu, Haiping; Li, J-H; Bunning, Timothy

    2004-10-27

    Photo-optic materials offer the possibility of light controlled photonic devices, intelligent and environmentally adaptive optical materials. One strategy for creating these materials is the combination of structure formation through holographic photopolymerization and the variable optical properties of liquid crystals. Holographically patterned, polymer stabilized liquid crystals (HPSLCs) have proven to be useful optical materials. By incorporating photo-optic, azobenzene-derived liquid crystal blends into such material systems, we have generated practical photoresponsive optical materials.

  3. Thermal tunability of photonic bandgaps in liquid crystal filled polymer photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Doudou; Chen, Guoxiang; Wang, Lili

    2016-05-01

    A highly tunable bandgap-guiding polymer photonic crystal fiber is designed by infiltrating the cladding air holes with liquid crystal 5CB. Structural parameter dependence and thermal tunability of the photonic bandgaps, mode properties and confinement losses of the designed fiber are investigated. Bandgaps red shift as the temperature goes up. Average thermal tuning sensitivity of 30.9 nm/°C and 20.6 nm/°C is achieved around room temperature for the first and second photonic bandgap, respectively. Our results provide theoretical references for applications of polymer photonic crystal fiber in sensing and tunable fiber-optic devices.

  4. Gold nanostars: surfactant-free synthesis, 3D modelling, and two-photon photoluminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Khoury, Christopher G.; Hwang, Hanjun; Wilson, Christy M.; Grant, Gerald A.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the control of the optical and plasmonic properties of unique nanosystems—gold nanostars—both experimentally and theoretically permits superior design and fabrication for biomedical applications. Here, we present a new, surfactant-free synthesis method of biocompatible gold nanostars with adjustable geometry such that the plasmon band can be tuned into the near-infrared region ‘tissue diagnostic window’, which is most suitable for in vivo imaging. Theoretical modelling was performed for multiple-branched 3D nanostars and yielded absorption spectra in good agreement with experimental results. The plasmon band shift was attributed to variations in branch aspect ratio, and the plasmon band intensifies with increasing branch number, branch length, and overall star size. Nanostars showed an extremely strong two-photon photoluminescence (TPL) process. The TPL imaging of wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA) functionalized nanostars on BT549 breast cancer cells and of PEGylated nanostars circulating in the vasculature, examined through a dorsal window chamber in vivo in laboratory mouse studies, demonstrated that gold nanostars can serve as an efficient contrast agent for biological imaging applications.

  5. Gold nanostars: surfactant-free synthesis, 3D modelling, and two-photon photoluminescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Khoury, Christopher G; Hwang, Hanjun; Wilson, Christy M; Grant, Gerald A; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the control of the optical and plasmonic properties of unique nanosystems—gold nanostars—both experimentally and theoretically permits superior design and fabrication for biomedical applications. Here, we present a new, surfactant-free synthesis method of biocompatible gold nanostars with adjustable geometry such that the plasmon band can be tuned into the near-infrared region ‘tissue diagnostic window’, which is most suitable for in vivo imaging. Theoretical modelling was performed for multiple-branched 3D nanostars and yielded absorption spectra in good agreement with experimental results. The plasmon band shift was attributed to variations in branch aspect ratio, and the plasmon band intensifies with increasing branch number, branch length, and overall star size. Nanostars showed an extremely strong two-photon photoluminescence (TPL) process. The TPL imaging of wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA) functionalized nanostars on BT549 breast cancer cells and of PEGylated nanostars circulating in the vasculature, examined through a dorsal window chamber in vivo in laboratory mouse studies, demonstrated that gold nanostars can serve as an efficient contrast agent for biological imaging applications. PMID:22260928

  6. Switching of Photonic Crystal Lasers by Graphene.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Min-Soo; Kim, Ha-Reem; Kim, Kyoung-Ho; Jeong, Kwang-Yong; Park, Jin-Sung; Choi, Jae-Hyuck; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Lee, Jung Min; Park, Won Il; Song, Jung-Hwan; Seo, Min-Kyo; Park, Hong-Gyu

    2017-03-08

    Unique features of graphene have motivated the development of graphene-integrated photonic devices. In particular, the electrical tunability of graphene loss enables high-speed modulation of light and tuning of cavity resonances in graphene-integrated waveguides and cavities. However, efficient control of light emission such as lasing, using graphene, remains a challenge. In this work, we demonstrate on/off switching of single- and double-cavity photonic crystal lasers by electrical gating of a monolayer graphene sheet on top of photonic crystal cavities. The optical loss of graphene was controlled by varying the gate voltage Vg, with the ion gel atop the graphene sheet. First, the fundamental properties of graphene were investigated through the transmittance measurement and numerical simulations. Next, optically pumped lasing was demonstrated for a graphene-integrated single photonic crystal cavity at Vg below -0.6 V, exhibiting a low lasing threshold of ∼480 μW, whereas lasing was not observed at Vg above -0.6 V owing to the intrinsic optical loss of graphene. Changing quality factor of the graphene-integrated photonic crystal cavity enables or disables the lasing operation. Moreover, in the double-cavity photonic crystal lasers with graphene, switching of individual cavities with separate graphene sheets was achieved, and these two lasing actions were controlled independently despite the close distance of ∼2.2 μm between adjacent cavities. We believe that our simple and practical approach for switching in graphene-integrated active photonic devices will pave the way toward designing high-contrast and ultracompact photonic integrated circuits.

  7. Tuning photonic bands in plasma metallic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Mayank Kumar; Chaudhari, Sachin

    2016-11-01

    Introducing plasma in the background provides additional degrees of freedom for tuning dispersion curves of photonic crystals. 2D photonic crystals in triangular lattice arrangements offer more global bandgap regions and thus are of more interest for various applications. The dispersion characteristics of a two-dimensional plasma metallic photonic crystal (PMPC) in square as well as triangular lattice arrangements have been analyzed in this paper using the orthogonal finite difference time domain method. The dispersion characteristics of PMPCs for the range of r/a ratios and plasma frequencies for triangular lattice configuration have been analyzed. On introducing plasma in the background, the photonic bands of PMPC are shifted towards higher normalized frequencies. This shift is more for lower bands and increases with plasma frequency. The cut-off frequency was observed for both TE and TM polarizations in PMPC and showed strong dependence on r/a ratio as well as plasma frequency. Photonic bandgaps of PMPC may be tuned by controlling plasma parameters, giving opportunity for utilizing these PMPC structures for various applications such as fine-tuning cavities for enhanced light-matter interaction, plasmonic waveguides, and Gyrotron cavities.

  8. Viewing zone duplication of multi-projection 3D display system using uniaxial crystal.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Kun; Park, Soon-Gi; Moon, Seokil; Lee, Byoungho

    2016-04-18

    We propose a novel multiplexing technique for increasing the viewing zone of a multi-view based multi-projection 3D display system by employing double refraction in uniaxial crystal. When linearly polarized images from projector pass through the uniaxial crystal, two possible optical paths exist according to the polarization states of image. Therefore, the optical paths of the image could be changed, and the viewing zone is shifted in a lateral direction. The polarization modulation of the image from a single projection unit enables us to generate two viewing zones at different positions. For realizing full-color images at each viewing zone, a polarization-based temporal multiplexing technique is adopted with a conventional polarization switching device of liquid crystal (LC) display. Through experiments, a prototype of a ten-view multi-projection 3D display system presenting full-colored view images is implemented by combining five laser scanning projectors, an optically clear calcite (CaCO3) crystal, and an LC polarization rotator. For each time sequence of temporal multiplexing, the luminance distribution of the proposed system is measured and analyzed.

  9. Ultrafast optical switching using photonic molecules in photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanhui; Qian, Chenjiang; Qiu, Kangsheng; Gao, Yunan; Xu, Xiulai

    2015-04-06

    We study the coupling between photonic molecules and waveguides in photonic crystal slab structures using finite-difference time-domain method and coupled mode theory. In a photonic molecule with two cavities, the coupling of cavity modes results in two super-modes with symmetric and anti-symmetric field distributions. When two super-modes are excited simultaneously, the energy of electric field oscillates between the two cavities. To excite and probe the energy oscillation, we integrate photonic molecule with two photonic crystal waveguides. In coupled structure, we find that the quality factors of two super-modes might be different because of different field distributions of super-modes. After optimizing the radii of air holes between two cavities of photonic molecule, nearly equal quality factors of two super-modes are achieved, and coupling strengths between the waveguide modes and two super-modes are almost the same. In this case, complete energy oscillations between two cavities can be obtained with a pumping source in one waveguide, which can be read out by another waveguide. Finally, we demonstrate that the designed structure can be used for ultrafast optical switching with a time scale of a few picoseconds.

  10. Single crystal to single crystal transition in (10, 3)-d framework with pyrazine-2-carboxylate ligand: Synthesis, structures and magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qian; Zhao, Jiong-Peng; Liu, Zhong-Yi

    2012-12-15

    Assembling of pyrazine-2-carboxylate (Pzc) acid with nickel chlorine under solvothermal condition with MeOH as solvent gave a porous complex 1 {l_brace}[Ni(Pzc)ClH{sub 2}O]{center_dot}MeOH{r_brace}{sub n} with 1D channels. In 1 the ligands and metal ions are connected by three of each other and a rare (10,3)-d topology net is gained. The MeOH molecules filled in the 1D channels as guests. It is interesting that 1 undergoes a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to another complex 2 when the guest MeOH molecules in the channels are exchanged by water molecules. Magnetic study indicates anti-ferromagnetic couplings exist in the two complexes and the guest exchange in the complex has little influence on the magnetism. - Graphical abstract: A porous complex 1 with rare (10,3)-d net was gained, and 1 underwent a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to another phase 2. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New (10,3)-d net was obtained with pyrazine-2-carboxylate ligands as a triangular node. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The complex 1 has a 1D channel filled with methanol molecules as guests. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 1 could undergo SCSC structural transition to 2 after guests exchanged. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antiferromagnetic interactions were found in 1 and 2.

  11. Section Chern number for a three-dimensional photonic crystal and the bulk-edge correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oono, Shuhei; Kariyado, Toshikaze; Hatsugai, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    We have characterized the robust propagation modes of electromagnetic waves in helical structures by the section Chern number that is defined for a two-dimensional (2D) section of the three-dimensional (3D) Brillouin zone. The Weyl point in the photonic bands is associated with a discontinuous jump of the section Chern number. A spatially localized Gaussian basis set is used to calculate the section Chern numbers where we have implemented the divergence-free condition on each basis function in 3D. The validity of the bulk-edge correspondence in a 3D photonic crystal is discussed in relation to the broken inversion symmetry.

  12. Photonic quasi-crystal terahertz lasers

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, Miriam Serena; Nobile, Michele; Ronzani, Alberto; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Castellano, Fabrizio; Talora, Valerio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles

    2014-01-01

    Quasi-crystal structures do not present a full spatial periodicity but are nevertheless constructed starting from deterministic generation rules. When made of different dielectric materials, they often possess fascinating optical properties, which lie between those of periodic photonic crystals and those of a random arrangement of scatterers. Indeed, they can support extended band-like states with pseudogaps in the energy spectrum, but lacking translational invariance, they also intrinsically feature a pattern of ‘defects’, which can give rise to critically localized modes confined in space, similar to Anderson modes in random structures. If used as laser resonators, photonic quasi-crystals open up design possibilities that are simply not possible in a conventional periodic photonic crystal. In this letter, we exploit the concept of a 2D photonic quasi crystal in an electrically injected laser; specifically, we pattern the top surface of a terahertz quantum-cascade laser with a Penrose tiling of pentagonal rotational symmetry, reaching 0.1–0.2% wall-plug efficiencies and 65 mW peak output powers with characteristic surface-emitting conical beam profiles, result of the rich quasi-crystal Fourier spectrum. PMID:25523102

  13. Photonic quasi-crystal terahertz lasers.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Miriam Serena; Nobile, Michele; Ronzani, Alberto; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Castellano, Fabrizio; Talora, Valerio; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H; Davies, A Giles

    2014-12-19

    Quasi-crystal structures do not present a full spatial periodicity but are nevertheless constructed starting from deterministic generation rules. When made of different dielectric materials, they often possess fascinating optical properties, which lie between those of periodic photonic crystals and those of a random arrangement of scatterers. Indeed, they can support extended band-like states with pseudogaps in the energy spectrum, but lacking translational invariance, they also intrinsically feature a pattern of 'defects', which can give rise to critically localized modes confined in space, similar to Anderson modes in random structures. If used as laser resonators, photonic quasi-crystals open up design possibilities that are simply not possible in a conventional periodic photonic crystal. In this letter, we exploit the concept of a 2D photonic quasi crystal in an electrically injected laser; specifically, we pattern the top surface of a terahertz quantum-cascade laser with a Penrose tiling of pentagonal rotational symmetry, reaching 0.1-0.2% wall-plug efficiencies and 65 mW peak output powers with characteristic surface-emitting conical beam profiles, result of the rich quasi-crystal Fourier spectrum.

  14. Liquid crystals for photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniewicz, A.; Gniewek, A.; Parka, J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we describe application of liquid crystals in optical imaging and processing. Electrically and optically addressed liquid crystal spatial light modulators are key elements in real-time holographic devices. Their implementation for beam steering and hologram formation is briefly discussed. The Joint Fourier transform optical correlator for pattern recognition is presented as well as the use of liquid crystals for the adaptive optics purposes is discussed.

  15. The effect of pose variability and repeated reliability of segmental centres of mass acquisition when using 3D photonic scanning.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chuang-Yuan; Pease, David L; Sanders, Ross H

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) photonic scanning is an emerging technique to acquire accurate body segment parameter data. This study established the repeated reliability of segmental centres of mass when using 3D photonic scanning (3DPS). Seventeen male participants were scanned twice by a 3D whole-body laser scanner. The same operators conducted the reconstruction and segmentation processes to obtain segmental meshes for calculating the segmental centres of mass. The segmental centres of mass obtained from repeated 3DPS were compared by relative technical error of measurement (TEM). Hypothesis tests were conducted to determine the size of change required for each segment to be determined a true variation. The relative TEMs for all segments were less than 5%. The relative changes in centres of mass at ±1.5% for most segments can be detected (p < 0.05). The arm segments which are difficult to keep in the same scanning pose generated more error than other segments. Practitioner Summary: Three-dimensional photonic scanning is an emerging technique to acquire body segment parameter data. This study established the repeated reliability of segmental centres of mass when using 3D photonic scanning and emphasised that the error for arm segments need to be considered while using this technique to acquire centres of mass.

  16. Topological photonics: From crystals to particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siroki, Gleb; Huidobro, Paloma A.; Giannini, Vincenzo

    2017-07-01

    Photonic crystal topological insulators host protected states at their edges. In the band structure these edge states appear as continuous bands crossing the photonic band gap. They allow light to propagate unidirectionally and without scattering. In practice it is essential to make devices relying on these effects as miniature as possible. Here we study photonic topological insulator particles (finite crystals). In such particles the edge state frequencies are discrete. Nevertheless, the discrete states support pseudospin-dependent unidirectional propagation. They allow light to bend around sharp corners similarly to the continuous edge states and act as topologically protected whispering gallery modes, which can store and filter light as well as manipulate its angular momentum. Though we consider a particular all-dielectric realization that does not require a magnetic field, the results in the findings are general, explaining multiple experimental observations of discrete transmission peaks in photonic topological insulators.

  17. Spectral element method for band-structure calculations of 3D phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Linlin; Liu, Na; Zhou, Jianyang; Zhou, Yuanguo; Wang, Jiamin; Huo Liu, Qing

    2016-11-01

    The spectral element method (SEM) is a special kind of high-order finite element method (FEM) which combines the flexibility of a finite element method with the accuracy of a spectral method. In contrast to the traditional FEM, the SEM exhibits advantages in the high-order accuracy as the error decreases exponentially with the increase of interpolation degree by employing the Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre (GLL) polynomials as basis functions. In this study, the spectral element method is developed for the first time for the determination of band structures of 3D isotropic/anisotropic phononic crystals (PCs). Based on the Bloch theorem, we present a novel, intuitive discretization formulation for Navier equation in the SEM scheme for periodic media. By virtue of using the orthogonal Legendre polynomials, the generalized eigenvalue problem is converted to a regular one in our SEM implementation to improve the efficiency. Besides, according to the specific geometry structure, 8-node and 27-node hexahedral elements as well as an analytic mesh have been used to accurately capture curved PC models in our SEM scheme. To verify its accuracy and efficiency, this study analyses the phononic-crystal plates with square and triangular lattice arrangements, and the 3D cubic phononic crystals consisting of simple cubic (SC), bulk central cubic (BCC) and faced central cubic (FCC) lattices with isotropic or anisotropic scatters. All the numerical results considered demonstrate that SEM is superior to the conventional FEM and can be an efficient alternative method for accurate determination of band structures of 3D phononic crystals.

  18. Generation of Wannier functions for photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Christian; Mack, Patrick; Busch, Kurt

    2013-08-01

    We present an approach for the efficient generation of Wannier functions for Photonic Crystal computations that is based on a combination of group-theoretical analysis and efficient minimization strategies. In particular, we describe the symmetry properties that allow for exponential localization of Wannier functions and how they are related to the underlying Bloch mode symmetries of the photonic band structure and we show that no exponentially localized Wannier functions can be created from the physical modes of a three-dimensional crystal. Moreover, we comment on the use of conjugate gradient and randomized minimization algorithms that—together with the group theoretical considerations—facilitate the efficient numerical determination of maximally localized Wannier functions for many bands. This is a requirement for the accurate computation of Photonic Crystal functional elements and devices.

  19. A compact acousto-optic lens for 2D and 3D femtosecond based 2-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kirkby, Paul A.; Naga Srinivas, N.K.M.; Silver, R. Angus

    2010-01-01

    We describe a high speed 3D Acousto-Optic Lens Microscope (AOLM) for femtosecond 2-photon imaging. By optimizing the design of the 4 AO Deflectors (AODs) and by deriving new control algorithms, we have developed a compact spherical AOL with a low temporal dispersion that enables 2-photon imaging at 10-fold lower power than previously reported. We show that the AOLM can perform high speed 2D raster-scan imaging (>150 Hz) without scan rate dependent astigmatism. It can deflect and focus a laser beam in a 3D random access sequence at 30 kHz and has an extended focusing range (>137 μm; 40X 0.8NA objective). These features are likely to make the AOLM a useful tool for studying fast physiological processes distributed in 3D space PMID:20588506

  20. Veselago lens by photonic hyper-crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zun Narimanov, Evgenii E.

    2014-07-21

    Based on the recent concept of the photonic hyper-crystal—an artificial optical medium that combines the properties of hyperbolic materials and photonic crystals, we present the imaging system functioning as a Veselago lens. This planar lens shows a nearly constant negative refractive index with substantially reduced image aberrations, and can find potential applications in photolithography and hot-spots detection of silicon-based integrated circuits.

  1. Natural photonic crystals: formation, structure, function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, Michael H.; Dahlby, Michael R.; Barrows, Frank P.; Richens, Zachary J.; Terooatea, Tommy; Jorgensen, Matthew R.

    2012-03-01

    The structure and properties of natural photonic crystals are discussed using the colored scales of the beetle Lamprocyphus augustus as an example. While the exact mechanism behind the formation of these biopolymeric photonic structures has yet to be fully explored, similarities of these structures to intracellular cubic membrane architectures are introduced. Some crucial parameters behind the formation of cubic membranes are discussed. Using these insights, intracellular cubic membrane structures are transformed into an extracellular environment.

  2. Fano resonance between Mie and Bragg scattering in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Rybin, M V; Khanikaev, A B; Inoue, M; Samusev, K B; Steel, M J; Yushin, G; Limonov, M F

    2009-07-10

    We report the observation of a Fano resonance between continuum Mie scattering and a narrow Bragg band in synthetic opal photonic crystals. The resonance leads to a transmission spectrum exhibiting a Bragg dip with an asymmetric profile, which can be tunably reversed to a Bragg rise. The Fano asymmetry parameter is linked with the dielectric contrast between the permittivity of the filler and the specific value determined by the opal matrix. The existence of the Fano resonance is directly related to disorder due to nonuniformity of a-SiO2 opal spheres. The theoretical "quasi-3D" model produces results in excellent agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Multiple Colors Output on Voile through 3D Colloidal Crystals with Robust Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yao; Tang, Bingtao; Ju, Benzhi; Wu, Suli; Zhang, Shufen

    2017-01-25

    Distinguished from the chromatic mechanism of dyes and pigments, structural color is derived from physical interactions of visible light with structures that are periodic at the scale of the wavelength of light. Using colloidal crystals with coloring functions for fabrics has resulted in significant improvements compared with chemical colors because the structural color from colloidal crystals bears many unique and fascinating optical properties, such as vivid iridescence and nonphotobleaching. However, the poor mechanical performance of the structural color films cannot meet actual requirements because of the weak point contact of colloidal crystal particles. Herein, we demonstrate in this study the patterning on voile fabrics with high mechanical strength on account of the periodic array lock effect of polymers, and multiple structural color output was simultaneously achieved by a simple two-phase self-assembly method for printing voile fabrics with 3D colloidal crystals. The colored voile fabrics exhibit high color saturation, good mechanical stability, and multiple-color patterns printable. In addition, colloidal crystals are promising potential substitutes for organic dyes and pigments because colloidal crystals are environmentally friendly.

  4. Ultra compact spectrometer apparatus and method using photonic crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods of photonic crystal formation, and to methods and apparatus for using such photonic crystals, particularly in conjunction with detector arrays. Photonic crystal parameters and detector array parameters are compared to optimize the selection and orientation of a photonic crystal shape. A photonic crystal is operatively positioned relative to a plurality of light sensors. The light sensors can be separated by a pitch distance and positioned within one half of the pitch distance of an exit surface of the photonic crystals.

  5. Efficient beaming of self-collimated light from photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Moon; Lee, Sun-Goo; Park, Hae Yong; Kim, Jae-Eun

    2008-12-08

    We propose a novel structure for achieving highly efficient beaming of self-collimated light from two-dimensional photonic crystals. The finite-difference time-domain simulations show that both enhanced transmission and highly directional emission of self-collimated beams from photonic crystals are achieved by using the bending and splitting of self-collimated beams in photonic crystals, and also by introducing an antireflection coating-like photonic crystal collimator to the exit surface of the structure. This structure is potentially important for highly efficient coupling of self-collimated beams from photonic crystals into conventional optical fibers and photonic crystal waveguides.

  6. A SiPM-based isotropic-3D PET detector X'tal cube with a three-dimensional array of 1 mm(3) crystals.

    PubMed

    Yamaya, Taiga; Mitsuhashi, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Inadama, Naoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Murayama, Hideo; Kawai, Hideyuki; Suga, Mikio; Watanabe, Mitsuo

    2011-11-07

    We are developing a novel, general purpose isotropic-3D PET detector X'tal cube which has high spatial resolution in all three dimensions. The research challenge for this detector is implementing effective detection of scintillation photons by covering six faces of a segmented crystal block with silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). In this paper, we developed the second prototype of the X'tal cube for a proof-of-concept. We aimed at realizing an ultimate detector with 1.0 mm(3) cubic crystals, in contrast to our previous development using 3.0 mm(3) cubic crystals. The crystal block was composed of a 16 × 16 × 16 array of lutetium gadolinium oxyorthosilicate (LGSO) crystals 0.993 × 0.993 × 0.993 mm(3) in size. The crystals were optically glued together without inserting any reflector inside and 96 multi-pixel photon counters (MPPCs, S10931-50P, i.e. six faces each with a 4 × 4 array of MPPCs), each having a sensitive area of 3.0 × 3.0 mm(2), were optically coupled to the surfaces of the crystal block. Almost all 4096 crystals were identified through Anger-type calculation due to the finely adjusted reflector sheets inserted between the crystal block and light guides. The reflector sheets, which formed a belt of 0.5 mm width, were placed to cover half of the crystals of the second rows from the edges in order to improve identification performance of the crystals near the edges. Energy resolution of 12.7% was obtained at 511 keV with almost uniform light output for all crystal segments thanks to the effective detection of the scintillation photons.

  7. Single Quantum Dot with Microlens and 3D-Printed Micro-objective as Integrated Bright Single-Photon Source.

    PubMed

    Fischbach, Sarah; Schlehahn, Alexander; Thoma, Alexander; Srocka, Nicole; Gissibl, Timo; Ristok, Simon; Thiele, Simon; Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Strittmatter, André; Heindel, Tobias; Rodt, Sven; Herkommer, Alois; Giessen, Harald; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2017-06-21

    Integrated single-photon sources with high photon-extraction efficiency are key building blocks for applications in the field of quantum communications. We report on a bright single-photon source realized by on-chip integration of a deterministic quantum dot microlens with a 3D-printed multilens micro-objective. The device concept benefits from a sophisticated combination of in situ 3D electron-beam lithography to realize the quantum dot microlens and 3D femtosecond direct laser writing for creation of the micro-objective. In this way, we obtain a high-quality quantum device with broadband photon-extraction efficiency of (40 ± 4)% and high suppression of multiphoton emission events with g((2))(τ = 0) < 0.02. Our results highlight the opportunities that arise from tailoring the optical properties of quantum emitters using integrated optics with high potential for the further development of plug-and-play fiber-coupled single-photon sources.

  8. Single Quantum Dot with Microlens and 3D-Printed Micro-objective as Integrated Bright Single-Photon Source

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Integrated single-photon sources with high photon-extraction efficiency are key building blocks for applications in the field of quantum communications. We report on a bright single-photon source realized by on-chip integration of a deterministic quantum dot microlens with a 3D-printed multilens micro-objective. The device concept benefits from a sophisticated combination of in situ 3D electron-beam lithography to realize the quantum dot microlens and 3D femtosecond direct laser writing for creation of the micro-objective. In this way, we obtain a high-quality quantum device with broadband photon-extraction efficiency of (40 ± 4)% and high suppression of multiphoton emission events with g(2)(τ = 0) < 0.02. Our results highlight the opportunities that arise from tailoring the optical properties of quantum emitters using integrated optics with high potential for the further development of plug-and-play fiber-coupled single-photon sources. PMID:28670600

  9. Waveguide photonic crystals with characteristics controlled with p-i-n diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Usanov, D. A. Skripal, A. V.; Abramov, A. V.; Bogolyubov, A. S.; Skvortsov, V. S.; Merdanov, M. K.

    2010-12-15

    A one-dimensional waveguide photonic structure-specifically, a photonic crystal with a controllable frequency characteristic-is designed. The central frequency of the spectral window of the photonic crystal can be tuned by choosing the parameters of disturbance of periodicity in the photonic crystal, whereas the transmission coefficient at a particular frequency can be controlled by varying the voltage at a p-i-n diode. It is shown that the possibility exists of using the waveguide photonic crystal to design a microwave device operating in the 3-cm-wavelength region, with a transmission band of 70 MHz at a level 3 dB and the transmission coefficient controllable in the range from -1.5 to -25 dB under variations in the forward voltage bias at the p-i-n diode from zero to 700 mV.

  10. Integrated photonic crystal selective emitter for thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Yehia, Omar; Bermel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Converting blackbody thermal radiation to electricity via thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is inherently inefficient. Photon recycling using cold-side filters offers potentially improved performance but requires extremely close spacing between the thermal emitter and the receiver, namely a high view factor. Here, we propose an alternative approach for thermal energy conversion, the use of an integrated photonic crystal selective emitter (IPSE), which combines two-dimensional photonic crystal selective emitters and filters into a single device. Finite difference time domain and current transport simulations show that IPSEs can significantly suppress sub-bandgap photons. This increases heat-to-electricity conversion for photonic crystal based emitters from 35.2 up to 41.8% at 1573 K for a GaSb photovoltaic (PV) diode with matched bandgaps of 0.7 eV. The physical basis of this enhancement is a shift from a perturbative to a nonperturbative regime, which maximized photon recycling. Furthermore, combining IPSEs with nonconductive optical waveguides eliminates a key difficulty associated with TPV: the need for precise alignment between the hot selective emitter and cool PV diode. The physical effects of both the IPSE and waveguide can be quantified in terms of an extension of the concept of an effective view factor.

  11. Giant lamb shift in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Hua; Kivshar, Yuri S; Gu, Ben-Yuan

    2004-08-13

    We obtain a general result for the Lamb shift of excited states of multilevel atoms in inhomogeneous electromagnetic structures and apply it to study atomic hydrogen in inverse-opal photonic crystals. We find that the photonic-crystal environment can lead to very large values of the Lamb shift, as compared to the case of vacuum. We also suggest that the position-dependent Lamb shift should extend from a single level to a miniband for an assembly of atoms with random distribution in space, similar to the velocity-dependent Doppler effect in atomic/molecular gases.

  12. Optical amplification enhancement in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapienza, R.; Leonetti, M.; Froufe-Perez, L. S.; Galisteo-Lopez, J. F.; Lopez, C.; Conti, C.

    2011-02-15

    Improving and controlling the efficiency of a gain medium is one of the most challenging problems of laser research. By measuring the gain length in an opal-based photonic crystal doped with laser dye, we demonstrate that optical amplification is more than twenty-fold enhanced along the {Gamma}-K symmetry directions of the face-centered-cubic photonic crystal. These results are theoretically explained by directional variations of the density of states, providing a quantitative connection between density of the states and light amplification.

  13. Two-dimensional photonic crystal surfactant detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Tao; Smith, Natasha; Asher, Sanford A

    2012-08-07

    We developed a novel two-dimensional (2-D) crystalline colloidal array photonic crystal sensing material for the visual detection of amphiphilic molecules in water. A close-packed polystyrene 2-D array monolayer was embedded in a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-based hydrogel film. These 2-D photonic crystals placed on a mirror show intense diffraction that enables them to be used for visual determination of analytes. Binding of surfactant molecules attaches ions to the sensor that swells the PNIPAAm-based hydrogel. The resulting increase in particle spacing red shifts the 2-D diffracted light. Incorporation of more hydrophobic monomers increases the sensitivity to surfactants.

  14. Optofluidic Fano resonance photonic crystal refractometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuling; Liu, Yonghao; Zhao, Deyin; Yang, Hongjun; Zhou, Weidong; Sun, Yuze

    2017-02-01

    We report an ultra-compact surface-normal optofluidic refractometric sensor based on a two-dimensional silicon photonic crystal on insulator. In contrast to the conventional symmetric Lorentzian resonance that is prevalently used in the label-free sensors, the asymmetric lineshape and steep peak-to-dip transition of a Fano resonance enable the enhanced detection sensitivity. The detection limit of 1.3 × 10-6 refractive index units is achieved, which is among the lowest reported experimentally in the defect-free photonic crystal sensors.

  15. Detection of axonal synapses in 3D two-photon images.

    PubMed

    Bass, Cher; Helkkula, Pyry; De Paola, Vincenzo; Clopath, Claudia; Bharath, Anil Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Studies of structural plasticity in the brain often require the detection and analysis of axonal synapses (boutons). To date, bouton detection has been largely manual or semi-automated, relying on a step that traces the axons before detection the boutons. If tracing the axon fails, the accuracy of bouton detection is compromised. In this paper, we propose a new algorithm that does not require tracing the axon to detect axonal boutons in 3D two-photon images taken from the mouse cortex. To find the most appropriate techniques for this task, we compared several well-known algorithms for interest point detection and feature descriptor generation. The final algorithm proposed has the following main steps: (1) a Laplacian of Gaussian (LoG) based feature enhancement module to accentuate the appearance of boutons; (2) a Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF) interest point detector to find candidate locations for feature extraction; (3) non-maximum suppression to eliminate candidates that were detected more than once in the same local region; (4) generation of feature descriptors based on Gabor filters; (5) a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier, trained on features from labelled data, and was used to distinguish between bouton and non-bouton candidates. We found that our method achieved a Recall of 95%, Precision of 76%, and F1 score of 84% within a new dataset that we make available for accessing bouton detection. On average, Recall and F1 score were significantly better than the current state-of-the-art method, while Precision was not significantly different. In conclusion, in this article we demonstrate that our approach, which is independent of axon tracing, can detect boutons to a high level of accuracy, and improves on the detection performance of existing approaches. The data and code (with an easy to use GUI) used in this article are available from open source repositories.

  16. Detection of axonal synapses in 3D two-photon images

    PubMed Central

    Helkkula, Pyry; De Paola, Vincenzo; Clopath, Claudia; Bharath, Anil Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Studies of structural plasticity in the brain often require the detection and analysis of axonal synapses (boutons). To date, bouton detection has been largely manual or semi-automated, relying on a step that traces the axons before detection the boutons. If tracing the axon fails, the accuracy of bouton detection is compromised. In this paper, we propose a new algorithm that does not require tracing the axon to detect axonal boutons in 3D two-photon images taken from the mouse cortex. To find the most appropriate techniques for this task, we compared several well-known algorithms for interest point detection and feature descriptor generation. The final algorithm proposed has the following main steps: (1) a Laplacian of Gaussian (LoG) based feature enhancement module to accentuate the appearance of boutons; (2) a Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF) interest point detector to find candidate locations for feature extraction; (3) non-maximum suppression to eliminate candidates that were detected more than once in the same local region; (4) generation of feature descriptors based on Gabor filters; (5) a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier, trained on features from labelled data, and was used to distinguish between bouton and non-bouton candidates. We found that our method achieved a Recall of 95%, Precision of 76%, and F1 score of 84% within a new dataset that we make available for accessing bouton detection. On average, Recall and F1 score were significantly better than the current state-of-the-art method, while Precision was not significantly different. In conclusion, in this article we demonstrate that our approach, which is independent of axon tracing, can detect boutons to a high level of accuracy, and improves on the detection performance of existing approaches. The data and code (with an easy to use GUI) used in this article are available from open source repositories. PMID:28873436

  17. High-resistance liquid-crystal lens array for rotatable 2D/3D autostereoscopic display.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Cheng; Jen, Tai-Hsiang; Ting, Chih-Hung; Huang, Yi-Pai

    2014-02-10

    A 2D/3D switchable and rotatable autostereoscopic display using a high-resistance liquid-crystal (Hi-R LC) lens array is investigated in this paper. Using high-resistance layers in an LC cell, a gradient electric-field distribution can be formed, which can provide a better lens-like shape of the refractive-index distribution. The advantages of the Hi-R LC lens array are its 2D/3D switchability, rotatability (in the horizontal and vertical directions), low driving voltage (~2 volts) and fast response (~0.6 second). In addition, the Hi-R LC lens array requires only a very simple fabrication process.

  18. The crystal structure of Aspergillus fumigatus cyclophilin reveals 3D domain swapping of a central element.

    PubMed

    Limacher, Andreas; Kloer, Daniel P; Flückiger, Sabine; Folkers, Gerd; Crameri, Reto; Scapozza, Leonardo

    2006-02-01

    The crystal structure of Aspergillus fumigatus cyclophilin (Asp f 11) was solved by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method and was refined to a resolution of 1.85 A with R and R(free) values of 18.9% and 21.4%, respectively. Many cyclophilin structures have been solved to date, all showing the same monomeric conformation. In contrast, the structure of A. fumigatus cyclophilin reveals dimerization by 3D domain swapping and represents one of the first proteins with a swapped central domain. The domain-swapped element consists of two beta strands and a subsequent loop carrying a conserved tryptophan. The tryptophan binds into the active site, inactivating cis-trans isomerization. This might be a means of biological regulation. The two hinge loops leave the protein prone to misfolding. In this context, alternative forms of 3D domain swapping that can lead to N- or C-terminally swapped dimers, oligomers, and aggregates are discussed.

  19. Mechanical property of PEG hydrogel and the 3D red blood cell microstructures fabricated by two-photon polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Xiaorong; Zheng, Meiling; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Dong, Xianzi; Jin, Feng; Xing, Jinfeng; Duan, Xuanming

    2017-09-01

    Two-photon polymerization (TPP) microfabrication is an advanced technology to fabricate precise three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel micro/nanostructure. 3D hydrogel microstructures fabricated by TPP with sophisticated details and appropriate stiffness are able to effectively simulate the microenvironment used in tissue engineering and drug delivery. The mechanical property of the microstructures, for instance, the Young's modulus is crucial to achieve the microstructures with high fidelity. In this study, the mechanical property of the poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) 3D microstructures fabricated with various laser powers, writing speeds and layer distances in the air was investigated by characterizing the Young's modulus. Meanwhile, the Young's modulus of the microstructure with different layer distances in water was determined as 3.50-6.52 MPa. Furthermore, 3D PEG microstructures simulating red blood cell morphology of different postures and sizes were successfully fabricated.

  20. Fiber based photonic-crystal acoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Onur

    Photonic-crystal slabs are two-dimensional photonic crystals etched into a dielectric layer such as silicon. Standard micro fabrication techniques can be employed to manufacture these structures, which makes it feasible to produce them in large areas, usually an important criterion for practical applications. An appealing feature of these structures is that they can be employed as free-space optical devices such as broadband reflectors. The small thickness of the slab (usually in the vicinity of half a micron) also makes it deflectable. These combined optical and mechanical properties make it possible to employ photonic-crystal slabs in a range of practical applications, including displacement sensors, which in turn can be used for example to detect acoustic waves. An additional benefit of employing a photonic-crystal slab is that it is possible to tailor its optical and mechanical properties by adjusting the geometrical parameters of the structure such as hole radius or shape, pitch, and the slab thickness. By altering the hole radius and pitch, it is possible to make broadband reflectors or sharp transmission filters out of these structures. Adjusting the thickness also affects its deformability, making it possible to make broadband mirrors compliant to acoustic waves. Altering the hole shape, for example by introducing an asymmetry, extends the functionalities of photonic-crystal slabs even further. Breaking the symmetry by introducing asymmetric holes enables polarization-sensitive devices such as retarders, polarization beam splitters, and photonic crystals with additional non-degenerate resonances useful for increased sensitivity in sensors. All these practical advantages of photonic-crystal slabs makes them suitable as key components in micromachined sensor applications. We report one such example of an application of photonic-crystal slabs in the form of a micromachined acoustic sensor. It consists of a Fabry-Perot interferometer made of a photonic-crystal

  1. One-dimensional opal photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitonov, A. M.

    2008-12-01

    One-dimensional opals are 1D self-assembled close packed colloidal crystals consisting of monodisperse colloidal globules. Polystyrene globules with sizes in the 1.9-10 μm range sit on a flat substrate and touch two neighbors in diametrally opposite contact points. These opals are quasi-1D photonic crystals. Optical modes, including whispering gallery modes of individual globules, coupled collective modes, and nanojet-induced modes, are visualized in 1D opals.

  2. Optomechanics of two- and three-dimensional soft photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Dwarak

    Soft photonic crystals are a class of periodic dielectric structures that undergo highly nonlinear deformation due to strain or other external stimulus such as temperature, pH etc. This can in turn dramatically affect optical properties such as light transmittance. Moreover certain classes of lithographically fabricated structures undergo some structural distortion due to the effects of processing, eventually affecting the optical properties of the final photonic crystal. In this work, we study the deformation mechanics of soft photonic crystal structures using realistic physics-based models and leverage that understanding to explain the optomechanics of actual 2-D and 3-D soft photonic crystals undergoing similar symmetry breaking nonlinear deformations. We first study the optomechanics of two classes of 3-D soft photonic crystals: (1) hydrogel and (2) elastomer based material systems. The hydrogel based inverse face-centered-cubic structure undergoes swelling with change in pH of the surrounding fluid. The inverse structure is a network of bulky domains with thin ligament-like connections, and it undergoes a pattern transformation from FCC to L11 as a result of swelling. A continuum scale poroelasticity based coupled fluid-diffusion FEM model is developed to accurately predict this mechanical behavior. Light transmittance simulation results qualitatively explain the experimentally observed trends in the optical behavior with pH change. The elastomer based, lithographically fabricated material experiences shrinkage induced distortion upon processing. This behavior is modeled using FEM with the material represented by a neo-Hookean constitutive law. The light transmittance calculations for normal incidence are carried out using the transfer matrix method and a good comparison is obtained for the positions of first and second order reflectance peaks. A unit cell based approach is taken to compute the photonic bandstructure to estimate light propagation through the

  3. Electron crystallography of ultrathin 3D protein crystals: atomic model with charges.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Koji; Kato, Kazuyuki; Ogasawara, Mitsuo; Tomita, Masahiro; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2015-03-17

    Membrane proteins and macromolecular complexes often yield crystals too small or too thin for even the modern synchrotron X-ray beam. Electron crystallography could provide a powerful means for structure determination with such undersized crystals, as protein atoms diffract electrons four to five orders of magnitude more strongly than they do X-rays. Furthermore, as electron crystallography yields Coulomb potential maps rather than electron density maps, it could provide a unique method to visualize the charged states of amino acid residues and metals. Here we describe an attempt to develop a methodology for electron crystallography of ultrathin (only a few layers thick) 3D protein crystals and present the Coulomb potential maps at 3.4-Å and 3.2-Å resolution, respectively, obtained from Ca(2+)-ATPase and catalase crystals. These maps demonstrate that it is indeed possible to build atomic models from such crystals and even to determine the charged states of amino acid residues in the Ca(2+)-binding sites of Ca(2+)-ATPase and that of the iron atom in the heme in catalase.

  4. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals.

    PubMed

    Smolyaninova, Vera N; Yost, Bradley; Lahneman, David; Narimanov, Evgenii E; Smolyaninov, Igor I

    2014-07-16

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, the "photonic hyper-crystal", which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing.

  5. Two-photon polymerization microfabrication of hydrogels: an advanced 3D printing technology for tissue engineering and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jin-Feng; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2015-08-07

    3D printing technology has attracted much attention due to its high potential in scientific and industrial applications. As an outstanding 3D printing technology, two-photon polymerization (TPP) microfabrication has been applied in the fields of micro/nanophotonics, micro-electromechanical systems, microfluidics, biomedical implants and microdevices. In particular, TPP microfabrication is very useful in tissue engineering and drug delivery due to its powerful fabrication capability for precise microstructures with high spatial resolution on both the microscopic and the nanometric scale. The design and fabrication of 3D hydrogels widely used in tissue engineering and drug delivery has been an important research area of TPP microfabrication. The resolution is a key parameter for 3D hydrogels to simulate the native 3D environment in which the cells reside and the drug is controlled to release with optimal temporal and spatial distribution in vitro and in vivo. The resolution of 3D hydrogels largely depends on the efficiency of TPP initiators. In this paper, we will review the widely used photoresists, the development of TPP photoinitiators, the strategies for improving the resolution and the microfabrication of 3D hydrogels.

  6. Dynamically tunable graphene/dielectric photonic crystal transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Ian; Mousavi, S. Hossein; Wang, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    It is well known that graphene supports plasmonic modes with high field confinement and lower losses when compared to conventional metals. Additionally, graphene features a highly tunable conductivity through which the plasmon dispersion can be modulated. Over the years these qualities have inspired a wide range of applications for graphene in the THz and infrared regimes. In this presentation we theoretically demonstrate a graphene parallel plate waveguide (PPWG) that sandwiches a 2D photonic crystal slab. The marriage of these two geometries offers a large two dimensional band gap that can be dynamically tuned over a very broad bandwidth. Our device operates in the low-THz band where the graphene PPWG supports a quasi-TEM mode with a relatively flat attenuation. Unlike conventional photonic crystal slabs, the quasi-TEM nature of the graphene PPWG mode allows the slab thickness to be less than 1/10 of the photonic crystal lattice constant. These features offer up a wealth of opportunities, including tunable metamaterials with a possible platform for large band gaps in 3D structures through tiling and stacking. Additionally, the geometry provides a platform for tunable defect cavities without needing three dimensional periodicity.

  7. Cylindrical liquid crystal lenses system for autostereoscopic 2D/3D display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Huang, Yi-Pai; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Wang, Po-Hao; Chen, Po-Chuan; Tsai, Chao-Hsu

    2012-06-01

    The liquid crystal lenses system, which could be electrically controlled easily for autostereoscopic 2D/3D switchable display was proposed. The High-Resistance liquid crystal (HRLC) lens utilized less controlled electrodes and coated a high-resistance layer between the controlled-electrodes was proposed and was used in this paper. Compare with the traditional LC lens, the HR-LC Lens could provide smooth electric-potential distribution within the LC layer under driving status. Hence, the proposed HR-LC Lens had less circuit complexity, low driving voltage, and good optical performance also could be obtained. In addition, combining with the proposed driving method called dual-directional overdriving method, the above method could reduce the switching time by applying large voltage onto cell. Consequently, the total switching time could be further reduced to around 2second. It is believed that the LC lens system has high potential in the future.

  8. Review on Chalcogenide 3D Nano-structured Crystals: Synthesis and Growth Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) nano-structured crystals have received extensive attention for their superior properties over zero dimensional (0D), one dimensional (1D), or two dimensional (2D) nanomaterials in many areas. This review is generalized for the group of chalcogenide nanoflowers (NFs) by the synthetic techniques, such as solvothermal, wet chemical, sol-gel, surface oxidation, microwave, coating, electrochemical, and several other methods. The formation mechanism was also described for the purpose of opening up new food for thoughts to bring up new functionality of materials by tuning the morphology of crystals. The pH value or the template plays fundamental role in forming the nano-flowered structure. Moreover, the correlations between the surface area (SA), contact angle (CA), and the NFs are also discussed within the context. Here, we also discussed some patents relevant to the topic.

  9. Photonic crystal microcapsules for label-free multiplex detection.

    PubMed

    Ye, Baofen; Ding, Haibo; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Hongcheng; Zhao, Yuanjin; Xie, Zhuoying; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-05-28

    A novel suspension array, which possesses the joint advantages of photonic crystal encoded technology, bioresponsive hydrogels, and photonic crystal sensors with capability of full multiplexing label-free detection is developed.

  10. Fabrication and Analysis of Photonic Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Korte, Kylee E.; Xia, Younan

    2007-01-01

    These laboratory experiments are designed to explore aspects of nanoscale chemistry by constructing and spectroscopically analyzing thin films of photonic crystals. Films comprised of colloidal spheres and polydimethylsiloxane exhibit diffraction-based stop bands that shift reversibly upon exposure to some common solvents. Topics covered in these…

  11. Test-Paper-Like Photonic Crystal Viscometer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqi; Fu, Qianqian; Ge, Jianping

    2017-04-01

    A test-paper-like photonic crystal (PC) viscometer is fabricated based on the positive correlation between viscosity and the infiltration time for viscous liquid to entirely soak the PC film. It can be broadly used in different occasions to quickly determine the viscosity for many liquids, considering its portable and disposable characteristics and the requirement of little samples.

  12. Fabrication and Analysis of Photonic Crystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Korte, Kylee E.; Xia, Younan

    2007-01-01

    These laboratory experiments are designed to explore aspects of nanoscale chemistry by constructing and spectroscopically analyzing thin films of photonic crystals. Films comprised of colloidal spheres and polydimethylsiloxane exhibit diffraction-based stop bands that shift reversibly upon exposure to some common solvents. Topics covered in these…

  13. Photonic Crystal Sensors Based on Porous Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Pacholski, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Porous silicon has been established as an excellent sensing platform for the optical detection of hazardous chemicals and biomolecular interactions such as DNA hybridization, antigen/antibody binding, and enzymatic reactions. Its porous nature provides a high surface area within a small volume, which can be easily controlled by changing the pore sizes. As the porosity and consequently the refractive index of an etched porous silicon layer depends on the electrochemial etching conditions photonic crystals composed of multilayered porous silicon films with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features can easily be obtained. The prominent optical response of the photonic crystal decreases the detection limit and therefore increases the sensitivity of porous silicon sensors in comparison to sensors utilizing Fabry-Pérot based optical transduction. Development of porous silicon photonic crystal sensors which allow for the detection of analytes by the naked eye using a simple color change or the fabrication of stacked porous silicon photonic crystals showing two distinct optical features which can be utilized for the discrimination of analytes emphasize its high application potential. PMID:23571671

  14. Photonic crystal sensors based on porous silicon.

    PubMed

    Pacholski, Claudia

    2013-04-09

    Porous silicon has been established as an excellent sensing platform for the optical detection of hazardous chemicals and biomolecular interactions such as DNA hybridization, antigen/antibody binding, and enzymatic reactions. Its porous nature provides a high surface area within a small volume, which can be easily controlled by changing the pore sizes. As the porosity and consequently the refractive index of an etched porous silicon layer depends on the electrochemial etching conditions photonic crystals composed of multilayered porous silicon films with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features can easily be obtained. The prominent optical response of the photonic crystal decreases the detection limit and therefore increases the sensitivity of porous silicon sensors in comparison to sensors utilizing Fabry-Pérot based optical transduction. Development of porous silicon photonic crystal sensors which allow for the detection of analytes by the naked eye using a simple color change or the fabrication of stacked porous silicon photonic crystals showing two distinct optical features which can be utilized for the discrimination of analytes emphasize its high application potential.

  15. Total internal reflection photonic crystal prism.

    PubMed

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Abashin, Maxim; Blair, John; Wu, Qi; Park, Wounjhang; Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Summers, Christopher J

    2007-06-25

    An integrated total internal reflection prism is demonstrated that generates a transversely localized evanescent wave along the boundary between a photonic crystal and an etched out trench. The reflection can be described by either the odd symmetry of the Bloch wave or a tangential momentum matching condition. In addition, the Bloch wave propagates through the photonic crystal in a negative refraction regime, which manages diffraction within the prism. A device with three input channels has been fabricated and tested that illuminates different regions of the reflection interface. The reflected wave is then sampled by a photonic wire array, where the individual channels are resolved. Heterodyne near field scanning optical microscopy is used to characterize the spatial phase variation of the evanescent wave and its decay constant.

  16. Photon statistics in scintillation crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Vaibhav Joga Singh

    Scintillation based gamma-ray detectors are widely used in medical imaging, high-energy physics, astronomy and national security. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors are eld-tested, relatively inexpensive, and have good detection eciency. Semi-conductor detectors are gaining popularity because of their superior capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. However, they are relatively hard to manufacture and therefore, at this time, not available in as large formats and much more expensive than scintillation gamma-ray detectors. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors consist of: a scintillator, a material that emits optical (scintillation) photons when it interacts with ionization radiation, and an optical detector that detects the emitted scintillation photons and converts them into an electrical signal. Compared to semiconductor gamma-ray detectors, scintillation gamma-ray detectors have relatively poor capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. This is in large part attributed to the "statistical limit" on the number of scintillation photons. The origin of this statistical limit is the assumption that scintillation photons are either Poisson distributed or super-Poisson distributed. This statistical limit is often dened by the Fano factor. The Fano factor of an integer-valued random process is dened as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Therefore, a Poisson process has a Fano factor of one. The classical theory of light limits the Fano factor of the number of photons to a value greater than or equal to one (Poisson case). However, the quantum theory of light allows for Fano factors to be less than one. We used two methods to look at the correlations between two detectors looking at same scintillation pulse to estimate the Fano factor of the scintillation photons. The relationship between the Fano factor and the correlation between the integral of the two signals detected was analytically derived, and the Fano factor was estimated using the measurements for SrI2:Eu, YAP

  17. Dosimetric characterization of 3D printed bolus at different infill percentage for external photon beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ricotti, Rosalinda; Ciardo, Delia; Pansini, Floriana; Bazani, Alessia; Comi, Stefania; Spoto, Ruggero; Noris, Samuele; Cattani, Federica; Baroni, Guido; Orecchia, Roberto; Vavassori, Andrea; Alicja Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara

    2017-07-01

    3D printing is rapidly evolving and further assessment of materials and technique is required for clinical applications. We evaluated 3D printed boluses with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polylactide (PLA) at different infill percentage. A low-cost 3D printer was used. The influence of the air inclusion within the 3D printed boluses was assessed thoroughly both with treatment planning system (TPS) and with physical measurements. For each bolus, two treatment plans were calculated with Monte Carlo algorithm, considering the computed tomography (CT) scan of the 3D printed bolus or modelling the 3D printed bolus as a virtual bolus structure with a homogeneous density. Depth dose measurements were performed with Gafchromic films. High infill percentage corresponds to high density and high homogeneity within bolus material. The approximation of the bolus in the TPS as a homogeneous material is satisfying for infill percentages greater than 20%. Measurements performed with PLA boluses are more comparable to the TPS calculated profiles. For boluses printed at 40% and 60% infill, the discrepancies between calculated and measured dose distribution are within 5%. 3D printing technology allows modulating the shift of the build-up region by tuning the infill percentage of the 3D printed bolus in order to improve superficial target coverage. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Digital holographic tomography method for 3D observation of domain patterns in ferroelectric single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrý, Pavel; Psota, Pavel; Steiger, Kateřina; Václavík, Jan; Vápenka, David; Doleček, Roman; Vojtíšek, Petr; Sládek, Juraj; Lédl, Vít.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the development and implementation of the digital holographic tomography for the three-dimensio- nal (3D) observations of the domain patterns in the ferroelectric single crystals. Ferroelectric materials represent a group of materials, whose macroscopic dielectric, electromechanical, and elastic properties are greatly in uenced by the presence of domain patterns. Understanding the role of domain patterns on the aforementioned properties require the experimental techniques, which allow the precise 3D measurements of the spatial distribution of ferroelectric domains in the single crystal. Unfortunately, such techniques are rather limited at this time. The most frequently used piezoelectric atomic force microscopy allows 2D observations on the ferroelectric sample surface. Optical methods based on the birefringence measurements provide parameters of the domain patterns averaged over the sample volume. In this paper, we analyze the possibility that the spatial distribution of the ferroelectric domains can be obtained by means of the measurement of the wavefront deformation of the transmitted optical wave. We demonstrate that the spatial distribution of the ferroelectric domains can be determined by means of the measurement of the spatial distribution of the refractive index. Finally, it is demonstrated that the measurements of wavefront deformations generated in ferroelectric polydomain systems with small variations of the refractive index provide data, which can be further processed by means of the conventional tomographic methods.

  19. Absorption in photonic crystals: from order to disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seassal, Christian; Lalouat, LoÑ--c.; Ding, He; Drouard, Emmanuel; Gomard, Guillaume; Peretti, Romain; Deschamp, Thierry; Mandorlo, Fabien; Orobtchouk, Régis; Fave, Alain

    2014-09-01

    In this communication, we present the potentialities offered by 2D photonic crystals to trap and absorb photons in thin silicon layers. We will specifically focus on the impact of the photonic crystal unit cells symmetry, and the possibility to increase light absorption and generated photocurrent using multi-periodic and pseudo-disordered photonic nanostructures.

  20. Quasicompactons in inverted nonlinear photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yongyao; Malomed, Boris A.; Wu Jianxiong; Pang Wei; Wang Sicong; Zhou Jianying

    2011-10-15

    We study large-amplitude one-dimensional solitary waves in photonic crystals featuring competition between linear and nonlinear lattices, with minima of the linear potential coinciding with maxima of the nonlinear pseudopotential, and vice versa (inverted nonlinear photonic crystals, INPCs), in the case of the saturable self-focusing nonlinearity. Such crystals were recently fabricated using a mixture of SU-8 and Rhodamine-B optical materials. By means of numerical methods and analytical approximations, we find that large-amplitude solitons are broad sharply localized stable pulses (quasicompactons, QCs). With the increase of the total power, P, the QC's centroid performs multiple switchings between minima and maxima of the linear potential. Unlike cubic INPCs, the large-amplitude solitons are mobile in the medium with the saturable nonlinearity. The threshold value of the kick necessary to set the soliton in motion is found as a function of P. Collisions between moving QCs are considered too.

  1. Optical properties of three-dimensional P(St-MAA) photonic crystals on polyester fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guojin; Zhou, Lan; Wu, Yujiang; Wang, Cuicui; Fan, Qinguo; Shao, Jianzhong

    2015-04-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals with face-centered cubic (fcc) structure was fabricated on polyester fabrics, a kind of soft textile materials quite different from the conventional solid substrates, by gravitational sedimentation self-assembly of monodisperse P(St-MAA) colloidal microspheres. The optical properties of structural colors on polyester fabrics were investigated and the position of photonic band gap was characterized. The results showed that the color-tuning ways of the structural colors from photonic crystals were in accordance with Bragg's law and could be modulated by the size of P(St-MAA) colloidal microspheres and the viewing angles. The L∗a∗b∗ values of the structural colors generated from the assembled polyester fabrics were in agreement with their reflectance spectra. The photonic band gap position of photonic crystals on polyester fabrics could be consistently confirmed by reflectance and transmittance spectra.

  2. Self-assembled tunable photonic hyper-crystals

    PubMed Central

    Smolyaninova, Vera N.; Yost, Bradley; Lahneman, David; Narimanov, Evgenii E.; Smolyaninov, Igor I.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel artificial optical material, the “photonic hyper-crystal”, which combines the most interesting features of hyperbolic metamaterials and photonic crystals. Similar to hyperbolic metamaterials, photonic hyper-crystals exhibit broadband divergence in their photonic density of states due to the lack of usual diffraction limit on the photon wave vector. On the other hand, similar to photonic crystals, hyperbolic dispersion law of extraordinary photons is modulated by forbidden gaps near the boundaries of photonic Brillouin zones. Three dimensional self-assembly of photonic hyper-crystals has been achieved by application of external magnetic field to a cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid. Unique spectral properties of photonic hyper-crystals lead to extreme sensitivity of the material to monolayer coatings of cobalt nanoparticles, which should find numerous applications in biological and chemical sensing. PMID:25027947

  3. Review on photonic crystal coatings for scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapitsch, Arno; Lecoq, Paul

    2014-11-01

    The amount of light and its time distribution are key factors determining the performance of scintillators when used as radiation detectors. However most inorganic scintillators are made of heavy materials and suffer from a high index of refraction which limits light extraction efficiency. This increases the path length of the photons in the material with the consequence of higher absorption and tails in the time distribution of the extracted light. Photonic crystals are a relatively new way of conquering this light extraction problem. Basically they are a way to produce a smooth and controllable index matching between the scintillator and the output medium through the nanostructuration of a thin layer of optically transparent high index material deposited at the coupling face of the scintillator. Our review paper discusses the theory behind this approach as well as the simulation details. Furthermore the different lithography steps of the production of an actual photonic crystal sample will be explained. Measurement results of LSO scintillator pixels covered with a nanolithography machined photonic crystal surface are presented together with practical tips for the further development and improvement of this technique.

  4. Flexible single-crystal silicon nanomembrane photonic crystal cavity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaochuan; Subbaraman, Harish; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Hosseini, Amir; Covey, John; Yu, Yalin; Kwong, David; Zhang, Yang; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Lu, Nanshu; Chen, Ray T

    2014-12-23

    Flexible inorganic electronic devices promise numerous applications, especially in fields that could not be covered satisfactorily by conventional rigid devices. Benefits on a similar scale are also foreseeable for silicon photonic components. However, the difficulty in transferring intricate silicon photonic devices has deterred widespread development. In this paper, we demonstrate a flexible single-crystal silicon nanomembrane photonic crystal microcavity through a bonding and substrate removal approach. The transferred cavity shows a quality factor of 2.2×10(4) and could be bent to a curvature of 5 mm radius without deteriorating the performance compared to its counterparts on rigid substrates. A thorough characterization of the device reveals that the resonant wavelength is a linear function of the bending-induced strain. The device also shows a curvature-independent sensitivity to the ambient index variation.

  5. The bifoil photodyne: a photonic crystal oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Lugo, J. E.; Doti, R.; Sanchez, N.; de la Mora, M. B.; del Rio, J. A.; Faubert, J.

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers is an example how to use light to generate a physical force. They have been used to levitate viruses, bacteria, cells, and sub cellular organisms. Nonetheless it would be beneficial to use such force to develop a new kind of applications. However the radiation pressure usually is small to think in moving larger objects. Currently, there is some research investigating novel photonic working principles to generate a higher force. Here, we studied theoretically and experimentally the induction of electromagnetic forces in one-dimensional photonic crystals when light impinges on the off-axis direction. The photonic structure consists of a micro-cavity like structure formed of two one-dimensional photonic crystals made of free-standing porous silicon, separated by a variable air gap and the working wavelength is 633 nm. We show experimental evidence of this force when the photonic structure is capable of making auto-oscillations and forced-oscillations. We measured peak displacements and velocities ranging from 2 up to 35 microns and 0.4 up to 2.1 mm/s with a power of 13 mW. Recent evidence showed that giant resonant light forces could induce average velocity values of 0.45 mm/s in microspheres embedded in water with 43 mW light power. PMID:24423985

  6. The bifoil photodyne: a photonic crystal oscillator.

    PubMed

    Lugo, J E; Doti, R; Sanchez, N; de la Mora, M B; del Rio, J A; Faubert, J

    2014-01-15

    Optical tweezers is an example how to use light to generate a physical force. They have been used to levitate viruses, bacteria, cells, and sub cellular organisms. Nonetheless it would be beneficial to use such force to develop a new kind of applications. However the radiation pressure usually is small to think in moving larger objects. Currently, there is some research investigating novel photonic working principles to generate a higher force. Here, we studied theoretically and experimentally the induction of electromagnetic forces in one-dimensional photonic crystals when light impinges on the off-axis direction. The photonic structure consists of a micro-cavity like structure formed of two one-dimensional photonic crystals made of free-standing porous silicon, separated by a variable air gap and the working wavelength is 633 nm. We show experimental evidence of this force when the photonic structure is capable of making auto-oscillations and forced-oscillations. We measured peak displacements and velocities ranging from 2 up to 35 microns and 0.4 up to 2.1 mm/s with a power of 13 mW. Recent evidence showed that giant resonant light forces could induce average velocity values of 0.45 mm/s in microspheres embedded in water with 43 mW light power.

  7. The bifoil photodyne: a photonic crystal oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo, J. E.; Doti, R.; Sanchez, N.; de La Mora, M. B.; Del Rio, J. A.; Faubert, J.

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers is an example how to use light to generate a physical force. They have been used to levitate viruses, bacteria, cells, and sub cellular organisms. Nonetheless it would be beneficial to use such force to develop a new kind of applications. However the radiation pressure usually is small to think in moving larger objects. Currently, there is some research investigating novel photonic working principles to generate a higher force. Here, we studied theoretically and experimentally the induction of electromagnetic forces in one-dimensional photonic crystals when light impinges on the off-axis direction. The photonic structure consists of a micro-cavity like structure formed of two one-dimensional photonic crystals made of free-standing porous silicon, separated by a variable air gap and the working wavelength is 633 nm. We show experimental evidence of this force when the photonic structure is capable of making auto-oscillations and forced-oscillations. We measured peak displacements and velocities ranging from 2 up to 35 microns and 0.4 up to 2.1 mm/s with a power of 13 mW. Recent evidence showed that giant resonant light forces could induce average velocity values of 0.45 mm/s in microspheres embedded in water with 43 mW light power.

  8. Atom-light interactions in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Goban, A; Hung, C-L; Yu, S-P; Hood, J D; Muniz, J A; Lee, J H; Martin, M J; McClung, A C; Choi, K S; Chang, D E; Painter, O; Kimble, H J

    2014-05-08

    The integration of nanophotonics and atomic physics has been a long-sought goal that would open new frontiers for optical physics, including novel quantum transport and many-body phenomena with photon-mediated atomic interactions. Reaching this goal requires surmounting diverse challenges in nanofabrication and atomic manipulation. Here we report the development of a novel integrated optical circuit with a photonic crystal capable of both localizing and interfacing atoms with guided photons. Optical bands of a photonic crystal waveguide are aligned with selected atomic transitions. From reflection spectra measured with average atom number N=1.1+/-0.4, we infer that atoms are localized within the waveguide by optical dipole forces. The fraction of single-atom radiative decay into the waveguide is Γ1D/Γ'≃(0.32±0.08), where Γ1D is the rate of emission into the guided mode and Γ' is the decay rate into all other channels. Γ1D/Γ' is unprecedented in all current atom-photon interfaces.

  9. Polysilicon photonic resonators for large-scale 3D integration of optical networks.

    PubMed

    Preston, Kyle; Schmidt, Bradley; Lipson, Michal

    2007-12-10

    We demonstrate optical microresonators in polycrystalline silicon with quality factors of 20,000. We also demonstrate polycrystalline resonators vertically coupled to crystalline silicon waveguides. Electrically active photonic structures fabricated in deposited polysilicon layers would enable the large-scale integration of photonics with current CMOS microelectronics.

  10. Crystal Structure and Thermostability Characterization of Enterovirus D68 3D(pol).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunnian; Wang, Caiyan; Li, Qing; Wang, Zhong; Xie, Wei

    2017-09-15

    Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is one of the many nonpolio enteroviruses that cause mild to severe respiratory illness. The nonstructural protein 3D(pol) is an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) of EV-D68 which plays a critical role in the replication of the viral genome and represents a promising drug target. Here, we report the first three-dimensional crystal structure of the RdRP from EV-D68 in complex with the substrate GTP to 2.3-Å resolution. The RdRP structure is similar to structures of other viral RdRPs, where the three domains, termed the palm, fingers, and thumb, form a structure resembling a cupped right hand. Particularly, an N-terminal fragment (Gly1 to Phe30) bridges the fingers and the thumb domains, which accounts for the enhanced stability of the full-length enzyme over the truncation mutant, as assessed by our thermal shift assays and the dynamic light scattering studies. Additionally, the GTP molecule bound proximal to the active site interacts with both the palm and fingers domains to stabilize the core structure of 3D(pol) Interestingly, using limited proteolysis assays, we found that different nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) stabilize the polymerase structure by various degrees, with GTP and CTP being the most and least stabilizing nucleosides, respectively. Lastly, we derived a model of the core structure of 3D(pol) stabilized by GTP, according to our proteolytic studies. The biochemical and biophysical characterizations conducted in this study help us to understand the stability of EV-D68-3D(pol), which may extend to other RdRPs as well.IMPORTANCE Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an emerging viral pathogen, which caused sporadic infections around the world. In recent years, epidemiology studies have reported an increasing number of patients with respiratory diseases globally due to the EV-D68 infection. Moreover, the infection has been associated with acute flaccid paralysis and cranial nerve dysfunction in children. However, there are no vaccines

  11. Epitaxial growth of three dimensionally structured III-V photonic crystal via hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Qiye; Kim, Honggyu; Zhang, Runyu; Zuo, Jianmin; Braun, Paul V.; Sardela, Mauro; Balaji, Manavaimaran; Lourdudoss, Sebastian; Sun, Yan-Ting

    2015-12-14

    Three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals are one class of materials where epitaxy, and the resultant attractive electronic properties, would enable new functionalities for optoelectronic devices. Here we utilize self-assembled colloidal templates to fabricate epitaxially grown single crystal 3D mesostructured Ga{sub x}In{sub 1−x}P (GaInP) semiconductor photonic crystals using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The epitaxial relationship between the 3D GaInP and the substrate is preserved during the growth through the complex geometry of the template as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. XRD reciprocal space mapping of the 3D epitaxial layer further demonstrates the film to be nearly fully relaxed with a negligible strain gradient. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reflection measurement indicates the optical properties of the photonic crystal which agree with finite difference time domain simulations. This work extends the scope of the very few known methods for the fabrication of epitaxial III-V 3D mesostructured materials to the well-developed HVPE technique.

  12. Breakdown of Bose-Einstein Distribution in Photonic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of nano-photonics in photonic crystals. Previous theoretical investigations of photon dynamics were carried out at zero temperature. Here, we investigate micro/nano cavity photonics in photonic crystals at finite temperature. Due to photonic-band-gap-induced localized long-lived photon dynamics, we discover that cavity photons in photonic crystals do not obey Bose-Einstein statistical distribution. Within the photonic band gap and in the vicinity of the band edge, cavity photons combine the long-lived non-Markovain dynamics with thermal fluctuations together to form photon states that memorize the initial cavity state information. As a result, Bose-Einstein distribution is completely broken down in these regimes, even if the thermal energy is larger or much larger than the cavity detuning energy. In this investigation, a crossover phenomenon from equilibrium to nonequilibrium steady states is also revealed. PMID:25822135

  13. Breakdown of Bose-Einstein distribution in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-03-30

    In the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of nano-photonics in photonic crystals. Previous theoretical investigations of photon dynamics were carried out at zero temperature. Here, we investigate micro/nano cavity photonics in photonic crystals at finite temperature. Due to photonic-band-gap-induced localized long-lived photon dynamics, we discover that cavity photons in photonic crystals do not obey Bose-Einstein statistical distribution. Within the photonic band gap and in the vicinity of the band edge, cavity photons combine the long-lived non-Markovain dynamics with thermal fluctuations together to form photon states that memorize the initial cavity state information. As a result, Bose-Einstein distribution is completely broken down in these regimes, even if the thermal energy is larger or much larger than the cavity detuning energy. In this investigation, a crossover phenomenon from equilibrium to nonequilibrium steady states is also revealed.

  14. Breakdown of Bose-Einstein Distribution in Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Ping-Yuan; Xiong, Heng-Na; Zhang, Wei-Min

    2015-03-01

    In the last two decades, considerable advances have been made in the investigation of nano-photonics in photonic crystals. Previous theoretical investigations of photon dynamics were carried out at zero temperature. Here, we investigate micro/nano cavity photonics in photonic crystals at finite temperature. Due to photonic-band-gap-induced localized long-lived photon dynamics, we discover that cavity photons in photonic crystals do not obey Bose-Einstein statistical distribution. Within the photonic band gap and in the vicinity of the band edge, cavity photons combine the long-lived non-Markovain dynamics with thermal fluctuations together to form photon states that memorize the initial cavity state information. As a result, Bose-Einstein distribution is completely broken down in these regimes, even if the thermal energy is larger or much larger than the cavity detuning energy. In this investigation, a crossover phenomenon from equilibrium to nonequilibrium steady states is also revealed.

  15. Suppression law of quantum states in a 3D photonic fast Fourier transform chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi, Andrea; Osellame, Roberto; Ramponi, Roberta; Bentivegna, Marco; Flamini, Fulvio; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Viggianiello, Niko; Innocenti, Luca; Mataloni, Paolo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2016-02-01

    The identification of phenomena able to pinpoint quantum interference is attracting large interest. Indeed, a generalization of the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect valid for any number of photons and optical modes would represent an important leap ahead both from a fundamental perspective and for practical applications, such as certification of photonic quantum devices, whose computational speedup is expected to depend critically on multi-particle interference. Quantum distinctive features have been predicted for many particles injected into multimode interferometers implementing the Fourier transform over the optical modes. Here we develop a scalable approach for the implementation of the fast Fourier transform algorithm using three-dimensional photonic integrated interferometers, fabricated via femtosecond laser writing technique. We observe the suppression law for a large number of output states with four- and eight-mode optical circuits: the experimental results demonstrate genuine quantum interference between the injected photons, thus offering a powerful tool for diagnostic of photonic platforms.

  16. Suppression law of quantum states in a 3D photonic fast Fourier transform chip

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Andrea; Osellame, Roberto; Ramponi, Roberta; Bentivegna, Marco; Flamini, Fulvio; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Viggianiello, Niko; Innocenti, Luca; Mataloni, Paolo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The identification of phenomena able to pinpoint quantum interference is attracting large interest. Indeed, a generalization of the Hong–Ou–Mandel effect valid for any number of photons and optical modes would represent an important leap ahead both from a fundamental perspective and for practical applications, such as certification of photonic quantum devices, whose computational speedup is expected to depend critically on multi-particle interference. Quantum distinctive features have been predicted for many particles injected into multimode interferometers implementing the Fourier transform over the optical modes. Here we develop a scalable approach for the implementation of the fast Fourier transform algorithm using three-dimensional photonic integrated interferometers, fabricated via femtosecond laser writing technique. We observe the suppression law for a large number of output states with four- and eight-mode optical circuits: the experimental results demonstrate genuine quantum interference between the injected photons, thus offering a powerful tool for diagnostic of photonic platforms. PMID:26843135

  17. Suppression law of quantum states in a 3D photonic fast Fourier transform chip.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Andrea; Osellame, Roberto; Ramponi, Roberta; Bentivegna, Marco; Flamini, Fulvio; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Viggianiello, Niko; Innocenti, Luca; Mataloni, Paolo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2016-02-04

    The identification of phenomena able to pinpoint quantum interference is attracting large interest. Indeed, a generalization of the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect valid for any number of photons and optical modes would represent an important leap ahead both from a fundamental perspective and for practical applications, such as certification of photonic quantum devices, whose computational speedup is expected to depend critically on multi-particle interference. Quantum distinctive features have been predicted for many particles injected into multimode interferometers implementing the Fourier transform over the optical modes. Here we develop a scalable approach for the implementation of the fast Fourier transform algorithm using three-dimensional photonic integrated interferometers, fabricated via femtosecond laser writing technique. We observe the suppression law for a large number of output states with four- and eight-mode optical circuits: the experimental results demonstrate genuine quantum interference between the injected photons, thus offering a powerful tool for diagnostic of photonic platforms.

  18. Polarization-selective resonant photonic crystal photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin-Kyu; Seo, Min-Kyo; Hwang, In-Kag; Kim, Sung-Bock; Lee, Yong-Hee

    2008-11-01

    Resonance-assisted photonic crystal (PhC) slab photodetectors are demonstrated by utilizing six 7-nm-thick InGaAsP quantum wells. In order to encourage efficient photon coupling into the slab from the vertical direction, a coupled-dipole-cavity-array PhC structure is employed. Inheriting the characteristics of the dipole mode, this resonant detector is highly polarization selective and shows a 22-nm-wide spectral width. The maximum responsivity of 0.28A/W, which is >20 times larger than that of the identical detector without the pattern, is observed near 1.56μm.

  19. Photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, Peter Schwarz, Benedikt; Harrer, Andreas; Zederbauer, Tobias; Detz, Hermann; Maxwell Andrews, Aaron; Gansch, Roman; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2013-12-09

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and characterization of a photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector (PCS-QCD). By employing a specifically designed resonant cavity, the performance of the photodetector is improved in three distinct ways. The PCS makes the QCD sensitive to surface normal incident light. It resonantly enhances the photon lifetime inside the active zone, thus increasing the photocurrent significantly. And, the construction form of the device inherently decreases the noise. Finally, we compare the characteristics of the PCS-QCD to a PCS - quantum well infrared photodetector and outline the advantages for certain fields of applications.

  20. Photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reininger, Peter; Schwarz, Benedikt; Harrer, Andreas; Zederbauer, Tobias; Detz, Hermann; Maxwell Andrews, Aaron; Gansch, Roman; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and characterization of a photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector (PCS-QCD). By employing a specifically designed resonant cavity, the performance of the photodetector is improved in three distinct ways. The PCS makes the QCD sensitive to surface normal incident light. It resonantly enhances the photon lifetime inside the active zone, thus increasing the photocurrent significantly. And, the construction form of the device inherently decreases the noise. Finally, we compare the characteristics of the PCS-QCD to a PCS - quantum well infrared photodetector and outline the advantages for certain fields of applications.

  1. The Relationship between Oxygen A-band Photon Pathlength Distributions and 3D Structures of Heating Rate Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, L.; Min, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Broadband heating directly drives the global atmospheric and oceanic circulation and its vertical profiles strongly depend upon cloud three-dimensional (3D) structures. Due to the complexity of cloud 3D problems and the difficulties in observations of broadband heating rate profiles (BBHRP), there are still large uncertainties in the relationship of clouds, radiation and climate feedback. Oxygen A-band photon pathlength distributions (PPLD) contain rich information about the 3D structures of clouds and BBHRP and can be observed by both ground based and space based measurements. Therefore, it is meaningful to explore the possibility of connecting A-band PPLD and BBHRP and consequently to describe the internal relationship between them together with the cloud 3D effects on BBHRP. A 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer model is applied to simulate solar broadband heating rate profiles and oxygen A-band photon pathlength distributions of several ideal cloud fields and two typical cloud fields generated by cloud resolving model (CRM). Principal components (PCs) and the first four moments are selected to represent the vertical structures of BBHRP and PPLD, respectively. In ideal cloud fields, the moments show clear constraint to PCs of BBHRP. The results demonstrate the feasibility to describe the vertical structures of BBHRP by PPLD. The relationship between moments and PCs turns complicated in CRM cloud fields due to the composition of various 3D effects. However, detailed analysis still show that the moments, the PCs and total cloud optical depth are effective factors in defining BBHRP, especially for the vertical structures of relative low clouds. Further, a statistical fitting between the PCs and the moments by a two-layer neural network is applied to provide a quantitative representation of the linkages.

  2. Comparison of Three-Dimensional (3D) Conformal Proton Radiotherapy (RT), 3D Conformal Photon RT, and Intensity-Modulated RT for Retroperitoneal and Intra-Abdominal Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Erika L.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Louis, Debbie; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng; Morris, Christopher G.; Paryani, Nitesh; Slopsema, Roelf

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To compare three-dimensional conformal proton radiotherapy (3DCPT), intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT), and 3D conformal photon radiotherapy (3DCRT) to predict the optimal RT technique for retroperitoneal sarcomas. Methods and Materials: 3DCRT, IMRT, and 3DCPT plans were created for treating eight patients with retroperitoneal or intra-abdominal sarcomas. The clinical target volume (CTV) included the gross tumor plus a 2-cm margin, limited by bone and intact fascial planes. For photon plans, the planning target volume (PTV) included a uniform expansion of 5 mm. For the proton plans, the PTV was nonuniform and beam-specific. The prescription dose was 50.4 Gy/Cobalt gray equivalent CGE. Plans were normalized so that >95% of the CTV received 100% of the dose. Results: The CTV was covered adequately by all techniques. The median conformity index was 0.69 for 3DCPT, 0.75 for IMRT, and 0.51 for 3DCRT. The median inhomogeneity coefficient was 0.062 for 3DCPT, 0.066 for IMRT, and 0.073 for 3DCRT. The bowel median volume receiving 15 Gy (V15) was 16.4% for 3DCPT, 52.2% for IMRT, and 66.1% for 3DCRT. The bowel median V45 was 6.3% for 3DCPT, 4.7% for IMRT, and 15.6% for 3DCRT. The median ipsilateral mean kidney dose was 22.5 CGE for 3DCPT, 34.1 Gy for IMRT, and 37.8 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral mean kidney dose was 0 CGE for 3DCPT, 6.4 Gy for IMRT, and 11 Gy for 3DCRT. The median contralateral kidney V5 was 0% for 3DCPT, 49.9% for IMRT, and 99.7% for 3DCRT. Regardless of technique, the median mean liver dose was <30 Gy, and the median cord V50 was 0%. The median integral dose was 126 J for 3DCPT, 400 J for IMRT, and 432 J for 3DCRT. Conclusions: IMRT and 3DCPT result in plans that are more conformal and homogenous than 3DCRT. Based on Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in Clinic benchmarks, the dosimetric advantage of proton therapy may be less gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity.

  3. Research on interferometric photonic crystal fiber hydrophone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hong; Zhang, Zhen-hui; Wang, Fu-yin; Xiong, Shui-dong

    2013-08-01

    Current research on photonic crystal fiber (PCF) for acoustic sensing was focused on the PCF's pressure sensitivity enhancement. However, whether the enhancement of the PCF's pressure sensitivity can be actually realized is still controversial. Practical hydrophone, utilizing PCFs, to manifest its superior sensitivity to normal single mode fibers (SMFs) for acoustic sensing, should be made. Account to this point of view, actual hydrophone was fabricated. Index guiding PCF was used, the fiber core is solid silicon dioxide (SiO2), and the cladding is SiO2 filled with lots of periodical transverse circular air hollows. The PCF, mounted on an air-backed mandrel for structural sensitivity enhancement, was used as a sensing arm of the fiber Michelson interferometer. The other arm, so called reference arm, was made of SMF. Faraday rotator mirrors (FRM) were spliced in the end of each interferometric arm account for polarization induced phase fading, which is a common scheme in fiber interferometric sensing systems. A similar hydrophone, with all the same structure except that the PCF was exchanged into SMF, was also fabrication to make the contrast. The narrowlinewidth and frequency-tunable optical fiber laser was used to achieve high accuracy optical interferometric measurement. Meanwhile, the phase generated carrier (PGC) modulation-demodulation scheme was adopted to interrogate the measurand signal. Experiment was done by using acoustic standing-wave test apparatus. Linearity characteristics of the two hydrophones were measured at frequency 100Hz, 500Hz, and 1000Hz, experimental results showed that the maximum error of the linearity was 10%, a little larger than the theoretical results. Pressure sensitivities of the PCF hydrophone and the SMF hydrophone were measured using a reference standard PZT hydrophone in the frequency range from 20 Hz to 1600 Hz, the measurement data showed that the sensitivity of the PCF hydrophone was about -162.8 dB re. rad/μPa, with a

  4. Electrically tunable liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olausson, Christina B.; Scolari, Lara; Wei, Lei; Noordegraaf, Danny; Weirich, Johannes; Alkeskjold, Thomas T.; Hansen, Kim P.; Bjarklev, Anders

    2010-02-01

    We demonstrate electrical tunability of a fiber laser using a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber. Tuning of the laser is achieved by combining the wavelength filtering effect of a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber device with an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. We fabricate an all-spliced laser cavity based on a liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber mounted on a silicon assembly, a pump/signal combiner with single-mode signal feed-through and an ytterbium-doped photonic crystal fiber. The laser cavity produces a single-mode output and is tuned in the range 1040- 1065 nm by applying an electric field to the silicon assembly.

  5. Polymorphism, crystal nucleation and growth in the phase-field crystal model in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gyula I.; Tegze, György; Pusztai, Tamás; Tóth, Gergely; Gránásy, László

    2010-09-01

    We apply a simple dynamical density functional theory, the phase-field crystal (PFC) model of overdamped conservative dynamics, to address polymorphism, crystal nucleation, and crystal growth in the diffusion-controlled limit. We refine the phase diagram for 3D, and determine the line free energy in 2D and the height of the nucleation barrier in 2D and 3D for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation by solving the respective Euler-Lagrange (EL) equations. We demonstrate that, in the PFC model, the body-centered cubic (bcc), the face-centered cubic (fcc), and the hexagonal close-packed structures (hcp) compete, while the simple cubic structure is unstable, and that phase preference can be tuned by changing the model parameters: close to the critical point the bcc structure is stable, while far from the critical point the fcc prevails, with an hcp stability domain in between. We note that with increasing distance from the critical point the equilibrium shapes vary from the sphere to specific faceted shapes: rhombic dodecahedron (bcc), truncated octahedron (fcc), and hexagonal prism (hcp). Solving the equation of motion of the PFC model supplied with conserved noise, solidification starts with the nucleation of an amorphous precursor phase, into which the stable crystalline phase nucleates. The growth rate is found to be time dependent and anisotropic; this anisotropy depends on the driving force. We show that due to the diffusion-controlled growth mechanism, which is especially relevant for crystal aggregation in colloidal systems, dendritic growth structures evolve in large-scale isothermal single-component PFC simulations. An oscillatory effective pair potential resembling those for model glass formers has been evaluated from structural data of the amorphous phase obtained by instantaneous quenching. Finally, we present results for eutectic solidification in a binary PFC model.

  6. 3D lattice distortions and defect structures in ion-implanted nano-crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Hofmann, Felix; Robinson, Ian K.; Tarleton, Edmund; ...

    2017-04-06

    The ability of Focused Ion Beam (FIB) techniques to cut solid matter at the nano-scale revolutionized the study of material structure across the life-, earth- and material sciences. But a detailed understanding of the damage caused by the ion beam and its effect on material properties remains elusive. We examine this damage in 3D using coherent X-ray diffraction to measure the full lattice strain tensor in FIB-milled gold nano-crystals. We also found that even very low ion doses, previously thought to be negligible, cause substantial lattice distortions. At higher doses, extended self-organized defect structures appear. Combined with detailed numerical calculations,more » these observations allow fundamental insight into the nature of the damage created and the structural instabilities that lead to a surprisingly inhomogeneous morphology.« less

  7. Extreme low thermal conductivity in nanoscale 3D Si phononic crystal with spherical pores.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lina; Yang, Nuo; Li, Baowen

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we propose a nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) Si phononic crystal (PnC) with spherical pores, which can reduce the thermal conductivity of bulk Si by a factor up to 10,000 times at room temperature. Thermal conductivity of Si PnCs depends on the porosity, for example, the thermal conductivity of Si PnCs with porosity 50% is 300 times smaller than that of bulk Si. The phonon participation ratio spectra demonstrate that more phonons are localized as the porosity increases. The thermal conductivity is insensitive to the temperature changes from room temperature to 1100 K. The extreme-low thermal conductivity could lead to a larger value of ZT than unity as the periodic structure affects very little the electric conductivity.

  8. Crystal growth and electronic properties of a 3D Rashba material, BiTeI, with adjusted carrier concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kanou, Manabu; Sasagawa, Takao

    2013-04-03

    3D Rashba materials can be a leading player in spin-related novel phenomena, ranging from the metallic extreme (unconventional superconductivity) to the transport intermediate (spin Hall effects) to the novel insulating variant (3D topological insulating states). As the essential backbone for both fundamental and applied research of such a 3D Rashba material, this study established the growth of sizeable single crystals of a candidate compound BiTeI with adjusted carrier concentrations. Three techniques (standard vertical Bridgman, modified horizontal Bridgman, and vapour transport) were employed, and BiTeI crystals (>1 × 1 × 0.2 mm(3)) with fundamentally different electronic states from metallic to insulating were successfully grown by the chosen technique. The 3D Rashba electronic states, including the Fermi surface topology, for the corresponding carrier concentrations of the obtained BiTeI crystals were revealed by relativistic first-principles calculations.

  9. 3D printed reversible shape changing soft actuators assisted by liquid crystal elastomers.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chao; Roach, Devin J; Dunn, Conner K; Mu, Quanyi; Kuang, Xiao; Yakacki, Christopher M; Wang, T J; Yu, Kai; Qi, H Jerry

    2017-08-23

    In this work, we advance printed active composites by combining 3D printing, printed electronics, and liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) to achieve soft actuators with free-standing two-way shape changing behaviors. Incorporated LCE strips are activated by Joule heating produced by printed conductive wires, while uniaxial deformation of the LCE strip is utilized as a driving force to achieve bending in the printed composite. The bending behavior of laminated hinges is first characterized in order to obtain a precise control of actuation, which is then exploited to actuate four demonstrative designs: a morphing airplane, a miura-ori structure, a cubic box, and a soft crawler. The soft morphing airplane and miura-ori structure are designed and fabricated with multiple laminated hinges to demonstrate the synergistic actions during actuation. The cubic box is constructed to show the capability of sequential folding by implementing multiple groups of conductive wires to achieve accurately addressable heating with temporal control. Finally, the two-way transformation is utilized as a driving force for the locomotion of a soft crawler stimulated by a periodic rectangular wave current. These examples show the great potential of using the hybrid 3D printing and pick-and-place method and using LCEs to achieve controllable shape change structures for a variety of potential practical applications.

  10. A plasma photonic crystal bandgap device

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2016-04-18

    A fully tunable plasma photonic crystal is used to control the propagation of free space electromagnetic waves in the S to X bands of the microwave spectrum. An array of discharge plasma tubes forms a simple square crystal structure with the individual plasma dielectric constant tuned through variation in the plasma density. We show, through simulations and experiments, that transverse electric mode bandgaps exist, arising from the positive and negative dielectric constant regimes of the plasma, and that the respective bandgap frequencies can be shifted through changing the dielectric constant by varying discharge current density.

  11. Ray chaos in a photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Emmanuel; Felbacq, Didier

    2017-01-01

    The ray dynamics in a photonic crystal was investigated. Chaos occurs for perfectly periodic crystals, the rays dynamics being very sensitive to the initial conditions. Depending on the filling factor, the ray dynamics can exhibit stable paths near (fully) chaotic motion. The degree of chaoticity is quantified through the computation of Lyapunov exponents. As a result, the more diluted is the geometry, the more chaotic is the dynamic. Therefore, despite the perfect periodicity of the geometry, light transport is a diffusive process which can be tuned from normal diffusion (Brownian motion) to anomalous diffusion because of the existence of Lévy flights.

  12. Two-photon polymerization technique for microfabrication of CAD-designed 3D scaffolds from commercially available photosensitive materials.

    PubMed

    Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Schlie, Sabrina; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Haverich, Axel; Chichkov, Boris N

    2007-01-01

    We report on recent advances in the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine constructs using a two-photon polymerization technique (2PP). 2PP is a novel CAD/CAM technology allowing the fabrication of any computer-designed 3D structure from a photosensitive polymeric material. The flexibility of this technology and the ability to precisely define 3D construct geometry allows issues associated with vascularization and patient-specific tissue fabrication to be directly addressed. The fabrication of reproducible scaffold structures by 2PP is important for systematic studies of cellular processes and better understanding of in vitro tissue formation. In this study, 2PP was applied for the generation of 3D scaffold-like structures, using the photosensitive organic-inorganic hybrid polymer ORMOCER (ORganically MOdified CERamics) and epoxy-based SU8 materials. By comparing the proliferation rates of cells grown on flat material surfaces and under control conditions, it was demonstrated that ORMOCER and SU8 are not cytotoxic. Additional tests show that the DNA strand breaking of GFSHR-17 granulosa cells was not affected by the presence of ORMOCER. Furthermore, gap junction conductance measurements revealed that ORMOCER did not alter the formation of cell-cell junctions, critical for functional tissue growth. The possibilities of seeding 3D structures with cells were analysed. These studies demonstrate the great potential of 2PP technique for the manufacturing of scaffolds with controlled topology and properties.

  13. Simulation of light transport in scintillators based on 3D characterization of crystal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Simon R.

    2013-01-01

    In the development of positron emission tomography (PET) detectors, understanding and optimizing scintillator light collection is critical for achieving high performance, particularly when the design incorporates depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding or time-of-flight information. Monte-Carlo simulations play an important role in guiding research in detector designs and popular software such as GATE now include models of light transport in scintillators. Although current simulation toolkits are able to provide accurate models of perfectly polished surfaces, they do not successfully predict light output for other surface finishes, for example those often used in DOI-encoding detectors. The lack of accuracy of those models mainly originates from a simplified description of rough surfaces as an ensemble of micro-facets determined by the distribution of their normal, typically a Gaussian distribution. The user can specify the standard deviation of this distribution, but this parameter does not provide a full description of the surface reflectance properties. We propose a different approach based on 3D measurements of the surface using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Polished and rough (unpolished) crystals were scanned to compute the surface reflectance properties. The angular distributions of reflectance and reflected rays were computed and stored in look-up tables (LUTs). The LUTs account for the effect of incidence angle and were integrated in a light transport model. Crystals of different sizes were simulated with and without reflector. The simulated maximum light output and the light output as a function of DOI showed very good agreement with experimental characterization of the crystals, indicating that our approach provides an accurate model of polished and rough surfaces and could be used to predict light collection in scintillators. This model is based on a true 3D representation of the surface, makes no assumption about the surface and provides insight on the

  14. Simulation of light transport in scintillators based on 3D characterization of crystal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Roncali, Emilie; Cherry, Simon R

    2013-04-07

    In the development of positron emission tomography (PET) detectors, understanding and optimizing scintillator light collection is critical for achieving high performance, particularly when the design incorporates depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding or time-of-flight information. Monte-Carlo simulations play an important role in guiding research in detector designs and popular software such as GATE now include models of light transport in scintillators. Although current simulation toolkits are able to provide accurate models of perfectly polished surfaces, they do not successfully predict light output for other surface finishes, for example those often used in DOI-encoding detectors. The lack of accuracy of those models mainly originates from a simplified description of rough surfaces as an ensemble of micro-facets determined by the distribution of their normal, typically a gaussian distribution. The user can specify the standard deviation of this distribution, but this parameter does not provide a full description of the surface reflectance properties. We propose a different approach based on 3D measurements of the surface using atomic force microscopy. Polished and rough (unpolished) crystals were scanned to compute the surface reflectance properties. The angular distributions of reflectance and reflected rays were computed and stored in look-up tables (LUTs). The LUTs account for the effect of incidence angle and were integrated in a light transport model. Crystals of different sizes were simulated with and without reflector. The simulated maximum light output and the light output as a function of DOI showed very good agreement with experimental characterization of the crystals, indicating that our approach provides an accurate model of polished and rough surfaces and could be used to predict light collection in scintillators. This model is based on a true 3D representation of the surface, makes no assumption about the surface and provides insight on the optical

  15. Simulation of light transport in scintillators based on 3D characterization of crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncali, Emilie; Cherry, Simon R.

    2013-04-01

    In the development of positron emission tomography (PET) detectors, understanding and optimizing scintillator light collection is critical for achieving high performance, particularly when the design incorporates depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding or time-of-flight information. Monte-Carlo simulations play an important role in guiding research in detector designs and popular software such as GATE now include models of light transport in scintillators. Although current simulation toolkits are able to provide accurate models of perfectly polished surfaces, they do not successfully predict light output for other surface finishes, for example those often used in DOI-encoding detectors. The lack of accuracy of those models mainly originates from a simplified description of rough surfaces as an ensemble of micro-facets determined by the distribution of their normal, typically a Gaussian distribution. The user can specify the standard deviation of this distribution, but this parameter does not provide a full description of the surface reflectance properties. We propose a different approach based on 3D measurements of the surface using atomic force microscopy. Polished and rough (unpolished) crystals were scanned to compute the surface reflectance properties. The angular distributions of reflectance and reflected rays were computed and stored in look-up tables (LUTs). The LUTs account for the effect of incidence angle and were integrated in a light transport model. Crystals of different sizes were simulated with and without reflector. The simulated maximum light output and the light output as a function of DOI showed very good agreement with experimental characterization of the crystals, indicating that our approach provides an accurate model of polished and rough surfaces and could be used to predict light collection in scintillators. This model is based on a true 3D representation of the surface, makes no assumption about the surface and provides insight on the optical

  16. Hands-on Symmetry, Building and Using 3-D Crystal Models in Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, K.

    2002-12-01

    Symmetry has historically been the most difficult subject in mineralogy and because so much of the science of mineralogy and crystallography builds on the fundamentals of form and symmetry, it is essential students understand it well. I concluded in recent years that better manipulatives might hold the key to better student comprehension. Mineralogy lab exercises related to symmetry typically involve the use of line drawings of 3-D crystal shapes sometimes augmented with a selection of small wooden models. Many students find the line drawings difficult to envision as 3-D solids. This makes the leap to identifying symmetry elements almost impossible for them and very time consuming for the instructor. The few line drawings for which models were available to my students were readily understood. Following the purchase of a new chop saw, I discovered that it is easy to cut most crystal models from scrap lumber and spent two weeks calculating, cutting, and finishing wooden models. For each of the line drawings used in my symmetry labs two models were cut, 200 models total. Models were also cut to show form development, distorted growth, enantiomorphism, and twinning. The models were cut to a final size of 5 to 15 cm and can be written on with chalk. The large model size and chalkability allowed students to more easily identify, mark, and erase mirrors, axes, forms, etc. Use of these models resulted in 50% less lab time needed in teaching the concepts of symmetry and form and 75% less time for students to complete the exercises. Scores on the symmetry labs averaged 55% to 65% in 1999-2001. The Fall 2002 averages were 85% and the errors made were much more trivial in nature, a dramatic improvement indeed.

  17. A tunable microwave plasma photonic crystal filter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2015-10-26

    The integration of gaseous plasma elements into a microwave photonic crystal band gap cavity structure allows for active tuning of the device. An alumina rod array microwave photonic crystal waveguide resonator is simulated and characterized through finite difference time domain methods. A gaseous plasma element is integrated into the cavity structure and the effect of plasma density on the transmission properties of the structure is investigated. We show, through both simulations and experiments, that the permittivity of the plasma can be adjusted to shift the peak resonance to allow for both switching and tunability of transmission. The experimentally measured peak shifts in transmission are compared to those simulated and the electron density of the gaseous plasma element is calculated and compared to values determined from the measured discharge current density.

  18. Effective medium theory of photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W. T.; Zhang, S.; Huang, Y. J.; Sridhar, S.

    2008-03-01

    We develop an effective medium theory for photonic crystals including negative index metamaterials. This theory is based on field summation within the unit cell. The unit cell is determined by the surface termination. The orientation of the surface breaks the field summation symmetry. This theory is self-consistent. The effective permittivity and permeability tensors will give the exact dispersion relation obtained from the band structure calculation. For waves incident into multilayered structures, our theory gives exact transmittance and reflectance for any wavelengths. For interface with periodic surface structures, our theory gives very accurate results for wavelength down to being comparable with the lattice spacing. By properly taking into account the multiple Bloch modes inside the photonic crystal, our theory can be made to give exact Bragg coefficients.

  19. Electrical Control of Silicon Photonic Crystal Cavity by Graphene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Electrical Control of Silicon Photonic Crystal Cavity by Graphene Arka Majumdar,†,‡,∥ Jonghwan Kim,†,∥ Jelena Vuckovic,‡ and Feng Wang...of electronics and photonics . The combination of graphene with photonic crystals is promising for electro-optic modulation. In this paper, we...demonstrate that by electrostatic gating a single layer of graphene on top of a photonic crystal cavity, the cavity resonance can be changed significantly. A

  20. Nonreciprocal photonic crystal add-drop filter

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Keyu; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Yin, Xiaobo

    2014-11-24

    We present a versatile add-drop integrated photonic filter (ADF) consisting of nonreciprocal waveguides in which the propagation of light is restricted in one predetermined direction. With the bus and add/drop waveguides symmetrically coupled through a cavity, the four-port device allows each individual port to add and/or drop a signal of the same frequency. The scheme is general and we demonstrate the nonreciprocal ADF with magneto-optical photonic crystals. The filter is immune to waveguide defects, allowing straightforward implementation of multi-channel ADFs by cascading the four-port designs. The results should find applications in wavelength-division multiplexing and related integrated photonic techniques.

  1. Photonic Crystal Microcavities for Quantum Information Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemeier, Jenna Nicole

    Quantum information science and technology is a broad and fascinating field, encompassing diverse research areas such as materials science, atomic physics, superconductors, solid-state physics, and photonics. A goal of this field is to demonstrate the basic functions of information initialization, manipulation, and read-out in systems that take advantage of quantum physics to greatly enhance computing performance capabilities. In a hybrid quantum information network, different systems are used to perform different functions, to best exploit the advantageous properties of each system. For example, matter quantum bits (qubits) can be used for local data storage and manipulation while photonic qubits can be used for long-distance communication between storage points of the network. Our research focuses on the following two solid-state realizations of a matter qubit for the purpose of building such a hybrid quantum network: the electronic spin of a self-assembled indium arsenide quantum dot and the electronic spin of a nitrogen-vacancy defect center in diamond. Light--matter interactions are necessary to transfer the information from the matter qubit to the photonic qubit, and this interaction can be enhanced by embedding the spin system in an optical cavity. We focus on photonic crystal microcavities for this purpose, and we study interactions between the optical cavity modes and incorporated spin systems. To improve the performance of this spin--photon interface, it is important to maximize the coupling strength between the spin and photonic systems and to increase the read-out efficiency of information stored in the cavity. In this thesis, we present our work to deterministically couple a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond to a photonic crystal microcavity in gallium phosphide. This is achieved by nanopositioning a pre-selected diamond nanocrystal in the intensity maximum of the optical cavity mode. We also present an optimized design of a photonic crystal

  2. Nonlinear photonic crystal microdevices for optical integration.

    PubMed

    Soljacić, Marin; Luo, Chiyan; Joannopoulos, J D; Fan, Shanhui

    2003-04-15

    A four-port nonlinear photonic crystal system is discussed that exhibits optical bistability with negligible backscattering to the inputs, making it particularly suitable for integration with other active devices on the same chip. Devices based on this system can be made to be small [O(lambda3)] in volume, have a nearly instantaneous response, and consume only a few milliwatts of power. Among many possible applications, we focus on an all-optical transistor and integrated optical isolation.

  3. Long period gratings in photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Jian; Jin, Wei

    2012-03-01

    The authors review the recent advances in fabricating long-period gratings (LPGs) in photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). The novel light-guiding properties of the PCFs allow the demonstration of novel sensors and devices based on such LPGs. The sensitivity of these PCF LPGs to temperature, strain and refractive index is discussed and compared with LPGs made on conventional single-mode fibers. In-fiber devices such as tunable band rejection filters, Mach-Zehnder interferometers are discussed.

  4. Electromagnetic waves: Negative refraction by photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbay, Ekmel

    2004-03-01

    Recently left-handed materials (LHM) attracted great attention since these materials exhibit negative effective index, which is due to simultaneously negative permeability and permittivity. Pendry proposed that negative effective index in left-handed materials can be used for constructing a perfect lens, which is not limited by diffraction(J. B. Pendry, Negative refraction makes a perfect lens, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 85, 3966 (2000)). Negative refraction is also achievable in a dielectric photonic crystal (PC) that has a periodically modulated positive permittivity and a permeability of unity. Luo et al. has studied negative refraction and subwavelength imaging in photonic crystals(C. Luo, S. G. Johnson, J. D. Joannopoulos, J. B. Pendry, Subwavelength Imaging in Photonic Crystals Phys. Rev. B 68, 045115 (2003)). In this presentation, we report our experimental and theoretical investigation of negative refraction and subwavelength focusing of electromagnetic waves in a 2D PC. Our structure consists of a square array of dielectric rods in air. Transmission measurements are performed for experimentally verifying the predicted negative refraction behavior in our structure. Negative index of refraction determined from the experiment is -1.94 which is very close to the theoretical value of -2.06. Negative refraction is observed for the incidence angles of > 20°(Ertugrul Cubukcu, Koray Aydin, Ekmel Ozbay, S. Foteinopolou, and Costas Soukoulis, Negative Refraction by Photonic Crystals, Nature, vol. 423, 604 (2003)). Since we know the optimum frequency for a broad angle negative refraction, we can use our crystal to test the superlensing effect that was predicted for negative refractive materials. Scanning transmission measurement technique is used to measure the spatial power distribution of the focused electromagnetic waves that radiate from a point source. Full width at half maximum of the focused beam is measured to be 0.21λ, which is in good agreement with the finite

  5. Intravitreal properties of porous silicon photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, L; Anglin, E; Cunin, F; Kim, D; Sailor, M J; Falkenstein, I; Tammewar, A; Freeman, W R

    2009-01-01

    Aim To determine the suitability of porous silicon photonic crystals for intraocular drug-delivery. Methods A rugate structure was electrochemically etched into a highly doped p-type silicon substrate to create a porous silicon film that was subsequently removed and ultrasonically fractured into particles. To stabilise the particles in aqueous media, the silicon particles were modified by surface alkylation (using thermal hydrosilylation) or by thermal oxidation. Unmodified particles, hydrosilylated particles and oxidised particles were injected into rabbit vitreous. The stability and toxicity of each type of particle were studied by indirect ophthalmoscopy, biomicroscopy, tonometry, electroretinography (ERG) and histology. Results No toxicity was observed with any type of the particles during a period of >4 months. Surface alkylation led to dramatically increased intravitreal stability and slow degradation. The estimated vitreous half-life increased from 1 week (fresh particles) to 5 weeks (oxidised particles) and to 16 weeks (hydrosilylated particles). Conclusion The porous silicon photonic crystals showed good biocompatibility and may be used as an intraocular drug-delivery system. The intravitreal injectable porous silicon photonic crystals may be engineered to host a variety of therapeutics and achieve controlled drug release over long periods of time to treat chronic vitreoretinal diseases. PMID:18441177

  6. Parametric wavelength conversion in photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sigang; Wu, Zhaohui; Yang, Yi; Chen, Minghua; Xie, Shizhong

    2016-11-01

    Nonlinear wavelength conversion provides flexible solutions for generating wideband tunable radiation in novel wavelength band. Parametric process in photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) has attracted comprehensive interests since it can act as broadband tunable light sources in non-conventional wavelength bands. The current state-of-the-art photonic crystal fibers can provide more freedom for customizing the dispersion and nonlinearity which is critical to the nonlinear process, such as four wave mixing (FWM), compared with the traditional fibers fabricated with doping techniques. Here we demonstrate broadband parametric wavelength conversion in our homemade photonic crystal fibers. The zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW) of PCFs is critical for the requirement of phase matching condition in the parametric four wave mixing process. Firstly a procedure of the theoretical design of PCF with the ZDW at 1060 nm is proposed through our homemade simulation software. A group of PCF samples with gradually variable parameters are fabricated according to the theoretical design. The broadband parametric gain around 1060 nm band is demonstrated pumped with our homemade mode locked fiber laser in the anomalous dispersion region. Also a narrow gain band with very large wavelength detune with the pump wavelength in the normal dispersion region is realized. Wavelength conversion with a span of 194 nm is realized. Furthermore a fiber optical parametric oscillator based on the fabricated PCF is built up. A wavelength tunable range as high as 340 nm is obtained. This report demonstrates a systematic procedure to realize wide band wavelength conversion based on PCFs.

  7. Slotted photonic crystals for biosensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullion, M. G.; Krauss, T. F.; Di Falco, A.

    2012-06-01

    We discuss the properties and potential of slotted photonic crystals devices as small optical, label-free biosensors. This approach combines slot waveguides, which guide light in a narrow air slot, with photonic crystals in which cavities and slow light behaviour can be engineered. We use cavities based upon the heterostructure approach, demonstrating experimental quality factors of up to 50,000 in air and 4,000 in water. As the peak of the cavity mode interacts with the contents of the slot, small changes in refractive index can be inferred from the cavity resonant wavelength with high sensitivity (~500 nm/RIU). We also integrate microfluidic channels, which when combined with the small footprint of each sensor, allows potential for dense multiplexing with only micro-litres of analyte. As the dispersive properties of the fundamental mode of a standard and slotted photonic crystal differ greatly, a suitable interface for coupling into the device must be found. We here utilise a resonant defect approach, which preferentially couples into the slot mode. Functionalising the surface of the device with antibodies allows us to detect specific binding of a target protein on the sensor surface. As a proof of principle demonstration we show detection of dissolved avidin concentrations as low as 15 nM using biotin functionalised devices.

  8. Polymer photonic crystal fibre for sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, David J.

    2010-04-01

    Polymer photonic crystal fibres combine two relatively recent developments in fibre technology. On the one hand, polymer optical fibre has very different physical and chemical properties to silica. In particular, polymer fibre has a much smaller Young's modulus than silica, can survive higher strains, is amenable to organic chemical processing and, depending on the constituent polymer, may absorb water. All of these features can be utilised to extend the range of applications of optical fibre sensors. On the other hand, the photonic crystal - or microstructured - geometry also offers advantages: flexibility in the fibre design including control of the dispersion properties of core and cladding modes, the possibility of introducing minute quantities of analyte directly into the electric field of the guided light and enhanced pressure sensitivity. When brought together these two technologies provide interesting possibilities for fibre sensors, particularly when combined with fibre Bragg or long period gratings. This paper discusses the features of polymer photonic crystal fibre relevant to sensing and provides examples of the applications demonstrated to date.

  9. Modeling of Photonic Band Gap Crystals and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kady, Ihab Fathy

    2002-01-01

    In this work, the authors have undertaken a theoretical approach to the complex problem of modeling the flow of electromagnetic waves in photonic crystals. The focus is to address the feasibility of using the exciting phenomena of photonic gaps (PBG) in actual applications. The authors start by providing analytical derivations of the computational electromagnetic methods used in their work. They also present a detailed explanation of the physics underlying each approach, as well as a comparative study of the strengths and weaknesses of each method. The Plane Wave expansion, Transfer Matrix, and Finite Difference time Domain Methods are addressed. They also introduce a new theoretical approach, the Modal Expansion Method. They then shift the attention to actual applications. They begin with a discussion of 2D photonic crystal wave guides. The structure addressed consists of a 2D hexagonal structure of air cylinders in a layered dielectric background. Comparison with the performance of a conventional guide is made, as well as suggestions for enhancing it. The studies provide an upper theoretical limit on the performance of such guides, as they assumed no crystal imperfections and non-absorbing media. Next, they study 3D metallic PBG materials at near infrared and optical wavelengths. The main objective is to study the importance of absorption in the metal and the suitability of observing photonic band gaps in such structures. They study simple cubic structures where the metallic scatters are either cubes or interconnected metallic rods. Several metals are studied (aluminum, gold, copper, and silver). The effect of topology is addressed and isolated metallic cubes are found to be less lossy than the connected rod structures. The results reveal that the best performance is obtained by choosing metals with a large negative real part of the dielectric function, together with a relatively small imaginary part. Finally, they point out a new direction in photonic crystal

  10. Analysis and Application of the Bi-Directional Scatter Distribution Function of Photonic Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Calculated normal-incidence reflectance spectra with TM polarization for five different values of the superstrate refractive index: (a) 1.00, (b...a liquid crystal superstrate [7] (right) SEM image of mold used to create the GMRF [8] 6 Figure 3. 2-D GMRF photonic crystal: (left) 3-D...schematic, without the superstrate [8] (right) SEM image of the mold used to produce the PC[8] superstrate is increased. It is important to note

  11. Design of a three-dimensional photonic band gap cavity in a diamondlike inverse woodpile photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woldering, Léon A.; Mosk, Allard P.; Vos, Willem L.

    2014-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the design of cavities in a three-dimensional (3D) inverse woodpile photonic crystal. This class of cubic diamondlike crystals has a very broad photonic band gap and consists of two perpendicular arrays of pores with a rectangular structure. The point defect that acts as a cavity is centered on the intersection of two intersecting perpendicular pores with a radius that differs from the ones in the bulk of the crystal. We have performed supercell band structure calculations with up to 5×5×5 unit cells. We find that up to five isolated and dispersionless bands appear within the 3D photonic band gap. For each isolated band, the electric-field energy is localized in a volume centered on the point defect, hence the point defect acts as a 3D photonic band gap cavity. The mode volume of the cavities resonances is as small as 0.8 λ3 (resonance wavelength cubed), indicating a strong confinement of the light. By varying the radius of the defect pores we found that only donorlike resonances appear for smaller defect radius, whereas no acceptorlike resonances appear for greater defect radius. From a 3D plot of the distribution of the electric-field energy density we conclude that peaks of energy are found in sharp edges situated at the point defect, similar to how electrons collect at such features. This is different from what is observed for cavities in noninverted woodpile structures. Since inverse woodpile crystals can be fabricated from silicon by CMOS-compatible means, we project that single cavities and even cavity arrays can be realized, for wavelength ranges compatible with telecommunication windows in the near infrared.

  12. Crystalline Hybrid Polyphenylene Macromolecules from Octaalkynylsilsesquioxanes, Crystal Structures, and a Potential Route to 3-D Graphenes

    SciTech Connect

    Roll, Mark F.; Kampf, Jeffrey W.; Laine, Richard M.

    2011-05-10

    We report here the Diels–Alder reaction of octa(diphenylacetylene)silsesquioxane [DPA₈OS] with tetraphenylcyclopentadienone or tetra(p-tolyl)cyclopentadienone to form octa(hexaphenylbenzene)octasilsesquioxane, (Ph₆C₆)₈OS, or octa(tetratolyldiphenylbenzene)octasilsesquioxane, (p-Tolyl₄Ph₂C₆)₈OS. Likewise, tetra(p-tolyl)cyclopentadienone reacts with octa(p-tolylethynylphenyl)OS to form octa(pentatolylphenylbenzene)octasilsesquioxane (p-Tolyl₅PhC₆)₈OS. These compounds, with molecular weights of 4685–5245 Da, were isolated and characterized using a variety of analytical methods. The crystal structure of DPA₈OS offers a 3 nm³ unit cell with Z = 1. The crystal structure of (Ph₆C₆)₈OS was determined to have a triclinic unit cell of 11 nm³ with Z = 1. The latter structure is believed to be the largest discrete molecular structure reported with 330 carbons. Efforts to dehydrogenatively cyclize (Scholl reaction) the hexaarylbenzene groups to form 3-D octgraphene compounds are described.

  13. Amorphous photonic crystals with only short-range order.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Zhang, Yafeng; Dong, Biqin; Zhan, Tianrong; Liu, Xiaohan; Zi, Jian

    2013-10-04

    Distinct from conventional photonic crystals with both short- and long-range order, amorphous photonic crystals that possess only short-range order show interesting optical responses owing to their unique structural features. Amorphous photonic crystals exhibit unique light scattering and transport, which lead to a variety of interesting phenomena such as isotropic photonic bandgaps or pseudogaps, noniridescent structural colors, and light localization. Recent experimental and theoretical advances in the study of amorphous photonic crystals are summarized, focusing on their unique optical properties, artificial fabrication, bionspiration, and potential applications. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Single-photon pulsed-light indirect time-of-flight 3D ranging.

    PubMed

    Bellisai, S; Bronzi, D; Villa, F A; Tisa, S; Tosi, A; Zappa, F

    2013-02-25

    "Indirect" time-of-flight is one technique to obtain depth-resolved images through active illumination that is becoming more popular in the recent years. Several methods and light timing patterns are used nowadays, aimed at improving measurement precision with smarter algorithms, while using less and less light power. Purpose of this work is to present an indirect time-of-flight imaging camera based on pulsed-light active illumination and a 32 × 32 single-photon avalanche diode array with an improved illumination timing pattern, able to increase depth resolution and to reach single-photon level sensitivity.

  15. Photonic band gaps structure properties of two-dimensional function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ji; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Zhang, Si-Qi; Liang, Yu; Wu, Xiang-Yao

    2017-05-01

    The tunable two-dimensional photonic crystals band gap, absolute photonic band gap and semi-Dirac point are beneficial to designing the novel optical devices. In this paper, tunable photonic band gaps structure was realized by a new type two-dimensional function photonic crystals, which dielectric constants of medium columns are functions of space coordinates. However for the two-dimensional conventional photonic crystals the dielectric constant does not change with space coordinates. As the parameter adjustment, we found that the photonic band gaps structures are dielectric constant function coefficient, medium columns radius, dielectric constant function form period number and pump light intensity dependent, namely, the photonic band gaps position and width can be tuned. we also obtained absolute photonic band gaps and semi-Dirac point in the photonic band gaps structures of two-dimensional function photonic crystals. These results provide an important theoretical foundation for design novel optical devices.

  16. Three-dimensional dynamic photonic crystal creation by four laser beams interference in colloidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. M.; Mantsevich, V. N.; Ezhova, K. V.; Tikhonov, I. V.; Dneprovskii, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a simple way to create dynamic photonic crystals with different lattice symmetry by interference of four non-coplanar laser beams in colloidal solution of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). The formation of dynamic photonic crystal was confirmed by the observed diffraction of the beams that have excited photonic crystal at the angles equal to that calculated for the corresponding three-dimensional lattice (self-diffraction regime). Self-diffraction from an induced 3D transient photonic crystal has been discovered in the case of resonant excitation of the excitons (electron - hole transitions) in CdSe/ZnS QDs (highly absorbing colloidal solution) by powerful beams of mode-locked laser with picosecond pulse duration. Self-diffraction arises for four laser beams intersecting in the cell with colloidal CdSe/ZnS QDs due to the induced 3D dynamic photonic crystal. The physical processes that arise in CdSe/ZnS QDs and are responsible for the observed self-action effects are discussed.

  17. Holographic 3D multi-spot two-photon excitation for fast optical stimulation in brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Yu; Toyoda, Haruyoshi

    2017-04-01

    We report here a holographic high speed accessing microscope of sensory-driven synaptic activity across all inputs to single living neurons in the context of the intact cerebral cortex. This system is based on holographic multiple beam generation with spatial light modulator, we have demonstrated performance of the holographic excitation efficiency in several in vitro prototype system. 3D weighted iterative Fourier Transform method using the Ewald sphere in consideration of calculation speed has been adopted; multiple locations can be patterned in 3D with single hologram. Standard deviation of intensities of spots are still large due to the aberration of the system and/or hologram calculation, we successfully excited multiple locations of neurons in living mouse brain to monitor the calcium signals.

  18. Inflight performance of a second-generation photon-counting 3D imaging lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnan, John; Machan, Roman; Leventhal, Ed; Lawrence, David; Jodor, Gabriel; Field, Christopher

    2008-04-01

    Sigma Space Corporation has recently developed a compact 3D imaging and polarimetric lidar suitable for use in a small aircraft or mini-UAV. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG microchip laser generates 6 microjoule, subnanosecond pulses at fire rates up to 22 kHz. A Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) breaks the 532 nm beam into a 10x10 array of Gaussian beamlets, each containing about 1 mW of laser power (50 nJ @ 20 kHz). The reflected radiation in each beamlet is imaged by the receive optics onto individual pixels of a high efficiency, 10x10 pixel, multistop detector. Each pixel is then input to one channel of a 100 channel, multistop timer demonstrated to have a 93 picosecond timing (1.4 cm range) resolution and an event recovery time of only 1.6 nsec. Thus, each green laser pulse produces a 100 pixel volumetric 3D image. The residual infrared energy at 1064 nm is used for polarimetry. The scan pattern and frequency of a dual wedge optical scanner, synchronized to the laser fire rate, are tailored to provide contiguous coverage of a ground scene in a single overflight. In both rooftop and preliminary flight tests, the lidar has produced high spatial resolution 3D images of terrain, buildings, tree structures, power lines, and bridges with a data acquisition rate up to 2.2 million multistop 3D pixels per second. Current tests are aimed at defining the lidar's ability to image through water columns and tree canopies.

  19. Printed Large-Area Single-Mode Photonic Crystal Bandedge Surface-Emitting Lasers on Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Deyin; Liu, Shihchia; Yang, Hongjun; Ma, Zhenqiang; Reuterskiöld-Hedlund, Carl; Hammar, Mattias; Zhou, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    We report here an optically pumped hybrid III-V/Si photoic crystal surface emitting laser (PCSEL), consisting of a heterogeneously integrated III-V InGaAsP quantum well heterostructure gain medium, printed on a patterned defect-free Si photonic crystal (PC) bandedge cavity. Single mode lasing was achieved for a large area laser, with a side-mode suppression ratio of 28 dB, for lasing operation temperature ~200 K. Two types of lasers were demonstrated operating at different temperatures. Detailed modal analysis reveals the lasing mode matches with the estimated lasing gain threshold conditions. Our demonstration promises a hybrid laser sources on Si towards three-dimensional (3D) integrated Si photonics for on-chip wavelength-division multiplex (3D WDM) systems for a wide range of volume photonic/electronic applications in computing, communication, sensing, imaging, etc.

  20. Printed Large-Area Single-Mode Photonic Crystal Bandedge Surface-Emitting Lasers on Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Deyin; Liu, Shihchia; Yang, Hongjun; Ma, Zhenqiang; Reuterskiöld-Hedlund, Carl; Hammar, Mattias; Zhou, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    We report here an optically pumped hybrid III-V/Si photoic crystal surface emitting laser (PCSEL), consisting of a heterogeneously integrated III-V InGaAsP quantum well heterostructure gain medium, printed on a patterned defect-free Si photonic crystal (PC) bandedge cavity. Single mode lasing was achieved for a large area laser, with a side-mode suppression ratio of 28 dB, for lasing operation temperature ~200 K. Two types of lasers were demonstrated operating at different temperatures. Detailed modal analysis reveals the lasing mode matches with the estimated lasing gain threshold conditions. Our demonstration promises a hybrid laser sources on Si towards three-dimensional (3D) integrated Si photonics for on-chip wavelength-division multiplex (3D WDM) systems for a wide range of volume photonic/electronic applications in computing, communication, sensing, imaging, etc. PMID:26727551

  1. Printed Large-Area Single-Mode Photonic Crystal Bandedge Surface-Emitting Lasers on Silicon.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Deyin; Liu, Shihchia; Yang, Hongjun; Ma, Zhenqiang; Reuterskiöld-Hedlund, Carl; Hammar, Mattias; Zhou, Weidong

    2016-01-04

    We report here an optically pumped hybrid III-V/Si photoic crystal surface emitting laser (PCSEL), consisting of a heterogeneously integrated III-V InGaAsP quantum well heterostructure gain medium, printed on a patterned defect-free Si photonic crystal (PC) bandedge cavity. Single mode lasing was achieved for a large area laser, with a side-mode suppression ratio of 28 dB, for lasing operation temperature ~ 200 K. Two types of lasers were demonstrated operating at different temperatures. Detailed modal analysis reveals the lasing mode matches with the estimated lasing gain threshold conditions. Our demonstration promises a hybrid laser sources on Si towards three-dimensional (3D) integrated Si photonics for on-chip wavelength-division multiplex (3D WDM) systems for a wide range of volume photonic/electronic applications in computing, communication, sensing, imaging, etc.

  2. Observing quantum interference in 3D integrated-photonic symmetric multiports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi, Andrea; Osellame, Roberto; Ramponi, Roberta; Bentivegna, Marco; Flamini, Fulvio; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Viggianiello, Niko; Innocenti, Luca; Mataloni, Paolo; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2017-02-01

    The investigation of multi-photon quantum interference in symmetric multi-port splitters has both fundamental and applicative interest. Destructive quantum interference in devices with specific symmetry leads to the suppression of a large number of possible output states, generalizing the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect; simple suppression laws have been developed for interferometers implementing the Fourier or the Hadamard transform over the modes. In fact, these enhanced interference features in the output distribution can be used to assess the indistinguishability of single-photon sources, and symmetric interferometers have been envisaged as benchmark or validation devices for Boson-Sampling machines. In this work we devise an innovative approach to implement symmetric multi-mode interferometers that realize the Fourier and Hadamard transform over the optical modes, exploiting integrated waveguide circuits. Our design is based on the optical implementations of the Fast-Fourier and Fast-Hadamard transform algorithms, and exploits a novel three-dimensional layout which is made possible by the unique capabilities of femtosecond laser waveguide writing. We fabricate devices with m = 4 and m = 8 modes and we let two identical photons evolve in the circuit. By characterizing the coincidence output distribution we are able to observe experimentally the known suppression laws for the output states. In particular, we characterize the robustness of this approach to assess the photons' indistinguishability and to rule out alternative non-quantum states of light. The reported results pave the way to the adoption of symmetric multiport interferometers as pivotal tools in the diagnostics and certification of quantum photonic platforms.

  3. Observation of superconductivity induced by a point contact on 3D Dirac semimetal Cd3As2 crystals.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Wang, Huichao; Liu, Haiwen; Lu, Hong; Yang, Wuhao; Jia, Shuang; Liu, Xiong-Jun; Xie, X C; Wei, Jian; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetals, which possess 3D linear dispersion in the electronic structure as a bulk analogue of graphene, have lately generated widespread interest in both materials science and condensed matter physics. Recently, crystalline Cd3As2 has been proposed and proved to be a 3D Dirac semimetal that can survive in the atmosphere. Here, by using point contact spectroscopy measurements, we observe exotic superconductivity around the point contact region on the surface of Cd3As2 crystals. The zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) and double conductance peaks (DCPs) symmetric around zero bias suggest p-wave-like unconventional superconductivity. Considering the topological properties of 3D Dirac semimetals, our findings may indicate that Cd3As2 crystals under certain conditions could be topological superconductors, which are predicted to support Majorana zero modes or gapless Majorana edge/surface modes in the boundary depending on the dimensionality of the material.

  4. Reflectivity calculated for a three-dimensional silicon photonic band gap crystal with finite support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devashish, D.; Hasan, Shakeeb B.; van der Vegt, J. J. W.; Vos, Willem L.

    2017-04-01

    We study numerically the reflectivity of three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals with a complete 3D photonic band gap. We employ the finite element method to study crystals with the cubic diamondlike inverse woodpile structure. The high-index backbone has a dielectric function similar to silicon. We study crystals with a range of thicknesses up to ten unit cells (L ≤10 c ). The crystals are surrounded by vacuum, and have a finite support as in experiments. The polarization-resolved reflectivity spectra reveal Fabry-Pérot fringes related to standing waves in the finite crystal, as well as broad stop bands with nearly 100 % reflectivity, even for thin crystals. The frequency ranges of the stop bands change little with angle of incidence, which is plausible since the stop bands are part of the 3D band gap. Moreover, this result supports the previous assertion that intense reflection peaks measured with a large numerical aperture provide a faithful signature of the 3D photonic band gap. For p -polarized waves, we observe an intriguing hybridization between the Fabry-Pérot resonances and the Brewster angle that remains to be observed in experiments. From the strong reflectivity peaks, it is inferred that the maximum reflectivity observed in experiments is not limited by finite size. The frequency ranges of the stop bands agree very well with stop gaps in the photonic band structure that pertain to infinite and perfect crystals. The angle-dependent reflectivity spectra provide an improved interpretation of the reflectivity measurements performed with a certain numerical aperture and a new insight in the crystal structure, namely unequal pore radii in X and Z directions. The Bragg attenuation lengths LB are found to be smaller by a factor 6 to 9 than earlier estimates that are based on the width of the stop band. Hence, crystals with a thickness of 12 unit cells studied in experiments are in the thick crystal limit (L ≫LB ). Our reflectivity calculations suggest

  5. 3D orbital tracking in a modified two-photon microscope: an application to the tracking of intracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Anzalone, Andrea; Annibale, Paolo; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this video protocol is to discuss how to perform and analyze a three-dimensional fluorescent orbital particle tracking experiment using a modified two-photon microscope(1). As opposed to conventional approaches (raster scan or wide field based on a stack of frames), the 3D orbital tracking allows to localize and follow with a high spatial (10 nm accuracy) and temporal resolution (50 Hz frequency response) the 3D displacement of a moving fluorescent particle on length-scales of hundreds of microns(2). The method is based on a feedback algorithm that controls the hardware of a two-photon laser scanning microscope in order to perform a circular orbit around the object to be tracked: the feedback mechanism will maintain the fluorescent object in the center by controlling the displacement of the scanning beam(3-5). To demonstrate the advantages of this technique, we followed a fast moving organelle, the lysosome, within a living cell(6,7). Cells were plated according to standard protocols, and stained using a commercially lysosome dye. We discuss briefly the hardware configuration and in more detail the control software, to perform a 3D orbital tracking experiment inside living cells. We discuss in detail the parameters required in order to control the scanning microscope and enable the motion of the beam in a closed orbit around the particle. We conclude by demonstrating how this method can be effectively used to track the fast motion of a labeled lysosome along microtubules in 3D within a live cell. Lysosomes can move with speeds in the range of 0.4-0.5 µm/sec, typically displaying a directed motion along the microtubule network(8).

  6. 3D Orbital Tracking in a Modified Two-photon Microscope: An Application to the Tracking of Intracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this video protocol is to discuss how to perform and analyze a three-dimensional fluorescent orbital particle tracking experiment using a modified two-photon microscope1. As opposed to conventional approaches (raster scan or wide field based on a stack of frames), the 3D orbital tracking allows to localize and follow with a high spatial (10 nm accuracy) and temporal resolution (50 Hz frequency response) the 3D displacement of a moving fluorescent particle on length-scales of hundreds of microns2. The method is based on a feedback algorithm that controls the hardware of a two-photon laser scanning microscope in order to perform a circular orbit around the object to be tracked: the feedback mechanism will maintain the fluorescent object in the center by controlling the displacement of the scanning beam3-5. To demonstrate the advantages of this technique, we followed a fast moving organelle, the lysosome, within a living cell6,7. Cells were plated according to standard protocols, and stained using a commercially lysosome dye. We discuss briefly the hardware configuration and in more detail the control software, to perform a 3D orbital tracking experiment inside living cells. We discuss in detail the parameters required in order to control the scanning microscope and enable the motion of the beam in a closed orbit around the particle. We conclude by demonstrating how this method can be effectively used to track the fast motion of a labeled lysosome along microtubules in 3D within a live cell. Lysosomes can move with speeds in the range of 0.4-0.5 µm/sec, typically displaying a directed motion along the microtubule network8. PMID:25350070

  7. Zero-n gap in one dimensional photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chobey, Mahesh K. Suthar, B.

    2016-05-06

    We study a one-dimensional (1-D) photonic crystal composed of Double Positive (DPS) and Double Negative (DNG) material. This structure shows omnidirectional photonic bandgap, which is insensitive with angle of incidence and polarization. To study the effect of structural parameters on the photonic band structure, we have calculated photonic band gap at various thicknesses of DPS and DNG.

  8. Effect of process parameters and crystal orientation on 3D anisotropic stress during CZ and FZ growth of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drikis, Ivars; Plate, Matiss; Sennikovs, Juris; Virbulis, Janis

    2017-09-01

    Simulations of 3D anisotropic stress are carried out in <100> and <111> oriented Si crystals grown by FZ and CZ processes for different diameters, growth rates and process stages. Temperature dependent elastic constants and thermal expansion coefficients are used in the FE simulations. The von Mises stress at the triple point line is 5-11% higher in <111> crystals compared to <100> crystals. The process parameters have a larger effect on the von Mises stress than the crystal orientation. Generally, the <111> crystal has a higher azimuthal variation of stress along the triple point line ( 8%) than the <100> crystal ( 2%). The presence of a crystal ridge increases the stress beside the ridge and decreases it on the ridge compared with the round crystal.

  9. Laser applications of self-organized organic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furumi, Seiichi

    2008-08-01

    In this presentation, I report on the self-organized photonic crystals (PCs) of organic and polymer materials for laser applications. Here the self-organized PCs correspond to chiral liquid crystals (CLCs) and colloidal crystals (CCs). First, CLC molecules self-organize the supramolecular helical arrangement by the helical twisting power like as 1-D PC structure. When the fluorescent dye-doped CLC is optically excited with a linearly polarized beam, the laser emission appears at the photonic band gap (PBG) edge(s) of CLC hosts. The optically excited laser emission shows circularly polarized characteristic, even though the excitation beam is linearly polarized. Applying voltages to the optically excited CLC cells enables reversible switching of the laser action as a result of changes in the supramolecular helical structure of CLC host. Moreover, we succeed in the phototunable laser emission by using photoreactive CLCs. Second research topic is establishment of new potential utilities of CC structures of polymer micro-particles. Monodispersed micro-particles have an intrinsic capability to self-assemble the face-centered cubic lattice structures like as 3-D PCs on substrates from the suspension solutions. The highly ordered architectures of colloidal particles are called as the CCs. The laser cavity structure consists of an intermediate light-emitting layer of a fluorescent dye sandwiched between a pair of polymeric CC films. Optical excitation of the device gives rise to the laser oscillation within the photonic band-gap of the CC films. Interestingly, the laser action can be generated by optical excitation even though the CC laser device of all-polymer materials becomes bent shape by mechanical stress.

  10. Raman cooling in silicon photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin-Chung; Bahl, Gaurav

    2016-03-01

    Laser cooling of solids can be achieved through various photon up-conversion processes including anti-Stokes photoluminescence and anti-Stokes light scattering. While it has been shown that cooling using photoluminescence-based methods can achieve efficiency comparable to that of thermoelectric cooling, the reliance on specific transitions of the rare-earth dopants limits material choice. Light scattering, on the other hand, occurs in all materials, and has the potential to enable cooling in most materials. We show that by engineering the photonic density of states of a material, one can suppress the Stokes process, and enhance the anti-Stokes radiation. We employ the well-known diamond-structured photonic crystal patterned in crystalline silicon to demonstrate theoretically that when operating within a high transparency regime, the net energy removal rate from phonon annihilation can overcome the optical absorption. The engineered photonic density of states can thus enable simultaneous cooling of all Raman-active phonon modes and the net cooling of the solid.

  11. Automated 3-D Detection of Dendritic Spines from In Vivo Two-Photon Image Stacks.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Hernandez-Herrera, P; Labate, D; Papadakis, M

    2017-07-14

    Despite the significant advances in the development of automated image analysis algorithms for the detection and extraction of neuronal structures, current software tools still have numerous limitations when it comes to the detection and analysis of dendritic spines. The problem is especially challenging in in vivo imaging, where the difficulty of extracting morphometric properties of spines is compounded by lower image resolution and contrast levels native to two-photon laser microscopy. To address this challenge, we introduce a new computational framework for the automated detection and quantitative analysis of dendritic spines in vivo multi-photon imaging. This framework includes: (i) a novel preprocessing algorithm enhancing spines in a way that they are included in the binarized volume produced during the segmentation of foreground from background; (ii) the mathematical foundation of this algorithm, and (iii) an algorithm for the detection of spine locations in reference to centerline trace and separating them from the branches to whom spines are attached to. This framework enables the computation of a wide range of geometric features such as spine length, spatial distribution and spine volume in a high-throughput fashion. We illustrate our approach for the automated extraction of dendritic spine features in time-series multi-photon images of layer 5 cortical excitatory neurons from the mouse visual cortex.

  12. Single photon emission from diamond nanocrystals in an opal photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Stewart, L A; Zhai, Y; Dawes, J M; Steel, M J; Rabeau, J R; Withford, M J

    2009-09-28

    We present the first optical measurement of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in a three-dimensional photonic crystal. The photonic crystal, fabricated by self-assembly of polystyrene microspheres, exhibits a photonic stopband that overlaps the NV photoluminescence spectrum. A modified emission spectrum and photon antibunching were measured from the NV centers. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements revealed a 30% increase in the source lifetime. Encapsulation of single NV centers in a three-dimensional photonic crystal is a step towards controlling emission properties of a single photon source.

  13. Hexagonal photonic crystal waveguide based on barium titanate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianheng; Liu, Zhifu; Wessels, Bruce W.; Tu, Yongming; Ho, Seng-Tiong; Joshi-Imre, Alexandra; Ocola, Leonidas E.

    2011-03-01

    The simulation, fabrication and measurement of nonlinear photonic crystals (PhCs) with hexagonal symmetry in epitaxial BaTiO3 were investigated. The optical transmission properties of a PhC were simulated by a 2-D finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method. A complete bandgap exists for both the TE and TM optical modes. The fabricated PhC has a well-defined stop band over the spectral region of 1525 to 1575 nm. A microcavity structure was also fabricated by incorporation of a line defect in the PhC. Transmission of the microcavity structure over the spectral region from 1456 to 1584nm shows a well-defined 5 nm wide window at 1495nm. Simulations indicate that the phase velocity matched PhC microcavity device of 0.5 mm long can potentially serve as modulator with a 3 dB bandwidth of 4 THz.

  14. Photonic crystal beads from gravity-driven microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hongcheng; Rong, Fei; Tang, Baocheng; Zhao, Yuanjin; Fu, Degang; Gu, Zhongze

    2013-06-25

    This Letter reports a simple method for the mass production of 3D colloidal photonic crystal beads (PCBs) by using a gravity-driven microfluidic device and online droplet drying method. Compared to traditional methods, the droplet templates of the PCBs are generated by using the ultrastable gravity as the driving force for the microfluidics, thus the PCBs are formed with minimal polydispersity. Moreover, drying of the droplet templates is integrated into the production process, and the nanoparticles in the droplets self-assemble online. Overall, this process results in PCBs with good morphology, low polydispersity, brilliant structural colors, and narrow stop bands. PCBs could be bulk generated by this process for many practical applications, such as multiplex-encoded assays and the construction of novel optical materials.

  15. Characterization of tunable photonic crystal fiber directional couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun Soo; Park, Kwang No; Lee, Kyung Shik

    2007-06-01

    We present a tunable photonic crystal fiber (PCF) directional coupler fabricated by a side-polishing method. The PCF directional coupler was modeled as a typical single-mode fiber-based directional coupler and analyzed using the improved effective-index method (IEIM). The characteristics of the PCF directional coupler such as the coupling coefficient and the coupling ratio were measured and found to be in good agreement with those predicted by the theoretical model. The PCF directional coupler exhibited an insertion loss of ˜2 dB for a 3 dB coupler and was able to tune the coupling ratio between 0% and 100% by tilting the angle of the top side-polished quartz block against the fixed-bottom quartz block.

  16. Confined Etching within 2D and 3D Colloidal Crystals for Tunable Nanostructured Templates: Local Environment Matters.

    PubMed

    Wendisch, Fedja J; Oberreiter, Richard; Salihovic, Miralem; Elsaesser, Michael S; Bourret, Gilles R

    2017-02-01

    We report the isotropic etching of 2D and 3D polystyrene (PS) nanosphere hcp arrays using a benchtop O2 radio frequency plasma cleaner. Unexpectedly, this slow isotropic etching allows tuning of both particle diameter and shape. Due to a suppressed etching rate at the point of contact between the PS particles originating from their arrangement in 2D and 3D crystals, the spherical PS templates are converted into polyhedral structures with well-defined hexagonal cross sections in directions parallel and normal to the crystal c-axis. Additionally, we found that particles located at the edge (surface) of the hcp 2D (3D) crystals showed increased etch rates compared to those of the particles within the crystals. This indicates that 2D and 3D order affect how nanostructures chemically interact with their surroundings. This work also shows that the morphology of nanostructures periodically arranged in 2D and 3D supercrystals can be modified via gas-phase etching and programmed by the superlattice symmetry. To show the potential applications of this approach, we demonstrate the lithographic transfer of the PS template hexagonal cross section into Si substrates to generate Si nanowires with well-defined hexagonal cross sections using a combination of nanosphere lithography and metal-assisted chemical etching.

  17. Half-disordered photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Beque, V; Keilman, J; Citrin, D S

    2016-08-10

    Optical transmission spectra of finite-thickness slabs of two-dimensional triangular-lattice photonic crystals of air holes in a dielectric matrix with various concentrations of randomly located vacancies (absent air holes) are studied. We focus on structures in which only one half of the structure-the incidence or transmission side-is disordered. We find vacancy-induced scattering gives rise to a strong difference in the two cases; for light incident on the disordered side, high transmission within the photonic pseudogap at normal incidence is predicted, in strong contrast to the opposite case, where low transmission is predicted throughout the pseudogap, as is observed in the case of an ideal structure with no defects.

  18. Slab photonic crystals with dimer colloid bases

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Erin K.; Liddell Watson, Chekesha M.

    2014-06-14

    The photonic band gap properties for centered rectangular monolayers of asymmetric dimers are reported. Colloids in suspension have been organized into the phase under confinement. The theoretical model is inspired by the range of asymmetric dimers synthesized via seeded emulsion polymerization and explores, in particular, the band structures as a function of degree of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion. These parameters are varied incrementally from spheres to lobe-tangent dimers over morphologies yielding physically realizable particles. The work addresses the relative scarcity of theoretical studies on photonic crystal slabs with vertical variation that is consistent with colloidal self-assembly. Odd, even and polarization independent gaps in the guided modes are determined for direct slab structures. A wide range of lobe symmetry and degree of lobe fusion combinations having Brillouin zones with moderate to high isotropy support gaps between odd mode band indices 3-4 and even mode band indices 1-2 and 2-3.

  19. Photonic Crystal Emitters for Thermophotovoltaic Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmakh, Veronika; Chan, Walker R.; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Soljacic, Marin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Celanovic, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of 2D photonic crystal (PhC) thermal emitters for a millimeter-scale hydrocarbon TPV microgenerator as a possible replacement for batteries in portable microelectronics, robotics, etc. In our TPV system, combustion heats a PhC emitter to incandescence and the resulting radiation is converted by a low-bandgap TPV cell. The PhC tailors the photonic density of states to produce spectrally confined thermal emission that matches the bandgap of the TPV cell, enabling high heat-to-electricity conversion efficiency. The work builds on a previously developed fabrication process to produce a square array of cylindrical cavities in a metal substrate. We will present ongoing incremental improvements in the optical and thermo-mechanical properties, the fabrication process, and the system integration, as recently combined with fabrication using novel materials, such as sputtered coatings, to enable a monolithic system.

  20. Band structure peculiarities of magnetic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorgyan, A. H.; Golik, S. S.

    2017-10-01

    In this work we studied light diffraction in magneto-photonic crystals (MPC) having large magneto-optical activity and modulation large depth. The case of arbitrary angles between the direction of the external static magnetic field and the normal to the border of the MPC layer is considered. The problem is solved by Ambartsumian's modified layer addition method. It is found that there is a new type of non-reciprocity, namely, the relation R (α) ≠ R (- α) takes place, where R is the reflection coefficient, and α is the incidence angle. It is shown the formation of new photonic band gap (PBG) at oblique incidence of light, which is not selective for the polarization of the incident light, in the case when the external magnetic field is directed along the medium axis. Such a system can be used as: a tunable polarization filter, polarization mirror, circular (elliptical) polarizer, tunable optical diode, etc.

  1. Square lattice photonic crystal surface mode lasers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tsan-Wen; Lu, Shao-Ping; Chiu, Li-Hsun; Lee, Po-Tsung

    2010-12-06

    In this report, we propose a square lattice photonic crystal hetero-slab-edge microcavity design. In numerical simulations, three surface modes in this microcavity are investigated and optimized by tuning the slab-edge termination τ and gradual mirror layer. High simulated quality (Q) factor of 2.3 × 10(5) and small mode volume of 0.105 μm(3) are obtained from microcavity with τ = 0.80. In experiments, we obtain and identify different surface modes lasing. The surface mode in the second photonic band gap shows a very-low threshold of 140 μW and high Q factor of 5,500, which could be an avenue to low-threshold optical lasers and highly sensitive sensor applications with efficient light-matter interactions.

  2. Dirac directional emission in anisotropic zero refractive index photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    He, Xin-Tao; Zhong, Yao-Nan; Zhou, You; Zhong, Zhi-Chao; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2015-08-14

    A certain class of photonic crystals with conical dispersion is known to behave as isotropic zero-refractive-index medium. However, the discrete building blocks in such photonic crystals are limited to construct multidirectional devices, even for high-symmetric photonic crystals. Here, we show multidirectional emission from low-symmetric photonic crystals with semi-Dirac dispersion at the zone center. We demonstrate that such low-symmetric photonic crystal can be considered as an effective anisotropic zero-refractive-index medium, as long as there is only one propagation mode near Dirac frequency. Four kinds of Dirac multidirectional emitters are achieved with the channel numbers of five, seven, eleven, and thirteen, respectively. Spatial power combination for such kind of Dirac directional emitter is also verified even when multiple sources are randomly placed in the anisotropic zero-refractive-index photonic crystal.

  3. Dirac directional emission in anisotropic zero refractive index photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin-Tao; Zhong, Yao-Nan; Zhou, You; Zhong, Zhi-Chao; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2015-01-01

    A certain class of photonic crystals with conical dispersion is known to behave as isotropic zero-refractive-index medium. However, the discrete building blocks in such photonic crystals are limited to construct multidirectional devices, even for high-symmetric photonic crystals. Here, we show multidirectional emission from low-symmetric photonic crystals with semi-Dirac dispersion at the zone center. We demonstrate that such low-symmetric photonic crystal can be considered as an effective anisotropic zero-refractive-index medium, as long as there is only one propagation mode near Dirac frequency. Four kinds of Dirac multidirectional emitters are achieved with the channel numbers of five, seven, eleven, and thirteen, respectively. Spatial power combination for such kind of Dirac directional emitter is also verified even when multiple sources are randomly placed in the anisotropic zero-refractive-index photonic crystal. PMID:26271208

  4. Photonic crystal devices formed by a charged-particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Koops, Hans W. P.

    2000-01-01

    A photonic crystal device and method. The photonic crystal device comprises a substrate with at least one photonic crystal formed thereon by a charged-particle beam deposition method. Each photonic crystal comprises a plurality of spaced elements having a composition different from the substrate, and may further include one or more impurity elements substituted for spaced elements. Embodiments of the present invention may be provided as electromagnetic wave filters, polarizers, resonators, sources, mirrors, beam directors and antennas for use at wavelengths in the range from about 0.2 to 200 microns or longer. Additionally, photonic crystal devices may be provided with one or more electromagnetic waveguides adjacent to a photonic crystal for forming integrated electromagnetic circuits for use at optical, infrared, or millimeter-wave frequencies.

  5. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons.

  6. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    PubMed Central

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons. PMID:27170160

  7. Automated 3D dendritic spine detection and analysis from two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Ingrid Y. Y.; Lindquist, W. Brent

    2001-04-01

    The functional significance of dendritic spines and their plasticity to a wide spectrum of developmental and pathological conditions has led to extensive studies based on spine morphology. The advances in image acquisition techniques and the associated generation of large 3D data sets of optical micrographs have not been accompanied by comparable advances in data analysis techniques. We present an automated 3D spine detection and quantification procedure suitable for images obtained by laser scanning microscopy. The image is first processed by deconvolution and the dendritic phase consisting of the neuronal cytoplasm is extracted by segmentation. Spines are detected as geometrical protrusions relative to the dendritic backbone. As very thin necks may not be imaged, some spine `heads' may be detached from the dendrite and are detected as detached components. These detected heads are merged with spine `bases' where appropriate. Morphological characterizations on spine length, volume, density and shape classifications are obtained. For time-lapse data, images are registered and individual spines are traced through the image sequence. Successful comparison results on spine lengths and densities with manual analysis are obtained. This method is highly automatic and allows detailed and objective quantification of the structure and dynamics of dendritic spines, which can be important predictors for the function of neural networks.

  8. The crystal structure of the dimeric colicin M immunity protein displays a 3D domain swap.

    PubMed

    Usón, Isabel; Patzer, Silke I; Rodríguez, Dayté Dayana; Braun, Volkmar; Zeth, Kornelius

    2012-04-01

    Bacteriocins are proteins secreted by many bacterial cells to kill related bacteria of the same niche. To avoid their own suicide through reuptake of secreted bacteriocins, these bacteria protect themselves by co-expression of immunity proteins in the compartment of colicin destination. In Escherichia coli the colicin M (Cma) is inactivated by the interaction with the Cma immunity protein (Cmi). We have crystallized and solved the structure of Cmi at a resolution of 1.95Å by the recently developed ab initio phasing program ARCIMBOLDO. The monomeric structure of the mature 10kDa protein comprises a long N-terminal α-helix and a four-stranded C-terminal β-sheet. Dimerization of this fold is mediated by an extended interface of hydrogen bond interactions between the α-helix and the four-stranded β-sheet of the symmetry related molecule. Two intermolecular disulfide bridges covalently connect this dimer to further lock this complex. The Cmi protein resembles an example of a 3D domain swapping being stalled through physical linkage. The dimer is a highly charged complex with a significant surplus of negative charges presumably responsible for interactions with Cma. Dimerization of Cmi was also demonstrated to occur in vivo. Although the Cmi-Cma complex is unique among bacteria, the general fold of Cmi is representative for a class of YebF-like proteins which are known to be secreted into the external medium by some Gram-negative bacteria.

  9. Hydrogen sensor based on metallic photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Nau, D; Seidel, A; Orzekowsky, R B; Lee, S-H; Deb, S; Giessen, H

    2010-09-15

    We present a hydrogen sensor based on metallic photonic crystal slabs. Tungsten trioxide (WO(3)) is used as a waveguide layer below an array of gold nanowires. Hydrogen exposure influences the optical properties of this photonic crystal arrangement by gasochromic mechanisms, where the photonic crystal geometry leads to sharp spectral resonances. Measurements reveal a change of the transmission depending on the hydrogen concentration. Theoretical limits for the detection range and sensitivity of this approach are discussed.

  10. Young's double-slit experiment in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, C. M.

    2012-10-01

    We present an experimental and numerical study of the transmission of a photonic crystal perforated by two subwavelength slits, separated by two wavelengths. The experimental near-field image of the double-slit design of the photonic crystal shows an interference pattern, which is analogous to Young's experiment. This interference arises as a consequence of the excitation of surface states of the photonic crystals and agrees very well with the simulations.

  11. Young's double-slit experiment in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2012-10-01

    We present an experimental and numerical study of the transmission of a photonic crystal perforated by two sub-wavelength slits, separated by two wavelengths.The experimental near-field image of the double-slit design of the photonic crystal shows an interference pattern, which is analogous to Young’s experiment. This interference arises as a consequence of the excitation of surface states of the photonic crystals and agrees very well with the simulations.

  12. One-dimensional photonic crystals bound by light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Liyong; Li, Xiao; Chen, Jun; Cao, Yongyin; Du, Guiqiang; Ng, Jack

    2017-08-01

    Through rigorous simulations, the light scattering induced optical binding of one-dimensional (1D) dielectric photonic crystals is studied. The optical forces corresponding to the pass band, band gap, and band edge are qualitatively different. It is shown that light can induce self-organization of dielectric slabs into stable photonic crystals, with its lower band edge coinciding with the incident light frequency. Incident light at normal and oblique incidence and photonic crystals with parity-time symmetry are also considered.

  13. Tuning quantum correlations with intracavity photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Maria M. de; Gomila, Damia; Zambrini, Roberta; Garcia-March, Miguel Angel

    2011-09-15

    We show how to tune quantum noise in nonlinear systems by means of periodic spatial modulation. We prove that the introduction of an intracavity photonic crystal in a multimode optical parametric oscillator inhibits and enhances light quantum fluctuations. Furthermore, it leads to a significant noise reduction in field quadratures, robustness of squeezing in a wider angular range, and spatial entanglement. These results have potential benefits for quantum imaging, metrology, and quantum information applications and suggest a control mechanism of fluctuations by spatial modulation of interest also in other nonlinear systems.

  14. Photonic crystal self-collimation sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufei; Wang, Hailing; Xue, Qikun; Zheng, Wanhua

    2012-05-21

    A novel refractive index sensor based on the two dimensional photonic crystal folded Michelson interferometer employing the self-collimation effect is proposed and its performances are theoretically investigated. Two sensing areas are included in the sensor. Simulation results indicate the branch area is suitable for the small index variety range and fine detection, whereas the reflector area prone to the large index change range and coarse detection. Because of no defect waveguides and no crosstalk of signal, the sensor is desirable to perform monolithic integrated, low-cost, label-free real-time parallel sensing. In addition, a flexible design of self-collimation sensors array is demonstrated.

  15. Vorticity cutoff in nonlinear photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Albert; Zacarés, Mario; García-March, Miguel-Angel

    2005-07-22

    Using group-theory arguments, we demonstrate that, unlike in homogeneous media, no symmetric vortices of arbitrary order can be generated in two-dimensional (2D) nonlinear systems possessing a discrete-point symmetry. The only condition needed is that the nonlinearity term exclusively depends on the modulus of the field. In the particular case of 2D periodic systems, such as nonlinear photonic crystals or Bose-Einstein condensates in periodic potentials, it is shown that the realization of discrete symmetry forbids the existence of symmetric vortex solutions with vorticity higher than two.

  16. Super-collimation by axisymmetric photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Purlys, V.; Gailevičius, D.; Peckus, M.; Gadonas, R.; Maigyte, L.; Staliunas, K.

    2014-06-02

    We propose and experimentally show the mechanism of beam super-collimation by axisymmetric photonic crystals, specifically by periodic (in propagation direction) structure of layers of concentric rings. The physical mechanism behind the effect is an inverse scattering cascade of diffracted wave components back into on- and near-axis angular field components, resulting in substantial enhancement of intensity of these components. We explore the super-collimation by numerical calculations and prove it experimentally. We demonstrate experimentally the axial field enhancement up to 7 times in terms of field intensity.

  17. Efficient photonic crystal Y-junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Rab; Karle, Tim J.; Moerman, I.; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2003-07-01

    A highly efficient Y-junction based on a planar photonic crystal (PhC) platform is presented. The PhC consists of a triangular array of holes etched into a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure, with a typical period of 322 nm and ~35% fill factor. The Y-junction has smaller holes positioned at the centre of the junction, giving rise to very uniform splitting and high transmission. The performance is very encouraging, with experimental transmission of approximately 40% for each arm of the Y-splitter relative to a comparable single-defect PhC waveguide.

  18. Broadband dispersion-compensating photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sigang; Zhang, Yejin; He, Lina; Xie, Shizhong

    2006-10-01

    We present a modified dual-core photonic crystal fiber, based on pure silica, with special grapefruit holes in the inner cladding. The fiber has large, broadband negative dispersion, and the dispersion value varies linearly from -380to-420 ps/(nmkm) in the C band. To decrease the fabrication difficulty, large air holes are adopted. Furthermore, the chromatic dispersion of the fiber is not sensitive to the structure parameters. So the proposed fiber structure can greatly facilitate fiber drawing and can be used for broadband dispersion compensation.

  19. Anomalous bending effect in photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Tu, Haohua; Jiang, Zhi; Marks, Daniel L; Boppart, Stephen A

    2008-04-14

    An unexpected transmission loss up to 50% occurs to intense femtosecond pulses propagating along an endlessly single-mode photonic crystal fiber over a length of 1 m. A specific leaky-fiber mode gains amplification along the fiber at the expense of the fundamental fiber mode through stimulated four-wave mixing and Raman scattering, leading to this transmission loss. Bending near the fiber entrance dissipates the propagating seed of this leaky mode, preventing the leaky mode amplification and therefore enhancing the transmission of these pulses.

  20. Experimental and numerical investigation of the 3D SPECT photon detection kernel for non-uniform attenuating media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riauka, Terence A.; Hooper, H. Richard; Gortel, Zbigniew W.

    1996-07-01

    Experimental tests for non-uniform attenuating media are performed to validate theoretical expressions for the photon detection kernel, obtained from a recently proposed analytical theory of photon propagation and detection for SPECT. The theoretical multi-dimensional integral expressions for the photon detection kernel, which are computed numerically, describe the probability that a photon emitted from a given source voxel will trigger detection of a photon at a particular projection pixel. The experiments were performed using a cylindrical water-filled phantom with large cylindrical air-filled inserts to simulate inhomogeneity of the medium. A point-like, a short thin cylindrical and a large cylindrical radiation source of were placed at various positions within the phantom. The values numerically calculated from the theoretical kernel expressions are in very good agreement with the experimentally measured data. The significance of Compton-scattered photons in planar image formation is discussed and highlighted by these results. Using both experimental measurements and the calculated values obtained from the theory, the kernel's size is investigated. This is done by determining the square pixel neighbourhood of the gamma camera that must be connected to a particular radiation source voxel to account for a specific fraction of all counts recorded at all camera pixels. It is shown that the kernel's size is primarily dependent upon the source position and the properties of the attenuating medium through Compton scattering events, with 3D depth-dependent collimator resolution playing an important but secondary role, at least for imaging situations involving parallel hole collimation. By considering small point-like sources within a non-uniform elliptical phantom, approximating the human thorax, it is demonstrated

  1. Photons, Electrons and Positrons Transport in 3D by Monte Carlo Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    Version 04 FOTELP-2014 is a new compact general purpose version of the previous FOTELP-2K6 code designed to simulate the transport of photons, electrons and positrons through three-dimensional material and sources geometry by Monte Carlo techniques, using subroutine package PENGEOM from the PENELOPE code under Linux-based and Windows OS. This new version includes routine ELMAG for electron and positron transport simulation in electric and magnetic fields, RESUME option and routine TIMER for obtaining starting random number and for measuring the time of simulation.

  2. Tunable photonic crystals with partial bandgaps from blue phase colloidal crystals and dielectric-doped blue phases.

    PubMed

    Stimulak, Mitja; Ravnik, Miha

    2014-09-07

    Blue phase colloidal crystals and dielectric nanoparticle/polymer doped blue phases are demonstrated to combine multiple components with different symmetries in one photonic material, creating a photonic crystal with variable and micro-controllable photonic band structure. In this composite photonic material, one contribution to the band structure is determined by the 3D periodic birefringent orientational profile of the blue phases, whereas the second contribution emerges from the regular array of the colloidal particles or from the dielectric/nanoparticle-doped defect network. Using the planewave expansion method, optical photonic bands of the blue phase I and II colloidal crystals and related nanoparticle/polymer doped blue phases are calculated, and then compared to blue phases with no particles and to face-centred-cubic and body-centred-cubic colloidal crystals in isotropic background. We find opening of local band gaps at particular points of Brillouin zone for blue phase colloidal crystals, where there were none in blue phases without particles or dopants. Particle size and filling fraction of the blue phase defect network are demonstrated as parameters that can directly tune the optical bands and local band gaps. In the blue phase I colloidal crystal with an additionally doped defect network, interestingly, we find an indirect total band gap (with the exception of one point) at the entire edge of SC irreducible zone. Finally, this work demonstrates the role of combining multiple - by symmetry - differently organised components in one photonic crystal material, which offers a novel approach towards tunable soft matter photonic materials.

  3. Biomimetic Photonic Crystals based on Diatom Algae Frustules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishler, Jonathan; Alverson, Andrew; Herzog, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Diatom algae are unicellular, photosynthetic microorganisms with a unique external shell known as a frustule. Frustules, which are composed of amorphous silica, exhibit a unique periodic nano-patterning, distinguishing diatoms from other types of phytoplankton. Diatoms have been studied for their distinctive optical properties due to their resemblance of photonic crystals. In this regard, diatoms are not only considered for their applications as photonic crystals, but also for their use as biomimetic templates for artificially fabricated photonic crystals. Through the examination and measurement of the physical characteristics of many scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of diatom frustules, a biomimetic photonic crystal derived from diatom frustules can be recreated and modeled with the finite element method. In this approach, the average geometries of the diatom frustules are used to recreate a 2-dimensional photonic crystal, after which the electric field distribution and optical transmission through the photonic crystal are both measured. The optical transmission is then compared to the transmission spectra of a regular hexagonal photonic crystal, revealing the effects of diatom geometry on their optical properties. Finally, the dimensions of the photonic crystal are parametrically swept, allowing for further control over the transmission of light through the photonic crystal.

  4. Switchable Photonic Crystals Using One-Dimensional Confined Liquid Crystals for Photonic Device Application.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seong Ho; Gim, Min-Jun; Lee, Wonsuk; Choi, Suk-Won; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2017-01-25

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have recently attracted considerable attention, with much effort devoted to photonic bandgap (PBG) control for varying the reflected color. Here, fabrication of a modulated one-dimensional (1D) anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) PC with a periodic porous structure is reported. The PBG of the fabricated PC can be reversibly changed by switching the ultraviolet (UV) light on/off. The AAO nanopores contain a mixture of photoresponsive liquid crystals (LCs) with irradiation-activated cis/trans photoisomerizable azobenzene. The resultant mixture of LCs in the porous AAO film exhibits a reversible PBG, depending on the cis/trans configuration of azobenzene molecules. The PBG switching is reliable over many cycles, suggesting that the fabricated device can be used in optical and photonic applications such as light modulators, smart windows, and sensors.

  5. Scaffolds fabricated by 3D two-photon photopolymerization for live cell studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplicky, T.; Cunderlikova, B.; Mateasik, A.; Vincze, A.; Chorvat, D.; Marcek Chorvatova, A.

    2016-12-01

    Design and fabrication of appropriate biocompatible microstructures that ensure fixation and control of experimental conditions for live cell and bacteria observations is an important prerequisite for number of real time experiments. Our approach is to design engineered microfabricated 3D structures for growth of cells in culture without significant modification of their metabolic state. Presented approach is aimed at evaluation of the potential applicability of biocompatible constructs in the biomedical field and thus live cell monitoring in controlled conditions. Design and evaluation of properties of materials and structures with mesoscopic arrangement and their interaction with biological objects is a prerequisite for establishment of physiologically relevant in vitro models of pathologies as well as for development of a new generation of nano / micro / bio-sensors.

  6. Evaluation of hybrid polymers for high-precision manufacturing of 3D optical interconnects by two-photon absorption lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleunitz, A.; Klein, J. J.; Krupp, A.; Stender, B.; Houbertz, R.; Gruetzner, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fabrication of optical interconnects has been widely investigated for the generation of optical circuit boards. Twophoton absorption (TPA) lithography (or high-precision 3D printing) as an innovative production method for direct manufacture of individual 3D photonic structures gains more and more attention when optical polymers are employed. In this regard, we have evaluated novel ORMOCER-based hybrid polymers tailored for the manufacture of optical waveguides by means of high-precision 3D printing. In order to facilitate future industrial implementation, the processability was evaluated and the optical performance of embedded waveguides was assessed. The results illustrate that hybrid polymers are not only viable consumables for industrial manufacture of polymeric micro-optics using generic processes such as UV molding. They also are potential candidates to fabricate optical waveguide systems down to the chip level where TPA-based emerging manufacturing techniques are engaged. Hence, it is shown that hybrid polymers continue to meet the increasing expectations of dynamically growing markets of micro-optics and optical interconnects due to the flexibility of the employed polymer material concept.

  7. 3D integration of microfluidics and microoptics inside photosensitive glass by femtosecond laser direct writing for photonic biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Koji; Wang, Zhongke; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2008-02-01

    Optical waveguides with a propagation loss of around 0.5 dB/cm are written inside photosensitive Foturan glass by internal modification of refractive index using femtosecond (fs) laser. Integration of the optical wafveguides with a micromirror enables us to bend the guided laser beam at an angle of 90° with a bending loss of less than 0.3 dB. In the meanwhile, a plano-convex microlens is completely embedded inside the Foturan glass chip via formation of a three-dimensional (3D) hollow microstructure using fs laser direct writing followed by heat treatment and successive wet etching. This technique can also be used to fabricate microfluidic devices and therefore realizes 3D integration of microoptical and microfluidic components by one continuous procedure. Subsequently, microoptical waveguides are further integrated into the single glass chip. Demonstration of optical measurements using the integrated microchip reveals that photonic biosensing can be performed with an efficiency increased by a factor of 8 for fluorescence detection and by a factor of 3 for absorption detection.

  8. 3D micro-lenses for free space intra-chip coupling in photonic-integrated circuits (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Robert; Williams, Gwilym I.; Ladak, Sam; Smowton, Peter M.

    2017-02-01

    The integration of multiple optical elements on a common substrate to create photonic integrated circuits (PIC) has been successfully applied in: fibre-optic communications, photonic computing and optical sensing. The push towards III-Vs on silicon promises a new generation of integrated devices that combine the advantages of both integrated electronics and optics in a single substrate. III-V edge emitting laser diodes offer high efficiency and low threshold currents making them ideal candidates for the optically active elements of the next generation of PICs. Nevertheless, the highly divergent and asymmetric beam shapes intrinsic to these devices limits the efficiency with which optical elements can be free space coupled intra-chip; a capability particularly desirable for optical sensing applications e.g. [1]. Furthermore, the monolithic nature of the integrated approach prohibits the use of macroscopic lenses to improve coupling. However, with the advent of 3D direct laser writing, three dimensional lenses can now be manufactured on a microscopic-scale [2], making the use of micro-lens technology for enhanced free space coupling of integrated optical elements feasible. Here we demonstrate the first use of 3D micro-lenses to improve the coupling efficiency of monolithically integrated lasers. Fabricated from IP-dip photoresist using a Nanoscribe GmbH 3D lithography tool, the lenses are embedded directly onto a structured GaInP/AlGaInP substrate containing arrays of ridge lasers free space coupled to one another via a 200 μm air gap. We compare the coupling efficiency of these lasers with and without micro-lenses through photo-voltage and beam profile measurements and discuss optimisation of lens design.

  9. 1×3 power splitter based on 2D slab photonic crystal multiple line defect waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Rajat; Sabarinathan, Jayshri

    2011-08-01

    2-D slab photonic crystal multiple line defect waveguides have been designed for optical power splitting application which has numerous applications in photonic integrated circuit. The operation of the device is based on multimode interference effects and self-imaging phenomenon. The proposed structure consists of multiple photonic crystal line defect waveguides which are formed in the Γ-K direction by removing several entire rows of air-holes. The adjacent photonic crystal waveguides are separated by a row of air-holes. In this scheme a 1×3 power splitter is designed which involves three photonic crystal line defect waveguides multimode region, five photonic crystal line defect waveguides multimode region and one separation region. The entire structure is verified by 3-D finite difference time domain method. The transmitted power achieved at each output channel i.e. CH1, CH2 and CH3 are about 26.3%, 26.8% and 26.3% respectively. The total transmitted output power of 1×3 power splitter is 79.4% at target wavelength of 1.55μm.

  10. Connected hexagonal photonic crystals with largest full band gap.

    PubMed

    Fu, H; Chen, Y; Chern, R; Chang, Chien

    2005-10-03

    A two-dimensional photonic crystal with a large full band gap has been designed, fabricated, and characterized. The photonic crystal design was based on a calculation using inverse iteration with multigrid acceleration. The fabrication of the photonic crystal on silicon was realized by the processes of electron-beam lithography and inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching. It was found that the hexagonal array of circular columns and rods has an optimal full photonic band gap. In addition, we show that a larger extraction of light from our designed photonic crystal can be obtained when compared with the frequently used photonic crystals reported previously. Our designed PC structure therefore should be very useful for creating highly efficient optoelectronic devices.

  11. Photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence for early breast cancer biomarker detection.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Brian T; Zangar, Richard C

    2012-08-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces offer a compelling platform for improving the sensitivity of surface-based fluorescent assays used in disease diagnostics. Through the complementary processes of photonic crystal enhanced excitation and enhanced extraction, a periodic dielectric-based nanostructured surface can simultaneously increase the electric field intensity experienced by surface-bound fluorophores and increase the collection efficiency of emitted fluorescent photons. Through the ability to inexpensively fabricate photonic crystal surfaces over substantial surface areas, they are amenable to single-use applications in biological sensing, such as disease biomarker detection in serum. In this review, we will describe the motivation for implementing high-sensitivity, multiplexed biomarker detection in the context of breast cancer diagnosis. We will summarize recent efforts to improve the detection limits of such assays though the use of photonic crystal surfaces. Reduction of detection limits is driven by low autofluorescent substrates for photonic crystal fabrication, and detection instruments that take advantage of their unique features.

  12. Dielectric matrices with air cavities as a waveguide photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usanov, D. A.; Skripal', A. V.; Merdanov, M. K.; Gorlitskii, V. O.

    2016-02-01

    Frequency dependences of the transmission coefficient of a microwave photonic crystal that represents a structure containing alternating layers of ceramic material (Al2O3) with a relatively large number of cavities and foam plastic are studied in the presence and absence of distortions of the periodicity of a photonic structure. The frequency dependences of the transmission coefficient can be analyzed using a model of effective medium that makes it possible to consider the interaction of electromagnetic wave and photonic crystal using a transfer matrix of a 1D photonic crystal. The band character of the frequency dependence of the transmission coefficient of the photonic crystal related to the periodicity of the photonic crystal in the transverse plane for the waveguide with a standard cross section is not manifested in a certain range of material permittivities.

  13. Continuously scanning time-correlated single-photon-counting single-pixel 3-D lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, Markus; Larsson, Håkan; Grönwall, Christina; Tolt, Gustav

    2017-03-01

    Time-correlated single-photon-counting (TCSPC) lidar provides very high resolution range measurements. This makes the technology interesting for three-dimensional imaging of complex scenes with targets behind foliage or other obscurations. TCSPC is a statistical method that demands integration of multiple measurements toward the same area to resolve objects at different distances within the instantaneous field-of-view. Point-by-point scanning will demand significant overhead for the movement, increasing the measurement time. Here, the effect of continuously scanning the scene row-by-row is investigated and signal processing methods to transform this into low-noise point clouds are described. The methods are illustrated using measurements of a characterization target and an oak and hazel copse. Steps between different surfaces of less than 5 cm in range are resolved as two surfaces.

  14. TART97 a coupled neutron-photon 3-D, combinatorial geometry Monte Carlo transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1997-11-22

    TART97 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo transport code. This code can on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART97 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART97 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on- line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART97 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART97 and its data riles.

  15. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qinglan; Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-08-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO{sub 2} dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  16. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  17. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qinglan; Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-08-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO2 dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  18. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinglan; Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J; Cunningham, Brian T

    2016-08-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO2 dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  19. Second generation airborne 3D imaging lidars based on photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnan, John J.; Wells, David; Machan, Roman; Leventhal, Edward

    2007-09-01

    The first successful photon-counting airborne laser altimeter was demonstrated in 2001 under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). This "micro-altimeter" flew at altitudes up to 22,000 ft (6.7 km) and, using single photon returns in daylight, successfully recorded high resolution images of the underlying topography including soil, low-lying vegetation, tree canopies, water surfaces, man-made structures, ocean waves, and moving vehicles. The lidar, which operated at a wavelength of 532 nm near the peak of the solar irradiance curve, was also able to see the underlying terrain through trees and thick atmospheric haze and performed shallow water bathymetry to depths of a few meters over the Atlantic Ocean and Assawoman Bay off the Virginia coast. Sigma Space Corporation has recently developed second generation systems suitable for use in a small aircraft or mini UAV. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG microchip laser generates few microjoule, subnanosecond pulses at fire rates up to 22 kHz. A Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) breaks the transmit beam into a 10x10 array of quasi-uniform spots which are imaged by the receive optics onto individual anodes of a high efficiency 10x10 GaAsP segmented anode microchannel plate photomultiplier. Each anode is input to one channel of a 100 channel, multistop timer demonstrated to have a 100 picosecond timing (1.5 cm range) resolution and an event recovery time less than 2 nsec. The pattern and frequency of a dual wedge optical scanner, synchronized to the laser fire rate, are tailored to provide contiguous coverage of a ground scene in a single overflight.

  20. Gallium Nitride Based Logpile Photonic Crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Li, Qiming; Lee, Yun-Ju; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Wang, George T.; Fischer, Arthur J.

    2011-11-09

    A nine-layer logpile three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) is demonstrated composed of single crystalline gallium nitride (GaN) nanorods, ~ 100 nm in size with lattice constants of 260, 280, and 300 nm with photonic band gap in the visible region. This unique GaN structure is created through a combined approach of a layer-by-layer template fabrication technique and selective metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). These GaN 3DPC exhibit a stacking direction band gap characterized by strong optical reflectance between 380 and 500 nm. By introducing a ''line-defect'' cavity in the fifth (middle) layer of the 3DPC, a localized transmission mode with a quality factor of 25–30 is also observed within the photonic band gap. The realization of a group III nitride 3DPC with uniform features and a band gap at wavelengths in the visible region is an important step toward realizing complete control of the electromagnetic environment for group III nitride-based optoelectronic devices.

  1. Gallium nitride based logpile photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Li, Qiming; Lee, Yun-Ju; Figiel, Jeffrey J; Wang, George T; Fischer, Arthur J

    2011-11-09

    We demonstrate a nine-layer logpile three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) composed of single crystalline gallium nitride (GaN) nanorods, ∼100 nm in size with lattice constants of 260, 280, and 300 nm with photonic band gap in the visible region. This unique GaN structure is created through a combined approach of a layer-by-layer template fabrication technique and selective metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). These GaN 3DPC exhibit a stacking direction band gap characterized by strong optical reflectance between 380 and 500 nm. By introducing a "line-defect" cavity in the fifth (middle) layer of the 3DPC, a localized transmission mode with a quality factor of 25-30 is also observed within the photonic band gap. The realization of a group III nitride 3DPC with uniform features and a band gap at wavelengths in the visible region is an important step toward realizing complete control of the electromagnetic environment for group III nitride based optoelectronic devices.

  2. Assembly of Dimer-Based Photonic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddell Watson, Chekesha M.

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in colloid synthesis to prepare monodisperse shape anisotropic particles provide the opportunity to address challenges related to structural diversity in ordered colloidal solids. In particular, computational simulations and mechanical models suggest that upon system densification nonspherical dimer colloids undergo disorder-order and order-order phase transitions to unconventional solid structures including, base-centered monoclinic crystals, degenerate aperiodic crystals, plastic crystal or rotator, etc. based on free energy minimization. The particle systems have notable analogy to molecular systems, where the shape of molecules and their packing density has been shown to critically influence structural phase behavior and lead to a rich variety of structures, both natural and synthetic. The materials engineering challenges have been in attaining sufficiently monodisperse (size uniformity) colloidal building blocks, as well as the lack of understanding and control of self-assembly processes for non-spherical colloids. This talk highlights our investigations of how particle shape programs the self-organization of colloidal structures. Methods including evaporation mediated assembly and confinement provide a platform to understand the formation of complex colloidal structures from non-spherical building blocks (silica-coated iron oxide, polystyrene, hollow silica shell). Optical property simulations for unconventional 2D and 3D structures with nonspherical particle bases will also be discussed.

  3. Micro-Tensile Testing and 3D-EBSD Characterization of Pure Nickel Multi-Crystals (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2011-4391 MICRO-TENSILE TESTING AND 3D- EBSD CHARACTERIZATION OF PURE NICKEL MULTI- CRYSTALS (Preprint) Paul A. Shade...Yoon-Suk Choi and Robert Wheeler UES Inc. NOVEMBER 2011 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. See additional restrictions...described on inside pages STINFO COPY AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURING DIRECTORATE WRIGHT-PATTERSON

  4. Recent advances in liquid-crystal fiber optics and photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woliński, T. R.; Siarkowska, A.; Budaszewski, D.; Chychłowski, M.; Czapla, A.; Ertman, S.; Lesiak, P.; Rutkowska, K. A.; Orzechowski, K.; Sala-Tefelska, M.; Sierakowski, M.; DÄ browski, R.; Bartosewicz, B.; Jankiewicz, B.; Nowinowski-Kruszelnicki, E.; Mergo, P.

    2017-02-01

    Liquid crystals over the last two decades have been successfully used to infiltrate fiber-optic and photonic structures initially including hollow-core fibers and recently micro-structured photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). As a result photonic liquid crystal fibers (PLCFs) have been created as a new type of micro-structured fibers that benefit from a merge of "passive" PCF host structures with "active" LC guest materials and are responsible for diversity of new and uncommon spectral, propagation, and polarization properties. This combination has simultaneously boosted research activities in both fields of Liquid Crystals Photonics and Fiber Optics by demonstrating that optical fibers can be more "special" than previously thought. Simultaneously, photonic liquid crystal fibers create a new class of fiber-optic devices that utilize unique properties of the photonic crystal fibers and tunable properties of LCs. Compared to "classical" photonic crystal fibers, PLCFs can demonstrate greatly improved control over their optical properties. The paper discusses the latest advances in this field comprising PLCFs that are based on nanoparticles-doped LCs. Doping of LCs with nanoparticles has recently become a common method of improving their optical, magnetic, electrical, and physical properties. Such a combination of nanoparticles-based liquid crystals and photonic crystal fibers can be considered as a next milestone in developing a new class of fiber-based optofluidic systems.

  5. Slow light enhanced correlated photon pair generation in photonic-crystal coupled-resonator optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Takesue, Hiroki; Shimizu, Kaoru; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Notomi, Masaya

    2013-04-08

    We demonstrate the generation of quantum-correlated photon pairs from a Si photonic-crystal coupled-resonator optical waveguide. A slow-light supermode realized by the collective resonance of high-Q and small-mode-volume photonic-crystal cavities successfully enhanced the efficiency of the spontaneous four-wave mixing process. The generation rate of photon pairs was improved by two orders of magnitude compared with that of a photonic-crystal line defect waveguide without a slow-light effect.

  6. 3D near-infrared imaging based on a single-photon avalanche diode array sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata Pavia, Juan; Charbon, Edoardo; Wolf, Martin

    2011-07-01

    An imager for optical tomography was designed based on a detector with 128×128 single-photon pixels that included a bank of 32 time-to-digital converters. Due to the high spatial resolution and the possibility of performing time resolved measurements, a new contact-less setup has been conceived in which scanning of the object is not necessary. This enables one to perform high-resolution optical tomography with much higher acquisition rate, which is fundamental in clinical applications. The setup has a resolution of 97ps and operates with a laser source with an average power of 3mW. This new imaging system generated a high amount of data that could not be processed by established methods, therefore new concepts and algorithms were developed to take full advantage of it. Images were generated using a new reconstruction algorithm that combined general inverse problem methods with Fourier transforms in order to reduce the complexity of the problem. Simulations show that the potential resolution of the new setup is in the order of millimeters. Experiments have been performed to confirm this potential. Images derived from the measurements demonstrate that we have already reached a resolution of 5mm.

  7. Gold nanoparticle-mediated fluorescence enhancement by two-photon polymerized 3D microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aekbote, Badri L.; Schubert, Félix; Ormos, Pál; Kelemen, Lóránd

    2014-12-01

    Fluorescence enhancement achieved by functionalized microstructures made by two-photon polymerization (TPP) is reported for the first time. Microstructures of various shapes made of SU-8 photoresist were prepared and coated with gold nanoparticles (NP) of 80 nm. Localized fluorescence enhancement was demonstrated by microstructures equipped with tips of sub-micron dimensions. The enhancement was realized by positioning the NP-coated structures over fluorescent protein layers. Two fluorophores with their absorption in the red and in the green region of the VIS spectrum were used. Laser scanning confocal microscopy was used to quantify the enhancement. The enhancement factor was as high as 6 in areas of several square-micrometers and more than 3 in the case of local enhancement, comparable with literature values for similar nanoparticles. The structured pattern of the observed fluorescence intensity indicates a classic enhancement mechanism realized by standing waves over reflecting surfaces. With further development mobile microtools made by TPP and functionalized by metal NPs can be actuated by optical tweezers and position to any fluorescent micro-object, such as single cells to realize localized, targeted fluorescence enhancement.

  8. Compensation of spherical aberration influences for two-photon polymerization patterning of large 3D scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stichel, T.; Hecht, B.; Houbertz, R.; Sextl, G.

    2015-10-01

    Two-photon polymerization using femtosecond laser pulses at a wavelength of 515 nm is used for three-dimensional patterning of photosensitive, biocompatible inorganic-organic hybrid polymers (ORMOCER®s). In order to fabricate millimeter-sized biomedical scaffold structures with interconnected pores, medium numerical aperture air objectives with long working distances are applied which allow voxel lengths of several micrometers and thus the solidification of large scaffolds in an adequate time. It is demonstrated that during processing the refraction of the focused laser beam at the air/material interface leads to strong spherical aberration which decreases the peak intensity of the focal point spread function along with shifting and severely extending the focal region in the direction of the beam propagation. These effects clearly decrease the structure integrity, homogeneity and the structure details and therefore are minimized by applying a positioning and laser power adaptation throughout the fabrication process. The results will be discussed with respect to the resulting structural homogeneity and its application as biomedical scaffold.

  9. 3D Stem Cell Niche Engineering via Two-Photon Laser Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Nava, Michele M; Zandrini, Tommaso; Cerullo, Giulio; Osellame, Roberto; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2017-01-01

    A strategy to modulate the behavior of stem cells in culture is to mimic structural aspects of the native cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction. An important example of such artificial microenvironments for stem cell culture is the so-called "synthetic niche." Synthetic niches can be defined as polymeric culture systems mimicking at least one aspect of the interactions between stem cells and the extracellular surroundings, including biochemical factors (e.g., the delivery of soluble factors) and/or biophysical factors (e.g., the microarchitecture of the ECM). Most of the currently available approaches for scaffold fabrication, based on self-assembly methods, do not allow for a submicrometer control of the geometrical structure of the substrate, which might play a crucial role in stem cell fate determination. A novel technology that overcomes these limitations is laser two-photon polymerization (2PP). Femtosecond laser 2PP is a mask-less direct laser writing technique that allows manufacturing three dimensional arbitrary microarchitectures using photosensitive materials. Here, we report on the development of an innovative culture substrate, called the "nichoid," microfabricated in a hybrid organic-inorganic photoresist called SZ2080, to study mesenchymal stem cell mechanobiology.

  10. 3D near-infrared imaging based on a single-photon avalanche diode array sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata Pavia, Juan; Wolf, Martin; Charbon, Edoardo

    2012-10-01

    Near-infrared light can be used to determine the optical properties (absorption and scattering) of human tissue. Optical tomography uses this principle to image the internal structure of parts of the body by measuring the light that is scattered in the tissue. An imager for optical tomography was designed based on a detector with 128x128 single photon pixels that included a bank of 32 time-to-digital converters. Due to the high spatial resolution and the possibility of performing time resolved measurements, a new contactless setup has been conceived. The setup has a resolution of 97ps and operates with a laser source with an average power of 3mW. This new setup generated an high amount of data that could not be processed by established methods, therefore new concepts and algorithms were developed to take advantage of it. Simulations show that the potential resolution of the new setup would be much higher than previous designs. Measurements have been performed showing its potential. Images derived from the measurements showed that it is possible to reach a resolution of at least 5mm.

  11. A 3D hybrid praseodymium-antimony-oxochloride compound: single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation and photocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Zou, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Gui-Gang; Hu, Bing; Li, Jian-Rong; Feng, Mei-Ling; Wang, Xin-Chen; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2013-11-04

    A 3D organic-inorganic hybrid compound, (2-MepyH)3[{Fe(1,10-phen)3}3][{Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl(11.5)}(TDC)(4.5)({Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl(9.5)} Cl)]·3(2-Mepy)·28H2O (1; 2-Mepy=2-methylpyridine, 1,10-phen=1,10-phenanthroline, H2TDC=thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid), was hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Unusually, two kinds of high-nuclearity clusters, namely [(Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl11)(COO)5](5-) and [(Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl9)Cl(COO)5](4-), coexist in the structure of compound 1; two of the latter clusters are doubly bridged by two μ2-Cl(-) moieties to form a new centrosymmetric dimeric cluster. An unprecedented spontaneous and reversible single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation was observed, which simultaneously involved a notable organic-ligand movement between the metal ions and an alteration of the bridging ion in the dimeric cluster, induced by guest-release/re-adsorption, thereby giving rise to the interconversion between compound 1 and the compound (2-MepyH)3[{Fe(1,10-phen)3}3][{Pr4Sb12O18(OH)Cl(11.5)}(TDC)4({Pr4Sb12O18Cl(10.5)(TDC)(0.5)(H2O)(1.5)}O(0.5))]·25H2O (1'). The mechanism of this transformation has also been discussed in great detail. Photocatalytic H2-evolution activity was observed for compound 1' under UV light with Pt as a co-catalyst and MeOH as a sacrificial electron donor. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Two-Photon Imaging of 3D Organization of Bimetallic AuAg Nanoclusters in DNA Matrix.

    PubMed

    Brach, Katarzyna; Waszkielewicz, Magdalena; Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Samoc, Marek; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna

    2017-09-12

    We report on two-photon excitation properties of small silver-doped gold nanoclusters (AuAgNCs) and on their three-dimensional arrangement in a hybrid system composed of DNA liquid crystals (LCs) and AuAgNCs. UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and multiphoton excitation spectroscopy were used to characterize the nanoparticles. We show that AuAgNCs exhibit two-photon excited luminescence (2PL) emission and second-harmonic generation (SHG) and that these properties remain the same in liquid crystalline matrix. The results are described in detail and discussed in the context of possible imaging application of AuAgNC and specific AuAgNCs organization induced by liquid crystalline ordering of DNA molecules.

  13. Vacancy-induced transmission in three-dimensional photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Keilman, J; Caruso, K; Citrin, D S

    2015-07-01

    The transmission spectra of finite-thickness slabs of three-dimensional (3D) diamond-lattice photonic crystals of air spheres in a dielectric background in which various concentrations of randomly located vacancies are present are studied. We find that resonant modes associated with isolated defects couple to form an extended defect band, leading to a significant increase in transmission for frequencies inside the 3D photonic bandgap. Outside the 3D gap, vacancies induce scattering from evanescent to propagating modes, leading to an increase in transmission near the pseudo-gap edges within the gap. The local defect density of states for several concentrations of vacancies is computed; thus, it is shown that the total number of defect states and the range of supported frequencies increase due to increasing vacancy density.

  14. 2D and 3D crystallization of a bacterial homologue of human vitamin C membrane transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Jeckelmann, Jean-Marc; Harder, Daniel; Ucurum, Zöhre; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2014-10-01

    Most organisms are able to synthesize vitamin C whereas humans are not. In order to contribute to the elucidation of the molecular working mechanism of vitamin C transport through biological membranes, we cloned, overexpressed, purified, functionally characterized, and 2D- and 3D-crystallized a bacterial protein (UraDp) with 29% of amino acid sequence identity to the human sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 1 (SVCT1). Ligand-binding experiments by scintillation proximity assay revealed that uracil is a substrate preferably bound to UraDp. For structural analysis, we report on the production of tubular 2D crystals and present a first projection structure of UraDp from negatively stained tubes. On the other hand the successful growth of UraDp 3D crystals and their crystallographic analysis is described. These 3D crystals, which diffract X-rays to 4.2Å resolution, pave the way towards the high-resolution crystal structure of a bacterial homologue with high amino acid sequence identity to human SVCT1.

  15. A 1-D dusty plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Mitu, M. L.; Ticoş, C. M.; Toader, D.; Banu, N.; Scurtu, A.

    2013-09-21

    It is demonstrated numerically that a 1-D plasma crystal made of micron size cylindrical dust particles can, in principle, work as a photonic crystal for terahertz waves. The dust rods are parallel to each other and arranged in a linear string forming a periodic structure of dielectric-plasma regions. The dispersion equation is found by solving the waves equation with the boundary conditions at the dust-plasma interface and taking into account the dielectric permittivity of the dust material and plasma. The wavelength of the electromagnetic waves is in the range of a few hundred microns, close to the interparticle separation distance. The band gaps of the 1-D plasma crystal are numerically found for different types of dust materials, separation distances between the dust rods and rod diameters. The distance between levitated dust rods forming a string in rf plasma is shown experimentally to vary over a relatively wide range, from 650 μm to about 1350 μm, depending on the rf power fed into the discharge.

  16. Bulk crystal growth and electronic characterization of the 3D Dirac semimetal Na{sub 3}Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Kushwaha, Satya K.; Krizan, Jason W.; Cava, R. J.; Feldman, Benjamin E.; Gyenis, András; Randeria, Mallika T.; Xiong, Jun; Xu, Su-Yang; Alidoust, Nasser; Belopolski, Ilya; Liang, Tian; Zahid Hasan, M.; Ong, N. P.; Yazdani, A.

    2015-04-01

    High quality hexagon plate-like Na{sub 3}Bi crystals with large (001) plane surfaces were grown from a molten Na flux. The freshly cleaved crystals were analyzed by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, allowing for the characterization of the three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetal (TDS) behavior and the observation of the topological surface states. Landau levels were observed, and the energy-momentum relations exhibited a linear dispersion relationship, characteristic of the 3D TDS nature of Na{sub 3}Bi. In transport measurements on Na{sub 3}Bi crystals, the linear magnetoresistance and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillations are observed for the first time.

  17. Ice crystallization in porous building materials: assessing damage using real-time 3D monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deprez, Maxim; De Kock, Tim; De Schutter, Geert; Cnudde, Veerle

    2017-04-01

    Frost action is one of the main causes of deterioration of porous building materials in regions at middle to high latitudes. Damage will occur when the internal stresses due to ice formation become larger than the strength of the material. Hence, the sensitivity of the material to frost damage is partly defined by the structure of the solid body. On the other hand, the size, shape and interconnection of pores manages the water distribution in the building material and, therefore, the characteristics of the pore space control potential to form ice crystals (Ruedrich et al., 2011). In order to assess the damage to building materials by ice crystallization, lot of effort was put into identifying the mechanisms behind the stress build up. First of all, volumetric expansion of 9% (Hirschwald, 1908) during the transition of water to ice should be mentioned. Under natural circumstances, however, water saturation degrees within natural rocks or concrete cannot reach a damaging value. Therefore, linear growth pressure (Scherer, 1999), as well as several mechanisms triggered by water redistribution during freezing (Powers and Helmuth, 1953; Everett, 1961) are more likely responsible for damage due to freezing. Nevertheless, these theories are based on indirect observations and models and, thus, direct evidence that reveals the exact damage mechanism under certain conditions is still lacking. To obtain this proof, in-situ information needs to be acquired while a freezing process is performed. X-ray computed tomography has proven to be of great value in material research. Recent advances at the Ghent University Centre for Tomography (UGCT) have already allowed to dynamically 3D image crack growth in natural rock during freeze-thaw cycles (De Kock et al., 2015). A great potential to evaluate the different stress build-up mechanisms can be found in this imaging technique consequently. It is required to cover a range of materials with different petrophysical properties to achieve

  18. Interface electromagnetic waves between Kronig-Penney photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrany, Khashayar; Momeni, Babak; Khorasani, Sina; Rashidian, Bizhan

    2003-02-01

    The electromagnetic interface states formed in a heterostructure composed of two semi-infinite Kronig-Penny photonic crystals have been studied. Modified transfer matrices have been used for study of Kronig-Penny photonic crystals (heterostructures with conducting interfaces) to show strong similarity between solid-state physics and electromagnetics. Our calculations are limited to TE polarization.

  19. Waveguide circuits in three-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Rana; Christensen, C.; Muehlmeier, J.; Tuttle, G.; Ho, K.-M.

    2008-04-07

    Waveguide circuits in three-dimensional photonic crystals with complete photonic band gaps are simulated with finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations, and compared with measurements on microwave scale photonic crystals. The transmission through waveguide bends critically depends on the photonic crystal architecture in the bend region. We have found experimentally and theoretically, a new waveguide bend configuration consisting of overlapping rods in the bend region, that performs better than the simple waveguide bend of terminated rods, especially in the higher frequency portion of the band. Efficient beam splitters with this junction geometry are also simulated.

  20. Heteroplasmon hybridization in stacked complementary plasmo-photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Masanobu; Choi, Bongseok

    2015-03-11

    We constructed plasmo-photonic crystals in which efficient light-trapping, plasmonic resonances couple with photonic guided resonances of large density of states and high-quality factor. We have numerically and experimentally shown that heteroplasmon hybrid modes emerge in stacked complementary (SC) plasmo-photonic crystals. The resonant electromagnetic-field distributions evidence that the two hybrid modes originate from two different heteroplasmons, exhibiting a large energy splitting of 300 meV. We further revealed a series of plasmo-photonic modes in the SC crystals.

  1. Peculiarities of the band structure of multi-component photonic crystals with different dimensions.

    PubMed

    Samusev, A K; Samusev, K B; Rybin, M V; Limonov, M F

    2010-03-24

    In this work we offer a simple analytical method which allows us to determine and study the effects of the selective switching of photonic stop-bands in multi-component photonic crystals (Mc-PhCs) of any dimensionality. The calculations for Mc-PhCs with low dielectric contrast have been performed in the framework of the model based on the scattering form factor analysis. It has been shown that the effects of selective switching of photonic stop-bands predicted theoretically and found experimentally before in three-dimensional (3D) Mc-PhC have a general character and may be observed also in one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Mc-PhCs. It is found that 1D, 2D and 3D Mc-PhCs demonstrate unexpectedly similar quasi-periodic behaviour of photonic stop-bands as a function of the reciprocal lattice vector. A proper choice of the structural and dielectric parameters can create a resonance photonic stop-band determining the Bragg wavelengths, to which a photonic crystal can never be transparent.

  2. Strongly-Refractive One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Prisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal prisms can separate a beam of polychromatic electromagnetic waves into constituent wavelength components and can utilize unconventional refraction properties for wavelength dispersion over significant portions of an entire photonic band rather than just near the band edges outside the photonic band gaps. Using a ID photonic crystal simplifies the design and fabrication process and allows the use of larger feature sizes. The prism geometry broadens the useful wavelength range, enables better optical transmission, and exhibits angular dependence on wavelength with reduced non-linearity. The properties of the 1 D photonic crystal prism can be tuned by varying design parameters such as incidence angle, exit surface angle, and layer widths. The ID photonic crystal prism can be fabricated in a planar process, and can be used as optical integrated circuit elements.

  3. A 2D/3D hybrid integral imaging display by using fast switchable hexagonal liquid crystal lens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsin-Hsueh; Huang, Ping-Ju; Wu, Jui-Yi; Hsieh, Po-Yuan; Huang, Yi-Pai

    2017-05-01

    The paper proposes a new display which could switch 2D and 3D images on a monitor, and we call it as Hybrid Display. In 3D display technologies, the reduction of image resolution is still an important issue. The more angle information offer to the observer, the less spatial resolution would offer to image resolution because of the fixed panel resolution. Take it for example, in the integral photography system, the part of image without depth, like background, will reduce its resolution by transform from 2D to 3D image. Therefore, we proposed a method by using liquid crystal component to quickly switch the 2D image and 3D image. Meanwhile, the 2D image is set as a background to compensate the resolution.. In the experiment, hexagonal liquid crystal lens array would be used to take the place of fixed lens array. Moreover, in order to increase lens power of the hexagonal LC lens array, we applied high resistance (Hi-R) layer structure on the electrode. Hi-R layer would make the gradient electric field and affect the lens profile. Also, we use panel with 801 PPI to display the integral image in our system. Hence, the consequence of full resolution 2D background with the 3D depth object forms the Hybrid Display.

  4. Fano resonance in anodic aluminum oxide based photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Shang, Guo Liang; Fei, Guang Tao; Zhang, Yao; Yan, Peng; Xu, Shao Hui; Ouyang, Hao Miao; Zhang, Li De

    2014-01-08

    Anodic aluminum oxide based photonic crystals with periodic porous structure have been prepared using voltage compensation method. The as-prepared sample showed an ultra-narrow photonic bandgap. Asymmetric line-shape profiles of the photonic bandgaps have been observed, which is attributed to Fano resonance between the photonic bandgap state of photonic crystal and continuum scattering state of porous structure. And the exhibited Fano resonance shows more clearly when the sample is saturated ethanol gas than air-filled. Further theoretical analysis by transfer matrix method verified these results. These findings provide a better understanding on the nature of photonic bandgaps of photonic crystals made up of porous materials, in which the porous structures not only exist as layers of effective-refractive-index material providing Bragg scattering, but also provide a continuum light scattering state to interact with Bragg scattering state to show an asymmetric line-shape profile.

  5. Modelling defect cavities formed in inverse three-dimensional rod-connected diamond photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taverne, M. P. C.; Ho, Y.-L. D.; Zheng, X.; Liu, S.; Chen, L.-F.; Lopez-Garcia, M.; Rarity, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    Defect cavities in 3D photonic crystal can trap and store light in the smallest volumes allowable in dielectric materials, enhancing non-linearities and cavity QED effects. Here, we study inverse rod-connected diamond (RCD) crystals containing point defect cavities using plane-wave expansion and finite-difference time domain methods. By optimizing the dimensions of the crystal, wide photonic bandgaps are obtained. Mid-bandgap resonances can then be engineered by introducing point defects in the crystal. We investigate a variety of single spherical defects at different locations in the unit cell focusing on high-refractive-index-contrast (3.3:1) inverse RCD structures; quality factors (Q-factors) and mode volumes of the resonant cavity modes are calculated. By choosing a symmetric arrangement, consisting of a single sphere defect located at the center of a tetrahedral arrangement, mode volumes < 0.06 cubic wavelengths are obtained, a record for high-index cavities.

  6. Mineral crystal alignment in mineralized fracture callus determined by 3D small-angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yifei; Manjubala, Inderchand; Roschger, Paul; Schell, Hanna; Duda, Georg N.; Fratzl, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Callus tissue formed during bone fracture healing is a mixture of different tissue types as revealed by histological analysis. But the structural characteristics of mineral crystals within the healing callus are not well known. Since two-dimensional (2D) scanning small-angle X-ray scattering (sSAXS) patterns showed that the size and orientation of callus crystals vary both spatially and temporally [1] and 2D electron microscopic analysis implies an anisotropic property of the callus morphology, the mineral crystals within the callus are also expected to vary in size and orientation in 3D. Three-dimensional small-angle X-ray scattering (3D SAXS), which combines 2D SAXS patterns collected at different angles of sample tilting, has been previously applied to investigate bone minerals in horse radius [2] and oim/oim mouse femur/tibia [3]. We implement a similar 3D SAXS method but with a different way of data analysis to gather information on the mineral alignment in fracture callus. With the proposed accurate yet fast assessment of 3D SAXS information, it was shown that the plate shaped mineral particles in the healing callus were aligned in groups with their predominant orientations occurring as a fiber texture.

  7. Inexpensive photonic crystal spectrometer for colorimetric sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Kurt M; Jia, Zhang; Pervez, Nadia K; Cox, Marshall P; Gazes, Michael J; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2013-02-25

    Photonic crystal spectrometers possess significant size and cost advantages over traditional grating-based spectrometers. In a previous work [Pervez, et al, Opt. Express 18, 8277 (2010)] we demonstrated a proof of this concept by implementing a 9-element array photonic crystal spectrometer with a resolution of 20 nm. Here we demonstrate a photonic crystal spectrometer with improved performance. The dependence of the spectral recovery resolution on the number of photonic crystal arrays and the width of the response function from each photonic crystal is investigated. A mathematical treatment, regularization based on known information of the spectrum, is utilized in order to stabilize the spectral estimation inverse problem and achieve improved spectral recovery. Colorimetry applications, the measurement of CIE 1931 chromaticities and the color rendering index, are demonstrated with the improved spectrometer.

  8. Silicon-based photonic crystal waveguides and couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Stephen G.

    2008-10-01

    Most commercial photonics-related research and development efforts currently fall into one or both of the following technological sectors: silicon photonics and photonic integrated circuits. Silicon photonics [18] is the field concerned with assimilating photonic elements into the well-established CMOS VLSI architecture and IC manufacturing. The convergence of these technologies would be mutually advantageous: photonic devices could increase bus speeds and greatly improve chip-to-chip and board-to-board data rates, whereas photonics, as a field, would benefit from mature silicon manufacturing and economies of scale. On the other hand, those in the photonic integrated circuit sector seek to continue the miniaturization of photonic devices in an effort to obtain an appreciable share of the great windfall of profits that occur when manufacturing, packaging, and testing costs are substantially reduced by shrinking photonic elements to chip-scale dimensions. Integrated photonics companies may [12] or may not [34] incorporate silicon as the platform. In this thesis, we seek to further develop a technology that has the potential to facilitate the forging of silicon photonics and photonic integrated circuits: photonic crystals on silicon-on-insulator substrates. We will first present a brief overview of photonic crystals and their physical properties. We will then detail a finely-tuned procedure for fabricating two-dimensional photonic crystal in the silicon-on-insulator material system. We will then examine transmission properties of our fabricated devices including propagation loss, group index dispersion, and coupling efficiency of directional couplers. Finally, we will present a description of a system for adiabatically tapering optical fibers and the results of using tapered fibers for efficiently coupling light into photonic crystal devices.

  9. Weyl Points and Line Nodes in Gyroid Photonic Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Weyl points and line nodes in gyroid photonic crystals Ling Lu*, Liang Fu, John D...are predicted to be topologically non-trivial. However, Weyl points are yet to be discovered in nature. Here, we report photonic crystals based on...2D periodic systems. For example, most of the remarkable properties of graphene are tied to the Dirac points at its Fermi level1,2. In photonics , 2D

  10. Tuning light focusing with liquid crystal infiltrated graded index photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, B.; Giden, I. H.; Kurt, H.

    2017-01-01

    We perform numerical analyses of tunable graded index photonic crystals based on liquid crystals. Light manipulation with such a photonic medium is explored and a new approach for active tuning of the focal distance is proposed. The graded index photonic crystal is realized using the symmetry reduced unit element in two-dimensional photonic crystals without modifying the dielectric filling fraction or cell size dimensions. By applying an external static electric field to liquid crystals, their refractive indices and thus, the effective refractive index of the whole graded index photonic crystal will be changed. Setting the lattice constant to a=400 nm yields a tuning of 680 nm for focal point position. This property can be used for designing an electro-optic graded index photonic crystal-based flat lens with a tunable focal point. Future optical systems may have benefit from such tunable graded index lenses.

  11. Photonic crystal cavities with metallic Schottky contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Quiring, W.; Al-Hmoud, M.; Reuter, D.; Zrenner, A.; Rai, A.; Wieck, A. D.

    2015-07-27

    We report about the fabrication and analysis of high Q photonic crystal cavities with metallic Schottky-contacts. The structures are based on GaAs n-i membranes with an InGaAs quantum well in the i-region and nanostructured low ohmic metal top-gates. They are designed for photocurrent readout within the cavity and fast electric manipulations. The cavity structures are characterized by photoluminescence and photocurrent spectroscopy under resonant excitation. We find strong cavity resonances in the photocurrent spectra and surprisingly high Q-factors up to 6500. Temperature dependent photocurrent measurements in the region between 4.5 K and 310 K show an exponential enhancement of the photocurrent signal and an external quantum efficiency up to 0.26.

  12. Enhanced photoacoustic detection using photonic crystal substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yunfei; Liu, Kaiyang; McClelland, John; Lu, Meng

    2014-04-21

    This paper demonstrates the enhanced photoacoustic sensing of surface-bound light absorbing molecules and metal nanoparticles using a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) substrate. The PC structure functions as an optical resonator at the wavelength where the analyte absorption is strong. The optical resonance of the PC sensor provides an intensified evanescent field with respect to the excitation light source and results in enhanced optical absorption by surface-immobilized samples. For the analysis of a light absorbing dye deposited on the PC surface, the intensity of photoacoustic signal was enhanced by more than 10-fold in comparison to an un-patterned acrylic substrate. The technique was also applied to detect gold nanorods and exhibited more than 40 times stronger photoacoustic signals. The demonstrated approach represents a potential path towards single molecule absorption spectroscopy with greater performance and inexpensive instrumentation.

  13. Photonic crystal surface waves for optical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Konopsky, Valery N; Alieva, Elena V

    2007-06-15

    We present a new optical biosensor technique based on registration of dual optical s-polarized modes on a photonic crystal surface. The simultaneous registration of two optical surface waves with different evanescent depths from the same surface spot permits the segregation of the volume and the surface contributions from an analyte, while the absence of metal damping permits an increase in the propagation length of the optical surface waves and the sensitivity of the biosensor. Our technique was tested with the binding of biotin molecules to a streptavidin monolayer that has been detected with signal/noise ratio of approximately 15 at 1-s signal accumulation time. The detection limit is approximately 20 fg of the analyte on the probed spot of the surface.

  14. Photonic crystal nanostructures for optical biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Dorfner, D; Zabel, T; Hürlimann, T; Hauke, N; Frandsen, L; Rant, U; Abstreiter, G; Finley, J

    2009-08-15

    We present the design, fabrication and optical investigation of photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity drop filters for use as optical biosensors. The resonant cavity mode wavelength and Q-factor are studied as a function of the ambient refractive index and as a function of adsorbed proteins (bovine serum albumin) on the sensor surface. Experiments were performed by evanescent excitation of the cavity mode via a PhC waveguide. This in turn is coupled to a ridge waveguide that allows the introduction of a fluid flow cell on a chip. A response of partial delta lambda/delta c=(4.54+/-0.66)x10(5)nm/M is measured leading to a measured detection limit as good as Delta m=4.0+/-0.6 fg or Delta m/Delta A=(4.9+/-0.7)x10(2)pg/mm(2)in the sensitive area.

  15. Bio-inspired photonic crystals with superwettability.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Minxuan; Wang, Jingxia; Jiang, Lei

    2016-12-21

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have attracted enormous research interest due to their unique light manipulation and potential applications in sensing, catalysts, detection, displays, solar cells and other fields. In particular, many novel applications of PCs are derived from their surface wettability. Generally, the wettability of PCs is determined by a combination of its surface geometrical structures and surface chemical compositions. This review focuses on the recent developments in the mechanism, fabrication and application of bio-inspired PCs with superwettability. It includes information on constructing superwetting PCs based on designing the topographical structure and regulating the surface chemical composition, and information on extending the practical applications of superwetting PCs in humidity/oil/solvent sensing, actuating, anti-fouling and liquid-impermeable surface, chemical detection, etc.

  16. Mode conversion in magneto photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    otmani, Hamza; Bouchemat, Mohamed; Hocini, Abdesselam; Boumaza, Touraya; benmerkhi, ahlem

    2017-01-01

    The first concept of an integrated isolator was based on nonreciprocal TE-TM mode conversion, the nonreciprocal coupling between these modes is caused by the Faraday rotation if the magnetization is aligned along the z-axis, parallel to mode propagation. We propose to study this magneto-optical phenomenon, by the simulation of magneto photonic crystal fibre (MPCF), it consists of a periodic triangular lattice of air-holes filled with magnetic fluid which consists of magnetic nanoparticles into a BIG (Bismuth Iron Garnet) fibre. We simulated the influence of gyrotropy and the wavelength, and calculated Faraday rotation and modal birefringence. In this fibre the light is guided by internal total reflection, like classical fibres. However it was shown that they could function on a mode conversion much stronger than conventional fibres.

  17. Polarization modulation instability in photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Kruhlak, R J; Wong, G K; Chen, J S; Murdoch, S G; Leonhardt, R; Harvey, J D; Joly, N Y; Knight, J C

    2006-05-15

    Polarization modulation instability (PMI) in birefringent photonic crystal fibers has been observed in the normal dispersion regime with a frequency shift of 64 THz between the generated frequencies and the pump frequency. The generated sidebands are orthogonally polarized to the pump. From the observed PMI frequency shift and the measured dispersion, we determined the phase birefringence to be 5.3 x 10(-5) at a pump wavelength of 647.1 nm. This birefringence was used to estimate the PMI gain as a function of pump wavelength. Four-wave mixing experiments in both the normal and the anomalous dispersion regimes generated PMI frequency shifts that show good agreement with the predicted values over a 70 THz range. These results could lead to amplifiers and oscillators based on PMI.

  18. Semicrystalline woodpile photonic crystals without complicated alignment via soft lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Kuang, Ping; Leung, Wai; Kim, Yong-Sung; Park, Joong-Mok; Kang, Henry; Constant, Kristen; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2010-05-13

    We report the fabrication and characterization of woodpile photonic crystals with up to 12 layers through titania nanoparticle infiltration of a polymer template made by soft lithography. Because the complicated alignment in the conventional layer-by-layer fabrication associated with diamondlike symmetry is replaced by a simple 90{sup o} alignment, the fabricated photonic crystal has semicrystalline phase. However, the crystal performs similarly to a perfectly aligned crystal for the light propagation integrated from the surface normal to 30{sup o} at the main photonic band gap.

  19. A 3D profile function suitable for integration of neutron time-of-flight single crystal diffraction peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmann, Matthias J.

    2017-03-01

    A 3D profile function is presented suitable to integrate reflections arising in time-of-flight (TOF) single crystal neutron diffraction experiments. In order to account for the large asymmetry of the peak shape in the TOF direction, a 3D Gaussian ellipsoid in the pixel (x, z) and time-of-flight coordinates is convoluted with a rising and falling exponential along the time-of-flight direction. An analytic expression is derived, making it suitable for least-squares fitting. The application of this function in detector space or reciprocal space is straightforward.

  20. Ultrahigh-efficiency apodized grating coupler using fully etched photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yunhong; Ou, Haiyan; Peucheret, Christophe

    2013-08-01

    We present an efficient method to design apodized grating couplers with Gaussian output profiles for efficient coupling between standard single mode fibers and silicon chips. An apodized grating coupler using fully etched photonic crystal holes on the silicon-on-insulator platform is designed, and fabricated in a single step of lithography and etching. An ultralow coupling loss of -1.74 dB (67% coupling efficiency) with a 3 dB bandwidth of 60 nm is experimentally measured.

  1. Application of pressure to shift the bandgap in polystyrene-based photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nigel P.; Khokhar, Ali Z.; McLachlan, Martyn A.; McComb, David W.; De La Rue, Richard M.

    2004-09-01

    We describe a simple technique for the selective area modification of the bandgap in planar 3-D photonic crystals (PhC). The PhCs are grown by controlled drying of monosized polystyrene spheres. Uniaxial pressure of 41 MPa can produce a shift in the bandgap of ~90 nm from 230 nm spheres. An unexpected broadening of the bandgap is attributed to the change in topology associated with large necks formed between spheres at pressures greater than 10 MPa.

  2. Efficient parametric interactions in a low loss GaInP photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Cestier, I; Willinger, A; Colman, P; Combrié, S; Lehoucq, G; De Rossi, A; Eisenstein, G

    2011-10-01

    We describe time domain characterizations of dynamic four-wave mixing in a low loss modified W1 GaInP photonic crystal waveguide. Using 32 ps wide pump pulses with peak powers of up to 1.1 W we achieved a very large conversion efficiency of -6.8 dB as well as a 1.3 dB parametric gain experienced by a weak CW probe signal. Time domain simulations confirm quantitatively all the measured results.

  3. Automated optimization of photonic crystal slab cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkov, Momchil; Savona, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    Thanks to their high quality factor, combined to the smallest modal volume, defect-cavities in photonic crystal slabs represent a promising, versatile tool for fundamental studies and applications in photonics. In paricular, the L3, H0, and H1 defects are the most popular and widespread cavity designs, due to their compactness, simplicity, and small mode volume. For these cavities, the current best optimal designs still result in Q-values of a few times 105 only, namely one order of magnitude below the bound set by fabrication imperfections and material absorption in silicon. Here, we use a genetic algorithm to find a global maximum of the quality factor of these designs, by varying the positions of few neighbouring holes. We consistently find Q-values above one million - one order of magnitude higher than previous designs. Furthermore, we study the effect of disorder on the optimal designs and conclude that a similar improvement is also expected experimentally in state-of-the-art systems.

  4. Photonic crystal light-emitting sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Aurélien; Benisty, Henri; Weisbuch, Claude

    2012-12-01

    Photonic crystals (PhCs) are periodically structured optical media offering the opportunity for spontaneous emission (SpE) to be strongly controlled in spatial terms (directions) or in absolute terms (rates). We discuss the application of this concept for practical light-emitting sources, summarizing the principles and actual merits of various approaches based on two- and three-dimensional PhCs. We take into consideration the numerous constraints on real-world light-emitting structures and materials. The various mechanisms through which modified photonic bands and band gaps can be used are first revisited in view of their use in light sources. We then present an in-depth discussion of planar emitters and enhanced extraction of light thanks to grating diffraction. Applications to conventional III-V semiconductors and to III-nitrides are reviewed. Comparison with random surface roughening reveals some common physical limitations. Some advanced approaches with complex structures or etched active structures are also discussed. Finally, the most promising mechanism to enhance the SpE rate, the Purcell effect, is considered. Its implementation, including through plasmonic effects, is shown to be effective only for very specific sources. We conclude by outlining the mix of physics and material parameters needed to grasp the relevant issues.

  5. Optical limiter based on two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belabbas, Amirouche; Lazoul, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    The aim behind this work is to investigate the capabilities of nonlinear photonic crystals to achieve ultra-fast optical limiters based on third order nonlinear effects. The purpose is to combine the actions of nonlinear effects with the properties of photonic crystals in order to activate the photonic band according to the magnitude of the nonlinear effects, themselves a function of incident laser power. We are interested in designing an optical limiter based nonlinear photonic crystal operating around 1064 nm and its second harmonic at 532 nm. Indeed, a very powerful solid-state laser that can blind or destroy optical sensors and is widely available and easy to handle. In this work, we perform design and optimization by numerical simulations to determine the better structure for the nonlinear photonic crystal to achieve compact and efficient integrated optical limiter. The approach consists to analyze the band structures in Kerr-nonlinear two-dimensional photonic crystals as a function of the optical intensity. We confirm that these bands are dynamically red-shifted with regard to the bands observed in linear photonic crystals or in the case of weak nonlinear effects. The implemented approach will help to understand such phenomena as intensitydriven optical limiting with Kerr-nonlinear photonic crystals.

  6. Structural Color Patterns by Electrohydrodynamic Jet Printed Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haibo; Zhu, Cun; Tian, Lei; Liu, Cihui; Fu, Guangbin; Shang, Luoran; Gu, Zhongze

    2017-02-09

    In this work, we demonstrate the fabrication of photonic crystal patterns with controllable morphologies and structural colors utilizing electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing with colloidal crystal inks. The final shape of photonic crystal units is controlled by the applied voltage signal and wettability of the substrate. Optical properties of the structural color patterns are tuned by the self-assembly of the silica nanoparticle building blocks. Using this direct printing technique, it is feasible to print customized functional patterns composed of photonic crystal dots or photonic crystal lines according to relevant printing mode and predesigned tracks. This is the first report for E-jet printing with colloidal crystal inks. Our results exhibit promising applications in displays, biosensors, and other functional devices.

  7. 3D-Printed High-Density Droplet Array Chip for Miniaturized Protein Crystallization Screening under Vapor Diffusion Mode.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yi-Ran; Zhu, Li-Na; Gao, Jie; Zhao, Hong-Xia; Zhu, Ying; Ye, Sheng; Fang, Qun

    2017-03-23

    Here we describe the combination of three-dimensional (3D) printed chip and automated microfluidic droplet-based screening techniques for achieving massively parallel, nanoliter-scale protein crystallization screening under vapor diffusion mode. We fabricated high-density microwell array chips for sitting-drop vapor diffusion crystallization utilizing the advantage of the 3D-printing technique in producing high-aspect-ratio chips. To overcome the obstacle of 3D-printed microchips in performing long-term reactions caused by their porousness and gas permeability properties in chip body, we developed a two-step postprocessing method, including paraffin filling and parylene coating, to achieve high sealability and stability. We also developed a simple method especially suitable for controlling the vapor diffusion speed of nanoliter-scale droplets by changing the layer thickness of covering oil. With the above methods, 84 tests of nanoliter-scale protein crystallization under vapor diffusion mode were successfully achieved in the 7 × 12 droplet array chip with a protein consumption of 10 nL for each test, which is 20-100 times lower than that in the conventional large-volume screening system. Such a nanoliter-scale vapor diffusion system was applied to two model proteins with commercial precipitants and displayed advantages over that under microbatch mode. It identified more crystallization conditions, especially for the protein samples with lower concentrations.

  8. Thermally Driven Photonic Actuator Based on Silica Opal Photonic Crystal with Liquid Crystal Elastomer.

    PubMed

    Xing, Huihui; Li, Jun; Shi, Yang; Guo, Jinbao; Wei, Jie

    2016-04-13

    We have developed a novel thermoresponsive photonic actuator based on three-dimensional SiO2 opal photonic crystals (PCs) together with liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs). In the process of fabrication of such a photonic actuator, the LCE precursor is infiltrated into the SiO2 opal PC followed by UV light-induced photopolymerization, thereby forming the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite film with a bilayer structure. We find that this bilayer composite film simultaneously exhibits actuation behavior as well as the photonic band gap (PBG) response to external temperature variation. When the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite film is heated, it exhibits a considerable bending deformation, and its PBG shifts to a shorter wavelength at the same time. In addition, this actuation is quite fast, reversible, and highly repeatable. The thermoresponsive behavior of the SiO2 opal PC/LCE composite films mainly derives from the thermal-driven change of nematic order of the LCE layer which leads to the asymmetric shrinkage/expansion of the bilayer structure. These results will be of interest in designing optical actuator systems for environment-temperature detection.

  9. Co-axial association of recombinant eye lens aquaporin-0 observed in loosely packed 3D crystals.

    PubMed

    Palanivelu, Dinesh V; Kozono, David E; Engel, Andreas; Suda, Kitaru; Lustig, Ariel; Agre, Peter; Schirmer, Tilman

    2006-01-27

    Aquaporin-0 (AQP0) is the major membrane protein in vertebrate eye lenses. It has been proposed that AQP0 tetramers mediate contact between membranes of adjacent lens fiber cells, which would be consistent with the extraordinarily narrow inter-cellular spacing. We have obtained 3D crystals of recombinant bovine AQP0 that diffract to 7.0 A resolution. The crystal packing was determined by molecular replacement and shows that, within the cubic lattice, AQP0 tetramers are associated head-to-head along their 4-fold axes. Oligomeric states larger than the tetramer were also observed in solution by native gel electrophoresis and analytical ultracentrifugation methods. In the crystals, there are no direct contacts between octamers, and it can thus be inferred that crystalline order is mediated solely by the detergent belts surrounding the membrane protein. Across the tetramer-tetramer interface, extracellular loops A and C interdigitate at the center and the perimeter of the octamer, respectively. The octamer structure is compared with that of the recently determined structure of truncated ovine AQP0 derived from electron diffraction of 2D crystals. Intriguingly, also in these crystals, octamers are observed, but with significantly different relative tetramer-tetramer orientations. The interactions observed in the loosely packed 3D crystals reported here may in fact represent an in vivo association mode between AQP0 tetramers from juxtaposed membranes in the eye lens.

  10. Square spiral photonic crystals: robust architecture for microfabrication of materials with large three-dimensional photonic band gaps.

    PubMed

    Toader, Ovidiu; John, Sajeev

    2002-07-01

    We provide a blueprint for microfabricating photonic crystals with very large and robust three-dimensional photonic band gaps (PBG's). These crystals are based on interleaving polygonal spiral posts and can be efficiently manufactured on a large scale in a one-step process using the recently introduced technique of glancing angle deposition. We classify various families of spiral photonic crystals based on (i) the parent three-dimensional (3D) point lattice to which they are most closely related, (ii) the crystallographic axis of the parent lattice around which the spiral posts wind, and (iii) the set of points of the parent lattice which the spiral arms connect or nearly connect. We obtain optimal geometries for the spiral photonic crystals by detailed mapping of the size and location of the PBG within a multidimensional parameter space which characterizes the shape of each spiral post. For the optimum PBG, the spiral arms and elbows may deviate significantly from the points of the original point lattice. The largest 3D PBG's are obtained for square spiral posts that wind around the [001] axis of diamond (or face centered cubic) lattice and in which the spiral arm segments approximately connect either the fifth or first nearest-neighbor points of the parent lattice. In the case of silicon posts (with a dielectric constant of 11.9) in an air background, whose arm segments nearly connect fifth nearest-neighbor point of the diamond lattice, the full PBG can be as large as 16% of the gap center frequency. For the corresponding air posts in a silicon background, the maximum PBG is 24% of the gap center frequency. We compute both the total electromagnetic density of states and the electromagnetic field distributions near the PBG. It is suggested the PBG in an optimized structure is highly tolerant to various forms of disorder that may arise during the manufacturing process.

  11. Anomalous Fluorescence Enhancement from Double Heterostructure 3D Colloidal Photonic Crystals–A Multifunctional Fluorescence-Based Sensor Platform

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhari, Ehsan; Li, Xiang; Kim, Tak H.; Gan, Zongsong; Cole, Ivan S.; Zhao, Dongyuan; Kielpinski, Dave; Gu, Min; Li, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Augmenting fluorescence intensity is of vital importance to the development of chemical and biochemical sensing, imaging and miniature light sources. Here we report an unprecedented fluorescence enhancement with a novel architecture of multilayer three-dimensional colloidal photonic crystals self-assembled from polystyrene spheres. The new technique uses a double heterostructure, which comprises a top and a bottom layer with a periodicity overlapping the excitation wavelength (E) of the emitters, and a middle layer with a periodicity matching the fluorescence wavelength (F) and a thickness that supports constructive interference for the excitation wavelength. This E-F-E double heterostructure displays direction-dependent light trapping for both excitation and fluorescence, coupling the modes of photonic crystal with multiple-beam interference. The E-F-E double heterostructure renders an additional 5-fold enhancement to the extraordinary FL amplification of Rhodamine B in monolithic E CPhCs, and 4.3-fold acceleration of emission dynamics. Such a self-assembled double heterostructue CPhCs may find significant applications in illumination, laser, chemical/biochemical sensing, and solar energy harvesting. We further demonstrate the multi-functionality of the E-F-E double heterostructure CPhCs in Hg (II) sensing. PMID:26400503

  12. A three-dimensional optical photonic crystal with designed point defects.

    PubMed

    Qi, Minghao; Lidorikis, Elefterios; Rakich, Peter T; Johnson, Steven G; Joannopoulos, J D; Ippen, Erich P; Smith, Henry I

    2004-06-03

    Photonic crystals offer unprecedented opportunities for miniaturization and integration of optical devices. They also exhibit a variety of new physical phenomena, including suppression or enhancement of spontaneous emission, low-threshold lasing, and quantum information processing. Various techniques for the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals--such as silicon micromachining, wafer fusion bonding, holographic lithography, self-assembly, angled-etching, micromanipulation, glancing-angle deposition and auto-cloning--have been proposed and demonstrated with different levels of success. However, a critical step towards the fabrication of functional 3D devices, that is, the incorporation of microcavities or waveguides in a controllable way, has not been achieved at optical wavelengths. Here we present the fabrication of 3D photonic crystals that are particularly suited for optical device integration using a lithographic layer-by-layer approach. Point-defect microcavities are introduced during the fabrication process and optical measurements show they have resonant signatures around telecommunications wavelengths (1.3-1.5 microm). Measurements of reflectance and transmittance at near-infrared are in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  13. Saturation and stability of nonlinear photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Franco-Ortiz, M; Corella-Madueño, A; Rosas-Burgos, R A; Adrian Reyes, J; Avendaño, Carlos G

    2017-03-29

    We consider a one-dimensional photonic crystal made by an infinite set of nonlinear nematic films immersed in a linear dielectric medium. The thickness of each equidistant film is negligible and its refraction index depends continuously on the electric field intensity, giving rise to all the involved nonlinear terms, which joints from a starting linear index for negligible amplitudes to a final saturation index for extremely large field intensities. We show that the nonlinear exact solutions of this system form an intensity-dependent band structure which we calculate and analyze. Next, we ponder a finite version of this system; that is, we take a finite array of linear dielectric stacks of the same size separated by the same nonlinear extremely thin nematic slabs and find the reflection coefficients for this arrangement and obtain the dependence on the wave number and intensity of the incident wave. As a final step we analyze the stability of the analytical solutions of the nonlinear crystal by following the evolution of an additive amplitude to the analytical nonlinear solution we have found here. We discuss our results and state our conclusions.

  14. Saturation and stability of nonlinear photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Ortiz, M.; Corella-Madueño, A.; Rosas-Burgos, R. A.; Reyes, J. Adrian; Avendaño, Carlos G.

    2017-03-01

    We consider a one-dimensional photonic crystal made by an infinite set of nonlinear nematic films immersed in a linear dielectric medium. The thickness of each equidistant film is negligible and its refraction index depends continuously on the electric field intensity, giving rise to all the involved nonlinear terms, which joints from a starting linear index for negligible amplitudes to a final saturation index for extremely large field intensities. We show that the nonlinear exact solutions of this system form an intensity-dependent band structure which we calculate and analyze. Next, we ponder a finite version of this system; that is, we take a finite array of linear dielectric stacks of the same size separated by the same nonlinear extremely thin nematic slabs and find the reflection coefficients for this arrangement and obtain the dependence on the wave number and intensity of the incident wave. As a final step we analyze the stability of the analytical solutions of the nonlinear crystal by following the evolution of an additive amplitude to the analytical nonlinear solution we have found here. We discuss our results and state our conclusions.

  15. Spectroscopy of photonic band gaps in mesoporous one-dimensional photonic crystals based on aluminum oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Voinov, Yu. P.; Shchavlev, V. V.; Bi, Dongxue; Shang, Guo Liang; Fei, Guang Tao

    2016-12-01

    Mesoporous one-dimensional photonic crystals based on aluminum oxide have been synthesized by electrochemical etching method. Reflection spectra of the obtained mesoporous samples in a wide spectral range that covers several band gaps are presented. Microscopic parameters of photonic crystals are calculated and corresponding reflection spectra for the first six band gaps are presented.

  16. Dual exposure, two-photon, conformal phasemask lithography for three dimensional silicon inverse woodpile photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shir, Daniel J.; Nelson, Erik C.; Chanda, Debashis; Brzezinski, Andrew; Braun, Paul V.; Rogers, John A.; Wiltzius, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the fabrication and characterization of three dimensional silicon inverse woodpile photonic crystals. A dual exposure, two-photon, conformal phasemask technique is used to create high quality polymer woodpile structures over large areas with geometries that quantitatively match expectations based on optical simulations. Depositing silicon into these templates followed by the removal of the polymer results in silicon inverse woodpile photonic crystals for which calculations indicate a wide, complete photonic bandgap over a range of structural fill fractions. Spectroscopic measurements of normal incidence reflection from both the polymer and siliconphotonic crystals reveal good optical properties.

  17. Visualizing the 3D internal structure of calcite single crystals grown in agarose hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanying; Xin, Huolin L; Muller, David A; Estroff, Lara A

    2009-11-27

    Single crystals are usually faceted solids with homogeneous chemical compositions. Biogenic and synthetic calcite single crystals, however, have been found to incorporate macromolecules, spurring investigations of how large molecules are distributed within the crystals without substantially disrupting the crystalline lattice. Here, electron tomography reveals how random, three-dimensional networks of agarose nanofibers are incorporated into single crystals of synthetic calcite by allowing both high- and low-energy fiber/crystal interface facets to satisfy network curvatures. These results suggest that physical entrapment of polymer aggregates is a viable mechanism by which macromolecules can become incorporated inside inorganic single crystals. As such, this work has implications for understanding the structure and formation of biominerals as well as toward the development of new high-surface area, single-crystal composite materials.

  18. Novel and simple route to fabricate 2D ordered gold nanobowl arrays based on 3D colloidal crystals.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yanying; Tao, Qin; An, Ming; Rong, Chunhui; Dong, Jian; Dai, Yurong; Qian, Weiping

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we present a new method to fabricate large-area two-dimensionally (2D) ordered gold nanobowl arrays based on 3D colloidal crystals by wet chemosynthesis, which combines the advantages of a very simple preparation and an applicability to "real" nanomaterials. By combination of in situ growth of gold nanoshell (GNSs) arrays based on three-dimensional (3D) colloidal silica crystals, a monolayer ordered reversed GNS array (2D ordered GNS array) was conveniently manufactured by an acrylic ester modified biaxial oriented polypropylene (BOPP). 2D ordered gold nanobowl array with adjustable periodic holes, good stability, reproducibility, and repeatability could be obtained when the silica core was etched by HF solution. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factor (EF) of this 2D ordered gold nanobowl array could reach 1.27 × 10(7), which shows high SERS enhancing activity and can be used as a universal SERS substrate.

  19. High extinction ratio bandgap of photonic crystals in LNOI wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shao-Mei; Cai, Lu-Tong; Jiang, Yun-Peng; Jiao, Yang

    2017-02-01

    A high-extinction-ratio bandgap of air-bridge photonic crystal slab, in the near infrared, is reported. These structures were patterned in single-crystalline LiNbO3 film bonded to SiO2/LiNbO3 substrate by focused ion beam. To improve the vertical confinement of light, the SiO2 layer was removed by 3.6% HF acid. Compared with photonic crystals sandwiched between SiO2 and air, the structures suspending in air own a robust photonic bandgap and high transmission efficiency at valence band region. The measured results are in good agreement with numerically computed transmission spectra by finite-difference time-domain method. The air-bridge photonic crystal waveguides were formed by removing one line holes. We reveal experimentally the guiding characteristics and calculate the theoretical results for photonic crystal waveguides in LiNbO3 film.

  20. Optical extinction due to intrinsic structural variations of photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenderink, A. Femius; Lagendijk, Ad; Vos, Willem L.

    2005-10-01

    Unavoidable variations in size and position of the building blocks of photonic crystals cause light scattering and extinction of coherent beams. We present a model for both two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals that relates the extinction length to the magnitude of the variations. The predicted lengths agree well with our experiments on high-quality opals and inverse opals, and with literature data analyzed by us. As a result, control over photons is limited to distances up to 50 lattice parameters (˜15 μm) in state-of-the-art structures, thereby impeding applications that require large photonic crystals, such as proposed optical integrated circuits. Conversely, scattering in photonic crystals may lead to different physics such as Anderson localization and nonclassical diffusion.

  1. Coupling light in photonic crystal waveguides: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Hemant Sankar; Goyal, Amit Kumar; Srivastava, Varun; Pal, Suchandan

    2016-07-01

    Submicron scale structures with high index contrast are key to compact structures for realizing photonic integrated structures. Ultra-compact optical devices in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates serve compatibility with semiconductor fabrication technology leading to reduction of cost and mass production. Photonic crystal structures possess immense potential for realizing various compact optical devices. However, coupling light to photonic crystal waveguide structures is crucial in order to achieve strong transmission and wider bandwidth of signal. Widening of bandwidth will increase potential for various applications and high transmission will make easy signal detection at the output. In this paper, the techniques reported so far for coupling light in photonic crystal waveguides have been reviewed and analyzed so that a comprehensive guide for an efficient coupling to photonic crystal waveguides can be made possible.

  2. Photonic-crystal slab for terahertz-wave technology platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Masayuki

    2016-03-01

    Photonic crystals manipulate photons in a manner analogous to solid-state crystals, and are composed of a dielectric material with a periodic refractive index distribution. In particular, two-dimensional photonic-crystal slabs with high index contrasts (semiconductor/air) are promising for practical applications, owing to the strong optical confinement in simple, thin planar structures. This paper presents the recent progress on a silicon photonic-crystal slab as a technology platform in the terahertz-wave region, which is located between the radio and light wave regions (0.1-10 THz). Extremely low-loss (<0.1 dB/cm) terahertz waveguides based on the photonic-bandgap effect as well as dynamic control and modulation of a terahertz-wave transmission in a photonic-crystal slab by the effective interaction between photoexcited carriers and the terahertz-wave trapping due to the photonic band-edge effect are demonstrated. Terahertz photonic-crystal slabs hold the potential for developing ultralow-loss, compact terahertz components and integrated devices used in applications including wireless communication, spectroscopic sensing, and imaging.

  3. Valley photonic crystals for control of spin and topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jian-Wen; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Zhu, Hanyu; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-11-01

    Photonic crystals offer unprecedented opportunity for light manipulation and applications in optical communication and sensing. Exploration of topology in photonic crystals and metamaterials with non-zero gauge field has inspired a number of intriguing optical phenomena such as one-way transport and Weyl points. Recently, a new degree of freedom, valley, has been demonstrated in two-dimensional materials. Here, we propose a concept of valley photonic crystals with electromagnetic duality symmetry but broken inversion symmetry. We observe photonic valley Hall effect originating from valley-dependent spin-split bulk bands, even in topologically trivial photonic crystals. Valley-spin locking behaviour results in selective net spin flow inside bulk valley photonic crystals. We also show the independent control of valley and topology in a single system that has been long pursued in electronic systems, resulting in topologically-protected flat edge states. Valley photonic crystals not only offer a route towards the observation of non-trivial states, but also open the way for device applications in integrated photonics and information processing using spin-dependent transportation.

  4. Calculation of the Slip System Activity in Deformed Zinc Single Crystals Using Digital 3-D Image Correlation Data

    SciTech Connect

    Florando, J; Rhee, M; Arsenlis, A; LeBlanc, M; Lassila, D

    2006-02-21

    A 3-D image correlation system, which measures the full-field displacements in 3 dimensions, has been used to experimentally determine the full deformation gradient matrix for two zinc single crystals. Based on the image correlation data, the slip system activity for the two crystals has been calculated. The results of the calculation show that for one crystal, only the primary slip system is active, which is consistent with traditional theory. The other crystal however, shows appreciable deformation on slip systems other than the primary. An analysis has been conducted which confirms the experimental observation that these other slip system deform in such a manner that the net result is slip which is approximately one third the magnitude and directly orthogonal to the primary system.

  5. Prospects of Wannier functions in investigating photonic crystal all-optical devices for signal processing.

    PubMed

    Muradoglu, M S; Baghai-Wadji, A R; Ng, T W

    2010-04-01

    Wannier functions derived from Bloch functions have been identified as an efficient means of analyzing the properties of photonic crystals in which localized functions have now opened the door for 2D and 3D structures containing defects to be investigated. In this paper, based on the Maxwell equations in diagonalized form and utilizing Bloch waves we have obtained an equivalent system of algebraic equations in eigenform. By establishing and exploiting several distinct properties of the resulting eigenpairs, we demonstrate an ability to construct Wannier functions associated with the simplest one-dimensional photonic structure. More importantly, the numerical investigation of the inner- and intra-band orthonormality conditions as well as Hilbert space partitioning features shows a capability for multi-resolution analysis that will make all-optical signal processing devices with photonic crystal structures feasible.

  6. Application of photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence to a cytokine immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Patrick C; Ganesh, Nikhil; Cunningham, Brian T

    2008-12-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces are demonstrated as a means for enhancing the detection sensitivity and resolution for assays that use a fluorescent tag to quantify the concentration of an analyte protein molecule in a liquid test sample. Computer modeling of the spatial distribution of resonantly coupled electromagnetic fields on the photonic crystal surface are used to estimate the magnitude of enhancement factor compared to performing the same fluorescent assay on a plain glass surface, and the photonic crystal structure is fabricated and tested to experimentally verify the performance using a sandwich immunoassay for the protein tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha). The demonstrated photonic crystal fabrication method utilizes a nanoreplica molding technique that allows for large-area inexpensive fabrication of the structure in a format that is compatible with confocal microarray laser scanners. The signal-to-noise ratio for fluorescent spots on the photonic crystal is increased by at least 5-fold relative to the glass slide, allowing a TNF-alpha concentration of 1.6 pg/mL to be distinguished from noise on a photonic crystal surface. In addition, the minimum quantitative limit of detection on the photonic crystal surface is one-third the limit on the glass slide--a decrease from 18 to 6 pg/mL. The increased performance of the immunoassay allows for more accurate quantitation of physiologically relevant concentrations of TNF-alpha in a protein microarray format that can be expanded to multiple cytokines.

  7. Photonic crystal alloys: a new twist in controlling photonic band structure properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Dong-Uk; Roh, Young-Geun; Yu, Jaejun; Jeon, Heonsu; Park, Q-Han

    2008-04-28

    We identified new photonic structures and phenomenon that are analogous to alloy crystals and the associated electronic bandgap engineering. From a set of diamond-lattice microwave photonic crystals of randomly mixed silica and alumina spheres but with a well defined mixing composition, we observed that both bandedges of the L-point bandgap monotonically shifted with very little bowing as the composition was varied. The observed results were in excellent agreement with the virtual crystal approximation theory originally developed for electronic properties of alloy crystals. This result signifies the similarity and correspondence between photonics and electronics.

  8. 3D Dewetting for Crystal Patterning: Toward Regular Single-Crystalline Belt Arrays and Their Functionality.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuchen; Feng, Jiangang; Su, Bin; Jiang, Lei

    2016-03-16

    Arrays of unidirectional dewetting behaviors can be generated by using 3D-wettability-difference micropillars, yielding highly ordered organic single-crystalline belt arrays. These patterned organic belts show an improved mobility record and can be used as flexible pressure sensors with high sensitivity.

  9. Method of construction of composite one-dimensional photonic crystal with extended photonic band gaps.

    PubMed

    Tolmachev, V; Perova, T; Moore, R

    2005-10-17

    A method of photonic band gap extension using mixing of periodic structures with two or more consecutively placed photonic crystals with different lattice constants is proposed. For the design of the structures with maximal photonic band gap extension the gap map imposition method is utilised. Optimal structures have been established and the gap map of photonic band gaps has been calculated at normal incidence of light for both small and large optical contrast and at oblique incidence of light for small optical contrast.

  10. Three dimensional reflectance properties of superconductor-dielectric photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, G. N. Sancheti, Bhagyashree; Pandey, J. P.; Pandey, U. K.; Ojha, S. P.

    2016-05-06

    In this present communication, we have studied the optical properties of Photonics Crystals with super conducting constituent using the TMM method for a stratified medium. We also studied the three dimensional reflectance property of superconductor-dielectric photonic crystal at different temperature and thickness. From above study we show that the superconductor-dielectric photonic crystal may be used as broad band reflector and omnidirectional reflector at low temperature below to the critical temperature. Such property may be applied to make of the reflector which can be used in low temperature region.

  11. Configurable Dirac-like conical dispersions in complex photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Changqing; Lai, Yun

    2017-01-01

    We investigate Dirac-like conical dispersions in photonic crystals with complex unit cells. Comparing with photonic crystals with simple unit cells, the complex-unit-cell design can provide extra degrees of freedom to engineer the frequency of the Dirac-like point in a broad frequency regime. Interestingly, we find that many functionalities of double zero media associated with the Dirac-like point are well preserved in such complex photonic crystals, such as wave tunneling, cloaking, wave front control, etc. Different transmission behaviors, e.g., total reflection and negative refraction, can be achieved by shifting the frequency of the Dirac-like point.

  12. Compact wavelength demultiplexing using focusing negative index photonic crystal superprisms.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Babak; Huang, Jiandong; Soltani, Mohammad; Askari, Murtaza; Mohammadi, Saeed; Rakhshandehroo, Mohammad; Adibi, Ali

    2006-03-20

    Here, we demonstrate a compact photonic crystal wavelength demultiplexing device based on a diffraction compensation scheme with two orders of magnitude performance improvement over the conventional superprism structures reported to date. We show that the main problems of the conventional superprism-based wavelength demultiplexing devices can be overcome by combining the superprism effect with two other main properties of photonic crystals, i.e., negative diffraction and negative refraction. Here, a 4-channel optical demultiplexer with a channel spacing of 8 nm and cross-talk level of better than -6.5 dB is experimentally demonstrated using a 4500 microm(2) photonic crystal region.

  13. Two-dimensionally confined topological edge states in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Sabyasachi; Miyake, Hirokazu; DeGottardi, Wade; Waks, Edo; Hafezi, Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    We present an all-dielectric photonic crystal structure that supports two-dimensionally confined helical topological edge states. The topological properties of the system are controlled by the crystal parameters. An interface between two regions of differing band topologies gives rise to topological edge states confined in a dielectric slab that propagate around sharp corners without backscattering. Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain calculations show these edges to be confined in the out-of-plane direction by total internal reflection. Such nanoscale photonic crystal architectures could enable strong interactions between photonic edge states and quantum emitters.

  14. Study on a Photonic Crystal Hydrogel Material for Chemical Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia-Yu; Yan, Chun-Xiao; Hu, Xiao-Chun; Liu, Chao; Tang, Hua-Min; Zhou, Chao-Hua; Xue, Fei

    2014-01-01

    There is intense interest in the applications of photonic crystal hydrogel materials for the detection of glucose, metal ions, organophosphates and so on. In this paper, monodisperse polystyrene spheres with diameters between 100 440 nm were synthesized by emulsion polymerization. Highly charged polystyrene spheres readily self-assembled into crystalline colloidal array because of electrostatic interactions. Photonic crystal hydrogel materials were formed by polymerization of acrylamide hydrogel around the crystalline colloidal arrays of polystyrene spheres. After chemical modification of hydrogel backbone with carboxyl groups, our photonic crystals hydrogel materials are demonstrated to be excellent in response to pH and ionic strength changes.

  15. 20-junction photonic power converter performance under non-uniform illumination calculated by 3D distributed circuit model (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahal, Sanmeet; Wilkins, Mathew M.; Masson, Denis P.; Fafard, Simon; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Hinzer, Karin

    2017-04-01

    Distributed circuit models (DCM) divide photovoltaic devices into discrete elementary units. Each unit is assigned an equivalent circuit based on geometry and location, with circuit parameters being fit to or extrapolated from experimental results. Interconnection of these elementary units with ohmic resistors representing lateral and vertical resistances within the layers of the device forms the complete circuit model. DCMs allow grid design optimization, simulation of chromatic aberration, luminescent coupling and analysis of power losses due to regionally specific resistances, which are not possible with simple lumped models. Previous DCMs have been limited to 1-3 junction devices, using a 2D surface model, or use of a one-diode circuit model for the cell junctions. Furthermore, a DCM can be used to simulate complex multi-junction devices with non-uniform illumination, whereas in comprehensive physics-based simulators like Synopsys TCAD Sentaurus this would require vastly greater computational resources. In this work, a parameterized 3D distributed circuit model was developed to calculate the performance of III-V solar cells and photonic power converters (PPC) with a variable number of epitaxially stacked pn junctions. We validated these calculations against published results using a similar 3D model for a 1-junction solar cell. Furthermore, experimental results from Azastra Opto's 20-junction PPC illuminated by an 845 nm diode laser are compared. These devices are designed with many pn junctions to achieve higher voltages and to operate under non-uniform illumination profiles from a laser or LED. The effect on device performance of varying both these parameters will be discussed.

  16. Direct Writing of Three-Dimensional Macroporous Photonic Crystals on Pressure-Responsive Shape Memory Polymers.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yin; Ni, Yongliang; Leo, Sin-Yen; Wang, Bingchen; Basile, Vito; Taylor, Curtis; Jiang, Peng

    2015-10-28

    Here we report a single-step direct writing technology for making three-dimensional (3D) macroporous photonic crystal patterns on a new type of pressure-responsive shape memory polymer (SMP). This approach integrates two disparate fields that do not typically intersect: the well-established templating nanofabrication and shape memory materials. Periodic arrays of polymer macropores templated from self-assembled colloidal crystals are squeezed into disordered arrays in an unusual shape memory "cold" programming process. The recovery of the original macroporous photonic crystal lattices can be triggered by direct writing at ambient conditions using both macroscopic and nanoscopic tools, like a pencil or a nanoindenter. Interestingly, this shape memory disorder-order transition is reversible and the photonic crystal patterns can be erased and regenerated hundreds of times, promising the making of reconfigurable/rewritable nanooptical devices. Quantitative insights into the shape memory recovery of collapsed macropores induced by the lateral shear stresses in direct writing are gained through fundamental investigations on important process parameters, including the tip material, the critical pressure and writing speed for triggering the recovery of the deformed macropores, and the minimal feature size that can be directly written on the SMP membranes. Besides straightforward applications in photonic crystal devices, these smart mechanochromic SMPs that are sensitive to various mechanical stresses could render important technological applications ranging from chromogenic stress and impact sensors to rewritable high-density optical data storage media.

  17. Integral scaling behavior of different morphologies of 3D xenon crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, H. M.; Bilgram, J. H.

    2006-07-01

    Three-dimensional crystals have been observed in situ during the growth from supercooled melt. Depending on growth conditions three crystal morphologies were formed: dendrites, doublons and seaweed. Fractal dimensions of contour and area have been determined using correlation and box dimension techniques. Algorithms have been developed on the basis of fractal geometry to extract quantities from contour and area of projections of a crystal to characterise the crystal morphology. A method is presented to find hidden length scales in apparently scale invariant physical systems. We show that intrinsic length scales found by this method can be used to characterise morphologies of xenon crystals. It is shown that scaling relations by conventional tools of fractal geometry omit important intrinsical behavior and provide only averaged quantities.

  18. Ultralow-loss polycrystalline silicon waveguides and high uniformity 1x12 MMI fanout for 3D photonic integration.

    PubMed

    Kwong, David; Covey, John; Hosseini, Amir; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Xiaochuan; Chen, Ray T

    2012-09-10

    We have investigated the feasibility of multimode polysilicon waveguides to demonstrate the suitability of polysilicon as a candidate for multilayer photonic applications. Solid Phase Crystallization (SPC) with a maximum temperature of 1000°C is used to create polysilicon on thermally grown SiO2. We then measure the propagation losses for various waveguide widths on both polysilicon and crystalline silicon platforms. We find that as the width increases for polysilicon waveguides, the propagation loss decreases similar to crystalline silicon waveguides. At a waveguide width of 10 µm, polysilicon and crystalline silicon waveguides have propagation losses of 0.56 dB/cm and 0.31 dB/cm, respectively, indicating there is little bulk absorption from the polysilicon and is the lowest propagation loss for polysilicon demonstrated to date. In addition, the first 1x12 polysilicon MMI is demonstrated with a low insertion loss of -1.29dB and a high uniformity of 1.07 dB. These results vindicate the use of polysilicon waveguides of varying widths in photonic integrated circuits.

  19. High-Q photonic crystal cavities in all-semiconductor photonic crystal heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushell, Z. L.; Florescu, M.; Sweeney, S. J.

    2017-06-01

    Photonic crystal cavities enable the realization of high Q-factor and low mode-volume resonators, with typical architectures consisting of a thin suspended periodically patterned layer to maximize confinement of light by strong index guiding. We investigate a heterostructure-based approach comprising a high refractive index core and lower refractive index cladding layers. While confinement typically decreases with decreasing index contrast between the core and cladding layers, we show that, counterintuitively, due to the confinement provided by the photonic band structure in the cladding layers, it becomes possible to achieve Q factors >104 with only a small refractive index contrast. This opens up opportunities for implementing high-Q factor cavities in conventional semiconductor heterostructures, with direct applications to the design of electrically pumped nanocavity lasers using conventional fabrication approaches.

  20. Two-pattern compound photonic crystals with a large complete photonic band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Lin; Thomas, Edwin L.

    2011-09-15

    We present a set of two-dimensional aperiodic structures with a large complete photonic band gap (PBG), which are named two-pattern photonic crystals. By superposing two substructures without regard to registration, we designed six new aperiodic PBG structures having a complete PBG larger than 15% for {epsilon}{sub 2}/{epsilon}{sub 1} = 11.4. The rod-honeycomb two-pattern photonic crystal provides the largest complete PBG to date. An aperiodic structure becomes the champion structure with the largest PBG. Surprisingly, the TM and TE gaps of a two-pattern photonic crystal are much less interdependent than the PBGs of conventional photonic crystals proposed before, affording interesting capabilities for us to tune the TM and TE PBGs separately. By altering the respective substructures, optical devices for different polarizations (TE, TM, or both) can readily be designed.

  1. Nanoplasmonic photonic crystal diatoms and phytoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Mark P.; Hajiaboli, Ahmadreza; Hiltz, Jonathan; Gonzalez, Timothy; Singh, Gursimranbir; Lennox, R. Bruce

    2011-03-01

    Evidence is emerging that silica-containing plant cells (phytoliths) and single cell micro-organisms (diatoms) exhibit optical properties reminiscent of photonic crystals. In the latter biosilicates, these properties appear to arise from light interactions with the intricate periodic patterns of micro- and nano-pores called foramina that are distributed over the frustule (outer silica shell). In this report, we show that Nitzschia Closterium pennate diatom frustules can be used to template arrays of nanoplasmonic particles to confer more complex physical properties, as shown by simulation and experiment. Selective templating of silver and gold nanoparticles in and around the array of pores was achieved by topochemical functionalization with nanoparticles deposited from solution, or by differential wetting/dewetting of evaporated gold films. The nanoplasmonic diatom frustules exhibit surface enhanced Raman scattering from chemisorbed 4-aminothiophenol. Thermally induced dewetting of gold films deposited on a frustule produces two classes of faceted gold nanoparticles. Larger particles of irregular shape are distributed with some degree of uniaxial anisotropy on the surface of the frustule. Smaller particles of more uniform size are deposited in a periodic manner in the frustule pores. It is thought that surface curvature and defects drive the hydrodynamic dewetting events that give rise to the different classes of nanoparticles. Finite difference time domain calculations on an idealized nanoplasmonic frustule suggest a complex electromagnetic field response due to coupling between localized surface plasmon modes of the nanoparticles in the foramina and an overlayer gold film.

  2. Photonic crystal cavities and integrated optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Lin; Li, ZhiYuan

    2015-11-01

    This paper gives a brief introduction to our recent works on photonic crystal (PhC) cavities and related integrated optical structures and devices. Theoretical background and numerical methods for simulation of PhC cavities are first presented. Based on the theoretical basis, two relevant quantities, the cavity mode volume and the quality factor are discussed. Then the methods of fabrication and characterization of silicon PhC slab cavities are introduced. Several types of PhC cavities are presented, such as the usual L3 missing-hole cavity, the new concept waveguide-like parallel-hetero cavity, and the low-index nanobeam cavity. The advantages and disadvantages of each type of cavity are discussed. This will help the readers to decide which type of PhC cavities to use in particular applications. Furthermore, several integrated optical devices based on PhC cavities, such as optical filters, channel-drop filters, optical switches, and optical logic gates are described in both the working principle and operation characteristics. These devices designed and realized in our group demonstrate the wide range of applications of PhC cavities and offer possible solutions to some integrated optical problems.

  3. Optics in Microstructured and Photonic Crystal Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, J. C.

    2008-10-01

    The development of optical fibers with two-dimensional patterns of air holes running down their length has reinvigorated research in the field of fiber optics. It has greatly—and fundamentally—broadened the range of specialty optical fibers, by demonstrating that optical fibers can be more "special" than previously thought. Fibers with air cores have made it possible to deliver energetic femtosecond-scale optical pulses, transform limited, as solitons, using single-mode fiber. Other fibers with anomalous dispersion at visible wavelengths have spawned a new generation of single-mode optical supercontinuum sources, spanning visible and near-infrared wavelengths and based on compact pump sources. A third example is in the field of fiber lasers, where the use of photonic crystal fiber concepts has led to a new hybrid laser technology, in which the very high numerical aperture available sing air holes have enabled fibers so short they are more naturally held straight than bent. This paper describes some of the basic physics and technology behind these developments, illustrated with some of the impressive demonstrations of the past 18 months.

  4. Photochemistry in photonic crystal fiber nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jocelyn S Y; Euser, Tijmen G; Farrer, Nicola J; Sadler, Peter J; Scharrer, Michael; Russell, Philip St J

    2010-05-17

    We report the use of a liquid-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) as a highly controlled photochemical reactor. Hollow-core PCFs have several major advantages over conventional sample cells: the sample volume per optical path length is very small (2.8 nL cm(-1) in the fiber used), long optical path lengths are possible as a result of very low intrinsic waveguide loss, and furthermore the light travels in a diffractionless single mode with a constant transverse intensity profile. As a proof of principle, the (very low) quantum yield of the photochemical conversion of vitamin B(12), cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) to hydroxocobalamin ([H(2)OCbl](+)) in aqueous solution was measured for several pH values from 2.5 to 7.5. The dynamics of the actively induced reaction were monitored in real-time by broadband absorption spectroscopy. The PCF nanoreactor required ten thousand times less sample volume compared to conventional techniques. Furthermore, the enhanced sensitivity and optical pump intensity implied that even systems with very small quantum yields can be measured very quickly--in our experiments one thousand times faster than in a conventional cuvette.

  5. Challenges in characterization of photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzycki, Krzysztof; Kobelke, Jens; Mergo, Pawel; Schuster, Kay

    2011-05-01

    We present experience with photonic crystal fiber (PCF) characterization during COST Action 299, focusing on phenomena causing errors and ways to mitigate them. PCFs developed at IPHT Jena (Germany; UMCS Lublin, Poland), designed for single mode operation were coupled to test instruments by fusion splicing to intermediate lengths of telecom single mode fibers (SMF). PCF samples were short (0.5-100 m), with 20-70 dB/km attenuation at 1310 nm and 1550 nm. Optical Time Domain Reflectometer (OTDR) was best for measuring loss as most PCFs produced strong backscattering, while variable splice losses and difficulties with PCF cleaving for optical power measurements made cutback and insertion loss measurements inaccurate. Experience with PCF handling and cleaving is also reviewed. Quality of splices to fiber under test was critical. Excitation of higher order modes produced strong "noise" during measurements of polarization parameters like PMD or PDL. Multimode propagation and vibration-induced interference precluded testing of fine dependence of PMD on temperature or strain, causing random variations comparable to true changes of PMD. OTDR measurements were not affected, but testing of short fiber sections with very different backscattering intensities puts special demands on instrument performance. Temperature testing of liquid-infiltrated PCF was time-consuming, as settling of parameters after temperature change took up to 40 minutes. PCFs were fragile, breaking below 2% linear expansion, sometimes in unusual way when twisted.

  6. Functional photonic crystal fiber sensing devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villatoro, Joel; Finazzi, Vittoria; Pruneri, Valerio

    2011-12-01

    We report on a functional, highly reproducible and cost effective sensing platform based on photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). The platform consists of a centimeter-length segment of an index-guiding PCF fusion spliced to standard single mode fibers (SMFs). The voids of the PCF are intentionally sealed over an adequate length in the PCF-SMF interfaces. A microscopic collapsed region in the PCF induces a mode field mismatch which combined with the axial symmetry of the structure allow the efficient excitation and recombination or overlapping of azimuthal symmetric modes in the PCF. The transmission or reflection spectrum of the devices exhibits a high-visibility interference pattern or a single, profound and narrow notch. The interference pattern or the notch position shifts when the length of the PCF experiences microelongations or when liquids or coatings are present on the PCF surface. Thus, the platform here proposed can be useful for sensing diverse parameters such as strain, vibration, pressure, humidity, refractive index, gases, etc. Unlike other PCF-based sensing platforms the multiplexing of the devices here proposed is simple for which it is possible to implement PCF-based sensor arrays or networks.

  7. Slow-light-enhanced gain in active photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ek, Sara; Lunnemann, Per; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2014-09-01

    Passive photonic crystals have been shown to exhibit a multitude of interesting phenomena, including slow-light propagation in line-defect waveguides. It was suggested that by incorporating an active material in the waveguide, slow light could be used to enhance the effective gain of the material, which would have interesting application prospects, for example enabling ultra-compact optical amplifiers for integration in photonic chips. Here we experimentally investigate the gain of a photonic crystal membrane structure with embedded quantum wells. We find that by solely changing the photonic crystal structural parameters, the maximum value of the gain coefficient can be increased compared with a ridge waveguide structure and at the same time the spectral position of the peak gain be controlled. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theory and show that gain values similar to those realized in state-of-the-art semiconductor optical amplifiers should be attainable in compact photonic integrated amplifiers.

  8. Photonic crystals for improving light absorption in organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duché, D. Le Rouzo, J.; Masclaux, C.; Gourgon, C.

    2015-02-07

    We theoretically and experimentally study the structuration of organic solar cells in the shape of photonic crystal slabs. By taking advantage of the optical properties of photonic crystals slabs, we show the possibility to couple Bloch modes with very low group velocities in the active layer of the cells. These Bloch modes, also called slow Bloch modes (SBMs), allow increasing the lifetime of photons within the active layer. Finally, we present experimental demonstration performed by using nanoimprint to directly pattern the standard poly-3-hexylthiophène:[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butiryc acid methyl ester organic semiconductor blend in thin film form in the shape of a photonic crystal able to couple SBMs. In agreement with the model, optical characterizations will demonstrate significant photonic absorption gains.

  9. Slow-light-enhanced gain in active photonic crystal waveguides.

    PubMed

    Ek, Sara; Lunnemann, Per; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mork, Jesper

    2014-09-30

    Passive photonic crystals have been shown to exhibit a multitude of interesting phenomena, including slow-light propagation in line-defect waveguides. It was suggested that by incorporating an active material in the waveguide, slow light could be used to enhance the effective gain of the material, which would have interesting application prospects, for example enabling ultra-compact optical amplifiers for integration in photonic chips. Here we experimentally investigate the gain of a photonic crystal membrane structure with embedded quantum wells. We find that by solely changing the photonic crystal structural parameters, the maximum value of the gain coefficient can be increased compared with a ridge waveguide structure and at the same time the spectral position of the peak gain be controlled. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theory and show that gain values similar to those realized in state-of-the-art semiconductor optical amplifiers should be attainable in compact photonic integrated amplifiers.

  10. High optical bandwidth GaN based photonic-crystal light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tung-Ching; Yin, Yu-Feng; Lan, Wen-Yi; Huang, JianJang

    2016-09-01

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) for visible light communication (VLC) as radio sources is a solution to channel crowding of radio frequency (RF) signal. However, for the application on high-speed communication, getting higher bandwidth of LEDs is always the problem which is limited by the spontaneous carrier lifetime in the multiple quantum wells. In this paper, we proposed GaN-based LEDs accompanied with photonic crystal (PhC) nanostructure for high speed communication. Using the characteristic of photonic band selection in photonic crystal structure, the guided modes are modulated by RF signal. The PhC can also provide faster mode extraction. From time resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) at room temperature, carrier lifetime of both lower- and higher-order modes is shortened. By observing f-3dB -J curve, it reveals that the bandwidth of PhC LEDs is higher than that of typical LED. The optical - 3-dB bandwidth (f-3dB) can be achieved up to 240 MHz in the PhC LED (PhCLED). We conclude that the higher operation speed can be obtained due to faster radiative carrier recombination of extracted guided modes from the PhC nanostructure.

  11. Correlating Intravital Multi-Photon Microscopy to 3D Electron Microscopy of Invading Tumor Cells Using Anatomical Reference Points

    PubMed Central

    Karreman, Matthia A.; Mercier, Luc; Schieber, Nicole L.; Shibue, Tsukasa; Schwab, Yannick; Goetz, Jacky G.

    2014-01-01

    Correlative microscopy combines the advantages of both light and electron microscopy to enable imaging of rare and transient events at high resolution. Performing correlative microscopy in complex and bulky samples such as an entire living organism is a time-consuming and error-prone task. Here, we investigate correlative methods that rely on the use of artificial and endogenous structural features of the sample as reference points for correlating intravital fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. To investigate tumor cell behavior in vivo with ultrastructural accuracy, a reliable approach is needed to retrieve single tumor cells imaged deep within the tissue. For this purpose, fluorescently labeled tumor cells were subcutaneously injected into a mouse ear and imaged using two-photon-excitation microscopy. Using near-infrared branding, the position of the imaged area within the sample was labeled at the skin level, allowing for its precise recollection. Following sample preparation for electron microscopy, concerted usage of the artificial branding and anatomical landmarks enables targeting and approaching the cells of interest while serial sectioning through the specimen. We describe here three procedures showing how three-dimensional (3D) mapping of structural features in the tissue can be exploited to accurately correlate between the two imaging modalities, without having to rely on the use of artificially introduced markers of the region of interest. The methods employed here facilitate the link between intravital and nanoscale imaging of invasive tumor cells, enabling correlating function to structure in the study of tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:25479106

  12. Volumetric label-free imaging and 3D reconstruction of mammalian cochlea based on two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Geng, Yang; Ye, Qing; Zhan, Zhenlin; Xie, Shusen

    2013-11-01

    The visualization of the delicate structure and spatial relationship of intracochlear sensory cells has relied on the laborious procedures of tissue excision, fixation, sectioning and staining for light and electron microscopy. Confocal microscopy is advantageous for its high resolution and deep penetration depth, yet disadvantageous due to the necessity of exogenous labeling. In this study, we present the volumetric imaging of rat cochlea without exogenous dyes using a near-infrared femtosecond laser as the excitation mechanism and endogenous two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) as the contrast mechanism. We find that TPEF exhibits strong contrast, allowing cellular and even subcellular resolution imaging of the cochlea, differentiating cell types, visualizing delicate structures and the radial nerve fiber. Our results further demonstrate that 3D reconstruction rendered with z-stacks of optical sections enables better revealment of fine structures and spatial relationships, and easily performed morphometric analysis. The TPEF-based optical biopsy technique provides great potential for new and sensitive diagnostic tools for hearing loss or hearing disorders, especially when combined with fiber-based microendoscopy.

  13. Imaging brain vasculature with BOLD 3D microscopy: MR detection limits determined by in vivo two-photon microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Hong; Masamoto, Kazuto; Hendrich, Kristy; Kanno, Iwao; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2008-01-01

    Rat brain vasculature was imaged at 9.4 T with blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) microscopy. Data were acquired without exogenous contrast agent in < 35 min using 3D gradient-echo imaging with 78-μm isotropic resolution (N = 6). Detailed vascular patterns including intracortical veins and some branches were observed in simple magnitude-contrast data acquired at an experimentally-optimized echo time. The venous origin of the dark patterns was confirmed by oxygenation-dependent studies, and when the systemic arterial oxygen saturation level was < 80%, BOLD microscopy revealed additional intracortical vessels presumed to be of arterial orgin. Quantification shows a decrease of intracortical venous density with depth. The full width at half-minimum intensity was 90–190 μm for most intracortical venous vessels identifiable by BOLD venography. Since actual diameters are not directly quantifiable by BOLD, we also measured diameter-dependent intracortical venous density in vivo by two-photon excitation fluorescent microscopy (N = 5). Density comparisons between the two modalities, along with computer simulations, show that venous vessels as small as ~16–30 μm diameter are detectable with 9.4-T BOLD microscopy under our experimental conditions. PMID:18383285

  14. Intracellular nanomanipulation by a photonic-force microscope with real-time acquisition of a 3D stiffness matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertseva, E.; Singh, A. S. G.; Lekki, J.; Thévenaz, P.; Lekka, M.; Jeney, S.; Gremaud, G.; Puttini, S.; Nowak, W.; Dietler, G.; Forró, L.; Unser, M.; Kulik, A. J.

    2009-07-01

    A traditional photonic-force microscope (PFM) results in huge sets of data, which requires tedious numerical analysis. In this paper, we propose instead an analog signal processor to attain real-time capabilities while retaining the richness of the traditional PFM data. Our system is devoted to intracellular measurements and is fully interactive through the use of a haptic joystick. Using our specialized analog hardware along with a dedicated algorithm, we can extract the full 3D stiffness matrix of the optical trap in real time, including the off-diagonal cross-terms. Our system is also capable of simultaneously recording data for subsequent offline analysis. This allows us to check that a good correlation exists between the classical analysis of stiffness and our real-time measurements. We monitor the PFM beads using an optical microscope. The force-feedback mechanism of the haptic joystick helps us in interactively guiding the bead inside living cells and collecting information from its (possibly anisotropic) environment. The instantaneous stiffness measurements are also displayed in real time on a graphical user interface. The whole system has been built and is operational; here we present early results that confirm the consistency of the real-time measurements with offline computations.

  15. Metallic dielectric photonic crystals and methods of fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Jeffrey Brian; Kim, Sang-Gook

    2016-12-20

    A metallic-dielectric photonic crystal is formed with a periodic structure defining a plurality of resonant cavities to selectively absorb incident radiation. A metal layer is deposited on the inner surfaces of the resonant cavities and a dielectric material fills inside the resonant cavities. This photonic crystal can be used to selectively absorb broadband solar radiation and then reemit absorbed radiation in a wavelength band that matches the absorption band of a photovoltaic cell. The photonic crystal can be fabricated by patterning a sacrificial layer with a plurality of holes, into which is deposited a supporting material. Removing the rest of the sacrificial layer creates a supporting structure, on which a layer of metal is deposited to define resonant cavities. A dielectric material then fills the cavities to form the photonic crystal.

  16. Birefringence property of asymmetric structure photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingsheng; Yue, Yingjuan; Li, Yan

    2010-12-01

    The random offset of hole-position or random variation of hole-diameter always occur during the actual manufacture process of asymmetric structure photonic crystal fibers. Birefringence of asymmetric photonic crystal fibers with circular air holes and photonic crystal fibers with elliptical air holes are studied numerically based on the finite element method under the perturbation circumstance. The results indicate that when the intrinsic-birefringence of asymmetric photonic crystal fiber is smaller, the random offset of hole-position has larger influence than the variation of hole-diameter. Birefringence resulted from perturbation is less sensitive to asymmetric structures with large pitch or small air-hole. Moreover, the desired birefringence can be obtained by controlling the relative size of the two air holes or the ellipticity of the elliptical-hole.

  17. The research on a photonic-crystal fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yong; Cheng, Yi

    2009-07-01

    To study the photonic-crystal fiber applied in the chemical sensor, the photonic-crystal fiber was used as transmission medium. With Sol-Gel method, we selective coated thin film containing fluorescent probe in the photonic-crystal fiber core, then attained an excellent photonic-crystal fiber acetylcholinesterase sensor. The sensor could be applied in biological / chemical research, clinical medicine, environmental protection, food inspection, biochemical preventive war field and so on. In organophosphorus pesticide residue testing, the experimental results indicated that the linear measurement range could arrive to 1×10-9~ 1×10-3 mol/L, moreover the detection limit is 1×10-10 mol/L.

  18. Narrow linewidth operation of buried-heterostructure photonic crystal nanolaser.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jimyung; Shinya, Akihiko; Nozaki, Kengo; Taniyama, Hideaki; Chen, Chin-Hui; Sato, Tomonari; Matsuo, Shinji; Notomi, Masaya

    2012-05-21

    We investigate the spectral linewidth of a monolithic photonic crystal nanocavity laser. The nanocavity laser is based on a buried heterostructure cavity in which an ultra-small InGaAsP active region is embedded in an InP photonic crystal. Although it was difficult to achieve narrow linewidth operation in previously reported photonic crystal nanocavity lasers, we have successfully demonstrated a linewidth of 143.5 MHz, which is far narrower than the cold cavity linewidth and the narrowest value yet reported for nanolasers and photonic crystal lasers. The narrow linewidth is accompanied by a low power consumption and an ultrasmall footprint, thus making this particular laser especially suitable for use as an integrated multi-purpose sensor.

  19. All-optical gates based on photonic crystal resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moille, Grégory; De Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain

    2016-04-01

    We briefly review the technology of advanced nonlinear resonators for all-optical gating with a specific focus on the application of high-performance signal sampling and on the properties of III-V semiconductor photonic crystals

  20. Imaging of Protein Crystals with Two-Photon Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Padayatti, Pius; Palczewska, Grazyna; Sun, Wenyu; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Salom, David

    2012-05-02

    Second-order nonlinear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC), which portrays second-harmonic generation (SHG) by noncentrosymmetric crystals, is emerging as a powerful imaging technique for protein crystals in media opaque to visible light because of its high signal-to-noise ratio. Here we report the incorporation of both SONICC and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) into one imaging system that allows visualization of crystals as small as 10 {mu}m in their longest dimension. Using this system, we then documented an inverse correlation between the level of symmetry in examined crystals and the intensity of their SHG. Moreover, because of blue-green TPEF exhibited by most tested protein crystals, we also could identify and image SHG-silent protein crystals. Our experimental data suggest that the TPEF in protein crystals is mainly caused by the oxidation of tryptophan residues. Additionally, we found that unspecific fluorescent dyes are able to bind to lysozyme crystals and enhance their detection by TPEF. We finally confirmed that the observed fluorescence was generated by a two-photon rather than a three-photon process. The capability for imaging small protein crystals in turbid or opaque media with nondamaging infrared light in a single system makes the combination of SHG and intrinsic visible TPEF a powerful tool for nondestructive protein crystal identification and characterization during crystallization trials.