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Sample records for 3d planimetry technique

  1. Assessing 3d Photogrammetry Techniques in Craniometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshobane, M. C.; de Bruyn, P. J. N.; Bester, M. N.

    2016-06-01

    Morphometrics (the measurement of morphological features) has been revolutionized by the creation of new techniques to study how organismal shape co-varies with several factors such as ecophenotypy. Ecophenotypy refers to the divergence of phenotypes due to developmental changes induced by local environmental conditions, producing distinct ecophenotypes. None of the techniques hitherto utilized could explicitly address organismal shape in a complete biological form, i.e. three-dimensionally. This study investigates the use of the commercial software, Photomodeler Scanner® (PMSc®) three-dimensional (3D) modelling software to produce accurate and high-resolution 3D models. Henceforth, the modelling of Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) and Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella) skulls which could allow for 3D measurements. Using this method, sixteen accurate 3D skull models were produced and five metrics were determined. The 3D linear measurements were compared to measurements taken manually with a digital caliper. In addition, repetitive measurements were recorded by varying researchers to determine repeatability. To allow for comparison straight line measurements were taken with the software, assuming that close accord with all manually measured features would illustrate the model's accurate replication of reality. Measurements were not significantly different demonstrating that realistic 3D skull models can be successfully produced to provide a consistent basis for craniometrics, with the additional benefit of allowing non-linear measurements if required.

  2. Microcomputer-based technique for 3-D reconstruction and volume measurement of computer tomographic images. Part 1: Phantom studies.

    PubMed

    Albright, R E; Fram, E K

    1988-12-01

    This paper presents a microcomputer-based technique that accurately quantifies volumes from computed tomographic (CT) scans of irregularly shaped objects as well as displaying 3-D reconstructions. The method uses standard CT film, allowing analysis of previous or outside CT studies. The planimetry method showed less than 5% error in measuring irregular 2-D areas larger than 6 mm2. The method is demonstrated to be significantly more accurate than spherical, ellipsoid, or rectangular geometric models in quantifying object volume by CT (P less than .001). With a single gantry angle, planimetry showed a two standard deviation error under 10% in measuring the volume of irregular objects compared with an error over 30% for ellipsoid models. The inaccuracy of the spherical model (80% error) and the rectangular prism model (192% error) renders them impractical to provide quantitative object volume. Microcomputer planimetry provides an accurate and versatile means to measure the volume and produce 3-D reconstructions of objects scanned with CT, and it has potential application in quantifying tumor response with CT and magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. A 3-D chimera grid embedding technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benek, J. A.; Buning, P. G.; Steger, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) chimera grid-embedding technique is described. The technique simplifies the construction of computational grids about complex geometries. The method subdivides the physical domain into regions which can accommodate easily generated grids. Communication among the grids is accomplished by interpolation of the dependent variables at grid boundaries. The procedures for constructing the composite mesh and the associated data structures are described. The method is demonstrated by solution of the Euler equations for the transonic flow about a wing/body, wing/body/tail, and a configuration of three ellipsoidal bodies.

  4. Techniques for interactive 3-D scientific visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Glinert, E.P. . Dept. of Computer Science); Blattner, M.M. Hospital and Tumor Inst., Houston, TX . Dept. of Biomathematics California Univ., Davis, CA . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Becker, B.G. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National La

    1990-09-24

    Interest in interactive 3-D graphics has exploded of late, fueled by (a) the allure of using scientific visualization to go where no-one has gone before'' and (b) by the development of new input devices which overcome some of the limitations imposed in the past by technology, yet which may be ill-suited to the kinds of interaction required by researchers active in scientific visualization. To resolve this tension, we propose a flat 5-D'' environment in which 2-D graphics are augmented by exploiting multiple human sensory modalities using cheap, conventional hardware readily available with personal computers and workstations. We discuss how interactions basic to 3-D scientific visualization, like searching a solution space and comparing two such spaces, are effectively carried out in our environment. Finally, we describe 3DMOVE, an experimental microworld we have implemented to test out some of our ideas. 40 refs., 4 figs.

  5. 3D Modeling Techniques for Print and Digital Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Megan Ashley

    In developing my thesis, I looked to gain skills using ZBrush to create 3D models, 3D scanning, and 3D printing. The models created compared the hearts of several vertebrates and were intended for students attending Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. I used several resources to create a model of the human heart and was able to work from life while creating heart models from other vertebrates. I successfully learned ZBrush and 3D scanning, and successfully printed 3D heart models. ZBrush allowed me to create several intricate models for use in both animation and print media. The 3D scanning technique did not fit my needs for the project, but may be of use for later projects. I was able to 3D print using two different techniques as well.

  6. On Alternative Approaches to 3D Image Perception: Monoscopic 3D Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, Barry G.

    2015-06-01

    In the eighteenth century, techniques that enabled a strong sense of 3D perception to be experienced without recourse to binocular disparities (arising from the spatial separation of the eyes) underpinned the first significant commercial sales of 3D viewing devices and associated content. However following the advent of stereoscopic techniques in the nineteenth century, 3D image depiction has become inextricably linked to binocular parallax and outside the vision science and arts communities relatively little attention has been directed towards earlier approaches. Here we introduce relevant concepts and terminology and consider a number of techniques and optical devices that enable 3D perception to be experienced on the basis of planar images rendered from a single vantage point. Subsequently we allude to possible mechanisms for non-binocular parallax based 3D perception. Particular attention is given to reviewing areas likely to be thought-provoking to those involved in 3D display development, spatial visualization, HCI, and other related areas of interdisciplinary research.

  7. Optimization Techniques for 3D Graphics Deployment on Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskela, Timo; Vatjus-Anttila, Jarkko

    2015-03-01

    3D Internet technologies are becoming essential enablers in many application areas including games, education, collaboration, navigation and social networking. The use of 3D Internet applications with mobile devices provides location-independent access and richer use context, but also performance issues. Therefore, one of the important challenges facing 3D Internet applications is the deployment of 3D graphics on mobile devices. In this article, we present an extensive survey on optimization techniques for 3D graphics deployment on mobile devices and qualitatively analyze the applicability of each technique from the standpoints of visual quality, performance and energy consumption. The analysis focuses on optimization techniques related to data-driven 3D graphics deployment, because it supports off-line use, multi-user interaction, user-created 3D graphics and creation of arbitrary 3D graphics. The outcome of the analysis facilitates the development and deployment of 3D Internet applications on mobile devices and provides guidelines for future research.

  8. Wound Measurement Techniques: Comparing the Use of Ruler Method, 2D Imaging and 3D Scanner.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aj; Wollak, C; Shah, J B

    2013-12-01

    The statistics on the growing number of non-healing wounds is alarming. In the United States, chronic wounds affect 6.5 million patients. An estimated US $25 billion is spent annually on treatment of chronic wounds and the burden is rapidly growing due to increasing health care costs, an aging population and a sharp rise in the incidence of diabetes and obesity worldwide.(1) Accurate wound measurement techniques will help health care personnel to monitor the wounds which will indirectly help improving care.(7,9) The clinical practice of measuring wounds has not improved even today.(2,3) A common method like the ruler method to measure wounds has poor interrater and intrarater reliability.(2,3) Measuring the greatest length by the greatest width perpendicular to the greatest length, the perpendicular method, is more valid and reliable than other ruler based methods.(2) Another common method like acetate tracing is more accurate than the ruler method but still has its disadvantages. These common measurement techniques are time consuming with variable inaccuracies. In this study, volumetric measurements taken with a non-contact 3-D scanner are benchmarked against the common ruler method, acetate grid tracing, and 2-D image planimetry volumetric measurement technique. A liquid volumetric fill method is used as the control volume. Results support the hypothesis that the 3-D scanner consistently shows accurate volumetric measurements in comparison to standard volumetric measurements obtained by the waterfill technique (average difference of 11%). The 3-D scanner measurement technique was found more reliable and valid compared to other three techniques, the ruler method (average difference of 75%), acetate grid tracing (average difference of 41%), and 2D planimetric measurements (average difference of 52%). Acetate tracing showed more accurate measurements compared to the ruler method (average difference of 41% (acetate tracing) compared to 75% (ruler method)). Improving

  9. Wound Measurement Techniques: Comparing the Use of Ruler Method, 2D Imaging and 3D Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aj; Wollak, C.; Shah, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    The statistics on the growing number of non-healing wounds is alarming. In the United States, chronic wounds affect 6.5 million patients. An estimated US $25 billion is spent annually on treatment of chronic wounds and the burden is rapidly growing due to increasing health care costs, an aging population and a sharp rise in the incidence of diabetes and obesity worldwide.1 Accurate wound measurement techniques will help health care personnel to monitor the wounds which will indirectly help improving care.7,9 The clinical practice of measuring wounds has not improved even today.2,3 A common method like the ruler method to measure wounds has poor interrater and intrarater reliability.2,3 Measuring the greatest length by the greatest width perpendicular to the greatest length, the perpendicular method, is more valid and reliable than other ruler based methods.2 Another common method like acetate tracing is more accurate than the ruler method but still has its disadvantages. These common measurement techniques are time consuming with variable inaccuracies. In this study, volumetric measurements taken with a non-contact 3-D scanner are benchmarked against the common ruler method, acetate grid tracing, and 2-D image planimetry volumetric measurement technique. A liquid volumetric fill method is used as the control volume. Results support the hypothesis that the 3-D scanner consistently shows accurate volumetric measurements in comparison to standard volumetric measurements obtained by the waterfill technique (average difference of 11%). The 3-D scanner measurement technique was found more reliable and valid compared to other three techniques, the ruler method (average difference of 75%), acetate grid tracing (average difference of 41%), and 2D planimetric measurements (average difference of 52%). Acetate tracing showed more accurate measurements compared to the ruler method (average difference of 41% (acetate tracing) compared to 75% (ruler method)). Improving the

  10. DYNAMIC 3D QSAR TECHNIQUES: APPLICATIONS IN TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two dynamic techniques recently developed to account for conformational flexibility of chemicals in 3D QSARs are presented. In addition to the impact of conformational flexibility of chemicals in 3D QSAR models, the applicability of various molecular descriptors is discussed. The...

  11. Summary on several key techniques in 3D geological modeling.

    PubMed

    Mei, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Several key techniques in 3D geological modeling including planar mesh generation, spatial interpolation, and surface intersection are summarized in this paper. Note that these techniques are generic and widely used in various applications but play a key role in 3D geological modeling. There are two essential procedures in 3D geological modeling: the first is the simulation of geological interfaces using geometric surfaces and the second is the building of geological objects by means of various geometric computations such as the intersection of surfaces. Discrete geometric surfaces that represent geological interfaces can be generated by creating planar meshes first and then spatially interpolating; those surfaces intersect and then form volumes that represent three-dimensional geological objects such as rock bodies. In this paper, the most commonly used algorithms of the key techniques in 3D geological modeling are summarized.

  12. Summary on Several Key Techniques in 3D Geological Modeling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Several key techniques in 3D geological modeling including planar mesh generation, spatial interpolation, and surface intersection are summarized in this paper. Note that these techniques are generic and widely used in various applications but play a key role in 3D geological modeling. There are two essential procedures in 3D geological modeling: the first is the simulation of geological interfaces using geometric surfaces and the second is the building of geological objects by means of various geometric computations such as the intersection of surfaces. Discrete geometric surfaces that represent geological interfaces can be generated by creating planar meshes first and then spatially interpolating; those surfaces intersect and then form volumes that represent three-dimensional geological objects such as rock bodies. In this paper, the most commonly used algorithms of the key techniques in 3D geological modeling are summarized. PMID:24772029

  13. Laser origami: a new technique for assembling 3D microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqué, Alberto; Mathews, Scott A.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Birnbaum, Andrew J.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to manufacture and assemble complex three-dimensional (3D) systems via traditional photolithographic techniques has attracted increasing attention. However, most of the work to date still utilizes the traditional patterning and etching processes designed for the semiconductor industry where 2D structures are first fabricated, followed by some alternative technique for releasing these structures out-of-plane. Here we present a novel technique called Laser Origami, which has demonstrated the ability to generate 3D microstructures through the controlled out-of-plane folding of 2D patterns. This non-lithographic, and non silicon-based process is capable of microfabricating 3D structures of arbitrary shape and geometric complexity on a variety of substrates. The Laser Origami technique allows for the design and fabrication of arrays of 3D microstructures, where each microstructure can be made to fold independently of the others. Application of these folded micro-assemblies might make possible the development of highly complex and interconnected electrical, optical and mechanical 3D systems. This article will describe the unique advantages and capabilities of Laser Origami, discuss its applications and explore its role for the assembly and generation of 3D microstructures.

  14. Postprocessing techniques for 3D non-linear structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    How graphics postprocessing techniques are currently used to examine the results of 3-D nonlinear analyses, some new techniques which take advantage of recent technology, and how these results relate to both the finite element model and its geometric parent are reviewed.

  15. Case study: The Avengers 3D: cinematic techniques and digitally created 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Graham D.

    2013-03-01

    Marvel's THE AVENGERS was the third film Stereo D collaborated on with Marvel; it was a summation of our artistic development of what Digitally Created 3D and Stereo D's artists and toolsets affords Marvel's filmmakers; the ability to shape stereographic space to support the film and story, in a way that balances human perception and live photography. We took our artistic lead from the cinematic intentions of Marvel, the Director Joss Whedon, and Director of Photography Seamus McGarvey. In the digital creation of a 3D film from a 2D image capture, recommendations to the filmmakers cinematic techniques are offered by Stereo D at each step from pre-production onwards, through set, into post. As the footage arrives at our facility we respond in depth to the cinematic qualities of the imagery in context of the edit and story, with the guidance of the Directors and Studio, creating stereoscopic imagery. Our involvement in The Avengers was early in production, after reading the script we had the opportunity and honor to meet and work with the Director Joss Whedon, and DP Seamus McGarvey on set, and into post. We presented what is obvious to such great filmmakers in the ways of cinematic techniques as they related to the standard depth cues and story points we would use to evaluate depth for their film. Our hope was any cinematic habits that supported better 3D would be emphasized. In searching for a 3D statement for the studio and filmmakers we arrived at a stereographic style that allowed for comfort and maximum visual engagement to the viewer.

  16. 3D thermography imaging standardization technique for inflammation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Xiangyang; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Siebert, J. Paul

    2005-01-01

    We develop a 3D thermography imaging standardization technique to allow quantitative data analysis. Medical Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging is very sensitive and reliable mean of graphically mapping and display skin surface temperature. It allows doctors to visualise in colour and quantify temperature changes in skin surface. The spectrum of colours indicates both hot and cold responses which may co-exist if the pain associate with an inflammatory focus excites an increase in sympathetic activity. However, due to thermograph provides only qualitative diagnosis information, it has not gained acceptance in the medical and veterinary communities as a necessary or effective tool in inflammation and tumor detection. Here, our technique is based on the combination of visual 3D imaging technique and thermal imaging technique, which maps the 2D thermography images on to 3D anatomical model. Then we rectify the 3D thermogram into a view independent thermogram and conform it a standard shape template. The combination of these imaging facilities allows the generation of combined 3D and thermal data from which thermal signatures can be quantified.

  17. Microfluidic techniques for development of 3D vascularized tissue.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Anwarul; Paul, Arghya; Vrana, Nihal E; Zhao, Xin; Memic, Adnan; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-08-01

    Development of a vascularized tissue is one of the key challenges for the successful clinical application of tissue engineered constructs. Despite the significant efforts over the last few decades, establishing a gold standard to develop three dimensional (3D) vascularized tissues has still remained far from reality. Recent advances in the application of microfluidic platforms to the field of tissue engineering have greatly accelerated the progress toward the development of viable vascularized tissue constructs. Numerous techniques have emerged to induce the formation of vascular structure within tissues which can be broadly classified into two distinct categories, namely (1) prevascularization-based techniques and (2) vasculogenesis and angiogenesis-based techniques. This review presents an overview of the recent advancements in the vascularization techniques using both approaches for generating 3D vascular structure on microfluidic platforms.

  18. Microfluidic Techniques for Development of 3D Vascularized Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Anwarul; Paul, Arghya; Vrana, Nihal Engin; Zhao, Xin; Memic, Adnan; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Development of a vascularized tissue is one of the key challenges for the successful clinical application of tissue engineered constructs. Despite the significant efforts over the last few decades, establishing a gold standard to develop three dimensional (3D) vascularized tissues has still remained far from reality. Recent advances in the application of microfluidic platforms to the field of tissue engineering have greatly accelerated the progress toward the development of viable vascularized tissue constructs. Numerous techniques have emerged to induce the formation of vascular structure within tissues which can be broadly classified into two distinct categories, namely (1) prevascularization-based techniques and (2) vasculogenesis and angiogenesis-based techniques. This review presents an overview of the recent advancements in the vascularization techniques using both approaches for generating 3D vascular structure on microfluidic platforms. PMID:24906345

  19. Digital 3D Borobudur - Integration of 3D surveying and modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwardhi, D.; Menna, F.; Remondino, F.; Hanke, K.; Akmalia, R.

    2015-08-01

    The Borobudur temple (Indonesia) is one of the greatest Buddhist monuments in the world, now listed as an UNESCO World Heritage Site. The present state of the temple is the result of restorations after being exposed to natural disasters several times. Today there is still a growing rate of deterioration of the building stones whose causes need further researches. Monitoring programs, supported at institutional level, have been effectively executed to observe the problem. The paper presents the latest efforts to digitally document the Borobudur Temple and its surrounding area in 3D with photogrammetric techniques. UAV and terrestrial images were acquired to completely digitize the temple, produce DEM, orthoimages and maps at 1:100 and 1:1000 scale. The results of the project are now employed by the local government organizations to manage the heritage area and plan new policies for the conservation and preservation of the UNESCO site. In order to help data management and policy makers, a web-based information system of the heritage area was also built to visualize and easily access all the data and achieved 3D results.

  20. Super stereoscopy technique for comfortable and realistic 3D displays.

    PubMed

    Akşit, Kaan; Niaki, Amir Hossein Ghanbari; Ulusoy, Erdem; Urey, Hakan

    2014-12-15

    Two well-known problems of stereoscopic displays are the accommodation-convergence conflict and the lack of natural blur for defocused objects. We present a new technique that we name Super Stereoscopy (SS3D) to provide a convenient solution to these problems. Regular stereoscopic glasses are replaced by SS3D glasses which deliver at least two parallax images per eye through pinholes equipped with light selective filters. The pinholes generate blur-free retinal images so as to enable correct accommodation, while the delivery of multiple parallax images per eye creates an approximate blur effect for defocused objects. Experiments performed with cameras and human viewers indicate that the technique works as desired. In case two, pinholes equipped with color filters per eye are used; the technique can be used on a regular stereoscopic display by only uploading a new content, without requiring any change in display hardware, driver, or frame rate. Apart from some tolerable loss in display brightness and decrease in natural spatial resolution limit of the eye because of pinholes, the technique is quite promising for comfortable and realistic 3D vision, especially enabling the display of close objects that are not possible to display and comfortably view on regular 3DTV and cinema.

  1. 3D goes digital: from stereoscopy to modern 3D imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerwien, N.

    2014-11-01

    In the 19th century, English physicist Charles Wheatstone discovered stereopsis, the basis for 3D perception. His construction of the first stereoscope established the foundation for stereoscopic 3D imaging. Since then, many optical instruments were influenced by these basic ideas. In recent decades, the advent of digital technologies revolutionized 3D imaging. Powerful readily available sensors and displays combined with efficient pre- or post-processing enable new methods for 3D imaging and applications. This paper draws an arc from basic concepts of 3D imaging to modern digital implementations, highlighting instructive examples from its 175 years of history.

  2. Three-dimensional (3D) shadowgraph technique visualizes thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinzi; Zhang, Jun; Physics; Maths Research Institutes, NYU Shanghai Team; Applied Maths Lab, NYU Team

    2016-11-01

    Shadowgraph technique has been widely used in thermal convection, and in other types of convection and advection processes in fluids. The technique reveals minute density differences in the fluid, which is otherwise transparent to the eyes and to light-sensitive devices. However, such technique normally integrates the fluid information along the depth of view and collapses the 3D density field onto a 2D plane. In this work, we introduce a stereoscopic shadowgraph technique that preserves the information of the fluid depth by using two cross-field shadowgraphs. The two shadowgraphs are coded with different and complementary colors, and each is seen by only one eye of the viewer. The two shadowgraphs can also be temporally modulated to achieve the same stereoscopic vision of the convective fluid. We further discuss ways to make use of this technique in order to extract useful information for research in fluids.

  3. Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique 3D-CAD-SAFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, V.; Kröning, M.; Chakhlov, S.; Fischer, W.

    2000-05-01

    Till the 80's ultrasonic holography has been used as an analyzing technique, a procedure which has been replaced by the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique "SAFT." This technique has been applied on metallic components in different power plants, mostly on pipe systems on pressure vessels or on specimen made of composite or concrete material. SAFT exists in different versions, either in 2D or 3D, for plane or arbitrarily shaped surfaces, for pulse echo or pitch- and catch arrangements. The defect sizes ranged from 100 μm in turbine shafts till fractures of meters in research pressure vessels. The paper covers the lastest results of the SAFT-reconstruction technique under Windows NT which has been guided by the experience obtained in the field. It contributes to the currently discussed question of the possible benefit using TOFD—techniques versus pulse echo techniques; the target has been a fatigue crack in a pipe segment which was investigated by different insonification angles, wave modes and probe arrangements. The results are evaluated with respect to signal-to-noise ratio improvement; problems of TOFD are demonstrated using an animation procedure which allows to walk through the weld in three orthogonal directions. A special example will be shown from a bore hole inspection of water power station valves where the reconstruction procedure follows the radial axial insonification planes. The multi-line SAFT images can be cut according to the situation of the crack position and orientation.

  4. High-resolution 3D volumetry versus conventional measuring techniques for the assessment of experimental lymphedema in the mouse hindlimb

    PubMed Central

    Frueh, Florian S.; Körbel, Christina; Gassert, Laura; Müller, Andreas; Gousopoulos, Epameinondas; Lindenblatt, Nicole; Giovanoli, Pietro; Laschke, Matthias W.; Menger, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphedema is a common complication of cancer treatment characterized by chronic limb swelling with interstitial inflammation. The rodent hindlimb is a widely used model for the evaluation of novel lymphedema treatments. However, the assessment of limb volume in small animals is challenging. Recently, high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities have been introduced for rodent limb volumetry. In the present study we evaluated the validity of microcomputed tomography (μCT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound in comparison to conventional measuring techniques. For this purpose, acute lymphedema was induced in the mouse hindlimb by a modified popliteal lymphadenectomy. The 4-week course of this type of lymphedema was first assessed in 6 animals. In additional 12 animals, limb volumes were analyzed by μCT, 9.4 T MRI and 30 MHz ultrasound as well as by planimetry, circumferential length and paw thickness measurements. Interobserver correlation was high for all modalities, in particular for μCT analysis (r = 0.975, p < 0.001). Importantly, caliper-measured paw thickness correlated well with μCT (r = 0.861), MRI (r = 0.821) and ultrasound (r = 0.800). Because the assessment of paw thickness represents a time- and cost-effective approach, it may be ideally suited for the quantification of rodent hindlimb lymphedema. PMID:27698469

  5. 3D painting documentation: evaluation of conservation conditions with 3D imaging and ranging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abate, D.; Menna, F.; Remondino, F.; Gattari, M. G.

    2014-06-01

    The monitoring of paintings, both on canvas and wooden support, is a crucial issue for the preservation and conservation of this kind of artworks. Many environmental factors (e.g. humidity, temperature, illumination, etc.), as well as bad conservation practices (e.g. wrong restorations, inappropriate locations, etc.), can compromise the material conditions over time and deteriorate an artwork. The article presents an on-going project realized by a multidisciplinary team composed by the ENEA UTICT 3D GraphLab, the 3D Optical Metrology Unit of the Bruno Kessler Foundation and the Soprintendenza per i Beni Storico Artistici ed Etnoantropologici of Bologna (Italy). The goal of the project is the multi-temporal 3D documentation and monitoring of paintings - at the moment in bad conservation's situation - and the provision of some metrics to quantify the deformations and damages.

  6. 3D motion adapted gating (3D MAG): a new navigator technique for accelerated acquisition of free breathing navigator gated 3D coronary MR-angiography.

    PubMed

    Hackenbroch, M; Nehrke, K; Gieseke, J; Meyer, C; Tiemann, K; Litt, H; Dewald, O; Naehle, C P; Schild, H; Sommer, T

    2005-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of a new navigator technique (3D MAG) on navigator efficiency, total acquisition time, image quality and diagnostic accuracy. Fifty-six patients with suspected coronary artery disease underwent free breathing navigator gated coronary MRA (Intera, Philips Medical Systems, 1.5 T, spatial resolution 0.9x0.9x3 mm3) with and without 3D MAG. Evaluation of both sequences included: 1) navigator scan efficiency, 2) total acquisition time, 3) assessment of image quality and 4) detection of stenoses >50%. Average navigator efficiencies of the LCA and RCA were 43+/-12% and 42+/-12% with and 36+/-16% and 35+/-16% without 3D MAG (P<0.01). Scan time was reduced from 12 min 7 s without to 8 min 55 s with 3D MAG for the LCA and from 12 min 19 s to 9 min 7 s with 3D MAG for the RCA (P<0.01). The average scores of image quality of the coronary MRAs with and without 3D MAG were 3.5+/-0.79 and 3.46+/-0.84 (P>0.05). There was no significant difference in the sensitivity and specificity in the detection of coronary artery stenoses between coronary MRAs with and without 3D MAG (P>0.05). 3D MAG provides accelerated acquisition of navigator gated coronary MRA by about 19% while maintaining image quality and diagnostic accuracy.

  7. Handheld underwater 3D sensor based on fringe projection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Heinze, Matthias; Schmidt, Ingo; Meng, Lichun; Ramm, Roland; Kühmstedt, Peter; Notni, Gunther

    2015-05-01

    A new, handheld 3D surface scanner was developed especially for underwater use until a diving depth of about 40 meters. Additionally, the sensor is suitable for the outdoor use under bad weather circumstance like splashing water, wind, and bad illumination conditions. The optical components of the sensor are two cameras and one projector. The measurement field is about 250 mm x 200 mm. The depth resolution is about 50 μm and the lateral resolution is approximately 150 μm. The weight of the scanner is about 10 kg. The housing was produced of synthetic powder using a 3D printing technique. The measurement time for one scan is between a third and a half second. The computer for measurement control and data analysis is already integrated into the housing of the scanner. A display on the backside presents the results of each measurement graphically for a real-time evaluation of the user during the recording of the measurement data.

  8. Imaging fault zones using 3D seismic image processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacopini, David; Butler, Rob; Purves, Steve

    2013-04-01

    Significant advances in structural analysis of deep water structure, salt tectonic and extensional rift basin come from the descriptions of fault system geometries imaged in 3D seismic data. However, even where seismic data are excellent, in most cases the trajectory of thrust faults is highly conjectural and still significant uncertainty exists as to the patterns of deformation that develop between the main faults segments, and even of the fault architectures themselves. Moreover structural interpretations that conventionally define faults by breaks and apparent offsets of seismic reflectors are commonly conditioned by a narrow range of theoretical models of fault behavior. For example, almost all interpretations of thrust geometries on seismic data rely on theoretical "end-member" behaviors where concepts as strain localization or multilayer mechanics are simply avoided. Yet analogue outcrop studies confirm that such descriptions are commonly unsatisfactory and incomplete. In order to fill these gaps and improve the 3D visualization of deformation in the subsurface, seismic attribute methods are developed here in conjunction with conventional mapping of reflector amplitudes (Marfurt & Chopra, 2007)). These signal processing techniques recently developed and applied especially by the oil industry use variations in the amplitude and phase of the seismic wavelet. These seismic attributes improve the signal interpretation and are calculated and applied to the entire 3D seismic dataset. In this contribution we will show 3D seismic examples of fault structures from gravity-driven deep-water thrust structures and extensional basin systems to indicate how 3D seismic image processing methods can not only build better the geometrical interpretations of the faults but also begin to map both strain and damage through amplitude/phase properties of the seismic signal. This is done by quantifying and delineating the short-range anomalies on the intensity of reflector amplitudes

  9. Alignment-independent technique for 3D QSAR analysis.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Jon G; Stoyanova-Slavova, Iva B; Buzatu, Dan A

    2016-04-01

    Molecular biochemistry is controlled by 3D phenomena but structure-activity models based on 3D descriptors are infrequently used for large data sets because of the computational overhead for determining molecular conformations. A diverse dataset of 146 androgen receptor binders was used to investigate how different methods for defining molecular conformations affect the performance of 3D-quantitative spectral data activity relationship models. Molecular conformations tested: (1) global minimum of molecules' potential energy surface; (2) alignment-to-templates using equal electronic and steric force field contributions; (3) alignment using contributions "Best-for-Each" template; (4) non-energy optimized, non-aligned (2D > 3D). Aggregate predictions from models were compared. Highest average coefficients of determination ranged from R Test (2) = 0.56 to 0.61. The best model using 2D > 3D (imported directly from ChemSpider) produced R Test (2) = 0.61. It was superior to energy-minimized and conformation-aligned models and was achieved in only 3-7 % of the time required using the other conformation strategies. Predictions averaged from models built on different conformations achieved a consensus R Test (2) = 0.65. The best 2D > 3D model was analyzed for underlying structure-activity relationships. For the compound strongest binding to the androgen receptor, 10 substructural features contributing to binding were flagged. Utility of 2D > 3D was compared for two other activity endpoints, each modeling a medium sized data set. Results suggested that large scale, accurate predictions using 2D > 3D SDAR descriptors may be produced for interactions involving endocrine system nuclear receptors and other data sets in which strongest activities are produced by fairly inflexible substrates.

  10. Alignment-independent technique for 3D QSAR analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Jon G.; Stoyanova-Slavova, Iva B.; Buzatu, Dan A.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular biochemistry is controlled by 3D phenomena but structure-activity models based on 3D descriptors are infrequently used for large data sets because of the computational overhead for determining molecular conformations. A diverse dataset of 146 androgen receptor binders was used to investigate how different methods for defining molecular conformations affect the performance of 3D-quantitative spectral data activity relationship models. Molecular conformations tested: (1) global minimum of molecules' potential energy surface; (2) alignment-to-templates using equal electronic and steric force field contributions; (3) alignment using contributions "Best-for-Each" template; (4) non-energy optimized, non-aligned (2D > 3D). Aggregate predictions from models were compared. Highest average coefficients of determination ranged from R Test 2 = 0.56 to 0.61. The best model using 2D > 3D (imported directly from ChemSpider) produced R Test 2 = 0.61. It was superior to energy-minimized and conformation-aligned models and was achieved in only 3-7 % of the time required using the other conformation strategies. Predictions averaged from models built on different conformations achieved a consensus R Test 2 = 0.65. The best 2D > 3D model was analyzed for underlying structure-activity relationships. For the compound strongest binding to the androgen receptor, 10 substructural features contributing to binding were flagged. Utility of 2D > 3D was compared for two other activity endpoints, each modeling a medium sized data set. Results suggested that large scale, accurate predictions using 2D > 3D SDAR descriptors may be produced for interactions involving endocrine system nuclear receptors and other data sets in which strongest activities are produced by fairly inflexible substrates.

  11. 3D Cultivation Techniques for Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Anastasia; Moll, Matthias; Gottwald, Eric; Nies, Cordula; Zantl, Roman; Wagner, Helga; Burkhardt, Britta; Sánchez, Juan J. Martínez; Ladurner, Ruth; Thasler, Wolfgang; Damm, Georg; Nussler, Andreas K.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges in drug development is the prediction of in vivo toxicity based on in vitro data. The standard cultivation system for primary human hepatocytes is based on monolayer cultures, even if it is known that these conditions result in a loss of hepatocyte morphology and of liver-specific functions, such as drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. As it has been demonstrated that hepatocytes embedded between two sheets of collagen maintain their function, various hydrogels and scaffolds for the 3D cultivation of hepatocytes have been developed. To further improve or maintain hepatic functions, 3D cultivation has been combined with perfusion. In this manuscript, we discuss the benefits and drawbacks of different 3D microfluidic devices. For most systems that are currently available, the main issues are the requirement of large cell numbers, the low throughput, and expensive equipment, which render these devices unattractive for research and the drug-developing industry. A higher acceptance of these devices could be achieved by their simplification and their compatibility with high-throughput, as both aspects are of major importance for a user-friendly device. PMID:27600213

  12. Advanced Infusion Techniques with 3-D Printed Tooling

    SciTech Connect

    Nuttall, David; Elliott, Amy; Post, Brian K.; Love, Lonnie J.

    2016-05-10

    The manufacturing of tooling for large, contoured surfaces for fiber-layup applications requires significant effort to understand the geometry and then to subtractively manufacture the tool. Traditional methods for the auto industry use clay that is hand sculpted. In the marine pleasure craft industry, the exterior of the model is formed from a foam lay-up that is either hand cut or machined to create smooth lines. Engineers and researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (ORNL MDF) collaborated with Magnum Venus Products (MVP) in the development of a process for reproducing legacy whitewater adventure craft via digital scanning and large scale 3-D printed layup molds. The process entailed 3D scanning a legacy canoe form, converting that form to a CAD model, additively manufacturing (3-D Print) the mold tool, and subtractively finishing the mold s transfer surfaces. Future work will include applying a gelcoat to the mold transfer surface and infusing using vacuum assisted resin transfer molding, or VARTM principles, to create a watertight vessel. The outlined steps were performed on a specific canoe geometry found by MVP s principal participant. The intent of utilizing this geometry is to develop an energy efficient and marketable process for replicating complex shapes, specifically focusing on this particular watercraft, and provide a finished product for demonstration to the composites industry. The culminating part produced through this agreement has been slated for public presentation and potential demonstration at the 2016 CAMX (Composites and Advanced Materials eXpo) exposition in Anaheim, CA. Phase I of this collaborative research and development agreement (MDF-15-68) was conducted under CRADA NFE-15-05575 and was initiated on May 7, 2015, with an introduction to the MVP product line, and concluded in March of 2016 with the printing of and processing of a canoe mold. The project partner Magnum Venous Products (MVP) is

  13. Highly porous 3D nanofiber scaffold using an electrospinning technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geunhyung; Kim, WanDoo

    2007-04-01

    A successful 3D tissue-engineering scaffold must have a highly porous structure and good mechanical stability. High porosity and optimally designed pore size provide structural space for cell accommodation and migration and enable the exchange of nutrients between the scaffold and environment. Poly(epsilon-carprolactone) fibers were electrospun using an auxiliary electrode and chemical blowing agent (BA), and characterized according to porosity, pore size, and their mechanical properties. We also investigated the effect of the BA on the electrospinning processability. The growth characteristic of human dermal fibroblasts cells cultured in the webs showed the good adhesion with the blown web relative to a normal electrospun mat. The blown nanofiber web had good tensile properties and high porosity compared to a typical electrospun nanofiber scaffold.

  14. A Taxonomy of 3D Occluded Objects Recognition Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleimanizadeh, Shiva; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Saba, Tanzila; Al-ghamdi, Jarallah Saleh

    2016-03-01

    The overall performances of object recognition techniques under different condition (e.g., occlusion, viewpoint, and illumination) have been improved significantly in recent years. New applications and hardware are shifted towards digital photography, and digital media. This faces an increase in Internet usage requiring object recognition for certain applications; particularly occulded objects. However occlusion is still an issue unhandled, interlacing the relations between extracted feature points through image, research is going on to develop efficient techniques and easy to use algorithms that would help users to source images; this need to overcome problems and issues regarding occlusion. The aim of this research is to review recognition occluded objects algorithms and figure out their pros and cons to solve the occlusion problem features, which are extracted from occluded object to distinguish objects from other co-existing objects by determining the new techniques, which could differentiate the occluded fragment and sections inside an image.

  15. New techniques in 3D scalar and vector field visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Becker, B.

    1993-05-05

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we have recently developed several techniques for volume visualization of scalar and vector fields, all of which use back-to-front compositing. The first renders volume density clouds by compositing polyhedral volume cells or their faces. The second is a ``splatting`` scheme which composites textures used to reconstruct the scalar or vector fields. One version calculates the necessary texture values in software, and another takes advantage of hardware texture mapping. The next technique renders contour surface polygons using semi-transparent textures, which adjust appropriately when the surfaces deform in a flow, or change topology. The final one renders the ``flow volume`` of smoke or dye tracer swept out by a fluid flowing through a small generating polygon. All of these techniques are applied to a climate model data set, to visualize cloud density and wind velocity.

  16. Clinical Study of 3D Imaging and 3D Printing Technique for Patient-Specific Instrumentation in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bing; Liu, Fei; Tang, Bensen; Deng, Biyong; Liu, Fang; Zhu, Weimin; Zhen, Dong; Xue, Mingyuan; Zhang, Mingjiao

    2017-01-25

    Patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) was designed to improve the accuracy of preoperative planning and postoperative prosthesis positioning in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, better understanding needs to be achieved due to the subtle nature of the PSI systems. In this study, 3D printing technique based on the image data of computed tomography (CT) has been utilized for optimal controlling of the surgical parameters. Two groups of TKA cases have been randomly selected as PSI group and control group with no significant difference of age and sex (p > 0.05). The PSI group is treated with 3D printed cutting guides whereas the control group is treated with conventional instrumentation (CI). By evaluating the proximal osteotomy amount, distal osteotomy amount, valgus angle, external rotation angle, and tibial posterior slope angle of patients, it can be found that the preoperative quantitative assessment and intraoperative changes can be controlled with PSI whereas CI is relied on experience. In terms of postoperative parameters, such as hip-knee-ankle (HKA), frontal femoral component (FFC), frontal tibial component (FTC), and lateral tibial component (LTC) angles, there is a significant improvement in achieving the desired implant position (p < 0.05). Assigned from the morphology of patients' knees, the PSI represents the convergence of congruent designs with current personalized treatment tools. The PSI can achieve less extremity alignment and greater accuracy of prosthesis implantation compared against control method, which indicates potential for optimal HKA, FFC, and FTC angles.

  17. Vibration Analysis using 3D Image Correlation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, T.; Splitthof, K.

    2010-06-01

    Digital speckle correlation techniques have already been successfully proven to be an accurate displacement analysis tool for a wide range of applications. With the use of two cameras, three dimensional measurements of contours and displacements can be carried out. With a simple setup it opens a wide range of applications. Rapid new developments in the field of digital imaging and computer technology opens further applications for these measurement methods to high speed deformation and strain analysis, e.g. in the fields of material testing, fracture mechanics, advanced materials and component testing. The high resolution of the deformation measurements in space and time opens a wide range of applications for vibration analysis of objects. Since the system determines the absolute position and displacements of the object in space, it is capable of measuring high amplitudes and even objects with rigid body movements. The absolute resolution depends on the field of view and is scalable. Calibration of the optical setup is a crucial point which will be discussed in detail. Examples of the analysis of harmonic vibration and transient events from material research and industrial applications are presented. The results show typical features of the system.

  18. Recent advances in 3D computed tomography techniques for simulation and navigation in hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masafumi

    2014-04-01

    A few years ago it could take several hours to complete a 3D image using a 3D workstation. Thanks to advances in computer science, obtaining results of interest now requires only a few minutes. Many recent 3D workstations or multimedia computers are equipped with onboard 3D virtual patient modeling software, which enables patient-specific preoperative assessment and virtual planning, navigation, and tool positioning. Although medical 3D imaging can now be conducted using various modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasonography (US) among others, the highest quality images are obtained using CT data, and CT images are now the most commonly used source of data for 3D simulation and navigation image. If the 2D source image is bad, no amount of 3D image manipulation in software will provide a quality 3D image. In this exhibition, the recent advances in CT imaging technique and 3D visualization of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic abnormalities are featured, including scan and image reconstruction technique, contrast-enhanced techniques, new application of advanced CT scan techniques, and new virtual reality simulation and navigation imaging.

  19. Computer-Aided Video Differential Planimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Michael; Djoleto, Ben D.

    1984-08-01

    THE VIDEO DIFFERENTIAL PLANIMETER (VDP)1 is a re-mote sensing instrument that can measure minute changes in the area of any object seen by an optical scanning system. The composite video waveforms obtained by scanning the object against a contrasting back-ground are amplified and shaped to yield a sequence of constant amplitude pulses whose polarity distinguishes the studied area from its background and whose varying widths reflect the dynamics of the viewed object. These pulses are passed through a relatively long time-constant capacitor-resistor circuit and are then fed into an integrator. The net integration voltage resulting from the most recent sequence of object-background time pulses is recorded and the integrator is returned to zero at the end of each video frame. If the object's area remains constant throughout the following frame, the integrator's summation will also remain constant. However, if the object's area varies, the positive and negative time pulses entering the integrator will change, and the integrator's summation will vary proportionately. The addition of a computer interface and a video recorder enhances the versatility and the resolving power of the VDP by permitting the repeated study and analysis of selected portions of the recorded data, thereby uncovering the major sources of the object's dynamics. Among the medical and biological procedures for which COMPUTER-AIDED VIDEO DIFFERENTIAL PLANIMETRY is suitable are Ophthalmoscopy, Endoscopy, Microscopy, Plethysmography, etc. A recent research study in Ophthalmoscopy2 will be cited to suggest a useful application of Video Differential Planimetry.

  20. Reducing Non-Uniqueness in Satellite Gravity Inversion using 3D Object Oriented Image Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadel, I.; van der Meijde, M.; Kerle, N.

    2013-12-01

    Non-uniqueness of satellite gravity interpretation has been usually reduced by using a priori information from various sources, e.g. seismic tomography models. The reduction in non-uniqueness has been based on velocity-density conversion formulas or user interpretation for 3D subsurface structures (objects) in seismic tomography models. However, these processes introduce additional uncertainty through the conversion relations due to the dependency on the other physical parameters such as temperature and pressure, or through the bias in the interpretation due to user choices and experience. In this research, a new methodology is introduced to extract the 3D subsurface structures from 3D geophysical data using a state-of-art 3D Object Oriented Image Analysis (OOA) technique. 3D OOA is tested using a set of synthetic models that simulate the real situation in the study area of this research. Then, 3D OOA is used to extract 3D subsurface objects from a real 3D seismic tomography model. The extracted 3D objects are used to reconstruct a forward model and its response is compared with the measured satellite gravity. Finally, the result of the forward modelling, based on the extracted 3D objects, is used to constrain the inversion process of satellite gravity data. Through this work, a new object-based approach is introduced to interpret and extract the 3D subsurface objects from 3D geophysical data. This can be used to constrain modelling and inversion of potential field data using the extracted 3D subsurface structures from other methods. In summary, a new approach is introduced to constrain inversion of satellite gravity measurements and enhance interpretation capabilities.

  1. Improving Semantic Updating Method on 3d City Models Using Hybrid Semantic-Geometric 3d Segmentation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkawi, K.-H.; Abdul-Rahman, A.

    2013-09-01

    Cities and urban areas entities such as building structures are becoming more complex as the modern human civilizations continue to evolve. The ability to plan and manage every territory especially the urban areas is very important to every government in the world. Planning and managing cities and urban areas based on printed maps and 2D data are getting insufficient and inefficient to cope with the complexity of the new developments in big cities. The emergence of 3D city models have boosted the efficiency in analysing and managing urban areas as the 3D data are proven to represent the real world object more accurately. It has since been adopted as the new trend in buildings and urban management and planning applications. Nowadays, many countries around the world have been generating virtual 3D representation of their major cities. The growing interest in improving the usability of 3D city models has resulted in the development of various tools for analysis based on the 3D city models. Today, 3D city models are generated for various purposes such as for tourism, location-based services, disaster management and urban planning. Meanwhile, modelling 3D objects are getting easier with the emergence of the user-friendly tools for 3D modelling available in the market. Generating 3D buildings with high accuracy also has become easier with the availability of airborne Lidar and terrestrial laser scanning equipments. The availability and accessibility to this technology makes it more sensible to analyse buildings in urban areas using 3D data as it accurately represent the real world objects. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) has accepted CityGML specifications as one of the international standards for representing and exchanging spatial data, making it easier to visualize, store and manage 3D city models data efficiently. CityGML able to represents the semantics, geometry, topology and appearance of 3D city models in five well-defined Level-of-Details (LoD), namely LoD0

  2. NEW 3D TECHNIQUES FOR RANKING AND PRIORITIZATION OF CHEMICAL INVENTORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    New three-dimensional quantitative structure activity (3-D QSAR) techniques for prioritizing chemical inventories for endocrine activity will be presented. The Common Reactivity Pattern (COREPA) approach permits identification of common steric and/or electronic patterns associate...

  3. Imaging Techniques for Dense 3D reconstruction of Swimming Aquatic Life using Multi-view Stereo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, David; Kiser, Jillian; McQueen, Sarah

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the movement characteristics of how various species of fish swim is an important step to uncovering how they propel themselves through the water. Previous methods have focused on profile capture methods or sparse 3D manual feature point tracking. This research uses an array of 30 cameras to automatically track hundreds of points on a fish as they swim in 3D using multi-view stereo. Blacktip sharks, sting rays, puffer fish, turtles and more were imaged in collaboration with the National Aquarium in Baltimore, Maryland using the multi-view stereo technique. The processes for data collection, camera synchronization, feature point extraction, 3D reconstruction, 3D alignment, biological considerations, and lessons learned will be presented. Preliminary results of the 3D reconstructions will be shown and future research into mathematically characterizing various bio-locomotive maneuvers will be discussed.

  4. A Shell/3D Modeling Technique for the Analysis of Delaminated Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; OBrien, T. Kevin

    2000-01-01

    A shell/3D modeling technique was developed for which a local solid finite element model is used only in the immediate vicinity of the delamination front. The goal was to combine the accuracy of the full three-dimensional solution with the computational efficiency of a shell finite element model. Multi-point constraints provided a kinematically compatible interface between the local 3D model and the global structural model which has been meshed with shell finite elements. Double Cantilever Beam, End Notched Flexure, and Single Leg Bending specimens were analyzed first using full 3D finite element models to obtain reference solutions. Mixed mode strain energy release rate distributions were computed using the virtual crack closure technique. The analyses were repeated using the shell/3D technique to study the feasibility for pure mode I, mode II and mixed mode I/II cases. Specimens with a unidirectional layup and with a multidirectional layup were simulated. For a local 3D model, extending to a minimum of about three specimen thicknesses on either side of the delamination front, the results were in good agreement with mixed mode strain energy release rates obtained from computations where the entire specimen had been modeled with solid elements. For large built-up composite structures the shell/3D modeling technique offers a great potential for reducing the model size, since only a relatively small section in the vicinity of the delamination front needs to be modeled with solid elements.

  5. 3D tumor spheroids: an overview on the tools and techniques used for their analysis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Elisabete C; Moreira, André F; de Melo-Diogo, Duarte; Gaspar, Vítor M; Carvalho, Marco P; Correia, Ilídio J

    2016-12-01

    In comparison with 2D cell culture models, 3D spheroids are able to accurately mimic some features of solid tumors, such as their spatial architecture, physiological responses, secretion of soluble mediators, gene expression patterns and drug resistance mechanisms. These unique characteristics highlight the potential of 3D cellular aggregates to be used as in vitro models for screening new anticancer therapeutics, both at a small and large scale. Nevertheless, few reports have focused on describing the tools and techniques currently available to extract significant biological data from these models. Such information will be fundamental to drug and therapeutic discovery process using 3D cell culture models. The present review provides an overview of the techniques that can be employed to characterize and evaluate the efficacy of anticancer therapeutics in 3D tumor spheroids.

  6. An engineering perspective on 3D printed personalized scaffolds for tracheal suspension technique

    PubMed Central

    An, Jia

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a large family of many distinct technologies covering a wide range of topics. From an engineering point of view, there should be considerations for selection of design, material, and process when using 3D printing for surgical technique innovation such as personalized scaffolds. Moreover, cost should also be considered if there are equally effective alternatives to the innovation. Furthermore, engineering considerations and options should be clearly communicated and readily available to surgeons for advancement in future. PMID:28149624

  7. An engineering perspective on 3D printed personalized scaffolds for tracheal suspension technique.

    PubMed

    An, Jia; Chua, Chee Kai

    2016-12-01

    3D printing is a large family of many distinct technologies covering a wide range of topics. From an engineering point of view, there should be considerations for selection of design, material, and process when using 3D printing for surgical technique innovation such as personalized scaffolds. Moreover, cost should also be considered if there are equally effective alternatives to the innovation. Furthermore, engineering considerations and options should be clearly communicated and readily available to surgeons for advancement in future.

  8. Holographic particle velocimetry - A 3D measurement technique for vortex interactions, coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle

    1991-10-01

    To understand the topology and dynamics of coherent structures (CS), the interactions of CS with fine-scale turbulence, and the effects of CS on entrainment, mixing and combustion, experimental tools are needed that can measure velocity (preferably vorticity) vector fields in both 3D space and time. While traditional measurement techniques are not able to serve this purpose, holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) appears to be promising. In a demonstration experiment, the instantaneous 3D velocity vector fields in some simple vortical flows have been obtained using the HPV technique. In this preliminary report, the principles of the HPV technique are illustrated and the key issues in its implementation are discussed.

  9. 3D nano/microfabrication techniques and nanobiomaterials for neural tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; O'Brien, Christopher; O'Brien, Joseph R; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2014-05-01

    Injuries of the nervous system occur commonly among people of many different ages and backgrounds. Currently, there are no effective strategies to improve neural regeneration; however, tissue engineering provides a promising avenue for regeneration of many tissue types, including the neural context. Functional nerve conduits derived from tissue engineering techniques present bioengineered 3D artificial substitutes for implantation and rehabilitation of injured nerves. In particular, nanotechnology as a versatile vehicle to create biomimetic nanostructured tissue-engineered neural scaffolds provides great potential for the development of innovative and successful nerve grafts. Nanostructured conduits derived from traditional and novel tissue engineering techniques have been shown to be superior for successful neural function construction due to a high degree of biomimetic character. In this paper, we will focus on current progress in developing 3D nano/microstructured neural scaffolds via electrospinning, emerging 3D printing and self-assembly techniques, nanobiomaterials and bioactive cues for enhanced neural tissue regeneration.

  10. Consideration of techniques to mitigate the unauthorized 3D printing production of keys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy; Kerlin, Scott

    2016-05-01

    The illicit production of 3D printed keys based on remote-sensed imagery is problematic as it allows a would-be intruder to access a secured facility without the attack attempt being as obviously detectable as conventional techniques. This paper considers the problem from multiple perspectives. First, it looks at different attack types and considers the prospective attack from a digital information perspective. Second, based on this, techniques for securing keys are considered. Third, the design of keys is considered from the perspective of making them more difficult to duplicate using visible light sensing and 3D printing. Policy and legal considerations are discussed.

  11. New techniques of determining focus position in gamma knife operation using 3D image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yingen; Wang, Dezong; Zhou, Quan

    1994-09-01

    In this paper, new techniques of determining the focus of a disease position in a gamma knife operation are presented. In these techniques, the transparent 3D color image of the human body organ is reconstructed using a new three-dimensional reconstruction method, and then the position, the area, and the volume of focus of a disease such as cancer or a tumor are calculated. They are used in the gamma knife operation. The CT pictures are input into a digital image processing system. The useful information is extracted and the original data are obtained. Then the transparent 3D color image is reconstructed using these original data. By using this transparent 3D color image, the positions of the human body organ and the focus of a disease are determined in a coordinate system. While the 3D image is reconstructed, the area and the volume of human body organ and focus of a disease can be calculated at the same time. It is expressed through actual application that the positions of human body organ and focus of a disease can be determined exactly by using the transparent 3D color image. It is very useful in gamma knife operation or other surgical operation. The techniques presented in this paper have great application value.

  12. Comparing and visualizing titanium implant integration in rat bone using 2D and 3D techniques.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Anna; Sarve, Hamid; Johansson, Carina B

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to compare the osseointegration of grit-blasted implants with and without a hydrogen fluoride treatment in rat tibia and femur, and to visualize bone formation using state-of-the-art 3D visualization techniques. Grit-blasted implants were inserted in femur and tibia of 10 Sprague-Dawley rats (4 implants/rat). Four weeks after insertion, bone implant samples were retrieved. Selected samples were imaged in 3D using Synchrotron Radiation-based μCT (SRμCT). The 3D data was quantified and visualized using two novel visualization techniques, thread fly-through and 2D unfolding. All samples were processed to cut and ground sections and 2D histomorphometrical comparisons of bone implant contact (BIC), bone area (BA), and mirror image area (MI) were performed. BA values were statistically significantly higher for test implants than controls (p < 0.05), but BIC and MI data did not differ significantly. Thus, the results partly indicate improved bone formation at blasted and hydrogen fluoride treated implants, compared to blasted implants. The 3D analysis was a valuable complement to 2D analysis, facilitating improved visualization. However, further studies are required to evaluate aspects of 3D quantitative techniques, with relation to light microscopy that traditionally is used for osseointegration studies.

  13. Fuzzy zoning for feature matching technique in 3D reconstruction of nasal endoscopic images.

    PubMed

    Rattanalappaiboon, Surapong; Bhongmakapat, Thongchai; Ritthipravat, Panrasee

    2015-12-01

    3D reconstruction from nasal endoscopic images greatly supports an otolaryngologist in examining nasal passages, mucosa, polyps, sinuses, and nasopharyx. In general, structure from motion is a popular technique. It consists of four main steps; (1) camera calibration, (2) feature extraction, (3) feature matching, and (4) 3D reconstruction. Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm is normally used for both feature extraction and feature matching. However, SIFT algorithm relatively consumes computational time particularly in the feature matching process because each feature in an image of interest is compared with all features in the subsequent image in order to find the best matched pair. A fuzzy zoning approach is developed for confining feature matching area. Matching between two corresponding features from different images can be efficiently performed. With this approach, it can greatly reduce the matching time. The proposed technique is tested with endoscopic images created from phantoms and compared with the original SIFT technique in terms of the matching time and average errors of the reconstructed models. Finally, original SIFT and the proposed fuzzy-based technique are applied to 3D model reconstruction of real nasal cavity based on images taken from a rigid nasal endoscope. The results showed that the fuzzy-based approach was significantly faster than traditional SIFT technique and provided similar quality of the 3D models. It could be used for creating a nasal cavity taken by a rigid nasal endoscope.

  14. A three-dimensional quantitative analysis of restenosis parameters after balloon angioplasty: comparison between semi-automatic computer-assisted planimetry and stereology.

    PubMed

    Salu, Koen J; Knaapen, Michiel W M; Bosmans, Johan M; Vrints, Chris J; Bult, Hidde

    2002-01-01

    Semi-automatic computer-assisted planimetry is often used for the quantification of restenosis parameters after balloon angioplasty although it is a time-consuming method. Moreover, slicing the artery to enable analysis of two-dimensional (2-D) images leads to a loss of information since the vessel structure is three-dimensional (3-D). Cavalieri's principle uses systematic random sampling allowing 3-D quantification. This study compares the accuracy and efficiency of planimetry versus point-counting measurements on restenosis parameters after balloon angioplasty and investigates the use of Cavalieri's principle for 3-D volume quantification. Bland and Altman plots showed good agreement between planimetry and point counting for the 2-D and 3-D quantification of lumen, internal elastic lamina (IEL) and external elastic lamina (EEL), with a slightly smaller agreement for intima and media. Mean values and induced coefficients of variation were similar for both methods for all parameters. Point counting induced a 6% error in its 3-D quantification, which is negligible in view of the biological variation (>90%) among animals. However, point counting was 3 times faster compared to planimetry, improving its efficiency. This study shows that combining Cavalieri's principle with point counting is a precise and efficient method for the 3-D quantification of restenosis parameters after balloon angioplasty.

  15. An Accuracy Assessment of Automated Photogrammetric Techniques for 3d Modeling of Complex Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgantas, A.; Brédif, M.; Pierrot-Desseilligny, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a comparison of automatic photogrammetric techniques to terrestrial laser scanning for 3D modelling of complex interior spaces. We try to evaluate the automated photogrammetric techniques not only in terms of their geometric quality compared to laser scanning but also in terms of cost in money, acquisition and computational time. To this purpose we chose as test site a modern building's stairway. APERO/MICMAC ( ©IGN )which is an Open Source photogrammetric software was used for the production of the 3D photogrammetric point cloud which was compared to the one acquired by a Leica Scanstation 2 laser scanner. After performing various qualitative and quantitative controls we present the advantages and disadvantages of each 3D modelling method applied in a complex interior of a modern building.

  16. 3D fibre deposition and stereolithography techniques for the design of multifunctional nanocomposite magnetic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Roberto; D'Amora, Ugo; Russo, Teresa; Ronca, Alfredo; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic nanocomposite scaffolds based on poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) were fabricated by 3D fibre deposition modelling (FDM) and stereolithography techniques. In addition, hybrid coaxial and bilayer magnetic scaffolds were produced by combining such techniques. The aim of the current research was to analyse some structural and functional features of 3D magnetic scaffolds obtained by the 3D fibre deposition technique and by stereolithography as well as features of multimaterial scaffolds in the form of coaxial and bilayer structures obtained by the proper integration of such methods. The compressive mechanical behaviour of these scaffolds was investigated in a wet environment at 37 °C, and the morphological features were analysed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray micro-computed tomography. The capability of a magnetic scaffold to absorb magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in water solution was also assessed. confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to assess the in vitro biological behaviour of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on 3D structures. Results showed that a wide range of mechanical properties, covering those spanning hard and soft tissues, can be obtained by 3D FDM and stereolithography techniques. 3D virtual reconstruction and SEM showed the precision with which the scaffolds were fabricated, and a good-quality interface between poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) based scaffolds was observed for bilayer and coaxial scaffolds. Magnetised scaffolds are capable of absorbing water solution of MNPs, and a preliminary information on cell adhesion and spreading of hMSCs was obtained without the application of an external magnetic field.

  17. Geoinformation techniques for the 3D visualisation of historic buildings and representation of a building's pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsilimantou, Elisavet; Delegou, Ekaterini; Ioannidis, Charalabos; Moropoulou, Antonia

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the documentation of an historic building registered as Cultural Heritage asset is presented. The aim of the survey is to create a 3D geometric representation of a historic building and in accordance with multidisciplinary study extract useful information regarding the extent of degradation, constructions' durability etc. For the implementation of the survey, a combination of different types of acquisition technologies is used. The project focuses on the study of Villa Klonaridi, in Athens, Greece. For the complete documentation of the building, conventional topography, photogrammetric and laser scanning techniques is combined. Close range photogrammetric techniques are used for the acquisition of the façades and architectural details. One of the main objectives is the development of an accurate 3D model, where the photorealistic representation of the building is achieved, along with the decay pathology, historical phases and architectural components. In order to achieve a suitable graphical representation for the study of the material and decay patterns beyond the 2D representation, 3D modelling and additional information modelling is performed for comparative analysis. The study provides various conclusions regarding the scale of deterioration obtained by the 2D and 3D analysis respectively. Considering the variation in material and decay patterns, comparative results are obtained regarding the degradation of the building. Overall, the paper describes a process performed on a Historic Building, where the 3D digital acquisition of the monuments' structure is realized with the combination of close range surveying and laser scanning methods.

  18. On the Estimation of Forest Resources Using 3D Remote Sensing Techniques and Point Cloud Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjalainen, Mika; Karila, Kirsi; Liang, Xinlian; Yu, Xiaowei; Huang, Guoman; Lu, Lijun

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, 3D capable remote sensing techniques have shown great potential in forest biomass estimation because of their ability to measure the forest canopy structure, tree height and density. The objective of the Dragon3 forest resources research project (ID 10667) and the supporting ESA young scientist project (ESA contract NO. 4000109483/13/I-BG) was to study the use of satellite based 3D techniques in forest tree height estimation, and consequently in forest biomass and biomass change estimation, by combining satellite data with terrestrial measurements. Results from airborne 3D techniques were also used in the project. Even though, forest tree height can be estimated from 3D satellite SAR data to some extent, there is need for field reference plots. For this reason, we have also been developing automated field plot measurement techniques based on Terrestrial Laser Scanning data, which can be used to train and calibrate satellite based estimation models. In this paper, results of canopy height models created from TerraSAR-X stereo and TanDEM-X INSAR data are shown as well as preliminary results from TLS field plot measurement system. Also, results from the airborne CASMSAR system to measure forest canopy height from P- and X- band INSAR are presented.

  19. The Effect Of 3D Audio And Other Audio Techniques On Virtual Reality Experience.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Willem-Paul; Hoekstra, Allart R D; van Egmond, René

    2015-01-01

    Three studies were conducted to examine the effect of audio on people's experience in a virtual world. The first study showed that people could distinguish between mono, stereo, Dolby surround and 3D audio of a wasp. The second study found significant effects for audio techniques on people's self-reported anxiety, presence, and spatial perception. The third study found that adding sound to a visual virtual world had a significant effect on people's experience (including heart rate), while it found no difference in experience between stereo and 3D audio.

  20. Application of multi-resolution 3D techniques in crime scene documentation with bloodstain pattern analysis.

    PubMed

    Hołowko, Elwira; Januszkiewicz, Kamil; Bolewicki, Paweł; Sitnik, Robert; Michoński, Jakub

    2016-10-01

    In forensic documentation with bloodstain pattern analysis (BPA) it is highly desirable to obtain non-invasively overall documentation of a crime scene, but also register in high resolution single evidence objects, like bloodstains. In this study, we propose a hierarchical 3D scanning platform designed according to the top-down approach known from the traditional forensic photography. The overall 3D model of a scene is obtained via integration of laser scans registered from different positions. Some parts of a scene being particularly interesting are documented using midrange scanner, and the smallest details are added in the highest resolution as close-up scans. The scanning devices are controlled using developed software equipped with advanced algorithms for point cloud processing. To verify the feasibility and effectiveness of multi-resolution 3D scanning in crime scene documentation, our platform was applied to document a murder scene simulated by the BPA experts from the Central Forensic Laboratory of the Police R&D, Warsaw, Poland. Applying the 3D scanning platform proved beneficial in the documentation of a crime scene combined with BPA. The multi-resolution 3D model enables virtual exploration of a scene in a three-dimensional environment, distance measurement, and gives a more realistic preservation of the evidences together with their surroundings. Moreover, high-resolution close-up scans aligned in a 3D model can be used to analyze bloodstains revealed at the crime scene. The result of BPA such as trajectories, and the area of origin are visualized and analyzed in an accurate model of a scene. At this stage, a simplified approach considering the trajectory of blood drop as a straight line is applied. Although the 3D scanning platform offers a new quality of crime scene documentation with BPA, some of the limitations of the technique are also mentioned.

  1. A Shell/3D Modeling Technique for Delaminations in Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald

    1999-01-01

    A shell/3D modeling technique was developed for which a local solid finite element model is used only in the immediate vicinity of the delamination front. The goal was to combine the accuracy of the full three-dimensional solution with the computational efficiency of a plate or shell finite element model. Multi-point constraints provide a kinematically compatible interface between the local 3D model and the global structural model which has been meshed with plate or shell finite elements. For simple double cantilever beam (DCB), end notched flexure (ENF), and single leg bending (SLB) specimens, mixed mode energy release rate distributions were computed across the width from nonlinear finite element analyses using the virtual crack closure technique. The analyses served to test the accuracy of the shell/3D technique for the pure mode I case (DCB), mode II case (ENF) and a mixed mode I/II case (SLB). Specimens with a unidirectional layup where the delamination is located between two 0 plies, as well as a multidirectional layup where the delamination is located between two non-zero degree plies, were simulated. For a local 3D model extending to a minimum of about three specimen thicknesses in front of and behind the delamination front, the results were in good agreement with mixed mode strain energy release rates obtained from computations where the entire specimen had been modeled with solid elements. For large built-up composite structures modeled with plate elements, the shell/3D modeling technique offers a great potential, since only a relatively small section in the vicinity of the delamination front needs to be modeled with solid elements.

  2. 3D visualization of biomedical CT images based on OpenGL and VRML techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Meng; Luo, Qingming; Xia, Fuhua

    2002-04-01

    Current high-performance computers and advanced image processing capabilities have made the application of three- dimensional visualization objects in biomedical computer tomographic (CT) images facilitate the researches on biomedical engineering greatly. Trying to cooperate with the update technology using Internet, where 3D data are typically stored and processed on powerful servers accessible by using TCP/IP, we should hold the results of the isosurface be applied in medical visualization generally. Furthermore, this project is a future part of PACS system our lab is working on. So in this system we use the 3D file format VRML2.0, which is used through the Web interface for manipulating 3D models. In this program we implemented to generate and modify triangular isosurface meshes by marching cubes algorithm. Then we used OpenGL and MFC techniques to render the isosurface and manipulating voxel data. This software is more adequate visualization of volumetric data. The drawbacks are that 3D image processing on personal computers is rather slow and the set of tools for 3D visualization is limited. However, these limitations have not affected the applicability of this platform for all the tasks needed in elementary experiments in laboratory or data preprocessed.

  3. A Review of 3D Printing Techniques and the Future in Biofabrication of Bioprinted Tissue.

    PubMed

    Patra, Satyajit; Young, Vanesa

    2016-06-01

    3D printing has been around in the art, micro-engineering, and manufacturing worlds for decades. Similarly, research for traditionally engineered skin tissue has been in the works since the 1990s. As of recent years, the medical field also began to take advantage of the untapped potential of 3D printing for the biofabrication of tissue. To do so, researchers created a set of goals for fabricated tissues based on the characteristics of natural human tissues and organs. Fabricated tissue was then measured against this set of standards. Researchers were interested in not only creating tissue that functioned like natural tissues but in creating techniques for 3D printing that would print tissues quickly, efficiently, and ultimately result in the ability to mass produce fabricated tissues. Three promising methods of 3D printing emerged from their research: thermal inkjet printing with bioink, direct-write bioprinting, and organ printing using tissue spheroids. This review will discuss all three printing techniques, as well as their advantages, disadvantages, and the possibility of future advancements in the field of tissue fabrication.

  4. Image-Based Modeling Techniques for Architectural Heritage 3d Digitalization: Limits and Potentialities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santagati, C.; Inzerillo, L.; Di Paola, F.

    2013-07-01

    3D reconstruction from images has undergone a revolution in the last few years. Computer vision techniques use photographs from data set collection to rapidly build detailed 3D models. The simultaneous applications of different algorithms (MVS), the different techniques of image matching, feature extracting and mesh optimization are inside an active field of research in computer vision. The results are promising: the obtained models are beginning to challenge the precision of laser-based reconstructions. Among all the possibilities we can mainly distinguish desktop and web-based packages. Those last ones offer the opportunity to exploit the power of cloud computing in order to carry out a semi-automatic data processing, thus allowing the user to fulfill other tasks on its computer; whereas desktop systems employ too much processing time and hard heavy approaches. Computer vision researchers have explored many applications to verify the visual accuracy of 3D model but the approaches to verify metric accuracy are few and no one is on Autodesk 123D Catch applied on Architectural Heritage Documentation. Our approach to this challenging problem is to compare the 3Dmodels by Autodesk 123D Catch and 3D models by terrestrial LIDAR considering different object size, from the detail (capitals, moldings, bases) to large scale buildings for practitioner purpose.

  5. Combined scanning probe nanotomography and optical microspectroscopy: a correlative technique for 3D characterization of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Mochalov, Konstantin E; Efimov, Anton E; Bobrovsky, Alexey; Agapov, Igor I; Chistyakov, Anton A; Oleinikov, Vladimir; Sukhanova, Alyona; Nabiev, Igor

    2013-10-22

    Combination of 3D structural analysis with optical characterization of the same sample area on the nanoscale is a highly demanded approach in nanophotonics, materials science, and quality control of nanomaterial. We have developed a correlative microscopy technique where the 3D structure of the sample is reconstructed on the nanoscale by means of a "slice-and-view" combination of ultramicrotomy and scanning probe microscopy (scanning probe nanotomography, SPNT), and its optical characteristics are analyzed using microspectroscopy. This approach has been used to determine the direct quantitative relationship of the 3D structural characteristics of nanovolumes of materials with their microscopic optical properties. This technique has been applied to 3D structural and optical characterization of a hybrid material consisting of cholesteric liquid crystals doped with fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) that can be used for photochemical patterning and image recording through the changes in the dissymmetry factor of the circular polarization of QD emission. The differences in the polarization images and fluorescent spectra of this hybrid material have proved to be correlated with the arrangement of the areas of homogeneous distribution and heterogeneous clustering of QDs. The reconstruction of the 3D nanostructure of the liquid crystal matrix in the areas of homogeneous QDs distribution has shown that QDs do not perturb the periodic planar texture of the cholesteric liquid crystal matrix, whereas QD clusters do perturb it. The combined microspectroscopy-nanotomography technique will be important for evaluating the effects of nanoparticles on the structural organization of organic and liquid crystal matrices and biomedical materials, as well as quality control of nanotechnology fabrication processes and products.

  6. Reconstruction of 3D angiography data using the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, Carnell J.; Hemler, Paul F.

    2001-07-01

    Three-dimensional angiographic reconstrcution has emerged as an alternative to the traditional depiction of aneurysm angioarchitecture provided by 2-D perspective projections acquired by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and fluoroscopy. One clinical application of research involving 3-D angiographic reconstruction is intraoperative localization and visualization during aneurysm embolization procedures. For this procedure, reconstruction quality is important for the 3-D reconstruction of anatomy as well as for the reconstrucution of intraaneurysm coils imaged endovascularly and subsequently rendered within an existing 3-D anatomic representation. Rotational angiography involves the acquisition of a series of 2-D, cone-beam projections of intracranial anatomy by a rotating x-ray gantry following a single injection of contrast media. Our investigation focuses on the practicality of using methods that employ algebraic reconstruction techniques (ART) to reconstruct 3-D data from 2-D cone-beam projections acquired using rotational angiography during embolization procedures. Important to our investigation are issues that arise within the implementation of the projection, correction and backprojection steps of the reconstruction algorithm that affect reconstruction quality. Several methods are discussed to perform accurate voxel grid projection and backprojection. Various parameters of the reconstruction algorithm implementation are also investigated. Preliminary results indicating that quality 3-D reconstructions from 2-D projections of synthetic volumes are presented. Further modifications to our implementation hold the promise of achieving accurate reconstruction results with a lower computation cost than the algorithm implemention used for this study. We have concluded that methods to extend the traditional ART algorithm for cone-beam projection acquisition produce quality 3-D reconstructions.

  7. Suitability of online 3D visualization technique in oil palm plantation management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat, Ruzinoor Che; Nordin, Norani; Zulkifli, Abdul Nasir; Yusof, Shahrul Azmi Mohd

    2016-08-01

    Oil palm industry has been the backbone for the growth of Malaysia economy. The exports of this commodity increasing almost every year. Therefore, there are many studies focusing on how to help this industry increased its productivity. In order to increase the productivity, the management of oil palm plantation need to be improved and strengthen. One of the solution in helping the oil palm manager is by implementing online 3D visualization technique for oil palm plantation using game engine technology. The potential of this application is that it can helps in fertilizer and irrigation management. For this reason, the aim of this paper is to investigate the issues in managing oil palm plantation from the view of oil palm manager by interview. The results from this interview will helps in identifying the suitable issues could be highlight in implementing online 3D visualization technique for oil palm plantation management.

  8. 3D precision measurements of meter sized surfaces using low cost illumination and camera techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekberg, Peter; Daemi, Bita; Mattsson, Lars

    2017-04-01

    Using dedicated stereo camera systems and structured light is a well-known method for measuring the 3D shape of large surfaces. However the problem is not trivial when high accuracy, in the range of few tens of microns, is needed. Many error sources need to be handled carefully in order to obtain high quality results. In this study, we present a measurement method based on low-cost camera and illumination solutions combined with high-precision image analysis and a new approach in camera calibration and 3D reconstruction. The setup consists of two ordinary digital cameras and a Gobo projector as a structured light source. A matrix of dots is projected onto the target area. The two cameras capture the images of the projected pattern on the object. The images are processed by advanced subpixel resolution algorithms prior to the application of the 3D reconstruction technique. The strength of the method lays in a different approach for calibration, 3D reconstruction, and high-precision image analysis algorithms. Using a 10 mm pitch pattern of the light dots, the method is capable of reconstructing the 3D shape of surfaces. The precision (1σ repeatability) in the measurements is  <10 µm over a volume of 60  ×  50  ×  10 cm3 at a hardware cost of ~2% of available advanced measurement techniques. The expanded uncertainty (95% confidence level) is estimated to be 83 µm, with the largest uncertainty contribution coming from the absolute length of the metal ruler used as reference.

  9. Areal 3-D seismic technique for reservoir delineation: Case history from offshore Niger Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Idowu, A.O. )

    1993-02-01

    In the 1950s, early exploration period in the Niger Delta witnessed the use of 2-D (two dimensional) seismic reflection method which adequate for imaging large subsurface geologic features including growth faulting and roll-over anticlines. This technique involves the Common-Depth-Point method (CDP) which acquires a plane of seismic information in distance along the surface and in time into the geological section, and is used to improve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, to remove multiples and consequently give a representation of the subsurface particularly if the data are collected up- or downdip. By mid-1980s, the obvious geological structures have, in general, been discovered and it became necessary to adopt a more sophisticated technique such as the 3-D (three dimensional) seismic method to delineate more subtle reservoirs and resolve complex fault patterns in order to aid exploration as well as facilitate efficient field development. The case history discussed in this paper involves the use of areal 3-D seismic method for delineating the reservoir characterization of the O-field located in a shallow water area of the western Niger Delta. The areal 3-D seismic technique is superior to the earlier CDP method in that a cube of seismic data can be collected in two dimensions in space and one in time by a variety of techniques including the swath seismic shooting pattern adopted for gathering the 3-D data for the O-field's reservoir which involves the line of sources. The objective is to adequately sample the subsurface so that changes in various parameters such as the amplitude phase or power in the siesmic signal or velocity of propagation can be mapped areally and interpreted as an indication of changes in the physical properties of the rock matrix.

  10. NDE of a 3-D surface crack using closely coupled probes for DCPD technique

    SciTech Connect

    Saka, M.; Abe, H.; Hirota, D.; Komura, I.

    1998-11-01

    A procedure of applying the d-c potential drop technique using the closely coupled probes to NDE of a 3-D surface crack is newly developed. The calibration equation for three sensors which differ in the distance between the probes is derived. Experiments validated the use of the calibration equation for the NDE of cracks. The method to use the three sensors properly based on the measuring sensitivity is shown.

  11. 3D MRI-based tumor delineation of ocular melanoma and its comparison with conventional techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Daftari, Inder k; Aghaian, Elsa; O'Brien, Joan M.; Dillon, William; Phillips, Theodore L.

    2005-11-15

    The aim of this study is to (1) compare the delineation of the tumor volume for ocular melanoma on high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) T2-weighted fast spin echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images with conventional techniques of A- and B-scan ultrasound, transcleral illumination, and placement of tantalum markers around tumor base and (2) to evaluate whether the surgically placed marker ring tumor delineation can be replaced by 3D MRI based tumor delineation. High-resolution 3D T2-weighted fast spin echo (3D FSE) MRI scans were obtained for 60 consecutive ocular melanoma patients using a 1.5 T MRI (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI), in a standard head coil. These patients were subsequently treated with proton beam therapy at the UC Davis Cyclotron, Davis, CA. The tumor was delineated by placement of tantalum rings (radio-opaque markers) around the tumor periphery as defined by pupillary transillumination during surgery. A point light source, placed against the sclera, was also used to confirm ring agreement with indirect ophthalmoscopy. When necessary, intraoperative ultrasound was also performed. The patients were planned using EYEPLAN software and the tumor volumes were obtained. For analysis, the tumors were divided into four categories based on tumor height and basal diameter. In order to assess the impact of high-resolution 3D T2 FSE MRI, the tumor volumes were outlined on the MRI scans by two independent observers and the tumor volumes calculated for each patient. Six (10%) of 60 patients had tumors, which were not visible on 3D MRI images. These six patients had tumors with tumor heights {<=}3 mm. A small intraobserver variation with a mean of (-0.22{+-}4)% was seen in tumor volumes delineated by 3D T2 FSE MR images. The ratio of tumor volumes measured on MRI to EYEPLAN for the largest to the smallest tumor volumes varied between 0.993 and 1.02 for 54 patients. The tumor volumes measured directly on 3D T2 FSE MRI ranged from 4.03 to 0.075 cm{sup 3

  12. 3D MRI-based tumor delineation of ocular melanoma and its comparison with conventional techniques.

    PubMed

    Daftari, Inder k; Aghaian, Elsa; O'Brien, Joan M; Dillon, William; Phillips, Theodore L

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study is to (1) compare the delineation of the tumor volume for ocular melanoma on high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) T2-weighted fast spin echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images with conventional techniques of A- and B-scan ultrasound, transcleral illumination, and placement of tantalum markers around tumor base and (2) to evaluate whether the surgically placed marker ring tumor delineation can be replaced by 3D MRI based tumor delineation. High-resolution 3D T2-weighted fast spin echo (3D FSE) MRI scans were obtained for 60 consecutive ocular melanoma patients using a 1.5 T MRI (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI), in a standard head coil. These patients were subsequently treated with proton beam therapy at the UC Davis Cyclotron, Davis, CA. The tumor was delineated by placement of tantalum rings (radio-opaque markers) around the tumor periphery as defined by pupillary transillumination during surgery. A point light source, placed against the sclera, was also used to confirm ring agreement with indirect ophthalmoscopy. When necessary, intraoperative ultrasound was also performed. The patients were planned using EYEPLAN software and the tumor volumes were obtained. For analysis, the tumors were divided into four categories based on tumor height and basal diameter. In order to assess the impact of high-resolution 3D T2 FSE MRI, the tumor volumes were outlined on the MRI scans by two independent observers and the tumor volumes calculated for each patient. Six (10%) of 60 patients had tumors, which were not visible on 3D MRI images. These six patients had tumors with tumor heights < or = 3 mm. A small intraobserver variation with a mean of (-0.22 +/- 4)% was seen in tumor volumes delineated by 3D T2 FSE MR images. The ratio of tumor volumes measured on MRI to EYEPLAN for the largest to the smallest tumor volumes varied between 0.993 and 1.02 for 54 patients. The tumor volumes measured directly on 3D T2 FSE MRI ranged from 4.03 to 0.075 cm3

  13. Total-Field Technique for 3-D Modeling of Short Period Teleseismic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiller, V.; Beller, S.; Operto, S.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Tago Pacheco, J.; Virieux, J.

    2014-12-01

    The massive development of dense seismic arrays and the rapid increase in computing capacity allow today to consider application of full waveform inversion of teleseismic data for high-resolution lithospheric imaging. We present an hybrid numerical method that allows for the modellingof short period teleseismic waves in 3D lithospheric target with both the discontinuous Galerkin finite elements method and finite difference method, opening the possibility to perform waveform inversion of seismograms recorded by dense regional broadband arrays. However, despite the supercomputer ability, the forward-problem remains expensive at global scale for teleseismic configuration especially when 3D numerical methods are considered. In order to perform the forward problem in a reasonable amount of time, we reduce the computational domain in which full waveform modelling is performed. We define a 3D regional domain located below the seismological network that is embedded in a homogeneous background or axisymmetric model, in which the seismic wavefield can be computed efficiently. The background wavefield is used to compute the full wavefield in the 3D regional domain using the so-called total-field/scattered-field technique. This method relies on the decomposition of the wavefield into a background and a scattered wavefields. The computational domain is subdivided into three sub-domains: an outer domain formed by the perfectly-matched absorbing layers, an intermediate domain in which only the outgoing wavefield scattered by the lithospheric heterogeneities is computed, and the inner domain formed by the lithospheric target in which the full wavefield is computed. In this study, we shall present simulations in realistic lithospheric target when the axisymetric background wavefield is computed with the AxiSEM softwave and the 3D simulation in lithospheric target model is performed with the discontinuous Galerkin or finite difference method.

  14. Experimental analysis of mechanical response of stabilized occipitocervical junction by 3D mark tracking technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaneau, A.; Doumalin, P.; Dupré, J. C.; Brèque, C.; Brémand, F.; D'Houtaud, S.; Rigoard, P.

    2010-06-01

    This study is about a biomechanical comparison of some stabilization solutions for the occipitocervical junction. Four kinds of occipito-cervical fixations are analysed in this work: lateral plates fixed by two kinds of screws, lateral plates fixed by hooks and median plate. To study mechanical rigidity of each one, tests have been performed on human skulls by applying loadings and by studying mechanical response of fixations and bone. For this experimental analysis, a specific setup has been developed to impose a load corresponding to the flexion-extension physiological movements. 3D mark tracking technique is employed to measure 3D displacement fields on the bone and on the fixations. Observations of displacement evolution on the bone according to the fixation show different rigidities given by each solution.

  15. Optimization of site characterization and remediation methods using 3-D geoscience modeling and visualization techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hedegaard, R.F.; Ho, J.; Eisert, J.

    1996-12-31

    Three-dimensional (3-D) geoscience volume modeling can be used to improve the efficiency of the environmental investigation and remediation process. At several unsaturated zone spill sites at two Superfund (CERCLA) sites (Military Installations) in California, all aspects of subsurface contamination have been characterized using an integrated computerized approach. With the aide of software such as LYNX GMS{trademark}, Wavefront`s Data Visualizer{trademark} and Gstools (public domain), the authors have created a central platform from which to map a contaminant plume, visualize the same plume three-dimensionally, and calculate volumes of contaminated soil or groundwater above important health risk thresholds. The developed methodology allows rapid data inspection for decisions such that the characterization process and remedial action design are optimized. By using the 3-D geoscience modeling and visualization techniques, the technical staff are able to evaluate the completeness and spatial variability of the data and conduct 3-D geostatistical predictions of contaminant and lithologic distributions. The geometry of each plume is estimated using 3-D variography on raw analyte values and indicator thresholds for the kriged model. Three-dimensional lithologic interpretation is based on either {open_quote}linked{close_quote} parallel cross sections or on kriged grid estimations derived from borehole data coded with permeability indicator thresholds. Investigative borings, as well as soil vapor extraction/injection wells, are sighted and excavation costs are estimated using these results. The principal advantages of the technique are the efficiency and rapidity with which meaningful results are obtained and the enhanced visualization capability which is a desirable medium to communicate with both the technical staff as well as nontechnical audiences.

  16. Monoplane 3D Overlay Roadmap versus Conventional Biplane 2D Roadmap Technique for Neurointervenional Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dong-Kyu; Stidd, David A.; Schafer, Sebastian; Chen, Michael; Moftakhar, Roham

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated whether a 3D overlay roadmap using monoplane fluoroscopy offers advantages over a conventional 2D roadmap using biplane fluoroscopy during endovascular aneurysm treatment. Materials and Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted for 131 consecutive cerebral aneurysm embolizations by three neurointerventionalists at a single institution. Allowing for a transition period, the periods from January 2012 to August 2012 (Time Period 1) and February 2013 to July 2013 (Time Period 2) were analyzed for radiation exposure, contrast administration, fluoroscopy time, procedure time, angiographic results, and perioperative complications. Two neurointerventionalists (Group 1) used a conventional 2D roadmap for both Time Periods, and one neurointerventionalist (Group 2) transitioned from a 2D roadmap during Time Period 1 to a 3D overlay roadmap during Time Period 2. Results During Time Period 2, Group 2 demonstrated reduced fluoroscopy time (p<0.001), procedure time (P=0.023), total radiation dose (p=0.001), and fluoroscopy dose (P=0.017) relative to Group 1. During Time Period 2, there was no difference of immediate angiographic results and procedure complications between the two groups. Through the transition from Time Period 1 to Time Period 2, Group 2 demonstrated decreased fluoroscopy time (p< 0.001), procedure time (p=0.022), and procedure complication rate (p=0.041) in Time Period 2 relative to Time Period 1. Conclusion The monoplane 3D overlay roadmap technique reduced fluoroscopy dose and fluoroscopy time during neurointervention of cerebral aneurysms with similar angiographic occlusions and complications rate relative to biplane 2D roadmap, which implies possible compensation of limitations of monoplane fluoroscopy by 3D overlay technique. PMID:27621947

  17. A Shell/3D Modeling Technique for the Analyses of Delaminated Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; OBrien, T. Kevin

    2001-01-01

    A shell/3D modeling technique was developed for which a local three-dimensional solid finite element model is used only in the immediate vicinity of the delamination front. The goal was to combine the accuracy of the full three-dimensional solution with the computational efficiency of a plate or shell finite element model. Multi-point constraints provided a kinematically compatible interface between the local three-dimensional model and the global structural model which has been meshed with plate or shell finite elements. Double Cantilever Beam (DCB), End Notched Flexure (ENF), and Single Leg Bending (SLB) specimens were modeled using the shell/3D technique to study the feasibility for pure mode I (DCB), mode II (ENF) and mixed mode I/II (SLB) cases. Mixed mode strain energy release rate distributions were computed across the width of the specimens using the virtual crack closure technique. Specimens with a unidirectional layup and with a multidirectional layup where the delamination is located between two non-zero degree plies were simulated. For a local three-dimensional model, extending to a minimum of about three specimen thicknesses on either side of the delamination front, the results were in good agreement with mixed mode strain energy release rates obtained from computations where the entire specimen had been modeled with solid elements. For large built-up composite structures modeled with plate elements, the shell/3D modeling technique offers a great potential for reducing the model size, since only a relatively small section in the vicinity of the delamination front needs to be modeled with solid elements.

  18. 3D cell culture: a review of current approaches and techniques.

    PubMed

    Haycock, John W

    2011-01-01

    Cell culture in two dimensions has been routinely and diligently undertaken in thousands of laboratories worldwide for the past four decades. However, the culture of cells in two dimensions is arguably primitive and does not reproduce the anatomy or physiology of a tissue for informative or useful study. Creating a third dimension for cell culture is clearly more relevant, but requires a multidisciplinary approach and multidisciplinary expertise. When entering the third dimension, investigators need to consider the design of scaffolds for supporting the organisation of cells or the use of bioreactors for controlling nutrient and waste product exchange. As 3D culture systems become more mature and relevant to human and animal physiology, the ability to design and develop co-cultures becomes possible as does the ability to integrate stem cells. The primary objectives for developing 3D cell culture systems vary widely - and range from engineering tissues for clinical delivery through to the development of models for drug screening. The intention of this review is to provide a general overview of the common approaches and techniques for designing 3D culture models.

  19. Determining the chronological order of crossing lines using 3D imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkinen, V.; Barbeau, C.; Kassamakov, I.; Lehto, S.; Reinikainen, T.; Aaltonen, J.; Hæggström, E.

    2010-10-01

    The chronological order of creation of crossing lines scratched into a copper surface was determined using 3D profiles measured with SWLI and CM. As the methods used are based only on the deformations of the surface and since the imaging techniques can be used for different materials, the proposed methods are potentially effective also on other materials. Determining the chronological order of orthogonally crossing lines is studied in forensic science. The order of creation of such lines allows in some cases determination of the history of an object without comparing it to other objects.. Methods based on two dimensional (2D) imaging have been used for this task, but such methods are ineffective if the lines are made with a similar tool. We apply Scanning White Light Interferometry (SWLI) and Confocal Microscopy (CM) to study crossing lines on a copper surface scratched with a scratching device. Both SWLI and CM quantitatively measure the 3D surface profiles with sufficient accuracy for forensic applications. 3D image processing allows removing unimportant features, such as surface form and roughness, as well as measurement noise from the measured profiles. Separating inherent features in the crossing area, from other surface characteristics allows one to determine the sequence of creation of the lines even on a rough and wavy surface.

  20. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Allison; de Bever, Josh; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  1. Enhancing photogrammetric 3d city models with procedural modeling techniques for urban planning support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubiger-Banz, S.; Arisona, S. M.; Zhong, C.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a workflow to increase the level of detail of reality-based 3D urban models. It combines the established workflows from photogrammetry and procedural modeling in order to exploit distinct advantages of both approaches. The combination has advantages over purely automatic acquisition in terms of visual quality, accuracy and model semantics. Compared to manual modeling, procedural techniques can be much more time effective while maintaining the qualitative properties of the modeled environment. In addition, our method includes processes for procedurally adding additional features such as road and rail networks. The resulting models meet the increasing needs in urban environments for planning, inventory, and analysis.

  2. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Allison; Bever, Josh de; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  3. Microcomputer-based technique for 3-D reconstruction and volume measurement of computed tomographic images. Part 2: Anaplastic primary brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Albright, R E; Fram, E K

    1988-12-01

    Serial computed tomography (CT) plays an integral part in monitoring effects of therapy for primary anaplastic brain tumors. Despite advances in CT technology, clinicians often cannot obtain accurate quantitative volume information to complement the qualitative assessment of tumor change. This paper presents a microcomputer-based method that provides both quantitative volume measurements and 3-D reconstructions of primary anaplastic brain tumors based on their hard copy CT or magnetic resonance imaging studies. The findings of this study demonstrate that planimetry is feasible for routine clinical use and is superior in accuracy to the spherical geometric model, which is shown to significantly overestimate tumor volume. The findings of 62 quantitative tumor studies (17 patients) showed a direct relationship between the total tumor volume and the volume of the hypodense intratumor core. There was no evidence of a relationship between the total tumor volume and the amount of peritumor low density (edema).

  4. Three-dimensional echocardiographic planimetry of maximal regurgitant orifice area in myxomatous mitral regurgitation: intraoperative comparison with proximal flow convergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breburda, C. S.; Griffin, B. P.; Pu, M.; Rodriguez, L.; Cosgrove, D. M. 3rd; Thomas, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We sought to validate direct planimetry of mitral regurgitant orifice area from three-dimensional echocardiographic reconstructions. BACKGROUND: Regurgitant orifice area (ROA) is an important measure of the severity of mitral regurgitation (MR) that up to now has been calculated from hemodynamic data rather than measured directly. We hypothesized that improved spatial resolution of the mitral valve (MV) with three-dimensional (3D) echo might allow accurate planimetry of ROA. METHODS: We reconstructed the MV using 3D echo with 3 degrees rotational acquisitions (TomTec) using a transesophageal (TEE) multiplane probe in 15 patients undergoing MV repair (age 59 +/- 11 years). One observer reconstructed the prolapsing mitral leaflet in a left atrial plane parallel to the ROA and planimetered the two-dimensional (2D) projection of the maximal ROA. A second observer, blinded to the results of the first, calculated maximal ROA using the proximal convergence method defined as maximal flow rate (2pi(r2)va, where r is the radius of a color alias contour with velocity va) divided by regurgitant peak velocity (obtained by continuous wave [CW] Doppler) and corrected as necessary for proximal flow constraint. RESULTS: Maximal ROA was 0.79 +/- 0.39 (mean +/- SD) cm2 by 3D and 0.86 +/- 0.42 cm2 by proximal convergence (p = NS). Maximal ROA by 3D echo (y) was highly correlated with the corresponding flow measurement (x) (y = 0.87x + 0.03, r = 0.95, p < 0.001) with close agreement seen (AROA (y - x) = 0.07 +/- 0.12 cm2). CONCLUSIONS: 3D echo imaging of the MV allows direct visualization and planimetry of the ROA in patients with severe MR with good agreement to flow-based proximal convergence measurements.

  5. In vitro vascularization of a combined system based on a 3D printing technique.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinru; Liu, Libiao; Wang, Jiayin; Xu, Yufan; Zhang, Weiming; Khang, Gilson; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-10-01

    A vital challenge in complex organ manufacturing is to vascularize large combined tissues. The aim of this study is to vascularize in vitro an adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC)/fibrin/collagen incorporated three-dimensional (3D) poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold (10 × 10 × 10 mm(3) ) with interconnected channels. A low-temperature 3D printing technique was employed to build the PLGA scaffold. A step-by-step cocktail procedure was designed to engage or steer the ADSCs in the PLGA channels towards both endothelial and smooth muscle cell lineages. The combined system had sufficient mechanical properties to support the cell/fibrin/collagen hydrogel inside the predefined PLGA channels. The ADSCs encapsulated in the fibrin/collagen hydrogel differentiated to endothelial and smooth muscle cell lineage, respectively, corresponding to their respective locations in the construct and formed vascular-like structures. This technique allows in vitro vascularization of the predefined PLGA channels and provides a choice for complex organ manufacture. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Fabrication of capacitive acoustic resonators combining 3D printing and 2D inkjet printing techniques.

    PubMed

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-10-14

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency.

  7. Fabrication of Capacitive Acoustic Resonators Combining 3D Printing and 2D Inkjet Printing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Ogam, Erick; Loussert, Christophe; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A capacitive acoustic resonator developed by combining three-dimensional (3D) printing and two-dimensional (2D) printed electronics technique is described. During this work, a patterned bottom structure with rigid backplate and cavity is fabricated directly by a 3D printing method, and then a direct write inkjet printing technique has been employed to print a silver conductive layer. A novel approach has been used to fabricate a diaphragm for the acoustic sensor as well, where the conductive layer is inkjet-printed on a pre-stressed thin organic film. After assembly, the resulting structure contains an electrically conductive diaphragm positioned at a distance from a fixed bottom electrode separated by a spacer. Measurements confirm that the transducer acts as capacitor. The deflection of the diaphragm in response to the incident acoustic single was observed by a laser Doppler vibrometer and the corresponding change of capacitance has been calculated, which is then compared with the numerical result. Observation confirms that the device performs as a resonator and provides adequate sensitivity and selectivity at its resonance frequency. PMID:26473878

  8. Development and comparison of projection and image space 3D nodule insertion techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, Marthony; Solomon, Justin; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to develop and compare two methods of inserting computerized virtual lesions into CT datasets. 24 physical (synthetic) nodules of three sizes and four morphologies were inserted into an anthropomorphic chest phantom (LUNGMAN, KYOTO KAGAKU). The phantom was scanned (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) with and without nodules present, and images were reconstructed with filtered back projection and iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) at 0.6 mm slice thickness using a standard thoracic CT protocol at multiple dose settings. Virtual 3D CAD models based on the physical nodules were virtually inserted (accounting for the system MTF) into the nodule-free CT data using two techniques. These techniques include projection-based and image-based insertion. Nodule volumes were estimated using a commercial segmentation tool (iNtuition, TeraRecon, Inc.). Differences were tested using paired t-tests and R2 goodness of fit between the virtually and physically inserted nodules. Both insertion techniques resulted in nodule volumes very similar to the real nodules (<3% difference) and in most cases the differences were not statistically significant. Also, R2 values were all <0.97 for both insertion techniques. These data imply that these techniques can confidently be used as a means of inserting virtual nodules in CT datasets. These techniques can be instrumental in building hybrid CT datasets composed of patient images with virtually inserted nodules.

  9. Strengthening of 3D Printed Fused Deposition Manufactured Parts Using the Fill Compositing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Belter, Joseph T.; Dollar, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a technique for increasing the strength of thermoplastic fused deposition manufactured printed parts while retaining the benefits of the process such as ease, speed of implementation, and complex part geometries. By carefully placing voids in the printed parts and filling them with high-strength resins, we can improve the overall part strength and stiffness by up to 45% and 25%, respectively. We discuss the process parameters necessary to use this strengthening technique and the theoretically possible strength improvements to bending beam members. We then show three-point bend testing data comparing solid printed ABS samples with those strengthened through the fill compositing process, as well as examples of 3D printed parts used in real-world applications. PMID:25880807

  10. 3D Sound Techniques for Sound Source Elevation in a Loudspeaker Listening Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong Guk; Jo, Sungdong; Kim, Hong Kook; Jang, Sei-Jin; Lee, Seok-Pil

    In this paper, we propose several 3D sound techniques for sound source elevation in stereo loudspeaker listening environments. The proposed method integrates a head-related transfer function (HRTF) for sound positioning and early reflection for adding reverberant circumstance. In addition, spectral notch filtering and directional band boosting techniques are also included for increasing elevation perception capability. In order to evaluate the elevation performance of the proposed method, subjective listening tests are conducted using several kinds of sound sources such as white noise, sound effects, speech, and music samples. It is shown from the tests that the degrees of perceived elevation by the proposed method are around the 17º to 21º when the stereo loudspeakers are located on the horizontal plane.

  11. Strengthening of 3D printed fused deposition manufactured parts using the fill compositing technique.

    PubMed

    Belter, Joseph T; Dollar, Aaron M

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a technique for increasing the strength of thermoplastic fused deposition manufactured printed parts while retaining the benefits of the process such as ease, speed of implementation, and complex part geometries. By carefully placing voids in the printed parts and filling them with high-strength resins, we can improve the overall part strength and stiffness by up to 45% and 25%, respectively. We discuss the process parameters necessary to use this strengthening technique and the theoretically possible strength improvements to bending beam members. We then show three-point bend testing data comparing solid printed ABS samples with those strengthened through the fill compositing process, as well as examples of 3D printed parts used in real-world applications.

  12. Analysis of Composite Panel-Stiffener Debonding Using a Shell/3D Modeling Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Ratcliffe, James; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2007-01-01

    Interlaminar fracture mechanics has proven useful for characterizing the onset of delaminations in composites and has been used successfully primarily to investigate onset in fracture toughness specimens and laboratory size coupon type specimens. Future acceptance of the methodology by industry and certification authorities, however, requires the successful demonstration of the methodology on the structural level. For this purpose, a panel was selected that is reinforced with stiffeners. Shear loading causes the panel to buckle, and the resulting out-of-plane deformations initiate skin/stiffener separation at the location of an embedded defect. A small section of the stiffener foot, web and noodle as well as the panel skin in the vicinity of the delamination front were modeled with a local 3D solid model. Across the width of the stiffener foot, the mixedmode strain energy release rates were calculated using the virtual crack closure technique. A failure index was calculated by correlating the results with a mixed-mode failure criterion of the graphite/epoxy material. Computed failure indices were compared to corresponding results where the entire web was modeled with shell elements and only a small section of the stiffener foot and panel were modeled locally with solid elements. Including the stiffener web in the local 3D solid model increased the computed failure index. Further including the noodle and transition radius in the local 3D solid model changed the local distribution across the width. The magnitude of the failure index decreased with increasing transition radius and noodle area. For the transition radii modeled, the material properties used for the noodle area had a negligible effect on the results. The results of this study are intended to be used as a guide for conducting finite element and fracture mechanics analyses of delamination and debonding in complex structures such as integrally stiffened panels.

  13. Monitoring of resin transfer in CFRP molding using 3D-DIC technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dingding; Arakawa, Kazuo; Uchino, Masakazu

    2014-06-01

    Vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) is a manufacturing process that is used to make large and complex composite structures. While promising, VARTM still suffers from relatively low fiber volume fractions and high void content in the final products. The infusion step of VARTM is very important, because the quality of the final product is usually decided by this process. Consequently, a comprehensive understanding of the infusion process is essential. In this study, a three-dimensional digital image correlation (3D-DIC) testing system was set up to research the entire infusion process through the monitor of the thickness change of the laminates in this process. Two distinct VARTM processes, with and without a rigid cover mold, were designed to be studied. The 3D-DIC technique proved to be a valid method that not only can monitor the thickness evolution of isolated points but also can give a full-field distribution of the thickness change of the laminate. The results showed that, without the use of a rigid cover mold, the stack of reinforcements initially shrank and then expanded as the resin filled the cavities before closing the inlet, while when using a rigid cover mold there was an additional expansion period before the shrinkage occurred. Such an expansion stage could promote the flow of the resin, shortening the infusion time.

  14. Panel Stiffener Debonding Analysis using a Shell/3D Modeling Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Ratcliffe, James G.; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2008-01-01

    A shear loaded, stringer reinforced composite panel is analyzed to evaluate the fidelity of computational fracture mechanics analyses of complex structures. Shear loading causes the panel to buckle. The resulting out -of-plane deformations initiate skin/stringer separation at the location of an embedded defect. The panel and surrounding load fixture were modeled with shell elements. A small section of the stringer foot, web and noodle as well as the panel skin near the delamination front were modeled with a local 3D solid model. Across the width of the stringer fo to, the mixed-mode strain energy release rates were calculated using the virtual crack closure technique. A failure index was calculated by correlating the results with a mixed-mode failure criterion of the graphite/epoxy material. The objective was to study the effect of the fidelity of the local 3D finite element model on the computed mixed-mode strain energy release rates and the failure index.

  15. Application Of Metric Space Technique (mst) In 2-d And 3-d To Sdss Dr5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yongfeng; Batuski, D. J.; Khalil, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Metric Space Technique (MST) is a 2-D analysis method using multiple measures for quantitative analysis of any type of structure in an `image'. All potential values of the measures for such distributions are thus coordinates in a multi-parameter space, and the analysis is based on considering a sample's measures (called `output functions'), and their distance from the origin, which corresponds to the measures of the observed SDSS sample, in this multi-parameter space. Applications of this method to thin (approximately 2-D) slices of SDSS DR5 have yielded a detailed comparison of numerical models (Berlind et al. 2006, Croton et al. 2005) against the SDSS galaxy 2-D distribution structure in multi-parameter space. We present those results, including discussion of the effects of transforming from physical space to redshift space on the statistics at different scales. We also extended this 2-D method into 3-D, and we present comparisons of the SDSS galaxy 3-D distribution versus the same numerical simulations.

  16. Panel-Stiffener Debonding and Analysis Using a Shell/3D Modeling Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Ratcliffe, James G.; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2007-01-01

    A shear loaded, stringer reinforced composite panel is analyzed to evaluate the fidelity of computational fracture mechanics analyses of complex structures. Shear loading causes the panel to buckle. The resulting out-of-plane deformations initiate skin/stringer separation at the location of an embedded defect. The panel and surrounding load fixture were modeled with shell elements. A small section of the stringer foot, web and noodle as well as the panel skin near the delamination front were modeled with a local 3D solid model. Across the width of the stringer foot, the mixed-mode strain energy release rates were calculated using the virtual crack closure technique. A failure index was calculated by correlating the results with a mixed-mode failure criterion of the graphite/epoxy material. The objective was to study the effect of the fidelity of the local 3D finite element model on the computed mixed-mode strain energy release rates and the failure index.

  17. MO-B-BRD-03: Principles, Pitfalls and Techniques of 3D Printing for Bolus and Compensators

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.

    2015-06-15

    This session is designed so that the learning objectives are practical. The intent is that the attendee may take home an understanding of not just the technology, but also the logistical steps necessary to execute these 3D printing techniques in the clinic. Four practical 3D printing topics will be discussed: (i) Creating bolus and compensators for photon machines; (ii) tools for proton therapy; (iii) clinical applications in imaging; (iv) custom phantom design for clinic and research use. The use of 3D printers within the radiation oncology setting is proving to be a useful tool for creating patient specific bolus and compensators with the added benefit of cost savings. Creating the proper protocol is essential to ensuring that the desired effect is achieved and modeled in the treatment planning system. The critical choice of printer material (since it determines the interaction with the radiation) will be discussed. Selection of 3D printer type, design methods, verification of dose calculation, and the printing process will be detailed to give the basis for establishing your own protocol for electron and photon fields. A practical discussion of likely obstacles that may be encountered will be included. The diversity of systems and techniques in proton facilities leads to different facilities having very different requirements for beam modifying hardware and quality assurance devices. Many departments find the need to design and fabricate facility-specific equipment, making 3D printing an attractive technology. 3D printer applications in proton therapy will be discussed, including beam filters and compensators, and the design of proton therapy specific quality assurance tools. Quality control specific to 3D printing in proton therapy will be addressed. Advantages and disadvantages of different printing technology for these applications will also be discussed. 3D printing applications using high-resolution radiology-based imaging data will be presented. This data

  18. Quasi-Facial Communication for Online Learning Using 3D Modeling Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yushun; Zhuang, Yueting

    2008-01-01

    Online interaction with 3D facial animation is an alternative way of face-to-face communication for distance education. 3D facial modeling is essential for virtual educational environments establishment. This article presents a novel 3D facial modeling solution that facilitates quasi-facial communication for online learning. Our algorithm builds…

  19. Pattern Transformation of Heat-Shrinkable Polymer by Three-Dimensional (3D) Printing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quan; Yan, Dong; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    A significant challenge in conventional heat-shrinkable polymers is to produce controllable microstructures. Here we report that the polymer material fabricated by three-dimensional (3D) printing technique has a heat-shrinkable property, whose initial microstructure can undergo a spontaneous pattern transformation under heating. The underlying mechanism is revealed by evaluating internal strain of the printed polymer from its fabricating process. It is shown that a uniform internal strain is stored in the polymer during the printing process and can be released when heated above its glass transition temperature. Furthermore, the internal strain can be used to trigger the pattern transformation of the heat-shrinkable polymer in a controllable way. Our work provides insightful ideas to understand a novel mechanism on the heat-shrinkable effect of printed material, but also to present a simple approach to fabricate heat-shrinkable polymer with a controllable thermo-structural response. PMID:25757881

  20. Thermal characterization of a liquid resin for 3D printing using photothermal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Pérez, José L.; Pincel, Pavel Vieyra; Cruz-Orea, Alfredo; Correa-Pacheco, Zormy N.

    2016-05-01

    Thermal properties of a liquid resin were studied by thermal lens spectrometry (TLS) and open photoacoustic cell (OPC), respectively. In the case of the TLS technique, the two mismatched mode experimental configuration was used with a He-Ne laser, as a probe beam and an Argon laser was used as the excitation source. The characteristic time constant of the transient thermal lens was obtained by fitting the theoretical expression to the experimental data in order to obtain the thermal diffusivity ( α) of the resin. On the other hand, the sample thermal effusivity ( e) was obtained by using the OPC technique. In this technique, an Argon laser was used as the excitation source and was operated at 514 nm with an output power of 30 mW. From the obtained thermal diffusivity ( α) and thermal effusivity ( e) values, the thermal conductivity ( k) and specific heat capacity per unit volume ( ρc) of resin were calculated through the relationships k = e( α)1/2 and ρc = e/( α)1/2. The obtained thermal parameters were compared with the thermal parameters of the literature. To our knowledge, the thermal characterization of resin has not been reported until now. The present study has applications in laser stereo-lithography to manufacture 3D printing pieces.

  1. Comparative validation of single-shot optical techniques for laparoscopic 3-D surface reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Maier-Hein, L; Groch, A; Bartoli, A; Bodenstedt, S; Boissonnat, G; Chang, P-L; Clancy, N T; Elson, D S; Haase, S; Heim, E; Hornegger, J; Jannin, P; Kenngott, H; Kilgus, T; Müller-Stich, B; Oladokun, D; Röhl, S; Dos Santos, T R; Schlemmer, H-P; Seitel, A; Speidel, S; Wagner, M; Stoyanov, D

    2014-10-01

    Intra-operative imaging techniques for obtaining the shape and morphology of soft-tissue surfaces in vivo are a key enabling technology for advanced surgical systems. Different optical techniques for 3-D surface reconstruction in laparoscopy have been proposed, however, so far no quantitative and comparative validation has been performed. Furthermore, robustness of the methods to clinically important factors like smoke or bleeding has not yet been assessed. To address these issues, we have formed a joint international initiative with the aim of validating different state-of-the-art passive and active reconstruction methods in a comparative manner. In this comprehensive in vitro study, we investigated reconstruction accuracy using different organs with various shape and texture and also tested reconstruction robustness with respect to a number of factors like the pose of the endoscope as well as the amount of blood or smoke present in the scene. The study suggests complementary advantages of the different techniques with respect to accuracy, robustness, point density, hardware complexity and computation time. While reconstruction accuracy under ideal conditions was generally high, robustness is a remaining issue to be addressed. Future work should include sensor fusion and in vivo validation studies in a specific clinical context. To trigger further research in surface reconstruction, stereoscopic data of the study will be made publically available at www.open-CAS.com upon publication of the paper.

  2. Advanced Multivariate Inversion Techniques for High Resolution 3D Geophysical Modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceira, M.; Zhang, H.; Rowe, C. A.

    2009-12-01

    We focus on the development and application of advanced multivariate inversion techniques to generate a realistic, comprehensive, and high-resolution 3D model of the seismic structure of the crust and upper mantle that satisfies several independent geophysical datasets. Building on previous efforts of joint invesion using surface wave dispersion measurements, gravity data, and receiver functions, we have added a fourth dataset, seismic body wave P and S travel times, to the simultaneous joint inversion method. We present a 3D seismic velocity model of the crust and upper mantle of northwest China resulting from the simultaneous, joint inversion of these four data types. Surface wave dispersion measurements are primarily sensitive to seismic shear-wave velocities, but at shallow depths it is difficult to obtain high-resolution velocities and to constrain the structure due to the depth-averaging of the more easily-modeled, longer-period surface waves. Gravity inversions have the greatest resolving power at shallow depths, and they provide constraints on rock density variations. Moreover, while surface wave dispersion measurements are primarily sensitive to vertical shear-wave velocity averages, body wave receiver functions are sensitive to shear-wave velocity contrasts and vertical travel-times. Addition of the fourth dataset, consisting of seismic travel-time data, helps to constrain the shear wave velocities both vertically and horizontally in the model cells crossed by the ray paths. Incorporation of both P and S body wave travel times allows us to invert for both P and S velocity structure, capitalizing on empirical relationships between both wave types’ seismic velocities with rock densities, thus eliminating the need for ad hoc assumptions regarding the Poisson ratios. Our new tomography algorithm is a modification of the Maceira and Ammon joint inversion code, in combination with the Zhang and Thurber TomoDD (double-difference tomography) program.

  3. 3D-Laser-Scanning Technique Applied to Bulk Density Measurements of Apollo Lunar Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macke, R. J.; Kent, J. J.; Kiefer, W. S.; Britt, D. T.

    2015-01-01

    In order to better interpret gravimetric data from orbiters such as GRAIL and LRO to understand the subsurface composition and structure of the lunar crust, it is import to have a reliable database of the density and porosity of lunar materials. To this end, we have been surveying these physical properties in both lunar meteorites and Apollo lunar samples. To measure porosity, both grain density and bulk density are required. For bulk density, our group has historically utilized sub-mm bead immersion techniques extensively, though several factors have made this technique problematic for our work with Apollo samples. Samples allocated for measurement are often smaller than optimal for the technique, leading to large error bars. Also, for some samples we were required to use pure alumina beads instead of our usual glass beads. The alumina beads were subject to undesirable static effects, producing unreliable results. Other investigators have tested the use of 3d laser scanners on meteorites for measuring bulk volumes. Early work, though promising, was plagued with difficulties including poor response on dark or reflective surfaces, difficulty reproducing sharp edges, and large processing time for producing shape models. Due to progress in technology, however, laser scanners have improved considerably in recent years. We tested this technique on 27 lunar samples in the Apollo collection using a scanner at NASA Johnson Space Center. We found it to be reliable and more precise than beads, with the added benefit that it involves no direct contact with the sample, enabling the study of particularly friable samples for which bead immersion is not possible

  4. A Novel Bio-carrier Fabricated Using 3D Printing Technique for Wastewater Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yang; Fan, Shu-Qian; Shen, Yu; Yang, Ji-Xiang; Yan, Peng; Chen, You-Peng; Li, Jing; Guo, Jin-Song; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Fang, Fang; Liu, Shao-Yang

    2015-07-01

    The structure of bio-carriers is one of the key operational characteristics of a biofilm reactor. The goal of this study is to develop a series of novel fullerene-type bio-carriers using the three-dimensional printing (3DP) technique. 3DP can fabricate bio-carriers with more specialized structures compared with traditional fabrication processes. In this research, three types of fullerene-type bio-carriers were fabricated using the 3DP technique and then compared with bio-carrier K3 (from AnoxKaldnes) in the areas of physicochemical properties and biofilm growth. Images acquired by 3D profiling and SEM indicated that the surface roughness of the 3DP bio-carrier was greater than that of K3. Furthermore, contact angle data indicated that the 3DP bio-carriers were more hydrophilic than K3. The biofilm on the 3DP bio-carriers exhibited higher microbial activity and stronger adhesion ability. These findings were attributed to excellent mass transfer of the substrate (and oxygen) between the vapour-liquid-solid tri-phase system and to the surface characteristics. It is concluded that the novel 3DP fullerene-type bio-carriers are ideal carriers for biofilm adherence and growth.

  5. A Novel Bio-carrier Fabricated Using 3D Printing Technique for Wastewater Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yang; Fan, Shu-Qian; Shen, Yu; Yang, Ji-Xiang; Yan, Peng; Chen, You-Peng; Li, Jing; Guo, Jin-Song; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Fang, Fang; Liu, Shao-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The structure of bio-carriers is one of the key operational characteristics of a biofilm reactor. The goal of this study is to develop a series of novel fullerene-type bio-carriers using the three-dimensional printing (3DP) technique. 3DP can fabricate bio-carriers with more specialized structures compared with traditional fabrication processes. In this research, three types of fullerene-type bio-carriers were fabricated using the 3DP technique and then compared with bio-carrier K3 (from AnoxKaldnes) in the areas of physicochemical properties and biofilm growth. Images acquired by 3D profiling and SEM indicated that the surface roughness of the 3DP bio-carrier was greater than that of K3. Furthermore, contact angle data indicated that the 3DP bio-carriers were more hydrophilic than K3. The biofilm on the 3DP bio-carriers exhibited higher microbial activity and stronger adhesion ability. These findings were attributed to excellent mass transfer of the substrate (and oxygen) between the vapour-liquid-solid tri-phase system and to the surface characteristics. It is concluded that the novel 3DP fullerene-type bio-carriers are ideal carriers for biofilm adherence and growth. PMID:26202477

  6. A Novel Bio-carrier Fabricated Using 3D Printing Technique for Wastewater Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yang; Fan, Shu-Qian; Shen, Yu; Yang, Ji-Xiang; Yan, Peng; Chen, You-Peng; Li, Jing; Guo, Jin-Song; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Fang, Fang; Liu, Shao-Yang

    2015-07-23

    The structure of bio-carriers is one of the key operational characteristics of a biofilm reactor. The goal of this study is to develop a series of novel fullerene-type bio-carriers using the three-dimensional printing (3DP) technique. 3DP can fabricate bio-carriers with more specialized structures compared with traditional fabrication processes. In this research, three types of fullerene-type bio-carriers were fabricated using the 3DP technique and then compared with bio-carrier K3 (from AnoxKaldnes) in the areas of physicochemical properties and biofilm growth. Images acquired by 3D profiling and SEM indicated that the surface roughness of the 3DP bio-carrier was greater than that of K3. Furthermore, contact angle data indicated that the 3DP bio-carriers were more hydrophilic than K3. The biofilm on the 3DP bio-carriers exhibited higher microbial activity and stronger adhesion ability. These findings were attributed to excellent mass transfer of the substrate (and oxygen) between the vapour-liquid-solid tri-phase system and to the surface characteristics. It is concluded that the novel 3DP fullerene-type bio-carriers are ideal carriers for biofilm adherence and growth.

  7. 3D objects enlargement technique using an optical system and multiple SLMs for electronic holography.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenji; Ichihashi, Yasuyuki; Senoh, Takanori; Oi, Ryutaro; Kurita, Taiichiro

    2012-09-10

    One problem in electronic holography, which is caused by the display performance of spatial light modulators (SLM), is that the size of reconstructed 3D objects is small. Although methods for increasing the size using multiple SLMs have been considered, they typically had the problem that some parts of 3D objects were missing as a result of the gap between adjacent SLMs or 3D objects lost the vertical parallax. This paper proposes a method of resolving this problem by locating an optical system containing a lens array and other components in front of multiple SLMs. We used an optical system and 9 SLMs to construct a device equivalent to an SLM with approximately 74,600,000 pixels and used this to reconstruct 3D objects in both the horizontal and vertical parallax with an image size of 63 mm without losing any part of 3D objects.

  8. 3D dynamic model of healthy and pathologic arteries for ultrasound technique evaluation.

    PubMed

    Balocco, Simone; Basset, Olivier; Azencot, Jacques; Tortoli, Piero; Cachard, Christian

    2008-12-01

    A 3D model reproducing the biomechanical behavior of human blood vessels is presented. The model, based on a multilayer geometry composed of right generalized cylinders, enables the representation of different vessel morphologies, including bifurcations, either healthy or affected by stenoses. Using a finite element approach, blood flow is simulated by considering a dynamic displacement of the scatterers (erythrocytes), while arterial pulsation due to the hydraulic pressure is taken into account through a fluid-structure interaction based on a wall model. Each region is acoustically characterized using FIELD II software, which produces the radio frequency echo signals corresponding to echographic scans. Three acoustic physiological phantoms of carotid arteries surrounded by elastic tissue are presented to illustrate the model's capability. The first corresponds to a healthy blood vessel, the second includes a 50% stenosis, and the third represents a carotid bifurcation. Examples of M mode, B mode and color Doppler images derived from these phantoms are shown. Two examples of M-mode image segmentation and the identification of the atherosclerotic plaque boundaries on Doppler color images are reported. The model could be used as a tool for the preliminary evaluation of ultrasound signal processing and visualization techniques.

  9. Computerized modeling techniques predict the 3D structure of H₄R: facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Zaid, Hilal; Ismael-Shanak, Siba; Michaeli, Amit; Rayan, Anwar

    2012-01-01

    The functional characterization of proteins presents a daily challenge r biochemical, medical and computational sciences, especially when the structures are undetermined empirically, as in the case of the Histamine H4 Receptor (H₄R). H₄R is a member of the GPCR superfamily that plays a vital role in immune and inflammatory responses. To date, the concept of GPCRs modeling is highlighted in textbooks and pharmaceutical pamphlets, and this group of proteins has been the subject of almost 3500 publications in the scientific literature. The dynamic nature of determining the GPCRs structure was elucidated through elegant and creative modeling methodologies, implemented by many groups around the world. H₄R which belongs to the GPCR family was cloned in 2000; understandably, its biological activity was reported only 65 times in pubmed. Here we attempt to cover the fundamental concepts of H₄R structure modeling and its implementation in drug discovery, especially those that have been experimentally tested and to highlight some ideas that are currently being discussed on the dynamic nature of H₄R and GPCRs computerized techniques for 3D structure modeling.

  10. Routine characterization of 3-D profiles of SRF cavity defects using replica techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, M.; Wu, G.; Burk, D.; Ozelis, J.; Harms, E.; Sergatskov, D.; Hicks, D.; Cooley, L.D.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Recent coordination of thermometry with optical images has shown that obvious defects at specific locations produce heat or even quench superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities, imposing a significant limit on the overall accelerating gradient produced by the cavity. Characterization of the topography at such locations provides clues about how the defects originated, from which schemes for their prevention might be devised. Topographic analyses also provide understanding of the electromagnetic mechanism by which defects limit cavity performance, from which viability of repair techniques might be assessed. In this article we discuss how a variety of two-component silicone-based room-temperature vulcanizing agents can be routinely used to make replicas of the cavity surface and extract topographic details of cavity defects. Previously, this level of detail could only be obtained by cutting suspect regions from the cavity, thus destroying the cavity. We show 3-D profiles extracted from several different 1.3 GHz cavities. The defect locations, which were all near cavity welds, compelled us to develop extraction techniques for both equator and iris welds as well as from deep inside long 9-cell cavities. Profilometry scans of the replicas yield micrometer-scale information, and we describe various curious features, such as small peaks at the bottom of pits, which were not apparent in previous optical inspections. We also discuss contour information in terms of electromagnetic mechanisms proposed by others for local cavity heating. We show that production of the replica followed by high-pressure rinsing dose not adversely affect the cavity RF performance.

  11. Comparison of Phase-Based 3D Near-Field Source Localization Techniques for UHF RFID

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Andreas; Miesen, Robert; Vossiek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present multiple techniques for phase-based narrowband backscatter tag localization in three-dimensional space with planar antenna arrays or synthetic apertures. Beamformer and MUSIC localization algorithms, known from near-field source localization and direction-of-arrival estimation, are applied to the 3D backscatter scenario and their performance in terms of localization accuracy is evaluated. We discuss the impact of different transceiver modes known from the literature, which evaluate different send and receive antenna path combinations for a single localization, as in multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems. Furthermore, we propose a new Singledimensional-MIMO (S-MIMO) transceiver mode, which is especially suited for use with mobile robot systems. Monte-Carlo simulations based on a realistic multipath error model ensure spatial correlation of the simulated signals, and serve to critically appraise the accuracies of the different localization approaches. A synthetic uniform rectangular array created by a robotic arm is used to evaluate selected localization techniques. We use an Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) setup to compare measurements with the theory and simulation. The results show how a mean localization accuracy of less than 30 cm can be reached in an indoor environment. Further simulations demonstrate how the distance between aperture and tag affects the localization accuracy and how the size and grid spacing of the rectangular array need to be adapted to improve the localization accuracy down to orders of magnitude in the centimeter range, and to maximize array efficiency in terms of localization accuracy per number of elements. PMID:27347976

  12. Performance assessment of 3D surface imaging technique for medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tuotuo; Geng, Jason; Li, Shidong

    2013-03-01

    Recent development in optical 3D surface imaging technologies provide better ways to digitalize the 3D surface and its motion in real-time. The non-invasive 3D surface imaging approach has great potential for many medical imaging applications, such as motion monitoring of radiotherapy, pre/post evaluation of plastic surgery and dermatology, to name a few. Various commercial 3D surface imaging systems have appeared on the market with different dimension, speed and accuracy. For clinical applications, the accuracy, reproducibility and robustness across the widely heterogeneous skin color, tone, texture, shape properties, and ambient lighting is very crucial. Till now, a systematic approach for evaluating the performance of different 3D surface imaging systems still yet exist. In this paper, we present a systematic performance assessment approach to 3D surface imaging system assessment for medical applications. We use this assessment approach to exam a new real-time surface imaging system we developed, dubbed "Neo3D Camera", for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The assessments include accuracy, field of view, coverage, repeatability, speed and sensitivity to environment, texture and color.

  13. A comparative analysis between active and passive techniques for underwater 3D reconstruction of close-range objects.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Gianfranco; Gallo, Alessandro; Bruno, Fabio; Muzzupappa, Maurizio

    2013-08-20

    In some application fields, such as underwater archaeology or marine biology, there is the need to collect three-dimensional, close-range data from objects that cannot be removed from their site. In particular, 3D imaging techniques are widely employed for close-range acquisitions in underwater environment. In this work we have compared in water two 3D imaging techniques based on active and passive approaches, respectively, and whole-field acquisition. The comparison is performed under poor visibility conditions, produced in the laboratory by suspending different quantities of clay in a water tank. For a fair comparison, a stereo configuration has been adopted for both the techniques, using the same setup, working distance, calibration, and objects. At the moment, the proposed setup is not suitable for real world applications, but it allowed us to conduct a preliminary analysis on the performances of the two techniques and to understand their capability to acquire 3D points in presence of turbidity. The performances have been evaluated in terms of accuracy and density of the acquired 3D points. Our results can be used as a reference for further comparisons in the analysis of other 3D techniques and algorithms.

  14. A Comparative Analysis between Active and Passive Techniques for Underwater 3D Reconstruction of Close-Range Objects

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Gianfranco; Gallo, Alessandro; Bruno, Fabio; Muzzupappa, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    In some application fields, such as underwater archaeology or marine biology, there is the need to collect three-dimensional, close-range data from objects that cannot be removed from their site. In particular, 3D imaging techniques are widely employed for close-range acquisitions in underwater environment. In this work we have compared in water two 3D imaging techniques based on active and passive approaches, respectively, and whole-field acquisition. The comparison is performed under poor visibility conditions, produced in the laboratory by suspending different quantities of clay in a water tank. For a fair comparison, a stereo configuration has been adopted for both the techniques, using the same setup, working distance, calibration, and objects. At the moment, the proposed setup is not suitable for real world applications, but it allowed us to conduct a preliminary analysis on the performances of the two techniques and to understand their capability to acquire 3D points in presence of turbidity. The performances have been evaluated in terms of accuracy and density of the acquired 3D points. Our results can be used as a reference for further comparisons in the analysis of other 3D techniques and algorithms. PMID:23966193

  15. Accelerating orthodontic tooth movement: A new, minimally-invasive corticotomy technique using a 3D-printed surgical template

    PubMed Central

    Giansanti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Background A reduction in orthodontic treatment time can be attained using corticotomies. The aggressive nature of corticotomy due to the elevation of muco-periosteal flaps and to the duration of the surgery raised reluctance for its employ among patients and dental community. This study aims to provide detailed information on the design and manufacture of a 3D-printed CAD-CAM (computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing) surgical guide which can aid the clinician in achieving a minimally-invasive, flapless corticotomy. Material and Methods An impression of dental arches was created; the models were digitally-acquired using a 3D scanner and saved as STereoLithography ( STL ) files. The patient underwent cone beam computed tomography (CBCT): images of jaws and teeth were transformed into 3D models and saved as an STL file. An acrylic template with the design of a surgical guide was manufactured and scanned. The STLs of jaws, scanned casts, and acrylic templates were matched. 3D modeling software allowed the view of the 3D models from different perspectives and planes with perfect rendering. The 3D model of the acrylic template was transformed into a surgical guide with slots designed to guide, at first, a scalpel blade and then a piezoelectric cutting insert. The 3D STL model of the surgical guide was printed. Results This procedure allowed the manufacturing of a 3D-printed CAD/CAM surgical guide, which overcomes the disadvantages of the corticotomy, removing the need for flap elevation. No discomfort, early surgical complications or unexpected events were observed. Conclusions The effectiveness of this minimally-invasive surgical technique can offer the clinician a valid alternative to other methods currently in use. Key words:Corticotomy, orthodontics, CAD/CAM, minimally invasive, surgical template, 3D printer. PMID:27031067

  16. Dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal, IMRT, and V-MAT techniques for accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI).

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jian-Jian; Chang, Zheng; Horton, Janet K; Wu, Qing-Rong Jackie; Yoo, Sua; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose is to dosimetrically compare the following 3 delivery techniques: 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (V-MAT) in the treatment of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). Overall, 16 patients with T1/2N0 breast cancer were treated with 3D-CRT (multiple, noncoplanar photon fields) on the RTOG 0413 partial-breast trial. These cases were subsequently replanned using static gantry IMRT and V-MAT technology to understand dosimetric differences among these 3 techniques. Several dosimetric parameters were used in plan quality evaluation, including dose conformity index (CI) and dose-volume histogram analysis of normal tissue coverage. Quality assurance studies including gamma analysis were performed to compare the measured and calculated dose distributions. The IMRT and V-MAT plans gave more conformal target dose distributions than the 3D-CRT plans (p < 0.05 in CI). The volume of ipsilateral breast receiving 5 and 10Gy was significantly less using the V-MAT technique than with either 3D-CRT or IMRT (p < 0.05). The maximum lung dose and the ipsilateral lung volume receiving 10 (V10) or 20Gy (V20) were significantly less with both V-MAT and IMRT (p < 0.05). The IMRT technique was superior to 3D-CRT and V-MAT of low dose distributions in ipsilateral lung (p < 0.05 in V5 and D5). The total mean monitor units (MUs) for V-MAT (621.0 ± 111.9) were 12.2% less than those for 3D-CRT (707.3 ± 130.9) and 46.5% less than those for IMRT (1161.4 ± 315.6) (p < 0.05). The average machine delivery time was 1.5 ± 0.2 minutes for the V-MAT plans, 7.0 ± 1.6 minutes for the 3D-CRT plans, and 11.5 ± 1.9 minutes for the IMRT plans, demonstrating much less delivery time for V-MAT. Based on this preliminary study, V-MAT and IMRT techniques offer improved dose conformity as compared with 3D-CRT techniques without increasing dose to the ipsilateral lung. In terms of MU and delivery

  17. 3D printed electromagnetic transmission and electronic structures fabricated on a single platform using advanced process integration techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffenbaugh, Paul Issac

    3D printing has garnered immense attention from many fields including in-office rapid prototyping of mechanical parts, outer-space satellite replication, garage functional firearm manufacture, and NASA rocket engine component fabrication. 3D printing allows increased design flexibility in the fabrication of electronics, microwave circuits and wireless antennas and has reached a level of maturity which allows functional parts to be printed. Much more work is necessary in order to perfect the processes of 3D printed electronics especially in the area of automation. Chapter 1 shows several finished prototypes of 3D printed electronics as well as newly developed techniques in fabrication. Little is known about the RF and microwave properties and applications of the standard materials which have been developed for 3D printing. Measurement of a wide variety of materials over a broad spectrum of frequencies up to 10 GHz using a variety of well-established measurement methods is performed throughout chapter 2. Several types of high frequency RF transmission lines are fabricated and valuable model-matched data is gathered and provided in chapter 3 for future designers' use. Of particular note is a fully 3D printed stripline which was automatically fabricated in one process on one machine. Some core advantages of 3D printing RF/microwave components include rapid manufacturing of complex, dimensionally sensitive circuits (such as antennas and filters which are often iteratively tuned) and the ability to create new devices that cannot be made using standard fabrication techniques. Chapter 4 describes an exemplary fully 3D printed curved inverted-F antenna.

  18. Effects of Processing and Medical Sterilization Techniques on 3D-Printed and Molded Polylactic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geritano, Mariah Nicole

    Manufacturing industries have evolved tremendously in the past decade with the introduction of Additive Manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D Printing. The medical device industry has been a leader in adapting this new technology into research and development. 3D printing enables medical devices and implants to become more customizable, patient specific, and allows for low production numbers. This study compares the mechanical and thermal properties of traditionally manufactured parts versus parts manufactured through 3D printing before and after sterilization, and the ability of an FDM printer to produce reliable, identical samples. It was found that molded samples and 100% infill high-resolution samples have almost identical changes in properties when exposed to different sterilization methods, and similar cooling rates. The data shown throughout this investigation confirms that manipulation of printing parameters can result in an object with comparable material properties to that created through traditional manufacturing methods.

  19. Study on camera calibration technique of 3D color digitization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuchen; Ge, Baozhen

    2006-11-01

    3D (three-dimensional) color digitization of an object is fulfilled by light-stripe method based on laser triangle principle and direct capturing method based on the color photo of the object. With this system, information matching between 3D and color sensor and data registration of different sensors are fulfilled by a sensor calibration process. The process uses the same round filament target to calibrate all of the sensors together. The principle and procedure of the process are presented in detail. Finally, a costume model is 3D color digitized and the obtaining data sets are processed by the method discussed, the results verify the correctness and feasibility of the algorithm.

  20. Using 3D modeling techniques to enhance teaching of difficult anatomical concepts

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Sonia; Baldwin, Michael; Nassiri, Joshua; Kikinis, Ron; Shaffer, Kitt

    2016-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Anatomy is an essential component of medical education as it is critical for the accurate diagnosis in organs and human systems. The mental representation of the shape and organization of different anatomical structures is a crucial step in the learning process. The purpose of this pilot study is to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of developing innovative teaching modules for anatomy education of first-year medical students based on 3D reconstructions from actual patient data. Materials and Methods A total of 196 models of anatomical structures from 16 anonymized CT datasets were generated using the 3D Slicer open-source software platform. The models focused on three anatomical areas: the mediastinum, the upper abdomen and the pelvis. Online optional quizzes were offered to first-year medical students to assess their comprehension in the areas of interest. Specific tasks were designed for students to complete using the 3D models. Results Scores of the quizzes confirmed a lack of understanding of 3D spatial relationships of anatomical structures despite standard instruction including dissection. Written task material and qualitative review by students suggested that interaction with 3D models led to a better understanding of the shape and spatial relationships among structures, and helped illustrate anatomical variations from one body to another. Conclusion The study demonstrates the feasibility of one possible approach to the generation of 3D models of the anatomy from actual patient data. The educational materials developed have the potential to supplement the teaching of complex anatomical regions and help demonstrate the anatomic variation among patients. PMID:26897601

  1. Novel 3D imaging techniques for improved understanding of planetary surface geomorphology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Jan-Peter

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the role of different planetary surface formation processes within our Solar System is one of the fundamental goals of planetary science research. There has been a revolution in planetary surface observations over the past decade for Mars and the Moon, especially in 3D imaging of surface shape (down to resolutions of 75cm) and subsequent correction for terrain relief of imagery from orbiting and co-registration of lander and rover robotic images. We present some of the recent highlights including 3D modelling of surface shape from the ESA Mars Express HRSC (High Resolution Stereo Camera), see [1], [2] at 30-100m grid-spacing; and then co-registered to HRSC using a resolution cascade of 20m DTMs from NASA MRO stereo-CTX and 0.75m DTMs from MRO stereo-HiRISE [3]. This has opened our eyes to the formation mechanisms of megaflooding events, such as the formation of Iani Vallis and the upstream blocky terrain, to crater lakes and receding valley cuts [4]. A comparable set of products is now available for the Moon from LROC-WA at 100m [5] and LROC-NA at 1m [6]. Recently, a very novel technique for the super-resolution restoration (SRR) of stacks of images has been developed at UCL [7]. First examples shown will be of the entire MER-A Spirit rover traverse taking a stack of 25cm HiRISE to generate a corridor of SRR images along the rover traverse of 5cm imagery of unresolved features such as rocks, created as a consequence of meteoritic bombardment, ridge and valley features. This SRR technique will allow us for ˜400 areas on Mars (where 5 or more HiRISE images have been captured) and similar numbers on the Moon to resolve sub-pixel features. Examples will be shown of how these SRR images can be employed to assist with the better understanding of surface geomorphology. Acknowledgements: The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under PRoViDE grant agreement n° 312377

  2. 3D filtering technique in presence of additive noise in color videos implemented on DSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomaryov, Volodymyr I.; Montenegro-Monroy, Hector; Palacios, Alfredo

    2014-05-01

    A filtering method for color videos contaminated by additive noise is presented. The proposed framework employs three filtering stages: spatial similarity filtering, neighboring frame denoising, and spatial post-processing smoothing. The difference with other state-of- the-art filtering methods, is that this approach, based on fuzzy logic, analyses basic and related gradient values between neighboring pixels into a 7 fi 7 sliding window in the vicinity of a central pixel in each of the RGB channels. Following, the similarity measures between the analogous pixels in the color bands are taken into account during the denoising. Next, two neighboring video frames are analyzed together estimating local motions between the frames using block matching procedure. In the final stage, the edges and smoothed areas are processed differently in a current frame during the post-processing filtering. Numerous simulations results confirm that this 3D fuzzy filter perform better than other state-of-the- art methods, such as: 3D-LLMMSE, WMVCE, RFMDAF, FDARTF G, VBM3D and NLM, in terms of objective criteria (PSNR, MAE, NCD and SSIM) as well as subjective perception via human vision system in the different color videos. An efficiency analysis of the designed and other mentioned filters have been performed on the DSPs TMS320 DM642 and TMS320DM648 by Texas Instruments through MATLAB and Simulink module showing that the novel 3D fuzzy filter can be used in real-time processing applications.

  3. The 4C technique: the 'Rosetta stone' for genome biology in 3D?

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Rolf; Göndör, Anita

    2007-06-01

    Despite considerable efforts, the spatial link between the nuclear architecture and the genome remains enigmatic. The 4C method, independently innovated in four different laboratories, might in combination with other methods change that. As this method is based on the unbiased identification of sequences interacting with specific baits, there are unique opportunities for unravelling the secrets of how the genome functions in 3D.

  4. Thermoforming techniques for manufacturing porous scaffolds for application in 3D cell cultivation.

    PubMed

    Borowiec, Justyna; Hampl, Jörg; Gebinoga, Michael; Elsarnagawy, Tarek; Elnakady, Yasser A; Fouad, Hassan; Almajhadi, Fahd; Fernekorn, Uta; Weise, Frank; Singh, Sukhdeep; Elsarnagawy, Dief; Schober, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Within the scientific community, there is an increasing demand to apply advanced cell cultivation substrates with increased physiological functionalities for studying spatially defined cellular interactions. Porous polymeric scaffolds are utilized for mimicking an organ-like structure or engineering complex tissues and have become a key element for three-dimensional (3D) cell cultivation in the meantime. As a consequence, efficient 3D scaffold fabrication methods play an important role in modern biotechnology. Here, we present a novel thermoforming procedure for manufacturing porous 3D scaffolds from permeable materials. We address the issue of precise thermoforming of porous polymer foils by using multilayer polymer thermoforming technology. This technology offers a new method for structuring porous polymer foils that are otherwise available for non-porous polymers only. We successfully manufactured 3D scaffolds from solvent casted and phase separated polylactic acid (PLA) foils and investigated their biocompatibility and basic cellular performance. The HepG2 cell culture in PLA scaffold has shown enhanced albumin secretion rate in comparison to a previously reported polycarbonate based scaffold with similar geometry.

  5. Recovering a collapsed medieval fresco by using 3D modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiabrando, F.; Rinaudo, F.

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents the results of a reconstruction of the 3D model of a dome and of a medieval fresco, collapsed after an earthquake and now reconstructed in significant portions, to offer to the visitors a possible reconstruction of the lost masterpiece of medieval art. After the earthquake the collapsed dome was replaced by means of a concrete sphere connected with the survived portions of the old dome's timber. The old dome shape and the fresco were virtually reconstructed thanks to a set of historical pictures obtained by Italian, USA and German archives; those images have been calibrated and oriented by using modern digital photogrammetric approach and a realistic 3D model of the old inner surface of the dome has been realised. By using a LiDAR survey the 3D model of the apse and of the dome, has been set up and the boundaries between original and new structures have been reconstructed by visual evidences.The new dome has been virtually erased and the old dome with the fresco 3D model inserted allowing the reconstruction of the apse as it was before the earthquake. This virtual 3D model has been used to realise a 1:1 scale model of the old dome where the restorers fit some parts of the old fresco fragments recovered just after the earthquake, cleaned and classified. The fresco images correctly oriented inside the reconstructed dome have been projected on plane surfaces by using azimuthal orthographic projections of small portions of the dome in order to reduce the geometric deformations and to allow the mosaicking of these small planes onto a spherical surface.

  6. 2D and 3D optical diagnostic techniques applied to Madonna dei Fusi by Leonardo da Vinci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, R.; Gambino, M. C.; Greco, M.; Marras, L.; Materazzi, M.; Pampaloni, E.; Pelagotti, A.; Pezzati, L.; Poggi, P.; Sanapo, C.

    2005-06-01

    3D measurement and modelling have been traditionally applied to statues, buildings, archeological sites or similar large structures, but rarely to paintings. Recently, however, 3D measurements have been performed successfully also on easel paintings, allowing to detect and document the painting's surface. We used 3D models to integrate the results of various 2D imaging techniques on a common reference frame. These applications show how the 3D shape information, complemented with 2D colour maps as well as with other types of sensory data, provide the most interesting information. The 3D data acquisition was carried out by means of two devices: a high-resolution laser micro-profilometer, composed of a commercial distance meter mounted on a scanning device, and a laser-line scanner. The 2D data acquisitions were carried out using a scanning device for simultaneous RGB colour imaging and IR reflectography, and a UV fluorescence multispectral image acquisition system. We present here the results of the techniques described, applied to the analysis of an important painting of the Italian Reinassance: `Madonna dei Fusi', attributed to Leonardo da Vinci.

  7. Shape optimization of 3D continuum structures via force approximation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, Garret N.; Kodiyalam, Srinivas

    1988-01-01

    The existing need to develop methods whereby the shape design efficiency can be improved through the use of high quality approximation methods is addressed. An efficient approximation method for stress constraints in 3D shape design problems is proposed based on expanding the nodal forces in Taylor series with respect to shape variations. The significance of this new method is shown through elementary beam theory calculations and via numerical computations using 3D solid finite elements. Numerical examples including the classical cantilever beam structure and realistic automotive parts like the engine connecting rod are designed for optimum shape using the proposed method. The numerical results obtained from these methods are compared with other published results, to assess the efficiency and the convergence rate of the proposed method.

  8. Stereoscopic 3D display technique using spatiotemporal interlacing has improved spatial and temporal properties.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paul V; Kim, Joohwan; Banks, Martin S

    2015-04-06

    Stereoscopic 3D (S3D) displays use spatial or temporal interlacing to send different images to the two eyes. Temporal interlacing delivers images to the left and right eyes alternately in time; it has high effective spatial resolution but is prone to temporal artifacts. Spatial interlacing delivers even pixel rows to one eye and odd rows to the other eye simultaneously; it is subject to spatial limitations such as reduced spatial resolution. We propose a spatiotemporal-interlacing protocol that interlaces the left- and right-eye views spatially, but with the rows being delivered to each eye alternating with each frame. We performed psychophysical experiments and found that flicker, motion artifacts, and depth distortion are substantially reduced relative to the temporal-interlacing protocol, and spatial resolution is better than in the spatial-interlacing protocol. Thus, the spatiotemporal-interlacing protocol retains the benefits of spatial and temporal interlacing while minimizing or even eliminating the drawbacks.

  9. Stereoscopic 3D display technique using spatiotemporal interlacing has improved spatial and temporal properties

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Paul V.; Kim, Joohwan; Banks, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Stereoscopic 3D (S3D) displays use spatial or temporal interlacing to send different images to the two eyes. Temporal interlacing delivers images to the left and right eyes alternately in time; it has high effective spatial resolution but is prone to temporal artifacts. Spatial interlacing delivers even pixel rows to one eye and odd rows to the other eye simultaneously; it is subject to spatial limitations such as reduced spatial resolution. We propose a spatiotemporal-interlacing protocol that interlaces the left- and right-eye views spatially, but with the rows being delivered to each eye alternating with each frame. We performed psychophysical experiments and found that flicker, motion artifacts, and depth distortion are substantially reduced relative to the temporal-interlacing protocol, and spatial resolution is better than in the spatial-interlacing protocol. Thus, the spatiotemporal-interlacing protocol retains the benefits of spatial and temporal interlacing while minimizing or even eliminating the drawbacks. PMID:25968758

  10. An Integrated RELAP5-3D and Multiphase CFD Code System Utilizing a Semi Implicit Coupling Technique

    SciTech Connect

    D.L. Aumiller; E.T. Tomlinson; W.L. Weaver

    2001-06-21

    An integrated code system consisting of RELAP5-3D and a multiphase CFD program has been created through the use of a generic semi-implicit coupling algorithm. Unlike previous CFD coupling work, this coupling scheme is numerically stable provided the material Courant limit is not violated in RELAP5-3D or at the coupling locations. The basis for the coupling scheme and details regarding the unique features associated with the application of this technique to a four-field CFD program are presented. Finally, the results of a verification problem are presented. The coupled code system is shown to yield accurate and numerically stable results.

  11. 3D printing of high-resolution PLA-based structures by hybrid electrohydrodynamic and fused deposition modeling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Seong, Baekhoon; Nguyen, VuDat; Byun, Doyoung

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the three-dimensional (3D) printing technique has received much attention for shape forming and manufacturing. The fused deposition modeling (FDM) printer is one of the various 3D printers available and has become widely used due to its simplicity, low-cost, and easy operation. However, the FDM technique has a limitation whereby its patterning resolution is too low at around 200 μm. In this paper, we first present a hybrid mechanism of electrohydrodynamic jet printing with the FDM technique, which we name E-FDM. We then develop a novel high-resolution 3D printer based on the E-FDM process. To determine the optimal condition for structuring, we also investigated the effect of several printing parameters, such as temperature, applied voltage, working height, printing speed, flow-rate, and acceleration on the patterning results. This method was capable of fabricating both high resolution 2D and 3D structures with the use of polylactic acid (PLA). PLA has been used to fabricate scaffold structures for tissue engineering, which has different hierarchical structure sizes. The fabrication speed was up to 40 mm/s and the pattern resolution could be improved to 10 μm.

  12. Generation of 3D Model for Urban area using Ikonos and Cartosat-1 Satellite Imageries with RS and GIS Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajpriya, N. R.; Vyas, A.; Sharma, S. A.

    2014-11-01

    Urban design is a subject that is concerned with the shape, the surface and its physical arrangement of all kinds of urban elements. Although urban design is a practice process and needs much detailed and multi-dimensional description. 3D city models based spatial analysis gives the possibility of solving these problems. Ahmedabad is third fastest growing cities in the world with large amount of development in infrastructure and planning. The fabric of the city is changing and expanding at the same time, which creates need of 3d visualization of the city to develop a sustainable planning for the city. These areas have to be monitored and mapped on a regular basis and satellite remote sensing images provide a valuable and irreplaceable source for urban monitoring. With this, the derivation of structural urban types or the mapping of urban biotopes becomes possible. The present study focused at development of technique for 3D modeling of buildings for urban area analysis and to implement encoding standards prescribed in "OGC City GML" for urban features. An attempt has been to develop a 3D city model with level of details 1 (LOD 1) for part of city of Ahmedabad in State of Gujarat, India. It shows the capability to monitor urbanization in 2D and 3D.

  13. Commissioning a small-field biological irradiator using point, 2D, and 3D dosimetry techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Joseph; Oldham, Mark; Thomas, Andrew; Li Yifan; Adamovics, John; Kirsch, David G.; Das, Shiva

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To commission a small-field biological irradiator, the XRad225Cx from Precision x-Ray, Inc., for research use. The system produces a 225 kVp x-ray beam and is equipped with collimating cones that produce both square and circular radiation fields ranging in size from 1 to 40 mm. This work incorporates point, 2D, and 3D measurements to determine output factors (OF), percent-depth-dose (PDD) and dose profiles at multiple depths. Methods: Three independent dosimetry systems were used: ion-chambers (a farmer chamber and a micro-ionisation chamber), 2D EBT2 radiochromic film, and a novel 3D dosimetry system (DLOS/PRESAGE registered ). Reference point dose rates and output factors were determined from in-air ionization chamber measurements for fields down to {approx}13 mm using the formalism of TG61. PDD, profiles, and output factors at three separate depths (0, 0.5, and 2 cm), were determined for all field sizes from EBT2 film measurements in solid water. Several film PDD curves required a scaling correction, reflecting the challenge of accurate film alignment in very small fields. PDDs, profiles, and output factors were also determined with the 3D DLOS/PRESAGE registered system which generated isotropic 0.2 mm data, in scan times of 20 min. Results: Surface output factors determined by ion-chamber were observed to gradually drop by {approx}9% when the field size was reduced from 40 to 13 mm. More dramatic drops were observed for the smallest fields as determined by EBT{approx}18% and {approx}42% for the 2.5 mm and 1 mm fields, respectively. PRESAGE registered and film output factors agreed well for fields <20 mm (where 3D data were available) with mean deviation of 2.2% (range 1%-4%). PDD values at 2 cm depth varied from {approx}72% for the 40 mm field, down to {approx}55% for the 1 mm field. EBT and PRESAGE registered PDDs agreed within {approx}3% in the typical therapy region (1-4 cm). At deeper depths the EBT curves were slightly steeper (2.5% at 5 cm

  14. Complete calibration of a phase-based 3D imaging system based on fringe projection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Shasha; Ma, Haiyan; Zhang, Zonghua; Guo, Tong; Zhang, Sixiang; Hu, Xiaotang

    2011-11-01

    Phase calculation-based 3D imaging systems have been widely studied because of the advantages of non-contact operation, full-field, fast acquisition and automatic data processing. A vital step is calibration, which builds up the relationship between phase map and range image. The existing calibration methods are complicated because of using a precise translating stage or a 3D gauge block. Recently, we presented a simple method to convert phase into depth data by using a polynomial function and a plate having discrete markers on the surface with known distance in between. However, the initial position of all the markers needs to be determined manually and the X, Y coordinates are not calibrated. This paper presents a complete calibration method of phase calculation-based 3D imaging systems by using a plate having discrete markers on the surface with known distance in between. The absolute phase of each pixel can be calculated by projecting fringe pattern onto the plate. Each marker position can be determined by an automatic extraction algorithm, so the relative depth of each pixel to a chosen reference plane can be obtained. Therefore, coefficient set of the polynomial function for each pixel are determined by using the obtained absolute phase and depth data. In the meanwhile, pixel positions and the X, Y coordinates can be established by the parameters of the CCD camera. Experimental results and performance evaluation show that the proposed calibration method can easily build up the relationship between absolute phase map and range image in a simple way.

  15. Robust object tracking techniques for vision-based 3D motion analysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyaz, Vladimir A.; Zheltov, Sergey Y.; Vishnyakov, Boris V.

    2016-04-01

    Automated and accurate spatial motion capturing of an object is necessary for a wide variety of applications including industry and science, virtual reality and movie, medicine and sports. For the most part of applications a reliability and an accuracy of the data obtained as well as convenience for a user are the main characteristics defining the quality of the motion capture system. Among the existing systems for 3D data acquisition, based on different physical principles (accelerometry, magnetometry, time-of-flight, vision-based), optical motion capture systems have a set of advantages such as high speed of acquisition, potential for high accuracy and automation based on advanced image processing algorithms. For vision-based motion capture accurate and robust object features detecting and tracking through the video sequence are the key elements along with a level of automation of capturing process. So for providing high accuracy of obtained spatial data the developed vision-based motion capture system "Mosca" is based on photogrammetric principles of 3D measurements and supports high speed image acquisition in synchronized mode. It includes from 2 to 4 technical vision cameras for capturing video sequences of object motion. The original camera calibration and external orientation procedures provide the basis for high accuracy of 3D measurements. A set of algorithms as for detecting, identifying and tracking of similar targets, so for marker-less object motion capture is developed and tested. The results of algorithms' evaluation show high robustness and high reliability for various motion analysis tasks in technical and biomechanics applications.

  16. Ultrafast holographic technique for 3D in situ documentation of cultural heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Susanne; Bongartz, Jens; Giel, Dominik M.; Thelen, Andrea; Hering, Peter

    2003-10-01

    A novel 3d reconstruction method for medical application has been applied for the examination and documentation of a 2000-year-old bog body. An ultra-fast pulsed holographic camera has been modified to allow imaging of the bog body from different views. Full-scale daylight copies of the master holograms give a detailed impressive three-dimensional view of the mummy and can be exhibited instead of the object. In combination with a rapid prototyping model (built by the Rapid Prototyping group of the Stiftung caesar, Bonn, Germany) derived from computer tomography (CT) data our results are an ideal basis for a future facial reconstruction.

  17. Monitoring the solid-liquid interface in tanks using profiling sonar and 3D visualization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Nitin; Zhang, Jinsong; Roelant, David; Srivastava, Rajiv

    2005-03-01

    Visualization of the interface between settled solids and the optically opaque liquid above is necessary to facilitate efficient retrieval of the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from underground storage tanks. A profiling sonar was used to generate 2-D slices across the settled solids at the bottom of the tank. By incrementally rotating the sonar about its centerline, slices of the solid-liquid interface can be imaged and a 3-D image of the settled solids interface generated. To demonstrate the efficacy of the sonar in real-time solid-liquid interface monitoring systems inside HLW tanks, two sets of experiments were performed. First, various solid objects and kaolin clay (10 μm dia) were successfully imaged while agitating with 30% solids (by weight) entrained in the liquid. Second, a solid with a density similar to that of the immersed fluid density was successfully imaged. Two dimensional (2-D) sonar images and the accuracy and limitations of the in-tank imaging will be presented for these two experiments. In addition, a brief review of how to utilize a 2-D sonar image to generate a 3-D surface of the settled layer within a tank will be discussed.

  18. Mechanics of the ankle and subtalar joints revealed through a 3D quasi-static stress MRI technique.

    PubMed

    Siegler, S; Udupa, J K; Ringleb, S I; Imhauser, C W; Hirsch, B E; Odhner, D; Saha, P K; Okereke, E; Roach, N

    2005-03-01

    A technique to study the three-dimensional (3D) mechanical characteristics of the ankle and of the subtalar joints in vivo and in vitro is described. The technique uses an MR scanner compatible 3D positioning and loading linkage to load the hindfoot with precise loads while the foot is being scanned. 3D image processing algorithms are used to derive from the acquired MR images bone morphology, hindfoot architecture, and joint kinematics. The technique was employed to study these properties both in vitro and in vivo. The ankle and subtler joint motion and the changes in architecture produced in response to an inversion load and an anterior drawer load were evaluated. The technique was shown to provide reliable measures of bone morphology. The left-to-right variations in bone morphology were less than 5%. The left-to-right variations in unloaded hindfoot architecture parameters were less than 10%, and these properties were only slightly affected by inversion and anterior drawer loads. Inversion and anterior drawer loads produced motion both at the ankle and at the subtalar joint. In addition, high degree of coupling, primarily of internal rotation with inversion, was observed both at the ankle and at the subtalar joint. The in vitro motion produced in response to inversion and anterior drawer load was greater than the in vivo motion. Finally, external motion, measured directly across the ankle complex, produced in response to load was much greater than the bone movements measured through the 3D stress MRI technique indicating the significant effect of soft tissue and skin interference.

  19. Analysis of Composite Skin-Stiffener Debond Specimens Using a Shell/3D Modeling Technique and Submodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin (Technical Monitor); Krueger, Ronald; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2004-01-01

    The application of a shell/3D modeling technique for the simulation of skin/stringer debond in a specimen subjected to tension and three-point bending was studied. The global structure was modeled with shell elements. A local three-dimensional model, extending to about three specimen thicknesses on either side of the delamination front was used to model the details of the damaged section. Computed total strain energy release rates and mixed-mode ratios obtained from shell/3D simulations were in good agreement with results obtained from full solid models. The good correlation of the results demonstrated the effectiveness of the shell/3D modeling technique for the investigation of skin/stiffener separation due to delamination in the adherents. In addition, the application of the submodeling technique for the simulation of skin/stringer debond was also studied. Global models made of shell elements and solid elements were studied. Solid elements were used for local submodels, which extended between three and six specimen thicknesses on either side of the delamination front to model the details of the damaged section. Computed total strain energy release rates and mixed-mode ratios obtained from the simulations using the submodeling technique were not in agreement with results obtained from full solid models.

  20. Application of the Shell/3D Modeling Technique for the Analysis of Skin-Stiffener Debond Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; O'Brien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2002-01-01

    The application of a shell/3D modeling technique for the simulation of skin/stringer debond in a specimen subjected to three-point bending is demonstrated. The global structure was modeled with shell elements. A local three-dimensional model, extending to about three specimen thicknesses on either side of the delamination front was used to capture the details of the damaged section. Computed total strain energy release rates and mixed-mode ratios obtained from shell/13D simulations were in good agreement with results obtained from full solid models. The good correlations of the results demonstrated the effectiveness of the shell/3D modeling technique for the investigation of skin/stiffener separation due to delamination in the adherents.

  1. Lightning strike simulation using coaxial line technique and 3D linear injection current analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flourens, F.; Gauthier, D.; Serafin, D.

    1989-09-01

    The GORFFD code for determining aircraft responses to either a lightning event or to simulated current injection is based on the finite-difference solution of Maxwell's equation, and allows the simulation of complex, 3D metallic and dielectric composite structures. A transfer method is used to analyze the EM environment associated with in-flight measurements. Attention is given to a linear-analysis numerical model in which the lightning channel is simulated as a thin wire that is driven by a current source. Surface E-fields and current mappings are produced for the Transall transport and Mirage fighter aircraft. An experimental method has been devised for verification of these lightning-strike simulations.

  2. The research of 3D visualization techniques for the test of laser energy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lixin; Wang, Bo

    2013-07-01

    In the process of laser transmission in the atmosphere, the complexity and instability of the atmospheric composition that seriously interfere with, even change, the performance of the laser beam. The image of laser energy distribution can be captured and analyzed through infrared CCD and digital image processing technology. The basic features of laser energy density distribution, such as the location and power of the peak point and other basic parameters could be acquired; laser energy density distribution can display in real time continuous multi-frame; the 3D visualization of pseudo-color for laser energy density distribution could be displayed, that reflect the relative size and position of the energy distribution in the different regions of the laser spot, using the VC++, windows APIs and OpenGL programming. The laser energy density distribution can be observed from all angles.

  3. An experimental technique for performing 3-D LDA measurements inside whirling annular seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Johnson, Mark C.; Deotte, Robert E., Jr.; Thames, H. Davis, III.; Wiedner, Brian G.

    1992-01-01

    During the last several years, the Fluid Mechanics Division of the Turbomachinery Laboratory at Texas A&M University has developed a rather unique facility with the experimental capability for measuring the flow field inside journal bearings, labyrinth seals, and annular seals. The facility consists of a specially designed 3-D LDA system which is capable of measuring the instantaneous velocity vector within 0.2 mm of a wall while the laser beams are aligned almost perpendicular to the wall. This capability was required to measure the flow field inside journal bearings, labyrinth seals, and annular seals. A detailed description of this facility along with some representative results obtained for a whirling annular seal are presented.

  4. Analysis of Composite Panel-Stiffener Debonding Using a Shell/3D Modeling Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2006-01-01

    Interlaminar fracture mechanics has proven useful for characterizing the onset of delaminations in composites and has been used with limited success primarily to investigate onset in fracture toughness specimens and laboratory size coupon type specimens. Future acceptance of the methodology by industry and certification authorities however, requires the successful demonstration of the methodology on structural level. For this purpose a panel was selected that was reinforced with stringers. Shear loading cases the panel to buckle and the resulting out-of-plane deformations initiate skin/stringer separation at the location of an embedded defect. For finite element analysis, the panel and surrounding load fixture were modeled with shell element. A small section of the stringer foot and the panel in the vicinity of the embedded defect were modeled with a local 3D solid model. A failure index was calculated by correlating computed mixed-mode failure criterion of the graphite/epoxy material.

  5. 3D surface real-time measurement using phase-shifted interference fringe technique for craniofacial identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Gennady G.; Vishnyakov, Gennady N.; Naumov, Alexey V.; Abramov, Sergey

    1998-03-01

    We offer to use the 3D surface profile real-time measurement using phase-shifted interference fringe projection technique for the cranioficial identification. Our system realizes the profile measurement by projecting interference fringe pattern on the object surface and by observing the deformed fringe pattern at the direction different from the projection. Fringes are formed by a Michelson interferometer with one mirror mounted on a piezoelectric translator. Four steps self- calibration phase-shift method was used.

  6. A hybrid experimental-numerical technique for determining 3D velocity fields from planar 2D PIV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, A.; Sigurdson, M.; Mezić, I.; Meinhart, C. D.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of 3D, three component velocity fields is central to the understanding and development of effective microfluidic devices for lab-on-chip mixing applications. In this paper we present a hybrid experimental-numerical method for the generation of 3D flow information from 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental data and finite element simulations of an alternating current electrothermal (ACET) micromixer. A numerical least-squares optimization algorithm is applied to a theory-based 3D multiphysics simulation in conjunction with 2D PIV data to generate an improved estimation of the steady state velocity field. This 3D velocity field can be used to assess mixing phenomena more accurately than would be possible through simulation alone. Our technique can also be used to estimate uncertain quantities in experimental situations by fitting the gathered field data to a simulated physical model. The optimization algorithm reduced the root-mean-squared difference between the experimental and simulated velocity fields in the target region by more than a factor of 4, resulting in an average error less than 12% of the average velocity magnitude.

  7. A survey of clearing techniques for 3D imaging of tissues with special reference to connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Azaripour, Adriano; Lagerweij, Tonny; Scharfbillig, Christina; Jadczak, Anna Elisabeth; Willershausen, Brita; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F

    2016-08-01

    For 3-dimensional (3D) imaging of a tissue, 3 methodological steps are essential and their successful application depends on specific characteristics of the type of tissue. The steps are 1° clearing of the opaque tissue to render it transparent for microscopy, 2° fluorescence labeling of the tissues and 3° 3D imaging. In the past decades, new methodologies were introduced for the clearing steps with their specific advantages and disadvantages. Most clearing techniques have been applied to the central nervous system and other organs that contain relatively low amounts of connective tissue including extracellular matrix. However, tissues that contain large amounts of extracellular matrix such as dermis in skin or gingiva are difficult to clear. The present survey lists methodologies that are available for clearing of tissues for 3D imaging. We report here that the BABB method using a mixture of benzyl alcohol and benzyl benzoate and iDISCO using dibenzylether (DBE) are the most successful methods for clearing connective tissue-rich gingiva and dermis of skin for 3D histochemistry and imaging of fluorescence using light-sheet microscopy.

  8. Fusion of 3D models derived from TLS and image-based techniques for CH enhanced documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastonero, P.; Donadio, E.; Chiabrando, F.; Spanò, A.

    2014-05-01

    Recognizing the various advantages offered by 3D new metric survey technologies in the Cultural Heritage documentation phase, this paper presents some tests of 3D model generation, using different methods, and their possible fusion. With the aim to define potentialities and problems deriving from integration or fusion of metric data acquired with different survey techniques, the elected test case is an outstanding Cultural Heritage item, presenting both widespread and specific complexities connected to the conservation of historical buildings. The site is the Staffarda Abbey, the most relevant evidence of medieval architecture in Piedmont. This application faced one of the most topical architectural issues consisting in the opportunity to study and analyze an object as a whole, from twice location of acquisition sensors, both the terrestrial and the aerial one. In particular, the work consists in the evaluation of chances deriving from a simple union or from the fusion of different 3D cloudmodels of the abbey, achieved by multi-sensor techniques. The aerial survey is based on a photogrammetric RPAS (Remotely piloted aircraft system) flight while the terrestrial acquisition have been fulfilled by laser scanning survey. Both techniques allowed to extract and process different point clouds and to generate consequent 3D continuous models which are characterized by different scale, that is to say different resolutions and diverse contents of details and precisions. Starting from these models, the proposed process, applied to a sample area of the building, aimed to test the generation of a unique 3Dmodel thorough a fusion of different sensor point clouds. Surely, the describing potential and the metric and thematic gains feasible by the final model exceeded those offered by the two detached models.

  9. New non-Doppler remote sensing technique for 3D wind field mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belen'kii, Mikhail S.; Gimmestad, Gary G.; Gurvich, Alexander V.

    1994-06-01

    A new approach to the statistical analysis of fluctuating, photon-limited signals that permits us to accumulate and process the lidar returns without averaging of the reflected energy fluctuations is developed. This approach requires recording the photocounts for each pulse in a series of pulses and then determining photocount statistics. Based on the semiclassical theory of photodetection and Mandel's formula, a relationship has been obtained between the time-space cross correlation function and the cross spectrum of the lidar returns and corresponding photocount statistics. It is shown that the relative uncertainties of measuring the cross correlation or the cross spectrum of the lidar returns is determined by the general number of photocounts, but not by their mean value. A fast-scanning lidar system, which is based on a new photocounting analysis approach, is described for 3D wind field mapping in the atmosphere at altitudes up to 5 km. A program for the experimental verification of the new approach is presented.

  10. Investigation of molten metal droplet deposition and solidification for 3D printing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chien-Hsun; Tsai, Ho-Lin; Wu, Yu-Che; Hwang, Weng-Sing

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the transient transport phenomenon during the pile up of molten lead-free solder via the inkjet printing method. With regard to the droplet impact velocity, the distance from nozzle to substrate can be controlled by using the pulse voltage and distance control apparatus. A high-speed digital camera was used to record the solder impact and examine the accuracy of the pile up. These impact conditions correspond to We  =  2.1-15.1 and Oh  =  5.4  ×  10-3-3.8  ×  10-3. The effects of impact velocity and relative distance between two types of molten droplets on the shape of the impact mode are examined. The results show that the optimal parameters of the distance from nozzle to substrate and the spreading factor in this experiment are 0.5 mm and 1.33. The diameter, volume and velocity of the inkjet solder droplet are around 37-65 μm, 25-144 picoliters, and 2.0-3.7 m s-1, respectively. The vertical and inclined column structures of molten lead-free solder can be fabricated using piezoelectric ink-jet printing systems. The end-shapes of the 3D micro structure have been found to be dependent upon the distance from nozzle to substrate and the impact velocity of the molten lead-free solder droplet.

  11. Trichobilharzia regenti (Schistosomatidae): 3D imaging techniques in characterization of larval migration through the CNS of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Bulantová, Jana; Macháček, Tomáš; Panská, Lucie; Krejčí, František; Karch, Jakub; Jährling, Nina; Saghafi, Saiedeh; Dodt, Hans-Ulrich; Horák, Petr

    2016-04-01

    Migration of parasitic worms through the host tissues, which may occasionally result in fatal damage to the internal organs, represents one of the major risks associated with helminthoses. In order to track the parasites, traditionally used 2D imaging techniques such as histology or squash preparation do not always provide sufficient data to describe worm location/behavior in the host. On the other hand, 3D imaging methods are widely used in cell biology, medical radiology, osteology or cancer research, but their use in parasitological research is currently occasional. Thus, we aimed at the evaluation of suitability of selected 3D methods to monitor migration of the neuropathogenic avian schistosome Trichobilharzia regenti in extracted spinal cord of experimental vertebrate hosts. All investigated methods, two of them based on tracking of fluorescently stained larvae with or without previous chemical clearing of tissue and one based on X-ray micro-CT, exhibit certain limits for in vivo observation. Nevertheless, our study shows that the tested methods as ultramicroscopy (used for the first time in parasitology) and micro-CT represent promising tool for precise analyzing of parasite larvae in the CNS. Synthesis of these 3D imaging techniques can provide more comprehensive look at the course of infection, host immune response and pathology caused by migrating parasites within entire tissue samples, which would not be possible with traditional approaches.

  12. Computer power fathoms the depths: billion-bit data processors illuminate the subsurface. [3-D Seismic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    Some of the same space-age signal technology being used to track events 200 miles above the earth is helping petroleum explorationists track down oil and natural gas two miles and more down into the earth. The breakthroughs, which have come in a technique called three-dimensional seismic work, could change the complexion of exploration for oil and natural gas. Thanks to this 3-D seismic approach, explorationists can make dynamic maps of sites miles beneath the surface. Then explorationists can throw these maps on space-age computer systems and manipulate them every which way - homing in sharply on salt domes, faults, sands and traps associated with oil and natural gas. ''The 3-D seismic scene has exploded within the last two years,'' says, Peiter Tackenberg, Marathon technical consultant who deals with both domestic and international exploration. The 3-D technique has been around for more than a decade, he notes, but recent achievements in space-age computer hardware and software have unlocked its full potential.

  13. Influence of bicortical techniques in internal connection placed in premaxillary area by 3D finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Cruz, Ronaldo Silva; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araújo; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Almeida, Daniel Augusto Faria; Verri, Ana Caroline Gonçales; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2017-02-01

    The aim of study was to evaluate the stress distribution in implant-supported prostheses and peri-implant bone using internal hexagon (IH) implants in the premaxillary area, varying surgical techniques (conventional, bicortical and bicortical in association with nasal floor elevation), and loading directions (0°, 30° and 60°) by three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis. Three models were designed with Invesalius, Rhinoceros 3D and Solidworks software. Each model contained a bone block of the premaxillary area including an implant (IH, Ø4 × 10 mm) supporting a metal-ceramic crown. 178 N was applied in different inclinations (0°, 30°, 60°). The results were analyzed by von Mises, maximum principal stress, microstrain and displacement maps including ANOVA statistical test for some situations. Von Mises maps of implant, screws and abutment showed increase of stress concentration as increased loading inclination. Bicortical techniques showed reduction in implant apical area and in the head of fixation screws. Bicortical techniques showed slight increase stress in cortical bone in the maximum principal stress and microstrain maps under 60° loading. No differences in bone tissue regarding surgical techniques were observed. As conclusion, non-axial loads increased stress concentration in all maps. Bicortical techniques showed lower stress for implant and screw; however, there was slightly higher stress on cortical bone only under loads of higher inclinations (60°).

  14. Dosimetric comparison of preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy techniques: 3D CRT, noncoplanar IMRT, coplanar IMRT, and VMAT.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sua; Blitzblau, Rachel; Yin, Fang-Fang; Horton, Janet K

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to compare dosimetric parameters of treatment plans among four techniques for preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy in order to select an optimal treatment technique. The techniques evaluated were noncoplanar 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT), noncoplanar intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRTNC), coplanar IMRT (IMRTCO), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The planning CT scans of 16 patients in the prone position were used in this study, with the single-fraction prescription doses of 15 Gy for the first eight patients and 18 Gy for the remaining eight patients. Six (6) MV photon beams were designed to avoid the heart and contralateral breast. Optimization for IMRT and VMAT was performed to reduce the dose to the skin and normal breast. All plans were normalized such that 100% of the prescribed dose covered greater than 95% of the clinical target volume (CTV) consisting of gross tumor volume (GTV) plus 1.5 cm margin. Mean homogeneity index (HI) was the lowest (1.05 ± 0.02) for 3D CRT and the highest (1.11 ± 0.04) for VMAT. Mean conformity index (CI) was the lowest (1.42 ± 0.32) for IMRTNC and the highest (1.60 ± 0.32) for VMAT. Mean of the maximum point dose to skin was the lowest (73.7 ± 11.5%) for IMRTNC and the highest (86.5 ± 6.68%) for 3D CRT. IMRTCO showed very similar HI, CI, and maximum skin dose to IMRTNC (differences <1%). The estimated mean treatment delivery time, excluding the time spent for patient positioning and imaging, was 7.0 ± 1.0, 8.3 ± 1.1, 9.7 ± 1.0, and 11.0 ± 1.5min for VMAT, IMRTCO, IMRTNC and 3D CRT, respectively. In comparison of all four techniques for preoperative single-fraction partial breast radiotherapy, we can conclude that noncoplanar or coplanar IMRT were optimal in this study as IMRT plans provided homogeneous and conformal target coverage, skin sparing, and relatively short treatment delivery time.

  15. Shape and Surface: The challenges and advantages of 3D techniques in innovative fashion, knitwear and product design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendt, E.

    2016-07-01

    The presentation wants to show what kind of problems fashion and textile designers are facing in 3D-knitwear design, especially regarding fashionable flat-knit styles, and how they can use different kinds of techniques and processes to generate new types of 3D-designs and structures. To create really new things we have to overcome standard development methods and traditional thinking and should start to open our minds again for the material itself to generate new advanced textile solutions. This paper mainly introduces different results of research projects worked out in the master program “Textile Produkte” during lectures in “Innovative Product Design” and “Experimental Knitting”.

  16. Characterization of controlled bone defects using 2D and 3D ultrasound imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Biren J; Longsine, Whitney; Sabonghy, Eric P; Han, Arum; Tasciotti, Ennio; Weiner, Bradley K; Ferrari, Mauro; Righetti, Raffaella

    2010-08-21

    Ultrasound is emerging as an attractive alternative modality to standard x-ray and CT methods for bone assessment applications. As of today, however, there is a lack of systematic studies that investigate the performance of diagnostic ultrasound techniques in bone imaging applications. This study aims at understanding the performance limitations of new ultrasound techniques for imaging bones in controlled experiments in vitro. Experiments are performed on samples of mammalian and non-mammalian bones with controlled defects with size ranging from 400 microm to 5 mm. Ultrasound findings are statistically compared with those obtained from the same samples using standard x-ray imaging modalities and optical microscopy. The results of this study demonstrate that it is feasible to use diagnostic ultrasound imaging techniques to assess sub-millimeter bone defects in real time and with high accuracy and precision. These results also demonstrate that ultrasound imaging techniques perform comparably better than x-ray imaging and optical imaging methods, in the assessment of a wide range of controlled defects both in mammalian and non-mammalian bones. In the future, ultrasound imaging techniques might provide a cost-effective, real-time, safe and portable diagnostic tool for bone imaging applications.

  17. A genetic algorithm particle pairing technique for 3D velocity field extraction in holographic particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, J.; Meng, H.

    This research explores a novel technique, using Genetic Algorithm Particle Pairing (GAPP) to extract three-dimensional (3D) velocity fields of complex flows. It is motivated by Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV), in which intrinsic speckle noise hinders the achievement of high particle density required for conventional correlation methods in extracting 3D velocity fields, especially in regions with large velocity gradients. The GA particle pairing method maps particles recorded at the first exposure to those at the second exposure in a 3D space, providing one velocity vector for each particle pair instead of seeking statistical averaging. Hence, particle pairing can work with sparse seeding and complex 3D velocity fields. When dealing with a large number of particles from two instants, however, the accuracy of pairing results and processing speed become major concerns. Using GA's capability to search a large solution space parallelly, our algorithm can efficiently find the best mapping scenarios among a large number of possible particle pairing schemes. During GA iterations, different pairing schemes or solutions are evaluated based on fluid dynamics. Two types of evaluation functions are proposed, tested, and embedded into the GA procedures. Hence, our Genetic Algorithm Particle Pairing (GAPP) technique is characterized by robustness in velocity calculation, high spatial resolution, good parallelism in handling large data sets, and high processing speed on parallel architectures. It has been successfully tested on a simple HPIV measurement of a real trapped vortex flow as well as a series of numerical experiments. In this paper, we introduce the principle of GAPP, analyze its performance under different parameters, and evaluate its processing speed on different computer architectures.

  18. Impact of 3D Rotational Angiography on Liver Embolization Procedures: Review of Technique and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lucatelli, Pierleone Corona, Mario Argirò, Renato Anzidei, Michele; Vallati, Giulio; Fanelli, Fabrizio Bezzi, Mario Catalano, Carlo

    2015-06-15

    In the last years, the interest into interventional applications of C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) progressively raised, widening its clinical application from the original field of interventional neuroradiology to the field of peripheral procedures. Liver embolization procedures, due to their complexity and potential treatment-related life-threatening complications, represent one of the main clinical applications of this novel angiographic technique. CBCT has been demonstrated to render procedures safer and technically easier, and to predict outcome as well as to avoid major complications in different treatment scenarios (trans-arterial embolization, trans-arterial chemoembolization, selective internal radiation therapy, percutaneous portal vein embolization). This review summarizes all technical, dosimetric and procedural aspects of CBCT techniques, underlying all its potential clinical advantages in the field of liver embolization procedures. Moreover, the paper provides all the instructions to obtain the best diagnostic performance out of this novel angiographic technique.

  19. Hypersonic Transition Experiments in 3D Cone Flow with New Measurement Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    thermography was used for measuring stationary crossflow vortices. This instability was quantitatively measured. The position where these vortices...different measurement techniques were applied for investigating them: (i) IR- thermography was used for measuring stationary crossflow vortices. This... thermography were presented. Measurements of stationary crossflow vortices were shown and this instability was characterized concerning location

  20. Techniques for Revealing 3d Hidden Archeological Features: Morphological Residual Models as Virtual-Polynomial Texture Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, H.; Martínez Rubio, J.; Elorza Arana, A.

    2015-02-01

    The recent developments in 3D scanning technologies are not been accompanied by visualization interfaces. We are still using the same types of visual codes as when maps and drawings were made by hand. The available information in 3D scanning data sets is not being fully exploited by current visualization techniques. In this paper we present recent developments regarding the use of 3D scanning data sets for revealing invisible information from archaeological sites. These sites are affected by a common problem, decay processes, such as erosion, that never ceases its action and endangers the persistence of last vestiges of some peoples and cultures. Rock art engravings, or epigraphical inscriptions, are among the most affected by these processes because they are, due to their one nature, carved at the surface of rocks often exposed to climatic agents. The study and interpretation of these motifs and texts is strongly conditioned by the degree of conservation of the imprints left by our ancestors. Every single detail in the remaining carvings can make a huge difference in the conclusions taken by specialists. We have selected two case-studies severely affected by erosion to present the results of the on-going work dedicated to explore in new ways the information contained in 3D scanning data sets. A new method for depicting subtle morphological features in the surface of objects or sites has been developed. It allows to contrast human patterns still present at the surface but invisible to naked eye or by any other archaeological inspection technique. It was called Morphological Residual Model (MRM) because of its ability to contrast the shallowest morphological details, to which we refer as residuals, contained in the wider forms of the backdrop. Afterwards, we have simulated the process of building Polynomial Texture Maps - a widespread technique that as been contributing to archaeological studies for some years - in a 3D virtual environment using the results of MRM

  1. A fast technique applied to the analysis of Resistive Wall Modes with 3D conducting structures

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinacci, Guglielmo Liu, Yueqiang

    2009-03-20

    This paper illustrates the development of a 'fast' technique for the analysis of Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs) in fusion devices with three-dimensional conducting structures, by means of the recently developed CarMa code. Thanks to its peculiar features, the computational cost scales almost linearly with the number of discrete unknowns. Some large scale problems are solved in configurations of interest for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

  2. Photons, Electrons and Positrons Transport in 3D by Monte Carlo Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    Version 04 FOTELP-2014 is a new compact general purpose version of the previous FOTELP-2K6 code designed to simulate the transport of photons, electrons and positrons through three-dimensional material and sources geometry by Monte Carlo techniques, using subroutine package PENGEOM from the PENELOPE code under Linux-based and Windows OS. This new version includes routine ELMAG for electron and positron transport simulation in electric and magnetic fields, RESUME option and routine TIMER for obtaining starting random number and for measuring the time of simulation.

  3. Analysis of Composite Skin-Stiffener Debond Specimens Using Volume Elements and a Shell/3D Modeling Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Minguet, Pierre J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The debonding of a skin/stringer specimen subjected to tension was studied using three-dimensional volume element modeling and computational fracture mechanics. Mixed mode strain energy release rates were calculated from finite element results using the virtual crack closure technique. The simulations revealed an increase in total energy release rate in the immediate vicinity of the free edges of the specimen. Correlation of the computed mixed-mode strain energy release rates along the delamination front contour with a two-dimensional mixed-mode interlaminar fracture criterion suggested that in spite of peak total energy release rates at the free edge the delamination would not advance at the edges first. The qualitative prediction of the shape of the delamination front was confirmed by X-ray photographs of a specimen taken during testing. The good correlation between prediction based on analysis and experiment demonstrated the efficiency of a mixed-mode failure analysis for the investigation of skin/stiffener separation due to delamination in the adherents. The application of a shell/3D modeling technique for the simulation of skin/stringer debond in a specimen subjected to three-point bending is also demonstrated. The global structure was modeled with shell elements. A local three-dimensional model, extending to about three specimen thicknesses on either side of the delamination front was used to capture the details of the damaged section. Computed total strain energy release rates and mixed-mode ratios obtained from shell/3D simulations were in good agreement with results obtained from full solid models. The good correlations of the results demonstrated the effectiveness of the shell/3D modeling technique for the investigation of skin/stiffener separation due to delamination in the adherents.

  4. 3D kinematic in-vitro comparison of posterolateral corner reconstruction techniques in a combined injury model.

    PubMed

    Nau, Thomas; Chevalier, Yan; Hagemeister, Nicola; Duval, Nicolas; deGuise, Jacques A

    2005-10-01

    With the variable injury pattern to the posterolateral structures (PLS) of the knee, a number of reconstructive procedures have been introduced. It was the aim of the present study to evaluate the resulting 3D kinematics following three different surgical techniques of reconstruction in a combined posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)/PLS injury model. In nine human cadaveric knees, 3D kinematics were recorded during the path of flexion-extension using a computer based custom made 6-degree-of-freedom (DOF) testing apparatus. Additional laxity tests were conducted at 30 and 90 degrees of flexion. Testing was performed before and after cutting the PLS and PCL, followed by PCL reconstruction alone. Reconstructing the posterolateral corner, three surgical techniques were compared: (a) the posterolateral corner sling procedure (PLCS), (b) the biceps tenodesis (BT), and (c) a bone patellar-tendon bone (BTB) allograft reconstruction. Posterior as well as rotational laxity were significantly increased after PCL/PLS transection at 30 and 90 degrees of flexion. Isolated PCL reconstruction resulted in a remaining external rotational deficiency for both tested flexion angles. Additional PLS reconstruction closely restored external rotation as well as posterior translation to intact values by all tested procedures. Compared to the intact knee, dynamic testing revealed a significant internal tibial rotation for (b) BT (mean=3.9 degrees, p=0.043) and for (c) BTB allograft (mean=4.3 degrees, p=0.012). (a) The PLCS demonstrated a tendency to internal tibial rotation between 0 and 60 degrees of flexion (mean=2.2 degrees, p=0.079). Varus/valgus rotation as well as anterior/posterior translation did not show significant differences for any of the tested techniques. The present study shows that despite satisfying results in static laxity testing, pathological 3D knee kinematics were not restored to normal, demonstrated by a nonphysiological internal tibial rotation during the path of

  5. A novel 3D modelling and simulation technique in thermotherapy predictive analysis on biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Arce-Diego, J. L.; Romanov, Oleg G.; Tolstik, Alexei L.

    2007-07-01

    Optical techniques applied to biological tissue allow the development of new tools in medical praxis, either in tissue characterization or treatment. Examples of the latter are Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) or Low Intensity Laser Treatment (LILT), and also a promising technique called thermotherapy, that tries to control temperature increase in a pathological tissue in order to reduce or even eliminate pathological effects. The application of thermotherapy requires a previous analysis in order to avoid collateral damage to the patient, and also to choose the appropriate optical source parameters. Among different implementations of opto-thermal models, the one we use consists of a three dimensional Beer-Lambert law for the optical part, and a bio-heat equation, that models heat transference, conduction, convection, radiation, blood perfusion and vaporization, solved via a numerical spatial-temporal explicit finite difference approach, for the thermal part. The usual drawback of the numerical method of the thermal model is that convergence constraints make spatial and temporal steps very small, with the natural consequence of slow processing. In this work, a new algorithm implementation is used for the bio-heat equation solution, in such a way that the simulation time decreases considerably. Thermal damage based on the Arrhenius integral damage is also considered.

  6. 3D absolute shape measurement of live rabbit hearts with a superfast two-frequency phase-shifting technique

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yajun; Laughner, Jacob I.; Efimov, Igor R.; Zhang, Song

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a two-frequency binary phase-shifting technique to measure three-dimensional (3D) absolute shape of beating rabbit hearts. Due to the low contrast of the cardiac surface, the projector and the camera must remain focused, which poses challenges for any existing binary method where the measurement accuracy is low. To conquer this challenge, this paper proposes to utilize the optimal pulse width modulation (OPWM) technique to generate high-frequency fringe patterns, and the error-diffusion dithering technique to produce low-frequency fringe patterns. Furthermore, this paper will show that fringe patterns produced with blue light provide the best quality measurements compared to fringe patterns generated with red or green light; and the minimum data acquisition speed for high quality measurements is around 800 Hz for a rabbit heart beating at 180 beats per minute. PMID:23482151

  7. 3D modelling of trompe l'oeil decorated vaults using dense matching techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiabrando, F.; Lingua, A.; Noardo, F.; Spano, A.

    2014-05-01

    Dense matching techniques, implemented in many commercial and open source software, are useful instruments for carrying out a rapid and detailed analysis of complex objects, including various types of details and surfaces. For this reason these tools were tested in the metric survey of a frescoed ceiling in the hall of honour of a baroque building. The surfaces are covered with trompe-l'oeil paintings which theoretically can give a very good texture to automatic matching algorithms but in this case problems arise when attempting to reconstruct the correct geometry: in fact, in correspondence with the main architectonic painted details, the models present some irregularities, unexpectedly coherent with the painted drawing. The photogrammetric models have been compared with data deriving from a LIDAR survey of the same object, to evaluate the entity of this blunder: some profiles of selected sections have been extracted, verifying the different behaviours of the software tools.

  8. Multiscale analysis of replication technique efficiency for 3D roughness characterization of manufactured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, S.; Mezghani, S.; El Mansori, M.

    2016-09-01

    The replication of topography has been generally restricted to optimizing material processing technologies in terms of statistical and single-scale features such as roughness. By contrast, manufactured surface topography is highly complex, irregular, and multiscale. In this work, we have demonstrated the use of multiscale analysis on replicates of surface finish to assess the precise control of the finished replica. Five commercial resins used for surface replication were compared. The topography of five standard surfaces representative of common finishing processes were acquired both directly and by a replication technique. Then, they were characterized using the ISO 25178 standard and multiscale decomposition based on a continuous wavelet transform, to compare the roughness transfer quality at different scales. Additionally, atomic force microscope force modulation mode was used in order to compare the resins’ stiffness properties. The results showed that less stiff resins are able to replicate the surface finish along a larger wavelength band. The method was then tested for non-destructive quality control of automotive gear tooth surfaces.

  9. Sparse array 3-D ISAR imaging based on maximum likelihood estimation and CLEAN technique.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changzheng; Yeo, Tat Soon; Tan, Chee Seng; Tan, Hwee Siang

    2010-08-01

    Large 2-D sparse array provides high angular resolution microwave images but artifacts are also induced by the high sidelobes of the beam pattern, thus, limiting its dynamic range. CLEAN technique has been used in the literature to extract strong scatterers for use in subsequent signal cancelation (artifacts removal). However, the performance of DFT parameters estimation based CLEAN algorithm for the estimation of the signal amplitudes is known to be poor, and this affects the signal cancelation. In this paper, DFT is used only to provide the initial estimates, and the maximum likelihood parameters estimation method with steepest descent implementation is then used to improve the precision of the calculated scatterers positions and amplitudes. Time domain information is also used to reduce the sidelobe levels. As a result, clear, artifact-free images could be obtained. The effects of multiple reflections and rotation speed estimation error are also discussed. The proposed method has been verified using numerical simulations and it has been shown to be effective.

  10. Lessons in modern digital field geology: Open source software, 3D techniques, and the new world of digital mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, Terry; Hurtado, Jose; Langford, Richard; Serpa, Laura

    2014-05-01

    Although many geologists refuse to admit it, it is time to put paper-based geologic mapping into the historical archives and move to the full potential of digital mapping techniques. For our group, flat map digital geologic mapping is now a routine operation in both research and instruction. Several software options are available, and basic proficiency with the software can be learned in a few hours of instruction and practice. The first practical field GIS software, ArcPad, remains a viable, stable option on Windows-based systems. However, the vendor seems to be moving away from ArcPad in favor of mobile software solutions that are difficult to implement without GIS specialists. Thus, we have pursued a second software option based on the open source program QGIS. Our QGIS system uses the same shapefile-centric data structure as our ArcPad system, including similar pop-up data entry forms and generic graphics for easy data management in the field. The advantage of QGIS is that the same software runs on virtually all common platforms except iOS, although the Android version remains unstable as of this writing. A third software option we are experimenting with for flat map-based field work is Fieldmove, a derivative of the 3D-capable program Move developed by Midland Valley. Our initial experiments with Fieldmove are positive, particularly with the new, inexpensive (<300Euros) Windows tablets. However, the lack of flexibility in data structure makes for cumbersome workflows when trying to interface our existing shapefile-centric data structures to Move. Nonetheless, in spring 2014 we will experiment with full-3D immersion in the field using the full Move software package in combination with ground based LiDAR and photogrammetry. One new workflow suggested by our initial experiments is that field geologists should consider using photogrammetry software to capture 3D visualizations of key outcrops. This process is now straightforward in several software packages, and

  11. Study of 3D metrology techniques as an alternative to cross-sectional analysis at the R&D level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucher, Johann; Miller, Kirk

    2004-05-01

    The decrease in critical dimension (CD) of integrated circuits (IC) always challenges metrology tools capabilities. In less than ten years we will reach the limit of CMOS technology with typical printed gate length less than 20 nm and physical gate length of less than 15nm. Advanced R&D departments must already address today all the issues related to so small devices otherwise the roadmap requirements would not be fulfilled. Indeed most of the issues are directly related to metrology capabilities such as precise control of the shape of etched features, sidewall roughness, wafer CD uniformity, and mask inspection (. . .). All these parameters will represent a bottleneck for advanced patterning if metrology tools are unable to measure them with a precision better than few nanometers. In this paper we show that 3D metrology is mandatory to succeed in reaching future roadmap requirements. We address in details the CD AFM technique capabilities which is a potential candidate for advanced patterning metrology. The experimental data are compared with today"s reference: cross-sectional analysis (X-SEM). We also discuss on other techniques such as scatterometry and top view CD-SEM which are also candidates for 3D metrology.

  12. Application of 3D-QSAR techniques in anti-HIV-1 drug design--an overview.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Asim Kumar

    2005-01-01

    Despite the availability of several classes of drugs against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1), this deadly disease showing very little sign of containment, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa and South-East Asia. More than 20 million people died since the first diagnosis of AIDS more than twenty years ago and almost 40 million people are currently living with HIV/AIDS. Structure-based drug design effort was immensely successful in identifying several drugs that are currently available for the treatment of HIV-1. Many applications have been reported on the use of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies to understand the drug-receptor interactions and help in the design of more effective analogs. Extensive application was also reported on the application of 3D-QSAR techniques, such as, Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA), Comparative Molecular Similarity Analysis (CoMSIA), pharmacophore generation using Catalyst/HypoGen, free-energy binding analysis, GRID/GOLPE, HINT-based techniques, etc. in anti-HIV-1 drug discovery programs in academia and industry. We have attempted to put together a comprehensive overview on the 3D-QSAR applications in anti-HIV-1 drug design reported in the literature during the last decade.

  13. Treatment techniques for 3D conformal radiation to breast and chest wall including the internal mammary chain.

    PubMed

    Sonnik, Deborah; Selvaraj, Raj N; Faul, Clare; Gerszten, Kristina; Heron, Dwight E; King, Gwendolyn C

    2007-01-01

    Breast, chest wall, and regional nodal irradiation have been associated with an improved outcome in high-risk breast cancer patients. Complex treatment planning is often utilized to ensure complete coverage of the target volume while minimizing the dose to surrounding normal tissues. The 2 techniques evaluated in this report are the partially wide tangent fields (PWTFs) and the 4-field photon/electron combination (the modified "Kuske Technique"). These 2 techniques were evaluated in 10 consecutive breast cancer patients. All patients had computerized tomographic (CT) scans for 3D planning supine on a breast board. The breast was defined clinically by the physician and confirmed radiographically with radiopaque bebes. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of normal and target tissues were then compared. The deep tangent field with blocks resulted in optimal coverage of the target and the upper internal mammary chain (IMC) while sparing of critical and nontarget tissues. The wide tangent technique required less treatment planning and delivery time. We compared the 2 techniques and their resultant DVHs and feasibility in a busy clinic.

  14. Treatment techniques for 3D conformal radiation to breast and chest wall including the internal mammary chain

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnik, Deborah; Selvaraj, Raj N. . E-mail: selvarajrn@upmc.edu; Faul, Clare; Gerszten, Kristina; Heron, Dwight E.; King, Gwendolyn C.

    2007-04-01

    Breast, chest wall, and regional nodal irradiation have been associated with an improved outcome in high-risk breast cancer patients. Complex treatment planning is often utilized to ensure complete coverage of the target volume while minimizing the dose to surrounding normal tissues. The 2 techniques evaluated in this report are the partially wide tangent fields (PWTFs) and the 4-field photon/electron combination (the modified 'Kuske Technique'). These 2 techniques were evaluated in 10 consecutive breast cancer patients. All patients had computerized tomographic (CT) scans for 3D planning supine on a breast board. The breast was defined clinically by the physician and confirmed radiographically with radiopaque bebes. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of normal and target tissues were then compared. The deep tangent field with blocks resulted in optimal coverage of the target and the upper internal mammary chain (IMC) while sparing of critical and nontarget tissues. The wide tangent technique required less treatment planning and delivery time. We compared the 2 techniques and their resultant DVHs and feasibility in a busy clinic.

  15. Scatterer size and concentration estimation technique based on a 3D acoustic impedance map from histologic sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Oelze, Michael L.; O'Brien, William D.; Zachary, James F.

    2004-05-01

    Accurate estimates of scatterer parameters (size and acoustic concentration) are beneficial adjuncts to characterize disease from ultrasonic backscatterer measurements. An estimation technique was developed to obtain parameter estimates from the Fourier transform of the spatial autocorrelation function (SAF). A 3D impedance map (3DZM) is used to obtain the SAF of tissue. 3DZMs are obtained by aligning digitized light microscope images from histologic preparations of tissue. Estimates were obtained for simulated 3DZMs containing spherical scatterers randomly located: relative errors were less than 3%. Estimates were also obtained from a rat fibroadenoma and a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor (MMT). Tissues were fixed (10% neutral-buffered formalin), embedded in paraffin, serially sectioned and stained with H&E. 3DZM results were compared to estimates obtained independently against ultrasonic backscatter measurements. For the fibroadenoma and MMT, average scatterer diameters were 91 and 31.5 μm, respectively. Ultrasonic measurements yielded average scatterer diameters of 105 and 30 μm, respectively. The 3DZM estimation scheme showed results similar to those obtained by the independent ultrasonic measurements. The 3D impedance maps show promise as a powerful tool to characterize ultrasonic scattering sites of tissue. [Work supported by the University of Illinois Research Board.

  16. Sn and Cu oxide nanoparticles deposited on TiO2 nanoflower 3D substrates by Inert Gas Condensation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusior, A.; Kollbek, K.; Kowalski, K.; Borysiewicz, M.; Wojciechowski, T.; Adamczyk, A.; Trenczek-Zajac, A.; Radecka, M.; Zakrzewska, K.

    2016-09-01

    Sn and Cu oxide nanoparticles were deposited by Inert Gas Condensation (IGC) technique combined with dc magnetron sputtering onto nanoflower TiO2 3D substrates obtained in the oxidation process of Ti-foil in 30% H2O2. Sputtering parameters such as insertion length and Ar/He flow rates were optimized taking into account the nanostructure morphology. Comparative studies with hydrothermal method were carried out. Surface properties of the synthesized nanomaterials were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy, SEM, Atomic Force Microscopy, AFM, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, XPS. X-ray diffraction, XRD and Raman spectroscopy were performed in order to determine phase composition. Impedance spectroscopy demonstrated the influence of nanoparticles on the electrical conductivity.

  17. Dosimetric study for cervix carcinoma treatment using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compensation based on 3D intracavitary brachytherapy technique

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Gang; Wang, Pei; Lang, Jinyi; Tian, Yin; Luo, Yangkun; Fan, Zixuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compensation based on 3D high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) boost technique (ICBT + IMRT) has been used in our hospital for advanced cervix carcinoma patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric results of the four different boost techniques (the conventional 2D HDR intracavitary brachytherapy [CICBT], 3D optimized HDR intracavitary brachytherapy [OICBT], and IMRT-alone with the applicator in situ). Material and methods For 30 patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma, after the completion of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for whole pelvic irradiation 45 Gy/25 fractions, five fractions of ICBT + IMRT boost with 6 Gy/fractions for high risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and 5 Gy/fractions for intermediate risk clinical target volume (IRCTV) were applied. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were acquired using an in situ CT/MRI-compatible applicator. The gross tumor volume (GTV), the high/intermediate-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV/IRCTV), bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were contoured by CT scans. Results For ICBT + IMRT plan, values of D90, D100 of HRCTV, D90, D100, and V100 of IRCTV significantly increased (p < 0.05) in comparison to OICBT and CICBT. The D2cc values for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were significantly lower than that of CICBT and IMRT alone. In all patients, the mean rectum V60 Gy values generated from ICBT + IMRT and OICBT techniques were very similar but for bladder and sigmoid, the V60 Gy values generated from ICBT + IMRT were higher than that of OICBT. For the ICBT + IMRT plan, the standard deviations (SD) of D90 and D2cc were found to be lower than other three treatment plans. Conclusions The ICBT + IMRT technique not only provides good target coverage but also maintains low doses (D2cc) to the OAR. ICBT + IMRT is an optional technique to boost parametrial region or tumor of large size and irregular shape

  18. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  19. Application of combined EBSD and 3D-SEM technique on crystallographic facet analysis of steel at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, P; Solberg, J K; Karlsen, M; Akselsen, O M; Ostby, E

    2013-07-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction has been increasingly used to identify the crystallographic planes and orientation of cleavage facets with respect to the rolling direction in fracture surfaces. The crystallographic indices of cleavage planes can be determined either directly from the fracture surface or indirectly from metallographic sections perpendicular to the plane of the fracture surface. A combination of electron backscatter diffraction and 3D scanning electron microscopy imaging technique has been modified to determine crystallographic facet orientations. The main purpose of this work has been to identify the macroscopic crystallographic orientations of cleavage facets in the fracture surfaces of weld heat affected zones in a well-known steel fractured at low temperatures. The material used for the work was an American Petroleum Institute (API) X80 grade steel developed for applications at low temperatures, and typical heat affected zone microstructures were obtained by carrying out weld thermal simulation. The fracture toughness was measured at different temperatures (0°C, -30°C, -60°C and -90°C) by using Crack Tip Opening Displacement testing. Fracture surfaces and changes in microstructure were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. Crystallographic orientations were identified by electron backscatter diffraction, indirectly from a polished section perpendicular to the major fracture surface of the samples. Computer assisted 3D imaging was used to measure the angles between the cleavage facets and the adjacent polished surface, and then these angles were combined with electron backscatter diffraction measurements to determine the macroscopic crystallographic planes of the facets. The crystallographic indices of the macroscopic cleavage facet planes were identified to be {100}, {110}, {211} and {310} at all temperatures.

  20. Shoulder 3D range of motion and humerus rotation in two volleyball spike techniques: injury prevention and performance.

    PubMed

    Seminati, Elena; Marzari, Alessandra; Vacondio, Oreste; Minetti, Alberto E

    2015-06-01

    Repetitive stresses and movements on the shoulder in the volleyball spike expose this joint to overuse injuries, bringing athletes to a career threatening injury. Assuming that specific spike techniques play an important role in injury risk, we compared the kinematic of the traditional (TT) and the alternative (AT) techniques in 21 elite athletes, evaluating their safety with respect to performance. Glenohumeral joint was set as the centre of an imaginary sphere, intersected by the distal end of the humerus at different angles. Shoulder range of motion and angular velocities were calculated and compared to the joint limits. Ball speed and jump height were also assessed. Results indicated the trajectory of the humerus to be different for the TT, with maximal flexion of the shoulder reduced by 10 degrees, and horizontal abduction 15 degrees higher. No difference was found for external rotation angles, while axial rotation velocities were significantly higher in AT, with a 5% higher ball speed. Results suggest AT as a potential preventive solution to shoulder chronic pathologies, reducing shoulder flexion during spiking. The proposed method allows visualisation of risks associated with different overhead manoeuvres, by depicting humerus angles and velocities with respect to joint limits in the same 3D space.

  1. A low feed-through 3D vacuum packaging technique with silicon vias for RF MEMS resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jicong; Yuan, Quan; Kan, Xiao; Yang, Jinling; Yang, Fuhua

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a wafer-level three-dimensional (3D) vacuum packaging technique for radio frequency microelectromechanical systems (RF MEMS) resonators. A Sn-rich Au-Sn solder bonding is employed to provide a vacuum encapsulation as well as electrical conductions. Vertical silicon vias are micro-fabricated by glass reflow process. The optimized grounding, via pitch, and all-round shielding effectively reduce feed-through capacitance. Thus the signal-to-background ratios (SBRs) of the transmission signals increase from 17 dB to 20 dB, and the quality factor (Q) values of the packaged resonators go from around 8000 up to more than 9500. The measured average leak rate and shear strength are (2.55  ±  0.9)  ×  10-8 atm-cc s-1 and 42.53  ±  4.19 MPa, respectively. Furthermore, thermal cycling test between  -40 °C and 100 °C and high temperature storage test at 150 °C show that the resonant-frequency drifts are less than  ±7 ppm. In addition, the SBRs and the Q values have no obvious change after the tests. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed encapsulation technique is well suited for the applications of RF MEMS devices.

  2. A σ-coordinate model for 3D free-surface flows using an unstructured finite-volume technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uh Zapata, Miguel

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a numerical solution of three-dimensional free-surface flows using a σ-coordinate model, a projection method and an unstructured finite-volume technique. The coordinate transformation is used in order to overcome difficulties arising from free surface elevation and irregular geometry. The projection method consists to combine the momentum and continuity equations in order to establish a Poisson-type equation for the non-hydrostatic pressure. A cell-centered finite volume method with a triangular mesh in the horizontal direction is used to simulate the flows with free-surfaces, in which the average values of conserved variables are stored at the centre of each element. A parallel algorithm is also presented for the finite volume discretization of the 3D Navier-Stokes equations. The proposed parallel method is formulated by using a multi-color SOR method, a block domain decomposition and interprocessor data communication techniques with Message Passing Interface. The model has been validated by several benchmarks which numerical simulations are in good agreement with the corresponding analytical and existing experimental results.

  3. CT and MRI Assessment and Characterization Using Segmentation and 3D Modeling Techniques: Applications to Muscle, Bone and Brain.

    PubMed

    Gargiulo, Paolo; Helgason, Thordur; Ramon, Ceon; Jr, Halldór Jónsson; Carraro, Ugo

    2014-03-31

    This paper reviews the novel use of CT and MRI data and image processing tools to segment and reconstruct tissue images in 3D to determine characteristics of muscle, bone and brain. This to study and simulate the structural changes occurring in healthy and pathological conditions as well as in response to clinical treatments. Here we report the application of this methodology to evaluate and quantify: 1. progression of atrophy in human muscle subsequent to permanent lower motor neuron (LMN) denervation, 2. muscle recovery as induced by functional electrical stimulation (FES), 3. bone quality in patients undergoing total hip replacement and 4. to model the electrical activity of the brain. Study 1: CT data and segmentation techniques were used to quantify changes in muscle density and composition by associating the Hounsfield unit values of muscle, adipose and fibrous connective tissue with different colors. This method was employed to monitor patients who have permanent muscle LMN denervation in the lower extremities under two different conditions: permanent LMN denervated not electrically stimulated and stimulated. Study 2: CT data and segmentation techniques were employed, however, in this work we assessed bone and muscle conditions in the pre-operative CT scans of patients scheduled to undergo total hip replacement. In this work, the overall anatomical structure, the bone mineral density (BMD) and compactness of quadriceps muscles and proximal femoral was computed to provide a more complete view for surgeons when deciding which implant technology to use. Further, a Finite element analysis provided a map of the strains around the proximal femur socket when solicited by typical stresses caused by an implant press fitting. Study 3 describes a method to model the electrical behavior of human brain using segmented MR images. The aim of the work is to use these models to predict the electrical activity of the human brain under normal and pathological conditions by

  4. Smart three-dimensional lightweight structure triggered from a thin composite sheet via 3D printing technique

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quan; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Gengkai

    2016-01-01

    Complex fabrication process and expensive materials have restricted the development of smart three-dimensional (3D) lightweight structures, which are expected to possess self-shaping, self-folding and self-unfolding performances. Here we present a simple approach to fabricate smart lightweight structures by triggering shape transformation from thin printed composite sheets. The release of the internal strain in printed polymer materials enables the printed composite sheet to keep flat under heating and transform into a designed 3D configuration when cooled down to room temperature. The 3D lightweight structure can be switched between flat and 3D configuration under appropriate thermal stimuli. Our work exploits uniform internal strain in printed materials as a controllable tool to fabricate smart 3D lightweight structures, opening an avenue for possible applications in engineering fields. PMID:26926357

  5. Smart three-dimensional lightweight structure triggered from a thin composite sheet via 3D printing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Quan; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Gengkai

    2016-02-01

    Complex fabrication process and expensive materials have restricted the development of smart three-dimensional (3D) lightweight structures, which are expected to possess self-shaping, self-folding and self-unfolding performances. Here we present a simple approach to fabricate smart lightweight structures by triggering shape transformation from thin printed composite sheets. The release of the internal strain in printed polymer materials enables the printed composite sheet to keep flat under heating and transform into a designed 3D configuration when cooled down to room temperature. The 3D lightweight structure can be switched between flat and 3D configuration under appropriate thermal stimuli. Our work exploits uniform internal strain in printed materials as a controllable tool to fabricate smart 3D lightweight structures, opening an avenue for possible applications in engineering fields.

  6. Smart three-dimensional lightweight structure triggered from a thin composite sheet via 3D printing technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Gengkai

    2016-02-29

    Complex fabrication process and expensive materials have restricted the development of smart three-dimensional (3D) lightweight structures, which are expected to possess self-shaping, self-folding and self-unfolding performances. Here we present a simple approach to fabricate smart lightweight structures by triggering shape transformation from thin printed composite sheets. The release of the internal strain in printed polymer materials enables the printed composite sheet to keep flat under heating and transform into a designed 3D configuration when cooled down to room temperature. The 3D lightweight structure can be switched between flat and 3D configuration under appropriate thermal stimuli. Our work exploits uniform internal strain in printed materials as a controllable tool to fabricate smart 3D lightweight structures, opening an avenue for possible applications in engineering fields.

  7. 3D Numerical study on the hollow profile polymer extrusion forming based on the gas-assisted technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Z.; Huang, X. Y.; Liu, H. S.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, gas-assisted extrusion method was introduced into the extrusion of the hollow profiles. To validate the feasibility of the new extrusion method, 3D numerical simulation of the hollow profiles based on gas-assisted technique was carried out by using the finite element method. The Phan-Thien-Tanner (PTT) mode was selected as the construction equation. In the simulations, the physical field distributions of four different extrusion modes were obtained and analyzed. Results showed that the extrudate effect of traditional no gas- assisted mode was poor because the extrudate swell phenomenon is obvious and the physical field values are larger. For the gas-assisted of the inner wall, the extrudate swell of the melt was more obvious than that of the traditional no gas-assisted mode on account of the no-slip boundary condition on the outer wall. For the gas-assisted of the outer wall, the dimple effect of the inner wall is more obvious owing to the no-slip boundary condition on the inner wall. However, the extrusion effect of the double walls gas-assisted mode is very good because of the full-slip effect on the both walls.

  8. Generation of Multilayered 3D Structures of HepG2 Cells Using a Bio-printing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyeryeon; Kang, Kyojin; Park, Su A; Kim, Wan Doo; Paik, Seung Sam; Lee, Sang-Hun; Jeong, Jaemin; Choi, Dongho

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic liver disease is a major widespread cause of death, and whole liver transplantation is the only definitive treatment for patients with end-stage liver diseases. However, many problems, including donor shortage, surgical complications and cost, hinder their usage. Recently, tissue-engineering technology provided a potential breakthrough for solving these problems. Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has been used to mimic tissues and organs suitable for transplantation, but applications for the liver have been rare. Methods A 3D bioprinting system was used to construct 3D printed hepatic structures using alginate. HepG2 cells were cultured on these 3D structures for 3 weeks and examined by fluorescence microscopy, histology and immunohistochemistry. The expression of liver-specific markers was quantified on days 1, 7, 14, and 21. Results The cells grew well on the alginate scaffold, and liver-specific gene expression increased. The cells grew more extensively in 3D culture than two-dimensional culture and exhibited better structural aspects of the liver, indicating that the 3D bioprinting method recapitulates the liver architecture. Conclusions The 3D bioprinting of hepatic structures appears feasible. This technology may become a major tool and provide a bridge between basic science and the clinical challenges for regenerative medicine of the liver. PMID:27559001

  9. The methodology of documenting cultural heritage sites using photogrammetry, UAV, and 3D printing techniques: the case study of Asinou Church in Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Themistocleous, K.; Ioannides, M.; Agapiou, A.; Hadjimitsis, D. G.

    2015-06-01

    As the affordability, reliability and ease-of-use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) advances, the use of aerial surveying for cultural heritage purposes becomes a popular choice, yielding an unprecedented volume of high-resolution, geo-tagged image-sets of historical sites from above. As well, recent developments in photogrammetry technology provide a simple and cost-effective method of generating relatively accurate 3D models from 2D images. These techniques provide a set of new tools for archaeologists and cultural heritage experts to capture, store, process, share, visualise and annotate 3D models in the field. This paper focuses on the methodology used to document the cultural heritage site of Asinou Church in Cyprus using various state of the art techniques, such as UAV, photogrammetry and 3D printing. Hundreds of images of the Asinou Church were taken by a UAV with an attached high resolution, low cost camera. These photographic images were then used to create a digital 3D model and a 3D printer was used to create a physical model of the church. Such a methodology provides archaeologists and cultural heritage experts a simple and cost-effective method of generating relatively accurate 3D models from 2D images of cultural heritage sites.

  10. 3-D ion distribution and evolution in storm-time RC Retrieved from TWINS ENA by differential voxel CT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, S.; Yan, W.; Xu, L.

    2013-12-01

    The quantitative retrieval of the 3-D spatial distribution of the parent energetic ions of ENA from a 2-D ENA image is a quite challenge task. The Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission of NASA is the first constellation to perform stereoscopic magnetospheric imaging of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) from a pair of spacecraft flying on two widely-separated Molniya orbits. TWINS provides a unique opportunity to retrieve the 3-D distribution of ions in the ring current (RC) by using a volumetric pixel (voxel) CT inversion method. In this study the voxel CT method is implemented for a series of differential ENA fluxes averaged over about 6 to 7 sweeps (corresponding to a time period of about 9 min.) at different energy levels ranging from 5 to 100 keV, obtained simultaneously by the two satellites during the main phase of a great magnetic storm with minimum Sym-H of -156 nT on 24-25 October 2011. The data were selected to span a period about 50 minutes during which a large substorm was undergoing its expansion phase first and then recovery. The ENA species of O and H are distinguished for some time-segments by analyzing the signals of pulse heights of second electrons emitted from the carbon foil and impacted on the MCP detector in the TWINS sensors. In order to eliminate the possible influence on retrieval induced by instrument bias error, a differential voxel CT technique is applied. The flux intensity of the ENAs' parent ions in the RC has been obtained as a function of energy, L value, MLT sector and latitude, along with their time evolution during the storm-time substorm expansion phase. Forward calculations proved the reliability of the retrieved results. It shows that the RC is highly asymmetric, with a major concentration in the midnight to dawn sector for equatorial latitudes. Halfway through the substorm expansion there occurred a large enhancement of equatorial ion flux at lower energy (5 keV) in the dusk sector, with narrow extent

  11. Assembly of cell-laden hydrogel fiber into non-liquefied and liquefied 3D spiral constructs by perfusion-based layer-by-layer technique.

    PubMed

    Sher, Praveen; Oliveira, Sara M; Borges, João; Mano, João F

    2015-01-06

    In this work, three-dimensional (3D) self-sustaining, spiral-shaped constructs were produced through a combination of ionotropic gelation, to form cell-encapsulated alginate fibers, and a perfusion-based layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. Single fibers were assembled over cylindrical molds by reeling to form spiral shapes, both having different geometries and sizes. An uninterrupted nanometric multilayer coating produced by a perfusion-based LbL technique, using alginate and chitosan, generated stable 3D spiral-shaped macrostructures by gripping and affixing the threads together without using any crosslinking/binding agent. The chelation process altered the internal microenvironment of the 3D construct from the solid to the liquefied state while preserving the external geometry. L929 cell viability by MTS and dsDNA quantification favor liquefied 3D constructs more than non-liquefied ones. The proposed technique setup helps us to generate complex polyelectrolyte-based 3D constructs for tissue engineering applications and organ printing.

  12. Tri-Dimensional Electric Resistivity Tomography (ERT-3D) Technique, an Efficient Tool to Unveil the Subsoil of Archaeological Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, R. E.; Vargas, D.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; HernaNdez-Quintero, J. E.; Tejero, A.

    2014-12-01

    Three-Dimensional Electrical Resistivity Tomography techniques (ERT-3D) have demonstrated to be an efficient tool to study the subsurface of areas of archaeological interest by special arrays designed to 'illuminate' the subsoil beneath the structure under study. 'L'- and 'Corner'-arrays are applied to design alternative electrode geometries, which attempt to cover the subsurface with enough resistivity observations underneath the studied target. Two examples are presented where novel geometries can be applied to investigate the subsoil of two important pyramids in Mexico. First, the archaeological site of Cuicuilco is studied. The area is found towards the southern portion of the Mexican Basin. This pyramid presents a circular structure of 110 m in diameter and a total height of 25 m. The region is partially covered by the lava flows that came from an eruptive event form the Xitle Volcano 1500 years ago. The geophysical study was carried out at the base of the pyramid. 48 electrodes were deployed along a circular transect, with an electrode separation of 5.4 m. A total of 1716 apparent resistivity observations were measured. The inverted model computed is obtained with an investigation depth of 30 m, approximately (Figure 1, in color). A resistive anomaly can be observed towards the central portion of the model. This anomaly can be associated to a burial chamber, excavated by the archaeologists. The second example corresponds to the pyiramid El Castillo, located in the archaeological site of Chichen Itza, in the southern lowlands of Mexico, within the Yucatan Peninsula. Previous GPR studies carried out within the pyramid's Plaza provided evidences of a buried tunnel excavated within the limestone rocks. Such feature seemed to run beneath the eastern flank of the pyramide. The geophysical study was carried out by employing 96 flat-surface electrodes, which surrounded the edifice forming a square geometry. A total of 5,350 apparent resistivity observations were

  13. Characterization of a subwavelength-scale 3D void structure using the FDTD-based confocal laser scanning microscopic image mapping technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyongsik; Chon, James W; Gu, Min; Lee, Byoungho

    2007-08-20

    In this paper, a simple confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) image mapping technique based on the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) calculation has been proposed and evaluated for characterization of a subwavelength-scale three-dimensional (3D) void structure fabricated inside polymer matrix. The FDTD simulation method adopts a focused Gaussian beam incident wave, Berenger's perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary condition, and the angular spectrum analysis method. Through the well matched simulation and experimental results of the xz-scanned 3D void structure, we first characterize the exact position and the topological shape factor of the subwavelength-scale void structure, which was fabricated by a tightly focused ultrashort pulse laser. The proposed CLSM image mapping technique based on the FDTD can be widely applied from the 3D near-field microscopic imaging, optical trapping, and evanescent wave phenomenon to the state-of-the-art bio- and nanophotonics.

  14. Predicting Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata) Freshness by a Novel Combined Technique of 3D Imaging and SW-NIR Spectral Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ivorra, Eugenio; Verdu, Samuel; Sánchez, Antonio J; Grau, Raúl; Barat, José M

    2016-10-19

    A technique that combines the spatial resolution of a 3D structured-light (SL) imaging system with the spectral analysis of a hyperspectral short-wave near infrared system was developed for freshness predictions of gilthead sea bream on the first storage days (Days 0-6). This novel approach allows the hyperspectral analysis of very specific fish areas, which provides more information for freshness estimations. The SL system obtains a 3D reconstruction of fish, and an automatic method locates gilthead's pupils and irises. Once these regions are positioned, the hyperspectral camera acquires spectral information and a multivariate statistical study is done. The best region is the pupil with an R² of 0.92 and an RMSE of 0.651 for predictions. We conclude that the combination of 3D technology with the hyperspectral analysis offers plenty of potential and is a very promising technique to non destructively predict gilthead freshness.

  15. Predicting Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata) Freshness by a Novel Combined Technique of 3D Imaging and SW-NIR Spectral Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ivorra, Eugenio; Verdu, Samuel; Sánchez, Antonio J.; Grau, Raúl; Barat, José M.

    2016-01-01

    A technique that combines the spatial resolution of a 3D structured-light (SL) imaging system with the spectral analysis of a hyperspectral short-wave near infrared system was developed for freshness predictions of gilthead sea bream on the first storage days (Days 0–6). This novel approach allows the hyperspectral analysis of very specific fish areas, which provides more information for freshness estimations. The SL system obtains a 3D reconstruction of fish, and an automatic method locates gilthead’s pupils and irises. Once these regions are positioned, the hyperspectral camera acquires spectral information and a multivariate statistical study is done. The best region is the pupil with an R2 of 0.92 and an RMSE of 0.651 for predictions. We conclude that the combination of 3D technology with the hyperspectral analysis offers plenty of potential and is a very promising technique to non destructively predict gilthead freshness. PMID:27775556

  16. Application of 3D WebGIS and real-time technique in earthquake information publishing and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Boren; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Mao; Huang, Jing

    2015-06-01

    In hazard management, earthquake researchers have utilized GIS to ease the process of managing disasters. Researchers use WebGIS to assess hazards and seismic risk. Although they can provide a visual analysis platform based on GIS technology, they lack a general description in the extensibility of WebGIS for processing dynamic data, especially real-time data. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for real-time 3D visual earthquake information publishing model based on WebGIS and digital globe to improve the ability of processing real-time data in systems based on WebGIS. On the basis of the model, we implement a real-time 3D earthquake information publishing system—EqMap3D. The system can not only publish real-time earthquake information but also display these data and their background geoscience information in a 3D scene. It provides a powerful tool for display, analysis, and decision-making for researchers and administrators. It also facilitates better communication between researchers engaged in geosciences and the interested public.

  17. A Three Pronged Approach for Improved Data Understanding: 3-D Visualization, Use of Gaming Techniques, and Intelligent Advisory Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    immersion environment with new displays and multi-sensory interaction, using concepts such as deliberate synesthesia , will enhance the ability for...transformations for deliberate synesthesia Deliberate Synesthesia • Sonification • Visification Advanced 3-D visualization and role-playing game (RPG...by exploring concepts such as multi- sensory interaction, dynamic computer-guided focus of attention, deliberate synesthesia , utilization of

  18. In vivo application of 3D-line skeleton graph analysis (LSGA) technique with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of trabecular bone structure.

    PubMed

    Pothuaud, Laurent; Newitt, David C; Lu, Ying; MacDonald, Brian; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2004-05-01

    Over the last several years magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has emerged as a means of measuring in vivo 3D trabecular bone structure. In particular, MR based diagnosis could be used to complement standard bone mineral density (BMD) methods for assessing osteoporosis and evaluating longitudinal changes. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using the 3D-LSGA technique for the evaluation of trabecular bone structure of high-resolution MR images, particularly for assessing longitudinal changes, in vivo. First, the reproducibility of topological 3D-LSGA based measurements was evaluated in a set of seven volunteers, and coefficients of variations ranged from 3.5% to 6%. Second, high-resolution MR images of the radius in 30 postmenopausal women from a placebo controlled drug study (Idoxifene), divided into placebo ( n=9) and treated ( n=21) groups, were obtained at baseline (BL) and after 1 year of treatment (follow-up, FU). In addition, dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measures of BMD were obtained in the distal radius. Standard morphological measurements based on the mean intercept length (MIL) technique as well as 3D-LSGA based measurements were applied to the 3D MR images. Significant changes from BL to FU were detected, in the treated group, using the topological 3D-LSGA based measurements, morphological measures of volume of connected trabeculae and App Tb.N from MIL analysis. The duration of the study was short, and the number of patients remaining in the study was small, hence these results cannot be interpreted with regard to a true therapeutic response. Furthermore, the site (wrist) and the drug (idoxifene) are not optimal for follow-up study. However, this paper demonstrated the feasibility of using 3D-LSGA based evaluation coupled with in vivo high-resolution MR imaging as a complementary approach for the monitoring of trabecular bone changes in individual subjects.

  19. Reconstruction of defects of maxillary sinus wall after removal of a huge odontogenic lesion using prebended 3D titanium-mesh and CAD/CAM technique

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A 63 year-old male with a huge odontogenic lesion of sinus maxillaris was treated with computer-assisted surgery. After resection of the odontogenic lesion, the sinus wall was reconstructed with a prebended 3D titanium-mesh using CAD/CAM technique. This work provides a new treatment device for maxillary reconstruction via rapid prototyping procedures. PMID:22070833

  20. Assessment of some problematic factors in facial image identification using a 2D/3D superimposition technique.

    PubMed

    Atsuchi, Masaru; Tsuji, Akiko; Usumoto, Yosuke; Yoshino, Mineo; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2013-09-01

    The number of criminal cases requiring facial image identification of a suspect has been increasing because a surveillance camera is installed everywhere in the city and furthermore, the intercom with the recording function is installed in the home. In this study, we aimed to analyze the usefulness of a 2D/3D facial image superimposition system for image identification when facial aging, facial expression, and twins are under consideration. As a result, the mean values of the average distances calculated from the 16 anatomical landmarks between the 3D facial images of the 50s groups and the 2D facial images of the 20s, 30s, and 40s groups were 2.6, 2.3, and 2.2mm, respectively (facial aging). The mean values of the average distances calculated from 12 anatomical landmarks between the 3D normal facial images and four emotional expressions were 4.9 (laughter), 2.9 (anger), 2.9 (sadness), and 3.6mm (surprised), respectively (facial expressions). The average distance obtained from 11 anatomical landmarks between the same person in twins was 1.1mm, while the average distance between different person in twins was 2.0mm (twins). Facial image identification using the 2D/3D facial image superimposition system demonstrated adequate statistical power and identified an individual with high accuracy, suggesting its usefulness. However, computer technology concerning video image processing and superimpose progress, there is a need to keep familiar with the morphology and anatomy as its base.

  1. A cone-beam CT based technique to augment the 3D virtual skull model with a detailed dental surface.

    PubMed

    Swennen, G R J; Mommaerts, M Y; Abeloos, J; De Clercq, C; Lamoral, P; Neyt, N; Casselman, J; Schutyser, F

    2009-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is used for maxillofacial imaging. 3D virtual planning of orthognathic and facial orthomorphic surgery requires detailed visualisation of the interocclusal relationship. This study aimed to introduce and evaluate the use of a double CBCT scan procedure with a modified wax bite wafer to augment the 3D virtual skull model with a detailed dental surface. The impressions of the dental arches and the wax bite wafer were scanned for ten patient separately using a high resolution standardized CBCT scanning protocol. Surface-based rigid registration using ICP (iterative closest points) was used to fit the virtual models on the wax bite wafer. Automatic rigid point-based registration of the wax bite wafer on the patient scan was performed to implement the digital virtual dental arches into the patient's skull model. Probability error histograms showed errors of < or =0.22 mm (25% percentile), < or =0.44 mm (50% percentile) and < or =1.09 mm (90% percentile) for ICP surface matching. The mean registration error for automatic point-based rigid registration was 0.18+/-0.10 mm (range 0.13-0.26 mm). The results show the potential for a double CBCT scan procedure with a modified wax bite wafer to set-up a 3D virtual augmented model of the skull with detailed dental surface.

  2. Real-time 3D ultrasound fetal image enhancment techniques using motion-compensated frame rate up-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gun-Ill; Park, Rae-Hong; Song, Young-Seuk; Kim, Cheol-An; Hwang, Jae-Sub

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we present a motion compensated frame rate up-conversion method for real-time three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound fetal image enhancement. The conventional mechanical scan method with one-dimensional (1-D) array converters used for 3-D volume data acquisition has a slow frame rate of multi-planar images. This drawback is not an issue for stationary objects, however in ultrasound images showing a fetus of more than about 25 weeks, we perceive abrupt changes due to fast motions. To compensate for this defect, we propose the frame rate up-conversion method by which new interpolated frames are inserted between two input frames, giving smooth renditions to human eyes. More natural motions can be obtained by frame rate up-conversion. In the proposed algorithm, we employ forward motion estimation (ME), in which motion vectors (MVs) ar estimated using a block matching algorithm (BMA). To smooth MVs over neighboring blocks, vector median filtering is performed. Using these smoothed MVs, interpolated frames are reconstructed by motion compensation (MC). The undesirable blocking artifacts due to blockwise processing are reduced by block boundary filtering using a Gaussian low pass filter (LPF). The proposed method can be used in computer aided diagnosis (CAD), where more natural 3-D ultrasound images are displayed in real-time. Simulation results with several real test sequences show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  3. The Use of 3d Scanning and Photogrammetry Techniques in the Case Study of the Roman Theatre of Nikopolis. Surveying, Virtual Reconstruction and Restoration Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilis, T.; Kouimtzoglou, T.; Magnisali, M.; Tokmakidis, P.

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the specific methods by which 3D scanning and photogrammetric techniques were incorporated into the architectural study, the documentation and the graphic restoration study of the monument of the ancient theatre of Nikopolis. Traditional methods of surveying were enhanced by the use of 3D scanning and image-based 3D reconstruction and 3D remodelling and renderings. For this reason, a team of specialists from different scientific fields has been organized. This presented the opportunity to observe every change of the restoration design process, not only by the use of common elevations and ground plans, but also in 3D space. It has been also very liberating to know how the monument will look like in this unique site after the restoration, so as to obtain at the study stage the best intervention decisions possible. Moreover, these modern work tools helped of course to convince the authorities for the accuracy of the restoration actions and finally to make the proposal clear to the public.

  4. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  5. Manual Planimetry of the Medial Temporal Lobe Versus Automated Volumetry of the Hippocampus in the Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Sanmartin, Esther; García, Ciara; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Westman, Eric; Simmons, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Though a disproportionate rate of atrophy in the medial temporal lobe (MTA) represents a reliable marker of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology, measurement of the MTA is not currently widely used in daily clinical practice. This is mainly because the methods available to date are sophisticated and difficult to implement in clinical practice (volumetric methods), are poorly explored (linear and planimetric methods), or lack objectivity (visual rating). Here, we aimed to compare the results of a manual planimetric measure (the yearly rate of absolute atrophy of the medial temporal lobe, 2D-yrA-MTL) with the results of an automated volumetric measure (the yearly rate of atrophy of the hippocampus, 3D-yrA-H). Methods: A series of 1.5T MRI studies on 290 subjects in the age range of 65–85 years, including patients with AD (n = 100), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n = 100), and matched controls (n = 90) from the AddNeuroMed study, were examined by two independent subgroups of researchers: one in charge of volumetric measures and the other in charge of planimetric measures. Results: The means of both methods were significantly different between AD and the other two diagnostic groups. In the differential diagnosis of AD against controls, 3D-yrA-H performed significantly better than 2D-yrA-MTL while differences were not statistically significant in the differential diagnosis of AD against MCI. Conclusion: Automated volumetry of the hippocampus is superior to manual planimetry of the MTL in the diagnosis of AD. Nevertheless, the 2D-yrAMTL is a simpler method that could be easily implemented in clinical practice when volumetry is not available.  PMID:27433401

  6. Customization of UWB 3D-RTLS Based on the New Uncertainty Model of the AoA Ranging Technique.

    PubMed

    Jachimczyk, Bartosz; Dziak, Damian; Kulesza, Wlodek J

    2017-01-25

    The increased potential and effectiveness of Real-time Locating Systems (RTLSs) substantially influence their application spectrum. They are widely used, inter alia, in the industrial sector, healthcare, home care, and in logistic and security applications. The research aims to develop an analytical method to customize UWB-based RTLS, in order to improve their localization performance in terms of accuracy and precision. The analytical uncertainty model of Angle of Arrival (AoA) localization in a 3D indoor space, which is the foundation of the customization concept, is established in a working environment. Additionally, a suitable angular-based 3D localization algorithm is introduced. The paper investigates the following issues: the influence of the proposed correction vector on the localization accuracy; the impact of the system's configuration and LS's relative deployment on the localization precision distribution map. The advantages of the method are verified by comparing them with a reference commercial RTLS localization engine. The results of simulations and physical experiments prove the value of the proposed customization method. The research confirms that the analytical uncertainty model is the valid representation of RTLS' localization uncertainty in terms of accuracy and precision and can be useful for its performance improvement. The research shows, that the Angle of Arrival localization in a 3D indoor space applying the simple angular-based localization algorithm and correction vector improves of localization accuracy and precision in a way that the system challenges the reference hardware advanced localization engine. Moreover, the research guides the deployment of location sensors to enhance the localization precision.

  7. Customization of UWB 3D-RTLS Based on the New Uncertainty Model of the AoA Ranging Technique

    PubMed Central

    Jachimczyk, Bartosz; Dziak, Damian; Kulesza, Wlodek J.

    2017-01-01

    The increased potential and effectiveness of Real-time Locating Systems (RTLSs) substantially influence their application spectrum. They are widely used, inter alia, in the industrial sector, healthcare, home care, and in logistic and security applications. The research aims to develop an analytical method to customize UWB-based RTLS, in order to improve their localization performance in terms of accuracy and precision. The analytical uncertainty model of Angle of Arrival (AoA) localization in a 3D indoor space, which is the foundation of the customization concept, is established in a working environment. Additionally, a suitable angular-based 3D localization algorithm is introduced. The paper investigates the following issues: the influence of the proposed correction vector on the localization accuracy; the impact of the system’s configuration and LS’s relative deployment on the localization precision distribution map. The advantages of the method are verified by comparing them with a reference commercial RTLS localization engine. The results of simulations and physical experiments prove the value of the proposed customization method. The research confirms that the analytical uncertainty model is the valid representation of RTLS’ localization uncertainty in terms of accuracy and precision and can be useful for its performance improvement. The research shows, that the Angle of Arrival localization in a 3D indoor space applying the simple angular-based localization algorithm and correction vector improves of localization accuracy and precision in a way that the system challenges the reference hardware advanced localization engine. Moreover, the research guides the deployment of location sensors to enhance the localization precision. PMID:28125056

  8. The effect of CT scanner parameters and 3D volume rendering techniques on the accuracy of linear, angular, and volumetric measurements of the mandible

    PubMed Central

    Whyms, B.J.; Vorperian, H.K.; Gentry, L.R.; Schimek, E.M.; Bersu, E.T.; Chung, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates the effect of scanning parameters on the accuracy of measurements from three-dimensional multi-detector computed tomography (3D-CT) mandible renderings. A broader range of acceptable parameters can increase the availability of CT studies for retrospective analysis. Study Design Three human mandibles and a phantom object were scanned using 18 combinations of slice thickness, field of view, and reconstruction algorithm and three different threshold-based segmentations. Measurements of 3D-CT models and specimens were compared. Results Linear and angular measurements were accurate, irrespective of scanner parameters or rendering technique. Volume measurements were accurate with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm, but not 2.5 mm. Surface area measurements were consistently inflated. Conclusions Linear, angular and volumetric measurements of mandible 3D-CT models can be confidently obtained from a range of parameters and rendering techniques. Slice thickness is the primary factor affecting volume measurements. These findings should also apply to 3D rendering using cone-beam-CT. PMID:23601224

  9. SU-C-213-04: Application of Depth Sensing and 3D-Printing Technique for Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Patient Measurement and Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M; Suh, T; Han, B; Xing, L; Jenkins, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate an innovative method of using depth sensing cameras and 3D printing techniques for Total Body Irradiation (TBI) treatment planning and compensator fabrication. Methods: A tablet with motion tracking cameras and integrated depth sensing was used to scan a RANDOTM phantom arranged in a TBI treatment booth to detect and store the 3D surface in a point cloud (PC) format. The accuracy of the detected surface was evaluated by comparison to extracted measurements from CT scan images. The thickness, source to surface distance and off-axis distance of the phantom at different body section was measured for TBI treatment planning. A 2D map containing a detailed compensator design was calculated to achieve uniform dose distribution throughout the phantom. The compensator was fabricated using a 3D printer, silicone molding and tungsten powder. In vivo dosimetry measurements were performed using optically stimulated luminescent detectors (OSLDs). Results: The whole scan of the anthropomorphic phantom took approximately 30 seconds. The mean error for thickness measurements at each section of phantom compare to CT was 0.44 ± 0.268 cm. These errors resulted in approximately 2% dose error calculation and 0.4 mm tungsten thickness deviation for the compensator design. The accuracy of 3D compensator printing was within 0.2 mm. In vivo measurements for an end-to-end test showed the overall dose difference was within 3%. Conclusion: Motion cameras and depth sensing techniques proved to be an accurate and efficient tool for TBI patient measurement and treatment planning. 3D printing technique improved the efficiency and accuracy of the compensator production and ensured a more accurate treatment delivery.

  10. Interpretation of Magnetic Anomalies in Salihli (Turkey) Geothermal Area Using 3-D Inversion and Edge Detection Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timur, Emre

    2016-04-01

    There are numerous geophysical methods used to investigate geothermal areas. The major purpose of this magnetic survey is to locate the boudaries of active hydrothermal system in the South of Gediz Graben in Salihli (Manisa/Turkey). The presence of the hydrothermal system had already been inferred from surface evidence of hydrothermal activity and drillings. Firstly, 3-D prismatic models were theoretically investigated and edge detection methods were utilized with an iterative inversion method to define the boundaries and the parameters of the structure. In the first step of the application, it was necessary to convert the total field anomaly into a pseudo-gravity anomaly map. Then the geometric boudaries of the structures were determined by applying a MATLAB based software with 3 different edge detection algorithms. The exact location of the structures were obtained by using these boundary coordinates as initial geometric parameters in the inversion process. In addition to these methods, reduction to pole and horizontal gradient methods were applied to the data to achieve more information about the location and shape of the possible reservoir. As a result, the edge detection methods were found to be successful, both in the field and as theoretical data sets for delineating the boundaries of the possible geothermal reservoir structure. The depth of the geothermal reservoir was determined as 2,4 km from 3-D inversion and 2,1 km from power spectrum methods.

  11. Techniques for efficient, real-time, 3D visualization of multi-modality cardiac data using consumer graphics hardware.

    PubMed

    Levin, David; Aladl, Usaf; Germano, Guido; Slomka, Piotr

    2005-09-01

    We exploit consumer graphics hardware to perform real-time processing and visualization of high-resolution, 4D cardiac data. We have implemented real-time, realistic volume rendering, interactive 4D motion segmentation of cardiac data, visualization of multi-modality cardiac data and 3D display of multiple series cardiac MRI. We show that an ATI Radeon 9700 Pro can render a 512x512x128 cardiac Computed Tomography (CT) study at 0.9 to 60 frames per second (fps) depending on rendering parameters and that 4D motion based segmentation can be performed in real-time. We conclude that real-time rendering and processing of cardiac data can be implemented on consumer graphics cards.

  12. A New Total Digital Smile Planning Technique (3D-DSP) to Fabricate CAD-CAM Mockups for Esthetic Crowns and Veneers

    PubMed Central

    Mastrangelo, F.; Gherlone, E. F.; Gastaldi, G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Recently, the request of patients is changed in terms of not only esthetic but also previsualization therapy planning. The aim of this study is to evaluate a new 3D-CAD-CAM digital planning technique that uses a total digital smile process. Materials and Methods. Study participants included 28 adult dental patients, aged 19 to 53 years, with no oral, periodontal, or systemic diseases. For each patient, 3 intra- and extraoral pictures and intraoral digital impressions were taken. The digital images improved from the 2D Digital Smile System software and the scanner stereolithographic (STL) file was matched into the 3D-Digital Smile System to obtain a virtual previsualization of teeth and smile design. Then, the mockups were milled using a CAM system. Minimally invasive preparation was carried out on the enamel surface with the mockups as position guides. Results. The patients found both the digital smile design previsualization (64.3%) and the milling mockup test (85.7%) very effective. Conclusions. The new total 3D digital planning technique is a predictably and minimally invasive technique, allows easy diagnosis, and improves the communication with the patient and helps to reduce the working time and the errors usually associated with the classical prosthodontic manual step. PMID:27478442

  13. A New Total Digital Smile Planning Technique (3D-DSP) to Fabricate CAD-CAM Mockups for Esthetic Crowns and Veneers.

    PubMed

    Cattoni, F; Mastrangelo, F; Gherlone, E F; Gastaldi, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Recently, the request of patients is changed in terms of not only esthetic but also previsualization therapy planning. The aim of this study is to evaluate a new 3D-CAD-CAM digital planning technique that uses a total digital smile process. Materials and Methods. Study participants included 28 adult dental patients, aged 19 to 53 years, with no oral, periodontal, or systemic diseases. For each patient, 3 intra- and extraoral pictures and intraoral digital impressions were taken. The digital images improved from the 2D Digital Smile System software and the scanner stereolithographic (STL) file was matched into the 3D-Digital Smile System to obtain a virtual previsualization of teeth and smile design. Then, the mockups were milled using a CAM system. Minimally invasive preparation was carried out on the enamel surface with the mockups as position guides. Results. The patients found both the digital smile design previsualization (64.3%) and the milling mockup test (85.7%) very effective. Conclusions. The new total 3D digital planning technique is a predictably and minimally invasive technique, allows easy diagnosis, and improves the communication with the patient and helps to reduce the working time and the errors usually associated with the classical prosthodontic manual step.

  14. Computer-assisted 3D design software for teaching neuro-ophthalmology of the oculomotor system and training new retinal surgery techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glittenberg, Carl; Binder, Susanne

    2004-07-01

    Purpose: To create a more effective method of demonstrating complex subject matter in ophthalmology with the use of high end, 3-D, computer aided animation and interactive multimedia technologies. Specifically, to explore the possibilities of demonstrating the complex nature of the neuroophthalmological basics of the human oculomotor system in a clear and non confusing way, and to demonstrate new forms of retinal surgery in a manner that makes the procedures easier to understand for other retinal surgeons. Methods and Materials: Using Reflektions 4.3, Monzoom Pro 4.5, Cinema 4D XL 5.03, Cinema 4D XL 8 Studio Bundle, Mediator 4.0, Mediator Pro 5.03, Fujitsu-Siemens Pentium III and IV, Gericom Webgine laptop, M.G.I. Video Wave 1.0 and 5, Micrografix Picture Publisher 6.0 and 8, Amorphium 1.0, and Blobs for Windows, we created 3-D animations showing the origin, insertion, course, main direction of pull, and auxiliary direction of pull of the six extra-ocular eye muscles. We created 3-D animations that (a) show the intra-cranial path of the relevant oculomotor cranial nerves and which muscles are supplied by them, (b) show which muscles are active in each of the ten lines of sight, (c) demonstrate the various malfunctions of oculomotor systems, as well as (d) show the surgical techniques and the challenges in radial optic neurotomies and subretinal surgeries. Most of the 3-D animations were integrated in interactive multimedia teaching programs. Their effectiveness was compared to conventional teaching methods in a comparative study performed at the University of Vienna. We also performed a survey to examine the response of students being taught with the interactive programs. We are currently in the process of placing most of the animations in an interactive web site in order to make them freely available to everyone who is interested. Results: Although learning how to use complex 3-D computer animation and multimedia authoring software can be very time consuming and

  15. Decoration of Micro-/Nanoscale Noble Metal Particles on 3D Porous Nickel Using Electrodeposition Technique as Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xin; Hang, Tao; Shanmugam, Sangaraju; Li, Ming

    2015-07-29

    Micro-/nanoscale noble metal (Ag, Au, and Pt) particle-decorated 3D porous nickel electrodes for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline electrolyte are fabricated via galvanostatic electrodeposition technique. The developed electrodes are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements including Tafel polarization curves, cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is clearly shown that the enlarged real surface area caused by 3D highly porous dendritic structure has greatly reinforced the electrocatalytic activity toward HER. Comparative analysis of electrodeposited Ag, Au, and Pt particle-decorated porous nickel electrodes for HER indicates that both intrinsic property and size of the noble metal particles can lead to distinct catalytic activities. Both nanoscale Au and Pt particles have further reinforcement effect toward HER, whereas microscale Ag particles exhibit the reverse effect. As an effective 3D hydrogen evolution cathode, the nanoscale Pt-particle-decorated 3D porous nickel electrode demonstrates the highest catalytic activity with an extremely low overpotential of -0.045 V for hydrogen production, a considerable exchange current density of 9.47 mA cm(-2) at 25 °C, and high durability in long-term electrolysis, all of which are attributed to the intrinsic catalytic property and the extremely small size of Pt particles.

  16. Alignment issues, correlation techniques and their assessment for a visible light imaging-based 3D printer quality control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    Quality control is critical to manufacturing. Frequently, techniques are used to define object conformity bounds, based on historical quality data. This paper considers techniques for bespoke and small batch jobs that are not statistical model based. These techniques also serve jobs where 100% validation is needed due to the mission or safety critical nature of particular parts. One issue with this type of system is alignment discrepancies between the generated model and the physical part. This paper discusses and evaluates techniques for characterizing and correcting alignment issues between the projected and perceived data sets to prevent errors attributable to misalignment.

  17. In vivo kinematic study of the tarsal joints complex based on fluoroscopic 3D-2D registration technique.

    PubMed

    Chen Wang, M D; Geng, Xiang; Wang, Shaobai; Xin Ma, M D; Xu Wang, M D; Jiazhang Huang, M D; Chao Zhang, M D; Li Chen, M S; Yang, Junsheng; Wang, Kan

    2016-09-01

    The tarsal bones articulate with each other and demonstrate complicated kinematic characteristics. The in vivo motions of these tarsal joints during normal gait are still unclear. Seven healthy subjects were recruited and fourteen feet in total were tested in the current study. Three dimensional models of the tarsal bones were first created using CT scanning. Corresponding local 3D coordinate systems of each tarsal bone was subsequently established for 6DOF motion decompositions. The fluoroscopy system captured the lateral fluoroscopic images of the targeted tarsal region whilst the subject was walking. Seven key pose images during the stance phase were selected and 3D to 2D bone model registrations were performed on each image to determine joint positions. The 6DOF motions of each tarsal joint during gait were then obtained by connecting these positions together. The TNJ (talo-navicular joint) exhibited the largest ROMs (range of motion) on all rotational directions with 7.39±2.75°of dorsi/plantarflexion, 21.12±4.68°of inversion/eversion, and 16.11±4.44°of internal/external rotation. From heel strike to midstance, the TNJ, STJ (subtalar joint), and CCJ (calcaneao-cuboid joint) were associated with 5.97°, 5.04°, and 3.93°of dorsiflexion; 15.46°, 8.21°, and 5.82°of eversion; and 9.75°, 7.6°, and 4.99°of external rotation, respectively. Likewise, from midstance to heel off, the TNJ, STJ, and CCJ were associated with 6.39, 6.19°, and 4.47°of plantarflexion; 18.57°, 11.86°, and 6.32°of inversion and 13.95°, 9.66°, and 7.58°of internal rotation, respectively. In conclusion, among the tarsal joints, the TNJ exhibited the greatest rotational mobility. Synchronous and homodromous rotational motions were detected for TNJ, STJ, and CCJ during the stance phase.

  18. 3D photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Jeffrey J. L.; Roumeliotis, Michael; Chaudhary, Govind; Stodilka, Robert Z.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-06-01

    Our group has concentrated on development of a 3D photoacoustic imaging system for biomedical imaging research. The technology employs a sparse parallel detection scheme and specialized reconstruction software to obtain 3D optical images using a single laser pulse. With the technology we have been able to capture 3D movies of translating point targets and rotating line targets. The current limitation of our 3D photoacoustic imaging approach is its inability ability to reconstruct complex objects in the field of view. This is primarily due to the relatively small number of projections used to reconstruct objects. However, in many photoacoustic imaging situations, only a few objects may be present in the field of view and these objects may have very high contrast compared to background. That is, the objects have sparse properties. Therefore, our work had two objectives: (i) to utilize mathematical tools to evaluate 3D photoacoustic imaging performance, and (ii) to test image reconstruction algorithms that prefer sparseness in the reconstructed images. Our approach was to utilize singular value decomposition techniques to study the imaging operator of the system and evaluate the complexity of objects that could potentially be reconstructed. We also compared the performance of two image reconstruction algorithms (algebraic reconstruction and l1-norm techniques) at reconstructing objects of increasing sparseness. We observed that for a 15-element detection scheme, the number of measureable singular vectors representative of the imaging operator was consistent with the demonstrated ability to reconstruct point and line targets in the field of view. We also observed that the l1-norm reconstruction technique, which is known to prefer sparseness in reconstructed images, was superior to the algebraic reconstruction technique. Based on these findings, we concluded (i) that singular value decomposition of the imaging operator provides valuable insight into the capabilities of

  19. Nitric oxide spatial distribution in single cultured hippocampus neurons: investigation by projection of reconstructed 3-D image and visualization technique.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Ning, Gang-Min; Kutor, John; Hong, Di-Hui; Zhang, Mu; Zheng, Xiao-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed a non-homogeneous distribution of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in neurons. However, it is not yet clear whether the intracellular distribution of NOS represents the intracellular nitric oxide (NO) distribution. In the present study, software developed in our laboratory was applied to the reconstructed image obtained from confocal slice images in order to project the 3-D reconstructed images in any direction and to cut the neuron in different sections. This enabled the spatial distribution of NO to be visualized in any direction and section. In single neurons, NO distribution was seen to be heterogeneous. After stimulation with glutamate, the spatial changes in different areas of the neuron were different. These findings are consistent with immunocytochemical data on the intracellular localization of nNOS in hippocampus neurons, and will help to elucidate the specificity of nitric oxide signaling. Finally, the administration of SNAP and L-NAME was used to examine DAF-2 distribution in the neurons. The results showed this distribution to be homogenous; therefore, it did not account for the NO distribution results.

  20. Application of microwave 3D SAR imaging technique for evaluation of corrosion in steel rebars embedded in cement-based structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharkovsky, S.; Case, J. T.; Ghasr, M. T.; Zoughi, R.; Bae, S. W.; Belarbi, A.

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents and discusses the attributes and results of using wideband microwave 3D SAR-based imaging technique for evaluation of reinforced cement-based structures. The technique was used to detect corrosion and thinning of reinforcing steel bars and its potential was demonstrated through experiments for different bar sizes, depth of rebar locations, and spacing between rebars. The results of a limited and preliminary investigation in which thinning of rebars with and without rust in two mortar samples were obtained at three frequency bands covering the frequency range from 8.2 GHz-26.5 GHz.

  1. Multigrid techniques for nonlinear eigenvalue probems: Solutions of a nonlinear Schroedinger eigenvalue problem in 2D and 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costiner, Sorin; Taasan, Shlomo

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents multigrid (MG) techniques for nonlinear eigenvalue problems (EP) and emphasizes an MG algorithm for a nonlinear Schrodinger EP. The algorithm overcomes the mentioned difficulties combining the following techniques: an MG projection coupled with backrotations for separation of solutions and treatment of difficulties related to clusters of close and equal eigenvalues; MG subspace continuation techniques for treatment of the nonlinearity; an MG simultaneous treatment of the eigenvectors at the same time with the nonlinearity and with the global constraints. The simultaneous MG techniques reduce the large number of self consistent iterations to only a few or one MG simultaneous iteration and keep the solutions in a right neighborhood where the algorithm converges fast.

  2. Preconditioning techniques for constrained vector potential integral equations, with application to 3-D magnetoquasistatic analysis of electronic packages

    SciTech Connect

    Kamon, M.; Phillips, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper techniques are presented for preconditioning equations generated by discretizing constrained vector integral equations associated with magnetoquasistatic analysis. Standard preconditioning approaches often fail on these problems. The authors present a specialized preconditioning technique and prove convergence bounds independent of the constraint equations and electromagnetic excitation frequency. Computational results from analyzing several electronic packaging examples are given to demonstrate that the new preconditioning approach can sometimes reduce the number of GMRES iterations by more than an order of magnitude.

  3. A Model-Based 3D Template Matching Technique for Pose Acquisition of an Uncooperative Space Object

    PubMed Central

    Opromolla, Roberto; Fasano, Giancarmine; Rufino, Giancarlo; Grassi, Michele

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a customized three-dimensional template matching technique for autonomous pose determination of uncooperative targets. This topic is relevant to advanced space applications, like active debris removal and on-orbit servicing. The proposed technique is model-based and produces estimates of the target pose without any prior pose information, by processing three-dimensional point clouds provided by a LIDAR. These estimates are then used to initialize a pose tracking algorithm. Peculiar features of the proposed approach are the use of a reduced number of templates and the idea of building the database of templates on-line, thus significantly reducing the amount of on-board stored data with respect to traditional techniques. An algorithm variant is also introduced aimed at further accelerating the pose acquisition time and reducing the computational cost. Technique performance is investigated within a realistic numerical simulation environment comprising a target model, LIDAR operation and various target-chaser relative dynamics scenarios, relevant to close-proximity flight operations. Specifically, the capability of the proposed techniques to provide a pose solution suitable to initialize the tracking algorithm is demonstrated, as well as their robustness against highly variable pose conditions determined by the relative dynamics. Finally, a criterion for autonomous failure detection of the presented techniques is presented. PMID:25785309

  4. A model-based 3D template matching technique for pose acquisition of an uncooperative space object.

    PubMed

    Opromolla, Roberto; Fasano, Giancarmine; Rufino, Giancarlo; Grassi, Michele

    2015-03-16

    This paper presents a customized three-dimensional template matching technique for autonomous pose determination of uncooperative targets. This topic is relevant to advanced space applications, like active debris removal and on-orbit servicing. The proposed technique is model-based and produces estimates of the target pose without any prior pose information, by processing three-dimensional point clouds provided by a LIDAR. These estimates are then used to initialize a pose tracking algorithm. Peculiar features of the proposed approach are the use of a reduced number of templates and the idea of building the database of templates on-line, thus significantly reducing the amount of on-board stored data with respect to traditional techniques. An algorithm variant is also introduced aimed at further accelerating the pose acquisition time and reducing the computational cost. Technique performance is investigated within a realistic numerical simulation environment comprising a target model, LIDAR operation and various target-chaser relative dynamics scenarios, relevant to close-proximity flight operations. Specifically, the capability of the proposed techniques to provide a pose solution suitable to initialize the tracking algorithm is demonstrated, as well as their robustness against highly variable pose conditions determined by the relative dynamics. Finally, a criterion for autonomous failure detection of the presented techniques is presented.

  5. The appropriateness of the helical axis technique and six available cardan sequences for the representation of 3-d lead leg kinematics during the fencing lunge.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Taylor, Paul J; Bottoms, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    Cardan/Euler angles represent the most common technique for the quantification of segmental rotations. Cardan angles are influenced by their ordered sequence, and sensitive to planar-cross talk from the dominant rotation plane, which may affect the angular parameters. The International Society of Biomechanics (ISB) currently recommends a sagittal, coronal, and then transverse (XYZ) ordered sequence, although it has been proposed that when quantifying non-sagittal rotations this may not be the most appropriate technique. This study examined the influence of the helical and six available Cardan sequences on lower extremity three-dimensional (3-D) kinematics of the lead leg during the fencing lunge. Kinematic data were obtained using a 3-D motion capture system as participants completed simulated lunges. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to compare discrete kinematic parameters, and intraclass correlations were also utilized to determine evidence of planar crosstalk. The results indicate that in all three planes of rotation, peak angle and range of motion angles using the YXZ and ZXY sequences were significantly greater than the other sequences. It was also noted that the utilization of the YXZ and ZXY sequences was associated with the strongest correlations from the sagittal plane, and the XYZ sequence was found habitually to be associated with the lowest correlations. It appears that for accurate representation of 3-D kinematics of the lead leg during the fencing lunge, the XYZ sequence is the most appropriate and as such its continued utilization is encouraged.

  6. The Appropriateness of the Helical Axis Technique and Six Available Cardan Sequences for the Representation of 3-D Lead Leg Kinematics During the Fencing Lunge

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Taylor, Paul J; Bottoms, Lindsay

    Cardan/Euler angles represent the most common technique for the quantification of segmental rotations. Cardan angles are influenced by their ordered sequence, and sensitive to planar-cross talk from the dominant rotation plane, which may affect the angular parameters. The International Society of Biomechanics (ISB) currently recommends a sagittal, coronal, and then transverse (XYZ) ordered sequence, although it has been proposed that when quantifying non-sagittal rotations this may not be the most appropriate technique. This study examined the influence of the helical and six available Cardan sequences on lower extremity three-dimensional (3-D) kinematics of the lead leg during the fencing lunge. Kinematic data were obtained using a 3-D motion capture system as participants completed simulated lunges. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to compare discrete kinematic parameters, and intraclass correlations were also utilized to determine evidence of planar crosstalk. The results indicate that in all three planes of rotation, peak angle and range of motion angles using the YXZ and ZXY sequences were significantly greater than the other sequences. It was also noted that the utilization of the YXZ and ZXY sequences was associated with the strongest correlations from the sagittal plane, and the XYZ sequence was found habitually to be associated with the lowest correlations. It appears that for accurate representation of 3-D kinematics of the lead leg during the fencing lunge, the XYZ sequence is the most appropriate and as such its continued utilization is encouraged. PMID:24146700

  7. Development of a Hausdorff distance based 3D quantification technique to evaluate the CT imaging system impact on depiction of lesion morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Robins, Marthony; Solomon, Justin; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a 3D quantification technique to assess the impact of imaging system on depiction of lesion morphology. Regional Hausdorff Distance (RHD) was computed from two 3D volumes: virtual mesh models of synthetic nodules or "virtual nodules" and CT images of physical nodules or "physical nodules". The method can be described in following steps. First, the synthetic nodule was inserted into anthropomorphic Kyoto thorax phantom and scanned in a Siemens scanner (Flash). Then, nodule was segmented from the image. Second, in order to match the orientation of the nodule, the digital models of the "virtual" and "physical" nodules were both geometrically translated to the origin. Then, the "physical" was gradually rotated at incremental 10 degrees. Third, the Hausdorff Distance was calculated from each pair of "virtual" and "physical" nodules. The minimum HD value represented the most matching pair. Finally, the 3D RHD map and the distribution of RHD were computed for the matched pair. The technique was scalarized using the FWHM of the RHD distribution. The analysis was conducted for various shapes (spherical, lobular, elliptical, and speculated) of nodules. The calculated FWHM values of RHD distribution for the 8-mm spherical, lobular, elliptical, and speculated "virtual" and "physical" nodules were 0.23, 0.42, 0.33, and 0.49, respectively.

  8. Novel experimental technique for 3D investigation of high-speed cavitating diesel fuel flows by X-ray micro computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzi, M.; Mitroglou, N.; Santini, M.; Gavaises, M.

    2017-03-01

    An experimental technique for the estimation of the temporal-averaged vapour volume fraction within high-speed cavitating flow orifices is presented. The scientific instrument is designed to employ X-ray micro computed tomography (microCT) as a quantitative 3D measuring technique applied to custom designed, large-scale, orifice-type flow channels made from Polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK). The attenuation of the ionising electromagnetic radiation by the fluid under examination depends on its local density; the transmitted radiation through the cavitation volume is compared to the incident radiation, and combination of radiographies from sufficient number of angles leads to the reconstruction of attenuation coefficients versus the spatial position. This results to a 3D volume fraction distribution measurement of the developing multiphase flow. The experimental results obtained are compared against the high speed shadowgraph visualisation images obtained in an optically transparent nozzle with identical injection geometry; comparison between the temporal mean image and the microCT reconstruction shows excellent agreement. At the same time, the real 3D internal channel geometry (possibly eroded) has been measured and compared to the nominal manufacturing CAD drawing of the test nozzle.

  9. MR imaging features of idiopathic thoracic spinal cord herniations using combined 3D-fiesta and 2D-PC Cine techniques.

    PubMed

    Ferré, J C; Carsin-Nicol, B; Hamlat, A; Carsin, M; Morandi, X

    2005-03-01

    Idiopathic thoracic spinal cord herniation (TISCH) is a rare cause of surgically treatable progressive myelopathy. The authors report 3 cases of TISCH diagnosed based on conventional T1- and T2-weighted Spin-Echo (SE) MR images in one case, and T1- and T2-weighted SE images combined with 3D-FIESTA (Fast Imaging Employing Steady state Acquisition) and 2D-Phase-Contrast Cine MR imaging in 2 cases. Conventional MRI findings usually provided the diagnosis. 3D-FIESTA images confirmed it, showing the herniated cord in the ventral epidural space. Moreover, in combination with 2D-Phase Contrast cine technique, it was a sensitive method to for the detection of associated pre- or postoperative cerebrospinal fluid spaces abnormalities.

  10. Improved image guidance technique for minimally invasive mitral valve repair using real-time tracked 3D ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Adam; Moore, John; Bainbridge, Daniel; Peters, Terry

    2016-03-01

    In the past ten years, numerous new surgical and interventional techniques have been developed for treating heart valve disease without the need for cardiopulmonary bypass. Heart valve repair is now being performed in a blood-filled environment, reinforcing the need for accurate and intuitive imaging techniques. Previous work has demonstrated how augmenting ultrasound with virtual representations of specific anatomical landmarks can greatly simplify interventional navigation challenges and increase patient safety. These techniques often complicate interventions by requiring additional steps taken to manually define and initialize virtual models. Furthermore, overlaying virtual elements into real-time image data can also obstruct the view of salient image information. To address these limitations, a system was developed that uses real-time volumetric ultrasound alongside magnetically tracked tools presented in an augmented virtuality environment to provide a streamlined navigation guidance platform. In phantom studies simulating a beating-heart navigation task, procedure duration and tool path metrics have achieved comparable performance to previous work in augmented virtuality techniques, and considerable improvement over standard of care ultrasound guidance.

  11. Reverse engineering techniques applied to a human skull, for CAD 3D reconstruction and physical replication by rapid prototyping.

    PubMed

    Galantucci, L M; Percoco, G; Angelelli, G; Lopez, C; Introna, F; Liuzzi, C; De Donno, A

    2006-01-01

    The production of a copy of an existing object of complex shape is one of the typical applications of the integration between two modern computer-based technologies, reverse engineering (RE) and rapid prototyping (RP). The method is extremely versatile and can be used in various applicative domains (e.g. replacement of anatomical parts with artificial prostheses, replication of skeletal remains). Two different acquisition techniques of images of a skull, by laser and by CT scan, were compared to ascertain which enabled more accurate reproduction of the original specimen. The skull was chosen due to it being the body part most often used in medico-legal investigations (for personal identification, skull-photo superimposition techniques, forensic art, etc). Comparison between the copy and the original yielded satisfactory results for both techniques. However, CT scanning demonstrated some advantages over the laser technique, as it provided a cleaner point cloud, enabling shorter pre-reproduction processing times, as well as data on the internal parts, which resulted in the reproduction of a more faithful copy.

  12. Novel 3D Tissue Engineered Bone Model, Biomimetic Nanomaterials, and Cold Atmospheric Plasma Technique for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mian

    This thesis research is consist of four chapters, including biomimetic three-dimensional tissue engineered nanostructured bone model for breast cancer bone metastasis study (Chapter one), cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer (Chapter two), design of biomimetic and bioactive cold plasma modified nanostructured scaffolds for enhanced osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (Chapter three), and enhanced osteoblast and mesenchymal stem cell functions on titanium with hydrothermally treated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite/magnetically treated carbon nanotubes for orthopedic applications (Chapter four). All the thesis research is focused on nanomaterials and the use of cold plasma technique for various biomedical applications.

  13. Computer-aided diagnosis: a 3D segmentation method for lung nodules in CT images by use of a spiral-scanning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiahui; Engelmann, Roger; Li, Qiang

    2008-03-01

    Lung nodule segmentation in computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in computer-aided detection, diagnosis, and quantification systems for lung cancer. In this study, we developed a simple but accurate nodule segmentation method in three-dimensional (3D) CT. First, a volume of interest (VOI) was determined at the location of a nodule. We then transformed the VOI into a two-dimensional (2D) image by use of a "spiral-scanning" technique, in which a radial line originating from the center of the VOI spirally scanned the VOI. The voxels scanned by the radial line were arranged sequentially to form a transformed 2D image. Because the surface of a nodule in 3D image became a curve in the transformed 2D image, the spiral-scanning technique considerably simplified our segmentation method and enabled us to obtain accurate segmentation results. We employed a dynamic programming technique to delineate the "optimal" outline of a nodule in the 2D image, which was transformed back into the 3D image space to provide the interior of the nodule. The proposed segmentation method was trained on the first and was tested on the second Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) datasets. An overlap between nodule regions provided by computer and by the radiologists was employed as a performance metric. The experimental results on the LIDC database demonstrated that our segmentation method provided relatively robust and accurate segmentation results with mean overlap values of 66% and 64% for the nodules in the first and second LIDC datasets, respectively, and would be useful for the quantification, detection, and diagnosis of lung cancer.

  14. Quantitative assessment of canalicular bile formation in isolated hepatocyte couplets using microscopic optical planimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, A; Ng, O C; Strazzabosco, M; Boyer, J L

    1989-01-01

    Isolated rat hepatocyte couplets (IRHC) are primary units of bile secretion that accumulate fluid in an enclosed canalicular space with time in culture. We have quantitated the rate of canalicular secretion in IRHC cultured for 4-8 h by measuring the change in canalicular space volume by video-microscopic optical planimetry using high resolution Nomarski optics. Electron microscopic morphometric studies revealed significant increases in canalicular membrane area after 4-6 h in culture. Canalicular secretion in basal L-15 medium (3.8 +/- 1.3 fl/min) increased significantly with the choleretic bile salts (10 microM), taurocholate, and ursodeoxycholate (14 +/- 7 fl/min each). Secretion rates after exposure to bile acids correlated directly with the canalicular surface area before stimulation. In contrast, expansion times after stimulation varied inversely with initial canalicular volumes. Ursodeoxycholic acid failed to produce a hypercholeresis at 10-, 100-, or 200-microM concentrations compared with taurocholate, either in normal or taurine-depleted IRHC. The present findings establish that rates of canalicular bile secretion can be quantitated in IRHC by serial optical planimetry, both in the basal state and after stimulation with bile acids. Furthermore, ursodeoxycholate does not acutely induce hypercholeresis at the canalicular level in this model. Rather, both taurocholic and ursodeoxycholic acids induced secretion in proportion to the surface area of the canalicular membrane. The IRHC are a useful model to identify canalicular choleretics and for studies of canalicular bile formation. Images PMID:2913052

  15. Data-driven techniques for detecting dynamical state changes in noisily measured 3D single-molecule trajectories.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Christopher P

    2014-11-12

    Optical microscopes and nanoscale probes (AFM, optical tweezers, etc.) afford researchers tools capable of quantitatively exploring how molecules interact with one another in live cells. The analysis of in vivo single-molecule experimental data faces numerous challenges due to the complex, crowded, and time changing environments associated with live cells. Fluctuations and spatially varying systematic forces experienced by molecules change over time; these changes are obscured by "measurement noise" introduced by the experimental probe monitoring the system. In this article, we demonstrate how the Hierarchical Dirichlet Process Switching Linear Dynamical System (HDP-SLDS) of Fox et al. [IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 59] can be used to detect both subtle and abrupt state changes in time series containing "thermal" and "measurement" noise. The approach accounts for temporal dependencies induced by random and "systematic overdamped" forces. The technique does not require one to subjectively select the number of "hidden states" underlying a trajectory in an a priori fashion. The number of hidden states is simultaneously inferred along with change points and parameters characterizing molecular motion in a data-driven fashion. We use large scale simulations to study and compare the new approach to state-of-the-art Hidden Markov Modeling techniques. Simulations mimicking single particle tracking (SPT) experiments are the focus of this study.

  16. 3-D treatment planning and dose delivery verification integrating a variety of state-of-the-art techniques: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kuchnir, F T; Watson-Bullock, S; Reft, C S; Hallahan, D

    1991-12-01

    A patient previously treated with radiation for base-of-tongue cancer presented with recurrent disease seven years later. The spinal cord had received tolerance dose. Using state-of-the-art treatment planning techniques, including beam's-eye-view and volumetrics, dose-volume histograms, split field technique, mixed energies, and beam intensity modulation (with a compensator), we achieved uniform dose coverage of the target in 3-D. This was verified in vivo with thermoluminescence dosimeters positioned in the esophagus by means of a nasogastric tube that ran centrally through the target volume. The various techniques applied will be presented with a discussion of the rationale used in each step of plan optimization and verification.

  17. Fabrication of high sensitivity 3D nanoSQUIDs based on a focused ion beam sculpting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Leo, Natascia; Fretto, Matteo; Lacquaniti, Vincenzo; Granata, Carmine; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a nanofabrication process, based on a focused ion beam (FIB) nanosculpting technique, for high sensitivity three-dimensional nanoscale superconducting quantum interference devices (nanoSQUIDs) is reported. The crucial steps of the fabrication process are described, as are some peculiar features of the superconductor-normal metal-insulator-superconductor (SNIS) Josephson junctions, which may useful for applications in cryocooler systems. This fabrication procedure is employed to fabricate sandwich nanojunctions and high sensitivity nanoSQUIDs. Specifically, the superconductive nanosensors have a rectangular loop of 1 × 0.2-0.4 μm2 interrupted by two square Nb/Al-AlO x /Nb SNIS Josephson junctions with side lengths of 0.3 μm. The characterization of a typical nanoSQUID has been carried out and a spectral density of magnetic flux noise as low as 0.8 μΦ0 Hz-1/2 has been measured.

  18. A technique for on-board CT reconstruction using both kilovoltage and megavoltage beam projections for 3D treatment verification.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fang-Fang; Guan, Huaiqun; Lu, Wenkai

    2005-09-01

    The technologies with kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) imaging in the treatment room are now available for image-guided radiation therapy to improve patient setup and target localization accuracy. However, development of strategies to efficiently and effectively implement these technologies for patient treatment remains challenging. This study proposed an aggregated technique for on-board CT reconstruction using combination of kV and MV beam projections to improve the data acquisition efficiency and image quality. These projections were acquired in the treatment room at the patient treatment position with a new kV imaging device installed on the accelerator gantry, orthogonal to the existing MV portal imaging device. The projection images for a head phantom and a contrast phantom were acquired using both the On-Board Imager kV imaging device and the MV portal imager mounted orthogonally on the gantry of a Varian Clinac 21EX linear accelerator. MV projections were converted into kV information prior to the aggregated CT reconstruction. The multilevel scheme algebraic-reconstruction technique was used to reconstruct CT images involving either full, truncated, or a combination of both full and truncated projections. An adaptive reconstruction method was also applied, based on the limited numbers of kV projections and truncated MV projections, to enhance the anatomical information around the treatment volume and to minimize the radiation dose. The effects of the total number of projections, the combination of kV and MV projections, and the beam truncation of MV projections on the details of reconstructed kV/MV CT images were also investigated.

  19. Correction technique for cascade gammas in I-124 imaging on a fully-3D, Time-of-Flight PET Scanner.

    PubMed

    Surti, Suleman; Scheuermann, Ryan; Karp, Joel S

    2009-06-01

    It has been shown that I-124 PET imaging can be used for accurate dose estimation in radio-immunotherapy techniques. However, I-124 is not a pure positron emitter, leading to two types of coincidence events not typically encountered: increased random coincidences due to non-annihilation cascade photons, and true coincidences between an annihilation photon and primarily a coincident 602 keV cascade gamma (true coincidence gamma-ray background). The increased random coincidences are accurately estimated by the delayed window technique. Here we evaluate the radial and time distributions of the true coincidence gamma-ray background in order to correct and accurately estimate lesion uptake for I-124 imaging in a time-of-flight (TOF) PET scanner. We performed measurements using a line source of activity placed in air and a water-filled cylinder, using F-18 and I-124 radio-isotopes. Our results show that the true coincidence gamma-ray backgrounds in I-124 have a uniform radial distribution, while the time distribution is similar to the scattered annihilation coincidences. As a result, we implemented a TOF-extended single scatter simulation algorithm with a uniform radial offset in the tail-fitting procedure for accurate correction of TOF data in I-124 imaging. Imaging results show that the contrast recovery for large spheres in a uniform activity background is similar in F-18 and I-124 imaging. There is some degradation in contrast recovery for small spheres in I-124, which is explained by the increased positron range, and reduced spatial resolution, of I-124 compared to F-18. Our results show that it is possible to perform accurate TOF based corrections for I-124 imaging.

  20. 3D Buckligami: Digital Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hecke, Martin; de Reus, Koen; Florijn, Bastiaan; Coulais, Corentin

    2014-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit collective buckling in 3D, and create these by a 3D printing/moulding technique. Our structures consist of cubic lattice of anisotropic unit cells, and we show that their mechanical properties are programmable via the orientation of these unit cells.

  1. 3-D visualisation of palaeoseismic trench stratigraphy and trench logging using terrestrial remote sensing and GPR - combining techniques towards an objective multiparametric interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneiderwind, S.; Mason, J.; Wiatr, T.; Papanikolaou, I.; Reicherter, K.

    2015-09-01

    Two normal faults on the Island of Crete and mainland Greece were studied to create and test an innovative workflow to make palaeoseismic trench logging more objective, and visualise the sedimentary architecture within the trench wall in 3-D. This is achieved by combining classical palaeoseismic trenching techniques with multispectral approaches. A conventional trench log was firstly compared to results of iso cluster analysis of a true colour photomosaic representing the spectrum of visible light. Passive data collection disadvantages (e.g. illumination) were addressed by complementing the dataset with active near-infrared backscatter signal image from t-LiDAR measurements. The multispectral analysis shows that distinct layers can be identified and it compares well with the conventional trench log. According to this, a distinction of adjacent stratigraphic units was enabled by their particular multispectral composition signature. Based on the trench log, a 3-D-interpretation of GPR data collected on the vertical trench wall was then possible. This is highly beneficial for measuring representative layer thicknesses, displacements and geometries at depth within the trench wall. Thus, misinterpretation due to cutting effects is minimised. Sedimentary feature geometries related to earthquake magnitude can be used to improve the accuracy of seismic hazard assessments. Therefore, this manuscript combines multiparametric approaches and shows: (i) how a 3-D visualisation of palaeoseismic trench stratigraphy and logging can be accomplished by combining t-LiDAR and GRP techniques, and (ii) how a multispectral digital analysis can offer additional advantages and a higher objectivity in the interpretation of palaeoseismic and stratigraphic information. The multispectral datasets are stored allowing unbiased input for future (re-)investigations.

  2. An efficient formulation of the coupled finite element-integral equation technique for solving large 3D scattering problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1993-01-01

    It is often desirable to calculate the electromagnetic fields inside and about a complicated system of scattering bodies, as well as in their far-field region. The finite element method (FE) is well suited to solving the interior problem, but the domain has to be limited to a manageable size. At the truncation of the FE mesh one can either impose approximate (absorbing) boundary conditions or set up an integral equation (IE) for the fields scattered from the bodies. The latter approach is preferable since it results in higher accuracy. Hence, the two techniques can be successfully combined by introducing a surface that encloses the scatterers, applying a FE model to the inner volume and setting up an IE for the tangential fields components on the surface. Here the continuity of the tangential fields is used bo obtain a consistent solution. A few coupled FE-IE methods have recently appeared in the literature. The approach presented here has the advantage of using edge-based finite elements, a type of finite elements with degrees of freedom associated with edges of the mesh. Because of their properties, they are better suited than the conventional node based elements to represent electromagnetic fields, particularly when inhomogeneous regions are modeled, since the node based elements impose an unnatural continuity of all field components across boundaries of mesh elements. Additionally, our approach is well suited to handle large size problems and lends itself to code parallelization. We will discuss the salient features that make our approach very efficient from the standpoint of numerical computation, and the fields and RCS of a few objects are illustrated as examples.

  3. COMBINING A NEW 3-D SEISMIC S-WAVE PROPAGATION ANALYSIS FOR REMOTE FRACTURE DETECTION WITH A ROBUST SUBSURFACE MICROFRACTURE-BASED VERIFICATION TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect

    Bob Hardage; M.M. Backus; M.V. DeAngelo; R.J. Graebner; S.E. Laubach; Paul Murray

    2004-02-01

    Fractures within the producing reservoirs at McElroy Field could not be studied with the industry-provided 3C3D seismic data used as a cost-sharing contribution in this study. The signal-to-noise character of the converted-SV data across the targeted reservoirs in these contributed data was not adequate for interpreting azimuth-dependent data effects. After illustrating the low signal quality of the converted-SV data at McElroy Field, the seismic portion of this report abandons the McElroy study site and defers to 3C3D seismic data acquired across a different fractured carbonate reservoir system to illustrate how 3C3D seismic data can provide useful information about fracture systems. Using these latter data, we illustrate how fast-S and slow-S data effects can be analyzed in the prestack domain to recognize fracture azimuth, and then demonstrate how fast-S and slow-S data volumes can be analyzed in the poststack domain to estimate fracture intensity. In the geologic portion of the report, we analyze published regional stress data near McElroy Field and numerous formation multi-imager (FMI) logs acquired across McElroy to develop possible fracture models for the McElroy system. Regional stress data imply a fracture orientation different from the orientations observed in most of the FMI logs. This report culminates Phase 2 of the study, ''Combining a New 3-D Seismic S-Wave Propagation Analysis for Remote Fracture Detection with a Robust Subsurface Microfracture-Based Verification Technique''. Phase 3 will not be initiated because wells were to be drilled in Phase 3 of the project to verify the validity of fracture-orientation maps and fracture-intensity maps produced in Phase 2. Such maps cannot be made across McElroy Field because of the limitations of the available 3C3D seismic data at the depth level of the reservoir target.

  4. 3D-Cultivation of bone marrow stromal cells on hydroxyapatite scaffolds fabricated by dispense-plotting and negative mould technique.

    PubMed

    Detsch, R; Uhl, F; Deisinger, U; Ziegler, G

    2008-04-01

    The main principle of a bone tissue engineering (BTE) strategy is to cultivate osteogenic cells in an osteoconductive porous scaffold. Ceramic implants for osteogenesis are based mainly on hydroxyapatite (HA), since this is the inorganic component of bone. Rapid Prototyping (RP) is a new technology in research for producing ceramic scaffolds. This technology is particularly suitable for the fabrication of individually and specially tailored single implants. For tissue engineering these scaffolds are seeded with osteoblast or osteoblast precursor cells. To supply the cultured osteoblastic cells efficiently with nutrition in these 3D-geometries a bioreactor system can be used. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of differently fabricated HA-scaffolds on bone marrow stromal cells. For this, two RP-techniques, dispense-plotting and a negative mould method, were used to produce porous ceramics. The manufactured HA-scaffolds were then cultivated in a dynamic system (bioreactor) with an osteoblastic precursor cell line. In our study, the applied RP-techniques give the opportunity to design and process HA-scaffolds with defined porosity, interconnectivity and 3D pore distribution. A higher differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells could be detected on the negative mould fabricated scaffolds, while cell proliferation was higher on the dispense-plotted scaffolds. Nevertheless, both scaffold types can be used in tissue engineering applications.

  5. Converging Lithosphere beneath Tibet in 3-D: Highlights from Matching Hi-CLIMB Data with New Techniques (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Nowack, R. L.; Tseng, T.; Hung, S.; Huang, B.

    2009-12-01

    We match high-resolution seismic data from Project Hi-CLIMB with new techniques to holistically address several fundamental questions regarding the most prominent case of active continental collision. Images from multi-scale, finite-frequency tomography of both P- and S-wave travel-times, and regional patterns of S-wave birefringence delineate the northern, leading edge of sub-horizontally advancing mantle lithosphere of the Indian shield (Greater India) over a lateral (E-W) distance of about 600 km. Greater India apparently extends, in places, north of the Bangong-Nujian suture, a near-surface feature associated with the collision between Lhasa and Qiangtang terranes in the Mesozoic in central Tibet. Multi-frequency, migrated images of the lithosphere, using Gaussian beams which require no special treatment for caustic arrivals, show that the subsurface join of these two terranes is a wide zone of disrupted Moho that extends over a distance of about 250 km, separating two undisturbed blocks of mantle lithosphere. Longevity of large, stable blocks through repeated collisions attests to the strength of the mantle lithosphere, even through the crust is under pervasive pure shear at the surface. Two prominent regions of low P- and S-wave speeds, extending over the entire thickness of the crust, are apparent near the most recent (Indus-Yalung) suture zone and coincide with locations of low electric resistivity previously detected along two magnetotelluric profiles in active rifts. Regional coverage of our tomographic images clearly shows that the two regions are isolated features in an otherwise near-uniform curst; implying that pervasive, south-directed channel-flow of the lower crust is inactive. Deep-penetrating, virtual seismic reflection profiles, based on wide-angle reflections off the topside of the Moho from S to P conversions, indicate that greatly thickened crust in southern Tibet gradually shoals from as much as 75 km to just over 60 km in thickness across

  6. Non-invasive measurement of cholesterol in human blood by impedance technique: an investigation by 3D finite element field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristovich, Ekaterina; Khan, Sanowar

    2013-06-01

    This paper concerns detection of particle concentration (e.g. cholesterol) in conductive media (e.g. human blood) by impedance technique. The technique is based on changes in the impedance measurement across a given conducting medium due to changes in the particle concentration. The impedance is calculated by calculating the current through the conducting media produced by electric field distribution between two electrodes. This is done by modelling and computation of 3D electric fields between the electrodes for known voltages applied between them using the well-known finite element method (FEM). The complexity of such FE models is attributed to particle distribution, their geometric and material parameters, and their shape and size which can be of many orders of magnitude smaller than the overall problem domain under investigation. This paper overcomes this problem by adopting an effective particle coagulation (aggregation) strategy in FE modelling without significantly affecting the accuracy of field computation.

  7. An Approach to 3d Digital Modeling of Surfaces with Poor Texture by Range Imaging Techniques. `SHAPE from Stereo' VS. `SHAPE from Silhouette' in Digitizing Jorge Oteiza's Sculptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Fernández, J.; Álvaro Tordesillas, A.; Barba, S.

    2015-02-01

    Despite eminent development of digital range imaging techniques, difficulties persist in the virtualization of objects with poor radiometric information, in other words, objects consisting of homogeneous colours (totally white, black, etc.), repetitive patterns, translucence, or materials with specular reflection. This is the case for much of the Jorge Oteiza's works, particularly in the sculpture collection of the Museo Fundación Jorge Oteiza (Navarra, Spain). The present study intend to analyse and asses the performance of two digital 3D-modeling methods based on imaging techniques, facing cultural heritage in singular cases, determined by radiometric characteristics as mentioned: Shape from Silhouette and Shape from Stereo. On the other hand, the text proposes the definition of a documentation workflow and presents the results of its application in the collection of sculptures created by Oteiza.

  8. A technique for evaluating bone ingrowth into 3D printed, porous Ti6Al4V implants accurately using X-ray micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry.

    PubMed

    Palmquist, Anders; Shah, Furqan A; Emanuelsson, Lena; Omar, Omar; Suska, Felicia

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the application of X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) to accurately evaluate bone formation within 3D printed, porous Ti6Al4V implants manufactured using Electron Beam Melting (EBM), retrieved after six months of healing in sheep femur and tibia. All samples were scanned twice (i.e., before and after resin embedding), using fast, low-resolution scans (Skyscan 1172; Bruker micro-CT, Kontich, Belgium), and were analysed by 2D and 3D morphometry. The main questions posed were: (i) Can low resolution, fast scans provide morphometric data of bone formed inside (and around) metal implants with a complex, open-pore architecture?, (ii) Can micro-CT be used to accurately quantify both the bone area (BA) and bone-implant contact (BIC)?, (iii) What degree of error is introduced in the quantitative data by varying the threshold values?, and (iv) Does resin embedding influence the accuracy of the analysis? To validate the accuracy of micro-CT measurements, each data set was correlated with a corresponding centrally cut histological section. The results show that quantitative histomorphometry corresponds strongly with 3D measurements made by micro-CT, where a high correlation exists between the two techniques for bone area/volume measurements around and inside the porous network. On the contrary, the direct bone-implant contact is challenging to estimate accurately or reproducibly. Large errors may be introduced in micro-CT measurements when segmentation is performed without calibrating the data set against a corresponding histological section. Generally, the bone area measurement is strongly influenced by the lower threshold limit, while the upper threshold limit has little or no effect. Resin embedding does not compromise the accuracy of micro-CT measurements, although there is a change in the contrast distributions and optimisation of the threshold ranges is required.

  9. Full-fledged proteomic analysis of bioactive wheat amylase inhibitors by a 3-D analytical technique: Identification of new heterodimeric aggregation states.

    PubMed

    Zoccatelli, Gianni; Dalla Pellegrina, Chiara; Mosconi, Silvia; Consolini, Marica; Veneri, Gianluca; Chignola, Roberto; Peruffo, Angelo; Rizzi, Corrado

    2007-02-01

    Wheat proteinaceous alpha-amylase inhibitors (alpha-AIs) are increasingly investigated for their agronomical role as natural defence molecules of plants against the attack of insects and pests, but also for their effects on human health. The wheat genomes code for several bioactive alpha-AIs that share sequence homology, but differ in their specificity against alpha-amylases from different species and for their aggregation states. Wheat alpha-AIs are traditionally classified as belonging to the three classes of tetrameric, homodimeric and monomeric forms, each class being constituted by a number of polypeptides that display different electrophoretic mobilities. Here we describe a proteomic approach for the identification of bioactive alpha-AIs from wheat and, in particular, a 3-D technique that allows to best identify and characterize the dimeric fraction. The technique takes advantage of the thermal resistance of alpha-AIs (resistant to T > 70 degrees C) and consists in the separation of protein mixtures by 2-D polyacrylamide/starch electrophoresis under nondissociating PAGE (ND-PAGE, first dimension) and dissociating (urea-PAGE or U-PAGE second dimension) conditions, followed by in-gel spontaneous reaggregation of protein complexes and identification of the alpha-amylase inhibitory activity (antizymogram, third dimension) using enzymes from human salivary glands and from the larvae of Tenebrio molitor coleopter (yellow mealworm). Dimeric alpha-AIs from Triticum aestivum (bread wheat) were observed to exist as heterodimers. The formation of heterodimeric complexes was also confirmed by in vitro reaggregation assays carried out on RP-HPLC purified wheat dimeric alpha-AIs, and their bioactivity assayed by antizymogram analysis. The present 3-D analytical technique can be exploited for fast, full-fledged identification and characterization of wheat alpha-AIs.

  10. Biomechanical wall properties of the human rectum. A study with impedance planimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Dall, F H; Jørgensen, C S; Houe, D; Gregersen, H; Djurhuus, J C

    1993-01-01

    Biomechanical properties of the rectal wall were studied in 17 healthy adult volunteers (nine men and eight women). With impedance planimetry it is possible to obtain simultaneous measurements of pressure and rectal cross sectional area (CSA) during balloon inflations. Rectal distensions were done with an intraluminal balloon using specified pressures up to 40 cmH2O above baseline rectal pressure. Balloon inflation elicited a phase of rapid increase in rectal CSA followed by a phase of slow increase until a steady state was reached. Steady state occurred within 67 to 140 seconds with the shortest period at the highest distension pressures. Steady state rectal CSA values had a non-linear relation to increasing distension pressure. Rectal CSA values in women showed a tendency of being slightly higher than male values at all pressure steps with a significant difference at 3 and 5 cm H2O. Biomechanical parameters were calculated from rectal CSA pressure relations. Circumferential wall tension increased in a linear way. Rectal compliance decreased in a non-linear way with no further decline between 30 and 40 cmH2O. The pressure elastic modulus increased steeply until a distension pressure of 35 cmH2O with no further increase to 40 cmH2O. This suggests that rectal tone is reduced as the muscle fails to resist further distension at 35 cmH2O and higher pressures. Impedance planimetry offers new possibilities for investigation of anorectal physiology through the study of segmental biomechanical wall properties of the human rectum. PMID:8244148

  11. 3D granular deposits on rock avalanches: can the application of different operators and filtering techniques improve our understanding of the phenomena?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longchamp, Celine; Abellan, Antonio; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Rock avalanches are catastrophic events involving a great volume of material (>106 m3). The flowing mass can reach velocities up to ten meters per second and travel long distances on the order of kilometres, covering an area over 0.1 km2. These extremely destructive and uncontrollable events are very unusual in nature and the use of analogue modelling is of great importance in the understanding of the behaviour of such events. The main objective of this research is to analyse rock avalanche dynamics by means of a detailed structural analysis of the features observed in the avalanche. Data used for this research consist on 3D measurements of mass movements of different magnitudes, from decimetre level scale laboratory experiments to well-studied rock avalanches of several square kilometres magnitude, as follows: (1) Laboratory experiments are performed on a tilting plane in which a well-defined granular material is released, chute down a slope, propagate and finally stop on a horizontal surface. The deposits are then scanned by a 3D digitizer (Konica Minolta vivid 9i micro-LiDAR) in order to get a 3D geometrical model of the mass. Different grainsize (115, 545 and 2605 μm) and substratum roughness (simulate by aluminium and sandpapers with grainsize from 16 to 425 μm) were used in order to understand their influence on the motion of a granular mass; (2) A well know rock avalanche deposit, the Frank slide (Alberta, Canada), was also analysed from the available 3D LiDAR dataset. This deposit consists in a 30× 106 m3 rockslide-avalanche of Palaeozoic limestone that was widely studied by several authors before (e.g. Cruden and Hungr, 1986, Cruden and Krahn, 1973, etc). In order to better understand the fault and folding structures presented in the rock avalanche deposits, we applied a series of linear and non-linear Matlab operators and filtering techniques to the 3D datasets, including differences derivatives ('diff'), numerical gradient ('gradient'), discrete

  12. Planimetry of aortic valve area using multiplane transoesophageal echocardiography is not a reliable method for assessing severity of aortic stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Y.; Meneveau, N.; Vuillemenot, A.; Magnin, D.; Anguenot, T.; Schiele, F.; Bassand, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the reliability of aortic valve area planimetry by multiplane transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) in aortic stenosis. DESIGN: Study of the diagnostic value of aortic valve area planimetry using multiplane TOE, compared with catheterisation and the continuity equation, both being considered as criterion standards. SETTING: University hospital. PATIENTS: 49 consecutive patients (29 male, 20 female, aged 44 to 82 years, average 66.6 (SD 8.5)), referred for haemodynamic evaluation of an aortic stenosis, were enrolled in a prospective study. From this sample, 37 patients were eligible for the final analysis. METHODS: Transthoracic and multiplane transoesophageal echocardiograms were performed within 24 hours before catheterisation. At transthoracic echo, aortic valve area was calculated by the continuity equation. At TOE, the image of the aortic valve opening was obtained with a 30-65 degrees rotation of the transducer. Numerical dynamic images were stored on optical discs for off-line analysis and were reviewed by two blinded observers. Catheterisation was performed in all cases and aortic valve area was calculated by the Gorlin formula. RESULTS: Feasibility of the method was 92% (48/52). The agreement between aortic valve area measured at TOE (mean 0.88 (SD 0.35) cm2) and at catheterisation (0.79 (0.24) cm2) was very poor. The same discrepancies were found between TOE and the continuity equation (0.72 (0.26) cm2). TOE planimetry overestimated aortic valve area determined by the two other methods. Predictive positive and negative values of planimetry to detect aortic valve area < 0.75 cm2 were 62% (10/16) and 43% (9/21) respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Planimetry of aortic valve area by TOE is difficult and less accurate than the continuity equation for assessing the severity of aortic stenosis. Images PMID:9290405

  13. Generic Techniques for the Calibration of Robots with Application of the 3-D Fixtures and Statistical Technique on the PUMA 500 and ARID Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawfik, Hazem

    1991-01-01

    A relatively simple, inexpensive, and generic technique that could be used in both laboratories and some operation site environments is introduced at the Robotics Applications and Development Laboratory (RADL) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). In addition, this report gives a detailed explanation of the set up procedure, data collection, and analysis using this new technique that was developed at the State University of New York at Farmingdale. The technique was used to evaluate the repeatability, accuracy, and overshoot of the Unimate Industrial Robot, PUMA 500. The data were statistically analyzed to provide an insight into the performance of the systems and components of the robot. Also, the same technique was used to check the forward kinematics against the inverse kinematics of RADL's PUMA robot. Recommendations were made for RADL to use this technique for laboratory calibration of the currently existing robots such as the ASEA, high speed controller, Automated Radiator Inspection Device (ARID) etc. Also, recommendations were made to develop and establish other calibration techniques that will be more suitable for site calibration environment and robot certification.

  14. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  15. Analysis of the energy distribution of interface traps related to tunnel oxide degradation using charge pumping techniques for 3D NAND flash applications

    SciTech Connect

    An, Ho-Myoung; Kim, Hee-Dong; Kim, Tae Geun

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The degradation tendency extracted by CP technique was almost the same in both the bulk-type and TFT-type cells. - Highlights: • D{sub it} is directly investigated from bulk-type and TFT-type CTF memory. • Charge pumping technique was employed to analyze the D{sub it} information. • To apply the CP technique to monitor the reliability of the 3D NAND flash. - Abstract: The energy distribution and density of interface traps (D{sub it}) are directly investigated from bulk-type and thin-film transistor (TFT)-type charge trap flash memory cells with tunnel oxide degradation, under program/erase (P/E) cycling using a charge pumping (CP) technique, in view of application in a 3-demension stackable NAND flash memory cell. After P/E cycling in bulk-type devices, the interface trap density gradually increased from 1.55 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} to 3.66 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} due to tunnel oxide damage, which was consistent with the subthreshold swing and transconductance degradation after P/E cycling. Its distribution moved toward shallow energy levels with increasing cycling numbers, which coincided with the decay rate degradation with short-term retention time. The tendency extracted with the CP technique for D{sub it} of the TFT-type cells was similar to those of bulk-type cells.

  16. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  17. ACM-based automatic liver segmentation from 3-D CT images by combining multiple atlases and improved mean-shift techniques.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hongwei; He, Jiangping; Yang, Xin; Deklerck, Rudi; Cornelis, Jan

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present an autocontext model(ACM)-based automatic liver segmentation algorithm, which combines ACM, multiatlases, and mean-shift techniques to segment liver from 3-D CT images. Our algorithm is a learning-based method and can be divided into two stages. At the first stage, i.e., the training stage, ACM is performed to learn a sequence of classifiers in each atlas space (based on each atlas and other aligned atlases). With the use of multiple atlases, multiple sequences of ACM-based classifiers are obtained. At the second stage, i.e., the segmentation stage, the test image will be segmented in each atlas space by applying each sequence of ACM-based classifiers. The final segmentation result will be obtained by fusing segmentation results from all atlas spaces via a multiclassifier fusion technique. Specially, in order to speed up segmentation, given a test image, we first use an improved mean-shift algorithm to perform over-segmentation and then implement the region-based image labeling instead of the original inefficient pixel-based image labeling. The proposed method is evaluated on the datasets of MICCAI 2007 liver segmentation challenge. The experimental results show that the average volume overlap error and the average surface distance achieved by our method are 8.3% and 1.5 m, respectively, which are comparable to the results reported in the existing state-of-the-art work on liver segmentation.

  18. Imaging detection of new HCCs in cirrhotic patients treated with different techniques: Comparison of conventional US, spiral CT, and 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced US with the Navigator technique (Nav 3D CEUS)☆

    PubMed Central

    Giangregorio, F.; Comparato, G.; Marinone, M.G.; Di Stasi, M.; Sbolli, G.; Aragona, G.; Tansini, P.; Fornari, F.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The commercially available Navigator system© (Esaote, Italy) allows easy 3D reconstruction of a single 2D acquisition of contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) imaging of the whole liver (with volumetric correction provided by the electromagnetic device of the Navigator©). The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy of this panoramic technique (Nav 3D CEUS) with that of conventional US and spiral CT in the detection of new hepatic lesions in patients treated for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and methods From November 2006 to May 2007, we performed conventional US, Nav 3D CEUS, and spiral CT on 72 cirrhotic patients previously treated for 1 or more HCCs (M/F: 38/34; all HCV-positive; Child: A/B 58/14) (1 examination: 48 patients; 2 examinations: 20 patients; 3 examinations: 4 patients). Nav 3D CEUS was performed with SonoVue© (Bracco, Milan, Italy) as a contrast agent and Technos MPX© scanner (Esaote, Genoa, Italy). Sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV, respectively) were evaluated. Differences between the techniques were assessed with the chi-square test (SPSS release-15). Results Definitive diagnoses (based on spiral CT and additional follow-up) were: 6 cases of local recurrence (LocRecs) in 4 patients, 49 new nodules >2 cm from a treated nodule (NewNods) in 34 patients, and 10 cases of multinodular recurrence consisting of 4 or more nodules (NewMulti). The remaining 24 patients (22 treated for 1–3 nodules, 2 treated for >3 nodules) remained recurrence-free. Conventional US correctly detected 29/49 NewNods, 9/10 NewMultis, and 3/6 LocRecs (sensitivity: 59.2%; specificity: 100%; diagnostic accuracy: 73.6%; PPV: 100%; NPV: 70.1%). Spiral CT detected 42/49 NewNods plus 1 that was a false positive, 9/10 NewMultis, and all 6 LocRecs (sensitivity: 85.7%; specificity: 95.7%; diagnostic accuracy: 90.9%; PPV: 97.7%; NPV: 75.9%). 3D NAV results were: 46N (+9 multinodularN and 6 LR

  19. An unsplit Convolutional perfectly matched layer technique improved at grazing incidence for the differential anisotropic elastic wave equation: application to 3D heterogeneous near surface slices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2007-05-01

    In geophysical exploration, high computational cost of full waveform inverse problem can be drastically reduced by implementing efficient boundary conditions. In many regions of interest for the oil industry or geophysical exploration, nearly tabular geological structures can be handled and analyzed by setting receivers in wells or/and at large offset. Then, the numerical modelling of waves travelling in thin slices along wells and near surface structures can provide very fast responses if highly accurate absorbing conditions around the slice are introduced in the wave propagation modelling. Here we propose then a Convolutional version of the well known Perfectly Matched layer technique. This optimized version allows the generation of seismic waves travelling close to the boundary layer at almost grazing incidence, which allows the treatment of thin 3D slices. The Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) technique, introduced in 1994 by Bérenger for Maxwell's equations, has become classical in the context of numerical simulations in electromagnetics, in particular for 3D finite difference in the time domain (FDTD) calculations. One of the most attractive properties of a PML model is that no reflection occurs at the interface between the physical domain and the absorbing layer before truncation to a finite-size layer and discretization by a numerical scheme. Therefore, the absorbing layer does not send spurious energy back into the medium. This property holds for any frequency and angle of incidence. However, the layer must be truncated in order to be able to perform numerical simulations, and such truncation creates a reflected wave whose amplitude is amplified by the discretization process. In 2001, Collino and Tsogka introduced a PML model for the elastodynamics equation written as a first-order system in velocity and stress with split unknowns, and discretized it based on the standard 2D staggered-grid finite-difference scheme of Virieux (1986). Then in 2001 and 2004

  20. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; ...

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  1. Molecular modeling study of CP-690550 derivatives as JAK3 kinase inhibitors through combined 3D-QSAR, molecular docking, and dynamics simulation techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing Li; Cheng, Li Ping; Wang, Tian Chi; Deng, Wei; Wu, Fan Hong

    2017-03-01

    To develop more potent JAK3 kinase inhibitors, a series of CP-690550 derivatives were investigated using combined molecular modeling techniques, such as 3D-QSAR, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD). The leave-one-out correlation (q(2)) and non-cross-validated correlation coefficient (r(2)) of the best CoMFA model are 0.715 and 0.992, respectively. The q(2) and r(2) values of the best CoMSIA model are 0.739 and 0.995, respectively. The steric, electrostatic, and hydrophobic fields played important roles in determining the inhibitory activity of CP-690550 derivatives. Some new JAK3 kinase inhibitors were designed. Some of them have better inhibitory activity than the most potent Tofacitinib (CP-690550). Molecular docking was used to identify some key amino acid residues at the active site of JAK3 protein. 10ns MD simulations were successfully performed to confirm the detailed binding mode and validate the rationality of docking results. The calculation of the binding free energies by MMPBSA method gives a good correlation with the predicted biological activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report on MD simulations and free energy calculations for this series of compounds. The combination results of this study will be valuable for the development of potent and novel JAK3 kinase inhibitors.

  2. Kinematic analysis of healthy hips during weight-bearing activities by 3D-to-2D model-to-image registration technique.

    PubMed

    Hara, Daisuke; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Hamai, Satoshi; Higaki, Hidehiko; Ikebe, Satoru; Shimoto, Takeshi; Hirata, Masanobu; Kanazawa, Masayuki; Kohno, Yusuke; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic hip kinematics during weight-bearing activities were analyzed for six healthy subjects. Continuous X-ray images of gait, chair-rising, squatting, and twisting were taken using a flat panel X-ray detector. Digitally reconstructed radiographic images were used for 3D-to-2D model-to-image registration technique. The root-mean-square errors associated with tracking the pelvis and femur were less than 0.3 mm and 0.3° for translations and rotations. For gait, chair-rising, and squatting, the maximum hip flexion angles averaged 29.6°, 81.3°, and 102.4°, respectively. The pelvis was tilted anteriorly around 4.4° on average during full gait cycle. For chair-rising and squatting, the maximum absolute value of anterior/posterior pelvic tilt averaged 12.4°/11.7° and 10.7°/10.8°, respectively. Hip flexion peaked on the way of movement due to further anterior pelvic tilt during both chair-rising and squatting. For twisting, the maximum absolute value of hip internal/external rotation averaged 29.2°/30.7°. This study revealed activity dependent kinematics of healthy hip joints with coordinated pelvic and femoral dynamic movements. Kinematics' data during activities of daily living may provide important insight as to the evaluating kinematics of pathological and reconstructed hips.

  3. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  4. Towards autonomic computing in machine vision applications: techniques and strategies for in-line 3D reconstruction in harsh industrial environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molleda, Julio; Usamentiaga, Rubén; García, Daniel F.; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2011-03-01

    Nowadays machine vision applications require skilled users to configure, tune, and maintain. Because such users are scarce, the robustness and reliability of applications are usually significantly affected. Autonomic computing offers a set of principles such as self-monitoring, self-regulation, and self-repair which can be used to partially overcome those problems. Systems which include self-monitoring observe their internal states, and extract features about them. Systems with self-regulation are capable of regulating their internal parameters to provide the best quality of service depending on the operational conditions and environment. Finally, self-repairing systems are able to detect anomalous working behavior and to provide strategies to deal with such conditions. Machine vision applications are the perfect field to apply autonomic computing techniques. This type of application has strong constraints on reliability and robustness, especially when working in industrial environments, and must provide accurate results even under changing conditions such as luminance, or noise. In order to exploit the autonomic approach of a machine vision application, we believe the architecture of the system must be designed using a set of orthogonal modules. In this paper, we describe how autonomic computing techniques can be applied to machine vision systems, using as an example a real application: 3D reconstruction in harsh industrial environments based on laser range finding. The application is based on modules with different responsibilities at three layers: image acquisition and processing (low level), monitoring (middle level) and supervision (high level). High level modules supervise the execution of low-level modules. Based on the information gathered by mid-level modules, they regulate low-level modules in order to optimize the global quality of service, and tune the module parameters based on operational conditions and on the environment. Regulation actions involve

  5. Digital holography and 3-D imaging.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Partha; Barbastathis, George; Kim, Myung; Kukhtarev, Nickolai

    2011-03-01

    This feature issue on Digital Holography and 3-D Imaging comprises 15 papers on digital holographic techniques and applications, computer-generated holography and encryption techniques, and 3-D display. It is hoped that future work in the area leads to innovative applications of digital holography and 3-D imaging to biology and sensing, and to the development of novel nonlinear dynamic digital holographic techniques.

  6. Towards 3D multi-scale teleseismic and gravity data inversion using hybrid DSM/SPECFEM technique : application to the Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roland; Monteiller, Vadim; Chevrot, Sébastien; Wang, Yi; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Dufréchou, Grégory

    2015-04-01

    We describe here a method of inversion applied to seismic data sets constrained by gravity data at the regional scale. This will allow us to obtain robust models of P and S wave velocities but also of density, providing key constraints on the composition and thermal state of the lithosphere. Our approach relies on teleseimic waves, which illuminate the medium from below. We have developped a hybrid method in which a wave propagation method at the global scale (DSM/Direct solution method) is coupled with a spectral element method at the regional scale (Monteiller et al. 2013). With the spectral element method, we are able to model the 3D wave propagation effects in a computational domain of 400km long x 400km wide and 200 km deep, for an incident teleseismic wavefront introduced at the boundaries of this domain with periods as short as 2 s. The DSM global method allows to compute this incident field for a spherical Earth model. We use a multi-scale joint inversion of both gravity and seismic waveform data, accounting for the long wavelengths of the gravity field taken from a global model. In terms of inversion technique, we have validated an adjoint method for the inversion of seismic waveforms. An optimized BFGS inversion technique is used to minimize the difference between observed and computed full waveforms. The gradient of the misfit function gives the direction over which the model must be perturbed to minimize this difference. At each step of the inversion procedure we choose an optimal step length that accelerates the minimization. This is the crucial ingredient that allows us to build an efficient iterative full waveform inversion. We have extended this method by incorporating gravity data provided by the BGI/Bureau Gravimétrique International into the inversion. If the waveforms allow us to constrain the seismic velocities, they are less sensitive to the structure in density, which gives independent and crucial information to constrain the nature of rocks

  7. Design for reliability of BEoL and 3-D TSV structures – A joint effort of FEA and innovative experimental techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Auersperg, Jürgen; Vogel, Dietmar; Auerswald, Ellen; Rzepka, Sven; Michel, Bernd

    2014-06-19

    Copper-TSVs for 3D-IC-integration generate novel challenges for reliability analysis and prediction, e.g. the need to master multiple failure criteria for combined loading including residual stress, interface delamination, cracking and fatigue issues. So, the thermal expansion mismatch between copper and silicon leads to a stress situation in silicon surrounding the TSVs which is influencing the electron mobility and as a result the transient behavior of transistors. Furthermore, pumping and protrusion of copper is a challenge for Back-end of Line (BEoL) layers of advanced CMOS technologies already during manufacturing. These effects depend highly on the temperature dependent elastic-plastic behavior of the TSV-copper and the residual stresses determined by the electro deposition chemistry and annealing conditions. That’s why the authors pushed combined simulative/experimental approaches to extract the Young’s-modulus, initial yield stress and hardening coefficients in copper-TSVs from nanoindentation experiments, as well as the temperature dependent initial yield stress and hardening coefficients from bow measurements due to electroplated thin copper films on silicon under thermal cycling conditions. A FIB trench technique combined with digital image correlation is furthermore used to capture the residual stress state near the surface of TSVs. The extracted properties are discussed and used accordingly to investigate the pumping and protrusion of copper-TSVs during thermal cycling. Moreover, the cracking and delamination risks caused by the elevated temperature variation during BEoL ILD deposition are investigated with the help of fracture mechanics approaches.

  8. In Vivo Kinematics of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficient Knee During Wide-Based Squat Using a 2D/3D Registration Technique.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Takeshi; Gamada, Kazuyoshi; Kidera, Kenichi; Ikuta, Futoshi; Yoneta, Kei; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Osaki, Makoto; Yonekura, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency increases the risk of early osteoarthritis (OA). Studies of ACL deficient knee kinematics would be important to reveal the disease process and therefore to find mechanisms which would potentially slow OA progression. The purpose of this study was to determine if in vivo kinematics of the anterior cruciate ligament deficient (ACLD) knee during a wide-based squat activity differ from kinematics of the contralateral intact knee. Thirty-three patients with a unilateral ACLD knee consented to participate in this institutional review board approved study with the contralateral intact knee serving as the control. In vivo knee kinematics during the wide-based squat were analyzed using a 2D/3D registration technique utilizing CT-based bone models and lateral fluoroscopy. Comparisons were performed using values between 0 and 100° flexion both in flexion and extension phases of the squat activity. Both the ACLD and intact knees demonstrated increasing tibial internal rotation with knee flexion, and no difference was observed in tibial rotation between the groups. The tibia in the ACLD knee was more anterior than that of the contralateral knees at 0 and 5° flexion in both phases (p < 0.05). Tibiofemoral medial contact points of the ACLD knees were more posterior than that of the contralateral knees at 5, 10 and 15° of knee flexion in the extension phase of the squat activity (p < 0.05). Tibiofemoral lateral contact points of the ACLD knees were more posterior than that of the contralateral knees at 0° flexion in the both phases (p < 0.05). The kinematics of the ACLD and contralateral intact knees were similar during the wide-based squat except at the low flexion angles. Therefore, we conclude the wide-based squat may be recommended for the ACLD knee by avoiding terminal extension.

  9. Game of thrown bombs in 3D: using high speed cameras and photogrammetry techniques to reconstruct bomb trajectories at Stromboli (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, D.; Taddeucci, J.; Scarlato, P.; Del Bello, E.; Houghton, B. F.; Orr, T. R.; Andronico, D.; Kueppers, U.

    2015-12-01

    Large juvenile bombs and lithic clasts, produced and ejected during explosive volcanic eruptions, follow ballistic trajectories. Of particular interest are: 1) the determination of ejection velocity and launch angle, which give insights into shallow conduit conditions and geometry; 2) particle trajectories, with an eye on trajectory evolution caused by collisions between bombs, as well as the interaction between bombs and ash/gas plumes; and 3) the computation of the final emplacement of bomb-sized clasts, which is important for hazard assessment and risk management. Ground-based imagery from a single camera only allows the reconstruction of bomb trajectories in a plan perpendicular to the line of sight, which may lead to underestimation of bomb velocities and does not allow the directionality of the ejections to be studied. To overcome this limitation, we adapted photogrammetry techniques to reconstruct 3D bomb trajectories from two or three synchronized high-speed video cameras. In particular, we modified existing algorithms to consider the errors that may arise from the very high velocity of the particles and the impossibility of measuring tie points close to the scene. Our method was tested during two field campaigns at Stromboli. In 2014, two high-speed cameras with a 500 Hz frame rate and a ~2 cm resolution were set up ~350m from the crater, 10° apart and synchronized. The experiment was repeated with similar parameters in 2015, but using three high-speed cameras in order to significantly reduce uncertainties and allow their estimation. Trajectory analyses for tens of bombs at various times allowed for the identification of shifts in the mean directivity and dispersal angle of the jets during the explosions. These time evolutions are also visible on the permanent video-camera monitoring system, demonstrating the applicability of our method to all kinds of explosive volcanoes.

  10. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  11. Intraoral 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühmstedt, Peter; Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Munkelt, Christoph; Heinze, Matthias; Palme, Martin; Schmidt, Ingo; Hintersehr, Josef; Notni, Gunther

    2007-09-01

    Here a new set-up of a 3D-scanning system for CAD/CAM in dental industry is proposed. The system is designed for direct scanning of the dental preparations within the mouth. The measuring process is based on phase correlation technique in combination with fast fringe projection in a stereo arrangement. The novelty in the approach is characterized by the following features: A phase correlation between the phase values of the images of two cameras is used for the co-ordinate calculation. This works contrary to the usage of only phase values (phasogrammetry) or classical triangulation (phase values and camera image co-ordinate values) for the determination of the co-ordinates. The main advantage of the method is that the absolute value of the phase at each point does not directly determine the coordinate. Thus errors in the determination of the co-ordinates are prevented. Furthermore, using the epipolar geometry of the stereo-like arrangement the phase unwrapping problem of fringe analysis can be solved. The endoscope like measurement system contains one projection and two camera channels for illumination and observation of the object, respectively. The new system has a measurement field of nearly 25mm × 15mm. The user can measure two or three teeth at one time. So the system can by used for scanning of single tooth up to bridges preparations. In the paper the first realization of the intraoral scanner is described.

  12. Integrating structure-from-motion photogrammetry with geospatial software as a novel technique for quantifying 3D ecological characteristics of coral reefs

    PubMed Central

    Delparte, D; Gates, RD; Takabayashi, M

    2015-01-01

    The structural complexity of coral reefs plays a major role in the biodiversity, productivity, and overall functionality of reef ecosystems. Conventional metrics with 2-dimensional properties are inadequate for characterization of reef structural complexity. A 3-dimensional (3D) approach can better quantify topography, rugosity and other structural characteristics that play an important role in the ecology of coral reef communities. Structure-from-Motion (SfM) is an emerging low-cost photogrammetric method for high-resolution 3D topographic reconstruction. This study utilized SfM 3D reconstruction software tools to create textured mesh models of a reef at French Frigate Shoals, an atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. The reconstructed orthophoto and digital elevation model were then integrated with geospatial software in order to quantify metrics pertaining to 3D complexity. The resulting data provided high-resolution physical properties of coral colonies that were then combined with live cover to accurately characterize the reef as a living structure. The 3D reconstruction of reef structure and complexity can be integrated with other physiological and ecological parameters in future research to develop reliable ecosystem models and improve capacity to monitor changes in the health and function of coral reef ecosystems. PMID:26207190

  13. 3D carotid plaque MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dennis L.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS There has been significant progress made in 3D carotid plaque magnetic resonance imaging techniques in recent years. 3D plaque imaging clearly represents the future in clinical use. With effective flow suppression techniques, choices of different contrast weighting acquisitions, and time-efficient imaging approaches, 3D plaque imaging offers flexible imaging plane and view angle analysis, large coverage, multi-vascular beds capability, and even can be used in fast screening. PMID:26610656

  14. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    thickness, in the Z direction, and in drop-per-inch, in X and Y directions. 3D printing is also an easy and quick production technique, which can become useful in the ad-hoc realization of mechanical components for optical setups to be used in a laboratory for new concept studies and validation, reducing the manufacturing time. With this technique, indeed, it is possible to realize in few hours custom-made mechanical parts, without any specific knowledge and expertise in tool machinery, as long as the resolution and size are compliant with the requirements.

  15. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  16. Prone Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiotherapy Without a Boost to the Tumor Bed: Comparable Toxicity of IMRT Versus a 3D Conformal Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, Matthew E.; Raza, Shahzad; Becker, Stewart J.; Jozsef, Gabor; Lymberis, Stella C.; Hochman, Tsivia; Goldberg, Judith D.; DeWyngaert, Keith J.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: We report a comparison of the dosimetry and toxicity of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) among patients treated in the prone position with the same fractionation and target of the hypofractionation arm of the Canadian/Whelan trial. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved protocol identified a consecutive series of early-stage breast cancer patients treated according to the Canadian hypofractionation regimen but in the prone position. Patients underwent IMRT treatment planning and treatment if the insurance carrier approved reimbursement for IMRT; in case of refusal, a 3D-CRT plan was used. A comparison of the dosimetric and toxicity outcomes during the acute, subacute, and long-term follow-up of the two treatment groups is reported. Results: We included 97 consecutive patients with 100 treatment plans in this study (3 patients with bilateral breast cancer); 40 patients were treated with 3D-CRT and 57 with IMRT. IMRT significantly reduced the maximum dose (Dmax median, 109.96% for 3D-CRT vs. 107.28% for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) and improved median dose homogeneity (median, 1.15 for 3D-CRT vs. 1.05 for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) when compared with 3D-CRT. Acute toxicity consisted primarily of Grade 1 to 2 dermatitis and occurred in 92% of patients. Grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 13% of patients in the 3D-CRT group and 2% in the IMRT group. IMRT moderately decreased rates of acute pruritus (p = 0.03, chi-square test) and Grade 2 to 3 subacute hyperpigmentation (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test). With a minimum of 6 months' follow-up, the treatment was similarly well tolerated in either group, including among women with large breast volumes. Conclusion: Hypofractionated breast radiotherapy is well tolerated when treating patients in the prone position, even among those with large breast volumes. Breast IMRT significantly improves dosimetry but yields only a modest but

  17. Dosimetric validation and clinical implementation of two 3D dose verification systems for quality assurance in volumetric-modulated arc therapy techniques.

    PubMed

    Clemente-Gutiérrez, Francisco; Pérez-Vara, Consuelo

    2015-03-08

    A pretreatment quality assurance program for volumetric techniques should include redundant calculations and measurement-based verifications. The patient-specific quality assurance process must be based in clinically relevant metrics. The aim of this study was to show the commission, clinical implementation, and comparison of two systems that allow performing a 3D redundant dose calculation. In addition, one of them is capable of reconstructing the dose on patient anatomy from measurements taken with a 2D ion chamber array. Both systems were compared in terms of reference calibration data (absolute dose, output factors, percentage depth-dose curves, and profiles). Results were in good agreement for absolute dose values (discrepancies were below 0.5%) and output factors (mean differences were below 1%). Maximum mean discrepancies were located between 10 and 20 cm of depth for PDDs (-2.7%) and in the penumbra region for profiles (mean DTA of 1.5 mm). Validation of the systems was performed by comparing point-dose measurements with values obtained by the two systems for static, dynamic fields from AAPM TG-119 report, and 12 real VMAT plans for different anatomical sites (differences better than 1.2%). Comparisons between measurements taken with a 2D ion chamber array and results obtained by both systems for real VMAT plans were also performed (mean global gamma passing rates better than 87.0% and 97.9% for the 2%/2 mm and 3%/3 mm criteria). Clinical implementation of the systems was evaluated by comparing dose-volume parameters for all TG-119 tests and real VMAT plans with TPS values (mean differences were below 1%). In addition, comparisons between dose distributions calculated by TPS and those extracted by the two systems for real VMAT plans were also performed (mean global gamma passing rates better than 86.0% and 93.0% for the 2%/2 mm and 3%/ 3 mm criteria). The clinical use of both systems was successfully evaluated.

  18. SU-D-213-03: Towards An Optimized 3D Scintillation Dosimetry Tool for Quality Assurance of Dynamic Radiotherapy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rilling, M; Goulet, M; Thibault, S; Archambault, L

    2015-06-15

    specifications. This work leads the way to improving the 3D dosimeter’s achievable resolution, efficiency and build for providing a quality assurance tool fully meeting clinical needs. M.R. is financially supported by a Master’s Canada Graduate Scholarship from the NSERC. This research is also supported by the NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Optical Design.

  19. AE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  20. High-resolution 3D structural and optical analyses of hybrid or composite materials by means of scanning probe microscopy combined with the ultramicrotome technique: an example of application to engineering of liquid crystals doped with fluorescent quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalov, Konstantin E.; Efimov, Anton E.; Bobrovsky, Alexey Yu.; Agapov, Igor I.; Chistyakov, Anton A.; Oleinikov, Vladimir A.; Nabiev, Igor

    2013-05-01

    Combination of nanometer-scale 3D structural analysis with optical characterization of the same material is a challenging task. Its results may be important for nanophotonics, materials science, and quality control. We have developed a new technique for complementary high-resolution structural and optical characterization followed by optical spectroscopic and microscopic measurements accompanied by reconstruction of the 3D structure in the same area of the sample. The 3D structure is reconstructed by combination of ultramicrotomic and SPM techniques allowing the study of the 3D distribution of implanted nanoparticles and their effect on the matrix structure. The combination of scanning probe nanotomography (SPN) and optical microspectroscopy makes it possible to direct estimate how the 3D structural characteristics of materials affect their macroscopic optical properties. The technique developed has been applied to the engineering of materials made from cholesteric liquid crystals and fluorescent quantum dots (QDs). These materials permit photochemical patterning and image recording through the changes in the dissymmetry factor of circular polarization of QD emission. The differences in the polarisation images and morphological characteristics of the liquid crystal matrix have proved to be correlated with the arrangement of the areas of homogeneous distribution and nonhomogeneous clustering of QDs. The reconstruction of the 3D structure of the liquid crystal matrix in the areas of homogeneous QD distribution has shown that QDs embedded into cholesteric liquid crystal matrices do not perturb their periodic planar texture. The combined optical/SPM/ultramicrotome technique will be indispensable for evaluating the effects of inorganic nanoparticles on the organisation of organic and liquid crystal matrices, biomedical materials, cells, and tissues.

  1. Initial progress in the recording of crime scene simulations using 3D laser structured light imagery techniques for law enforcement and forensic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altschuler, Bruce R.; Monson, Keith L.

    1998-03-01

    Representation of crime scenes as virtual reality 3D computer displays promises to become a useful and important tool for law enforcement evaluation and analysis, forensic identification and pathological study and archival presentation during court proceedings. Use of these methods for assessment of evidentiary materials demands complete accuracy of reproduction of the original scene, both in data collection and in its eventual virtual reality representation. The recording of spatially accurate information as soon as possible after first arrival of law enforcement personnel is advantageous for unstable or hazardous crime scenes and reduces the possibility that either inadvertent measurement error or deliberate falsification may occur or be alleged concerning processing of a scene. Detailed measurements and multimedia archiving of critical surface topographical details in a calibrated, uniform, consistent and standardized quantitative 3D coordinate method are needed. These methods would afford professional personnel in initial contact with a crime scene the means for remote, non-contacting, immediate, thorough and unequivocal documentation of the contents of the scene. Measurements of the relative and absolute global positions of object sand victims, and their dispositions within the scene before their relocation and detailed examination, could be made. Resolution must be sufficient to map both small and large objects. Equipment must be able to map regions at varied resolution as collected from different perspectives. Progress is presented in devising methods for collecting and archiving 3D spatial numerical data from crime scenes, sufficient for law enforcement needs, by remote laser structured light and video imagery. Two types of simulation studies were done. One study evaluated the potential of 3D topographic mapping and 3D telepresence using a robotic platform for explosive ordnance disassembly. The second study involved using the laser mapping system on a

  2. Mini 3D for shallow gas reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect

    Vallieres, T. des; Enns, D.; Kuehn, H.; Parron, D.; Lafet, Y.; Van Hulle, D.

    1996-12-31

    The Mini 3D project was undertaken by TOTAL and ELF with the support of CEPM (Comite d`Etudes Petrolieres et Marines) to define an economical method of obtaining 3D seismic HR data for shallow gas assessment. An experimental 3D survey was carried out with classical site survey techniques in the North Sea. From these data 19 simulations, were produced to compare different acquisition geometries ranging from dual, 600 m long cables to a single receiver. Results show that short offset, low fold and very simple streamer positioning are sufficient to give a reliable 3D image of gas charged bodies. The 3D data allow a much more accurate risk delineation than 2D HR data. Moreover on financial grounds Mini-3D is comparable in cost to a classical HR 2D survey. In view of these results, such HR 3D should now be the standard for shallow gas surveying.

  3. Migration and Proliferative Activity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3D Polylactide Scaffolds Depends on Cell Seeding Technique and Collagen Modification.

    PubMed

    Rodina, A V; Tenchurin, T Kh; Saprykin, V P; Shepelev, A D; Mamagulashvili, V G; Grigor'ev, T E; Lukanina, K I; Orekhov, A S; Moskaleva, E Yu; Chvalun, S N

    2016-11-01

    We analyzed viability of mesenchymal stem cells seeded by static and dynamic methods to highly porous fibrous 3D poly-L-lactide scaffolds with similar physical and chemical properties, but different spatial organization modified with collagen. Standard collagen coating promoted protein adsorption on the scaffold surface and improved adhesive properties of 100 μ-thick scaffolds. Modification of 600-μ scaffolds with collagen under pressure increased proliferative activity of mesenchymal stem cells seeded under static and dynamic (delivery of 100,000 cells in 10 ml medium in a perfusion system at a rate of 1 ml/min) conditions by 47 and 648%, respectively (measured after 120-h culturing by MTT test). Dynamic conditions provide more uniform distribution of collagen on scaffold fibers and promote cell penetration into 3D poly-L-lactide scaffolds with thickness >600 μ.

  4. Accurate assessment of breast volume: a study comparing the volumetric gold standard (direct water displacement measurement of mastectomy specimen) with a 3D laser scanning technique.

    PubMed

    Yip, Jia Miin; Mouratova, Naila; Jeffery, Rebecca M; Veitch, Daisy E; Woodman, Richard J; Dean, Nicola R

    2012-02-01

    Preoperative assessment of breast volume could contribute significantly to the planning of breast-related procedures. The availability of 3D scanning technology provides us with an innovative method for doing this. We performed this study to compare measurements by this technology with breast volume measurement by water displacement. A total of 30 patients undergoing 39 mastectomies were recruited from our center. The volume of each patient's breast(s) was determined with a preoperative 3D laser scan. The volume of the mastectomy specimen was then measured in the operating theater by water displacement. There was a strong linear association between breast volumes measured using the 2 different methods when using a Pearson correlation (r = 0.95, P < 0.001). The mastectomy mean volume was defined by the equation: mastectomy mean volume = (scan mean volume × 1.03) -70.6. This close correlation validates the Cyberware WBX Scanner as a tool for assessment of breast volume.

  5. Real-time 3D display system based on computer-generated integral imaging technique using enhanced ISPP for hexagonal lens array.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hyeong; Erdenebat, Munkh-Uchral; Kwon, Ki-Chul; Jeong, Ji-Seong; Lee, Jae-Won; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Nam; Yoo, Kwan-Hee

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes an open computer language (OpenCL) parallel processing method to generate the elemental image arrays (EIAs) for hexagonal lens array from a three-dimensional (3D) object such as a volume data. Hexagonal lens array has a higher fill factor compared to the rectangular lens array case; however, each pixel of an elemental image should be determined to belong to the single hexagonal lens. Therefore, generation for the entire EIA requires very large computations. The proposed method reduces processing time for the EIAs for a given hexagonal lens array. By using the proposed image space parallel processing (ISPP) method, it can enhance the processing speed that generates the 3D display of real-time interactive integral imaging for hexagonal lens array. In our experiment, we implemented the EIAs for hexagonal lens array in real-time and obtained a good processing time for a large of volume data for multiple cases of lens arrays.

  6. 3D volume assessment techniques and computer-aided design and manufacturing for preoperative fabrication of implants in head and neck reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ashish; Otterburn, David; Saadeh, Pierre; Levine, Jamie; Hirsch, David L

    2011-11-01

    Cases in subdisciplines of craniomaxillofacial surgery--corrective jaw surgery, maxillofacial trauma, temporomandibular joint/skull base, jaw reconstruction, and postablative reconstruction-illustrate the ease of use, cost effectiveness, and superior results that can be achieved when using computer-assisted design and 3D volumetric analysis in preoperative surgical planning. This article discusses the materials and methods needed to plan cases, illustrates implementation of guides and implants, and describes postoperative analysis in relation to the virtually planned surgery.

  7. Multimodality CAD: combination of computerized classification techniques based on mammograms and 3D ultrasound volumes for improved accuracy in breast mass characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Paramagul, Chintana; Helvie, Mark A.; Zhou, Chuan

    2004-05-01

    Mammography and ultrasound (US) are two low-cost modalities that are commonly used by radiologists for evaluating breast masses and making biopsy recommendations. The goal of this study was to investigate computerized methods for combining information from these two modalities for mass characterization. Our data set consisted of 3D US images and mammograms of biopsy-proven solid breast masses from 60 patients. Thirty of the masses were malignant and 30 were benign. The US volume was obtained by scanning with an experimental 3D US image acquisition system. After computerized feature extraction from the 3D US images and mammograms, we investigated three methods (A, B and C) for combining the image features or classifier scores from different mammographic views and the US volumes. The classifier scores were analyzed using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methodology. The area Az under the ROC curve of the classifier based on US alone was 0.88+/-0.04 for testing Two classifiers were designed using the mammograms alone, with test Az values of 0.85+/-0.05 and 0.87+/-0.05, respectively. The test accuracy of combination methods A, B, and C were 0.89+/-0.04, 0.92+/-0.03, and 0.93+/-0.03, respectively. Our results indicate that combining the image features or classifier scores from the US and mammographic classification methods can improve the accuracy of computerized mass characterization.

  8. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  9. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; ...

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  10. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  11. 3-D Extensions for Trustworthy Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    3- D Extensions for Trustworthy Systems (Invited Paper) Ted Huffmire∗, Timothy Levin∗, Cynthia Irvine∗, Ryan Kastner† and Timothy Sherwood...address these problems, we propose an approach to trustworthy system development based on 3- D integration, an emerging chip fabrication technique in...which two or more integrated circuit dies are fabricated individually and then combined into a single stack using vertical conductive posts. With 3- D

  12. Venus in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    1993-01-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  13. Microfabricating 3D Structures by Laser Origami

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-09

    technique generates 3D microstructures by controlled out-of- plane folding of 2D patterns through a variety of laser-based digital fabrication...processes. Digital microfabrication techniques such as laser direct-write (LDW) offer a viable alternative for generating 3D self-folding designs. These...folding at the microscale where manual or mechanized actuation of the smaller struc- tures is not practical. LDW techniques allow micromachining and

  14. Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3-D Zr-Si Organic-Inorganic Scaffolds Produced by Two-Photon Polymerization Technique

    PubMed Central

    Koroleva, Anastasia; Deiwick, Andrea; Nguyen, Alexander; Schlie-Wolter, Sabrina; Narayan, Roger; Timashev, Peter; Popov, Vladimir; Bagratashvili, Viktor; Chichkov, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Two-photon polymerization (2PP) is applied for the fabrication of 3-D Zr-Si scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Zr-Si scaffolds with 150, 200, and 250 μm pore sizes are seeded with human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) and human adipose tissue derived stem cells (hASCs) and cultured in osteoinductive and control media for three weeks. Osteogenic differentiation of hASCs and hBMSCs and formation of bone matrix is comparatively analyzed via alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP), calcium quantification, osteocalcin staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It is observed that the 150 μm pore size Zr-Si scaffolds support the strongest matrix mineralization, as confirmed by calcium deposition. Analysis of ALP activity, osteocalcin staining and SEM observations of matrix mineralization reveal that mesenchymal stem cells cultured on 3-D scaffolds without osteogenic stimulation spontaneously differentiate towards osteogenic lineage. Nanoindentation measurements show that aging of the 2PP-produced Zr-Si scaffolds in aqueous or alcohol media results in an increase in the scaffold Young’s modulus and hardness. Moreover, accelerated formation of bone matrix by hASCs is noted, when cultured on the scaffolds with lower Young’s moduli and hardness values (non aged scaffolds) compared to the cells cultured on scaffolds with higher Young’s modulus and hardness values (aged scaffolds). Presented results support the potential application of Zr-Si scaffolds for autologous bone tissue engineering. PMID:25706270

  15. Complementary X-ray tomography techniques for histology-validated 3D imaging of soft and hard tissues using plaque-containing blood vessels as examples.

    PubMed

    Holme, Margaret N; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Weitkamp, Timm; Beckmann, Felix; Lobrinus, Johannes A; Rikhtegar, Farhad; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Zanette, Irene; Saxer, Till; Müller, Bert

    2014-01-01

    A key problem in X-ray computed tomography is choosing photon energies for postmortem specimens containing both soft and hard tissues. Increasing X-ray energy reduces image artifacts from highly absorbing hard tissues including plaque, but it simultaneously decreases contrast in soft tissues including the endothelium. Therefore, identifying the lumen within plaque-containing vessels is challenging. Destructive histology, the gold standard for tissue evaluation, reaches submicron resolution in two dimensions, whereas slice thickness limits spatial resolution in the third. We present a protocol to systematically analyze heterogeneous tissues containing weakly and highly absorbing components in the original wet state, postmortem. Taking the example of atherosclerotic human coronary arteries, the successively acquired 3D data of benchtop and synchrotron radiation-based tomography are validated by histology. The entire protocol requires ∼20 working days, enables differentiation between plaque, muscle and fat tissues without using contrast agents and permits blood flow simulations in vessels with plaque-induced constrictions.

  16. Spontaneous organization of uniform CeO2 nanoflowers by 3D oriented attachment in hot surfactant solutions monitored with an in situ electrical conductance technique.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huan-Ping; Zhang, Ya-Wen; Mai, Hao-Xin; Sun, Xiao; Liu, Qiang; Song, Wei-Guo; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2008-01-01

    Uniform CeO(2) nanoflowers were synthesized by rapid thermolysis of (NH(4))(2)Ce(NO(3))(6) in oleic acid (OA)/oleylamine (OM), by a unique 3D oriented-attachment mechanism. CeO(2) nanoflowers with controlled shape (cubic, four-petaled, and starlike) and tunable size (10-40 nm) were obtained by adjusting the reaction conditions including solvent composition, precursor concentration, reaction temperature, and reaction time. The nanoflower growth mechanism was investigated by in situ electrical conductance measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and UV/Vis spectroscopy. The CeO(2) nanoflowers are likely formed in two major steps, that is, initial formation of ceria cluster particles capped with various ligands (e.g., OA, OM, and NO(3) (-)) via hydrolysis of (NH(4))(2)Ce(NO(3))(6) at temperatures in the range 140-220 degrees C, and subsequent spontaneous organization of the primary particles into nanoflowers by 3D oriented attachment, due to a rapid decrease in surface ligand coverage caused by sudden decomposition of the precursor at temperatures above 220 degrees C in a strong redox reaction. After calcination at 400 degrees C for 4 h the 33.8 nm CeO(2) nanoflowers have a specific surface area as large as 156 m(2) g(-1) with high porosity, and they are highly active for conversion of CO to CO(2) in the low temperature range of 200-400 degrees C. The present approach has also been extended to the preparation of other transition metal oxide (CoO, NiO, and CuO(x)) nanoflowers.

  17. Analysis of ancient-river systems by 3D seismic time-slice technique: A case study in northeast Malay Basin, offshore Terengganu, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Sulaiman, Noorzamzarina; Hamzah, Umar; Samsudin, Abdul Rahim

    2014-09-03

    Fluvial sandstones constitute one of the major clastic petroleum reservoir types in many sedimentary basins around the world. This study is based on the analysis of high-resolution, shallow (seabed to 500 m depth) 3D seismic data which generated three-dimensional (3D) time slices that provide exceptional imaging of the geometry, dimension and temporal and spatial distribution of fluvial channels. The study area is in the northeast of Malay Basin about 280 km to the east of Terengganu offshore. The Malay Basin comprises a thick (> 8 km), rift to post-rift Oligo-Miocene to Pliocene basin-fill. The youngest (Miocene to Pliocene), post-rift succession is dominated by a thick (1–5 km), cyclic succession of coastal plain and coastal deposits, which accumulated in a humid-tropical climatic setting. This study focuses on the Pleistocene to Recent (500 m thick) succession, which comprises a range of seismic facies analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) seismic sections, mainly reflecting changes in fluvial channel style and river architecture. The succession has been divided into four seismic units (Unit S1-S4), bounded by basin-wide strata surfaces. Two types of boundaries have been identified: 1) a boundary that is defined by a regionally-extensive erosion surface at the base of a prominent incised valley (S3 and S4); 2) a sequence boundary that is defined by more weakly-incised, straight and low-sinuosity channels which is interpreted as low-stand alluvial bypass channel systems (S1 and S2). Each unit displays a predictable vertical change of the channel pattern and scale, with wide low-sinuosity channels at the base passing gradationally upwards into narrow high-sinuosity channels at the top. The wide variation in channel style and size is interpreted to be controlled mainly by the sea-level fluctuations on the widely flat Sunda land Platform.

  18. 3D change detection - Approaches and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Rongjun; Tian, Jiaojiao; Reinartz, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Due to the unprecedented technology development of sensors, platforms and algorithms for 3D data acquisition and generation, 3D spaceborne, airborne and close-range data, in the form of image based, Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) based point clouds, Digital Elevation Models (DEM) and 3D city models, become more accessible than ever before. Change detection (CD) or time-series data analysis in 3D has gained great attention due to its capability of providing volumetric dynamics to facilitate more applications and provide more accurate results. The state-of-the-art CD reviews aim to provide a comprehensive synthesis and to simplify the taxonomy of the traditional remote sensing CD techniques, which mainly sit within the boundary of 2D image/spectrum analysis, largely ignoring the particularities of 3D aspects of the data. The inclusion of 3D data for change detection (termed 3D CD), not only provides a source with different modality for analysis, but also transcends the border of traditional top-view 2D pixel/object-based analysis to highly detailed, oblique view or voxel-based geometric analysis. This paper reviews the recent developments and applications of 3D CD using remote sensing and close-range data, in support of both academia and industry researchers who seek for solutions in detecting and analyzing 3D dynamics of various objects of interest. We first describe the general considerations of 3D CD problems in different processing stages and identify CD types based on the information used, being the geometric comparison and geometric-spectral analysis. We then summarize relevant works and practices in urban, environment, ecology and civil applications, etc. Given the broad spectrum of applications and different types of 3D data, we discuss important issues in 3D CD methods. Finally, we present concluding remarks in algorithmic aspects of 3D CD.

  19. Effect of Radiotherapy Techniques (IMRT vs. 3D-CRT) on Outcome in Patients With Intermediate-Risk Rhabdomyosarcoma Enrolled in COG D9803-A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Chi; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Meza, Jane L.; Anderson, James R.; Lyden, Elizabeth R.; Brown, Christopher K.; Morano, Karen; Laurie, Fran; Arndt, Carola A.; Enke, Charles A.; Breneman, John C.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric parameters of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in patients with intermediate-risk rhabdomyosarcoma and to analyze their effect on locoregional control and failure-free survival (FFS). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 375 patients enrolled in the Children's Oncology Group protocol D9803 study, receiving IMRT or 3D-CRT. Dosimetric data were collected from 179 patients with an available composite plan. The chi-square test or Fisher's exact test was used to compare the patient characteristics and radiotherapy parameters between the two groups. The interval-to-event outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using log-rank tests. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to examine the effect of the treatment technique on FFS after adjusting for primary site and risk group. Results: The median follow-up time was 5.7 and 4.2 years for patients receiving 3D-CRT and IMRT, respectively. No differences in the 5-year failure of locoregional control (18% vs. 15%) or FFS (72% vs. 76%) rates were noted between the two groups. Multivariate analysis revealed no association between the two techniques and FFS. Patients with primary tumors in parameningeal sites were more likely to receive IMRT than 3D-CRT. IMRT became more common during the later years of the study. Patients receiving IMRT were more likely to receive >50 Gy, photon energy of {<=}6 MV, and >5 radiation fields than those who received 3D-CRT. The coverage of the IMRT planning target volume by the prescription dose was improved compared with the coverage using 3D-CRT with similar target dose heterogeneity. Conclusions: IMRT improved the target dose coverage compared with 3D-CRT, although an improvement in locoregional control or FFS could not be demonstrated in this population. Future studies comparing the integral dose to nontarget tissue and late radiation toxicity

  20. Twin Peaks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The two hills in the distance, approximately one to two kilometers away, have been dubbed the 'Twin Peaks' and are of great interest to Pathfinder scientists as objects of future study. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The white areas on the left hill, called the 'Ski Run' by scientists, may have been formed by hydrologic processes.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  1. 3D and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Y. C.

    1995-05-01

    This conference on physiology and function covers a wide range of subjects, including the vasculature and blood flow, the flow of gas, water, and blood in the lung, the neurological structure and function, the modeling, and the motion and mechanics of organs. Many technologies are discussed. I believe that the list would include a robotic photographer, to hold the optical equipment in a precisely controlled way to obtain the images for the user. Why are 3D images needed? They are to achieve certain objectives through measurements of some objects. For example, in order to improve performance in sports or beauty of a person, we measure the form, dimensions, appearance, and movements.

  2. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  3. 3D Immersive Visualization with Astrophysical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Brian R.

    2017-01-01

    We present the refinement of a new 3D immersion technique for astrophysical data visualization.Methodology to create 360 degree spherical panoramas is reviewed. The 3D software package Blender coupled with Python and the Google Spatial Media module are used together to create the final data products. Data can be viewed interactively with a mobile phone or tablet or in a web browser. The technique can apply to different kinds of astronomical data including 3D stellar and galaxy catalogs, images, and planetary maps.

  4. 3D Nanostructuring of Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blick, Robert

    2000-03-01

    Modern semiconductor technology allows to machine devices on the nanometer scale. I will discuss the current limits of the fabrication processes, which enable the definition of single electron transistors with dimensions down to 8 nm. In addition to the conventional 2D patterning and structuring of semiconductors, I will demonstrate how to apply 3D nanostructuring techniques to build freely suspended single-crystal beams with lateral dimension down to 20 nm. In transport measurements in the temperature range from 30 mK up to 100 K these nano-crystals are characterized regarding their electronic as well as their mechanical properties. Moreover, I will present possible applications of these devices.

  5. Horizontal structure and propagation characteristics of mesospheric gravity waves observed by Antarctic Gravity Wave Imaging/Instrument Network (ANGWIN), using a 3-D spectral analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Takashi S.; Nakamura, Takuji; Murphy, Damian; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Moffat-Griffin, Tracy; Zhao, Yucheng; Pautet, Pierre-Dominique; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Taylor, Michael

    2016-07-01

    ANGWIN (Antarctic Gravity Wave Imaging/Instrument Network) is an international airglow imager/instrument network in the Antarctic, which commenced observations in 2011. It seeks to reveal characteristics of mesospheric gravity waves, and to study sources, propagation, breaking of the gravity waves over the Antarctic and the effects on general circulation and upper atmosphere. In this study, we compared distributions of horizontal phase velocity of the gravity waves at around 90 km altitude observed in the mesospheric airglow imaging over different locations using our new statistical analysis method of 3-D Fourier transform, developed by Matsuda et al. (2014). Results from the airglow imagers at four stations at Syowa (69S, 40E), Halley (76S, 27W), Davis (69S, 78E) and McMurdo (78S, 156E) out of the ANGWIN imagers have been compared, for the observation period between April 6 and May 21 in 2013. In addition to the horizontal distribution of propagation and phase speed, gravity wave energies have been quantitatively compared, indicating a smaller GW activity in higher latitude stations. We further investigated frequency dependence of gravity wave propagation direction, as well as nightly variation of the gravity wave direction and correlation with the background wind variations. We found that variation of propagation direction is partly due to the effect of background wind in the middle atmosphere, but variation of wave sources could play important role as well. Secondary wave generation is also needed to explain the observed results.

  6. High-Resolution X-Ray Techniques as New Tool to Investigate the 3D Vascularization of Engineered-Bone Tissue.

    PubMed

    Bukreeva, Inna; Fratini, Michela; Campi, Gaetano; Pelliccia, Daniele; Spanò, Raffaele; Tromba, Giuliana; Brun, Francesco; Burghammer, Manfred; Grilli, Marco; Cancedda, Ranieri; Cedola, Alessia; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of structure-function relationships in normal and pathologic mammalian tissues is at the basis of a tissue engineering (TE) approach for the development of biological substitutes to restore or improve tissue function. In this framework, it is interesting to investigate engineered bone tissue, formed when porous ceramic constructs are loaded with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and implanted in vivo. To monitor the relation between bone formation and vascularization, it is important to achieve a detailed imaging and a quantitative description of the complete three-dimensional vascular network in such constructs. Here, we used synchrotron X-ray phase-contrast micro-tomography to visualize and analyze the three-dimensional micro-vascular networks in bone-engineered constructs, in an ectopic bone formation mouse-model. We compared samples seeded and not seeded with BMSC, as well as samples differently stained or unstained. Thanks to the high quality of the images, we investigated the 3D distribution of both vessels and collagen matrix and we obtained quantitative information for all different samples. We propose our approach as a tool for quantitative studies of angiogenesis in TE and for any pre-clinical investigation where a quantitative analysis of the vascular network is required.

  7. High-Resolution X-Ray Techniques as New Tool to Investigate the 3D Vascularization of Engineered-Bone Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bukreeva, Inna; Fratini, Michela; Campi, Gaetano; Pelliccia, Daniele; Spanò, Raffaele; Tromba, Giuliana; Brun, Francesco; Burghammer, Manfred; Grilli, Marco; Cancedda, Ranieri; Cedola, Alessia; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of structure–function relationships in normal and pathologic mammalian tissues is at the basis of a tissue engineering (TE) approach for the development of biological substitutes to restore or improve tissue function. In this framework, it is interesting to investigate engineered bone tissue, formed when porous ceramic constructs are loaded with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and implanted in vivo. To monitor the relation between bone formation and vascularization, it is important to achieve a detailed imaging and a quantitative description of the complete three-dimensional vascular network in such constructs. Here, we used synchrotron X-ray phase-contrast micro-tomography to visualize and analyze the three-dimensional micro-vascular networks in bone-engineered constructs, in an ectopic bone formation mouse-model. We compared samples seeded and not seeded with BMSC, as well as samples differently stained or unstained. Thanks to the high quality of the images, we investigated the 3D distribution of both vessels and collagen matrix and we obtained quantitative information for all different samples. We propose our approach as a tool for quantitative studies of angiogenesis in TE and for any pre-clinical investigation where a quantitative analysis of the vascular network is required. PMID:26442248

  8. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  9. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  10. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  11. 3D Analysis of D-RaCe and Self-Adjusting File in Removing Filling Materials from Curved Root Canals Instrumented and Filled with Different Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Simsek, Neslihan; Ahmetoglu, Fuat; Bulut, Elcin Tekin; Er, Kursat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of D-RaCe files and a self-adjusting file (SAF) system in removing filling material from curved root canals instrumented and filled with different techniques by using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). The mesial roots of 20 extracted mandibular first molars were used. Root canals (mesiobuccal and mesiolingual) were instrumented with SAF or Revo-S. The canals were then filled with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer using cold lateral compaction or thermoplasticized injectable techniques. The root fillings were first removed with D-RaCe (Step 1), followed by Step 2, in which a SAF system was used to remove the residual fillings in all groups. Micro-CT scans were used to measure the volume of residual filling after root canal filling, reinstrumentation with D-RaCe (Step 1), and reinstrumentation with SAF (Step 2). Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. There were no statistically significant differences between filling techniques in the canals instrumented with SAF (P = 0.292) and Revo-S (P = 0.306). The amount of remaining filling material was similar in all groups (P = 0.363); all of the instrumentation techniques left filling residue inside the canals. However, the additional use of SAF was more effective than using D-RaCe alone. PMID:25114976

  12. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    Multichannel seismic (MCS) images of crustal magma chambers are ideal targets for advanced visualization techniques. In the mid-ocean ridge environment, reflections originating at the melt-lens are well separated from other reflection boundaries, such as the seafloor, layer 2A and Moho, which enables the effective use of transparency filters. 3-D visualization of seismic reflectivity falls into two broad categories: volume and surface rendering. Volumetric-based visualization is an extremely powerful approach for the rapid exploration of very dense 3-D datasets. These 3-D datasets are divided into volume elements or voxels, which are individually color coded depending on the assigned datum value; the user can define an opacity filter to reject plotting certain voxels. This transparency allows the user to peer into the data volume, enabling an easy identification of patterns or relationships that might have geologic merit. Multiple image volumes can be co-registered to look at correlations between two different data types (e.g., amplitude variation with offsets studies), in a manner analogous to draping attributes onto a surface. In contrast, surface visualization of seismic reflectivity usually involves producing "fence" diagrams of 2-D seismic profiles that are complemented with seafloor topography, along with point class data, draped lines and vectors (e.g. fault scarps, earthquake locations and plate-motions). The overlying seafloor can be made partially transparent or see-through, enabling 3-D correlations between seafloor structure and seismic reflectivity. Exploration of 3-D datasets requires additional thought when constructing and manipulating these complex objects. As numbers of visual objects grow in a particular scene, there is a tendency to mask overlapping objects; this clutter can be managed through the effective use of total or partial transparency (i.e., alpha-channel). In this way, the co-variation between different datasets can be investigated

  13. Non-destructive optical clearing technique enhances optical coherence tomography (OCT) for real-time, 3D histomorphometry of brain tissue (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Akshay; Chang, Theodore H.; Chou, Li-Dek; Ramalingam, Tirunelveli S.

    2016-03-01

    Evaluation of neurodegenerative disease often requires examination of brain morphology. Volumetric analysis of brain regions and structures can be used to track developmental changes, progression of disease, and the presence of transgenic phenotypes. Current standards for microscopic investigation of brain morphology are limited to detection of superficial structures at a maximum depth of 300μm. While histological techniques can provide detailed cross-sections of brain structures, they require complicated tissue preparation and the ultimate destruction of the sample. A non-invasive, label-free imaging modality known as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) can produce 3-dimensional reconstructions through high-speed, cross-sectional scans of biological tissue. Although OCT allows for the preservation of intact samples, the highly scattering and absorbing properties of biological tissue limit imaging depth to 1-2mm. Optical clearing agents have been utilized to increase imaging depth by index matching and lipid digestion, however, these contemporary techniques are expensive and harsh on tissues, often irreversibly denaturing proteins. Here we present an ideal optical clearing agent that offers ease-of-use and reversibility. Similar to how SeeDB has been effective for microscopy, our fructose-based, reversible optical clearing technique provides improved OCT imaging and functional immunohistochemical mapping of disease. Fructose is a natural, non-toxic sugar with excellent water solubility, capable of increasing tissue transparency and reducing light scattering. We will demonstrate the improved depth-resolving performance of OCT for enhanced whole-brain imaging of normal and diseased murine brains following a fructose clearing treatment. This technique potentially enables rapid, 3-dimensional evaluation of biological tissues at axial and lateral resolutions comparable to histopathology.

  14. Designing Biomaterials for 3D Printing.

    PubMed

    Guvendiren, Murat; Molde, Joseph; Soares, Rosane M D; Kohn, Joachim

    2016-10-10

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is becoming an increasingly common technique to fabricate scaffolds and devices for tissue engineering applications. This is due to the potential of 3D printing to provide patient-specific designs, high structural complexity, rapid on-demand fabrication at a low-cost. One of the major bottlenecks that limits the widespread acceptance of 3D printing in biomanufacturing is the lack of diversity in "biomaterial inks". Printability of a biomaterial is determined by the printing technique. Although a wide range of biomaterial inks including polymers, ceramics, hydrogels and composites have been developed, the field is still struggling with processing of these materials into self-supporting devices with tunable mechanics, degradation, and bioactivity. This review aims to highlight the past and recent advances in biomaterial ink development and design considerations moving forward. A brief overview of 3D printing technologies focusing on ink design parameters is also included.

  15. How We 3D-Print Aerogel

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-23

    A new type of graphene aerogel will make for better energy storage, sensors, nanoelectronics, catalysis and separations. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have made graphene aerogel microlattices with an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The research appears in the April 22 edition of the journal, Nature Communications. The 3D printed graphene aerogels have high surface area, excellent electrical conductivity, are lightweight, have mechanical stiffness and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90 percent compressive strain). In addition, the 3D printed graphene aerogel microlattices show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials and much better mass transport.

  16. Application of computational fluid dynamics and fluid structure interaction techniques for calculating the 3D transient flow of journal bearings coupled with rotor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Yu, Guichang; Liu, Shulian; Zheng, Shuiying

    2012-09-01

    Journal bearings are important parts to keep the high dynamic performance of rotor machinery. Some methods have already been proposed to analysis the flow field of journal bearings, and in most of these methods simplified physical model and classic Reynolds equation are always applied. While the application of the general computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-fluid structure interaction (FSI) techniques is more beneficial for analysis of the fluid field in a journal bearing when more detailed solutions are needed. This paper deals with the quasi-coupling calculation of transient fluid dynamics of oil film in journal bearings and rotor dynamics with CFD-FSI techniques. The fluid dynamics of oil film is calculated by applying the so-called "dynamic mesh" technique. A new mesh movement approach is presented while the dynamic mesh models provided by FLUENT are not suitable for the transient oil flow in journal bearings. The proposed mesh movement approach is based on the structured mesh. When the journal moves, the movement distance of every grid in the flow field of bearing can be calculated, and then the update of the volume mesh can be handled automatically by user defined function (UDF). The journal displacement at each time step is obtained by solving the moving equations of the rotor-bearing system under the known oil film force condition. A case study is carried out to calculate the locus of the journal center and pressure distribution of the journal in order to prove the feasibility of this method. The calculating results indicate that the proposed method can predict the transient flow field of a journal bearing in a rotor-bearing system where more realistic models are involved. The presented calculation method provides a basis for studying the nonlinear dynamic behavior of a general rotor-bearing system.

  17. Printability of calcium phosphate: calcium sulfate powders for the application of tissue engineered bone scaffolds using the 3D printing technique.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zuoxin; Buchanan, Fraser; Mitchell, Christina; Dunne, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    In this study, calcium phosphate (CaP) powders were blended with a three-dimensional printing (3DP) calcium sulfate (CaSO4)-based powder and the resulting composite powders were printed with a water-based binder using the 3DP technology. Application of a water-based binder ensured the manufacture of CaP:CaSO4 constructs on a reliable and repeatable basis, without long term damage of the printhead. Printability of CaP:CaSO4 powders was quantitatively assessed by investigating the key 3DP process parameters, i.e. in-process powder bed packing, drop penetration behavior and the quality of printed solid constructs. Effects of particle size, CaP:CaSO4 ratio and CaP powder type on the 3DP process were considered. The drop penetration technique was used to reliably identify powder formulations that could be potentially used for the application of tissue engineered bone scaffolds using the 3DP technique. Significant improvements (p<0.05) in the 3DP process parameters were found for CaP (30-110 μm):CaSO4 powders compared to CaP (<20 μm):CaSO4 powders. Higher compressive strength was obtained for the powders with the higher CaP:CaSO4 ratio. Hydroxyapatite (HA):CaSO4 powders showed better results than beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP):CaSO4 powders. Solid and porous constructs were manufactured using the 3DP technique from the optimized CaP:CaSO4 powder formulations. High-quality printed constructs were manufactured, which exhibited appropriate green compressive strength and a high level of printing accuracy.

  18. Ames Lab 101: Real-Time 3D Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Song

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory scientist Song Zhang explains his real-time 3-D imaging technology. The technique can be used to create high-resolution, real-time, precise, 3-D images for use in healthcare, security, and entertainment applications.

  19. Ames Lab 101: Real-Time 3D Imaging

    ScienceCinema

    Zhang, Song

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory scientist Song Zhang explains his real-time 3-D imaging technology. The technique can be used to create high-resolution, real-time, precise, 3-D images for use in healthcare, security, and entertainment applications.

  20. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  1. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  2. 3D structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, William M.; Goodwin, Paul C.

    2011-03-01

    Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy achieves double the lateral and axial resolution of wide-field microscopy, using conventional fluorescent dyes, proteins and sample preparation techniques. A three-dimensional interference-fringe pattern excites the fluorescence, filling in the "missing cone" of the wide field optical transfer function, thereby enabling axial (z) discrimination. The pattern acts as a spatial carrier frequency that mixes with the higher spatial frequency components of the image, which usually succumb to the diffraction limit. The fluorescence image encodes the high frequency content as a down-mixed, moiré-like pattern. A series of images is required, wherein the 3D pattern is shifted and rotated, providing down-mixed data for a system of linear equations. Super-resolution is obtained by solving these equations. The speed with which the image series can be obtained can be a problem for the microscopy of living cells. Challenges include pattern-switching speeds, optical efficiency, wavefront quality and fringe contrast, fringe pitch optimization, and polarization issues. We will review some recent developments in 3D-SIM hardware with the goal of super-resolved z-stacks of motile cells.

  3. A Reverse Engineering method for 3d parametric modeling of geometries based on processing of laser scanning data and a sweep technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varitis, E.

    2016-11-01

    A Reverse Engineering (RE) method for parametric modelling is presented in this paper. According to this method laser scanning data are processed by means of an algorithm and a parametric geometry is produced. The algorithm generates a spline used as a driving curve for a 2D profile, both approximated from the point cloud data, with the final geometry being produced through with a sweep based technique. The method was applied to digitize a commercial product, a bottle, and the geometry was reconstructed at high accuracy and surface quality. Finally the results of the proposed method were compared with auto surfacing from *.stl files and with surfaces generated by means of sweep commands without converting curves to splines.

  4. A Correction Scheme for Thermal Conductivity Measurement Using the Comparative Cut-bar Technique Based on a 3D Numerical Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas W. Marshall; Changhu Xing; Charles Folsom; Colby Jensen; Heng Ban

    2014-05-01

    As an important factor affecting the accuracy of the thermal conductivity measurement, systematic (bias) error in the guarded comparative axial heat flow (cut-bar) method was mostly neglected by previous researches. This bias is due primarily to the thermal conductivity mismatch between sample and meter bars (reference), which is common for a sample of unknown thermal conductivity. A correction scheme, based on a finite element simulation of the measurement system, was proposed to reduce the magnitude of the overall measurement uncertainty. This scheme was experimentally validated by applying corrections on four types of sample measurements in which the specimen thermal conductivity is much smaller, slightly smaller, equal and much larger than that of the meter bar. As an alternative to the optimum guarding technique proposed before, the correction scheme can be used to minimize uncertainty contribution from the measurement system with non-optimal guarding conditions. It is especially necessary for large thermal conductivity mismatches between sample and meter bars.

  5. Application of k- and q-space encoding NMR techniques on granular media in a 3D model fluidized bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Silke; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2006-02-01

    A combination of PFG-NMR imaging and velocity encoding methods was applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of a bed of poppy seeds subjected to air flow, representing a model setup for fluidized bed reactors. The particle motion is described both from a statistical point of view, by determining propagators and dispersion coefficients representing an average over the whole bed volume, as well as combined with spatial resolution by generating velocity maps. Velocity images of different horizontal slices in the bed confirm the notion of a toroidal particle flow pattern inside the shallow granular bed. Despite the need of considerable averaging due to the random motion of the relatively few particles in the bed, quantitative velocity images and statistical information about the random particle motion can be obtained from monitoring the fluid component in the seeds by conventional spin-echo techniques.

  6. 3D scene reconstruction based on 3D laser point cloud combining UAV images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huiyun; Yan, Yangyang; Zhang, Xitong; Wu, Zhenzhen

    2016-03-01

    It is a big challenge capturing and modeling 3D information of the built environment. A number of techniques and technologies are now in use. These include GPS, and photogrammetric application and also remote sensing applications. The experiment uses multi-source data fusion technology for 3D scene reconstruction based on the principle of 3D laser scanning technology, which uses the laser point cloud data as the basis and Digital Ortho-photo Map as an auxiliary, uses 3DsMAX software as a basic tool for building three-dimensional scene reconstruction. The article includes data acquisition, data preprocessing, 3D scene construction. The results show that the 3D scene has better truthfulness, and the accuracy of the scene meet the need of 3D scene construction.

  7. Real-time monitoring of 3D cell culture using a 3D capacitance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Han, Nalae; Lee, Rimi; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Yong-Beom; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa

    2016-03-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures have recently received attention because they represent a more physiologically relevant environment compared to conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. However, 2D-based imaging techniques or cell sensors are insufficient for real-time monitoring of cellular behavior in 3D cell culture. Here, we report investigations conducted with a 3D capacitance cell sensor consisting of vertically aligned pairs of electrodes. When GFP-expressing human breast cancer cells (GFP-MCF-7) encapsulated in alginate hydrogel were cultured in a 3D cell culture system, cellular activities, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis at different heights, could be monitored non-invasively and in real-time by measuring the change in capacitance with the 3D capacitance sensor. Moreover, we were able to monitor cell migration of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with our 3D capacitance sensor.

  8. 3D Fast Spin Echo With Out-of-Slab Cancellation: A Technique for High-Resolution Structural Imaging of Trabecular Bone at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Magland, Jeremy F.; Rajapakse, Chamith S.; Wright, Alexander C.; Acciavatti, Raymond; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2016-01-01

    Spin-echo-based pulse sequences are desirable for the application of high-resolution imaging of trabecular bone but tend to involve high-power deposition. Increased availability of ultrahigh field scanners has opened new possibilities for imaging with increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficiency, but many pulse sequences that are standard at 1.5 and 3 T exceed specific absorption rate limits at 7 T. A modified, reduced specific absorption rate, three-dimensional, fast spin-echo pulse sequence optimized specifically for in vivo trabecular bone imaging at 7 T is introduced. The sequence involves a slab-selective excitation pulse, low-power nonselective refocusing pulses, and phase cycling to cancel undesired out-of-slab signal. In vivo images of the distal tibia were acquired using the technique at 1.5, 3, and 7 T field strengths, and SNR was found to increase at least linearly using receive coils of identical geometry. Signal dependence on the choice of refocusing flip angles in the echo train was analyzed experimentally and theoretically by combining the signal from hundreds of coherence pathways, and it is shown that a significant specific absorption rate reduction can be achieved with negligible SNR loss. PMID:20187181

  9. TH-C-12A-11: Target Correlation of a 3D Surface Surrogate for Left Breast Irradiation Using the Respiratory-Gated Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, Y; Walston, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of 3D optical surface imaging as a new surrogate for respiratory motion gated deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique for left breast cancer patients. Methods: Patients with left-sided breast cancer after lumpectomy or mastectomy were selected as candidates for DIBH technique for their external beam radiation therapy. Treatment plans were created on both free breathing (FB) and DIBH CTs to determine whether DIBH was beneficial in reducing heart doses. The Real-time Position Management (RPM) system was used to acquire patient's breathing trace during DIBH CT acquisition and treatment delivery. The reference 3D surface models from FB and DIBH CTs were generated and transferred to the “AlignRT” system for patient positioning and real-time treatment monitoring. MV Cine images were acquired for each beam as quality assurance for intra-fractional position verification. The chest wall excursions measured on these images were used to define the actual target position during treatment, and to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of RPM and AlignRT. Results: Reduction in heart dose can be achieved for left-sided breast patients using DIBH. Results showed that RPM has poor correlation with target position, as determined by the MV Cine imaging. This indicates that RPM may not be an adequate surrogate in defining the breath-hold level when used alone. Alternatively, the AlignRT surface imaging demonstrated a better correlation with the actual CW excursion during DIBH. Both the vertical and magnitude real-time deltas (RTDs) reported by AlignRT can be used as the gating parameter, with a recommend threshold of ±3 mm and 5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: 3D optical surface imaging serves as a superior target surrogate for the left breast treatment when compared to RPM. Working together with the realtime MV Cine imaging, they ensure accurate patient setup and dose delivery, while minimizing the imaging dose to patients.

  10. Extracting full-field dynamic strain on a wind turbine rotor subjected to arbitrary excitations using 3D point tracking and a modal expansion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baqersad, Javad; Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Health monitoring of rotating structures such as wind turbines and helicopter rotors is generally performed using conventional sensors that provide a limited set of data at discrete locations near or on the hub. These sensors usually provide no data on the blades or inside them where failures might occur. Within this paper, an approach was used to extract the full-field dynamic strain on a wind turbine assembly subject to arbitrary loading conditions. A three-bladed wind turbine having 2.3-m long blades was placed in a semi-built-in boundary condition using a hub, a machining chuck, and a steel block. For three different test cases, the turbine was excited using (1) pluck testing, (2) random impacts on blades with three impact hammers, and (3) random excitation by a mechanical shaker. The response of the structure to the excitations was measured using three-dimensional point tracking. A pair of high-speed cameras was used to measure displacement of optical targets on the structure when the blades were vibrating. The measured displacements at discrete locations were expanded and applied to the finite element model of the structure to extract the full-field dynamic strain. The results of the paper show an excellent correlation between the strain predicted using the proposed approach and the strain measured with strain-gages for each of the three loading conditions. The approach used in this paper to predict the strain showed higher accuracy than the digital image correlation technique. The new expansion approach is able to extract dynamic strain all over the entire structure, even inside the structure beyond the line of sight of the measurement system. Because the method is based on a non-contacting measurement approach, it can be readily applied to a variety of structures having different boundary and operating conditions, including rotating blades.

  11. 3D imaging in forensic odontology.

    PubMed

    Evans, Sam; Jones, Carl; Plassmann, Peter

    2010-06-16

    This paper describes the investigation of a new 3D capture method for acquiring and subsequent forensic analysis of bite mark injuries on human skin. When documenting bite marks with standard 2D cameras errors in photographic technique can occur if best practice is not followed. Subsequent forensic analysis of the mark is problematic when a 3D structure is recorded into a 2D space. Although strict guidelines (BAFO) exist, these are time-consuming to follow and, due to their complexity, may produce errors. A 3D image capture and processing system might avoid the problems resulting from the 2D reduction process, simplifying the guidelines and reducing errors. Proposed Solution: a series of experiments are described in this paper to demonstrate that the potential of a 3D system might produce suitable results. The experiments tested precision and accuracy of the traditional 2D and 3D methods. A 3D image capture device minimises the amount of angular distortion, therefore such a system has the potential to create more robust forensic evidence for use in courts. A first set of experiments tested and demonstrated which method of forensic analysis creates the least amount of intra-operator error. A second set tested and demonstrated which method of image capture creates the least amount of inter-operator error and visual distortion. In a third set the effects of angular distortion on 2D and 3D methods of image capture were evaluated.

  12. A study on the flip angle for an optimal T1-weighted image based on the 3D-THRIVE MRI technique: Focusing on the detection of a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the optimal flip angle (FA) for a T1-weighted image in the detection of a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A 3D-T1-weighted high-resolution isotropic volume examination (THRIVE) technique was used to determine the dependence of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) on the change in FA. This study targeted 40 liver cancer patients (25 men and 15 women aged 50 to 70 years with a mean age of 60.32 ± 6.2 years) who visited this hospital to undergo an abdominal MRI examination from January to June 2013. A 3.0 Tesla MRI machine (Philips, Medical System, Achieva) and a MRI receiver coil for data reception with a 16-channel multicoil were used in this study. The THRIVE (repetition time (TR): 8.1 ms, echo time (TE): 3.7 ms, matrix: 172 × 172, slice thickness: 4 mm, gap: 2 mm, field of view (FOV): 350 mm, and band width (BW): 380.1 Hz) technique was applied as a pulse sequence. The time required for the examination was 19 seconds, and the breath-hold technique was used. Axial images were obtained at five FAs: 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25°. The signal intensities of the liver, the lesion and the background noise were measured based on the acquired images before the SNR and the CNR were calculated. To evaluate the image at the FA, we used SPSS for Windows ver. 17.0 to conduct a one-way ANOVA test. A Bonferroni test was conducted as a post-hoc test. The SNRs of the hemorrhagic HCC in the 3D-THRIVE technique were 35.50 ± 4.12, 97.00 ± 10.24, 66.09 ± 7.29, 53.84 ± 5.43, and 42.92 ± 5.11 for FAs of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°, respectively (p = 0.0430), whereas the corresponding CNRs were 30.50 ± 3.84, 43.00 ± 5.42, 36.54 ± 4.09, 32.30 ± 2.79, and 31.69 ± 3.21 (p = 0.0003). At a small FA of 10, the SNR and the CNR showed the highest values. As the FA was increased, the SNR and the CNR values showed a decreasing tendency. In conclusion, the optimal T1-weighted image FA should be set to 10° to detect a HCC by using the 3D

  13. A comparison of 3D poly(ε-caprolactone) tissue engineering scaffolds produced with conventional and additive manufacturing techniques by means of quantitative analysis of SR μ-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, F.; Intranuovo, F.; Mohammadi, S.; Domingos, M.; Favia, P.; Tromba, G.

    2013-07-01

    The technique used to produce a 3D tissue engineering (TE) scaffold is of fundamental importance in order to guarantee its proper morphological characteristics. An accurate assessment of the resulting structural properties is therefore crucial in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the produced scaffold. Synchrotron radiation (SR) computed microtomography (μ-CT) combined with further image analysis seems to be one of the most effective techniques to this aim. However, a quantitative assessment of the morphological parameters directly from the reconstructed images is a non trivial task. This study considers two different poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds fabricated with a conventional technique (Solvent Casting Particulate Leaching, SCPL) and an additive manufacturing (AM) technique (BioCell Printing), respectively. With the first technique it is possible to produce scaffolds with random, non-regular, rounded pore geometry. The AM technique instead is able to produce scaffolds with square-shaped interconnected pores of regular dimension. Therefore, the final morphology of the AM scaffolds can be predicted and the resulting model can be used for the validation of the applied imaging and image analysis protocols. It is here reported a SR μ-CT image analysis approach that is able to effectively and accurately reveal the differences in the pore- and throat-size distributions as well as connectivity of both AM and SCPL scaffolds.

  14. 3D-printed bioanalytical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Gregory W.; Satterwhite-Warden, Jennifer E.; Kadimisetty, Karteek; Rusling, James F.

    2016-07-01

    While 3D printing technologies first appeared in the 1980s, prohibitive costs, limited materials, and the relatively small number of commercially available printers confined applications mainly to prototyping for manufacturing purposes. As technologies, printer cost, materials, and accessibility continue to improve, 3D printing has found widespread implementation in research and development in many disciplines due to ease-of-use and relatively fast design-to-object workflow. Several 3D printing techniques have been used to prepare devices such as milli- and microfluidic flow cells for analyses of cells and biomolecules as well as interfaces that enable bioanalytical measurements using cellphones. This review focuses on preparation and applications of 3D-printed bioanalytical devices.

  15. SU-E-T-451: Hybrid-VMAT: A Novel Technique Combining VMAT and 3D in Planning Whole Breast Radiotherapy with a Simultaneously-Integrated Boost (WBRT+SIB)

    SciTech Connect

    Guida, K; Qamar, K; Thompson, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The RTOG 1005 trial offered a hypofractionated arm in delivering WBRT+SIB. Traditionally, treatments were planned at our institution using field-in-field (FiF) tangents with a concurrent 3D conformal boost. With the availability of VMAT, it is possible that a hybrid VMAT-3D planning technique could provide another avenue in treating WBRT+SIB. Methods: A retrospective study of nine patients previously treated using RTOG 1005 guidelines was performed to compare FiF+3D plans with the hybrid technique. A combination of static tangents and partial VMAT arcs were used in base-dose optimization. The hybrid plans were optimized to deliver 4005cGy to the breast PTVeval and 4800cGy to the lumpectomy PTVeval over 15 fractions. Plans were optimized to meet the planning goals dictated by RTOG 1005. Results: Hybrid plans yielded similar coverage of breast and lumpectomy PTVs (average D95 of 4013cGy compared to 3990cGy for conventional), while reducing the volume of high dose within the breast; the average D30 and D50 for the hybrid technique were 4517cGy and 4288cGy, compared to 4704cGy and 4377cGy for conventional planning. Hybrid plans increased conformity as well, yielding CI95% values of 1.22 and 1.54 for breast and lumpectomy PTVeval volumes; in contrast, conventional plans averaged 1.49 and 2.27, respectively. The nearby organs at risk (OARs) received more low dose with the hybrid plans due to low dose spray from the partial arcs, but all hybrid plans did meet the acceptable constraints, at a minimum, from the protocol. Treatment planning time was also reduced, as plans were inversely optimized (VMAT) rather than forward optimized. Conclusion: Hybrid-VMAT could be a solution in delivering WB+SIB, as plans yield very conformal treatment plans and maintain clinical standards in OAR sparing. For treating breast cancer patients with a simultaneously-integrated boost, Hybrid-VMAT offers superiority in dosimetric conformity and planning time as compared to FIF

  16. Imaging detection of new HCCs in cirrhotic patients treated with different techniques: Comparison of conventional US, spiral CT, and 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced US with the Navigator technique (Nav 3D CEUS)().

    PubMed

    Giangregorio, F; Comparato, G; Marinone, M G; Di Stasi, M; Sbolli, G; Aragona, G; Tansini, P; Fornari, F

    2009-03-01

    Sommario INTRODUZIONE: Il sistema “Navigator” di Esaote consente di ottenere ricostruzioni 3-D di tutto il fegato (corrette volumetricamente da un sistema di guida) mediante singola acquisizione con CEUS (mediante scansione perpendicolare all'asse lungo del fegato, per una completa acquisizione 2-D del suo asse corto) e sovrappone tali ricostruzioni 3-D con quelle ottenute con la TC. SCOPO: valutare la capacità di tale sistema di diagnosticare nuovi HCC rispetto all'US e alla TC in una popolazione di HCC su cirrosi precedentemente trattati con varie metodiche. MATERIALI E METODI: Settantadue cirrotici con pregressi HCC (M/F: 38/34; tutti HCV +vi, Child A/B: 58/14, con detection di 49 nuovi noduli (N) in 34 pazienti; 10 nuovi HCC multinodulari (NMulti); 6 riprese locali di malattia (Ri) in 4 pazienti (3 riprese singole, in un paziente tre noduli con ripresa di malattia); 47 HCC trattati efficacemente (neg) in 22 pazienti + 2 pazienti con HCC multinodulare senza segni di ripresa (neg-Multi) sono stati sottoposti a 100 esami (1 esame: 48 pazienti; 2 esami: 20 pazienti; 3 esami: 4 pazienti) dal 1 novembre 2006 al novembre 2007. La Nav 3D CEUS è stata eseguita con SonoVue (BR1; Bracco) e con l'ecografo Esaote MPX collegato a un sistema “Navigator” con software di ricostruzione 3-D dedicato. La TC spirale di controllo è stata eseguita entro 30 giorni dall'esecuzione di Nav 3D CEUS. Sono stati valutati sensibilità, specificità, accuratezza diagnostica (ODA), valore predittivo positivo (PPV) e negativo (NPV). RISULTATI: La diagnosi finale fu: 34 pazienti con 49 nuove lesioni (N), 10 con HCC multiN e 6 recidive loco-regionali in 4 pazienti; 47 noduli in 24 pazienti senza nuove lesioni durante il follow-up. Gli US hanno ottenuto: 29 N (+5 multinodularN e 3 LR), 20 falsi negativi (+5 Nmulti e 3 LR) (sensibilità: 59,2, specificità: 100%; accuratezza diagnostica: 73;6; VPP: 100; VPN: 70, 1); la TC spirale ha ottenuto: 42 N (+9 multinodularN e 7 LR), 7 falsi

  17. 3D bioprinting and its in vivo applications.

    PubMed

    Hong, Nhayoung; Yang, Gi-Hoon; Lee, JaeHwan; Kim, GeunHyung

    2017-01-20

    The purpose of 3D bioprinting technology is to design and create functional 3D tissues or organs in situ for in vivo applications. 3D cell-printing, or additive biomanufacturing, allows the selection of biomaterials and cells (bioink), and the fabrication of cell-laden structures in high resolution. 3D cell-printed structures have also been used for applications such as research models, drug delivery and discovery, and toxicology. Recently, numerous attempts have been made to fabricate tissues and organs by using various 3D printing techniques. However, challenges such as vascularization are yet to be solved. This article reviews the most commonly used 3D cell-printing techniques with their advantages and drawbacks. Furthermore, up-to-date achievements of 3D bioprinting in in vivo applications are introduced, and prospects for the future of 3D cell-printing technology are discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017.

  18. 3-D capaciflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A capacitive type proximity sensor having improved range and sensitivity between a surface of arbitrary shape and an intruding object in the vicinity of the surface having one or more outer conductors on the surface which serve as capacitive sensing elements shaped to conform to the underlying surface of a machine. Each sensing element is backed by a reflector driven at the same voltage and in phase with the corresponding capacitive sensing element. Each reflector, in turn, serves to reflect the electric field lines of the capacitive sensing element away from the surface of the machine on which the sensor is mounted so as to enhance the component constituted by the capacitance between the sensing element and an intruding object as a fraction of the total capacitance between the sensing element and ground. Each sensing element and corresponding reflecting element are electrically driven in phase, and the capacitance between the sensing elements individually and the sensed object is determined using circuitry known to the art. The reflector may be shaped to shield the sensor and to shape its field of view, in effect providing an electrostatic lensing effect. Sensors and reflectors may be fabricated using a variety of known techniques such as vapor deposition, sputtering, painting, plating, or deformation of flexible films, to provide conformal coverage of surfaces of arbitrary shape.

  19. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  20. Spherical 3D isotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Future cosmological surveys will provide 3D large scale structure maps with large sky coverage, for which a 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) analysis in spherical coordinates is natural. Wavelets are particularly well-suited to the analysis and denoising of cosmological data, but a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform does not currently exist to analyse spherical 3D data. Aims: The aim of this paper is to present a new formalism for a spherical 3D isotropic wavelet, i.e. one based on the SFB decomposition of a 3D field and accompany the formalism with a public code to perform wavelet transforms. Methods: We describe a new 3D isotropic spherical wavelet decomposition based on the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) described in Starck et al. (2006). We also present a new fast discrete spherical Fourier-Bessel transform (DSFBT) based on both a discrete Bessel transform and the HEALPIX angular pixelisation scheme. We test the 3D wavelet transform and as a toy-application, apply a denoising algorithm in wavelet space to the Virgo large box cosmological simulations and find we can successfully remove noise without much loss to the large scale structure. Results: We have described a new spherical 3D isotropic wavelet transform, ideally suited to analyse and denoise future 3D spherical cosmological surveys, which uses a novel DSFBT. We illustrate its potential use for denoising using a toy model. All the algorithms presented in this paper are available for download as a public code called MRS3D at http://jstarck.free.fr/mrs3d.html

  1. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  2. 3D Viscoelastic traction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Toyjanova, Jennet; Hannen, Erin; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Darling, Eric M; Henann, David L; Franck, Christian

    2014-10-28

    Native cell-material interactions occur on materials differing in their structural composition, chemistry, and physical compliance. While the last two decades have shown the importance of traction forces during cell-material interactions, they have been almost exclusively presented on purely elastic in vitro materials. Yet, most bodily tissue materials exhibit some level of viscoelasticity, which could play an important role in how cells sense and transduce tractions. To expand the realm of cell traction measurements and to encompass all materials from elastic to viscoelastic, this paper presents a general, and comprehensive approach for quantifying 3D cell tractions in viscoelastic materials. This methodology includes the experimental characterization of the time-dependent material properties for any viscoelastic material with the subsequent mathematical implementation of the determined material model into a 3D traction force microscopy (3D TFM) framework. Utilizing this new 3D viscoelastic TFM (3D VTFM) approach, we quantify the influence of viscosity on the overall material traction calculations and quantify the error associated with omitting time-dependent material effects, as is the case for all other TFM formulations. We anticipate that the 3D VTFM technique will open up new avenues of cell-material investigations on even more physiologically relevant time-dependent materials including collagen and fibrin gels.

  3. Spatioangular Prefiltering for Multiview 3D Displays.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, Vikas; Hirakawa, Keigo; Zwicker, Matthias; Nguyen, Truong

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we analyze the reproduction of light fields on multiview 3D displays. A three-way interaction between the input light field signal (which is often aliased), the joint spatioangular sampling grids of multiview 3D displays, and the interview light leakage in modern multiview 3D displays is characterized in the joint spatioangular frequency domain. Reconstruction of light fields by all physical 3D displays is prone to light leakage, which means that the reconstruction low-pass filter implemented by the display is too broad in the angular domain. As a result, 3D displays excessively attenuate angular frequencies. Our analysis shows that this reduces sharpness of the images shown in the 3D displays. In this paper, stereoscopic image recovery is recast as a problem of joint spatioangular signal reconstruction. The combination of the 3D display point spread function and human visual system provides the narrow-band low-pass filter which removes spectral replicas in the reconstructed light field on the multiview display. The nonideality of this filter is corrected with the proposed prefiltering. The proposed light field reconstruction method performs light field antialiasing as well as angular sharpening to compensate for the nonideal response of the 3D display. The union of cosets approach which has been used earlier by others is employed here to model the nonrectangular spatioangular sampling grids on a multiview display in a generic fashion. We confirm the effectiveness of our approach in simulation and in physical hardware, and demonstrate improvement over existing techniques.

  4. Effect of viewing distance on 3D fatigue caused by viewing mobile 3D content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Sungchul; Lee, Dong-Su; Park, Min-Chul; Yano, Sumio

    2013-05-01

    With an advent of autostereoscopic display technique and increased needs for smart phones, there has been a significant growth in mobile TV markets. The rapid growth in technical, economical, and social aspects has encouraged 3D TV manufacturers to apply 3D rendering technology to mobile devices so that people have more opportunities to come into contact with many 3D content anytime and anywhere. Even if the mobile 3D technology leads to the current market growth, there is an important thing to consider for consistent development and growth in the display market. To put it briefly, human factors linked to mobile 3D viewing should be taken into consideration before developing mobile 3D technology. Many studies have investigated whether mobile 3D viewing causes undesirable biomedical effects such as motion sickness and visual fatigue, but few have examined main factors adversely affecting human health. Viewing distance is considered one of the main factors to establish optimized viewing environments from a viewer's point of view. Thus, in an effort to determine human-friendly viewing environments, this study aims to investigate the effect of viewing distance on human visual system when exposing to mobile 3D environments. Recording and analyzing brainwaves before and after watching mobile 3D content, we explore how viewing distance affects viewing experience from physiological and psychological perspectives. Results obtained in this study are expected to provide viewing guidelines for viewers, help ensure viewers against undesirable 3D effects, and lead to make gradual progress towards a human-friendly mobile 3D viewing.

  5. 3-D imaging of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Runge, V M; Gelblum, D Y; Wood, M L

    1990-01-01

    3-D gradient echo techniques, and in particular FLASH, represent a significant advance in MR imaging strategy allowing thin section, high resolution imaging through a large region of interest. Anatomical areas of application include the brain, spine, and extremities, although the majority of work to date has been performed in the brain. Superior T1 contrast and thus sensitivity to the presence of GdDTPA is achieved with 3-D FLASH when compared to 2-D spin echo technique. There is marked arterial and venous enhancement following Gd DTPA administration on 3-D FLASH, a less common finding with 2-D spin echo. Enhancement of the falx and tentorium is also more prominent. From a single data acquisition, requiring less than 11 min of scan time, high resolution reformatted sagittal, coronal, and axial images can obtained in addition to sections in any arbitrary plane. Tissue segmentation techniques can be applied and lesions displayed in three dimensions. These results may lead to the replacement of 2-D spin echo with 3-D FLASH for high resolution T1-weighted MR imaging of the CNS, particularly in the study of mass lesions and structural anomalies. The application of similar T2-weighted gradient echo techniques may follow, however the signal-to-noise ratio which can be achieved remains a potential limitation.

  6. Three-dimensional (3D) printing of mouse primary hepatocytes to generate 3D hepatic structure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yohan; Kang, Kyojin; Jeong, Jaemin; Paik, Seung Sam; Kim, Ji Sook; Park, Su A; Kim, Wan Doo; Park, Jisun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The major problem in producing artificial livers is that primary hepatocytes cannot be cultured for many days. Recently, 3-dimensional (3D) printing technology draws attention and this technology regarded as a useful tool for current cell biology. By using the 3D bio-printing, these problems can be resolved. Methods To generate 3D bio-printed structures (25 mm × 25 mm), cells-alginate constructs were fabricated by 3D bio-printing system. Mouse primary hepatocytes were isolated from the livers of 6–8 weeks old mice by a 2-step collagenase method. Samples of 4 × 107 hepatocytes with 80%–90% viability were printed with 3% alginate solution, and cultured with well-defined culture medium for primary hepatocytes. To confirm functional ability of hepatocytes cultured on 3D alginate scaffold, we conducted quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence with hepatic marker genes. Results Isolated primary hepatocytes were printed with alginate. The 3D printed hepatocytes remained alive for 14 days. Gene expression levels of Albumin, HNF-4α and Foxa3 were gradually increased in the 3D structures. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that the primary hepatocytes produced hepatic-specific proteins over the same period of time. Conclusion Our research indicates that 3D bio-printing technique can be used for long-term culture of primary hepatocytes. It can therefore be used for drug screening and as a potential method of producing artificial livers. PMID:28203553

  7. Scalable Multi-Platform Distribution of Spatial 3d Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimke, J.; Hagedorn, B.; Döllner, J.

    2013-09-01

    Virtual 3D city models provide powerful user interfaces for communication of 2D and 3D geoinformation. Providing high quality visualization of massive 3D geoinformation in a scalable, fast, and cost efficient manner is still a challenging task. Especially for mobile and web-based system environments, software and hardware configurations of target systems differ significantly. This makes it hard to provide fast, visually appealing renderings of 3D data throughout a variety of platforms and devices. Current mobile or web-based solutions for 3D visualization usually require raw 3D scene data such as triangle meshes together with textures delivered from server to client, what makes them strongly limited in terms of size and complexity of the models they can handle. In this paper, we introduce a new approach for provisioning of massive, virtual 3D city models on different platforms namely web browsers, smartphones or tablets, by means of an interactive map assembled from artificial oblique image tiles. The key concept is to synthesize such images of a virtual 3D city model by a 3D rendering service in a preprocessing step. This service encapsulates model handling and 3D rendering techniques for high quality visualization of massive 3D models. By generating image tiles using this service, the 3D rendering process is shifted from the client side, which provides major advantages: (a) The complexity of the 3D city model data is decoupled from data transfer complexity (b) the implementation of client applications is simplified significantly as 3D rendering is encapsulated on server side (c) 3D city models can be easily deployed for and used by a large number of concurrent users, leading to a high degree of scalability of the overall approach. All core 3D rendering techniques are performed on a dedicated 3D rendering server, and thin-client applications can be compactly implemented for various devices and platforms.

  8. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  9. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  10. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  11. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  12. 3D liver surgery simulation: computer-assisted surgical planning with 3D simulation software and 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Yukio; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2017-03-27

    To perform accurate hepatectomy without injury, it is necessary to understand the anatomical relationship among the branches of Glisson's sheath, hepatic veins, and tumor. In Japan, three-dimensional (3D) preoperative simulation for liver surgery is becoming increasingly common, and liver 3D modeling and 3D hepatectomy simulation by 3D analysis software for liver surgery have been covered by universal healthcare insurance since 2012. Herein, we review the history of virtual hepatectomy using computer-aided surgery (CAS) and our research to date, and we discuss the future prospects of CAS. We have used the SYNAPSE VINCENT medical imaging system (Fujifilm Medical, Tokyo, Japan) for 3D visualization and virtual resection of the liver since 2010. We developed a novel fusion imaging technique combining 3D computed tomography (CT) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The fusion image enables us to easily visualize anatomic relationships among the hepatic arteries, portal veins, bile duct, and tumor in the hepatic hilum. In 2013, we developed an original software, called Liversim, that enables real-time deformation of the liver using physical simulation, and a randomized control trial has recently been conducted to evaluate the use of Liversim and SYNAPSE VINCENT for preoperative simulation and planning. Furthermore, we developed a novel hollow 3D-printed liver model whose surface is covered with frames. This model is useful for safe liver resection, has better visibility, and the production cost is reduced to one-third of a previous model. Preoperative simulation and navigation with CAS in liver resection are expected to help planning and conducting a surgery and surgical education. Thus, a novel CAS system will contribute to not only the performance of reliable hepatectomy but also to surgical education.

  13. 3D vision system assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzaniti, J. Larry; Edmondson, Richard; Vaden, Justin; Hyatt, Bryan; Chenault, David B.; Kingston, David; Geulen, Vanilynmae; Newell, Scott; Pettijohn, Brad

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the development of a 3D vision system consisting of a flat panel stereoscopic display and auto-converging stereo camera and an assessment of the system's use for robotic driving, manipulation, and surveillance operations. The 3D vision system was integrated onto a Talon Robot and Operator Control Unit (OCU) such that direct comparisons of the performance of a number of test subjects using 2D and 3D vision systems were possible. A number of representative scenarios were developed to determine which tasks benefited most from the added depth perception and to understand when the 3D vision system hindered understanding of the scene. Two tests were conducted at Fort Leonard Wood, MO with noncommissioned officers ranked Staff Sergeant and Sergeant First Class. The scenarios; the test planning, approach and protocols; the data analysis; and the resulting performance assessment of the 3D vision system are reported.

  14. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  15. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  16. 3D Modeling Engine Representation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Prescott; Ramprasad Sampath; Curtis Smith; Timothy Yang

    2014-09-01

    Computers have been used for 3D modeling and simulation, but only recently have computational resources been able to give realistic results in a reasonable time frame for large complex models. This summary report addressed the methods, techniques, and resources used to develop a 3D modeling engine to represent risk analysis simulation for advanced small modular reactor structures and components. The simulations done for this evaluation were focused on external events, specifically tsunami floods, for a hypothetical nuclear power facility on a coastline.

  17. Acquisition and applications of 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterian, Paul; Mocanu, Elena

    2007-08-01

    The moiré fringes method and their analysis up to medical and entertainment applications are discussed in this paper. We describe the procedure of capturing 3D images with an Inspeck Camera that is a real-time 3D shape acquisition system based on structured light techniques. The method is a high-resolution one. After processing the images, using computer, we can use the data for creating laser fashionable objects by engraving them with a Q-switched Nd:YAG. In medical field we mention the plastic surgery and the replacement of X-Ray especially in pediatric use.

  18. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  19. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  20. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  1. Self assembled structures for 3D integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Madhav

    Three dimensional (3D) micro-scale structures attached to a silicon substrate have various applications in microelectronics. However, formation of 3D structures using conventional micro-fabrication techniques are not efficient and require precise control of processing parameters. Self assembly is a method for creating 3D structures that takes advantage of surface area minimization phenomena. Solder based self assembly (SBSA), the subject of this dissertation, uses solder as a facilitator in the formation of 3D structures from 2D patterns. Etching a sacrificial layer underneath a portion of the 2D pattern allows the solder reflow step to pull those areas out of the substrate plane resulting in a folded 3D structure. Initial studies using the SBSA method demonstrated low yields in the formation of five different polyhedra. The failures in folding were primarily attributed to nonuniform solder deposition on the underlying metal pads. The dip soldering method was analyzed and subsequently refined. A modified dip soldering process provided improved yield among the polyhedra. Solder bridging referred as joining of solder deposited on different metal patterns in an entity influenced the folding mechanism. In general, design parameters such as small gap-spacings and thick metal pads were found to favor solder bridging for all patterns studied. Two types of soldering: face and edge soldering were analyzed. Face soldering refers to the application of solder on the entire metal face. Edge soldering indicates application of solder only on the edges of the metal face. Mechanical grinding showed that face soldered SBSA structures were void free and robust in nature. In addition, the face soldered 3D structures provide a consistent heat resistant solder standoff height that serve as attachments in the integration of dissimilar electronic technologies. Face soldered 3D structures were developed on the underlying conducting channel to determine the thermo-electric reliability of

  2. 3D Simulation: Microgravity Environments and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Steve L.; Dischinger, Charles; Estes, Samantha; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most, if not all, 3-D and Virtual Reality (VR) software programs are designed for one-G gravity applications. Space environments simulations require gravity effects of one one-thousandth to one one-million of that of the Earth's surface (10(exp -3) - 10(exp -6) G), thus one must be able to generate simulations that replicate those microgravity effects upon simulated astronauts. Unfortunately, the software programs utilized by the National Aeronautical and Space Administration does not have the ability to readily neutralize the one-G gravity effect. This pre-programmed situation causes the engineer or analysis difficulty during micro-gravity simulations. Therefore, microgravity simulations require special techniques or additional code in order to apply the power of 3D graphic simulation to space related applications. This paper discusses the problem and possible solutions to allow microgravity 3-D/VR simulations to be completed successfully without program code modifications.

  3. Impedance mammograph 3D phantom studies.

    PubMed

    Wtorek, J; Stelter, J; Nowakowski, A

    1999-04-20

    The results obtained using the Technical University of Gdansk Electroimpedance Mammograph (TUGEM) of a 3D phantom study are presented. The TUGEM system is briefly described. The hardware contains the measurement head and DSP-based identification modules controlled by a PC computer. A specially developed reconstruction algorithm, Regulated Correction Frequency Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (RCFART), is used to obtain 3D images. To visualize results, the Advance Visualization System (AVS) is used. It allows a powerful image processing on a fast workstation or on a high-performance computer. Results of three types of 3D conductivity perturbations used in the study (aluminum, Plexiglas, and cucumber) are shown. The relative volumes of perturbations less than 2% of the measurement chamber are easily evidenced.

  4. 3D Scan Systems Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave Blank) 2. REPORT DATE 5 Feb 98 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 3D Scan Systems Integration REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED...2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-1 298-102 [ EDO QUALITY W3PECTEDI DLA-ARN Final Report for US Defense Logistics Agency on DDFG-T2/P3: 3D...SCAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION Contract Number SPO100-95-D-1014 Contractor Ohio University Delivery Order # 0001 Delivery Order Title 3D Scan Systems

  5. Full-color holographic 3D printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Masami; Shigeta, Hiroaki; Nishihara, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Susumu; Ohyama, Nagaaki; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Iwata, Fujio

    2003-05-01

    A holographic 3D printer is a system that produces a direct hologram with full-parallax information using the 3-dimensional data of a subject from a computer. In this paper, we present a proposal for the reproduction of full-color images with the holographic 3D printer. In order to realize the 3-dimensional color image, we selected the 3 laser wavelength colors of red (λ=633nm), green (λ=533nm), and blue (λ=442nm), and we built a one-step optical system using a projection system and a liquid crystal display. The 3-dimensional color image is obtained by synthesizing in a 2D array the multiple exposure with these 3 wavelengths made on each 250mm elementary hologram, and moving recording medium on a x-y stage. For the natural color reproduction in the holographic 3D printer, we take the approach of the digital processing technique based on the color management technology. The matching between the input and output colors is performed by investigating first, the relation between the gray level transmittance of the LCD and the diffraction efficiency of the hologram and second, by measuring the color displayed by the hologram to establish a correlation. In our first experimental results a non-linear functional relation for single and multiple exposure of the three components were found. These results are the first step in the realization of a natural color 3D image produced by the holographic color 3D printer.

  6. 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues.

    PubMed

    Mandrycky, Christian; Wang, Zongjie; Kim, Keekyoung; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Bioprinting is a 3D fabrication technology used to precisely dispense cell-laden biomaterials for the construction of complex 3D functional living tissues or artificial organs. While still in its early stages, bioprinting strategies have demonstrated their potential use in regenerative medicine to generate a variety of transplantable tissues, including skin, cartilage, and bone. However, current bioprinting approaches still have technical challenges in terms of high-resolution cell deposition, controlled cell distributions, vascularization, and innervation within complex 3D tissues. While no one-size-fits-all approach to bioprinting has emerged, it remains an on-demand, versatile fabrication technique that may address the growing organ shortage as well as provide a high-throughput method for cell patterning at the micrometer scale for broad biomedical engineering applications. In this review, we introduce the basic principles, materials, integration strategies and applications of bioprinting. We also discuss the recent developments, current challenges and future prospects of 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues. Combined with recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell technologies, 3D-bioprinted tissue models could serve as an enabling platform for high-throughput predictive drug screening and more effective regenerative therapies.

  7. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  8. 3D Spray Droplet Distributions in Sneezes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Techet, Alexandra; Scharfman, Barry; Bourouiba, Lydia

    2015-11-01

    3D spray droplet clouds generated during human sneezing are investigated using the Synthetic Aperture Feature Extraction (SAFE) method, which relies on light field imaging (LFI) and synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing computational photographic techniques. An array of nine high-speed cameras are used to image sneeze droplets and tracked the droplets in 3D space and time (3D + T). An additional high-speed camera is utilized to track the motion of the head during sneezing. In the SAFE method, the raw images recorded by each camera in the array are preprocessed and binarized, simplifying post processing after image refocusing and enabling the extraction of feature sizes and positions in 3D + T. These binary images are refocused using either additive or multiplicative methods, combined with thresholding. Sneeze droplet centroids, radii, distributions and trajectories are determined and compared with existing data. The reconstructed 3D droplet centroids and radii enable a more complete understanding of the physical extent and fluid dynamics of sneeze ejecta. These measurements are important for understanding the infectious disease transmission potential of sneezes in various indoor environments.

  9. Reproducibility of 3D chromatin configuration reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Mark R.; Xiong, Hao; Capurso, Daniel; Vazquez, Mariel; Arsuaga, Javier

    2014-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of eukaryotic chromatin plays an important role in processes such as gene regulation and cancer-driving gene fusions. Observing or inferring this 3D structure at even modest resolutions had been problematic, since genomes are highly condensed and traditional assays are coarse. However, recently devised high-throughput molecular techniques have changed this situation. Notably, the development of a suite of chromatin conformation capture (CCC) assays has enabled elicitation of contacts—spatially close chromosomal loci—which have provided insights into chromatin architecture. Most analysis of CCC data has focused on the contact level, with less effort directed toward obtaining 3D reconstructions and evaluating the accuracy and reproducibility thereof. While questions of accuracy must be addressed experimentally, questions of reproducibility can be addressed statistically—the purpose of this paper. We use a constrained optimization technique to reconstruct chromatin configurations for a number of closely related yeast datasets and assess reproducibility using four metrics that measure the distance between 3D configurations. The first of these, Procrustes fitting, measures configuration closeness after applying reflection, rotation, translation, and scaling-based alignment of the structures. The others base comparisons on the within-configuration inter-point distance matrix. Inferential results for these metrics rely on suitable permutation approaches. Results indicate that distance matrix-based approaches are preferable to Procrustes analysis, not because of the metrics per se but rather on account of the ability to customize permutation schemes to handle within-chromosome contiguity. It has recently been emphasized that the use of constrained optimization approaches to 3D architecture reconstruction are prone to being trapped in local minima. Our methods of reproducibility assessment provide a

  10. 3D polymer scaffold arrays.

    PubMed

    Simon, Carl G; Yang, Yanyin; Dorsey, Shauna M; Ramalingam, Murugan; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a combinatorial platform for fabricating tissue scaffold arrays that can be used for screening cell-material interactions. Traditional research involves preparing samples one at a time for characterization and testing. Combinatorial and high-throughput (CHT) methods lower the cost of research by reducing the amount of time and material required for experiments by combining many samples into miniaturized specimens. In order to help accelerate biomaterials research, many new CHT methods have been developed for screening cell-material interactions where materials are presented to cells as a 2D film or surface. However, biomaterials are frequently used to fabricate 3D scaffolds, cells exist in vivo in a 3D environment and cells cultured in a 3D environment in vitro typically behave more physiologically than those cultured on a 2D surface. Thus, we have developed a platform for fabricating tissue scaffold libraries where biomaterials can be presented to cells in a 3D format.

  11. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  12. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  13. The EISCAT_3D Science Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjulin, A.; Mann, I.; McCrea, I.; Aikio, A. T.

    2013-05-01

    EISCAT_3D will be a world-leading international research infrastructure using the incoherent scatter technique to study the atmosphere in the Fenno-Scandinavian Arctic and to investigate how the Earth's atmosphere is coupled to space. The EISCAT_3D phased-array multistatic radar system will be operated by EISCAT Scientific Association and thus be an integral part of an organisation that has successfully been running incoherent scatter radars for more than thirty years. The baseline design of the radar system contains a core site with transmitting and receiving capabilities located close to the intersection of the Swedish, Norwegian and Finnish borders and five receiving sites located within 50 to 250 km from the core. The EISCAT_3D project is currently in its Preparatory Phase and can smoothly transit into implementation in 2014, provided sufficient funding. Construction can start 2016 and first operations in 2018. The EISCAT_3D Science Case is prepared as part of the Preparatory Phase. It is regularly updated with annual new releases, and it aims at being a common document for the whole future EISCAT_3D user community. The areas covered by the Science Case are atmospheric physics and global change; space and plasma physics; solar system research; space weather and service applications; and radar techniques, new methods for coding and analysis. Two of the aims for EISCAT_3D are to understand the ways natural variability in the upper atmosphere, imposed by the Sun-Earth system, can influence the middle and lower atmosphere, and to improve the predictivity of atmospheric models by providing higher resolution observations to replace the current parametrised input. Observations by EISCAT_3D will also be used to monitor the direct effects from the Sun on the ionosphere-atmosphere system and those caused by solar wind magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction. In addition, EISCAT_3D will be used for remote sensing the large-scale behaviour of the magnetosphere from its

  14. ICER-3D Hyperspectral Image Compression Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Hua; Kiely, Aaron; Klimesh, matthew; Aranki, Nazeeh

    2010-01-01

    Software has been developed to implement the ICER-3D algorithm. ICER-3D effects progressive, three-dimensional (3D), wavelet-based compression of hyperspectral images. If a compressed data stream is truncated, the progressive nature of the algorithm enables reconstruction of hyperspectral data at fidelity commensurate with the given data volume. The ICER-3D software is capable of providing either lossless or lossy compression, and incorporates an error-containment scheme to limit the effects of data loss during transmission. The compression algorithm, which was derived from the ICER image compression algorithm, includes wavelet-transform, context-modeling, and entropy coding subalgorithms. The 3D wavelet decomposition structure used by ICER-3D exploits correlations in all three dimensions of sets of hyperspectral image data, while facilitating elimination of spectral ringing artifacts, using a technique summarized in "Improving 3D Wavelet-Based Compression of Spectral Images" (NPO-41381), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 3 (March 2009), page 7a. Correlation is further exploited by a context-modeling subalgorithm, which exploits spectral dependencies in the wavelet-transformed hyperspectral data, using an algorithm that is summarized in "Context Modeler for Wavelet Compression of Hyperspectral Images" (NPO-43239), which follows this article. An important feature of ICER-3D is a scheme for limiting the adverse effects of loss of data during transmission. In this scheme, as in the similar scheme used by ICER, the spatial-frequency domain is partitioned into rectangular error-containment regions. In ICER-3D, the partitions extend through all the wavelength bands. The data in each partition are compressed independently of those in the other partitions, so that loss or corruption of data from any partition does not affect the other partitions. Furthermore, because compression is progressive within each partition, when data are lost, any data from that partition received

  15. Laser processing in 3D diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, S. A.; Booth, M.; Li, L.; Oh, A.; Salter, P.; Sun, B.; Whitehead, D.; Zadoroshnyj, A.

    2017-02-01

    A technique for electrode production within diamond using a femtosecond laser system is described. Diagnosis tests to quantify the stress, the diamond to graphite ratio, and the resistivity of these electrodes are discussed. A 3D electronic grade single crystal diamond detector produced using this technique is shown, and the electrodes have a resistivity of O(1 Ω cm). An improvement to the technique through the use of an adaptive wavefront shows a reduction of the diamond to graphite ratio, and smaller, higher quality electrodes were manufactured.

  16. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  17. Laser printing of 3D metallic interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott A.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) techniques for the printing of functional materials has been demonstrated for numerous applications. The printing gives rise to patterns, which can be used to fabricate planar interconnects. More recently, various groups have demonstrated electrical interconnects from laser-printed 3D structures. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or of pastes containing dispersed metallic particles. However, the generated 3D structures do not posses the same metallic conductivity as a bulk metal interconnect of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. An alternative is to laser transfer entire 3D structures using a technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place is a LIFT process whereby whole components and parts can be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This paper will describe the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding, solid metal foils or beams precisely over the contact pads of discrete devices to interconnect them into fully functional circuits. Furthermore, this paper will also show how the same laser can be used to bend or fold the bulk metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief for the circuits under flexing or during motion from thermal mismatch. These interconnect "ridges" can span wide gaps (on the order of a millimeter) and accommodate height differences of tens of microns between adjacent devices. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented.

  18. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Michael P.; Rozen, Warren M.; McMenamin, Paul G.; Findlay, Michael W.; Spychal, Robert T.; Hunter-Smith, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  19. Emerging Applications of Bedside 3D Printing in Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chae, Michael P; Rozen, Warren M; McMenamin, Paul G; Findlay, Michael W; Spychal, Robert T; Hunter-Smith, David J

    2015-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques are an essential component of preoperative planning in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, conventional modalities, including three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions, are limited by their representation on 2D workstations. 3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, was once the province of industry to fabricate models from a computer-aided design (CAD) in a layer-by-layer manner. The early adopters in clinical practice have embraced the medical imaging-guided 3D-printed biomodels for their ability to provide tactile feedback and a superior appreciation of visuospatial relationship between anatomical structures. With increasing accessibility, investigators are able to convert standard imaging data into a CAD file using various 3D reconstruction softwares and ultimately fabricate 3D models using 3D printing techniques, such as stereolithography, multijet modeling, selective laser sintering, binder jet technique, and fused deposition modeling. However, many clinicians have questioned whether the cost-to-benefit ratio justifies its ongoing use. The cost and size of 3D printers have rapidly decreased over the past decade in parallel with the expiration of key 3D printing patents. Significant improvements in clinical imaging and user-friendly 3D software have permitted computer-aided 3D modeling of anatomical structures and implants without outsourcing in many cases. These developments offer immense potential for the application of 3D printing at the bedside for a variety of clinical applications. In this review, existing uses of 3D printing in plastic surgery practice spanning the spectrum from templates for facial transplantation surgery through to the formation of bespoke craniofacial implants to optimize post-operative esthetics are described. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of 3D printing to become an essential office-based tool in plastic surgery to assist in preoperative planning, developing

  20. Macrophage podosomes go 3D.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Emeline; Guiet, Romain; Balor, Stéphanie; Charrière, Guillaume M; Poincloux, Renaud; Labrousse, Arnaud; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Le Cabec, Véronique

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage tissue infiltration is a critical step in the immune response against microorganisms and is also associated with disease progression in chronic inflammation and cancer. Macrophages are constitutively equipped with specialized structures called podosomes dedicated to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. We recently reported that these structures play a critical role in trans-matrix mesenchymal migration mode, a protease-dependent mechanism. Podosome molecular components and their ECM-degrading activity have been extensively studied in two dimensions (2D), but yet very little is known about their fate in three-dimensional (3D) environments. Therefore, localization of podosome markers and proteolytic activity were carefully examined in human macrophages performing mesenchymal migration. Using our gelled collagen I 3D matrix model to obligate human macrophages to perform mesenchymal migration, classical podosome markers including talin, paxillin, vinculin, gelsolin, cortactin were found to accumulate at the tip of F-actin-rich cell protrusions together with β1 integrin and CD44 but not β2 integrin. Macrophage proteolytic activity was observed at podosome-like protrusion sites using confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. The formation of migration tunnels by macrophages inside the matrix was accomplished by degradation, engulfment and mechanic compaction of the matrix. In addition, videomicroscopy revealed that 3D F-actin-rich protrusions of migrating macrophages were as dynamic as their 2D counterparts. Overall, the specifications of 3D podosomes resembled those of 2D podosome rosettes rather than those of individual podosomes. This observation was further supported by the aspect of 3D podosomes in fibroblasts expressing Hck, a master regulator of podosome rosettes in macrophages. In conclusion, human macrophage podosomes go 3D and take the shape of spherical podosome rosettes when the cells perform mesenchymal migration. This work

  1. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K; Johnson, Blake N; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and 'living' platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with the

  2. Petal, terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. The metallic object at lower right is part of the lander's low-gain antenna. This image is part of a 3D 'monster

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  3. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  4. Uncertainty in 3D gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deene, Yves; Jirasek, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) gel dosimetry has a unique role to play in safeguarding conformal radiotherapy treatments as the technique can cover the full treatment chain and provides the radiation oncologist with the integrated dose distribution in 3D. It can also be applied to benchmark new treatment strategies such as image guided and tracking radiotherapy techniques. A major obstacle that has hindered the wider dissemination of gel dosimetry in radiotherapy centres is a lack of confidence in the reliability of the measured dose distribution. Uncertainties in 3D dosimeters are attributed to both dosimeter properties and scanning performance. In polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout, discrepancies in dose response of large polymer gel dosimeters versus small calibration phantoms have been reported which can lead to significant inaccuracies in the dose maps. The sources of error in polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout are well understood and it has been demonstrated that with a carefully designed scanning protocol, the overall uncertainty in absolute dose that can currently be obtained falls within 5% on an individual voxel basis, for a minimum voxel size of 5 mm3. However, several research groups have chosen to use polymer gel dosimetry in a relative manner by normalizing the dose distribution towards an internal reference dose within the gel dosimeter phantom. 3D dosimetry with optical scanning has also been mostly applied in a relative way, although in principle absolute calibration is possible. As the optical absorption in 3D dosimeters is less dependent on temperature it can be expected that the achievable accuracy is higher with optical CT. The precision in optical scanning of 3D dosimeters depends to a large extend on the performance of the detector. 3D dosimetry with X-ray CT readout is a low contrast imaging modality for polymer gel dosimetry. Sources of error in x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry (XCT) are currently under investigation and include inherent

  5. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Therese; Auk-Emblem, Pia; Dornish, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent), and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue. PMID:27600217

  6. Spacecraft 3D Augmented Reality Mobile App

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussey, Kevin J.; Doronila, Paul R.; Kumanchik, Brian E.; Chan, Evan G.; Ellison, Douglas J.; Boeck, Andrea; Moore, Justin M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spacecraft 3D application allows users to learn about and interact with iconic NASA missions in a new and immersive way using common mobile devices. Using Augmented Reality (AR) techniques to project 3D renditions of the mission spacecraft into real-world surroundings, users can interact with and learn about Curiosity, GRAIL, Cassini, and Voyager. Additional updates on future missions, animations, and information will be ongoing. Using a printed AR Target and camera on a mobile device, users can get up close with these robotic explorers, see how some move, and learn about these engineering feats, which are used to expand knowledge and understanding about space. The software receives input from the mobile device's camera to recognize the presence of an AR marker in the camera's field of view. It then displays a 3D rendition of the selected spacecraft in the user's physical surroundings, on the mobile device's screen, while it tracks the device's movement in relation to the physical position of the spacecraft's 3D image on the AR marker.

  7. The World of 3-D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayshark, Robin K.

    1991-01-01

    Students explore three-dimensional properties by creating red and green wall decorations related to Christmas. Students examine why images seem to vibrate when red and green pieces are small and close together. Instructions to conduct the activity and construct 3-D glasses are given. (MDH)

  8. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  9. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  10. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  11. Interactive 3d Landscapes on Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanini, B.; Calori, L.; Ferdani, D.; Pescarin, S.

    2011-09-01

    The paper describes challenges identified while developing browser embedded 3D landscape rendering applications, our current approach and work-flow and how recent development in browser technologies could affect. All the data, even if processed by optimization and decimation tools, result in very huge databases that require paging, streaming and Level-of-Detail techniques to be implemented to allow remote web based real time fruition. Our approach has been to select an open source scene-graph based visual simulation library with sufficient performance and flexibility and adapt it to the web by providing a browser plug-in. Within the current Montegrotto VR Project, content produced with new pipelines has been integrated. The whole Montegrotto Town has been generated procedurally by CityEngine. We used this procedural approach, based on algorithms and procedures because it is particularly functional to create extensive and credible urban reconstructions. To create the archaeological sites we used optimized mesh acquired with laser scanning and photogrammetry techniques whereas to realize the 3D reconstructions of the main historical buildings we adopted computer-graphic software like blender and 3ds Max. At the final stage, semi-automatic tools have been developed and used up to prepare and clusterise 3D models and scene graph routes for web publishing. Vegetation generators have also been used with the goal of populating the virtual scene to enhance the user perceived realism during the navigation experience. After the description of 3D modelling and optimization techniques, the paper will focus and discuss its results and expectations.

  12. 3D GPR Imaging of Wooden Logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halabe, Udaya B.; Pyakurel, Sandeep

    2007-03-01

    There has been a lack of an effective NDE technique to locate internal defects within wooden logs. The few available elastic wave propagation based techniques are limited to predicting E values. Other techniques such as X-rays have not been very successful in detecting internal defects in logs. If defects such as embedded metals could be identified before the sawing process, the saw mills could significantly increase their production by reducing the probability of damage to the saw blade and the associated downtime and the repair cost. Also, if the internal defects such as knots and decayed areas could be identified in logs, the sawing blade can be oriented to exclude the defective portion and optimize the volume of high valued lumber that can be obtained from the logs. In this research, GPR has been successfully used to locate internal defects (knots, decays and embedded metals) within the logs. This paper discusses GPR imaging and mapping of the internal defects using both 2D and 3D interpretation methodology. Metal pieces were inserted in a log and the reflection patterns from these metals were interpreted from the radargrams acquired using 900 MHz antenna. Also, GPR was able to accurately identify the location of knots and decays. Scans from several orientations of the log were collected to generate 3D cylindrical volume. The actual location of the defects showed good correlation with the interpreted defects in the 3D volume. The time/depth slices from 3D cylindrical volume data were useful in understanding the extent of defects inside the log.

  13. Total body irradiation with a compensator fabricated using a 3D optical scanner and a 3D printer.

    PubMed

    Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Jung-In; Joo, Yoon Ha; Lee, Jung Chan; Park, Jong Min

    2017-05-07

    We propose bilateral total body irradiation (TBI) utilizing a 3D printer and a 3D optical scanner. We acquired surface information of an anthropomorphic phantom with the 3D scanner and fabricated the 3D compensator with the 3D printer, which could continuously compensate for the lateral missing tissue of an entire body from the beam's eye view. To test the system's performance, we measured doses with optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) as well as EBT3 films with the anthropomorphic phantom during TBI without a compensator, conventional bilateral TBI, and TBI with the 3D compensator (3D TBI). The 3D TBI showed the most uniform dose delivery to the phantom. From the OSLD measurements of the 3D TBI, the deviations between the measured doses and the prescription dose ranged from  -6.7% to 2.4% inside the phantom and from  -2.3% to 0.6% on the phantom's surface. From the EBT3 film measurements, the prescription dose could be delivered to the entire body of the phantom within  ±10% accuracy, except for the chest region, where tissue heterogeneity is extreme. The 3D TBI doses were much more uniform than those of the other irradiation techniques, especially in the anterior-to-posterior direction. The 3D TBI was advantageous, owing to its uniform dose delivery as well as its efficient treatment procedure.

  14. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  15. Nuclear 3D organization and radiosensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidelman, Y. A.; Slanina, S. V.; Aleshchenko, A. V.; Sen’ko, O. V.; Kononkova, A. D.; Andreev, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Current mechanisms of radiation-induced chromosomal aberration (CA) formation suggest misrepair of chromosomal lesions being in spatial proximity. In this case CAs have to depend on pattern of chromosomal contacts and on chromosome spatial organization in a cell nucleus. We were interested in whether variation of nucleus 3D organization results in difference of radiation induced CA formation frequency. Experimental data available do not provide information sufficient for definite conclusions. To have more deep insight in this issue we developed the biophysical modeling technique taking into account different levels of chromosome/nuclear organization and radiation damage of DNA and chromosomes. Computer experiments on gamma irradiation were carried out for two types of cells with different 3D organization of nuclei, preferentially peripheral and internal. CA frequencies were found to depend on spatial positioning of chromosomes within a nucleus which determines a pattern of interchromosomal contacts. For individual chromosomes this effect can be more pronounced than for genome averaged. Since significant part of aberrations, for example dicentrics, results in cell death, the proposed technique is capable of evaluating radiosensitivity of cells, both normal and cancer, with the incorporation of 3D genome information. This predictive technology allows to reduce uncertainties of prognosis of biological effects of radiation compared to phenomenological methods and may have variety of biomedical applications, in particular, in cancer radiation therapy.

  16. Laser 3D micro-manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqué, Alberto; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Kim, Heungsoo; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Mathews, Scott A.

    2016-06-01

    Laser-based materials processing techniques are gaining widespread use in micro-manufacturing applications. The use of laser microfabrication techniques enables the processing of micro- and nanostructures from a wide range of materials and geometries without the need for masking and etching steps commonly associated with photolithography. This review aims to describe the broad applications space covered by laser-based micro- and nanoprocessing techniques and the benefits offered by the use of lasers in micro-manufacturing processes. Given their non-lithographic nature, these processes are also referred to as laser direct-write and constitute some of the earliest demonstrations of 3D printing or additive manufacturing at the microscale. As this review will show, the use of lasers enables precise control of the various types of processing steps—from subtractive to additive—over a wide range of scales with an extensive materials palette. Overall, laser-based direct-write techniques offer multiple modes of operation including the removal (via ablative processes) and addition (via photopolymerization or printing) of most classes of materials using the same equipment in many cases. The versatility provided by these multi-function, multi-material and multi-scale laser micro-manufacturing processes cannot be matched by photolithography nor with other direct-write microfabrication techniques and offer unique opportunities for current and future 3D micro-manufacturing applications.

  17. Improving Perceptual Skills with Interactive 3-D VRML Scenes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Janet Faye

    1998-01-01

    Describes techniques developed to improve the perceptual skills of maintenance technicians who align shafts on rotating equipment. A 3-D practice environment composed of animated mechanical components and tools was enhanced with 3-D VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) scenes. (Author/AEF)

  18. Will true 3d display devices aid geologic interpretation. [Mirage

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.R. Jr.

    1982-04-01

    A description is given of true 3D display devices and techniques that are being evaluated in various research laboratories around the world. These advances are closely tied to the expected application of 3D display devices as interpretational tools for explorationists. 34 refs.

  19. [Potentials of 3D-modeling in reconstructive orbital surgery].

    PubMed

    Butsan, S B; Khokhlachev, S B; Ĭigitaliev, Sh N; Zaiakin, Ia A

    2012-01-01

    A technique of bone reconstructive surgery of orbitofrontonasomalar region using 3D-modeling based on multispiral computer tomography data is presented. The efficacy of intraoperative templates created using 3D-modeling was showed for harvesting and modeling of bone calvarial autografts. The steps of reconstructive procedure are explained in details for repair of medial and inferior orbital fractures.

  20. Vision models for 3D surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sunanda

    1992-11-01

    Different approaches to computational stereo to represent human stereo vision have been developed over the past two decades. The Marr-Poggio theory of human stereo vision is probably the most widely accepted model of the human stereo vision. However, recently developed motion stereo models which use a sequence of images taken by either a moving camera or a moving object provide an alternative method of achieving multi-resolution matching without the use of Laplacian of Gaussian operators. While using image sequences, the baseline between two camera positions for a image pair is changed for the subsequent image pair so as to achieve different resolution for each image pair. Having different baselines also avoids the inherent occlusion problem in stereo vision models. The advantage of using multi-resolution images acquired by camera positioned at different baselines over those acquired by LOG operators is that one does not have to encounter spurious edges often created by zero-crossings in the LOG operated images. Therefore in designing a computer vision system, a motion stereo model is more appropriate than a stereo vision model. However, in some applications where only a stereo pair of images are available, recovery of 3D surfaces of natural scenes are possible in a computationally efficient manner by using cepstrum matching and regularization techniques. Section 2 of this paper describes a motion stereo model using multi-scale cepstrum matching for the detection of disparity between image pairs in a sequence of images and subsequent recovery of 3D surfaces from depth-map obtained by a non convergent triangulation technique. Section 3 presents a 3D surface recovery technique from a stereo pair using cepstrum matching for disparity detection and cubic B-splines for surface smoothing. Section 4 contains the results of 3D surface recovery using both of the techniques mentioned above. Section 5 discusses the merit of 2D cepstrum matching and cubic B

  1. Optical microcavity scanning 3D tomography.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, Andrea; Criante, Luigino; LoTurco, Sara; Farina, Marco

    2014-10-01

    A scanning optical microcavity is exploited to achieve lens-free 3D tomography of microfluidic channels. The microcavity, powered by a low-coherence source, is realized by approaching a cleaved fiber to few tens of micrometers over the sample. The interference of scattered waves inside the cavity shapes the transverse field distribution by focusing the beam and overcoming the diffraction limit due to the optical-fiber numerical aperture. The focusing effect is also preserved in the inner layers of the sample, allowing optical 3D tomography. Analysis of microfluidic channels was demonstrated through this noninvasive technique. Although the experimental setup recalls the well-known fiber-optic Fourier-domain common-path optical coherence tomography, the proposed method has intrinsic characteristics that distinguish it from the former one.

  2. Volumetric visualization of 3D data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Gregory; Miles, Richard

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a rapid growth in the ability to obtain detailed data on large complex structures in three dimensions. This development occurred first in the medical field, with CAT (computer aided tomography) scans and now magnetic resonance imaging, and in seismological exploration. With the advances in supercomputing and computational fluid dynamics, and in experimental techniques in fluid dynamics, there is now the ability to produce similar large data fields representing 3D structures and phenomena in these disciplines. These developments have produced a situation in which currently there is access to data which is too complex to be understood using the tools available for data reduction and presentation. Researchers in these areas are becoming limited by their ability to visualize and comprehend the 3D systems they are measuring and simulating.

  3. Illustrative visualization of 3D city models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doellner, Juergen; Buchholz, Henrik; Nienhaus, Marc; Kirsch, Florian

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents an illustrative visualization technique that provides expressive representations of large-scale 3D city models, inspired by the tradition of artistic and cartographic visualizations typically found in bird"s-eye view and panoramic maps. We define a collection of city model components and a real-time multi-pass rendering algorithm that achieves comprehensible, abstract 3D city model depictions based on edge enhancement, color-based and shadow-based depth cues, and procedural facade texturing. Illustrative visualization provides an effective visual interface to urban spatial information and associated thematic information complementing visual interfaces based on the Virtual Reality paradigm, offering a huge potential for graphics design. Primary application areas include city and landscape planning, cartoon worlds in computer games, and tourist information systems.

  4. Sensing and compressing 3-D models

    SciTech Connect

    Krumm, J.

    1998-02-01

    The goal of this research project was to create a passive and robust computer vision system for producing 3-D computer models of arbitrary scenes. Although the authors were unsuccessful in achieving the overall goal, several components of this research have shown significant potential. Of particular interest is the application of parametric eigenspace methods for planar pose measurement of partially occluded objects in gray-level images. The techniques presented provide a simple, accurate, and robust solution to the planar pose measurement problem. In addition, the representational efficiency of eigenspace methods used with gray-level features were successfully extended to binary features, which are less sensitive to illumination changes. The results of this research are presented in two papers that were written during the course of this project. The papers are included in sections 2 and 3. The first section of this report summarizes the 3-D modeling efforts.

  5. 3D Integration for Wireless Multimedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmich, Georg

    The convergence of mobile phone, internet, mapping, gaming and office automation tools with high quality video and still imaging capture capability is becoming a strong market trend for portable devices. High-density video encode and decode, 3D graphics for gaming, increased application-software complexity and ultra-high-bandwidth 4G modem technologies are driving the CPU performance and memory bandwidth requirements close to the PC segment. These portable multimedia devices are battery operated, which requires the deployment of new low-power-optimized silicon process technologies and ultra-low-power design techniques at system, architecture and device level. Mobile devices also need to comply with stringent silicon-area and package-volume constraints. As for all consumer devices, low production cost and fast time-to-volume production is key for success. This chapter shows how 3D architectures can bring a possible breakthrough to meet the conflicting power, performance and area constraints. Multiple 3D die-stacking partitioning strategies are described and analyzed on their potential to improve the overall system power, performance and cost for specific application scenarios. Requirements and maturity of the basic process-technology bricks including through-silicon via (TSV) and die-to-die attachment techniques are reviewed. Finally, we highlight new challenges which will arise with 3D stacking and an outlook on how they may be addressed: Higher power density will require thermal design considerations, new EDA tools will need to be developed to cope with the integration of heterogeneous technologies and to guarantee signal and power integrity across the die stack. The silicon/wafer test strategies have to be adapted to handle high-density IO arrays, ultra-thin wafers and provide built-in self-test of attached memories. New standards and business models have to be developed to allow cost-efficient assembly and testing of devices from different silicon and technology

  6. 3D Face modeling using the multi-deformable method.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jinkyu; Yu, Sunjin; Kim, Joongrock; Lee, Sangyoun

    2012-09-25

    In this paper, we focus on the problem of the accuracy performance of 3D face modeling techniques using corresponding features in multiple views, which is quite sensitive to feature extraction errors. To solve the problem, we adopt a statistical model-based 3D face modeling approach in a mirror system consisting of two mirrors and a camera. The overall procedure of our 3D facial modeling method has two primary steps: 3D facial shape estimation using a multiple 3D face deformable model and texture mapping using seamless cloning that is a type of gradient-domain blending. To evaluate our method's performance, we generate 3D faces of 30 individuals and then carry out two tests: accuracy test and robustness test. Our method shows not only highly accurate 3D face shape results when compared with the ground truth, but also robustness to feature extraction errors. Moreover, 3D face rendering results intuitively show that our method is more robust to feature extraction errors than other 3D face modeling methods. An additional contribution of our method is that a wide range of face textures can be acquired by the mirror system. By using this texture map, we generate realistic 3D face for individuals at the end of the paper.

  7. Alignment of continuous video onto 3D point clouds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenyi; Nister, David; Hsu, Steve

    2005-08-01

    We propose a general framework for aligning continuous (oblique) video onto 3D sensor data. We align a point cloud computed from the video onto the point cloud directly obtained from a 3D sensor. This is in contrast to existing techniques where the 2D images are aligned to a 3D model derived from the 3D sensor data. Using point clouds enables the alignment for scenes full of objects that are difficult to model; for example, trees. To compute 3D point clouds from video, motion stereo is used along with a state-of-the-art algorithm for camera pose estimation. Our experiments with real data demonstrate the advantages of the proposed registration algorithm for texturing models in large-scale semiurban environments. The capability to align video before a 3D model is built from the 3D sensor data offers new practical opportunities for 3D modeling. We introduce a novel modeling-through-registration approach that fuses 3D information from both the 3D sensor and the video. Initial experiments with real data illustrate the potential of the proposed approach.

  8. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  9. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  10. Comparing swimsuits in 3D.

    PubMed

    van Geer, Erik; Molenbroek, Johan; Schreven, Sander; deVoogd-Claessen, Lenneke; Toussaint, Huib

    2012-01-01

    In competitive swimming, suits have become more important. These suits influence friction, pressure and wave drag. Friction drag is related to the surface properties whereas both pressure and wave drag are greatly influenced by body shape. To find a relationship between the body shape and the drag, the anthropometry of several world class female swimmers wearing different suits was accurately defined using a 3D scanner and traditional measuring methods. The 3D scans delivered more detailed information about the body shape. On the same day the swimmers did performance tests in the water with the tested suits. Afterwards the result of the performance tests and the differences found in body shape was analyzed to determine the deformation caused by a swimsuit and its effect on the swimming performance. Although the amount of data is limited because of the few test subjects, there is an indication that the deformation of the body influences the swimming performance.

  11. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  12. 3D-graphite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Belenkov, E. A. Ali-Pasha, V. A.

    2011-01-15

    The structure of clusters of some new carbon 3D-graphite phases have been calculated using the molecular-mechanics methods. It is established that 3D-graphite polytypes {alpha}{sub 1,1}, {alpha}{sub 1,3}, {alpha}{sub 1,5}, {alpha}{sub 2,1}, {alpha}{sub 2,3}, {alpha}{sub 3,1}, {beta}{sub 1,2}, {beta}{sub 1,4}, {beta}{sub 1,6}, {beta}{sub 2,1}, and {beta}{sub 3,2} consist of sp{sup 2}-hybridized atoms, have hexagonal unit cells, and differ in regards to the structure of layers and order of their alternation. A possible way to experimentally synthesize new carbon phases is proposed: the polymerization and carbonization of hydrocarbon molecules.

  13. 3D tumor models: history, advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Benien, Parul; Swami, Archana

    2014-05-01

    Evaluation of cancer therapeutics by utilizing 3D tumor models, before clinical studies, could be more advantageous than conventional 2D tumor models (monolayer cultures). The 3D systems mimic the tumor microenvironment more closely than 2D systems. The following review discusses the various 3D tumor models present today with the advantages and limitations of each. 3D tumor models replicate the elements of a tumor microenvironment such as hypoxia, necrosis, angiogenesis and cell adhesion. The review introduces application of techniques such as microfluidics, imaging and tissue engineering to improve the 3D tumor models. Despite their tremendous potential to better screen chemotherapeutics, 3D tumor models still have a long way to go before they are used commonly as in vitro tumor models in pharmaceutical industrial research.

  14. Real time 3D scanner: investigations and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Taoufik; Pflug, Leopold

    1993-12-01

    This article presents a concept of reconstruction of 3-D objects using non-invasive and touch loss techniques. The principle of this method is to display parallel interference optical fringes on an object and then to record the object under two angles of view. According to an appropriated treatment one reconstructs the 3-D object even when the object has no symmetrical plan. The 3-D surface data is available immediately in digital form for computer- visualization and for analysis software tools. The optical set-up for recording the 3-D object, the 3-D data extraction and treatment, as well as the reconstruction of the 3-D object are reported and commented on. This application is dedicated for reconstructive/cosmetic surgery, CAD, animation and research purposes.

  15. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  16. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer the second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.

  17. Elastic wave modelling in 3D heterogeneous media: 3D grid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianfeng, Zhang; Tielin, Liu

    2002-09-01

    We present a new numerical technique for elastic wave modelling in 3D heterogeneous media with surface topography, which is called the 3D grid method in this paper. This work is an extension of the 2D grid method that models P-SV wave propagation in 2D heterogeneous media. Similar to the finite-element method in the discretization of a numerical mesh, the proposed scheme is flexible in incorporating surface topography and curved interfaces; moreover it satisfies the free-surface boundary conditions of 3D topography naturally. The algorithm, developed from a parsimonious staggered-grid scheme, solves the problem using integral equilibrium around each node, instead of satisfying elastodynamic differential equations at each node as in the conventional finite-difference method. The computational cost and memory requirements for the proposed scheme are approximately the same as those used by the same order finite-difference method. In this paper, a mixed tetrahedral and parallelepiped grid method is presented; and the numerical dispersion and stability criteria on the tetrahedral grid method and parallelepiped grid method are discussed in detail. The proposed scheme is successfully tested against an analytical solution for the 3D Lamb problem and a solution of the boundary method for the diffraction of a hemispherical crater. Moreover, examples of surface-wave propagation in an elastic half-space with a semi-cylindrical trench on the surface and 3D plane-layered model are presented.

  18. Investigation of surface wave amplitudes in 3-D velocity and 3-D Q models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Y.; Zhou, Y.

    2010-12-01

    It has been long recognized that seismic amplitudes depend on both wave speed structures and anelasticity (Q) structures. However, the effects of lateral heterogeneities in wave speed and Q structures on seismic amplitudes has not been well understood. We investigate the effects of 3-D wave speed and 3-D anelasticity (Q) structures on surface-wave amplitudes based upon wave propagation simulations of twelve globally-distributed earthquakes and 801 stations in Earth models with and without lateral heterogeneities in wave speed and anelasticity using a Spectral Element Method (SEM). Our tomographic-like 3-D Q models are converted from a velocity model S20RTS using a set of reasonable mineralogical parameters, assuming lateral perturbations in both velocity and Q are due to temperature perturbations. Surface-wave amplitude variations of SEM seismograms are measured in the period range of 50--200 s using boxcar taper, cosine taper and Slepian multi-tapers. We calculate ray-theoretical predictions of surface-wave amplitude perturbations due to elastic focusing, attenuation, and anelastic focusing which respectively depend upon the second spatial derivative (''roughness'') of perturbations in phase velocity, 1/Q, and the roughness of perturbations in 1/Q. Both numerical experiments and theoretical calculations show that (1) for short-period (~ 50 s) surface waves, the effects of amplitude attenuation due to 3-D Q structures are comparable with elastic focusing effects due to 3-D wave speed structures; and (2) for long-period (> 100 s) surface waves, the effects of attenuation become much weaker than elastic focusing; and (3) elastic focusing effects are correlated with anelastic focusing at all periods due to the correlation between velocity and Q models; and (4) amplitude perturbations are depend on measurement techniques and therefore cannot be directly compared with ray-theoretical predictions because ray theory does not account for the effects of measurement

  19. 3D multifocus astigmatism and compressed sensing (3D MACS) based superresolution reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiaqing; Sun, Mingzhai; Gumpper, Kristyn; Chi, Yuejie; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule based superresolution techniques (STORM/PALM) achieve nanometer spatial resolution by integrating the temporal information of the switching dynamics of fluorophores (emitters). When emitter density is low for each frame, they are located to the nanometer resolution. However, when the emitter density rises, causing significant overlapping, it becomes increasingly difficult to accurately locate individual emitters. This is particularly apparent in three dimensional (3D) localization because of the large effective volume of the 3D point spread function (PSF). The inability to precisely locate the emitters at a high density causes poor temporal resolution of localization-based superresolution technique and significantly limits its application in 3D live cell imaging. To address this problem, we developed a 3D high-density superresolution imaging platform that allows us to precisely locate the positions of emitters, even when they are significantly overlapped in three dimensional space. Our platform involves a multi-focus system in combination with astigmatic optics and an ℓ1-Homotopy optimization procedure. To reduce the intrinsic bias introduced by the discrete formulation of compressed sensing, we introduced a debiasing step followed by a 3D weighted centroid procedure, which not only increases the localization accuracy, but also increases the computation speed of image reconstruction. We implemented our algorithms on a graphic processing unit (GPU), which speeds up processing 10 times compared with central processing unit (CPU) implementation. We tested our method with both simulated data and experimental data of fluorescently labeled microtubules and were able to reconstruct a 3D microtubule image with 1000 frames (512×512) acquired within 20 seconds. PMID:25798314

  20. ABS 3D printed solutions for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolomé, E.; Bozzo, B.; Sevilla, P.; Martínez-Pasarell, O.; Puig, T.; Granados, X.

    2017-03-01

    3D printing has become a common, inexpensive and rapid prototyping technique, enabling the ad hoc fabrication of complex shapes. In this paper, we demonstrate that 3D printed objects in ABS can be used at cryogenic temperatures, offering flexible solutions in different fields. Firstly, a thermo-mechanical characterization of ABS 3D printed specimens at 77 K is reported, which allowed us to delimit the type of cryogenic uses where 3D printed pieces may be implemented. Secondly, we present three different examples where ABS 3D printed objects working at low temperatures have provided specific solutions: (i) SQUID inserts for angular magnetometry (low temperature material characterization field); (ii) a cage support for a metamaterial ;magnetic concentrator; (superconductivity application), and (iii) dedicated tools for cryopreservation in assisted reproductive techniques (medicine field).

  1. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-04-22

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young’s moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Ultimately, adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.

  2. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-04-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.

  3. 3D printing of functional biomaterials for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Ma, Xuanyi; Gou, Maling; Mei, Deqing; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-08-01

    3D printing is emerging as a powerful tool for tissue engineering by enabling 3D cell culture within complex 3D biomimetic architectures. This review discusses the prevailing 3D printing techniques and their most recent applications in building tissue constructs. The work associated with relatively well-known inkjet and extrusion-based bioprinting is presented with the latest advances in the fields. Emphasis is put on introducing two relatively new light-assisted bioprinting techniques, including digital light processing (DLP)-based bioprinting and laser based two photon polymerization (TPP) bioprinting. 3D bioprinting of vasculature network is particularly discussed for its foremost significance in maintaining tissue viability and promoting functional maturation. Limitations to current bioprinting approaches, as well as future directions of bioprinting functional tissues are also discussed.

  4. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications. PMID:25902277

  5. 3D visualization of polymer nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H

    2009-01-01

    Soft materials and structured polymers are extremely useful nanotechnology building blocks. Block copolymers, in particular, have served as 2D masks for nanolithography and 3D scaffolds for photonic crystals, nanoparticle fabrication, and solar cells. F or many of these applications, the precise 3 dimensional structure and the number and type of defects in the polymer is important for ultimate function. However, directly visualizing the 3D structure of a soft material from the nanometer to millimeter length scales is a significant technical challenge. Here, we propose to develop the instrumentation needed for direct 3D structure determination at near nanometer resolution throughout a nearly millimeter-cubed volume of a soft, potentially heterogeneous, material. This new capability will be a valuable research tool for LANL missions in chemistry, materials science, and nanoscience. Our approach to soft materials visualization builds upon exciting developments in super-resolution optical microscopy that have occurred over the past two years. To date, these new, truly revolutionary, imaging methods have been developed and almost exclusively used for biological applications. However, in addition to biological cells, these super-resolution imaging techniques hold extreme promise for direct visualization of many important nanostructured polymers and other heterogeneous chemical systems. Los Alamos has a unique opportunity to lead the development of these super-resolution imaging methods for problems of chemical rather than biological significance. While these optical methods are limited to systems transparent to visible wavelengths, we stress that many important functional chemicals such as polymers, glasses, sol-gels, aerogels, or colloidal assemblies meet this requirement, with specific examples including materials designed for optical communication, manipulation, or light-harvesting Our Research Goals are: (1) Develop the instrumentation necessary for imaging materials

  6. Are 3-D Movies Bad for Your Eyes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the viewer has a problem with focusing or depth perception. Also, the techniques used to create the 3- ... eyes), or other conditions that persistently inhibit focusing, depth perception or normal 3-D vision, would have difficulty ...

  7. 3-D textile reinforcements in composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miravete, A.

    1999-11-01

    Laminated composite materials have been used in structural applications since the 1960s. However, their high cost and inability to accommodate fibers in the laminate`s thickness direction greatly reduce their damage tolerance and impact resistance. The second generation of materials--3-D textile reinforced composites--offers significant cost reduction, and by incorporating reinforcement in the thickness direction, dramatically increases damage tolerance and impact resistance. However, methods for predicting mechanical properties of 3-D textile reinforced composite materials tend to be more complex. These materials also have disadvantages--particularly in regard to crimps in the yarns--that require more research. Textile preforms, micro- and macromechanical modeling, manufacturing processes, and characterization all need further development. As researchers overcome these problems, this new generation of composites will emerge as a highly competitive family of materials. This book provides a state-of-the-art account of this promising technology. In it, top experts describe the manufacturing processes, highlight the advantages, identify the main applications, analyze methods for predicting mechanical properties, and detail various reinforcement strategies, including grid structure, knitted fabric composites, and the braiding technique. Armed with the information in this book, readers will be prepared to better exploit the advantages of 3-D textile reinforced composites, overcome its disadvantages, and contribute to the further development of the technology.

  8. The 3D widgets for exploratory scientific visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, Kenneth P.; Meyer, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques are used to simulate flows of fluids like air or water around such objects as airplanes and automobiles. These techniques usually generate very large amounts of numerical data which are difficult to understand without using graphical scientific visualization techniques. There are a number of commercial scientific visualization applications available today which allow scientists to control visualization tools via textual and/or 2D user interfaces. However, these user interfaces are often difficult to use. We believe that 3D direct-manipulation techniques for interactively controlling visualization tools will provide opportunities for powerful and useful interfaces with which scientists can more effectively explore their datasets. A few systems have been developed which use these techniques. In this paper, we will present a variety of 3D interaction techniques for manipulating parameters of visualization tools used to explore CFD datasets, and discuss in detail various techniques for positioning tools in a 3D scene.

  9. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  10. Inferential modeling of 3D chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siyu; Xu, Jinbo; Zeng, Jianyang

    2015-04-30

    For eukaryotic cells, the biological processes involving regulatory DNA elements play an important role in cell cycle. Understanding 3D spatial arrangements of chromosomes and revealing long-range chromatin interactions are critical to decipher these biological processes. In recent years, chromosome conformation capture (3C) related techniques have been developed to measure the interaction frequencies between long-range genome loci, which have provided a great opportunity to decode the 3D organization of the genome. In this paper, we develop a new Bayesian framework to derive the 3D architecture of a chromosome from 3C-based data. By modeling each chromosome as a polymer chain, we define the conformational energy based on our current knowledge on polymer physics and use it as prior information in the Bayesian framework. We also propose an expectation-maximization (EM) based algorithm to estimate the unknown parameters of the Bayesian model and infer an ensemble of chromatin structures based on interaction frequency data. We have validated our Bayesian inference approach through cross-validation and verified the computed chromatin conformations using the geometric constraints derived from fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. We have further confirmed the inferred chromatin structures using the known genetic interactions derived from other studies in the literature. Our test results have indicated that our Bayesian framework can compute an accurate ensemble of 3D chromatin conformations that best interpret the distance constraints derived from 3C-based data and also agree with other sources of geometric constraints derived from experimental evidence in the previous studies. The source code of our approach can be found in https://github.com/wangsy11/InfMod3DGen.

  11. Feasibility of 3D harmonic contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Voormolen, M M; Bouakaz, A; Krenning, B J; Lancée, C T; ten Cate, F J; de Jong, N

    2004-04-01

    Improved endocardial border delineation with the application of contrast agents should allow for less complex and faster tracing algorithms for left ventricular volume analysis. We developed a fast rotating phased array transducer for 3D imaging of the heart with harmonic capabilities making it suitable for contrast imaging. In this study the feasibility of 3D harmonic contrast imaging is evaluated in vitro. A commercially available tissue mimicking flow phantom was used in combination with Sonovue. Backscatter power spectra from a tissue and contrast region of interest were calculated from recorded radio frequency data. The spectra and the extracted contrast to tissue ratio from these spectra were used to optimize the excitation frequency, the pulse length and the receive filter settings of the transducer. Frequencies ranging from 1.66 to 2.35 MHz and pulse lengths of 1.5, 2 and 2.5 cycles were explored. An increase of more than 15 dB in the contrast to tissue ratio was found around the second harmonic compared with the fundamental level at an optimal excitation frequency of 1.74 MHz and a pulse length of 2.5 cycles. Using the optimal settings for 3D harmonic contrast recordings volume measurements of a left ventricular shaped agar phantom were performed. Without contrast the extracted volume data resulted in a volume error of 1.5%, with contrast an accuracy of 3.8% was achieved. The results show the feasibility of accurate volume measurements from 3D harmonic contrast images. Further investigations will include the clinical evaluation of the presented technique for improved assessment of the heart.

  12. 3D resolution gray-tone lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbravescu, Niculae

    2000-04-01

    With the conventional micro machining technologies: isotropic and anisotropic, dry and wet etching, a few shapes can be done. To overcome this limitation, both binary multi- tasking technique or direct EB writing were used, but an inexpensive one-step UV-lithographic method, using a so- called 'gray-tone reticle', seems to be the best choice to produce local intensity modulation during exposure process. Although, by using this method and common technologies in standard IC fabrication it is easy to obtain an arbitrarily 3D shaping of positive thick resists, there are some limitations, too. The maximum number of gray-levels, on projection reticle, achieved by e-beam writing, are only 200. Also, for very thick resists, the limited focus depth of the projection objective gives a poor lateral resolution. These are the reasons why the author prose da new approach to enhance the 3D resolution of gray-tone lithography applied for thick resist. By a high resolution, both for vertical direction, as well as for horizontal direction. Particular emphasis was put on the design, manufacturing and use of halftone transmission masks, required for UV- lithographic step in the fabrication process of mechanical, optical or electronics components. The original design and fabrication method for the gray-tone test reticle were supported by experiments showing the main advantage of this new technology: the 3D structuring of thick resist in a single exposure step and also a very promising aspect ratio obtained of over 9:1. Preliminary experimental results are presented for positive thick resists in SEM micrographs. A future optimization of the lithographic process opens interesting perspectives for application of this high 3D resolution structuring method in the fabrication process of different products, with imposed complex smooth profiles, such as: x-ray LiGA-masks, refractive optics and surface- relief DOEs.

  13. 3D Imaging with Holographic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Kou, Shan Shan

    2010-04-01

    There are two main types of tomography that enable the 3D internal structures of objects to be reconstructed from scattered data. The commonly known computerized tomography (CT) give good results in the x-ray wavelength range where the filtered back-projection theorem and Radon transform can be used. These techniques rely on the Fourier projection-slice theorem where rays are considered to propagate straight through the object. Another type of tomography called `diffraction tomography' applies in applications in optics and acoustics where diffraction and scattering effects must be taken into account. The latter proves to be a more difficult problem, as light no longer travels straight through the sample. Holographic tomography is a popular way of performing diffraction tomography and there has been active experimental research on reconstructing complex refractive index data using this approach recently. However, there are two distinct ways of doing tomography: either by rotation of the object or by rotation of the illumination while fixing the detector. The difference between these two setups is intuitive but needs to be quantified. From Fourier optics and information transformation point of view, we use 3D transfer function analysis to quantitatively describe how spatial frequencies of the object are mapped to the Fourier domain. We first employ a paraxial treatment by calculating the Fourier transform of the defocused OTF. The shape of the calculated 3D CTF for tomography, by scanning the illumination in one direction only, takes on a form that we might call a 'peanut,' compared to the case of object rotation, where a diablo is formed, the peanut exhibiting significant differences and non-isotropy. In particular, there is a line singularity along one transverse direction. Under high numerical aperture conditions, the paraxial treatment is not accurate, and so we make use of 3D analytical geometry to calculate the behaviour in the non-paraxial case. This time, we

  14. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  15. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  16. A Clean Adirondack (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a 3-D anaglyph showing a microscopic image taken of an area measuring 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across on the rock called Adirondack. The image was taken at Gusev Crater on the 33rd day of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's journey (Feb. 5, 2004), after the rover used its rock abrasion tool brush to clean the surface of the rock. Dust, which was pushed off to the side during cleaning, can still be seen to the left and in low areas of the rock.

  17. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie

    2015-01-09

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  18. 3D printed long period gratings for optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Iezzi, Victor Lambin; Boisvert, Jean-Sébastien; Loranger, Sébastien; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-04-15

    We demonstrate a simple technique for implementing long period grating (LPG) structures by the use of a 3D printer. This Letter shows a way of manipulating the mode coupling within an optical fiber by applying stress through an external 3D printed periodic structure. Different LPG lengths and periods have been studied, as well as the effect of the applied stress on the coupling efficiency from the fundamental mode to cladding modes. The technique is very simple, highly flexible, affordable, and easy to implement without the need of altering the optical fiber. This Letter is part of a growing line of interest in the use of 3D printers for optical applications.

  19. 3D object hiding using three-dimensional ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Zhibo; Li, Tuo; Pan, An; Wang, Yali; Shi, Yishi

    2016-09-01

    We present a novel technique for 3D object hiding by applying three-dimensional ptychography. Compared with 3D information hiding based on holography, the proposed ptychography-based hiding technique is easier to implement, because the reference beam and high-precision interferometric optical setup are not required. The acquisition of the 3D object and the ptychographic encoding process are performed optically. Owing to the introduction of probe keys, the security of the ptychography-based hiding system is significantly enhanced. A series of experiments and simulations demonstrate the feasibility and imperceptibility of the proposed method.

  20. 3D-model building of the jaw impression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Moumen T.; Yamany, Sameh M.; Hemayed, Elsayed E.; Farag, Aly A.

    1997-03-01

    A novel approach is proposed to obtain a record of the patient's occlusion using computer vision. Data acquisition is obtained using intra-oral video cameras. The technique utilizes shape from shading to extract 3D information from 2D views of the jaw, and a novel technique for 3D data registration using genetic algorithms. The resulting 3D model can be used for diagnosis, treatment planning, and implant purposes. The overall purpose of this research is to develop a model-based vision system for orthodontics to replace traditional approaches. This system will be flexible, accurate, and will reduce the cost of orthodontic treatments.

  1. 3D face database for human pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, LiMei; Lu, Lu

    2008-10-01

    Face recognition is an essential work to ensure human safety. It is also an important task in biomedical engineering. 2D image is not enough for precision face recognition. 3D face data includes more exact information, such as the precision size of eyes, mouth, etc. 3D face database is an important part in human pattern recognition. There is a lot of method to get 3D data, such as 3D laser scan system, 3D phase measurement, shape from shading, shape from motion, etc. This paper will introduce a non-orbit, non-contact, non-laser 3D measurement system. The main idea is from shape from stereo technique. Two cameras are used in different angle. A sequence of light will project on the face. Human face, human head, human tooth, human body can all be measured by the system. The visualization data of each person can form to a large 3D face database, which can be used in human recognition. The 3D data can provide a vivid copy of a face, so the recognition exactness can be reached to 100%. Although the 3D data is larger than 2D image, it can be used in the occasion where only few people include, such as the recognition of a family, a small company, etc.

  2. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  3. Characterization of 3D-printed IPMC actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrico, James D.; Erickson, John M.; Leang, Kam K.

    2016-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) fused filament additive manufacturing (AM) technique (3D printing) is described for creating ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMC) actuators. The 3D printing technique addresses some of the limitations of existing manufacturing processes for creating IPMCs, which includes limited shapes and sizes and time-consuming steps. In this paper, the 3D printing process is described in detail, where first a precursor material (non-acid Nafion precursor resin) is extruded into a thermoplastic filament for 3D printing. A custom designed 3D printer is described which utilizes the filament to manufacture custom-shaped IPMC actuators. The 3D printed samples are hydrolyzed in an aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide and dimethyl sulfoxide, followed by application of platinum electrodes. The performance of 3D-printed IPMC actuators with different infill patterns are characterized. Specifically, experimental results are presented for electrode resistance, actuation performance, and overall effective actuator stiffness for samples with longitudinal (0 degrees) and transverse (90 degrees) infill pattern.

  4. Multizone Paper Platform for 3D Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Derda, Ratmir; Hong, Estrella; Mwangi, Martin; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E.; Whitesides, George M.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro 3D culture is an important model for tissues in vivo. Cells in different locations of 3D tissues are physiologically different, because they are exposed to different concentrations of oxygen, nutrients, and signaling molecules, and to other environmental factors (temperature, mechanical stress, etc). The majority of high-throughput assays based on 3D cultures, however, can only detect the average behavior of cells in the whole 3D construct. Isolation of cells from specific regions of 3D cultures is possible, but relies on low-throughput techniques such as tissue sectioning and micromanipulation. Based on a procedure reported previously (“cells-in-gels-in-paper” or CiGiP), this paper describes a simple method for culture of arrays of thin planar sections of tissues, either alone or stacked to create more complex 3D tissue structures. This procedure starts with sheets of paper patterned with hydrophobic regions that form 96 hydrophilic zones. Serial spotting of cells suspended in extracellular matrix (ECM) gel onto the patterned paper creates an array of 200 micron-thick slabs of ECM gel (supported mechanically by cellulose fibers) containing cells. Stacking the sheets with zones aligned on top of one another assembles 96 3D multilayer constructs. De-stacking the layers of the 3D culture, by peeling apart the sheets of paper, “sections” all 96 cultures at once. It is, thus, simple to isolate 200-micron-thick cell-containing slabs from each 3D culture in the 96-zone array. Because the 3D cultures are assembled from multiple layers, the number of cells plated initially in each layer determines the spatial distribution of cells in the stacked 3D cultures. This capability made it possible to compare the growth of 3D tumor models of different spatial composition, and to examine the migration of cells in these structures. PMID:21573103

  5. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  6. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  7. 3D Printed Bionic Ears

    PubMed Central

    Mannoor, Manu S.; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A.; Soboyejo, Winston O.; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the precise anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  8. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at lower left in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  9. Martian terrain & airbags - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Portions of the lander's deflated airbags and a petal are at the lower area of this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  10. Tomographic 3D-PIV and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsinga, Gerrit E.; Wieneke, Bernhard; Scarano, Fulvio; Schröder, Andreas

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry is a 3D PIV technique based on the illumination, recording, reconstruction and analysis of tracer-particle motion within a three-dimensional measurement volume. The recently developed technique makes use of several simultaneous views of the illuminated particles, typically 4, and their three-dimensional reconstruction as a light-intensity distribution by means of optical tomography. The reconstruction is performed with the MART algorithm (multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique), yielding a 3D distribution of light intensity discretized over an array of voxels. The reconstructed tomogram pair is then analyzed by means of 3D crosscorrelation with an iterative multigrid volume-deformation technique, returning the three-component velocity vector distribution over the measurement volume. The implementation of the tomographic technique in time-resolved mode by means of high repetition rate PIV hardware has the capability to yield 4D velocity information. The first part of the chapter describes the operation principles and gives a detailed assessment of the tomographic reconstruction algorithm performance based upon a computer-simulated experiment. The second part of the chapter proposes four applications on two flow cases: 1. the transitional wake behind a circular cylinder; 2. the turbulent boundary layer developing over a flat plate. For the first case, experiments in air at ReD = 2700 are described together with the experimental assessment of the tomographic reconstruction accuracy. In this experiment a direct comparison is made between the results obtained by tomographic PIV and stereo-PIV. Experiments conducted in a water facility on the cylinder wake shows the extension of the technique to time-resolved measurements in water at ReD = 540 by means of a low repetition rate PIV system. A high data yield is obtained using high-resolution cameras (2k × 2k pixels) returning 650k vectors per volume. Measurements of the

  11. 3D Ultrasonic Wave Simulations for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Leckey Cara A/; Miler, Corey A.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) for the detection of damage in aerospace materials is an important area of research at NASA. Ultrasonic guided Lamb waves are a promising SHM damage detection technique since the waves can propagate long distances. For complicated flaw geometries experimental signals can be difficult to interpret. High performance computing can now handle full 3-dimensional (3D) simulations of elastic wave propagation in materials. We have developed and implemented parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (3D EFIT) code to investigate ultrasound scattering from flaws in materials. EFIT results have been compared to experimental data and the simulations provide unique insight into details of the wave behavior. This type of insight is useful for developing optimized experimental SHM techniques. 3D EFIT can also be expanded to model wave propagation and scattering in anisotropic composite materials.

  12. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-06

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction.

  13. Quasi 3D dispersion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakucz, P.

    2003-04-01

    This paper studies the problem of tracer dispersion in a coloured fluid flowing through a two-phase 3D rough channel-system in a 40 cm*40 cm plexi-container filled by homogen glass fractions and colourless fluid. The unstable interface between the driving coloured fluid and the colourless fluid develops viscous fingers with a fractal structure at high capillary number. Five two-dimensional fractal fronts have been observed at the same time using four cameras along the vertical side-walls and using one camera located above the plexi-container. In possession of five fronts the spatial concentration contours are determined using statistical models. The concentration contours are self-affine fractal curves with a fractal dimension D=2.19. This result is valid for disperison at high Péclet numbers.

  14. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  15. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    ScienceCinema

    Love, Lonnie

    2016-11-02

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  16. Image based 3D city modeling : Comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Jain, K.; Mandla, V. R.

    2014-06-01

    3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth's surface and it's related objects such as building, tree, vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. The demand of 3D city modeling is increasing rapidly for various engineering and non-engineering applications. Generally four main image based approaches were used for virtual 3D city models generation. In first approach, researchers were used Sketch based modeling, second method is Procedural grammar based modeling, third approach is Close range photogrammetry based modeling and fourth approach is mainly based on Computer Vision techniques. SketchUp, CityEngine, Photomodeler and Agisoft Photoscan are the main softwares to represent these approaches respectively. These softwares have different approaches & methods suitable for image based 3D city modeling. Literature study shows that till date, there is no complete such type of comparative study available to create complete 3D city model by using images. This paper gives a comparative assessment of these four image based 3D modeling approaches. This comparative study is mainly based on data acquisition methods, data processing techniques and output 3D model products. For this research work, study area is the campus of civil engineering department, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India). This 3D campus acts as a prototype for city. This study also explains various governing parameters, factors and work experiences. This research work also gives a brief introduction, strengths and weakness of these four image based techniques. Some personal comment is also given as what can do or what can't do from these softwares. At the last, this study shows; it concluded that, each and every software has some advantages and limitations. Choice of software depends on user requirements of 3D project. For normal visualization project, SketchUp software is a good option. For 3D documentation record, Photomodeler gives good result. For Large city

  17. Direct-Write 3D Nanoprinting of Plasmonic Structures

    DOE PAGES

    Winkler, Robert; Schmidt, Franz-Philipp; Karl-Franzens Univ.; ...

    2016-11-23

    During the past decade, significant progress has been made in the field of resonant optics ranging from fundamental aspects to concrete applications. And while several techniques have been introduced for the fabrication of highly defined metallic nanostructures, the synthesis of complex, free-standing three-dimensional (3D) structures is still an intriguing, but so far intractable, challenge. Here, we demonstrate a 3D direct-write synthesis approach that addresses this challenge. Specifically, we succeeded in the direct-write fabrication of 3D nanoarchitectures via electron-stimulated reactions, which are applicable on virtually any material and surface morphology. Furthermore, by that, complex 3D nanostructures composed of highly compact, puremore » gold can be fabricated, which reveal strong plasmonic activity and pave the way for a new generation of 3D nanoplasmonic architectures that can be printed on-demand.« less

  18. A 3-D SAR approach to IFSAR processing

    SciTech Connect

    DOERRY,ARMIN W.; BICKEL,DOUGLAS L.

    2000-03-01

    Interferometric SAR (IFSAR) can be shown to be a special case of 3-D SAR image formation. In fact, traditional IFSAR processing results in the equivalent of merely a super-resolved, under-sampled, 3-D SAR image. However, when approached as a 3-D SAR problem, a number of IFSAR properties and anomalies are easily explained. For example, IFSAR decorrelation with height is merely ordinary migration in 3-D SAR. Consequently, treating IFSAR as a 3-D SAR problem allows insight and development of proper motion compensation techniques and image formation operations to facilitate optimal height estimation. Furthermore, multiple antenna phase centers and baselines are easily incorporated into this formulation, providing essentially a sparse array in the elevation dimension. This paper shows the Polar Format image formation algorithm extended to 3 dimensions, and then proceeds to apply it to the IFSAR collection geometry. This suggests a more optimal reordering of the traditional IFSAR processing steps.

  19. Direct-Write 3D Nanoprinting of Plasmonic Structures.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Robert; Schmidt, Franz-Philipp; Haselmann, Ulrich; Fowlkes, Jason D; Lewis, Brett B; Kothleitner, Gerald; Rack, Philip D; Plank, Harald

    2017-03-08

    During the past decade, significant progress has been made in the field of resonant optics ranging from fundamental aspects to concrete applications. While several techniques have been introduced for the fabrication of highly defined metallic nanostructures, the synthesis of complex, free-standing three-dimensional (3D) structures is still an intriguing, but so far intractable, challenge. In this study, we demonstrate a 3D direct-write synthesis approach that addresses this challenge. Specifically, we succeeded in the direct-write fabrication of 3D nanoarchitectures via electron-stimulated reactions, which are applicable on virtually any material and surface morphology. By that, complex 3D nanostructures composed of highly compact, pure gold can be fabricated, which reveal strong plasmonic activity and pave the way for a new generation of 3D nanoplasmonic architectures that can be printed on-demand.

  20. Direct-Write 3D Nanoprinting of Plasmonic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, Robert; Schmidt, Franz-Philipp; Haselmann, Ulrich; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Lewis, Brett B.; Kothleitner, Gerald; Rack, Philip D.; Plank, Harald

    2016-11-23

    During the past decade, significant progress has been made in the field of resonant optics ranging from fundamental aspects to concrete applications. And while several techniques have been introduced for the fabrication of highly defined metallic nanostructures, the synthesis of complex, free-standing three-dimensional (3D) structures is still an intriguing, but so far intractable, challenge. Here, we demonstrate a 3D direct-write synthesis approach that addresses this challenge. Specifically, we succeeded in the direct-write fabrication of 3D nanoarchitectures via electron-stimulated reactions, which are applicable on virtually any material and surface morphology. Furthermore, by that, complex 3D nanostructures composed of highly compact, pure gold can be fabricated, which reveal strong plasmonic activity and pave the way for a new generation of 3D nanoplasmonic architectures that can be printed on-demand.

  1. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  2. Advanced Data Visualization in Astrophysics: The X3D Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Owen, Chris I.; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta

    2016-02-01

    Most modern astrophysical data sets are multi-dimensional; a characteristic that can nowadays generally be conserved and exploited scientifically during the data reduction/simulation and analysis cascades. However, the same multi-dimensional data sets are systematically cropped, sliced, and/or projected to printable two-dimensional diagrams at the publication stage. In this article, we introduce the concept of the “X3D pathway” as a mean of simplifying and easing the access to data visualization and publication via three-dimensional (3D) diagrams. The X3D pathway exploits the facts that (1) the X3D 3D file format lies at the center of a product tree that includes interactive HTML documents, 3D printing, and high-end animations, and (2) all high-impact-factor and peer-reviewed journals in astrophysics are now published (some exclusively) online. We argue that the X3D standard is an ideal vector for sharing multi-dimensional data sets because it provides direct access to a range of different data visualization techniques, is fully open source, and is a well-defined standard from the International Organization for Standardization. Unlike other earlier propositions to publish multi-dimensional data sets via 3D diagrams, the X3D pathway is not tied to specific software (prone to rapid and unexpected evolution), but instead is compatible with a range of open-source software already in use by our community. The interactive HTML branch of the X3D pathway is also actively supported by leading peer-reviewed journals in the field of astrophysics. Finally, this article provides interested readers with a detailed set of practical astrophysical examples designed to act as a stepping stone toward the implementation of the X3D pathway for any other data set.

  3. Volumetric 3D Display System with Static Screen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Current display technology has relied on flat, 2D screens that cannot truly convey the third dimension of visual information: depth. In contrast to conventional visualization that is primarily based on 2D flat screens, the volumetric 3D display possesses a true 3D display volume, and places physically each 3D voxel in displayed 3D images at the true 3D (x,y,z) spatial position. Each voxel, analogous to a pixel in a 2D image, emits light from that position to form a real 3D image in the eyes of the viewers. Such true volumetric 3D display technology provides both physiological (accommodation, convergence, binocular disparity, and motion parallax) and psychological (image size, linear perspective, shading, brightness, etc.) depth cues to human visual systems to help in the perception of 3D objects. In a volumetric 3D display, viewers can watch the displayed 3D images from a completely 360 view without using any special eyewear. The volumetric 3D display techniques may lead to a quantum leap in information display technology and can dramatically change the ways humans interact with computers, which can lead to significant improvements in the efficiency of learning and knowledge man