Science.gov

Sample records for 3d potential field

  1. Development of a 3D Potential Field Forward Modelling System in Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, P.

    2012-12-01

    The collection of potential field data has long been a standard part of geophysical exploration. Specifically, airborne magnetic data is collected routinely in any brown-fields area, because of the low cost and fast acquisition rate compared to other geophysical techniques. However, the interpretation of such data can be a daunting task, especially when 3D models are becoming more necessary. The current trend in modelling software is to follow either the modelling of individual profiles, which are then "joined" up into 3D sections, or to model in a full 3D using polygonal based models (Singh and Guptasarma, 2001). Unfortunately, both techniques have disadvantages. When modelling in 2.5D the impact of other profiles is not truly available on your current profile being modelled, and vice versa. The problem is not present in 3D, but 3D polygonal models, while being easy to construct the initial model, are not as easy to make fast changes to. In some cases, the entire model must be recreated from scratch. The ability to easily change a model is the very basis of forward modelling. With this is mind, the objective of the project was to: 1) Develop software which was truly modelling in 3D 2) Create a system which would allow the rapid changing of the 3D model, without the need to recreate the model. The solution was to adopt a voxel based approach, rather than a polygonal approach. The solution for a cube (Blakely 1996) was used to calculate potential field for each voxel. The voxels are then summed over the entire volume. The language used was python, because of its huge capacity for scientific development. It enables full 3D visualisation as well as complex mathematical routines. Some properties worth noting are: 1) Although 200 rows by 200 columns by 200 layers would imply 8 million calculations, in reality, since the calculation for adjacent voxels produces the same result, only 200 calculations are necessary. 2) Changes to susceptibility and density do not affect

  2. 3D stochastic inversion and joint inversion of potential fields for multi scale parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsipour, Pejman

    In this thesis we present the development of new techniques for the interpretation of potential field (gravity and magnetic data), which are the most widespread economic geophysical methods used for oil and mineral exploration. These new techniques help to address the long-standing issue with the interpretation of potential fields, namely the intrinsic non-uniqueness inversion of these types of data. The thesis takes the form of three papers (four including Appendix), which have been published, or soon to be published, in respected international journals. The purpose of the thesis is to introduce new methods based on 3D stochastical approaches for: 1) Inversion of potential field data (magnetic), 2) Multiscale Inversion using surface and borehole data and 3) Joint inversion of geophysical potential field data. We first present a stochastic inversion method based on a geostatistical approach to recover 3D susceptibility models from magnetic data. The aim of applying geostatistics is to provide quantitative descriptions of natural variables distributed in space or in time and space. We evaluate the uncertainty on the parameter model by using geostatistical unconditional simulations. The realizations are post-conditioned by cokriging to observation data. In order to avoid the natural tendency of the estimated structure to lay near the surface, depth weighting is included in the cokriging system. Then, we introduce algorithm for multiscale inversion, the presented algorithm has the capability of inverting data on multiple supports. The method involves four main steps: i. upscaling of borehole parameters (It could be density or susceptibility) to block parameters, ii. selection of block to use as constraints based on a threshold on kriging variance, iii. inversion of observation data with selected block densities as constraints, and iv. downscaling of inverted parameters to small prisms. Two modes of application are presented: estimation and simulation. Finally, a novel

  3. pynoddy 1.0: an experimental platform for automated 3-D kinematic and potential field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian Wellmann, J.; Thiele, Sam T.; Lindsay, Mark D.; Jessell, Mark W.

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel methodology for performing experiments with subsurface structural models using a set of flexible and extensible Python modules. We utilize the ability of kinematic modelling techniques to describe major deformational, tectonic, and magmatic events at low computational cost to develop experiments testing the interactions between multiple kinematic events, effect of uncertainty regarding event timing, and kinematic properties. These tests are simple to implement and perform, as they are automated within the Python scripting language, allowing the encapsulation of entire kinematic experiments within high-level class definitions and fully reproducible results. In addition, we provide a link to geophysical potential-field simulations to evaluate the effect of parameter uncertainties on maps of gravity and magnetics. We provide relevant fundamental information on kinematic modelling and our implementation, and showcase the application of our novel methods to investigate the interaction of multiple tectonic events on a pre-defined stratigraphy, the effect of changing kinematic parameters on simulated geophysical potential fields, and the distribution of uncertain areas in a full 3-D kinematic model, based on estimated uncertainties in kinematic input parameters. Additional possibilities for linking kinematic modelling to subsequent process simulations are discussed, as well as additional aspects of future research. Our modules are freely available on github, including documentation and tutorial examples, and we encourage the contribution to this project.

  4. pynoddy 1.0: an experimental platform for automated 3-D kinematic and potential field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellmann, J. F.; Thiele, S. T.; Lindsay, M. D.; Jessell, M. W.

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel methodology for performing experiments with subsurface structural models using a set of flexible and extensible Python modules. We utilise the ability of kinematic modelling techniques to describe major deformational, tectonic, and magmatic events at low computational cost to develop experiments testing the interactions between multiple kinematic events, effect of uncertainty regarding event timing, and kinematic properties. These tests are simple to implement and perform, as they are automated within the Python scripting language, allowing the encapsulation of entire kinematic experiments within high-level class definitions and fully reproducible results. In addition, we provide a~link to geophysical potential-field simulations to evaluate the effect of parameter uncertainties on maps of gravity and magnetics. We provide relevant fundamental information on kinematic modelling and our implementation, and showcase the application of our novel methods to investigate the interaction of multiple tectonic events on a pre-defined stratigraphy, the effect of changing kinematic parameters on simulated geophysical potential-fields, and the distribution of uncertain areas in a full 3-D kinematic model, based on estimated uncertainties in kinematic input parameters. Additional possibilities for linking kinematic modelling to subsequent process simulations are discussed, as well as additional aspects of future research. Our modules are freely available on github, including documentation and tutorial examples, and we encourage the contribution to this project.

  5. New Two-stage Approach For 3d Potential Field Data Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prutkin, I. L.

    From the author's viewpoint the main challenges for a geophysicist dealing with po- tential field data inversion are following: 1) to make really three-dimensional inversion (to avoid the assumption that the object sought is an infinite cylinder); 2) to leave the simplest bodies (prisms, ellipsoids, cylinders of finite length) for the objects of more complex geometry, 3) to take into account the non-uniqueness of the inverse problem. In our investigation we've made an attempt to solve the above-mentioned problems. We take into account the non- uniqueness of the inverse problem in the framework of the equivalence theory developed by A.V. Tsyrulsky. We have reduced 3D grav- ity and magnetic inverse problems to the non-linear integral equations of the 1st kind relative to the function determining geometry of the object sought. They include a physical parameter as a numerical factor. Substituting different values of it, we obtain the opportunity to construct the whole equivalent family of the solutions. New inte- gral equations have been derived, which integrands are algebraic relative the function sought and don't contain its derivatives. The method of local corrections has been suggested, which makes it possible to curtail the time required to solve an inverse problem approximately by an order of magnitude. The parameterization of the solu- tion sought and regularization of an inverse problem were studied. On the base of his equivalence theory A.V. Tsyrulsky had suggested two-stage approach for 2D gravity and magnetic anomalies interpretation. The aim of the first stage is to approximate the observed field by the field of a sum of the simplest sources (point sources, thin layers, etc.) of no geological sense. On the second stage the field of a sum of some sources is regarded as a field of the object sought, we are able to try different variants to unite sources and to construct the equivalent family of solutions. Sole member of the family should be chosen with taking

  6. Modeling of 3d Space-time Surface of Potential Fields and Hydrogeologic Modeling of Nuclear Waste Disposal Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestopalov, V.; Bondarenko, Y.; Zayonts, I.; Rudenko, Y.

    Introduction After the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) disaster (04.26.1986) a huge amount (over 2000 sq. km) of nuclear wastes appeared within so-called "Cher- nobyl Exclusion Zone" (CEZ). At present there are not enough storage facilities in the Ukraine for safe disposal of nuclear wastes and hazardous chemical wastes. The urgent problem now is safe isolation of these dangerous wastes. According to the developed state program of radioactive waste management, the construction of a na- tional storage facility of nuclear wastes is planned. It is also possible to create regional storage facilities for hazardous chemical wastes. The region of our exploration cov- ers the eastern part of the Korosten Plutone and its slope, reaching the CNPP. 3D Space-Time Surface Imaging of Geophysical Fields. There are only three direct meth- ods of stress field reconstruction in present practice, namely the field investigations based on the large-scale fracturing tests, petrotectonic and optical polarization meth- ods. Unfortunately, all these methods are extremely laborious and need the regular field tests, which is difficult to conduct in the areas of anisotropic rock outcrops. A compilation of magnetic and gravity data covering the CNPP area was carried out as a prelude to an interpretation study. More than thirty map products were generated from magnetic, gravity and geodesy data to prepare the 3D Space-Time Surface Images (3D STSI). Multi-layer topography and geophysic surfaces included: total magnetic intensity, isostatically-corrected Bouguer gravity, aspect and slope, first and second derivatives, vertical and horizontal curvature, histogram characteristics and space cor- relation coefficients between the gradient fields. Many maps shows the first and sec- ond derivatives of the potential fields, with the results of lineament (edge) structure detection superimposed. The lineament or edges of the potential fields are located from maximal gradient in many directions

  7. Decoding 3-D Reach and Grasp Kinematics from High-Frequency Local Field Potentials in Primate Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jun; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos; Donoghue, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Intracortical microelectrode array recordings generate a variety of neural signals with potential application as control signals in neural interface systems. Previous studies have focused on single and multiunit activity, as well as low frequency local field potentials (LFPs), but have not explored higher frequency (>200 Hz) LFPs. In addition, the potential to decode three dimensional (3-D) reach and grasp kinematics based on LFPs has not been demonstrated. Here, we use mutual information and decoding analyses to probe the information content about 3-D reaching and grasping of 7 different LFP frequency bands in the range of 0.3 Hz – 400 Hz. LFPs were recorded via 96-microelectrode arrays in primary motor cortex (M1) of two monkeys performing free reaching to grasp moving objects. Mutual information analyses revealed that higher frequency bands (e.g. 100 – 200 Hz and 200 – 400 Hz) carried the most information about the examined kinematics. Furthermore, Kalman filter decoding revealed that broadband high frequency LFPs, likely reflecting multiunit activity, provided the best decoding performance as well as substantial accuracy in reconstructing reach kinematics, grasp aperture and aperture velocity. These results indicate that LFPs, especially high frequency bands, could be useful signals for neural interfaces controlling 3-D reach and grasp kinematics. PMID:20403782

  8. Potential Geophysical Field Transformations and Combined 3D Modelling for Estimation the Seismic Site Effects on Example of Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, Lev; Meirova, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    It is well-known that the local seismic site effects may have a significant contribution to the intensity of damage and destruction (e.g., Hough et al., 1990; Regnier et al., 2000; Bonnefoy-Claudet et al., 2006; Haase et al., 2010). The thicknesses of sediments, which play a large role in amplification, usually are derived from seismic velocities. At the same time, thickness of sediments may be determined (or defined) on the basis of 3D combined gravity-magnetic modeling joined with available geological materials, seismic data and borehole section examination. Final result of such investigation is a 3D physical-geological model (PGM) reflecting main geological peculiarities of the area under study. Such a combined study needs in application of a reliable 3D mathematical algorithm of computation together with advanced methodology of 3D modeling. For this analysis the developed GSFC software was selected. The GSFC (Geological Space Field Calculation) program was developed for solving a direct 3-D gravity and magnetic prospecting problem under complex geological conditions (Khesin et al., 1996; Eppelbaum and Khesin, 2004). This program has been designed for computing the field of Δg (Bouguer, free-air or observed value anomalies), ΔZ, ΔX, ΔY , ΔT , as well as second derivatives of the gravitational potential under conditions of rugged relief and inclined magnetization. The geological space can be approximated by (1) three-dimensional, (2) semi-infinite bodies and (3) those infinite along the strike closed, L.H. non-closed, R.H. on-closed and open). Geological bodies are approximated by horizontal polygonal prisms. The program has the following main advantages (besides abovementioned ones): (1) Simultaneous computing of gravity and magnetic fields; (2) Description of the terrain relief by irregularly placed characteristic points; (3) Computation of the effect of the earth-air boundary by the method of selection directly in the process of interpretation; (4

  9. Potential Geophysical Field Transformations and Combined 3D Modelling for Estimation the Seismic Site Effects on Example of Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, Lev; Meirova, Tatiana

    2015-04-01

    It is well-known that the local seismic site effects may have a significant contribution to the intensity of damage and destruction (e.g., Hough et al., 1990; Regnier et al., 2000; Bonnefoy-Claudet et al., 2006; Haase et al., 2010). The thicknesses of sediments, which play a large role in amplification, usually are derived from seismic velocities. At the same time, thickness of sediments may be determined (or defined) on the basis of 3D combined gravity-magnetic modeling joined with available geological materials, seismic data and borehole section examination. Final result of such investigation is a 3D physical-geological model (PGM) reflecting main geological peculiarities of the area under study. Such a combined study needs in application of a reliable 3D mathematical algorithm of computation together with advanced methodology of 3D modeling. For this analysis the developed GSFC software was selected. The GSFC (Geological Space Field Calculation) program was developed for solving a direct 3-D gravity and magnetic prospecting problem under complex geological conditions (Khesin et al., 1996; Eppelbaum and Khesin, 2004). This program has been designed for computing the field of Δg (Bouguer, free-air or observed value anomalies), ΔZ, ΔX, ΔY , ΔT , as well as second derivatives of the gravitational potential under conditions of rugged relief and inclined magnetization. The geological space can be approximated by (1) three-dimensional, (2) semi-infinite bodies and (3) those infinite along the strike closed, L.H. non-closed, R.H. on-closed and open). Geological bodies are approximated by horizontal polygonal prisms. The program has the following main advantages (besides abovementioned ones): (1) Simultaneous computing of gravity and magnetic fields; (2) Description of the terrain relief by irregularly placed characteristic points; (3) Computation of the effect of the earth-air boundary by the method of selection directly in the process of interpretation; (4

  10. Palacios field: A 3-D case history

    SciTech Connect

    McWhorter, R.; Torguson, B.

    1994-12-31

    In late 1992, Mitchell Energy Corporation acquired a 7.75 sq mi (20.0 km{sup 2}) 3-D seismic survey over Palacios field. Matagorda County, Texas. The company shot the survey to help evaluate the field for further development by delineating the fault pattern of the producing Middle Oligocene Frio interval. They compare the mapping of the field before and after the 3-D survey. This comparison shows that the 3-D volume yields superior fault imaging and interpretability compared to the dense 2-D data set. The problems with the 2-D data set are improper imaging of small and oblique faults and insufficient coverage over a complex fault pattern. Whereas the 2-D data set validated a simple fault model, the 3-D volume revealed a more complex history of faulting that includes three different fault systems. This discovery enabled them to reconstruct the depositional and structural history of Palacios field.

  11. Structured light field 3D imaging.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zewei; Liu, Xiaoli; Peng, Xiang; Yin, Yongkai; Li, Ameng; Wu, Jiachen; Gao, Bruce Z

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a method by means of light field imaging under structured illumination to deal with high dynamic range 3D imaging. Fringe patterns are projected onto a scene and modulated by the scene depth then a structured light field is detected using light field recording devices. The structured light field contains information about ray direction and phase-encoded depth, via which the scene depth can be estimated from different directions. The multidirectional depth estimation can achieve high dynamic 3D imaging effectively. We analyzed and derived the phase-depth mapping in the structured light field and then proposed a flexible ray-based calibration approach to determine the independent mapping coefficients for each ray. Experimental results demonstrated the validity of the proposed method to perform high-quality 3D imaging for highly and lowly reflective surfaces. PMID:27607639

  12. Combined magnetic vector-scalar potential finite element computation of 3D magnetic field and performance of modified Lundell alternators in Space Station applications. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ren H.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential (MVP) based finite element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based FE formulations for computation of three-dimensional (3D) magnetostatic fields is developed. This combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method leads to considerable reduction by nearly a factor of 3 in the number of unknowns in comparison to the number of unknowns which must be computed in global MVP based FE solutions. This method allows one to incorporate portions of iron cores sandwiched in between coils (conductors) in current-carrying regions. Thus, it greatly simplifies the geometries of current carrying regions (in comparison with the exclusive MSP based methods) in electric machinery applications. A unique feature of this approach is that the global MSP solution is single valued in nature, that is, no branch cut is needed. This is again a superiority over the exclusive MSP based methods. A Newton-Raphson procedure with a concept of an adaptive relaxation factor was developed and successfully used in solving the 3D-FE problem with magnetic material anisotropy and nonlinearity. Accordingly, this combined MVP-MSP 3D-FE method is most suited for solution of large scale global type magnetic field computations in rotating electric machinery with very complex magnetic circuit geometries, as well as nonlinear and anisotropic material properties.

  13. A simulation study of microwave field effects on a 3D orthorhombic lattice of rotating dipoles: short-range potential energy variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapranov, Sergey V.; Kouzaev, Guennadi A.

    2016-05-01

    Variation of the short-range potential energy of interaction of nearest dipoles in a three-dimensional (3D) orthorhombic lattice exposed to microwave electric fields is studied by means of the Langevin dynamics simulations. The global increase of the mean potential energy is typical for all the frequencies and intensities at lower temperatures, whereas separate potential energy peaks or peak chains are observed at intermediate temperatures. A simple statistical model proposed to account for the temperature dependence of the field intensity for potential energy peaks suggests the concerted collective rotation of the dipoles. The temperature dependence of the peak frequency is explained using a combination of the one-dimensional Kramers and the resonant activation theories applied to the field-driven collective rotation, with the nearly degenerate angular coordinates of the dipoles being used as a single effective coordinate.

  14. Rift processes and crustal structure of the Amundsen Sea Embayment, West Antarctica, from 3D potential field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalberg, Thomas; Gohl, Karsten; Eagles, Graeme; Spiegel, Cornelia

    2015-12-01

    The Amundsen Sea Embayment of West Antarctica is of particular interest as it provides critical geological boundary conditions in better understanding the dynamic behavior of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, which is undergoing rapid ice loss in the Amundsen Sea sector. One of the highly debated hypothesis is whether this region has been affected by the West Antarctic Rift System, which is one of the largest in the world and the dominating tectonic feature in West Antarctica. Previous geophysical studies suggested an eastward continuation of this rift system into the Amundsen Sea Embayment. This geophysical study of the Amundsen Sea Embayment presents a compilation of data collected during two RV Polarstern expeditions in the Amundsen Sea Embayment of West Antarctica in 2006 and 2010. Bathymetry and satellite-derived gravity data of the Amundsen Sea Embayment complete the dataset. Our 3-D gravity and magnetic models of the lithospheric architecture and development of this Pacific margin improve previous interpretations from 2-D models of the region. The crust-mantle boundary beneath the continental rise and shelf is between 14 and 29 km deep. The imaged basement structure can be related to rift basins within the Amundsen Sea Embayment, some of which can be interpreted as products of the Cretaceous rift and break-up phase and some as products of later propagation of the West Antarctic Rift System into the region. An estimate of the flexural rigidity of the lithosphere reveals a thin elastic thickness in the eastern embayment which increases towards the west. The results are comparable to estimates in other rift systems such as the Basin and Range province or the East African Rift. Based on these results, we infer an arm of the West Antarctic Rift System is superposed on a distributed Cretaceous rift province in the Amundsen Sea Embayment. Finally, the embayment was affected by magmatism from discrete sources along the Pacific margin of West Antarctica in the Cenozoic.

  15. Visualization of 3-D tensor fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesselink, L.

    1996-01-01

    Second-order tensor fields have applications in many different areas of physics, such as general relativity and fluid mechanics. The wealth of multivariate information in tensor fields makes them more complex and abstract than scalar and vector fields. Visualization is a good technique for scientists to gain new insights from them. Visualizing a 3-D continuous tensor field is equivalent to simultaneously visualizing its three eigenvector fields. In the past, research has been conducted in the area of two-dimensional tensor fields. It was shown that degenerate points, defined as points where eigenvalues are equal to each other, are the basic singularities underlying the topology of tensor fields. Moreover, it was shown that eigenvectors never cross each other except at degenerate points. Since we live in a three-dimensional world, it is important for us to understand the underlying physics of this world. In this report, we describe a new method for locating degenerate points along with the conditions for classifying them in three-dimensional space. Finally, we discuss some topological features of three-dimensional tensor fields, and interpret topological patterns in terms of physical properties.

  16. Advances toward field application of 3D hydraulic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardiff, M. A.; Barrash, W.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    Hydraulic tomography (HT) is a technique that shows great potential for aquifer characterization and one that holds the promise of producing 3D hydraulic property distributions, given suitable equipment. First suggested over 15 years ago, HT assimilates distributed aquifer pressure (head) response data collected during a series of multiple pumping tests to produce estimates of aquifer property variability. Unlike traditional curve-matching analyses, which assume homogeneity or "effective" parameters within the radius of influence of a hydrologic test, HT analysis relies on numerical models with detailed heterogeneity in order to invert for the highly resolved 3D parameter distribution that jointly fits all data. Several numerical and laboratory investigations of characterization using HT have shown that property distributions can be accurately estimated between observation locations when experiments are correctly designed - a property not always shared by other, simpler 1D characterization approaches such as partially-penetrating slug tests. HT may represent one of the best methods available for obtaining detailed 3D aquifer property descriptions, especially in deep or "hard" aquifer materials, where direct-push methods may not be feasible. However, to date HT has not yet been widely adopted at contaminated field sites. We believe that current perceived impediments to HT adoption center around four key issues: 1) A paucity in the scientific literature of proven, cross-validated 3D field applications 2) A lack of guidelines and best practices for performing field 3D HT experiments; 3) Practical difficulty and time commitment associated with the installation of a large number of high-accuracy sampling locations, and the running of a large number of pumping tests; and 4) Computational difficulty associated with solving large-scale inverse problems for parameter identification. In this talk, we present current results in 3D HT research that addresses these four issues

  17. Decoding 3D reach and grasp from hybrid signals in motor and premotor cortices: spikes, multiunit activity, and local field potentials.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Arjun K; Truccolo, Wilson; Vargas-Irwin, Carlos E; Donoghue, John P

    2012-03-01

    Neural activity in motor cortex during reach and grasp movements shows modulations in a broad range of signals from single-neuron spiking activity (SA) to various frequency bands in broadband local field potentials (LFPs). In particular, spatiotemporal patterns in multiband LFPs are thought to reflect dendritic integration of local and interareal synaptic inputs, attentional and preparatory processes, and multiunit activity (MUA) related to movement representation in the local motor area. Nevertheless, the relationship between multiband LFPs and SA, and their relationship to movement parameters and their relative value as brain-computer interface (BCI) control signals, remain poorly understood. Also, although this broad range of signals may provide complementary information channels in primary (MI) and ventral premotor (PMv) areas, areal differences in information have not been systematically examined. Here, for the first time, the amount of information in SA and multiband LFPs was compared for MI and PMv by recording from dual 96-multielectrode arrays while monkeys made naturalistic reach and grasp actions. Information was assessed as decoding accuracy for 3D arm end point and grip aperture kinematics based on SA or LFPs in MI and PMv, or combinations of signal types across areas. In contrast with previous studies with ≤16 simultaneous electrodes, here ensembles of >16 units (on average) carried more information than multiband, multichannel LFPs. Furthermore, reach and grasp information added by various LFP frequency bands was not independent from that in SA ensembles but rather typically less than and primarily contained within the latter. Notably, MI and PMv did not show a particular bias toward reach or grasp for this task or for a broad range of signal types. For BCIs, our results indicate that neuronal ensemble spiking is the preferred signal for decoding, while LFPs and combined signals from PMv and MI can add robustness to BCI control. PMID:22157115

  18. Light field display and 3D image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwane, Toru

    2016-06-01

    Light field optics and its applications become rather popular in these days. With light field optics or light field thesis, real 3D space can be described in 2D plane as 4D data, which we call as light field data. This process can be divided in two procedures. First, real3D scene is optically reduced with imaging lens. Second, this optically reduced 3D image is encoded into light field data. In later procedure we can say that 3D information is encoded onto a plane as 2D data by lens array plate. This transformation is reversible and acquired light field data can be decoded again into 3D image with the arrayed lens plate. "Refocusing" (focusing image on your favorite point after taking a picture), light-field camera's most popular function, is some kind of sectioning process from encoded 3D data (light field data) to 2D image. In this paper at first I show our actual light field camera and our 3D display using acquired and computer-simulated light field data, on which real 3D image is reconstructed. In second I explain our data processing method whose arithmetic operation is performed not in Fourier domain but in real domain. Then our 3D display system is characterized by a few features; reconstructed image is of finer resolutions than density of arrayed lenses and it is not necessary to adjust lens array plate to flat display on which light field data is displayed.

  19. Advancing the field of 3D biomaterial printing.

    PubMed

    Jakus, Adam E; Rutz, Alexandra L; Shah, Ramille N

    2016-01-11

    3D biomaterial printing has emerged as a potentially revolutionary technology, promising to transform both research and medical therapeutics. Although there has been recent progress in the field, on-demand fabrication of functional and transplantable tissues and organs is still a distant reality. To advance to this point, there are two major technical challenges that must be overcome. The first is expanding upon the limited variety of available 3D printable biomaterials (biomaterial inks), which currently do not adequately represent the physical, chemical, and biological complexity and diversity of tissues and organs within the human body. Newly developed biomaterial inks and the resulting 3D printed constructs must meet numerous interdependent requirements, including those that lead to optimal printing, structural, and biological outcomes. The second challenge is developing and implementing comprehensive biomaterial ink and printed structure characterization combined with in vitro and in vivo tissue- and organ-specific evaluation. This perspective outlines considerations for addressing these technical hurdles that, once overcome, will facilitate rapid advancement of 3D biomaterial printing as an indispensable tool for both investigating complex tissue and organ morphogenesis and for developing functional devices for a variety of diagnostic and regenerative medicine applications.

  20. Advancing the field of 3D biomaterial printing.

    PubMed

    Jakus, Adam E; Rutz, Alexandra L; Shah, Ramille N

    2016-02-01

    3D biomaterial printing has emerged as a potentially revolutionary technology, promising to transform both research and medical therapeutics. Although there has been recent progress in the field, on-demand fabrication of functional and transplantable tissues and organs is still a distant reality. To advance to this point, there are two major technical challenges that must be overcome. The first is expanding upon the limited variety of available 3D printable biomaterials (biomaterial inks), which currently do not adequately represent the physical, chemical, and biological complexity and diversity of tissues and organs within the human body. Newly developed biomaterial inks and the resulting 3D printed constructs must meet numerous interdependent requirements, including those that lead to optimal printing, structural, and biological outcomes. The second challenge is developing and implementing comprehensive biomaterial ink and printed structure characterization combined with in vitro and in vivo tissue- and organ-specific evaluation. This perspective outlines considerations for addressing these technical hurdles that, once overcome, will facilitate rapid advancement of 3D biomaterial printing as an indispensable tool for both investigating complex tissue and organ morphogenesis and for developing functional devices for a variety of diagnostic and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26752507

  1. 3D simulation of parametric ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieur, Fabrice

    2012-09-01

    Parametric sonar is widely used for seafloor characterization, sub-bottom object detection, or underwater communication. It takes advantage of the interaction between two primary beams transmitted at slightly different frequencies. Due to nonlinear propagation, two secondary beams at the sum and difference frequency are generated. The signal at the difference frequency combines sub-bottom penetration due to low attenuation, and high resolution due to an acoustic beam with a narrow mainlobe and negligible sidelobes. A method is presented that provides a full three dimensional estimate for the amplitude of the secondary fields at any depth without the need for stepwise propagation. The method applies to two dimensional transducers of arbitrary geometry and distribution transmitting wideband pulses. The method is limited by the assumption of a quasi-linear propagation in a homogeneous medium. The obtained results in the case of a flat piston transducer compare favorably to previous measurements and numerical estimates from proved methods.

  2. 3D Holographic Technology and Its Educational Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hyangsook

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses a number of significant developments in 3D holographic technology, its potential to revolutionize aspects of teaching and learning, and challenges of implementing the technology in educational settings.

  3. The 3D Flow Field Around an Embedded Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Artymowicz, Pawel; Wu, Yanqin

    2015-10-01

    3D modifications to the well-studied 2D flow topology around an embedded planet have the potential to resolve long-standing problems in planet formation theory. We present a detailed analysis of the 3D isothermal flow field around a 5 Earth-mass planet on a fixed circular orbit, simulated using our graphics processing unit hydrodynamics code PEnGUIn. We find that, overall, the horseshoe region has a columnar structure extending vertically much beyond the Hill sphere of the planet. This columnar structure is only broken for some of the widest horseshoe streamlines, along which high altitude fluid descends rapidly into the planet’s Bondi sphere, performs one horseshoe turn, and exits the Bondi sphere radially in the midplane. A portion of this flow exits the horseshoe region altogether, which we refer to as the “transient” horseshoe flow. The flow continues as it rolls up into a pair of up-down symmetric horizontal vortex lines shed into the wake of the planet. This flow, unique to 3D, affects both planet accretion and migration. It prevents the planet from sustaining a hydrostatic atmosphere due to its intrusion into the Bondi sphere, and leads to a significant corotation torque on the planet, unanticipated by 2D analysis. In the reported simulation, starting with a {{Σ }}˜ {r}-3/2 radial surface density profile, this torque is positive and partially cancels with the negative differential Lindblad torque, resulting in a factor of three slower planet migration rate. Finally, we report 3D effects can be suppressed by a sufficiently large disk viscosity, leading to results similar to 2D.

  4. General design method for 3-dimensional, potential flow fields. Part 2: Computer program DIN3D1 for simple, unbranched ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanitz, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The general design method for three-dimensional, potential, incompressible or subsonic-compressible flow developed in part 1 of this report is applied to the design of simple, unbranched ducts. A computer program, DIN3D1, is developed and five numerical examples are presented: a nozzle, two elbows, an S-duct, and the preliminary design of a side inlet for turbomachines. The two major inputs to the program are the upstream boundary shape and the lateral velocity distribution on the duct wall. As a result of these inputs, boundary conditions are overprescribed and the problem is ill posed. However, it appears that there are degrees of compatibility between these two major inputs and that, for reasonably compatible inputs, satisfactory solutions can be obtained. By not prescribing the shape of the upstream boundary, the problem presumably becomes well posed, but it is not clear how to formulate a practical design method under this circumstance. Nor does it appear desirable, because the designer usually needs to retain control over the upstream (or downstream) boundary shape. The problem is further complicated by the fact that, unlike the two-dimensional case, and irrespective of the upstream boundary shape, some prescribed lateral velocity distributions do not have proper solutions.

  5. A Volume Rendering Framework for Visualizing 3D Flow Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Hsien-Hsi; Li, Liya; Shen, Han-Wei; Tai, Wen-Kai

    In this paper, we present a volume rendering framework for visualizing 3D flow fields. We introduce the concept of coherence field which evaluates the representativeness of a given streamline set for the underlying 3D vector field. Visualization of the coherence field can provide effective visual feedback to the user for incremental insertion of more streamline seeds. Given an initial set of streamlines, a coherence volume is constructed from a distance field to measure the similarity between the existing streamlines and those in their nearby regions based on the difference between the approximate and the actual vector directions. With the visual feedback obtained from rendering the coherence volume, new streamline seeds can be selected by the user or by a heuristic seed selection algorithm to adaptively improve the coherence volume. An improved volume rendering technique that can render user-defined appearance textures is proposed to facilitate macro-visualization of 3D vector fields.

  6. Visualization of 2-D and 3-D Tensor Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesselink, Lambertus

    1997-01-01

    In previous work we have developed a novel approach to visualizing second order symmetric 2-D tensor fields based on degenerate point analysis. At degenerate points the eigenvalues are either zero or equal to each other, and the hyper-streamlines about these points give rise to tri-sector or wedge points. These singularities and their connecting hyper-streamlines determine the topology of the tensor field. In this study we are developing new methods for analyzing and displaying 3-D tensor fields. This problem is considerably more difficult than the 2-D one, as the richness of the data set is much larger. Here we report on our progress and a novel method to find , analyze and display 3-D degenerate points. First we discuss the theory, then an application involving a 3-D tensor field, the Boussinesq problem with two forces.

  7. Visualization of 2-D and 3-D Tensor Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesselink, Lambertus

    1995-01-01

    In previous work we have developed a novel approach to visualizing second order symmetric 2-D tensor fields based on degenerate point analysis. At degenerate points the eigenvalues are either zero or equal to each other, and the hyperstreamlines about these points give rise to trisector or wedge points. These singularities and their connecting hyperstreamlines determine the topology of the tensor field. In this study we are developing new methods for analyzing and displaying 3-D tensor fields. This problem is considerably more difficult than the 2-D one, as the richness of the data set is much larger. Here we report on our progress and a novel method to find, analyze and display 3-D degenerate points. First we discuss the theory, then an application involving a 3-D tensor field, the Boussinesq problem with two forces.

  8. Imaging 3D strain field monitoring during hydraulic fracturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rongzhang; Zaghloul, Mohamed A. S.; Yan, Aidong; Li, Shuo; Lu, Guanyi; Ames, Brandon C.; Zolfaghari, Navid; Bunger, Andrew P.; Li, Ming-Jun; Chen, Kevin P.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we present a distributed fiber optic sensing scheme to study 3D strain fields inside concrete cubes during hydraulic fracturing process. Optical fibers embedded in concrete were used to monitor 3D strain field build-up with external hydraulic pressures. High spatial resolution strain fields were interrogated by the in-fiber Rayleigh backscattering with 1-cm spatial resolution using optical frequency domain reflectometry. The fiber optics sensor scheme presented in this paper provides scientists and engineers a unique laboratory tool to understand the hydraulic fracturing processes in various rock formations and its impacts to environments.

  9. 3D quantum gravity and effective noncommutative quantum field theory.

    PubMed

    Freidel, Laurent; Livine, Etera R

    2006-06-01

    We show that the effective dynamics of matter fields coupled to 3D quantum gravity is described after integration over the gravitational degrees of freedom by a braided noncommutative quantum field theory symmetric under a kappa deformation of the Poincaré group.

  10. Potential of 3D City Models to assess flood vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, Kai; Bochow, Mathias; Schüttig, Martin; Nagel, Claus; Ross, Lutz; Kreibich, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    Vulnerability, as the product of exposure and susceptibility, is a key factor of the flood risk equation. Furthermore, the estimation of flood loss is very sensitive to the choice of the vulnerability model. Still, in contrast to elaborate hazard simulations, vulnerability is often considered in a simplified manner concerning the spatial resolution and geo-location of exposed objects as well as the susceptibility of these objects at risk. Usually, area specific potential flood loss is quantified on the level of aggregated land-use classes, and both hazard intensity and resistance characteristics of affected objects are represented in highly simplified terms. We investigate the potential of 3D City Models and spatial features derived from remote sensing data to improve the differentiation of vulnerability in flood risk assessment. 3D City Models are based on CityGML, an application scheme of the Geography Markup Language (GML), which represents the 3D geometry, 3D topology, semantics and appearance of objects on different levels of detail. As such, 3D City Models offer detailed spatial information which is useful to describe the exposure and to characterize the susceptibility of residential buildings at risk. This information is further consolidated with spatial features of the building stock derived from remote sensing data. Using this database a spatially detailed flood vulnerability model is developed by means of data-mining. Empirical flood damage data are used to derive and to validate flood susceptibility models for individual objects. We present first results from a prototype application in the city of Dresden, Germany. The vulnerability modeling based on 3D City Models and remote sensing data is compared i) to the generally accepted good engineering practice based on area specific loss potential and ii) to a highly detailed representation of flood vulnerability based on a building typology using urban structure types. Comparisons are drawn in terms of

  11. Electric field in 3D gravity with torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Blagojevic, M.; Cvetkovic, B.

    2008-08-15

    It is shown that in static and spherically symmetric configurations of the system of Maxwell field coupled to 3D gravity with torsion, at least one of the Maxwell field components has to vanish. Restricting our attention to the electric sector of the theory, we find an interesting exact solution, corresponding to the azimuthal electric field. Its geometric structure is to a large extent influenced by the values of two different central charges, associated to the asymptotic AdS structure of spacetime.

  12. Updated maps of Moho topography and the earth crust thickness in the Deep Arctic Ocean based on results of potential field zoning and 3-D gravity modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebovsky, Yury; Astafurova, Ekaterina; Chernykh, Andrey; Egorova, Alena; Kaminsky, Valeriy; Korneva, Mariya; Redko, Anton

    2014-05-01

    Both initial (Glebovsky et al., 2013) and updated maps and digital models (DM) of Moho topography and earth crust thickness in the deep Arctic Ocean were compiled using the same procedure. It included several steps: analysis of potential fields information compiled under CAMPGM and ArcGP projects and updating by new Russian data; separation of the study area into individual geostructures; calculation of gravitational effects from two main boundaries lying above Moho, presented by IBCAO grid, and by grid of basement relief (Kaminsky et al., 2012); subtraction of these effects from observed gravity anomalies, and converting of residual anomalies to depths to Moho using Parker's (1974) algorithm. Averaged depth to Moho required by Parker's algorithm to estimate its relative variations was determined from available deep refraction seismic data. It varies for different regional geological structures (basins, ridges and rises) which boundaries were contoured based on results of potential fields zoning. Modeling process for each structure was iterative and calibrated by seismic data. Results that best fit with seismic sections were merged to compile the grid of depths to Moho. This grid was specified by estimation of gravitational effects related both with increasing of density of sediments with depth and with uplift of asthenosphere beneath the Gakkel Ridge (GR). Grids of total and consolidated crust thickness were computed by sequential subtracting the IBCAO and sediment thickness grids from the final grid of depths to Moho. Updated versions of maps and DM of Moho topography and earth crust thickness are specified by recent Russian multi-channel and DSS seismic data collected in 2011-2012. It is confirmed the significant differences in crustal structure between the Eurasian (EB) and Amerasian Basins (AB). The thickness of the consolidated crust in the EB shows a fairly clear bilateral symmetry with respect to the GR. In the Nansen and Amundsen basins it varies from 3 to

  13. 3D elemental sensitive imaging by full-field XFCT.

    PubMed

    Deng, Biao; Du, Guohao; Zhou, Guangzhao; Wang, Yudan; Ren, Yuqi; Chen, Rongchang; Sun, Pengfei; Xie, Honglan; Xiao, Tiqiao

    2015-05-21

    X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) is a stimulated emission tomography modality that maps the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of elements. Generally, XFCT is done by scanning a pencil-beam across the sample. This paper presents a feasibility study of full-field XFCT (FF-XFCT) for 3D elemental imaging. The FF-XFCT consists of a pinhole collimator and X-ray imaging detector with no energy resolution. A prototype imaging system was set up at the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) for imaging the phantom. The first FF-XFCT experimental results are presented. The cadmium (Cd) and iodine (I) distributions were reconstructed. The results demonstrate FF-XFCT is fit for 3D elemental imaging and the sensitivity of FF-XFCT is higher than a conventional CT system.

  14. 3D temperature field reconstruction using ultrasound sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuqian; Ma, Tong; Cao, Chengyu; Wang, Xingwei

    2016-04-01

    3D temperature field reconstruction is of practical interest to the power, transportation and aviation industries and it also opens up opportunities for real time control or optimization of high temperature fluid or combustion process. In our paper, a new distributed optical fiber sensing system consisting of a series of elements will be used to generate and receive acoustic signals. This system is the first active temperature field sensing system that features the advantages of the optical fiber sensors (distributed sensing capability) and the acoustic sensors (non-contact measurement). Signals along multiple paths will be measured simultaneously enabled by a code division multiple access (CDMA) technique. Then a proposed Gaussian Radial Basis Functions (GRBF)-based approach can approximate the temperature field as a finite summation of space-dependent basis functions and time-dependent coefficients. The travel time of the acoustic signals depends on the temperature of the media. On this basis, the Gaussian functions are integrated along a number of paths which are determined by the number and distribution of sensors. The inversion problem to estimate the unknown parameters of the Gaussian functions can be solved with the measured times-of-flight (ToF) of acoustic waves and the length of propagation paths using the recursive least square method (RLS). The simulation results show an approximation error less than 2% in 2D and 5% in 3D respectively. It demonstrates the availability and efficiency of our proposed 3D temperature field reconstruction mechanism.

  15. Note: 3D printed spheroid for uniform magnetic field generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, Y.; Aktaş, B.

    2016-10-01

    This article is focused on a novel and practical production method for a uniform magnetic field generator. The method involves building of a surface coil template using a desktop 3D printer and winding of a conducting wire onto the structure using surface grooves as a guide. Groove pattern was based on the parametric spheroidal helical coil formula. The coil was driven by a current source and the magnetic field inside was measured using a Hall probe placed into the holes on the printed structure. The measurements are found to be in good agreement with our finite element analysis results and indicate a fairly uniform field inside.

  16. 3D measuring in the field of endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, Anton; Forster, Frank; Stockmann, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Industrial optical 3D-measurement techniques are well established to achieve quality targets in production and manufacturing. However measurements inside of objects, especially small ones, are still a challenge since there is no easy access for measurement tools. Inspection tools like endoscopes, which provide a 2D-view or a stereoscopic view of inner surfaces, are commercially available and widely used. Nevertheless, there is no technique for precisely measuring the inner surface geometry of a small hollow object. Especially medical applications would greatly benefit from "dimensional" measuring. Thus a novel approach and a corresponding prototype of a miniaturized endoscopic 3D-scanner are presented. To be suited even for very narrow objects, the prototype has a maximum diameter of 3.6 mm, its flexible design allows for access to bent tubes or canals. The 3D scanning approach is based on the principle of active triangulation, which means that a coded light pattern is projected and then viewed under a different angle. It is usually difficult to realize triangulation setups in a small embodiment. Therefore an optical tandem of a miniaturized pattern projector and a small camera with a resolution of 400 x 400 pixel is presented as a practical solution. The projector projects a pattern of 15 rings of distinct colors into a cylindrical measurement space where the color sequence constitutes a code. The camera uses a catadioptric setup with a spherical mirror to enhance its field of view. It detects the projected rings and is then able to unambiguously reconstruct the 3D-shape of a surface using ray-cone intersection. This so called color coding approach provides several advantages. For example, only a static projection pattern is needed, which greatly reduces complexity and size of the projector compared to phase shifting technologies. Experimental 3D-scans of arbitrarily shaped tubes demonstrate good performance and an accuracy of about 0.1mm.

  17. Shaping Field for 3D Laser Scanning Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Colon, Jorge; Lim, Hyungsik

    2015-01-01

    Imaging deep tissue can be extremely inefficient when the region of interest is non-planar and buried in a thick sample, yielding a severely limited effective field of view (FOV). Here we describe a novel technique, namely adaptive field microscopy, which improves the efficiency of 3D imaging by controlling the image plane. The plane of scanning laser focus is continuously reshaped in situ to match the conformation of the sample. The practicality is demonstrated for ophthalmic imaging, where a large area of the corneal epithelium of intact mouse eye is captured in a single frame with subcellular resolution. PMID:26176454

  18. Visualizing 3D velocity fields near contour surfaces. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Grant, C.

    1994-08-08

    Vector field rendering is difficult in 3D because the vector icons overlap and hide each other. We propose four different techniques for visualizing vector fields only near surfaces. The first uses motion blurred particles in a thickened region around the surface. The second uses a voxel grid to contain integral curves of the vector field. The third uses many antialiased lines through the surface, and the fourth uses hairs sprouting from the surface and then bending in the direction of the vector field. All the methods use the graphics pipeline, allowing real time rotation and interaction, and the first two methods can animate the texture to move in the flow determined by the velocity field.

  19. Visualizing 3D velocity fields near contour surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Grant, C.

    1994-03-01

    Vector field rendering is difficult in 3D because the vector icons overlap and hide each other. We propose four different techniques for visualizing vector fields only near surfaces. The first uses motion blurred particles in a thickened region around the surface. The second uses a voxel grid to contain integral curves of the vector field. The third uses many antialiased lines through the surface, and the fourth uses hairs sprouting from the surface and then bending in the direction of the vector field. All the methods use the graphite pipeline, allowing real time rotation and interaction, and the first two methods can animate the texture to move in the flow determined by the velocity field.

  20. 3D deformation field throughout the interior of materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Huiqing; Lu, Wei-Yang

    2013-09-01

    This report contains the one-year feasibility study for our three-year LDRD proposal that is aimed to develop an experimental technique to measure the 3D deformation fields inside a material body. In this feasibility study, we first apply Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) algorithm to pre-existing in-situ Xray Computed Tomography (XCT) image sets with pure rigid body translation. The calculated displacement field has very large random errors and low precision that are unacceptable. Then we enhance these tomography images by setting threshold of the intensity of each slice. DVC algorithm is able to obtain accurate deformation fields from these enhanced image sets and the deformation fields are consistent with the global mechanical loading that is applied to the specimen. Through this study, we prove that the internal markers inside the pre-existing tomography images of aluminum alloy can be enhanced and are suitable for DVC to calculate the deformation field throughout the material body.

  1. A cross-platform solution for light field based 3D telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gengkun; Xiang, Wei; Pickering, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Current telehealth services are dominated by conventional 2D video conferencing systems, which are limited in their capabilities in providing a satisfactory communication experience due to the lack of realism. The "immersiveness" provided by 3D technologies has the potential to promote telehealth services to a wider range of applications. However, conventional stereoscopic 3D technologies are deficient in many aspects, including low resolution and the requirement for complicated multi-camera setup and calibration, and special glasses. The advent of light field (LF) photography enables us to record light rays in a single shot and provide glasses-free 3D display with continuous motion parallax in a wide viewing zone, which is ideally suited for 3D telehealth applications. As far as our literature review suggests, there have been no reports of 3D telemedicine systems using LF technology. In this paper, we propose a cross-platform solution for a LF-based 3D telemedicine system. Firstly, a novel system architecture based on LF technology is established, which is able to capture the LF of a patient, and provide an immersive 3D display at the doctor site. For 3D modeling, we further propose an algorithm which is able to convert the captured LF to a 3D model with a high level of detail. For the software implementation on different platforms (i.e., desktop, web-based and mobile phone platforms), a cross-platform solution is proposed. Demo applications have been developed for 2D/3D video conferencing, 3D model display and edit, blood pressure and heart rate monitoring, and patient data viewing functions. The demo software can be extended to multi-discipline telehealth applications, such as tele-dentistry, tele-wound and tele-psychiatry. The proposed 3D telemedicine solution has the potential to revolutionize next-generation telemedicine technologies by providing a high quality immersive tele-consultation experience. PMID:26689324

  2. A cross-platform solution for light field based 3D telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gengkun; Xiang, Wei; Pickering, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Current telehealth services are dominated by conventional 2D video conferencing systems, which are limited in their capabilities in providing a satisfactory communication experience due to the lack of realism. The "immersiveness" provided by 3D technologies has the potential to promote telehealth services to a wider range of applications. However, conventional stereoscopic 3D technologies are deficient in many aspects, including low resolution and the requirement for complicated multi-camera setup and calibration, and special glasses. The advent of light field (LF) photography enables us to record light rays in a single shot and provide glasses-free 3D display with continuous motion parallax in a wide viewing zone, which is ideally suited for 3D telehealth applications. As far as our literature review suggests, there have been no reports of 3D telemedicine systems using LF technology. In this paper, we propose a cross-platform solution for a LF-based 3D telemedicine system. Firstly, a novel system architecture based on LF technology is established, which is able to capture the LF of a patient, and provide an immersive 3D display at the doctor site. For 3D modeling, we further propose an algorithm which is able to convert the captured LF to a 3D model with a high level of detail. For the software implementation on different platforms (i.e., desktop, web-based and mobile phone platforms), a cross-platform solution is proposed. Demo applications have been developed for 2D/3D video conferencing, 3D model display and edit, blood pressure and heart rate monitoring, and patient data viewing functions. The demo software can be extended to multi-discipline telehealth applications, such as tele-dentistry, tele-wound and tele-psychiatry. The proposed 3D telemedicine solution has the potential to revolutionize next-generation telemedicine technologies by providing a high quality immersive tele-consultation experience.

  3. Targeted infill drilling at Stratton field using 3-D seismic

    SciTech Connect

    Suydam, J.R.; Reitz, D.T.

    1994-12-31

    Stratton field is located on the Vicksburg flexure trend in Nueces and Kleberg Counties, South Texas. It has produced more than 2.8 Tcf of gas since 1937 from Frio fluvial/deltaic sandstones and Vicksburg shallow-marine sandstones. The field is a combination stratigraphic and faulted structural trap, and contains numerous highly compartmentalized sandstone reservoirs. Continuous infield drilling is required to keep the field producing, and 3-D seismic data have been used to select the best locations for these wells. In 1992, an 8-mi{sup 2} seismic survey was completed in the southern end of the field, and the resulting structural interpretation presented many more fault traps than were apparent in the 2-D seismic interpretation. So far, all of the new wells drilled within the survey have encountered untapped compartments enclosed by fault traps. Furthermore, fault cuts in the new wells have always been within 20 ft of the position predicted by seismic data.

  4. Targeted infill drilling at Stratton Field using 3-D seismic

    SciTech Connect

    Suydam, J.; Reitz, D.

    1994-09-01

    Stratton field is located on the Vicksburg flexure trend in Nueces and Kleberg counties, south Texas. It has produced over 2.8 tcf of gas since 1937 from Frio fluvial/deltaic sandstones and Vicksburg shallow marine sandstones. The field is a combination stratigraphic and faulted structural trap, and contains numerous highly compartmentalized sandstone reservoirs. Continuous infield drilling is required to keep the field producing, and 3-D seismic data have been used to select the best locations for these wells. In 1992, the Bureau of Economic Geology shot an 8-mi{sup 2} survey in the southern end of the field, and the resulting structural interpretation presented many more fault traps that were not apparent in the 2-D seismic interpretation. So far, all of the new wells drilled within the survey have encountered untapped compartments enclosed by fault traps. Furthermore, fault cuts in the new wells have always been within 20 ft of the position predicted by seismic data.

  5. Models Ion Trajectories in 2D and 3D Electrostatic and Magnetic Fields

    2000-02-21

    SIMION3D7.0REV is a C based ion optics simulation program that can model complex problems using Laplace equation solutions for potential fields. The program uses an ion optics workbench that can hold up to 200 2D and/or 3D electrostatic/magnetic potential arrays. Arrays can have up to 50,000,000 points. SIMION3D7.0''s 32 bit virtual Graphics User Interface provides a highly interactive advanced user environment. All potential arrays are visualized as 3D objects that the user can cut awaymore » to inspect ion trajectories and potential energy surfaces. User programs allow the user to customize the program for specific simulations. A geometry file option supports the definition of highly complex array geometry. Algorithm modifications have improved this version''s computational speed and accuracy.« less

  6. A full field, 3-D velocimeter for microgravity crystallization experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodkey, Robert S.; Russ, Keith M.

    1991-01-01

    The programming and algorithms needed for implementing a full-field, 3-D velocimeter for laminar flow systems and the appropriate hardware to fully implement this ultimate system are discussed. It appears that imaging using a synched pair of video cameras and digitizer boards with synched rails for camera motion will provide a viable solution to the laminar tracking problem. The algorithms given here are simple, which should speed processing. On a heavily loaded VAXstation 3100 the particle identification can take 15 to 30 seconds, with the tracking taking less than one second. It seeems reasonable to assume that four image pairs can thus be acquired and analyzed in under one minute.

  7. 3D print of polymer bonded rare-earth magnets, and 3D magnetic field scanning with an end-user 3D printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Abert, C.; Bruckner, F.; Groenefeld, M.; Muthsam, O.; Schuschnigg, S.; Sirak, K.; Thanhoffer, R.; Teliban, I.; Vogler, C.; Windl, R.; Suess, D.

    2016-10-01

    3D print is a recently developed technique, for single-unit production, and for structures that have been impossible to build previously. The current work presents a method to 3D print polymer bonded isotropic hard magnets with a low-cost, end-user 3D printer. Commercially available isotropic NdFeB powder inside a PA11 matrix is characterized, and prepared for the printing process. An example of a printed magnet with a complex shape that was designed to generate a specific stray field is presented, and compared with finite element simulation solving the macroscopic Maxwell equations. For magnetic characterization, and comparing 3D printed structures with injection molded parts, hysteresis measurements are performed. To measure the stray field outside the magnet, the printer is upgraded to a 3D magnetic flux density measurement system. To skip an elaborate adjusting of the sensor, a simulation is used to calibrate the angles, sensitivity, and the offset of the sensor. With this setup, a measurement resolution of 0.05 mm along the z-axes is achievable. The effectiveness of our calibration method is shown. With our setup, we are able to print polymer bonded magnetic systems with the freedom of having a specific complex shape with locally tailored magnetic properties. The 3D scanning setup is easy to mount, and with our calibration method we are able to get accurate measuring results of the stray field.

  8. 3-D magnetic field calculations for wiggglers using MAGNUS-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Pissanetzky, S.; Tompkins, P.

    1988-01-01

    The recent but steady trend toward increased magnetic and geometric complexity in the design of wigglers and undulators, of which tapered wigglers, hybrid structures, laced electromagnetic wigglers, magnetic cladding, twisters and magic structures are examples, has caused a need for reliable 3-D computer models and a better understanding of the behavior of magnetic systems in three dimensions. The capabilities of the MAGNUS-3D Group of Programs are ideally suited to solve this class of problems and provide insight into 3-D effects. MAGNUS-3D can solve any problem of Magnetostatics involving permanent magnets, linear or nonlinear ferromagnetic materials and electric conductors of any shape in space. The magnetic properties of permanent magnets are described by the complete nonlinear demagnetization curve as provided by the manufacturer, or, at the user's choice, by a simpler approximation involving the coercive force, the residual induction and the direction of magnetization. The ferromagnetic materials are described by a magnetization table and an accurate interpolation relation. An internal library with properties of common industrial steels is available. The conductors are independent of the mesh and are described in terms of conductor elements from an internal library.

  9. Degeneracy-aware interpolation of 3D diffusion tensor fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Chongke; Takahashi, Shigeo; Fujishiro, Issei

    2012-01-01

    Visual analysis of 3D diffusion tensor fields has become an important topic especially in medical imaging for understanding microscopic structures and physical properties of biological tissues. However, it is still difficult to continuously track the underlying features from discrete tensor samples, due to the absence of appropriate interpolation schemes in the sense that we are able to handle possible degeneracy while fully respecting the smooth transition of tensor anisotropic features. This is because the degeneracy may cause rotational inconsistency of tensor anisotropy. This paper presents such an approach to interpolating 3D diffusion tensor fields. The primary idea behind our approach is to resolve the possible degeneracy through optimizing the rotational transformation between a pair of neighboring tensors by analyzing their associated eigenstructure, while the degeneracy can be identified by applying a minimum spanning tree-based clustering algorithm to the original tensor samples. Comparisons with existing interpolation schemes will be provided to demonstrate the advantages of our scheme, together with several results of tracking white matter fiber bundles in a human brain.

  10. Near field 3D scene simulation for passive microwave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Ji

    2006-10-01

    Scene simulation is a necessary work in near field passive microwave remote sensing. A 3-D scene simulation model of microwave radiometric imaging based on ray tracing method is present in this paper. The essential influencing factors and general requirements are considered in this model such as the rough surface radiation, the sky radiation witch act as the uppermost illuminator in out door circumstance, the polarization rotation of the temperature rays caused by multiple reflections, and the antenna point spread function witch determines the resolution of the model final outputs. Using this model we simulate a virtual scene and analyzed the appeared microwave radiometric phenomenology, at last two real scenes of building and airstrip were simulated for validating the model. The comparison between the simulation and field measurements indicates that this model is completely feasible in practice. Furthermore, we analyzed the signatures of model outputs, and achieved some underlying phenomenology of microwave radiation witch is deferent with that in optical and infrared bands.

  11. 3D Printing of Molecular Potential Energy Surface Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lolur, Phalgun; Dawes, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, is gaining popularity in a variety of applications and has recently become routinely available. Today, 3D printing services are not only found in engineering design labs and through online companies, but also in university libraries offering student access. In addition, affordable options for…

  12. Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

    1999-04-27

    To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

  13. Tuning the 3D plasmon field of nanohole arrays.

    PubMed

    Couture, Maxime; Liang, Yuzhang; Poirier Richard, Hugo-Pierre; Faid, Rita; Peng, Wei; Masson, Jean-Francois

    2013-12-21

    Modern photonics is being revolutionized through the use of nanostructured plasmonic materials, which confine light to sub-diffraction limit resolution providing universal, sensitive, and simple transducers for molecular sensors. Understanding the mechanisms by which light interacts with plasmonic crystals is essential for developing application-focussed devices. The strong influence of grating coupling on electromagnetic field distribution, frequency and degeneracy of plasmon bands has now been characterized using hexagonal nanohole arrays. An equation for nanohole arrays was derived to demonstrate the strong influence of incidence and rotation angle on optical properties of 2D plasmonic crystals such as nanohole arrays. Consequently, we report experimental data that are in strong agreement with finite difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations that clearly demonstrate the influence of the grating coupling conditions on the optical properties (such as plasmon degeneracy and bandwidth), and on the distribution of the plasmon field around nanohole arrays (including tuneable penetration depths and highly localized fields). The tuneable 3D plasmon field allowed for controlled sensing properties and by increasing the angle of incidence to 30 degrees, the resonance wavelength was tuned from 1000 to 600 nm, and the sensitivity was enhanced by nearly 300% for a protein assay using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and by 40% with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors.

  14. Advanced prior modeling for 3D bright field electron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreehari, Suhas; Venkatakrishnan, S. V.; Drummy, Lawrence F.; Simmons, Jeffrey P.; Bouman, Charles A.

    2015-03-01

    Many important imaging problems in material science involve reconstruction of images containing repetitive non-local structures. Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) could in principle exploit such redundancies through the selection of a log prior probability term. However, in practice, determining such a log prior term that accounts for the similarity between distant structures in the image is quite challenging. Much progress has been made in the development of denoising algorithms like non-local means and BM3D, and these are known to successfully capture non-local redundancies in images. But the fact that these denoising operations are not explicitly formulated as cost functions makes it unclear as to how to incorporate them in the MBIR framework. In this paper, we formulate a solution to bright field electron tomography by augmenting the existing bright field MBIR method to incorporate any non-local denoising operator as a prior model. We accomplish this using a framework we call plug-and-play priors that decouples the log likelihood and the log prior probability terms in the MBIR cost function. We specifically use 3D non-local means (NLM) as the prior model in the plug-and-play framework, and showcase high quality tomographic reconstructions of a simulated aluminum spheres dataset, and two real datasets of aluminum spheres and ferritin structures. We observe that streak and smear artifacts are visibly suppressed, and that edges are preserved. Also, we report lower RMSE values compared to the conventional MBIR reconstruction using qGGMRF as the prior model.

  15. Pipe3D, a pipeline to analyze Integral Field Spectroscopy Data: I. New fitting philosophy of FIT3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Pérez, E.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; González, J. J.; Rosález-Ortega, F. F.; Cano-Dí az, M.; López-Cobá, C.; Marino, R. A.; Gil de Paz, A.; Mollá, M.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Ascasibar, Y.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present an improved version of FIT3D, a fitting tool for the analysis of the spectroscopic properties of the stellar populations and the ionized gas derived from moderate resolution spectra of galaxies. This tool was developed to analyze integral field spectroscopy data and it is the basis of Pipe3D, a pipeline used in the analysis of CALIFA, MaNGA, and SAMI data. We describe the philosophy and each step of the fitting procedure. We present an extensive set of simulations in order to estimate the precision and accuracy of the derived parameters for the stellar populations and the ionized gas. We report on the results of those simulations. Finally, we compare the results of the analysis using FIT3D with those provided by other widely used packages, and we find that the parameters derived by FIT3D are fully compatible with those derived using these other tools.

  16. Electrochemical fields within 3D reconstructed microstructures of mixed ionic and electronic conducting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanxiang; Chen, Yu; Lin, Ye; Yan, Mufu; Harris, William M.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.; Ni, Meng; Chen, Fanglin

    2016-11-01

    The performance and stability of the mixed ionic and electronic conducting (MIEC) membrane devices, such as solid oxide cells (SOCs) and oxygen separation membranes (OSMs) interplay tightly with the transport properties and the three-dimensional (3D) microstructure of the membrane. However, development of the MIEC devices is hindered by the limited knowledge about the distribution of electrochemical fields within the 3D local microstructures, especially at surface and interface. In this work, a generic model conforming to local thermodynamic equilibrium is developed to calculate the electrochemical fields, such as electric potential and oxygen chemical potential, within the 3D microstructure of the MIEC membrane. Stability of the MIEC membrane is evaluated by the distribution of oxygen partial pressure. The cell-level performance such as polarization resistance and voltage vs. current curve can be further calculated. Case studies are performed to demonstrate the capability of the framework by using X-ray computed tomography reconstructed 3D microstructures of a SOC and an OSM. The calculation method demonstrates high computational efficiency for large size 3D tomographic microstructures, and permits parallel calculation. The framework can serve as a powerful tool for correlating the transport properties and the 3D microstructure to the performance and the stability of MIEC devices.

  17. 3D Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso GeothermalField

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Gregory A.; Hoversten, G. Michael; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Gasperikova, Erika

    2007-04-23

    -dimensional conductivitymodel. Initial analysis of the Coso MT data was carried out using 2D MTimaging. An initial 3D conductivity model was constructed from a seriesof 2D resistivity images obtained using the inline electric fieldmeasurements (Zyx impedance elements) along several measurementtransects. This model was then refined through a 3D inversion process.This model shows the controlling geological structures possiblyinfluencing well production at Coso and correlations with mapped surfacefeatures such as faults and regional geoelectric strike. The 3D modelalso illustrates the refinement in positioning of conductivity contactswhen compared to isolated 2D inversion transects. The conductivity modelhas also been correlated with microearthquake locations, well fluidproduction intervals and most importantly with an acoustic and shearvelocity model derived by Wu and Lees (1999). This later correlationshows the near-vertical high conductivity structure on the eastern flankof the producing field is also a zone of increased acoustic velocity andincreased Vp/Vs ratio bounded by mapped fault traces. South of theDevil's Kitchen is an area of high geothermal well density, where highlyconductive near surface material is interpreted as a clay cap alterationzone manifested from the subsurface geothermal fluids and relatedgeochemistry. Beneath the clay cap, however, the conductivity isnondescript, whereas the Vp/Vs ratio is enhanced over the productionintervals. It is recommended that more MT data sites be acquired to thesouthwest of the Devil's Kitchen area to better refine the conductivitymodel in that area.

  18. Determining 3D flow fields via multi-camera light field imaging.

    PubMed

    Truscott, Tadd T; Belden, Jesse; Nielson, Joseph R; Daily, David J; Thomson, Scott L

    2013-03-06

    In the field of fluid mechanics, the resolution of computational schemes has outpaced experimental methods and widened the gap between predicted and observed phenomena in fluid flows. Thus, a need exists for an accessible method capable of resolving three-dimensional (3D) data sets for a range of problems. We present a novel technique for performing quantitative 3D imaging of many types of flow fields. The 3D technique enables investigation of complicated velocity fields and bubbly flows. Measurements of these types present a variety of challenges to the instrument. For instance, optically dense bubbly multiphase flows cannot be readily imaged by traditional, non-invasive flow measurement techniques due to the bubbles occluding optical access to the interior regions of the volume of interest. By using Light Field Imaging we are able to reparameterize images captured by an array of cameras to reconstruct a 3D volumetric map for every time instance, despite partial occlusions in the volume. The technique makes use of an algorithm known as synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing, whereby a 3D focal stack is generated by combining images from several cameras post-capture (1). Light Field Imaging allows for the capture of angular as well as spatial information about the light rays, and hence enables 3D scene reconstruction. Quantitative information can then be extracted from the 3D reconstructions using a variety of processing algorithms. In particular, we have developed measurement methods based on Light Field Imaging for performing 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV), extracting bubbles in a 3D field and tracking the boundary of a flickering flame. We present the fundamentals of the Light Field Imaging methodology in the context of our setup for performing 3DPIV of the airflow passing over a set of synthetic vocal folds, and show representative results from application of the technique to a bubble-entraining plunging jet.

  19. Determining 3D Flow Fields via Multi-camera Light Field Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Belden, Jesse; Nielson, Joseph R.; Daily, David J.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    In the field of fluid mechanics, the resolution of computational schemes has outpaced experimental methods and widened the gap between predicted and observed phenomena in fluid flows. Thus, a need exists for an accessible method capable of resolving three-dimensional (3D) data sets for a range of problems. We present a novel technique for performing quantitative 3D imaging of many types of flow fields. The 3D technique enables investigation of complicated velocity fields and bubbly flows. Measurements of these types present a variety of challenges to the instrument. For instance, optically dense bubbly multiphase flows cannot be readily imaged by traditional, non-invasive flow measurement techniques due to the bubbles occluding optical access to the interior regions of the volume of interest. By using Light Field Imaging we are able to reparameterize images captured by an array of cameras to reconstruct a 3D volumetric map for every time instance, despite partial occlusions in the volume. The technique makes use of an algorithm known as synthetic aperture (SA) refocusing, whereby a 3D focal stack is generated by combining images from several cameras post-capture 1. Light Field Imaging allows for the capture of angular as well as spatial information about the light rays, and hence enables 3D scene reconstruction. Quantitative information can then be extracted from the 3D reconstructions using a variety of processing algorithms. In particular, we have developed measurement methods based on Light Field Imaging for performing 3D particle image velocimetry (PIV), extracting bubbles in a 3D field and tracking the boundary of a flickering flame. We present the fundamentals of the Light Field Imaging methodology in the context of our setup for performing 3DPIV of the airflow passing over a set of synthetic vocal folds, and show representative results from application of the technique to a bubble-entraining plunging jet. PMID:23486112

  20. 3D seismic data interpretation of Boonsville Field, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhakeem, Aamer Ali

    The Boonsville field is one of the largest gas fields in the US located in the Fort Worth Basin, north central Texas. The highest potential reservoirs reside in the Bend Conglomerate deposited during the Pennsylvanian. The Boonsville data set is prepared by the Bureau of Economic Geology at the University of Texas, Austin, as part of the secondary gas recovery program. The Boonsville field seismic data set covers an area of 5.5 mi2. It includes 38 wells data. The Bend Conglomerate is deposited in fluvio-deltaic transaction. It is subdivided into many genetic sequences which include depositions of sandy conglomerate representing the potential reserves in the Boonsville field. The geologic structure of the Boonsville field subsurface are visualized by constructing structure maps of Caddo, Davis, Runaway, Beans Cr, Vineyard, and Wade. The mapping includes time structure, depth structure, horizon slice, velocity maps, and isopach maps. Many anticlines and folds are illustrated. Karst collapse features are indicated specially in the lower Atoka. Dipping direction of the Bend Conglomerate horizons are changing from dipping toward north at the top to dipping toward east at the bottom. Stratigraphic interpretation of the Runaway Formation and the Vineyard Formation using well logs and seismic data integration showed presence of fluvial dominated channels, point bars, and a mouth bar. RMS amplitude maps are generated and used as direct hydrocarbon indicator for the targeted formations. As a result, bright spots are indicated and used to identify potential reservoirs. Petrophysical analysis is conducted to obtain gross, net pay, NGR, water saturation, shale volume, porosity, and gas formation factor. Volumetric calculations estimated 989.44 MMSCF as the recoverable original gas in-place for a prospect in the Runaway and 3.32 BSCF for a prospect in the Vineyard Formation.

  1. Potentially singular solutions of the 3D axisymmetric Euler equations

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Guo; Hou, Thomas Y.

    2014-01-01

    The question of finite-time blowup of the 3D incompressible Euler equations is numerically investigated in a periodic cylinder with solid boundaries. Using rotational symmetry, the equations are discretized in the (2D) meridian plane on an adaptive (moving) mesh and is integrated in time with adaptively chosen time steps. The vorticity is observed to develop a ring-singularity on the solid boundary with a growth proportional to ∼(ts − t)−2.46, where ts ∼ 0.0035056 is the estimated singularity time. A local analysis also suggests the existence of a self-similar blowup. The simulations stop at τ2 = 0.003505 at which time the vorticity amplifies by more than (3 × 108)-fold and the maximum mesh resolution exceeds (3 × 1012)2. The vorticity vector is observed to maintain four significant digits throughout the computations. PMID:25157172

  2. Potentially singular solutions of the 3D axisymmetric Euler equations.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guo; Hou, Thomas Y

    2014-09-01

    The question of finite-time blowup of the 3D incompressible Euler equations is numerically investigated in a periodic cylinder with solid boundaries. Using rotational symmetry, the equations are discretized in the (2D) meridian plane on an adaptive (moving) mesh and is integrated in time with adaptively chosen time steps. The vorticity is observed to develop a ring-singularity on the solid boundary with a growth proportional to ∼(ts - t)(-2.46), where ts ∼ 0.0035056 is the estimated singularity time. A local analysis also suggests the existence of a self-similar blowup. The simulations stop at τ(2) = 0.003505 at which time the vorticity amplifies by more than (3 × 10(8))-fold and the maximum mesh resolution exceeds (3 × 10(12))(2). The vorticity vector is observed to maintain four significant digits throughout the computations.

  3. 3D magnetic geometric effects during 3D field application and comparison to measurements in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, R. S.; Unterberg, E. A.; Wingen, A.; Shafer, M. W.; Cianciosa, M. R.; Hillis, D. L.; McKee, G. R.; Bird, T. M.; Evans, T. E.

    2015-11-01

    Density pumpout during the application of 3D fields in tokamaks may be caused by changes to the plasma equilibrium shaping that destabilize microinstabilities, thereby increasing transport. Local geometric quantities of the magnetic field that are relevant for microinstabilities (curvature and local shear) are calculated using VMEC equilibria in typical RMP discharges on DIII-D. Measurements of phase-differenced soft X-ray emission in the pedestal region show a clear helical structure that is compared with a model of localized impurity transport based on the 3D geometry. Broadband density fluctuations measured by beam emission spectroscopy also show changes in magnitude with I-coil phase, in support of the theory that microstability changes with the magnetic geometry. A scan of 3D equilibria over a large range of DIII-D geometric parameter space has been preformed in order to map out the operating space of the microstability mechanism. Supported by US DOE DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-FG02-89ER53296, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  4. Feasibility of using PRESAGE® for relative 3D dosimetry of small proton fields

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Newton, Joseph; Oldham, Mark; Das, Indra J; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Adamovics, John

    2013-01-01

    Small field dosimetry is challenging due to the finite size of the conventional detectors that underestimate the dose distribution. With the fast development of the dynamic proton beam delivery system, it is essential to find a dosimeter which can be used for 3D dosimetry of small proton fields. We investigated the feasibility of using a proton formula PRESAGE® for 3D dosimetry of small fields in a uniform scanning proton beam delivery system with dose layer stacking technology. The relationship between optical density and the absorbed dose was found to be linear through small volume cuvette studies for both photon and proton irradiation. Two circular fields and three patient-specific fields were used for proton treatment planning calculation and beam delivery. The measured results were compared with the calculated results in the form of lateral dose profiles, depth dose, isodose plots and gamma index analysis. For the circular field study, lateral dose profile comparison showed that the relative PRESAGE® profile falls within ± 5% from the calculated profile for most of the spatial range. For unmodulated depth dose comparison, the agreement between the measured and calculated results was within 3% in the beam entrance region before the Bragg peak. However, at the Bragg peak, there was about 20% underestimation of the absorbed dose from PRESAGE®. For patient-specific field 3D dosimetry, most of the data points within the target volume passed gamma analysis for 3% relative dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement criteria. Our results suggest that this proton formula PRESAGE® dosimeter has the potential for 3D dosimetry of small fields in proton therapy, but further investigation is needed to improve the dose under-response of the PRESAGE® in the Bragg peak region. PMID:23103526

  5. Tightly bound 3D quantum dot energy states in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern Horing, Norman J.; Liu, S. Y.; Sawamura, M.

    2010-01-01

    We have analyzed the detailed quantum dynamics of a 3D quantum dot in a magnetic field. The dot is taken to be lodged in a bulk medium in a high magnetic field and it is represented by a three-dimensional Dirac delta function potential which would support just one subband state if there were no magnetic field. The integral equation for the Schrödinger Green's function of this system is solved in closed form analytically and the single particle subband energy spectrum and the density of states are examined taking account of splintering of the subband spectrum by landau quantization.

  6. Field structure of collapsing wave packets in 3D strong Langmuir turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, D. L.; Robinson, P. A.; Goldman, M. V.

    1989-01-01

    A simple model is constructed for the electric fields in the collapsing wave packets found in 3D simulations of driven and damped isotropic strong Langmuir turbulence. This model, based on a spherical-harmonic decomposition of the electrostatic potential, accounts for the distribution of wave-packet shapes observed in the simulations, particularly the predominance of oblate wave packets. In contrast with predictions for undamped and undriven subsonic collapse of scalar fields, oblate vector-field wave packets do not flatten during collapse but, instead, remain approximately self-similar and rigid.

  7. Statistical representation of high-dimensional deformation fields with application to statistically constrained 3D warping.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhong; Shen, Dinggang; Davatzikos, Christos

    2006-10-01

    This paper proposes a 3D statistical model aiming at effectively capturing statistics of high-dimensional deformation fields and then uses this prior knowledge to constrain 3D image warping. The conventional statistical shape model methods, such as the active shape model (ASM), have been very successful in modeling shape variability. However, their accuracy and effectiveness typically drop dramatically in high-dimensionality problems involving relatively small training datasets, which is customary in 3D and 4D medical imaging applications. The proposed statistical model of deformation (SMD) uses wavelet-based decompositions coupled with PCA in each wavelet band, in order to more accurately estimate the pdf of high-dimensional deformation fields, when a relatively small number of training samples are available. SMD is further used as statistical prior to regularize the deformation field in an SMD-constrained deformable registration framework. As a result, more robust registration results are obtained relative to using generic smoothness constraints on deformation fields, such as Laplacian-based regularization. In experiments, we first illustrate the performance of SMD in representing the variability of deformation fields and then evaluate the performance of the SMD-constrained registration, via comparing a hierarchical volumetric image registration algorithm, HAMMER, with its SMD-constrained version, referred to as SMD+HAMMER. This SMD-constrained deformable registration framework can potentially incorporate various registration algorithms to improve robustness and stability via statistical shape constraints.

  8. Automated objective characterization of visual field defects in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Wolfgang (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method and apparatus for electronically performing a visual field test for a patient. A visual field test pattern is displayed to the patient on an electronic display device and the patient's responses to the visual field test pattern are recorded. A visual field representation is generated from the patient's responses. The visual field representation is then used as an input into a variety of automated diagnostic processes. In one process, the visual field representation is used to generate a statistical description of the rapidity of change of a patient's visual field at the boundary of a visual field defect. In another process, the area of a visual field defect is calculated using the visual field representation. In another process, the visual field representation is used to generate a statistical description of the volume of a patient's visual field defect.

  9. Integration of real-time 3D capture, reconstruction, and light-field display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Li, Tuotuo; Pei, Renjing; Liu, Yongchun; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-03-01

    Effective integration of 3D acquisition, reconstruction (modeling) and display technologies into a seamless systems provides augmented experience of visualizing and analyzing real objects and scenes with realistic 3D sensation. Applications can be found in medical imaging, gaming, virtual or augmented reality and hybrid simulations. Although 3D acquisition, reconstruction, and display technologies have gained significant momentum in recent years, there seems a lack of attention on synergistically combining these components into a "end-to-end" 3D visualization system. We designed, built and tested an integrated 3D visualization system that is able to capture in real-time 3D light-field images, perform 3D reconstruction to build 3D model of the objects, and display the 3D model on a large autostereoscopic screen. In this article, we will present our system architecture and component designs, hardware/software implementations, and experimental results. We will elaborate on our recent progress on sparse camera array light-field 3D acquisition, real-time dense 3D reconstruction, and autostereoscopic multi-view 3D display. A prototype is finally presented with test results to illustrate the effectiveness of our proposed integrated 3D visualization system.

  10. 3D stress field simulation for Greater Munich, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Moritz; Heidbach, Oliver; Reinecker, John; Przybycin, Anna Maria; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Geotechnical applications such as tunneling, storage of waste, wellbore planning, or reservoir engineering requires detailed 3D information on the rock properties and behavior of the continuum. One of the key parameters is the contemporary crustal in-situ stress state. However, generally the availability of stress data on reservoir scale is scarce or no data exists at all. Furthermore, stress data is often limited to the orientation of the maximum horizontal stress. Hence, geomechanical-numerical modelling provides an approximation of a continuous description of the 3D in-situ stress state. We present a model workflow that shows (1) how to calibrate a regional scale model of Greater Munich with stress orientations and magnitudes mainly from borehole data and (2) how to derive from the regional model boundary conditions for a local high-resolution model of a geothermal reservoir site. This approach using two models is an alternative to the required trade-off between resolution, computational cost and a sufficient number of calibration data which is otherwise inevitable for a single model. The incorporated 3D geological models contain the topography from a digital elevation model and 6 stratigraphic units with different elasto-plastic rock properties. The local model mimics the area of a planned reservoir and its resolution is significantly higher than in the regional model and down to 10 m near the planned borehole trajectories using 21×106 tetrahedron finite elements with linear approximation functions. The uncertainties of the calibrated regional model are large since no information on the magnitude of the maximum horizontal stress is available. Even in the entire Greater Munich area only two reliable leak-off tests that deliver the magnitude of the minimum horizontal stress could be used. These uncertainties are transferred also to the local model. Hence we also show how to quantify for the workflow in general the systematic uncertainties and discuss

  11. [Tissue printing; the potential application of 3D printing in medicine].

    PubMed

    Visser, Jetze; Melchels, Ferry P W; Dhert, Wouter J A; Malda, Jos

    2013-01-01

    Complex structures based on a digital blueprint can be created using a 3D printer. As this blueprint can be created using patient imaging data, there are many potential patient-specific applications of 3D printing in medicine. Individually printed metal implants and synthetic devices are currently being used on a limited scale in clinical practice. Researchers in the field of regenerative medicine are now going a step further by printing a combination of cells, growth factors and biomaterials. This process is known as 'bioprinting'. It can be used to copy the complex organization of natural tissue required to repair or replace damaged tissues or organs. The technique needs to be optimized, however, and more knowledge is required regarding the development of printed living constructs into functional tissues before 'tissue from the printer' can be clinically applied. PMID:24382049

  12. 3D fingerprint imaging system based on full-field fringe projection profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shujun; Zhang, Zonghua; Zhao, Yan; Dai, Jie; Chen, Chao; Xu, Yongjia; Zhang, E.; Xie, Lili

    2014-01-01

    As an unique, unchangeable and easily acquired biometrics, fingerprint has been widely studied in academics and applied in many fields over the years. The traditional fingerprint recognition methods are based on the obtained 2D feature of fingerprint. However, fingerprint is a 3D biological characteristic. The mapping from 3D to 2D loses 1D information and causes nonlinear distortion of the captured fingerprint. Therefore, it is becoming more and more important to obtain 3D fingerprint information for recognition. In this paper, a novel 3D fingerprint imaging system is presented based on fringe projection technique to obtain 3D features and the corresponding color texture information. A series of color sinusoidal fringe patterns with optimum three-fringe numbers are projected onto a finger surface. From another viewpoint, the fringe patterns are deformed by the finger surface and captured by a CCD camera. 3D shape data of the finger can be obtained from the captured fringe pattern images. This paper studies the prototype of the 3D fingerprint imaging system, including principle of 3D fingerprint acquisition, hardware design of the 3D imaging system, 3D calibration of the system, and software development. Some experiments are carried out by acquiring several 3D fingerprint data. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed 3D fingerprint imaging system.

  13. Is the 3-D magnetic null point with a convective electric field an efficient particle accelerator?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.-N.; Büchner, J.; Otto, A.; Santos, J.; Marsch, E.; Gan, W.-Q.

    2010-04-01

    Aims: We study the particle acceleration at a magnetic null point in the solar corona, considering self-consistent magnetic fields, plasma flows and the corresponding convective electric fields. Methods: We calculate the electromagnetic fields by 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations and expose charged particles to these fields within a full-orbit relativistic test-particle approach. In the 3-D MHD simulation part, the initial magnetic field configuration is set to be a potential field obtained by extrapolation from an analytic quadrupolar photospheric magnetic field with a typically observed magnitude. The configuration is chosen so that the resulting coronal magnetic field contains a null. Driven by photospheric plasma motion, the MHD simulation reveals the coronal plasma motion and the self-consistent electric and magnetic fields. In a subsequent test particle experiment the particle energies and orbits (determined by the forces exerted by the convective electric field and the magnetic field around the null) are calculated in time. Results: Test particle calculations show that protons can be accelerated up to 30 keV near the null if the local plasma flow velocity is of the order of 1000 km s-1 (in solar active regions). The final parallel velocity is much higher than the perpendicular velocity so that accelerated particles escape from the null along the magnetic field lines. Stronger convection electric field during big flare explosions can accelerate protons up to 2 MeV and electrons to 3 keV. Higher initial velocities can help most protons to be strongly accelerated, but a few protons also run the risk to be decelerated. Conclusions: Through its convective electric field and due to magnetic nonuniform drifts and de-magnetization process, the 3-D null can act as an effective accelerator for protons but not for electrons. Protons are more easily de-magnetized and accelerated than electrons because of their larger Larmor radii. Notice that macroscopic MHD

  14. New techniques in 3D scalar and vector field visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Becker, B.

    1993-05-05

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we have recently developed several techniques for volume visualization of scalar and vector fields, all of which use back-to-front compositing. The first renders volume density clouds by compositing polyhedral volume cells or their faces. The second is a ``splatting`` scheme which composites textures used to reconstruct the scalar or vector fields. One version calculates the necessary texture values in software, and another takes advantage of hardware texture mapping. The next technique renders contour surface polygons using semi-transparent textures, which adjust appropriately when the surfaces deform in a flow, or change topology. The final one renders the ``flow volume`` of smoke or dye tracer swept out by a fluid flowing through a small generating polygon. All of these techniques are applied to a climate model data set, to visualize cloud density and wind velocity.

  15. ORBXYZ: a 3D single-particle orbit code for following charged-particle trajectories in equilibrium magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.V.; Cohen, R.H.; Ferguson, J.R.; Johnston, B.M.; Sharp, C.B.; Willmann, P.A.

    1981-06-30

    The single particle orbit code, TIBRO, has been modified extensively to improve the interpolation methods used and to allow use of vector potential fields in the simulation of charged particle orbits on a 3D domain. A 3D cubic B-spline algorithm is used to generate spline coefficients used in the interpolation. Smooth and accurate field representations are obtained. When vector potential fields are used, the 3D cubic spline interpolation formula analytically generates the magnetic field used to push the particles. This field has del.BETA = 0 to computer roundoff. When magnetic induction is used the interpolation allows del.BETA does not equal 0, which can lead to significant nonphysical results. Presently the code assumes quadrupole symmetry, but this is not an essential feature of the code and could be easily removed for other applications. Many details pertaining to this code are given on microfiche accompanying this report.

  16. Construction of Extended 3D Field of Views of the Internal Bladder Wall Surface: A Proof of Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Hamadou, Achraf; Daul, Christian; Soussen, Charles

    2016-09-01

    3D extended field of views (FOVs) of the internal bladder wall facilitate lesion diagnosis, patient follow-up and treatment traceability. In this paper, we propose a 3D image mosaicing algorithm guided by 2D cystoscopic video-image registration for obtaining textured FOV mosaics. In this feasibility study, the registration makes use of data from a 3D cystoscope prototype providing, in addition to each small FOV image, some 3D points located on the surface. This proof of concept shows that textured surfaces can be constructed with minimally modified cystoscopes. The potential of the method is demonstrated on numerical and real phantoms reproducing various surface shapes. Pig and human bladder textures are superimposed on phantoms with known shape and dimensions. These data allow for quantitative assessment of the 3D mosaicing algorithm based on the registration of images simulating bladder textures.

  17. Increasing the depth of field in Multiview 3D images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Beom-Ryeol; Son, Jung-Young; Yano, Sumio; Jung, Ilkwon

    2016-06-01

    A super-multiview condition simulator which can project up to four different view images to each eye is introduced. This simulator with the image having both disparity and perspective informs that the depth of field (DOF) will be extended to more than the default DOF values as the number of simultaneously but separately projected different view images to each eye increase. The DOF range can be extended to near 2 diopters with the four simultaneous view images. However, the DOF value increments are not prominent as the image with both disparity and perspective with the image with disparity only.

  18. 3D Magnetic Field Configuration of the 2006 December 13 Flare Extrapolated with the Optimization Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Wiegelmann, T.; Li, H.

    2008-06-01

    The photospheric vector magnetic field of the active region NOAA 10930 was obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board the Hinode satellite with a very high spatial resolution (about 0.3''). Observations of the two-ribbon flare on 2006 December 13 in this active region provide us a good sample to study the magnetic field configuration related to the occurrence of the flare. Using the optimization method for nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation proposed by Wheatland et al. and recently developed by Wiegelmann, we derive the three-dimensional (3D) vector magnetic field configuration associated with this flare. The general topology can be described as a highly sheared core field and a quasi-potential envelope arch field. The core field clearly shows some dips supposed to sustain a filament. Free energy release in the flare, calculated by subtracting the energy contained in the NLFFF and the corresponding potential field, is 2.4 × 1031 ergs, which is ~2% of the preflare potential field energy. We also calculate the shear angles, defined as the angles between the NLFFF and potential field, and find that they become larger at some particular sites in the lower atmosphere, while they become significantly smaller in most places, implying that the whole configuration gets closer to the potential field after the flare. The Ca II H line images obtained with the Broadband Filter Imager (BFI) of the SOT and the 1600 Å images with the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) show that the preflare heating occurs mainly in the core field. These results provide evidence in support of the tether-cutting model of solar flares.

  19. 3D structure and conductive thermal field of the Upper Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freymark, Jessica; Sippel, Judith; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Bär, Kristian; Stiller, Manfred; Fritsche, Johann-Gerhard; Kracht, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The Upper Rhine Graben (URG) was formed as part of the European Cenozoic Rift System in a complex extensional setting. At present-day, it has a large socioeconomic relevance as it provides a great potential for geothermal energy production in Germany and France. For the utilisation of this energy resource it is crucial to understand the structure and the observed temperature anomalies in the rift basin. In the framework of the EU-funded "IMAGE" project (Integrated Methods for Advanced Geothermal Exploration), we apply a data-driven numerical modelling approach to quantify the processes and properties controlling the spatial distribution of subsurface temperatures. Typically, reservoir-scale numerical models are developed for predictions on the subsurface hydrothermal conditions and for reducing the risk of drilling non-productive geothermal wells. One major problem related to such models is setting appropriate boundary conditions that define, for instance, how much heat enters the reservoir from greater depths. Therefore, we first build a regional lithospheric-scale 3D structural model, which covers not only the entire URG but also adjacent geological features like the Black Forest and the Vosges Mountains. In particular, we use a multidisciplinary dataset (e.g. well data, seismic reflection data, existing structural models, gravity) to construct the geometries of the sediments, the crust and the lithospheric mantle that control the spatial distribution of thermal conductivity and radiogenic heat production and hence temperatures. By applying a data-based and lithology-dependent parameterisation of this lithospheric-scale 3D structural model and a 3D finite element method, we calculate the steady-state conductive thermal field for the entire region. Available measured temperatures (down to depths of up to 5 km) are considered to validate the 3D thermal model. We present major characteristics of the lithospheric-scale 3D structural model and results of the 3D

  20. 3-D explosions: a meditation on rotation (and magnetic fields)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J. C.

    This is the text of an introduction to a workshop on asymmetric explosions held in Austin in June, 2003. The great progress in supernova research over thirty-odd years is briefly reviewed. The context in which the meeting was called is then summarized. The theoretical success of the intrinsically multidimensional delayed detonation paradigm in explaining the nature of Type Ia supernovae coupled with new techniques of observations in the near IR and with spectropolarimetry promise great advances in understanding binary progenitors, the explosion physics, and the ever more accurate application to cosmology. Spectropolarimetry has also revealed the strongly asymmetric nature of core collapse and given valuable perspectives on the supernova - gamma-ray burst connection. The capability of the magneto-rotational instability to rapidly create strong toroidal magnetic fields in the core collapse ambiance is outlined. This physics may be the precursor to driving MHD jets that play a role in asymmetric supernovae. Welcome to the brave new world of three-dimensional explosions!

  1. Engineering a 3D microfluidic culture platform for tumor-treating field application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavesi, Andrea; Adriani, Giulia; Tay, Andy; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Yeap, Wei Hseun; Wong, Siew Cheng; Kamm, Roger D.

    2016-05-01

    The limitations of current cancer therapies highlight the urgent need for a more effective therapeutic strategy. One promising approach uses an alternating electric field; however, the mechanisms involved in the disruption of the cancer cell cycle as well as the potential adverse effects on non-cancerous cells must be clarified. In this study, we present a novel microfluidic device with embedded electrodes that enables the application of an alternating electric field therapy to cancer cells in a 3D extracellular matrix. To demonstrate the potential of our system to aid in designing and testing new therapeutic approaches, cancer cells and cancer cell aggregates were cultured individually or co-cultured with endothelial cells. The metastatic potential of the cancer cells was reduced after electric field treatment. Moreover, the proliferation rate of the treated cancer cells was lower compared with that of the untreated cells, whereas the morphologies and proliferative capacities of the endothelial cells were not significantly affected. These results demonstrate that our novel system can be used to rapidly screen the effect of an alternating electric field on cancer and normal cells within an in vivo-like microenvironment with the potential to optimize treatment protocols and evaluate synergies between tumor-treating field treatment and chemotherapy.

  2. Engineering a 3D microfluidic culture platform for tumor-treating field application

    PubMed Central

    Pavesi, Andrea; Adriani, Giulia; Tay, Andy; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Yeap, Wei Hseun; Wong, Siew Cheng; Kamm, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    The limitations of current cancer therapies highlight the urgent need for a more effective therapeutic strategy. One promising approach uses an alternating electric field; however, the mechanisms involved in the disruption of the cancer cell cycle as well as the potential adverse effects on non-cancerous cells must be clarified. In this study, we present a novel microfluidic device with embedded electrodes that enables the application of an alternating electric field therapy to cancer cells in a 3D extracellular matrix. To demonstrate the potential of our system to aid in designing and testing new therapeutic approaches, cancer cells and cancer cell aggregates were cultured individually or co-cultured with endothelial cells. The metastatic potential of the cancer cells was reduced after electric field treatment. Moreover, the proliferation rate of the treated cancer cells was lower compared with that of the untreated cells, whereas the morphologies and proliferative capacities of the endothelial cells were not significantly affected. These results demonstrate that our novel system can be used to rapidly screen the effect of an alternating electric field on cancer and normal cells within an in vivo-like microenvironment with the potential to optimize treatment protocols and evaluate synergies between tumor-treating field treatment and chemotherapy. PMID:27215466

  3. Poly 3D fault modeling scripts/data for permeability potential of Washington State geothermal prospects

    DOE Data Explorer

    Michael Swyer

    2015-02-05

    Matlab scripts/functions and data used to build Poly3D models and create permeability potential GIS layers for 1) Mount St Helen's, 2) Wind River Valley, and 3) Mount Baker geothermal prospect areas located in Washington state.

  4. An industrial light-field camera applied for 3D velocity measurements in a slot jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seredkin, A. V.; Shestakov, M. V.; Tokarev, M. P.

    2016-10-01

    Modern light-field cameras have found their application in different areas like photography, surveillance and quality control in industry. A number of studies have been reported relatively low spatial resolution of 3D profiles of registered objects along the optical axis of the camera. This article describes a method for 3D velocity measurements in fluid flows using an industrial light-field camera and an alternative reconstruction algorithm based on a statistical approach. This method is more accurate than triangulation when applied for tracking small registered objects like tracer particles in images. The technique was used to measure 3D velocity fields in a turbulent slot jet.

  5. 3D form line construction by structural field interpolation (SFI) of geologic strike and dip observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, Michael; de Kemp, Eric; Schetselaar, Ernst

    2013-06-01

    Interpreting and modelling geometries of complex geologic structures from strike/dip measurements using manually-drafted structural form lines is labour intensive, irreproducible and inherently limited to two dimensions. Herein, the structural field interpolation (SFI) algorithm is presented that overcomes these limitations by constructing 3D structural form lines from the vector components of strike/dip measurements. The SFI interpolation algorithm employs an anisotropic inverse distance weighting scheme derived from eigen analysis of the poles to strike/dip measurements within a neighbourhood of user defined dimension and shape (ellipsoidal to spherical) and honours younging directions, when available. The eigen analysis also provides local estimates of the plunge vector and associated Woodcock distribution properties to assure plunge-normal structural form line reconstruction with unidirectional propagation of form lines across fold and fan structures. The method is advantageous for modelling geometries of geologic structures from a wide range of structurally anisotropic data. Modelled vector fields from three case studies are presented that reproduce the expected bedding-foliation geometry and provide reasonable representation of complex folds from local to regional scales. Results illustrate the potential for using vector fields to support geologic interpretation through the direct visualization of geometric trends of structural features in 3D.

  6. LC-lens array with light field algorithm for 3D biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Pai; Hsieh, Po-Yuan; Hassanfiroozi, Amir; Martinez, Manuel; Javidi, Bahram; Chu, Chao-Yu; Hsuan, Yun; Chu, Wen-Chun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, liquid crystal lens (LC-lens) array was utilized in 3D bio-medical applications including 3D endoscope and light field microscope. Comparing with conventional plastic lens array, which was usually placed in 3D endoscope or light field microscope system to record image disparity, our LC-lens array has higher flexibility of electrically changing its focal length. By using LC-lens array, the working distance and image quality of 3D endoscope and microscope could be enhanced. Furthermore, the 2D/3D switching ability could be achieved if we turn off/on the electrical power on LClens array. In 3D endoscope case, a hexagonal micro LC-lens array with 350um diameter was placed at the front end of a 1mm diameter endoscope. With applying electric field on LC-lens array, the 3D specimen would be recorded as from seven micro-cameras with different disparity. We could calculate 3D construction of specimen with those micro images. In the other hand, if we turn off the electric field on LC-lens array, the conventional high resolution 2D endoscope image would be recorded. In light field microscope case, the LC-lens array was placed in front of the CMOS sensor. The main purpose of LC-lens array is to extend the refocusing distance of light field microscope, which is usually very narrow in focused light field microscope system, by montaging many light field images sequentially focusing on different depth. With adjusting focal length of LC-lens array from 2.4mm to 2.9mm, the refocusing distance was extended from 1mm to 11.3mm. Moreover, we could use a LC wedge to electrically shift the optics axis and increase the resolution of light field.

  7. Research and implementation of visualization techniques for 3D explosion fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Jianguo; Xu, Xiangzhao; Ma, Tianbao; Yu, Wen

    2015-12-01

    The visualization of scalar data in 3D explosion fields was devised to solve the problems of the complex physical and the huge data in numerical simulation of explosion mechanics problems. For enhancing the explosion effects and reducing the impacts of image analysis, the adjustment coefficient was added into original Phong illumination model. A variety of accelerated volume rendering algorithm and multithread technique were used to realize the fast rendering and real-time interactive control of 3D explosion fields. Cutaway view was implemented, so arbitrary section of 3D explosion fields can be seen conveniently. Slice can be extracted along three axes of 3D explosion fields, and the value at an arbitrary point on the slice can be gained. The experiment results show that the volume rendering acceleration algorithm can generate high quality images and can increase the speed of image generating, while achieve interactive control quickly.

  8. Unlocking the scientific potential of complex 3D point cloud dataset : new classification and 3D comparison methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lague, D.; Brodu, N.; Leroux, J.

    2012-12-01

    Ground based lidar and photogrammetric techniques are increasingly used to track the evolution of natural surfaces in 3D at an unprecedented resolution and precision. The range of applications encompass many type of natural surfaces with different geometries and roughness characteristics (landslides, cliff erosion, river beds, bank erosion,....). Unravelling surface change in these contexts requires to compare large point clouds in 2D or 3D. The most commonly used method in geomorphology is based on a 2D difference of the gridded point clouds. Yet this is hardly adapted to many 3D natural environments such as rivers (with horizontal beds and vertical banks), while gridding complex rough surfaces is a complex task. On the other hand, tools allowing to perform 3D comparison are scarce and may require to mesh the point clouds which is difficult on rough natural surfaces. Moreover, existing 3D comparison tools do not provide an explicit calculation of confidence intervals that would factor in registration errors, roughness effects and instrument related position uncertainties. To unlock this problem, we developed the first algorithm combining a 3D measurement of surface change directly on point clouds with an estimate of spatially variable confidence intervals (called M3C2). The method has two steps : (1) surface normal estimation and orientation in 3D at a scale consistent with the local roughness ; (2) measurement of mean surface change along the normal direction with explicit calculation of a local confidence interval. Comparison with existing 3D methods based on a closest-point calculation demonstrates the higher precision of the M3C2 method when mm changes needs to be detected. The M3C2 method is also simple to use as it does not require surface meshing or gridding, and is not sensitive to missing data or change in point density. We also present a 3D classification tool (CANUPO) for vegetation removal based on a new geometrical measure: the multi

  9. Multilevel fast multipole method based on a potential formulation for 3D electromagnetic scattering problems.

    PubMed

    Fall, Mandiaye; Boutami, Salim; Glière, Alain; Stout, Brian; Hazart, Jerome

    2013-06-01

    A combination of the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM) and boundary element method (BEM) can solve large scale photonics problems of arbitrary geometry. Here, MLFMM-BEM algorithm based on a scalar and vector potential formulation, instead of the more conventional electric and magnetic field formulations, is described. The method can deal with multiple lossy or lossless dielectric objects of arbitrary geometry, be they nested, in contact, or dispersed. Several examples are used to demonstrate that this method is able to efficiently handle 3D photonic scatterers involving large numbers of unknowns. Absorption, scattering, and extinction efficiencies of gold nanoparticle spheres, calculated by the MLFMM, are compared with Mie's theory. MLFMM calculations of the bistatic radar cross section (RCS) of a gold sphere near the plasmon resonance and of a silica coated gold sphere are also compared with Mie theory predictions. Finally, the bistatic RCS of a nanoparticle gold-silver heterodimer calculated with MLFMM is compared with unmodified BEM calculations.

  10. AC electric field induced dipole-based on-chip 3D cell rotation.

    PubMed

    Benhal, Prateek; Chase, J Geoffrey; Gaynor, Paul; Oback, Björn; Wang, Wenhui

    2014-08-01

    The precise rotation of suspended cells is one of the many fundamental manipulations used in a wide range of biotechnological applications such as cell injection and enucleation in nuclear transfer (NT) cloning. Noticeably scarce among the existing rotation techniques is the three-dimensional (3D) rotation of cells on a single chip. Here we present an alternating current (ac) induced electric field-based biochip platform, which has an open-top sub-mm square chamber enclosed by four sidewall electrodes and two bottom electrodes, to achieve rotation about the two axes, thus 3D cell rotation. By applying an ac potential to the four sidewall electrodes, an in-plane (yaw) rotating electric field is generated and in-plane rotation is achieved. Similarly, by applying an ac potential to two opposite sidewall electrodes and the two bottom electrodes, an out-of-plane (pitch) rotating electric field is generated and rolling rotation is achieved. As a prompt proof-of-concept, bottom electrodes were constructed with transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) using the standard lift-off process and the sidewall electrodes were constructed using a low-cost micro-milling process and then assembled to form the chip. Through experiments, we demonstrate rotation of bovine oocytes of ~120 μm diameter about two axes, with the capability of controlling the rotation direction and the rate for each axis through control of the ac potential amplitude, frequency, and phase shift, and cell medium conductivity. The maximum observed rotation rate reached nearly 140° s⁻¹, while a consistent rotation rate reached up to 40° s⁻¹. Rotation rate spectra for zona pellucida-intact and zona pellucida-free oocytes were further compared and found to have no effective difference. This simple, transparent, cheap-to-manufacture, and open-top platform allows additional functional modules to be integrated to become a more powerful cell manipulation system.

  11. Fast and Memory-Efficient Topological Denoising of 2D and 3D Scalar Fields.

    PubMed

    Günther, David; Jacobson, Alec; Reininghaus, Jan; Seidel, Hans-Peter; Sorkine-Hornung, Olga; Weinkauf, Tino

    2014-12-01

    Data acquisition, numerical inaccuracies, and sampling often introduce noise in measurements and simulations. Removing this noise is often necessary for efficient analysis and visualization of this data, yet many denoising techniques change the minima and maxima of a scalar field. For example, the extrema can appear or disappear, spatially move, and change their value. This can lead to wrong interpretations of the data, e.g., when the maximum temperature over an area is falsely reported being a few degrees cooler because the denoising method is unaware of these features. Recently, a topological denoising technique based on a global energy optimization was proposed, which allows the topology-controlled denoising of 2D scalar fields. While this method preserves the minima and maxima, it is constrained by the size of the data. We extend this work to large 2D data and medium-sized 3D data by introducing a novel domain decomposition approach. It allows processing small patches of the domain independently while still avoiding the introduction of new critical points. Furthermore, we propose an iterative refinement of the solution, which decreases the optimization energy compared to the previous approach and therefore gives smoother results that are closer to the input. We illustrate our technique on synthetic and real-world 2D and 3D data sets that highlight potential applications. PMID:26356972

  12. FGG-NUFFT-Based Method for Near-Field 3-D Imaging Using Millimeter Waves

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Yingzhi; Zhu, Yongfeng; Tang, Liang; Fu, Qiang; Pei, Hucheng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, to deal with the concealed target detection problem, an accurate and efficient algorithm for near-field millimeter wave three-dimensional (3-D) imaging is proposed that uses a two-dimensional (2-D) plane antenna array. First, a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (FFT) is performed on the scattered data along the antenna array plane. Then, a phase shift is performed to compensate for the spherical wave effect. Finally, fast Gaussian gridding based nonuniform FFT (FGG-NUFFT) combined with 2-D inverse FFT (IFFT) is performed on the nonuniform 3-D spatial spectrum in the frequency wavenumber domain to achieve 3-D imaging. The conventional method for near-field 3-D imaging uses Stolt interpolation to obtain uniform spatial spectrum samples and performs 3-D IFFT to reconstruct a 3-D image. Compared with the conventional method, our FGG-NUFFT based method is comparable in both efficiency and accuracy in the full sampled case and can obtain more accurate images with less clutter and fewer noisy artifacts in the down-sampled case, which are good properties for practical applications. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the FGG-NUFFT-based near-field 3-D imaging algorithm can have better imaging performance than the conventional method for down-sampled measurements. PMID:27657066

  13. A 360-degree floating 3D display based on light field regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xinxing; Liu, Xu; Li, Haifeng; Zheng, Zhenrong; Wang, Han; Peng, Yifan; Shen, Weidong

    2013-05-01

    Using light field reconstruction technique, we can display a floating 3D scene in the air, which is 360-degree surrounding viewable with correct occlusion effect. A high-frame-rate color projector and flat light field scanning screen are used in the system to create the light field of real 3D scene in the air above the spinning screen. The principle and display performance of this approach are investigated in this paper. The image synthesis method for all the surrounding viewpoints is analyzed, and the 3D spatial resolution and angular resolution of the common display zone are employed to evaluate display performance. The prototype is achieved and the real 3D color animation image has been presented vividly. The experimental results verified the representability of this method.

  14. Generation of nearly 3D-unpolarized evanescent optical near fields using total internal reflection.

    PubMed

    Hassinen, Timo; Popov, Sergei; Friberg, Ari T; Setälä, Tero

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the time-domain partial polarization of optical fields composed of two evanescent waves created in total internal reflection by random electromagnetic beams with orthogonal planes of incidence. We show that such a two-beam configuration enables to generate nearly unpolarized, genuine three-component (3D) near fields. This result complements earlier studies on spectral polarization, which state that at least three symmetrically propagating beams are required to produce a 3D-unpolarized near field. The degree of polarization of the near field can be controlled by adjusting the polarization states and mutual correlation of the incident beams.

  15. Generation of nearly 3D-unpolarized evanescent optical near fields using total internal reflection.

    PubMed

    Hassinen, Timo; Popov, Sergei; Friberg, Ari T; Setälä, Tero

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the time-domain partial polarization of optical fields composed of two evanescent waves created in total internal reflection by random electromagnetic beams with orthogonal planes of incidence. We show that such a two-beam configuration enables to generate nearly unpolarized, genuine three-component (3D) near fields. This result complements earlier studies on spectral polarization, which state that at least three symmetrically propagating beams are required to produce a 3D-unpolarized near field. The degree of polarization of the near field can be controlled by adjusting the polarization states and mutual correlation of the incident beams. PMID:27367071

  16. Research on steady-state visual evoked potentials in 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Yu-Yi; Lee, Chia-Ying; Lin, Fang-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Pai; Ko, Li-Wei; Shieh, Han-Ping D.

    2015-05-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are intuitive systems for users to communicate with outer electronic devices. Steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) is one of the common inputs for BCI systems due to its easy detection and high information transfer rates. An advanced interactive platform integrated with liquid crystal displays is leading a trend to provide an alternative option not only for the handicapped but also for the public to make our lives more convenient. Many SSVEP-based BCI systems have been studied in a 2D environment; however there is only little literature about SSVEP-based BCI systems using 3D stimuli. 3D displays have potentials in SSVEP-based BCI systems because they can offer vivid images, good quality in presentation, various stimuli and more entertainment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of two important 3D factors (disparity and crosstalk) on SSVEPs. Twelve participants participated in the experiment with a patterned retarder 3D display. The results show that there is a significant difference (p-value<0.05) between large and small disparity angle, and the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of small disparity angles is higher than those of large disparity angles. The 3D stimuli with smaller disparity and lower crosstalk are more suitable for applications based on the results of 3D perception and SSVEP responses (SNR). Furthermore, we can infer the 3D perception of users by SSVEP responses, and modify the proper disparity of 3D images automatically in the future.

  17. 3D Global Coronal Density Structure and Associated Magnetic Field near Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramar, Maxim; Airapetian, Vladimir; Lin, Haosheng

    2016-08-01

    Measurement of the coronal magnetic field is a crucial ingredient in understanding the nature of solar coronal dynamic phenomena at all scales. We employ STEREO/COR1 data obtained near maximum of solar activity in December 2012 (Carrington rotation, CR 2131) to retrieve and analyze the three-dimensional (3D) coronal electron density in the range of heights from 1.5 to 4 R_⊙ using a tomography method and qualitatively deduce structures of the coronal magnetic field. The 3D electron density analysis is complemented by the 3D STEREO/EUVI emissivity in 195 Å band obtained by tomography for the same CR period. We find that the magnetic field configuration during CR 2131 has a tendency to become radially open at heliocentric distances below ˜ 2.5 R_⊙. We compared the reconstructed 3D coronal structures over the CR near the solar maximum to the one at deep solar minimum. Results of our 3D density reconstruction will help to constrain solar coronal field models and test the accuracy of the magnetic field approximations for coronal modeling.

  18. Slip versus Field-Line Mapping in Describing 3D Reconnection of Coronal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, V. S.; Mikic, Z.; Torok, T.; Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate two techniques for describing the structure of the coronal magnetic field and its evolution due to reconnection in numerical 3D simulations of the solar corona and CMEs. These techniques employ two types of mapping of the boundary of the computational domain on itself. One of them is defined at a given time moment via connections of the magnetic field lines to their opposite endpoints. The other mapping, called slip mapping, relates field line endpoints at two different time moments and allows one to identify the slippage of plasma elements due to resistivity across field lines for a given time interval (Titov et al. 2009). The distortion of each of these mappings can be measured by using the so-called squashing factor Q (Titov 2007). The high-Q layers computed for the first and second mappings define, respectively, (quasi-)separatrix surfaces and reconnection fronts in evolving magnetic configurations. Analyzing these structural features, we are able to reveal topologically different domains and reconnected flux systems in the configurations, in particular, open, closed and disconnected magnetic flux tubes, as well as quantify the related magnetic flux transfer. Comparison with observations makes it possible also to relate these features to observed morphological elements such as flare loops and ribbons, and EUV dimmings. We illustrate these general techniques by applying them to particular data-driven MHD simulations. *Research supported by NASA's HSR and LWS Programs, and NSF/SHINE and NSF/FESD.

  19. 3-D analysis and interpretation of magnetotelluric data from the Aluto-Langano geothermal field, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samrock, F.; Kuvshinov, A.; Bakker, J.; Jackson, A.; Fisseha, S.

    2015-09-01

    The Main Ethiopian Rift Valley encompasses a number of volcanoes, which are known to be actively deforming with reoccurring periods of uplift and setting. One of the regions where temporal changes take place is the Aluto volcanic complex. It hosts a productive geothermal field and the only currently operating geothermal power plant of Ethiopia. We carried out magnetotelluric (MT) measurements in early 2012 in order to identify the source of unrest. Broad-band MT data (0.001-1000 s) have been acquired at 46 sites covering the expanse of the Aluto volcanic complex with an average site spacing of 1 km. Based on this MT data it is possible to map the bulk electrical resistivity of the subsurface down to depths of several kilometres. Resistivity is a crucial geophysical parameter in geothermal exploration as hydrothermal and magmatic reservoirs are typically related to low resistive zones, which can be easily sensed by MT. Thus by mapping the electrical conductivity one can identify and analyse geothermal systems with respect to their temperature, extent and potential for production of energy. 3-D inversions of the observed MT data from Aluto reveal the typical electrical conductivity distribution of a high-enthalpy geothermal system, which is mainly governed by the hydrothermal alteration mineralogy. The recovered 3-D conductivity models provide no evidence for an active deep magmatic system under Aluto. Forward modelling of the tippers rather suggest that occurrence of melt is predominantly at lower crustal depths along an off-axis fault zone a few tens of kilometres west of the central rift axis. The absence of an active magmatic system implies that the deforming source is most likely situated within the shallow hydrothermal system of the Aluto-Langano geothermal field.

  20. Evidence of toroidally localized turbulence with applied 3D fields in the DIII-D tokamak

    DOE PAGES

    Wilcox, R. S.; Shafer, M. W.; Ferraro, N. M.; McKee, G. R.; Zeng, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Canik, J. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Nazikian, R.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2016-09-21

    New evidence indicates that there is significant 3D variation in density fluctuations near the boundary of weakly 3D tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied to suppress transient edge instabilities. The increase in fluctuations is concomitant with an increase in the measured density gradient, suggesting that this toroidally localized gradient increase could be a mechanism for turbulence destabilization in localized flux tubes. Two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulations find that, although changes to the magnetic field topology are small, there is a significant 3D variation of the density gradient within the flux surfaces that is extended along field lines. This modeling agreesmore » qualitatively with the measurements. The observed gradient and fluctuation asymmetries are proposed as a mechanism by which global profile gradients in the pedestal could be relaxed due to a local change in the 3D equilibrium. In conclusion, these processes may play an important role in pedestal and scrape-off layer transport in ITER and other future tokamak devices with small applied 3D fields.« less

  1. Evidence of Toroidally Localized Turbulence with Applied 3D Fields in the DIII-D Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, R. S.; Shafer, M. W.; Ferraro, N. M.; McKee, G. R.; Zeng, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Canik, J. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Nazikian, R.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    New evidence indicates that there is significant 3D variation in density fluctuations near the boundary of weakly 3D tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied to suppress transient edge instabilities. The increase in fluctuations is concomitant with an increase in the measured density gradient, suggesting that this toroidally localized gradient increase could be a mechanism for turbulence destabilization in localized flux tubes. Two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulations find that, although changes to the magnetic field topology are small, there is a significant 3D variation of the density gradient within the flux surfaces that is extended along field lines. This modeling agrees qualitatively with the measurements. The observed gradient and fluctuation asymmetries are proposed as a mechanism by which global profile gradients in the pedestal could be relaxed due to a local change in the 3D equilibrium. These processes may play an important role in pedestal and scrape-off layer transport in ITER and other future tokamak devices with small applied 3D fields.

  2. 3D-printed biological organs: medical potential and patenting opportunity.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has emerged as a new disruptive technology that may address the ever-increasing demand for organ transplants. 3D bioprinting offers many technical features that allow for building functional biological tissue constructs by dispensing the individual or group of cells into specific locations along with various types of bio-scaffold materials and extracellular matrices, and thus, may provide flexibility needed for on-demand individualized construction of biological organs. Several key classes of 3D bioprinting techniques are reviewed, including potential medical and industrial applications. Several unanswered engineering components for the ultimate creation of printed biological organs are also discussed. The complicated nature of the human organs, in addition to the legal and ethical requirements for safe implantation into the human body, would require significant research and development to produce marketable bioprinted organs. This also suggests the possibility for further patenting and licensing opportunities from different sectors of the economy.

  3. 3D-printed biological organs: medical potential and patenting opportunity.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting has emerged as a new disruptive technology that may address the ever-increasing demand for organ transplants. 3D bioprinting offers many technical features that allow for building functional biological tissue constructs by dispensing the individual or group of cells into specific locations along with various types of bio-scaffold materials and extracellular matrices, and thus, may provide flexibility needed for on-demand individualized construction of biological organs. Several key classes of 3D bioprinting techniques are reviewed, including potential medical and industrial applications. Several unanswered engineering components for the ultimate creation of printed biological organs are also discussed. The complicated nature of the human organs, in addition to the legal and ethical requirements for safe implantation into the human body, would require significant research and development to produce marketable bioprinted organs. This also suggests the possibility for further patenting and licensing opportunities from different sectors of the economy. PMID:25711801

  4. Modeling Images of Natural 3D Surfaces: Overview and Potential Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalobeanu, Andre; Kuehnel, Frank; Stutz, John

    2004-01-01

    Generative models of natural images have long been used in computer vision. However, since they only describe the of 2D scenes, they fail to capture all the properties of the underlying 3D world. Even though such models are sufficient for many vision tasks a 3D scene model is when it comes to inferring a 3D object or its characteristics. In this paper, we present such a generative model, incorporating both a multiscale surface prior model for surface geometry and reflectance, and an image formation process model based on realistic rendering, the computation of the posterior model parameter densities, and on the critical aspects of the rendering. We also how to efficiently invert the model within a Bayesian framework. We present a few potential applications, such as asteroid modeling and Planetary topography recovery, illustrated by promising results on real images.

  5. 3-D seismic velocity and attenuation structures in the geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Nugraha, Andri Dian; Syahputra, Ahmad; Fatkhan,; Sule, Rachmat

    2013-09-09

    We conducted delay time tomography to determine 3-D seismic velocity structures (Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio) using micro-seismic events in the geothermal field. The P-and S-wave arrival times of these micro-seismic events have been used as input for the tomographic inversion. Our preliminary seismic velocity results show that the subsurface condition of geothermal field can be fairly delineated the characteristic of reservoir. We then extended our understanding of the subsurface physical properties through determining of attenuation structures (Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio) using micro-seismic waveform. We combined seismic velocities and attenuation structures to get much better interpretation of the reservoir characteristic. Our preliminary attanuation structures results show reservoir characterization can be more clearly by using the 3-D attenuation model of Qp, Qs, and Qs/Qp ratio combined with 3-D seismic velocity model of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs ratio.

  6. Synthesis of 3D Model of a Magnetic Field-Influenced Body from a Single Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Cuilan; Newman, Timothy; Gallagher, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    A method for recovery of a 3D model of a cloud-like structure that is in motion and deforming but approximately governed by magnetic field properties is described. The method allows recovery of the model from a single intensity image in which the structure's silhouette can be observed. The method exploits envelope theory and a magnetic field model. Given one intensity image and the segmented silhouette in the image, the method proceeds without human intervention to produce the 3D model. In addition to allowing 3D model synthesis, the method's capability to yield a very compact description offers further utility. Application of the method to several real-world images is demonstrated.

  7. 3-D Flow Field Diagnostics and Validation Studies using Stereoscopic Tracking Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, Soyoung Stephen; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of 3-D three-component velocity fields is of great importance in both ground and space experiments for understanding materials processing and fluid physics. Here, we present the investigation results of stereoscopic tracking velocimetry (STV) for measuring 3-D velocity fields. The effort includes diagnostic technology development, experimental velocity measurement, and comparison with analytical and numerical computation. The advantages of STV stems from the system simplicity for building compact hardware and in software efficiency for continual near-real-time process monitoring. It also has illumination flexibility for observing volumetric flow fields from arbitrary directions. STV is based on stereoscopic CCD observations of particles seeded in a flow. Neural networks are used for data analysis. The developed diagnostic tool is tested with a simple directional solidification apparatus using Succinonitrile. The 3-D velocity field in the liquid phase is measured and compared with results from detailed numerical computations. Our theoretical, numerical, and experimental effort has shown STV to be a viable candidate for reliably quantifying the 3-D flow field in materials processing and fluids experiments.

  8. 3D displacement field measurement with correlation based on the micro-geometrical surface texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubaker-Isheil, Halima; Serri, Jérôme; Fontaine, Jean-François

    2011-07-01

    Image correlation methods are widely used in experimental mechanics to obtain displacement field measurements. Currently, these methods are applied using digital images of the initial and deformed surfaces sprayed with black or white paint. Speckle patterns are then captured and the correlation is performed with a high degree of accuracy to an order of 0.01 pixels. In 3D, however, stereo-correlation leads to a lower degree of accuracy. Correlation techniques are based on the search for a sub-image (or pattern) displacement field. The work presented in this paper introduces a new correlation-based approach for 3D displacement field measurement that uses an additional 3D laser scanner and a CMM (Coordinate Measurement Machine). Unlike most existing methods that require the presence of markers on the observed object (such as black speckle, grids or random patterns), this approach relies solely on micro-geometrical surface textures such as waviness, roughness and aperiodic random defects. The latter are assumed to remain sufficiently small thus providing an adequate estimate of the particle displacement. The proposed approach can be used in a wide range of applications such as sheet metal forming with large strains. The method proceeds by first obtaining cloud points using the 3D laser scanner mounted on a CMM. These points are used to create 2D maps that are then correlated. In this respect, various criteria have been investigated for creating maps consisting of patterns, which facilitate the correlation procedure. Once the maps are created, the correlation between both configurations (initial and moved) is carried out using traditional methods developed for field measurements. Measurement validation was conducted using experiments in 2D and 3D with good results for rigid displacements in 2D, 3D and 2D rotations.

  9. Qualitative and quantitative comparative analyses of 3D lidar landslide displacement field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugen, Benjamin D.

    Landslide ground surface displacements vary at all spatial scales and are an essential component of kinematic and hazards analyses. Unfortunately, survey-based displacement measurements require personnel to enter unsafe terrain and have limited spatial resolution. And while recent advancements in LiDAR technology provide the ability remotely measure 3D landslide displacements at high spatial resolution, no single method is widely accepted. A series of qualitative metrics for comparing 3D landslide displacement field measurement methods were developed. The metrics were then applied to nine existing LiDAR techniques, and the top-ranking methods --Iterative Closest Point (ICP) matching and 3D Particle Image Velocimetry (3DPIV) -- were quantitatively compared using synthetic displacement and control survey data from a slow-moving translational landslide in north-central Colorado. 3DPIV was shown to be the most accurate and reliable point cloud-based 3D landslide displacement field measurement method, and the viability of LiDAR-based techniques for measuring 3D motion on landslides was demonstrated.

  10. Motion field estimation for a dynamic scene using a 3D LiDAR.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingquan; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Qingzhou; Zou, Qin; Zhang, Pin; Feng, Shaojun; Ochieng, Washington

    2014-09-09

    This paper proposes a novel motion field estimation method based on a 3D light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor for motion sensing for intelligent driverless vehicles and active collision avoidance systems. Unlike multiple target tracking methods, which estimate the motion state of detected targets, such as cars and pedestrians, motion field estimation regards the whole scene as a motion field in which each little element has its own motion state. Compared to multiple target tracking, segmentation errors and data association errors have much less significance in motion field estimation, making it more accurate and robust. This paper presents an intact 3D LiDAR-based motion field estimation method, including pre-processing, a theoretical framework for the motion field estimation problem and practical solutions. The 3D LiDAR measurements are first projected to small-scale polar grids, and then, after data association and Kalman filtering, the motion state of every moving grid is estimated. To reduce computing time, a fast data association algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, considering the spatial correlation of motion among neighboring grids, a novel spatial-smoothing algorithm is also presented to optimize the motion field. The experimental results using several data sets captured in different cities indicate that the proposed motion field estimation is able to run in real-time and performs robustly and effectively.

  11. Motion Field Estimation for a Dynamic Scene Using a 3D LiDAR

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingquan; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Qingzhou; Zou, Qin; Zhang, Pin; Feng, Shaojun; Ochieng, Washington

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel motion field estimation method based on a 3D light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor for motion sensing for intelligent driverless vehicles and active collision avoidance systems. Unlike multiple target tracking methods, which estimate the motion state of detected targets, such as cars and pedestrians, motion field estimation regards the whole scene as a motion field in which each little element has its own motion state. Compared to multiple target tracking, segmentation errors and data association errors have much less significance in motion field estimation, making it more accurate and robust. This paper presents an intact 3D LiDAR-based motion field estimation method, including pre-processing, a theoretical framework for the motion field estimation problem and practical solutions. The 3D LiDAR measurements are first projected to small-scale polar grids, and then, after data association and Kalman filtering, the motion state of every moving grid is estimated. To reduce computing time, a fast data association algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, considering the spatial correlation of motion among neighboring grids, a novel spatial-smoothing algorithm is also presented to optimize the motion field. The experimental results using several data sets captured in different cities indicate that the proposed motion field estimation is able to run in real-time and performs robustly and effectively. PMID:25207868

  12. Numerical Optimization Strategy for Determining 3D Flow Fields in Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, Alex; Sigurdson, Marin; Mezic, Igor; Meinhart, Carl

    2015-11-01

    We present a hybrid experimental-numerical method for generating 3D flow fields from 2D PIV experimental data. An optimization algorithm is applied to a theory-based simulation of an alternating current electrothermal (ACET) micromixer in conjunction with 2D PIV data to generate an improved representation of 3D steady state flow conditions. These results can be used to investigate mixing phenomena. Experimental conditions were simulated using COMSOL Multiphysics to solve the temperature and velocity fields, as well as the quasi-static electric fields. The governing equations were based on a theoretical model for ac electrothermal flows. A Nelder-Mead optimization algorithm was used to achieve a better fit by minimizing the error between 2D PIV experimental velocity data and numerical simulation results at the measurement plane. By applying this hybrid method, the normalized RMS velocity error between the simulation and experimental results was reduced by more than an order of magnitude. The optimization algorithm altered 3D fluid circulation patterns considerably, providing a more accurate representation of the 3D experimental flow field. This method can be generalized to a wide variety of flow problems. This research was supported by the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies through grant W911NF-09-0001 from the U.S. Army Research Office.

  13. 3-D intestinal scaffolds for evaluating the therapeutic potential of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Costello, Cait M; Sorna, Rachel M; Goh, Yih-Lin; Cengic, Ivana; Jain, Nina K; March, John C

    2014-07-01

    Biomimetic in vitro intestinal models are becoming useful tools for studying host-microbial interactions. In the past, these models have typically been limited to simple cultures on 2-D scaffolds or Transwell inserts, but it is widely understood that epithelial cells cultured in 3-D environments exhibit different phenotypes that are more reflective of native tissue, and that different microbial species will preferentially adhere to select locations along the intestinal villi. We used a synthetic 3-D tissue scaffold with villous features that could support the coculture of epithelial cell types with select bacterial populations. Our end goal was to establish microbial niches along the crypt-villus axis in order to mimic the natural microenvironment of the small intestine, which could potentially provide new insights into microbe-induced intestinal disorders, as well as enabling targeted probiotic therapies. We recreated the surface topography of the small intestine by fabricating a biodegradable and biocompatible villous scaffold using poly lactic-glycolic acid to enable the culture of Caco-2 with differentiation along the crypt-villus axis in a similar manner to native intestines. This was then used as a platform to mimic the adhesion and invasion profiles of both Salmonella and Pseudomonas, and assess the therapeutic potential of Lactobacillus and commensal Escherichia coli in a 3-D setting. We found that, in a 3-D environment, Lactobacillus is more successful at displacing pathogens, whereas Nissle is more effective at inhibiting pathogen adhesion. PMID:24798584

  14. Microscopic spin Hamiltonian approaches for 3d8 and 3d2 ions in a trigonal crystal field - perturbation theory methods versus complete diagonalization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudowicz, Czeslaw; Yeung, Yau-yuen; Yang, Zi-Yuan; Qin, Jian

    2002-06-01

    In this paper, we critically review the existing microscopic spin Hamiltonian (MSH) approaches, namely the complete diagonalization method (CDM) and the perturbation theory method (PTM), for 3d8(3d2) ions in a trigonal (C3v, D3, D3d) symmetry crystal field (CF). A new CDM is presented and a CFA/MSH computer package based on our crystal-field analysis (CFA) package for 3dN ions is developed for numerical calculations. Our method takes into account the contribution to the SH parameters (D, g∥ and g⊥) from all 45 CF states for 3d8(3d2) ions and is based on the complete diagonalization of the Hamiltonian including the electrostatic interactions, the CF terms (in the intermediate CF scheme) and the spin-orbit coupling. The CFA/MSH package enables us to study not only the CF energy levels and wavefunctions but also the SH parameters as functions of the CF parameters (B20, B40 and B43 or alternatively Dq, v and v') for 3d8(3d2) ions in trigonal symmetry. Extensive comparative studies of other MSH approaches are carried out using the CFA/MSH package. First, we check the accuracy of the approximate PTM based on the `quasi-fourth-order' perturbation formulae developed by Petrosyan and Mirzakhanyan (PM). The present investigations indicate that the PM formulae for the g-factors (g∥ and g⊥) indeed work well, especially for the cases of small v and v' and large Dq, whereas the PM formula for the zero-field splitting (ZFS) exhibits serious shortcomings. Earlier criticism of the PM approach by Zhou et al (Zhou K W, Zhao S B, Wu P F and Xie J K 1990 Phys. Status Solidi b 162 193) is then revisited. Second, we carry out an extensive comparison of the results of the present CFA/MSH package and those of other CDMs based on the strong- and weak-CF schemes. The CF energy levels and the SH parameters for 3d2 and 3d8 ions at C3v symmetry sites in several crystals are calculated and analysed. Our investigations reveal serious inconsistencies in the CDM results of Zhou et al and Li

  15. Investigation of the 3-D actinic flux field in mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J. E.; Angelini, F.; Blumthaler, M.; Fitzka, M.; Gobbi, G. P.; Kift, R.; Kreuter, A.; Rieder, H. E.; Simic, S.; Webb, A.; Weihs, P.

    2011-11-01

    During three field campaigns spectral actinic flux was measured from 290-500 nm under clear sky conditions in Alpine terrain and the associated O3- and NO2-photolysis frequencies were calculated and the measurement products were then compared with 1-D- and 3-D-model calculations. To do this 3-D-radiative transfer model was adapted for actinic flux calculations in mountainous terrain and the maps of the actinic flux field at the surface, calculated with the 3-D-radiative transfer model, are given. The differences between the 3-D- and 1-D-model results for selected days during the campaigns are shown, together with the ratios of the modeled actinic flux values to the measurements. In many cases the 1-D-model overestimates actinic flux by more than the measurement uncertainty of 10%. The results of using a 3-D-model generally show significantly lower values, and can underestimate the actinic flux by up to 30%. This case study attempts to quantify the impact of snow cover in combination with topography on spectral actinic flux. The impact of snow cover on the actinic flux was ~ 25% in narrow snow covered valleys, but for snow free areas there were no significant changes due snow cover in the surrounding area and it is found that the effect snow-cover at distances over 5 km from the point of interest was below 5%. Overall the 3-D-model can calculate actinic flux to the same accuracy as the 1-D-model for single points, but gives a much more realistic view of the surface actinic flux field in mountains as topography and obstruction of the horizon are taken into account.

  16. A multi-stage 3-D stress field modelling approach exemplified in the Bavarian Molasse Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Moritz O.; Heidbach, Oliver; Reinecker, John; Przybycin, Anna M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-09-01

    The knowledge of the contemporary in situ stress state is a key issue for safe and sustainable subsurface engineering. However, information on the orientation and magnitudes of the stress state is limited and often not available for the areas of interest. Therefore 3-D geomechanical-numerical modelling is used to estimate the in situ stress state and the distance of faults from failure for application in subsurface engineering. The main challenge in this approach is to bridge the gap in scale between the widely scattered data used for calibration of the model and the high resolution in the target area required for the application. We present a multi-stage 3-D geomechanical-numerical approach which provides a state-of-the-art model of the stress field for a reservoir-scale area from widely scattered data records. Therefore, we first use a large-scale regional model which is calibrated by available stress data and provides the full 3-D stress tensor at discrete points in the entire model volume. The modelled stress state is used subsequently for the calibration of a smaller-scale model located within the large-scale model in an area without any observed stress data records. We exemplify this approach with two-stages for the area around Munich in the German Molasse Basin. As an example of application, we estimate the scalar values for slip tendency and fracture potential from the model results as measures for the criticality of fault reactivation in the reservoir-scale model. The modelling results show that variations due to uncertainties in the input data are mainly introduced by the uncertain material properties and missing SHmax magnitude estimates needed for a more reliable model calibration. This leads to the conclusion that at this stage the model's reliability depends only on the amount and quality of available stress information rather than on the modelling technique itself or on local details of the model geometry. Any improvements in modelling and increases

  17. Potential energy curves and electronic structure of 3d transition metal hydrides and their cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Satyender; Masunov, Artëm E.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate gas-phase neutral and cationic hydrides formed by 3d transition metals from Sc to Cu with density functional theory (DFT) methods. The performance of two exchange-correlation functionals, Boese-Martin for kinetics (BMK) and Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS), in predicting bond lengths and energetics, electronic structures, dipole moments, and ionization potentials is evaluated in comparison with available experimental data. To ensure a unique self-consistent field (SCF) solution, we use stability analysis, Fermi smearing, and continuity analysis of the potential energy curves. Broken-symmetry approach was adapted in order to get the qualitatively correct description of the bond dissociation. We found that on average BMK predicted values of dissociation energies and ionization potentials are closer to experiment than those obtained with high level wave function theory methods. This agreement deteriorates quickly when the fraction of the Hartree-Fock exchange in DFT functional is decreased. Natural bond orbital (NBO) population analysis was used to describe the details of chemical bonding in the systems studied. The multireference character in the wave function description of the hydrides is reproduced in broken-symmetry DFT description, as evidenced by NBO analysis. We also propose a new scheme to correct for spin contamination arising in broken-symmetry DFT approach. Unlike conventional schemes, our spin correction is introduced for each spin-polarized electron pair individually and therefore is expected to yield more accurate energy values. We derive an expression to extract the energy of the pure singlet state from the energy of the broken-symmetry DFT description of the low spin state and the energies of the high spin states (pentuplet and two spin-contaminated triplets in the case of two spin-polarized electron pairs). The high spin states are build with canonical natural orbitals and do not require SCF convergence.

  18. Superintegrable potentials on 3D Riemannian and Lorentzian spaces with nonconstant curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros, A.; Enciso, A.; Herranz, F. J.; Ragnisco, O.

    2010-02-15

    A quantum sl(2,R) coalgebra (with deformation parameter z) is shown to underly the construction of a large class of superintegrable potentials on 3D curved spaces, that include the nonconstant curvature analog of the spherical, hyperbolic, and (anti-)de Sitter spaces. The connection and curvature tensors for these 'deformed' spaces are fully studied by working on two different phase spaces. The former directly comes from a 3D symplectic realization of the deformed coalgebra, while the latter is obtained through a map leading to a spherical-type phase space. In this framework, the nondeformed limit z {yields} 0 is identified with the flat contraction leading to the Euclidean and Minkowskian spaces/potentials. The resulting Hamiltonians always admit, at least, three functionally independent constants of motion coming from the coalgebra structure. Furthermore, the intrinsic oscillator and Kepler potentials on such Riemannian and Lorentzian spaces of nonconstant curvature are identified, and several examples of them are explicitly presented.

  19. 3-D FEM field analysis in controlled-PM LSM for Maglev vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kinjiro; Lee, J.; Kim, Y.J.

    1997-03-01

    The magnetic fields in the controlled-PM LSM for Maglev vehicle, of which the width is not only finite with lateral edges, but also an effective electric-airgap is very large, are accurately analyzed by using 3-D FEM. The lateral airgap-flux due to lateral edges of the machine is made clear and its effects on thrust and lift forces are evaluated quantitatively from the comparison with 2-D FEA. The accuracy of 3-D FEA is verified by comparing the calculated results with the measured values.

  20. Moving from Batch to Field Using the RT3D Reactive Transport Modeling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, T. P.; Gautam, T. R.

    2002-12-01

    The public domain reactive transport code RT3D (Clement, 1997) is a general-purpose numerical code for solving coupled, multi-species reactive transport in saturated groundwater systems. The code uses MODFLOW to simulate flow and several modules of MT3DMS to simulate the advection and dispersion processes. RT3D employs the operator-split strategy which allows the code solve the coupled reactive transport problem in a modular fashion. The coupling between reaction and transport is defined through a separate module where the reaction equations are specified. The code supports a versatile user-defined reaction option that allows users to define their own reaction system through a Fortran-90 subroutine, known as the RT3D-reaction package. Further a utility code, known as BATCHRXN, allows the users to independently test and debug their reaction package. To analyze a new reaction system at a batch scale, users should first run BATCHRXN to test the ability of their reaction package to model the batch data. After testing, the reaction package can simply be ported to the RT3D environment to study the model response under 1-, 2-, or 3-dimensional transport conditions. This paper presents example problems that demonstrate the methods for moving from batch to field-scale simulations using BATCHRXN and RT3D codes. The first example describes a simple first-order reaction system for simulating the sequential degradation of Tetrachloroethene (PCE) and its daughter products. The second example uses a relatively complex reaction system for describing the multiple degradation pathways of Tetrachloroethane (PCA) and its daughter products. References 1) Clement, T.P, RT3D - A modular computer code for simulating reactive multi-species transport in 3-Dimensional groundwater aquifers, Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Research Report, PNNL-SA-28967, September, 1997. Available at: http://bioprocess.pnl.gov/rt3d.htm.

  1. HOSVD-Based 3D Active Appearance Model: Segmentation of Lung Fields in CT Images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhu; Kang, Wanjun; Hu, Haihui; Wang, Bin

    2016-07-01

    An Active Appearance Model (AAM) is a computer vision model which can be used to effectively segment lung fields in CT images. However, the fitting result is often inadequate when the lungs are affected by high-density pathologies. To overcome this problem, we propose a Higher-order Singular Value Decomposition (HOSVD)-based Three-dimensional (3D) AAM. An evaluation was performed on 310 diseased lungs form the Lung Image Database Consortium Image Collection. Other contemporary AAMs operate directly on patterns represented by vectors, i.e., before applying the AAM to a 3D lung volume,it has to be vectorized first into a vector pattern by some technique like concatenation. However, some implicit structural or local contextual information may be lost in this transformation. According to the nature of the 3D lung volume, HOSVD is introduced to represent and process the lung in tensor space. Our method can not only directly operate on the original 3D tensor patterns, but also efficiently reduce the computer memory usage. The evaluation resulted in an average Dice coefficient of 97.0 % ± 0.59 %, a mean absolute surface distance error of 1.0403 ± 0.5716 mm, a mean border positioning errors of 0.9187 ± 0.5381 pixel, and a Hausdorff Distance of 20.4064 ± 4.3855, respectively. Experimental results showed that our methods delivered significant and better segmentation results, compared with the three other model-based lung segmentation approaches, namely 3D Snake, 3D ASM and 3D AAM. PMID:27277277

  2. 3D Kinetic Simulation of Plasma Jet Penetration in Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, Sergei A.; Bogatu, I. N.; Kim, J. S.

    2009-11-01

    A high velocity plasmoid penetration through a magnetic barrier is a problem of a great experimental and theoretical interest. Our LSP PIC code 3D fully kinetic numerical simulations of high density (10^16 cm-3) high velocity (30-140 km/sec) plasma jet/bullet, penetrating through the transversal magnetic field, demonstrate three different regimes: reflection by field, penetration by magnetic field expulsion and penetration by magnetic self-polarization. The behavior depends on plasma jet parameters and its composition: hydrogen, carbon (A=12) and C60-fullerene (A=720) plasmas were investigated. The 3D simulation of two plasmoid head-on injections along uniform magnetic field lines is analyzed. Mini rail plasma gun (accelerator) modeling is also presented and discussed.

  3. Field testing of a 3D automatic target recognition and pose estimation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruel, Stephane; English, Chad E.; Melo, Len; Berube, Andrew; Aikman, Doug; Deslauriers, Adam M.; Church, Philip M.; Maheux, Jean

    2004-09-01

    Neptec Design Group Ltd. has developed a 3D Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) and pose estimation technology demonstrator in partnership with the Canadian DND. The system prototype was deployed for field testing at Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC)-Valcartier. This paper discusses the performance of the developed algorithm using 3D scans acquired with an imaging LIDAR. 3D models of civilian and military vehicles were built using scans acquired with a triangulation laser scanner. The models were then used to generate a knowledge base for the recognition algorithm. A commercial imaging LIDAR was used to acquire test scans of the target vehicles with varying range, pose and degree of occlusion. Recognition and pose estimation results are presented for at least 4 different poses of each vehicle at each test range. Results obtained with targets partially occluded by an artificial plane, vegetation and military camouflage netting are also presented. Finally, future operational considerations are discussed.

  4. Wave optics theory and 3-D deconvolution for the light field microscope

    PubMed Central

    Broxton, Michael; Grosenick, Logan; Yang, Samuel; Cohen, Noy; Andalman, Aaron; Deisseroth, Karl; Levoy, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Light field microscopy is a new technique for high-speed volumetric imaging of weakly scattering or fluorescent specimens. It employs an array of microlenses to trade off spatial resolution against angular resolution, thereby allowing a 4-D light field to be captured using a single photographic exposure without the need for scanning. The recorded light field can then be used to computationally reconstruct a full volume. In this paper, we present an optical model for light field microscopy based on wave optics, instead of previously reported ray optics models. We also present a 3-D deconvolution method for light field microscopy that is able to reconstruct volumes at higher spatial resolution, and with better optical sectioning, than previously reported. To accomplish this, we take advantage of the dense spatio-angular sampling provided by a microlens array at axial positions away from the native object plane. This dense sampling permits us to decode aliasing present in the light field to reconstruct high-frequency information. We formulate our method as an inverse problem for reconstructing the 3-D volume, which we solve using a GPU-accelerated iterative algorithm. Theoretical limits on the depth-dependent lateral resolution of the reconstructed volumes are derived. We show that these limits are in good agreement with experimental results on a standard USAF 1951 resolution target. Finally, we present 3-D reconstructions of pollen grains that demonstrate the improvements in fidelity made possible by our method. PMID:24150383

  5. 3D Extended Logging for Geothermal Resources: Field Trials with the Geo-Bilt System

    SciTech Connect

    Mallan, R; Wilt, M; Kirkendall, B; Kasameyer, P

    2002-05-29

    Geo-BILT (Geothermal Borehole Induction Logging Tool) is an extended induction logging tool designed for 3D resistivity imaging around a single borehole. The tool was developed for deployment in high temperature geothermal wells under a joint program funded by the California Energy Commission, Electromagnetic Instruments (EMI) and the U.S. Department of Energy. EM1 was responsible for tool design and manufacture, and numerical modeling efforts were being addressed at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) and other contractors. The field deployment was done by EM1 and LLNL. The tool operates at frequencies from 2 to 42 kHz, and its design features a series of three-component magnetic sensors offset at 2 and 5 meters from a three-component magnetic source. The combined package makes it possible to do 3D resistivity imaging, deep into the formation, from a single well. The manufacture and testing of the tool was completed in spring of 2001, and the initial deployment of Geo-BILT occurred in May 2001 at the Lost Hills oil field in southern California at leases operated by Chevron USA. This site was chosen for the initial field test because of the favorable geological conditions and the availability of a number of wells suitable for tool deployment. The second deployment occurred in April 2002 at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, operated by Caithness Power LLC, in central Nevada. This constituted the first test in a high temperature environment. The Chevron site features a fiberglass-cased observation well in the vicinity of a water injector. The injected water, which is used for pressure maintenance and for secondary sweep of the heavy oil formation, has a much lower resistivity than the oil bearing formation. This, in addition to the non-uniform flow of this water, creates a 3D resistivity structure, which is analogous to conditions produced from flowing fractures adjacent to geothermal boreholes. Therefore, it is an excellent site for testing the 3D capability of

  6. The potential of 3-D virtual worlds in professional nursing education.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Margaret M; Murray, Peter J; Erdley, W Scott

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) virtual worlds (VWs), such as Second Life, are actively being explored for their potential use in health care and nursing professional education and even for practice. The relevance of this e-learning innovation on a large scale for teaching students and professionals is yet to be demonstrated and variables influencing adoption, such as increased knowledge, self-directed learning, and peer collaboration, by academics, and health care professionals requires empirical research. PMID:19592909

  7. Decoding 3D search coil signals in a non-homogeneous magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Jakob S; Benedetto, Giacomo Di; Hess, Bernhard J M

    2010-06-18

    We present a method for recording eye-head movements with the magnetic search coil technique in a small external magnetic field. Since magnetic fields are typically non-linear, except in a relative small region in the center small field frames have not been used for head-unrestrained experiments in oculomotor studies. Here we present a method for recording 3D eye movements by accounting for the magnetic non-linearities using the Biot-Savart law. We show that the recording errors can be significantly reduced by monitoring current head position and thereby taking the location of the eye in the external magnetic field into account. PMID:20359490

  8. Self-dual Maxwell field in 3D gravity with torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Blagojevic, M.; Cvetkovic, B.

    2008-08-15

    We study the system of a self-dual Maxwell field coupled to 3D gravity with torsion, with the Maxwell field modified by a topological mass term. General structure of the field equations reveals a new, dynamical role of the classical central charges, and gives a simple correspondence between self-dual solutions with torsion and their Riemannian counterparts. We construct two exact self-dual solutions, corresponding to the sectors with a massless and massive Maxwell field, and calculate their conserved charges.

  9. Radial electric field 3D modeling for wire arrays driving dynamic hohlraums on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Raymond Cecil

    2007-06-01

    The anode-cathode structure of the Z-machine wire array results in a higher negative radial electric field (Er) on the wires near the cathode relative to the anode. The magnitude of this field has been shown to anti-correlate with the axial radiation top/bottom symmetry in the DH (Dynamic Hohlraum). Using 3D modeling, the structure of this field is revealed for different wire-array configurations and for progressive mechanical alterations, providing insight for minimizing the negative Er on the wire array in the anode-to-cathode region of the DH. Also, the 3D model is compared to Sasorov's approximation, which describes Er at the surface of the wire in terms of wire-array parameters.

  10. Stereovision-based 3D field recognition for automatic guidance system of off-road vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fangming; Ying, Yibin; Shen, Chuan; Jiang, Huanyu; Zhang, Qin

    2005-11-01

    A stereovision-based disparity evaluation algorithm was developed for rice crop field recognition. The gray level intensities and the correlation relation were integrated to produce the disparities of stereo-images. The surface of ground and rice were though as two rough planes, but their disparities waved in a narrow range. The cut/uncut edges of rice crops were first detected and track through the images. We used a step model to locate those edge positions. The points besides the edges were matched respectively to get disparity values using area correlation method. The 3D camera coordinates were computed based on those disparities. The vehicle coordinates were obtained by multiplying the 3D camera coordinates with a transform formula. It has been implemented on an agricultural robot and evaluated in rice crop field with straight rows. The results indicated that the developed stereovision navigation system is capable of reconstructing the field image.

  11. Using the CAVE virtual-reality environment as an aid to 3-D electromagnetic field computation

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, L.R.; Levine, D.; Huang, M.; Papka, M; Kettunen, L.

    1995-08-01

    One of the major problems in three-dimensional (3-D) field computation is visualizing the resulting 3-D field distributions. A virtual-reality environment, such as the CAVE, (CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment) is helping to overcome this problem, thus making the results of computation more usable for designers and users of magnets and other electromagnetic devices. As a demonstration of the capabilities of the CAVE, the elliptical multipole wiggler (EMW), an insertion device being designed for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) now being commissioned at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), wa made visible, along with its fields and beam orbits. Other uses of the CAVE in preprocessing and postprocessing computation for electromagnetic applications are also discussed.

  12. Exploring Direct 3D Interaction for Full Horizontal Parallax Light Field Displays Using Leap Motion Controller

    PubMed Central

    Adhikarla, Vamsi Kiran; Sodnik, Jaka; Szolgay, Peter; Jakus, Grega

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the design and evaluation of direct 3D gesture interaction with a full horizontal parallax light field display. A light field display defines a visual scene using directional light beams emitted from multiple light sources as if they are emitted from scene points. Each scene point is rendered individually resulting in more realistic and accurate 3D visualization compared to other 3D displaying technologies. We propose an interaction setup combining the visualization of objects within the Field Of View (FOV) of a light field display and their selection through freehand gesture tracked by the Leap Motion Controller. The accuracy and usefulness of the proposed interaction setup was also evaluated in a user study with test subjects. The results of the study revealed high user preference for free hand interaction with light field display as well as relatively low cognitive demand of this technique. Further, our results also revealed some limitations and adjustments of the proposed setup to be addressed in future work. PMID:25875189

  13. 3D real-time visualization of blood flow in cerebral aneurysms by light field particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsohn, Matthias F.; Kemmling, André; Petersen, Arne; Wietzke, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral aneurysms require endovascular treatment to eliminate potentially lethal hemorrhagic rupture by hemostasis of blood flow within the aneurysm. Devices (e.g. coils and flow diverters) promote homeostasis, however, measurement of blood flow within an aneurysm or cerebral vessel before and after device placement on a microscopic level has not been possible so far. This would allow better individualized treatment planning and improve manufacture design of devices. For experimental analysis, direct measurement of real-time microscopic cerebrovascular flow in micro-structures may be an alternative to computed flow simulations. An application of microscopic aneurysm flow measurement on a regular basis to empirically assess a high number of different anatomic shapes and the corresponding effect of different devices would require a fast and reliable method at low cost with high throughout assessment. Transparent three dimensional 3D models of brain vessels and aneurysms may be used for microscopic flow measurements by particle image velocimetry (PIV), however, up to now the size of structures has set the limits for conventional 3D-imaging camera set-ups. On line flow assessment requires additional computational power to cope with the processing large amounts of data generated by sequences of multi-view stereo images, e.g. generated by a light field camera capturing the 3D information by plenoptic imaging of complex flow processes. Recently, a fast and low cost workflow for producing patient specific three dimensional models of cerebral arteries has been established by stereo-lithographic (SLA) 3D printing. These 3D arterial models are transparent an exhibit a replication precision within a submillimeter range required for accurate flow measurements under physiological conditions. We therefore test the feasibility of microscopic flow measurements by PIV analysis using a plenoptic camera system capturing light field image sequences. Averaging across a sequence of

  14. Surface strain-field determination of tympanic membrane using 3D-digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Montes, María del S.; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando; Muñoz, Silvino; Perez, Carlos; de la Torre, Manuel; Flores, Mauricio; Alvarez, Luis

    2015-08-01

    In order to increase the understanding of soft tissues mechanical properties, 3D Digital Holographic Interferometry (3D-DHI) was used to quantify the strain-field on a cat tympanic membrane (TM) surface. The experiments were carried out applying a constant sound-stimuli pressure of 90 dB SPL (0.632 Pa) on the TM at 1.2 kHz. The technique allows the accurate acquisition of the micro-displacement data along the x, y and z directions, which is a must for a full characterization of the tissue mechanical behavior under load, and for the calculation of the strain-field in situ. The displacements repeatability in z direction shows a standard deviation of 0.062 μm at 95% confidence level. In order to realize the full 3D characterization correctly the contour of the TM surface was measured employing the optically non-contact two-illumination positions contouring method. The x, y and z displacements combined with the TM contour data allow the evaluation its strain-field by spatially differentiating the u(m,n), v(m,n), and w(m,n) deformation components. The accurate and correct determination of the TM strain-field leads to describing its elasticity, which is an important parameter needed to improve ear biomechanics studies, audition processes and TM mobility in both experimental measurements and theoretical analysis of ear functionality and its modeling.

  15. Optimisation of Ionic Models to Fit Tissue Action Potentials: Application to 3D Atrial Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, Nigel H.; Dokos, Socrates

    2013-01-01

    A 3D model of atrial electrical activity has been developed with spatially heterogeneous electrophysiological properties. The atrial geometry, reconstructed from the male Visible Human dataset, included gross anatomical features such as the central and peripheral sinoatrial node (SAN), intra-atrial connections, pulmonary veins, inferior and superior vena cava, and the coronary sinus. Membrane potentials of myocytes from spontaneously active or electrically paced in vitro rabbit cardiac tissue preparations were recorded using intracellular glass microelectrodes. Action potentials of central and peripheral SAN, right and left atrial, and pulmonary vein myocytes were each fitted using a generic ionic model having three phenomenological ionic current components: one time-dependent inward, one time-dependent outward, and one leakage current. To bridge the gap between the single-cell ionic models and the gross electrical behaviour of the 3D whole-atrial model, a simplified 2D tissue disc with heterogeneous regions was optimised to arrive at parameters for each cell type under electrotonic load. Parameters were then incorporated into the 3D atrial model, which as a result exhibited a spontaneously active SAN able to rhythmically excite the atria. The tissue-based optimisation of ionic models and the modelling process outlined are generic and applicable to image-based computer reconstruction and simulation of excitable tissue. PMID:23935704

  16. Anderson Localization of a Bose-Einstein Condensate in a 3D Random Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Skipetrov, S. E.; Minguzzi, A.; Tiggelen, B. A. van; Shapiro, B.

    2008-04-25

    We study the effect of Anderson localization on the expansion of a Bose-Einstein condensate, released from a harmonic trap, in a 3D random potential. We use scaling arguments and the self-consistent theory of localization to show that the long-time behavior of the condensate density is controlled by a single parameter equal to the ratio of the mobility edge and the chemical potential of the condensate. We find that the two critical exponents of the localization transition determine the evolution of the condensate density in time and space.

  17. Velocity field measurements in sedimentary rock cores by magnetization prepared 3D SPRITE.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Konstantin; Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2012-10-01

    A time-efficient MRI method suitable for quantitative mapping of 3-D velocity fields in sedimentary rock cores, and granular samples is discussed. The method combines the 13-interval Alternating-Pulsed-Gradient Stimulated-Echo (APGSTE) scheme and three-dimensional Single Point Ramped Imaging with T(1) Enhancement (SPRITE). Collecting a few samples near the q-space origin and employing restricted k-space sampling dramatically improves the performance of the imaging method. The APGSTE-SPRITE method is illustrated through mapping of 3-D velocity field in a macroscopic bead pack and heterogeneous sandstone and limestone core plugs. The observed flow patterns are consistent with a general trend for permeability to increase with the porosity. Domains of low permeability obstruct the flow within the core volume. Water tends to flow along macroscopic zones of higher porosity and across zones of lower porosity. PMID:22967892

  18. Velocity field measurements in sedimentary rock cores by magnetization prepared 3D SPRITE.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Konstantin; Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2012-10-01

    A time-efficient MRI method suitable for quantitative mapping of 3-D velocity fields in sedimentary rock cores, and granular samples is discussed. The method combines the 13-interval Alternating-Pulsed-Gradient Stimulated-Echo (APGSTE) scheme and three-dimensional Single Point Ramped Imaging with T(1) Enhancement (SPRITE). Collecting a few samples near the q-space origin and employing restricted k-space sampling dramatically improves the performance of the imaging method. The APGSTE-SPRITE method is illustrated through mapping of 3-D velocity field in a macroscopic bead pack and heterogeneous sandstone and limestone core plugs. The observed flow patterns are consistent with a general trend for permeability to increase with the porosity. Domains of low permeability obstruct the flow within the core volume. Water tends to flow along macroscopic zones of higher porosity and across zones of lower porosity.

  19. Kinetic turbulence in 3D collisionless magnetic reconnection with a guide magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejandro Munoz Sepulveda, Patricio; Kilian, Patrick; Jain, Neeraj; Büchner, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The features of kinetic plasma turbulence developed during non-relativistic 3D collisionless magnetic reconnection are still not fully understood. This is specially true under the influence of a strong magnetic guide field, a scenario common in space plasmas such as in the solar corona and also in laboratory experiments such as MRX or VINETA II. Therefore, we study the mechanisms and micro-instabilities leading to the development of turbulence during 3D magnetic reconnection with a fully kinetic PIC code, emphasizing the role of the guide field with an initial setup suitable for the aforementioned environments. We also clarify the relations between these processes and the generation of non-thermal populations and particle acceleration.

  20. Simultaneous 3D Strain and Flow Fields Measurement of a Model Artery under Unsteady Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toloui, Mostafa; Sheng, Jian

    2011-11-01

    Fluid-Structure Interaction imposes challenges in both aero-elasticity and biomedical studies. A simultaneous solid deformation and fluid flow measurement technique based on digital in-line holographic particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) has been developed. It allows us to measure concurrently 3D strain field of a deforming structure and the unsteady flow near it. To facilitate the measurement, both wall and flow are seeded with tracer particles distinguished by size. The motion of these tracers provides the 3D deformation of the wall and the 3D velocity distribution of the flow separately. A fully index matched facility including transparent artery and NaI solution is constructed to enable observations near the wall or through the complex geometry. An arterial model with the inner diameter of 9.5 mm and the thickness of 0.9 mm is manufactured from the cross-linked transparent PDMS at the mixing ratio of 1:10 and doped with mono-dispersed 19 μm polystyrene particles. A cinematic holographic PTV system is used to trace the 3D particle motion in the model and flow simultaneously. Preliminary study is performed within a sample volume of 15 × 15 × 75 mm with the spatial resolution of 7.4 μm in lateral and 10 μm in depth. Uncertainty and accuracy analysis will be reported. NSF Grant No: CBET-0844647.

  1. Full-field strain measurements on turbomachinery components using 3D SLDV technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire, Martyn; Sever, Ibrahim

    2016-06-01

    This paper focuses on measurements of 3D Operating Deflection Shapes (ODSs), and subsequently, construction of full-field surface strain maps of a number of turbomachinery components. For this purpose a 3D Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer (SLDV) is used. The ODS measurements are performed for a large number of modes and results obtained are compared with the 1-D shapes that are most commonly measured. It is demonstrated that the 3D measurements are a significant improvement over the 1-D case in terms of independent amount of extra information they provide. This is confirmed through comparisons with FE results. Special tests are carried out to recover the full-field strain on scanned faces of the components used. Visual comparison of these measurements with FE counterparts reveal that strain maps can be successfully measured, not only for low frequency modes but also for highly complex high frequency ones. These maps are measured with different levels of input force to assess the linearity of strain results to varying response amplitudes. Lessons learnt and observations made are summarised in concluding remarks and the scope of future work to take this study into the production environment is discussed. This study constitutes a unique comprehensive investigation into full-field strain measurements using real application hardware and a large frequency range.

  2. 3D mapping of nanoscale electric potentials in semiconductor structures using electron-holographic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Daniel; Lubk, Axel; Prete, Paola; Lovergine, Nico; Lichte, Hannes

    2016-09-01

    Off-axis electron holography (EH) is a powerful method for mapping projected electric potentials, such as built-in potentials in semiconductor devices, in two dimensions (2D) at nanometer resolution. However, not well-defined thickness profiles, surface effects, and composition changes of the sample under investigation complicate the interpretation of the projected potentials. Here, we demonstrate how these problems can be overcome by combining EH with tomographic techniques, that is, electron holographic tomography (EHT), reconstructing electric potentials in 3D. We present EHT reconstructions of an n-type MOSFET including its dopant-related built-in potentials inside the device, as well as of a GaAs/AlGaAs core-multishell nanowire containing a 5 nm thick quantum well tube.

  3. Commissioning a small-field biological irradiator using point, 2D, and 3D dosimetry techniques

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Joseph; Oldham, Mark; Thomas, Andrew; Li, Yifan; Adamovics, John; Kirsch, David G.; Das, Shiva

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To commission a small-field biological irradiator, the XRad225Cx from Precision x-Ray, Inc., for research use. The system produces a 225 kVp x-ray beam and is equipped with collimating cones that produce both square and circular radiation fields ranging in size from 1 to 40 mm. This work incorporates point, 2D, and 3D measurements to determine output factors (OF), percent-depth-dose (PDD) and dose profiles at multiple depths. Methods: Three independent dosimetry systems were used: ion-chambers (a farmer chamber and a micro-ionisation chamber), 2D EBT2 radiochromic film, and a novel 3D dosimetry system (DLOS/PRESAGE®). Reference point dose rates and output factors were determined from in-air ionization chamber measurements for fields down to ∼13 mm using the formalism of TG61. PDD, profiles, and output factors at three separate depths (0, 0.5, and 2 cm), were determined for all field sizes from EBT2 film measurements in solid water. Several film PDD curves required a scaling correction, reflecting the challenge of accurate film alignment in very small fields. PDDs, profiles, and output factors were also determined with the 3D DLOS/PRESAGE® system which generated isotropic 0.2 mm data, in scan times of 20 min. Results: Surface output factors determined by ion-chamber were observed to gradually drop by ∼9% when the field size was reduced from 40 to 13 mm. More dramatic drops were observed for the smallest fields as determined by EBT∼18% and ∼42% for the 2.5 mm and 1 mm fields, respectively. PRESAGE® and film output factors agreed well for fields <20 mm (where 3D data were available) with mean deviation of 2.2% (range 1%–4%). PDD values at 2 cm depth varied from ∼72% for the 40 mm field, down to ∼55% for the 1 mm field. EBT and PRESAGE® PDDs agreed within ∼3% in the typical therapy region (1–4 cm). At deeper depths the EBT curves were slightly steeper (2.5% at 5 cm). These results indicate good overall consistency between ion-chamber, EBT

  4. Formalizing the potential of stereoscopic 3D user experience in interactive entertainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Masuch, Maic

    2015-03-01

    The use of stereoscopic 3D vision affects how interactive entertainment has to be developed as well as how it is experienced by the audience. The large amount of possibly impacting factors and variety as well as a certain subtlety of measured effects on user experience make it difficult to grasp the overall potential of using S3D vision. In a comprehensive approach, we (a) present a development framework which summarizes possible variables in display technology, content creation and human factors, and (b) list a scheme of S3D user experience effects concerning initial fascination, emotions, performance, and behavior as well as negative feelings of discomfort and complexity. As a major contribution we propose a qualitative formalization which derives dependencies between development factors and user effects. The argumentation is based on several previously published user studies. We further show how to apply this formula to identify possible opportunities and threats in content creation as well as how to pursue future steps for a possible quantification.

  5. Investigating the Potential of Using Off-Axis 3D Woven Composites in Composite Joints' Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Mohamed Nasr; Wang, Ying; Yudhanto, Arief; Joesbury, Adam; Potluri, Prasad; Lubineau, Gilles; Soutis, Constantinos

    2016-09-01

    The effect of circular notch has been evaluated for three different architectures of three-dimensional (3D) carbon fibre woven composites (orthogonal, ORT; layer-to-layer, LTL; angle interlock, AI) through open-hole quasi-static tension and double-lap bearing strength tests in the off-axis (45°) direction. Damage characterisation is monitored using Digital Image correlation (DIC) for open-hole testing and X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) for double-lap bearing strength test. The off-axis notched 3D woven composites exhibits minor reduction (less than 10 %) of the notched strength compared to the un-notched strength. DIC strain contour clearly show stress/strain localisation regions around the hole periphery and stress/strain redistribution away from the whole due to the z-binder existence, especially for ORT architecture. Up to 50 % bearing strain, no significant difference in the bearing stress/bearing strain response is observed. However when ORT architecture was loaded up to failure, it demonstrates higher strain to failure (~140 %) followed by AI (~105 %) and lastly LTL (~85 %). X-ray CT scans reveal the effect of the z-binder architecture on damage evolution and delamination resistance. The study suggests that off-axis loaded 3D woven composites, especially ORT architecture, has a great potential of overcoming the current challenges facing composite laminates when used in composite joints' applications.

  6. 3D-HST WFC3-selected Photometric Catalogs in the Five CANDELS/3D-HST Fields: Photometry, Photometric Redshifts, and Stellar Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Labbé, Ivo; Franx, Marijn; van der Wel, Arjen; Bezanson, Rachel; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Fumagalli, Mattia; Förster Schreiber, Natascha; Kriek, Mariska; Leja, Joel; Lundgren, Britt F.; Magee, Daniel; Marchesini, Danilo; Maseda, Michael V.; Nelson, Erica J.; Oesch, Pascal; Pacifici, Camilla; Patel, Shannon G.; Price, Sedona; Rix, Hans-Walter; Tal, Tomer; Wake, David A.; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-10-01

    The 3D-HST and CANDELS programs have provided WFC3 and ACS spectroscopy and photometry over ≈900 arcmin2 in five fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-North, GOODS-South, and the UKIDSS UDS field. All these fields have a wealth of publicly available imaging data sets in addition to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, which makes it possible to construct the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of objects over a wide wavelength range. In this paper we describe a photometric analysis of the CANDELS and 3D-HST HST imaging and the ancillary imaging data at wavelengths 0.3-8 μm. Objects were selected in the WFC3 near-IR bands, and their SEDs were determined by carefully taking the effects of the point-spread function in each observation into account. A total of 147 distinct imaging data sets were used in the analysis. The photometry is made available in the form of six catalogs: one for each field, as well as a master catalog containing all objects in the entire survey. We also provide derived data products: photometric redshifts, determined with the EAZY code, and stellar population parameters determined with the FAST code. We make all the imaging data that were used in the analysis available, including our reductions of the WFC3 imaging in all five fields. 3D-HST is a spectroscopic survey with the WFC3 and ACS grisms, and the photometric catalogs presented here constitute a necessary first step in the analysis of these grism data. All the data presented in this paper are available through the 3D-HST Web site (http://3dhst.research.yale.edu).

  7. 3D-HST WFC3-SELECTED PHOTOMETRIC CATALOGS IN THE FIVE CANDELS/3D-HST FIELDS: PHOTOMETRY, PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, AND STELLAR MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Bezanson, Rachel; Leja, Joel; Nelson, Erica J.; Oesch, Pascal; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Labbé, Ivo; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Van der Wel, Arjen; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Maseda, Michael V.; Förster Schreiber, Natascha; Kriek, Mariska; Lundgren, Britt F.; Magee, Daniel; Marchesini, Danilo; and others

    2014-10-01

    The 3D-HST and CANDELS programs have provided WFC3 and ACS spectroscopy and photometry over ≈900 arcmin{sup 2} in five fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-North, GOODS-South, and the UKIDSS UDS field. All these fields have a wealth of publicly available imaging data sets in addition to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, which makes it possible to construct the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of objects over a wide wavelength range. In this paper we describe a photometric analysis of the CANDELS and 3D-HST HST imaging and the ancillary imaging data at wavelengths 0.3-8 μm. Objects were selected in the WFC3 near-IR bands, and their SEDs were determined by carefully taking the effects of the point-spread function in each observation into account. A total of 147 distinct imaging data sets were used in the analysis. The photometry is made available in the form of six catalogs: one for each field, as well as a master catalog containing all objects in the entire survey. We also provide derived data products: photometric redshifts, determined with the EAZY code, and stellar population parameters determined with the FAST code. We make all the imaging data that were used in the analysis available, including our reductions of the WFC3 imaging in all five fields. 3D-HST is a spectroscopic survey with the WFC3 and ACS grisms, and the photometric catalogs presented here constitute a necessary first step in the analysis of these grism data. All the data presented in this paper are available through the 3D-HST Web site (http://3dhst.research.yale.edu)

  8. An approach to 3D magnetic field calculation using numerical and differential algebra methods

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.; Brady, V.O.

    1992-07-17

    Motivated by the need for new means for specification and determination of 3D fields that are produced by electromagnetic lens elements in the region interior to coil windings and seeking to obtain techniques that will be convenient for accurate conductor placement and dynamical study of particle motion, we have conveniently gene the representation of a 2D magnetic field to 3D. We have shown that the 3 dimensioal magnetic field components of a multipole magnet in the curl-fire divergence-fire region near the axis r=0 can be derived from one dimensional functions A{sub n}(z) and their derivatives (part 1). In the region interior to coil windings of accelerator magnets the three spatial components of magnet fields can be expressed in terms of harmonic components'' proportional to functions sin (n{theta}) or cos (n{theta}) of the azimuthal angle. The r,z dependence of any such component can then be expressed in terms of powers of r times functions A{sub n}(z) and their derivatives. For twodimensional configurations B{sub z} of course is identically zero, the derivatives of A{sub n}(z) vanish, and the harmonic components of the transverse field then acquire a simple proportionality B{sub r,n} {proportional to} r{sup n-1} sin (n{theta}),B{sub {theta},n} {proportional to} r{sup n-1} cos (n{theta}), whereas in a 3-D configuration the more complex nature of the field gives rise to additional so-called psuedomultipole'' components as judged by additional powers of r required in the development of the field. Computation of the 3-D magnetic field arising at a sequence of field points, as a direct result of a specified current configuration or coil geometry, can be calculated explicitly through use of the Biot-Savart law and from such data the coefficients can then be derived for a general development of the type indicated above. We indicate, discuss, and illustrate two means by which this development may be performed.

  9. RV functional imaging: 3-D echo-derived dynamic geometry and flow field simulations.

    PubMed

    Pasipoularides, Ares D; Shu, Ming; Womack, Michael S; Shah, Ashish; Von Ramm, Olaf; Glower, Donald D

    2003-01-01

    We describe a novel functional imaging approach for quantitative analysis of right ventricular (RV) blood flow patterns in specific experimental animals (or humans) using real-time, three-dimensional (3-D) echocardiography (RT3D). The method is independent of the digital imaging modality used. It comprises three parts. First, a semiautomated segmentation aided by intraluminal contrast medium locates the RV endocardial surface. Second, a geometric scheme for dynamic RV chamber reconstruction applies a time interpolation procedure to the RT3D data to quantify wall geometry and motion at 400 Hz. A volumetric prism method validated the dynamic geometric reconstruction against simultaneous sonomicrometric canine measurements. Finally, the RV endocardial border motion information is used for mesh generation on a computational fluid dynamics solver to simulate development of the early RV diastolic inflow field. Boundary conditions (tessellated endocardial surface nodal velocities) for the solver are directly derived from the endocardial geometry and motion information. The new functional imaging approach may yield important kinematic information on the distribution of instantaneous velocities in the RV diastolic flow field of specific normal or diseased hearts. PMID:12388220

  10. Lessons in modern digital field geology: Open source software, 3D techniques, and the new world of digital mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, Terry; Hurtado, Jose; Langford, Richard; Serpa, Laura

    2014-05-01

    Although many geologists refuse to admit it, it is time to put paper-based geologic mapping into the historical archives and move to the full potential of digital mapping techniques. For our group, flat map digital geologic mapping is now a routine operation in both research and instruction. Several software options are available, and basic proficiency with the software can be learned in a few hours of instruction and practice. The first practical field GIS software, ArcPad, remains a viable, stable option on Windows-based systems. However, the vendor seems to be moving away from ArcPad in favor of mobile software solutions that are difficult to implement without GIS specialists. Thus, we have pursued a second software option based on the open source program QGIS. Our QGIS system uses the same shapefile-centric data structure as our ArcPad system, including similar pop-up data entry forms and generic graphics for easy data management in the field. The advantage of QGIS is that the same software runs on virtually all common platforms except iOS, although the Android version remains unstable as of this writing. A third software option we are experimenting with for flat map-based field work is Fieldmove, a derivative of the 3D-capable program Move developed by Midland Valley. Our initial experiments with Fieldmove are positive, particularly with the new, inexpensive (<300Euros) Windows tablets. However, the lack of flexibility in data structure makes for cumbersome workflows when trying to interface our existing shapefile-centric data structures to Move. Nonetheless, in spring 2014 we will experiment with full-3D immersion in the field using the full Move software package in combination with ground based LiDAR and photogrammetry. One new workflow suggested by our initial experiments is that field geologists should consider using photogrammetry software to capture 3D visualizations of key outcrops. This process is now straightforward in several software packages, and

  11. 3D visualization of deformation structures and potential fluid pathways at the Grimsel Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeberger, Raphael; Kober, Florian; Berger, Alfons; Spillmann, Thomas; Herwegh, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge on the ability of fluids to infiltrate subsurface rocks is of major importance for underground constructions, geothermal or radioactive waste disposal projects. In this study, we focus on the characterization of water infiltration pathways, their 3D geometries and origins. Based on surface and subsurface mapping in combination with drill core data, we developed by the use of MoveTM (Midland Valley Exploration Ltd.) a 3D structural model of the Grimsel Test Site (GTS). GTS is an underground laboratory operated by NAGRA, the Swiss organisation responsible for the management of nuclear waste. It is located within a suite of post-Variscan magmatic bodies comprising former granitic and granodioritic melts, which are dissected by mafic and aplitic dikes. During Alpine orogeny, the suite was tectonically overprinted within two stages of ductile deformation (Wehrens et al., in prep.) followed by brittle overprint of some of the shear zones during the retrograde exhumation history. It is this brittle deformation, which controls today's water infiltration network. However, the associated fractures, cataclasites and fault gouges are controlled themselves by aforementioned pre-existing mechanical discontinuities, whose origin ranges back as far as to the magmatic stage. For example, two sets of vertically oriented mafic dikes (E-W and NW-SE striking) and compositional heterogeneities induced by magmatic segregation processes in the plutonic host rocks served as nucleation sites for Alpine strain localization. Subsequently, NE-SW, E-W and NW-SE striking ductile shear zones were formed, in combination with high temperature fracturing while dissecting the host rocks in a complex 3D pattern (Wehrens et al, in prep.). Whether the ductile shear zones have been subjected to brittle reactivation and can serve as infiltration pathways or not, depends strongly on their orientations with respect to the principal stress field. Especially where deformation structures intersect

  12. 3-D Waveguide Effects of Topographical Structural Variation on Full Waveform Propagation: 3-D Finite Difference Modeling Comparisons with Field Data From Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T. S.; Miller, R.; Greenfield, R.; Fisk, D.

    2002-12-01

    The propagation of seismic waves through regions of complex topography is not thoroughly understood. Surface waves, are of particular interest, as they are large in amplitude and can characterize the source depth, magnitude, and frequency content. The amplitude and frequency content of seismic waves that propagate in regions with large topographical variations are affected by both the scattering and blockage of the wave energy. The ability to predict the 3-d scattering due to topography will improve the understanding of both regional scale surface wave magnitudes, and refine surface wave discriminants as well as at the local scale (<2 km ) where it will aid in the development of rule of thumb guide lines for array sensor placement for real time sensing technologies. Ideally, when validating the numerical accuracy of a propagation model against field data, the input geologic parameters would be known and thus eliminates geology as a source of error in the calculation. In March of 2001, Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) performed a detailed seismic site characterization at the Smart Weapons Test Range, Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona. The result of the KGS characterization study is a high-resolution 3-d model that is used in our seismic simulations. The velocities Vs, Vp are calculated by tomography and refraction, attenuation coefficients estimated from the surface wave and from p-waves and are provided in a model with attributes resolved in 3-d to 0.5 meters. In the present work, we present comparisons of synthetic data with seismic data collected at the Smart Weapons Test Range to benchmark the accuracy achieved in simulating 3-d wave propagation in the vicinity of a topographical anomaly (trench). Synthetic seismograms are generated using a 3-d 8th order staggered grid visco-elastic finite difference code that accounts for topography. The geologic model is based on the Yuma site characterization. The size of these calculations required use of the DoD High Performance

  13. Self-Sensing, Ultralight, and Conductive 3D Graphene/Iron Oxide Aerogel Elastomer Deformable in a Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiang; Li, Hui; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Hu, Han; Zhao, Zongbin; Li, Jihao; Li, Jingye; Qiao, Yu; Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-04-28

    Three-dimensional (3D) graphene aerogels (GA) show promise for applications in supercapacitors, electrode materials, gas sensors, and oil absorption due to their high porosity, mechanical strength, and electrical conductivity. However, the control, actuation, and response properties of graphene aerogels have not been well studied. In this paper, we synthesized 3D graphene aerogels decorated with Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4/GA) by self-assembly of graphene with simultaneous decoration by Fe3O4 nanoparticles using a modified hydrothermal reduction process. The aerogels exhibit up to 52% reversible magnetic field-induced strain and strain-dependent electrical resistance that can be used to monitor the degree of compression/stretching of the material. The density of Fe3O4/GA is only about 5.8 mg cm(-3), making it an ultralight magnetic elastomer with potential applications in self-sensing soft actuators, microsensors, microswitches, and environmental remediation. PMID:25792130

  14. The role of plasma response in divertor footprint modification by 3D fields in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Joonwook; Kim, Kimin; Canal, Gustavo; Gan, Kaifu; Gray, Travis; McLean, Adam; Park, Jong-Kyu; Scotti, Filippo

    2015-11-01

    In NSTX, the divertor footprints of both heat and particle fluxes are found to be significantly modified by externally applied 3D magnetic perturbations. Striations on the divertor surface, indicating separatrix splitting and formation of magnetic lobes, are observed for both n = 1 and n = 3 perturbation fields. These striations can lead to localized heating of the divertor plates and to the re-attachment of detached plasmas, both of which have to be avoided in ITER for successful heat flux management. In this work, the role of plasma response on the formation of separatrix splitting has been investigated in the ideal framework by comparing measured heat and particle flux footprints with field line tracing calculations with and without contributions from the plasma response calculated by the ideal code IPEC. Simulations show that, n = 3 fields are slightly shielded by the plasma, with the measured helical pattern of striations in good agreement with the results from the vacuum approximation. The n = 1 fields are, however, significantly amplified by the plasma response, which provides a better agreement with the measurements. Resistive plasma response calculations by M3D-C1 are also in progress and the results will be compared with those from the ideal code IPEC. This work was supported by DoE Contracts: DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-AC52-07NA27344 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  15. The distribution of 3D superconductivity near the second critical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachmar, Ayman; Nasrallah, Marwa

    2016-09-01

    We study the minimizers of the Ginzburg-Landau energy functional with a uniform magnetic field in a three dimensional bounded domain. The functional depends on two positive parameters, the Ginzburg-Landau parameter and the intensity of the applied magnetic field, and acts on complex-valued functions and vector fields. We establish a formula for the distribution of the L 2-norm of the minimizing complex-valued function (order parameter). The formula is valid in the regime where the Ginzburg-Landau parameter is large and the applied magnetic field is close to and strictly below the second critical field—the threshold value corresponding to the transition from the superconducting to the normal phase in the bulk of the sample. Earlier results are valid in 2D domains and for the L 4-norm in 3D domains.

  16. 3D CFD simulations of trailing suction hopper dredger plume mixing: comparison with field measurements.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Lynyrd; Talmon, A M; van Rhee, C

    2014-11-15

    A 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is used to simulate mixing of an overflow plume within 400 m from a trailing suction hopper dredger (TSHD). The simulations are compared with new field measurements. It is the first time simulations of overflow dredging plumes are compared in such detail to field measurements this close to a TSHD. Seven cases with a large variety in overflow flux and plume characteristics are used. Measured maximum suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) vary between 30 and 500 mg/l and fluxes vary between 0.7% and 20% of the total overflow flux; the CFD model has, subject to the limitations of the field data, been shown to reproduce this in a satisfactory way. The model gives better understanding of important near field processes, which helps to assess the frequency, duration and intensity of stresses like turbidity and sedimentation needed to find the environmental impact of dredging projects.

  17. Effects of 3D Toroidally Asymmetric Magnetic Field on Tokamak Magnetic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.

    2005-10-01

    The effects of 3D error magnetic field on magnetic surfaces are investigated using the DIII-D internal coils (I-Coils). Slowly rotating n=1 traveling waves at 5 Hz and various amplitudes were applied to systematically perturb the edge surfaces by programming the I-Coil currents. The vertical separatrix location difference between EFIT magnetic reconstructions that assumes toroidal symmetry and Thomson scattering Te measurements responds in phase to the applied perturbed field. The oscillation amplitudes increase with the strength of the applied field but are much smaller than those expected from the applied field alone. The results indicate that plasma response is important. Various plasma response models based on results from the MHD codes MARS and GATO are being developed and compared to the experimental observations. To more accurately evaluate the effects of magnetic measurement errors, a new form of the magnetic uncertainty matrix is also being implemented into EFIT. Details will be presented.

  18. The distribution of 3D superconductivity near the second critical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachmar, Ayman; Nasrallah, Marwa

    2016-09-01

    We study the minimizers of the Ginzburg–Landau energy functional with a uniform magnetic field in a three dimensional bounded domain. The functional depends on two positive parameters, the Ginzburg–Landau parameter and the intensity of the applied magnetic field, and acts on complex-valued functions and vector fields. We establish a formula for the distribution of the L 2-norm of the minimizing complex-valued function (order parameter). The formula is valid in the regime where the Ginzburg–Landau parameter is large and the applied magnetic field is close to and strictly below the second critical field—the threshold value corresponding to the transition from the superconducting to the normal phase in the bulk of the sample. Earlier results are valid in 2D domains and for the L 4-norm in 3D domains.

  19. Potential of 3D printing technologies for fabrication of electron bolus and proton compensators.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Fisher, Ted; Zhang, Miao; Kim, Leonard; Chen, Ting; Narra, Venkat; Swann, Beth; Singh, Rachana; Siderit, Richard; Yin, Lingshu; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin; McKenna, Michael; McDonough, James; Ning, Yue J

    2015-05-08

    In electron and proton radiotherapy, applications of patient-specific electron bolus or proton compensators during radiation treatments are often necessary to accommodate patient body surface irregularities, tissue inhomogeneity, and variations in PTV depths to achieve desired dose distributions. Emerging 3D printing technologies provide alternative fabrication methods for these bolus and compensators. This study investigated the potential of utilizing 3D printing technologies for the fabrication of the electron bolus and proton compensators. Two printing technologies, fused deposition modeling (FDM) and selective laser sintering (SLS), and two printing materials, PLA and polyamide, were investigated. Samples were printed and characterized with CT scan and under electron and proton beams. In addition, a software package was developed to convert electron bolus and proton compensator designs to printable Standard Tessellation Language file format. A phantom scalp electron bolus was printed with FDM technology with PLA material. The HU of the printed electron bolus was 106.5 ± 15.2. A prostate patient proton compensator was printed with SLS technology and polyamide material with -70.1 ± 8.1 HU. The profiles of the electron bolus and proton compensator were compared with the original designs. The average over all the CT slices of the largest Euclidean distance between the design and the fabricated bolus on each CT slice was found to be 0.84 ± 0.45 mm and for the compensator to be 0.40 ± 0.42 mm. It is recommended that the properties of specific 3D printed objects are understood before being applied to radiotherapy treatments.

  20. Coupling Magnetic Fields and ALE Hydrodynamics for 3D Simulations of MFCG's

    SciTech Connect

    White, D; Rieben, R; Wallin, B

    2006-09-20

    We review the development of a full 3D multiphysics code for the simulation of explosively driven Magnetic Flux Compression Generators (MFCG) and related pulse power devices. In a typical MFCG the device is seeded with an initial electric current and the device is then detonated. The detonation compresses the magnetic field and amplifies the current. This is a multiphysics problem in that detonation kinetics, electromagnetic diffusion and induction, material deformation, and thermal effects are all important. This is a tightly coupled problem in that the different physical quantities have comparable spatial and temporal variation, and hence should be solved simultaneously on the same computational mesh.

  1. High-resolution 2D NMR spectra in inhomogeneous fields via 3D acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yanqin; Wei, Zhiliang; Zhang, Liandi; Lin, Liangjie; Chen, Zhong

    2014-04-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays an important role in chemical studies. Here, a pulse sequence, based on coherence transfer module of tracking differences of precession frequencies of two spins and spin echo module, is proposed to obtain two dimension (2D) high-resolution NMR spectra via 3D acquisition under large field inhomogeneity. The proposed scheme composes of simple hard pulses and rectangle gradients. Resulting 2D spectra exhibit chemical shift differences and J coupling splittings in two orthogonal dimensions. The method developed here may offer a promising way for in situ high-resolution NMR studies on combinatorial chemistry.

  2. Small oscillations of a 3D electric dipole in the presence of a uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Pino, L. A.; Atenas, B.; Curilef, S.

    2016-05-01

    The classical behavior of a 3D electric dipole in the presence of a uniform magnetic field is studied in the small oscillations approximation. Using the Lagrangian formulation, the equations of motion are obtained, as well as their solutions and constants of motion. Normal modes of oscillation and their corresponding normal coordinates are obtained. Furthermore, the existence of a type of bound states without turning points, so-called trapped states conjectured by Troncoso and Curilef [Eur. J. Phys 27 (2006) 1315-1322], is investigated.

  3. 3D geometry of the strain-field at transform plate boundaries: Implications for seismic rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, P.; Bilham, R. |

    1994-11-01

    We examine the amplitude and distribution of slip on vertical frictionless faults in the zone of concentrated shear strain that is characteristic of transform plate boundaries. We study both a 2D and a 3D approximation to this strain field. Mean displacements on ruptures within the zone of concentrated shear strain are proportional to the shear strain at failure when they are short, and are limited by plate displacements since the last major earthquake when they are long. The transition between these two behaviors occurs when the length of the dislocation approaches twice the thickness of the seismogenic crust, approximately the breadth of the zone of concentrated shear strain observed geodetically at transform plate boundaries. This result explains the observed non-linear scaling relation between seismic moment and rupture length. A geometrical consequence of the 3D model, in which the strain-field tapers downward, is that moderate earthquakes with rupture lengths similar to the thickness of the crust tend to slip more at depth than near the surface. Seismic moments estimated from surface slip in moderate earthquakes (M less than or equal to 7) will thus be underestimated. Shallow creep, if its along-strike dimension is extensive, can reduce a surface slip deficit that would otherwise develop on faults on which M less than 7 events are typical. In the absence of surface creep or other forms of off-fault deformation great earthquakes may be necessary features of transform boundaries with downward-tapering strain-fields.

  4. 3D Design, Contruction, and Field Analysis of CIS Main Dipole Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, G. P. A.; Fox, W.; Friesel, D. L.; Rinckel, T.

    1997-05-01

    The lattice for CIS ( Cooler Injection Synchroton ) requires four laminated 90^circ main dipole magnets with bending radius ρ = 1.273 m, EFL = 2 m, and an edge angle of 12^circ. Optimum Cooler injection and injection in the planned 15 GeV LISS ring requires operation up to about 1.75 T. Initial operation of 1 Hz, with later upgrade to 5 Hz is planned. We will present 2D and 3D field calculations used to optimize the shape of laminations and endpacks of the magnet. Endpacks are designed to determine edge angle and to compensate hexapole components, in particular above 1.4 T where saturation becomes significant. The large dipole curvature required a new type of dipole construction. Each magnet consists of wedge shaped blocks fabricated from stamped lamination of cold rolled low carbon iron. B-stage (dry) epopy was used for bonding and insulation. The end blocks are machined to include the calculated 3D shape of the endpacks. All four magnets were mapped in the field range from 0.3 T - 1.8 T. Comparison of calculations and data in terms of B(I) curves, EFL, edge angle, and hexapole component as function of field excitation will be presented. The constructed magnets are well within expected specifications.

  5. Evaluation of 3D printing and its potential impact on biotechnology and the chemical sciences.

    PubMed

    Gross, Bethany C; Erkal, Jayda L; Lockwood, Sarah Y; Chen, Chengpeng; Spence, Dana M

    2014-04-01

    Nearing 30 years since its introduction, 3D printing technology is set to revolutionize research and teaching laboratories. This feature encompasses the history of 3D printing, reviews various printing methods, and presents current applications. The authors offer an appraisal of the future direction and impact this technology will have on laboratory settings as 3D printers become more accessible.

  6. Effect of high magnetic field on a quasi-3D silver dendrite growing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fengzhi; Katsuki, Akio; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-05-01

    The Ag+/Cu liquid-solid redox reaction was investigated in a vertical and inhomogeneous high magnetic field (up to 15 T). According to a comparison between the morphologies of quasi-3D silver dendrites generated under different magnetic flux densities, the imposition of a high magnetic field strongly affected the aggregation process of the silver dendrites. The present experiment used four kinds of liquid-solid boundaries, which are affected by the reaction direction and solution condition, as bases for the diffusion limited aggregation (DLA)-like dendritic growth of silver deposition. Results are interpreted in terms of convections of the aqueous solution and a tentative quantitative analysis of forces acting on particles arising from the magnetic field. A new force is predicted theoretically and is discussed in detail.

  7. Noise analysis for near field 3-D FM-CW radar imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.

    2015-06-19

    Near field radar imaging systems are used for several applications including concealed weapon detection in airports and other high-security venues. Despite the near-field operation, phase noise and thermal noise can limit the performance in several ways including reduction in system sensitivity and reduction of image dynamic range. In this paper, the effects of thermal noise, phase noise, and processing gain are analyzed in the context of a near field 3-D FM-CW imaging radar as might be used for concealed weapon detection. In addition to traditional frequency domain analysis, a time-domain simulation is employed to graphically demonstrate the effect of these noise sources on a fast-chirping FM-CW system.

  8. TE/TM alternating direction scheme for wake field calculation in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorodnov, Igor; Weiland, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    In the future, accelerators with very short bunches will be used. It demands developing new numerical approaches for long-time calculation of electromagnetic fields in the vicinity of relativistic bunches. The conventional FDTD scheme, used in MAFIA, ABCI and other wake and PIC codes, suffers from numerical grid dispersion and staircase approximation problem. As an effective cure of the dispersion problem, a numerical scheme without dispersion in longitudinal direction can be used as it was shown by Novokhatski et al. [Transition dynamics of the wake fields of ultrashort bunches, TESLA Report 2000-03, DESY, 2000] and Zagorodnov et al. [J. Comput. Phys. 191 (2003) 525]. In this paper, a new economical conservative scheme for short-range wake field calculation in 3D is presented. As numerical examples show, the new scheme is much more accurate on long-time scale than the conventional FDTD approach.

  9. Locating earthquakes in west Texas oil fields using 3-D anisotropic velocity models

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Fa; Doser, D.; Baker, M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    Earthquakes within the War-Wink gas field, Ward County, Texas, that have been located with a 1-D velocity model occur near the edges and top of a naturally occurring overpressured zone. Because the War-Wink field is a structurally controlled anticline with significant velocity anisotropy associated with the overpressured zone and finely layered evaporites, the authors have attempted to re-locate earthquakes using a 3-D anisotropic velocity model. Preliminary results with this model give the unsatisfactory result that many earthquakes previously located at the top of the overpressured zone (3-3.5 km) moved into the evaporites (1-1.5 km) above the field. They believe that this result could be caused by: (1) aliasing the velocity model; or (2) problems in determining the correct location minima when several minima exist. They are currently attempting to determine which of these causes is more likely for the unsatisfactory result observed.

  10. 3D QSAR studies of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls as potential xenoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Patricia; Ingale, Kundan; Wheeler, John S; Mumtaz, Moiz

    2016-02-01

    Mono-hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs) are found in human biological samples and lack of data on their potential estrogenic activity has been a source of concern. We have extended our previous in silico 2D QSAR study through the application of advance techniques such as docking and 3D QSAR to gain insights into their estrogen receptor (ERα) binding. The results support our earlier findings that the hydroxyl group is the most important feature on the compounds; its position, orientation and surroundings in the structure are influential for the binding of OH-PCBs to ERα. This study has also revealed the following additional interactions that influence estrogenicity of these chemicals (a) the aromatic interactions of the biphenyl moieties with the receptor, (b) hydrogen bonding interactions of the p-hydroxyl group with key amino acids ARG394 and GLU353, (c) low or no electronegative substitution at para-positions of the p-hydroxyl group, (d) enhanced electrostatic interactions at the meta position on the B ring, and (e) co-planarity of the hydroxyl group on the A ring. In combination the 2D and 3D QSAR approaches have led us to the support conclusion that the hydroxyl group is the most important feature on the OH-PCB influencing the binding to estrogen receptors, and have enhanced our understanding of the mechanistic details of estrogenicity of this class of chemicals. Such in silico computational methods could serve as useful tools in risk assessment of chemicals. PMID:26598992

  11. 3D numerical simulations of negative hydrogen ion extraction using realistic plasma parameters, geometry of the extraction aperture and full 3D magnetic field map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Wünderlich, D.; Ruf, B.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.; Minea, T.

    2014-02-01

    Decreasing the co-extracted electron current while simultaneously keeping negative ion (NI) current sufficiently high is a crucial issue on the development plasma source system for ITER Neutral Beam Injector. To support finding the best extraction conditions the 3D Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collision electrostatic code ONIX (Orsay Negative Ion eXtraction) has been developed. Close collaboration with experiments and other numerical models allows performing realistic simulations with relevant input parameters: plasma properties, geometry of the extraction aperture, full 3D magnetic field map, etc. For the first time ONIX has been benchmarked with commercial positive ions tracing code KOBRA3D. A very good agreement in terms of the meniscus position and depth has been found. Simulation of NI extraction with different e/NI ratio in bulk plasma shows high relevance of the direct negative ion extraction from the surface produced NI in order to obtain extracted NI current as in the experimental results from BATMAN testbed.

  12. The Quantitative Measurement Of Temperature Distribution In 3-D Thermal Field With High-Speed Real-Time Holographic Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji-zong, Wu; Wei-qiao, Fu; Qin, Wu

    1989-06-01

    The theory of using high-speed real-time holographic interferometry to measure quantitatively 3-D thermal field is discussed in thispaper. An experimental arrangement, and the holographic interference fringes of thermal field formed by the electrAc heating coil wires which were taken by the high-speed camera are given. With CONCEPT 32/2725 computer system and corresponding programms the distribution of 3-D thermal field is calculated and plotted Finally, the problems required to be improved and solved for the method of measuring quantitatively 3-D thermal field are discussed.

  13. RF Pulse Designs for 3D MRI Providing Uniform Tipping in Inhomogeneous B1 Fields

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Matson, Gerald B.

    2011-01-01

    Although high-field MRI offers increased signal-to-noise (S/N), the non-uniform tipping produced by conventional RF pulses leads to spatially dependent contrast and sub-optimal S/N, thus complicating the interpretation of the MR images. For structural imaging, 3D sequences which do not make use of frequency-selective RF pulses have become popular. Therefore, the aim of this research was to develop non-slice-selective (NSS) RF pulses with immunity to both B1 inhomogeneity and resonance offset. To accomplish this, an optimization routine based on optimal control theory was used to design new NSS pulses with desired ranges of immunity to B1 inhomogeneity and resonance offset. The design allows the phase of transverse magnetization produced by the pulses to vary. While the emphasis is on shallow tip designs, new designs for 30°, 60°, 90° and 180° degree NSS RF pulses are also provided. These larger tip angle pulses are compared with recently published NSS pulses. Evidence is presented that the pulses presented in this article have equivalent performance but are shorter than the recently published pulses. Although the NSS pulses generate higher specific absorption rates (SAR) and larger magnetization transfer (MT) effects than the rectangular pulses they replace, they nevertheless show promise for 3D MRI experiments at high field. PMID:21523819

  14. 3D and 4D GPR for Stratigraphic and Hydrologic Characterization of Field Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasmueck, M.; Viggiano, D. A.

    2008-05-01

    In a time of almost unlimited mobility, information, and connectivity it is surprising how our knowledge of natural systems becomes fragmented as soon as we enter the ground. Excavation, drilling, and 2D geophysics are unable to capture the spatio-temporal variability inside soil and rock volumes at the 1-10m scale. The problem is the lack of efficient and high-resolution imaging for the near surface domain. We have developed a high- resolution 3D Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) system suitable for data acquisition at field sites. To achieve sharp and repeatable subsurface imaging we have integrated GPR with a rotary laser/IR strobe system. With 40 xyz coordinate updates per second, continuously moving GPR antennae can be tracked centimeter precise. A real-time LED guidance system shows the GPR antenna operator how to follow pre-computed survey tracks. Without having to stake out hundreds of survey tracks anymore one person now can scan an area of up to 600m2 per hour with a dual GPR antenna at 1m/s with 0.1m line spacing. The coordinate and GPR data are fused in real-time providing a first look of the subsurface in horizontal map view for quality control and in-field site assessment during data acquisition. The precision of the laser positioning system enables centimeter accurate repeat surveys to image and quantify water content changes in the vadose zone. To verify quantitative results of such 4D GPR we performed a controlled pond infiltration injecting 3200L of water from a 4x4m temporary pond with a thin soil layer and 5m of unsaturated porous limestone below. A total of sixteen repeated 3D GPR surveys were acquired just before the infiltration and in the following 2 weeks. All data were recorded with 250MHz antennae on a 5x10cm grid covering an area of 18x20m. Data processing included 3D migration and extraction of time shifts between pairs of time- lapse 3D GPR surveys. From the time shifts water content changes were computed using the Topp equation. The

  15. The Potential of Encapsulating “Raw Materials” in 3D Osteochondral Gradient Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Neethu; Gupta, Vineet; Sridharan, BanuPriya; Sutherland, Amanda; Detamore, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolds with continuous gradients in material composition and bioactive signals enable a smooth transition of properties at the interface. Components like chondroitin sulfate (CS) and bioactive glass (BG) in 3D scaffolds may serve as “raw materials” for synthesis of new extracellular matrix (ECM), and may have the potential to completely or partially replace expensive growth factors. We hypothesized that scaffolds with gradients of ECM components would enable superior performance of engineered constructs. Raw material encapsulation altered the appearance, structure, porosity, and degradation of the scaffolds. They allowed the scaffolds to better retain their 3D structure during culture and provided a buffering effect to the cells in culture. Following seeding of rat mesenchymal stem cells, there were several instances where glycosaminoglycan (GAG), collagen, or calcium contents were higher with the scaffolds containing raw materials (CS or BG) than with those containing transforming growth factor (TGF)-β3 or bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. It was also noteworthy that a combination of both CS and TGF-β3 increased the secretion of collagen type II. Moreover, cells seeded in scaffolds containing opposing gradients of CS/TGF-β3 and BG/BMP-2 produced clear regional variations in the secretion of tissue-specific ECM. The study demonstrated raw materials have the potential to create a favorable microenvironment for cells; they can significantly enhance the synthesis of certain extracellular matrix (ECM) components when compared to expensive growth factors; either alone or in combination with growth factors they can enhance the secretion of tissue specific matrix proteins. Raw materials are promising candidates that can be used to either replace or be used in combination with growth factors. Success with raw materials in lieu of growth factors could have profound implications in terms of lower cost and faster regulatory approval for more rapid translation of

  16. 3-D reservoir characterization of the House Creek oil field, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, Debra K.; Pantea, Michael P.; Slatt, Roger M.

    1997-01-01

    This CD-ROM is intended to serve a broad audience. An important purpose is to explain geologic and geochemical factors that control petroleum production from the House Creek Field. This information may serve as an analog for other marine-ridge sandstone reservoirs. The 3-D slide and movie images are tied to explanations and 2-D geologic and geochemical images to visualize geologic structures in three dimensions, explain the geologic significance of porosity/permeability distribution across the sandstone bodies, and tie this to petroleum production characteristics in the oil field. Movies, text, images including scanning electron photomicrographs (SEM), thin-section photomicrographs, and data files can be copied from the CD-ROM for use in external mapping, statistical, and other applications.

  17. Study of the internal magnetic field of Mercury through 3D hybrid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, Ludivine; Marcel Chanteur, Gerard; Modolo, Ronan; Leblanc, Francois; Schmidt, Carl; Langlais, Benoît; Thebault, Erwan

    2016-10-01

    In 1974, Mariner 10 discovered the intrinsic magnetic field of Mercury which interacts with the solar wind, leading to the formation of a magnetosphere. In spite of the recent MESSENGER observations, this magnetosphere remains quite unknown, especially in the Southern hemisphere. In order to improve our understanding of the Hermean magnetosphere, and to prepare the Bepi-Colombo mission (ESA/JAXA), we simulated the magnetized environment of Mercury using the model named LatHyS (LATMOS Hybrid Simulation). LatHyS is a 3D parallel multi-species hybrid code which has been applied to Mars, Titan and Ganymede, which has recently be improved by the implementation of a multi-grid method allowing to refine the spatial resolution near the planetary object (40 km in the case of Mercury). In order to investigate the Hermean environment, several hybrid simulations have been performed considering different internal field models, and results are compared with MESSENGER observations.

  18. 3D-NTT: a versatile integral field spectro-imager for the NTT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelin, M.; Amram, P.; Balard, P.; Balkowski, C.; Boissin, O.; Boulesteix, J.; Carignan, C.; Daigle, O.; de Denus Baillargeon, M.-M.; Epinat, B.; Gach, J.-L.; Hernandez, O.; Rigaud, F.; Vallée, P.

    2008-07-01

    The 3D-NTT is a visible integral field spectro-imager offering two modes. A low resolution mode (R ~ 300 to 6 000) with a large field of view Tunable Filter (17'x17') and a high resolution mode (R ~ 10 000 to 40 000) with a scanning Fabry-Perot (7'x7'). It will be operated as a visitor instrument on the NTT from 2009. Two large programmes will be led: "Characterizing the interstellar medium of nearby galaxies with 2D maps of extinction and abundances" (PI M. Marcelin) and "Gas accretion and radiative feedback in the early universe" (PI J. Bland Hawthorn). Both will be mainly based on the Tunable Filter mode. This instrument is being built as a collaborative effort between LAM (Marseille), GEPI (Paris) and LAE (Montreal). The website adress of the instrument is : http://www.astro.umontreal.ca/3DNTT

  19. Analysis of the repeatability of time-lapse 3d vsp multicomponent surveys, delhi field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Mariana Fernandes de

    Delhi Field is a producing oil field located in northeastern Louisiana. In order to monitor the CO2 sweep efficiency, time-lapse 3D seismic data have been acquired in this area. Time-lapse studies are increasingly used to evaluate changes in the seismic response induced by the production of hydrocarbons or the injection of water, CO2 or steam into a reservoir. A 4D seismic signal is generated by a combination of production and injection effects within the reservoir as well as non-repeatability effects. In order to get reliable results from time-lapse seismic methods, it is important to distinguish the production and injection effects from the non-repeatability effects in the 4D seismic signal. Repeatability of 4D land seismic data is affected by several factors. The most significant of them are: source and receiver geometry inaccuracies, differences in seismic sources signatures, variations in the immediate near surface and ambient non-repeatable noise. In this project, two 3D multicomponent VSP surveys acquired in Delhi Field were used to quantify the relative contribution of each factor that can affect the repeatability in land seismic data. The factors analyzed in this study were: source and receiver geometry inaccura- cies, variations in the immediate near surface and ambient non-repeatable noise. This study showed that all these factors had a significant impact on the repeatability of the successive multicomponent VSP surveys in Delhi Field. This project also shows the advantages and disadvantages in the use of different repeata- bility metrics, normalized-root-mean-square (NRMS) difference and signal-to-distortion ratio (SDR) attribute, to evaluate the level of seismic repeatability between successive time-lapse seismic surveys. It is observed that NRMS difference is greatly influenced by time-shifts and that SDR attribute combined with the time-shift may give more distinct and representative repeatability information than the NRMS difference.

  20. Holographic display system for dynamic synthesis of 3D light fields with increased space bandwidth product.

    PubMed

    Agour, Mostafa; Falldorf, Claas; Bergmann, Ralf B

    2016-06-27

    We present a new method for the generation of a dynamic wave field with high space bandwidth product (SBP). The dynamic wave field is generated from several wave fields diffracted by a display which comprises multiple spatial light modulators (SLMs) each having a comparably low SBP. In contrast to similar approaches in stereoscopy, we describe how the independently generated wave fields can be coherently superposed. A major benefit of the scheme is that the display system may be extended to provide an even larger display. A compact experimental configuration which is composed of four phase-only SLMs to realize the coherent combination of independent wave fields is presented. Effects of important technical parameters of the display system on the wave field generated across the observation plane are investigated. These effects include, e.g., the tilt of the individual SLM and the gap between the active areas of multiple SLMs. As an example of application, holographic reconstruction of a 3D object with parallax effects is demonstrated. PMID:27410593

  1. 3-D modeling of water balance and soil erosion in a clayey subsurface drained agricultural field in boreal climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turunen, M.; Warsta, L.; Koivusalo, H. J.; Paasonen-Kivekäs, M.; Nurminen, J.; Myllys, M.; Alakukku, L.; Äijö, H.; Puustinen, M.

    2012-12-01

    Fluxes of nutrients and other substances from cultivated fields cause eutrophication and deterioration of water quality in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. In order to develop effective strategies to control the environmental impacts of crop cultivation, it is crucial to identify the main transport pathways and the effects of different water management methods on the loads. Reduction of sediment loads is essential since sediment particles typically carry nutrients (especially sorbed phosphorus) and other potentially harmful substances, e.g. pesticides, from the fields to the adjacent surface waters. The novel part of this study was the investigation of suspended sediment transport in soil macropores to the subsurface drains and to the deep groundwater. We applied a 3-D distributed dual-permeability model (FLUSH) using a dataset collected from a subsurface drained, clayey agricultural field (15 ha) to holistically assess water balance, soil erosion and sediment transport from the field to an adjacent stream. The data set included five years of hydrological and water quality measurements from four intensively monitored field sections with different soil properties, topography, drainage systems (drain spacing and drain depth), drain installation methods (trenchless and trench drainage) and drain envelope materials (gravel and fiber). The 3-D model allowed us to quantify how soil erosion and sediment transport differed between the field sections within the field area. The simulations were conducted during snow- and frost-free periods. The simulation results include closure of water balance of the cultivated field, distribution of soil erosion and sediment transport within the field area and the effects of different subsurface drainage systems on sediment loads. The 3-D dual-permeability subsurface flow model was able to reproduce the measured drainflows and sediment fluxes in the clayey field and according to the simulations over 90% of drainflow waters were conveyed to

  2. Electric fields and field-aligned currents in polar regions of the solar corona: 3-D MHD consideration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisanko, Yu. V.

    1995-01-01

    The calculation of the solar rotation electro-dynamical effects in the near-the-Sun solar wind seems more convenient from the non-inertial corotating reference frame. This implies some modification of the 3-D MHD equations generally on the base of the General Theory of Relativity. The paper deals with the search of stationary (in corotating non-inertial reference frame) solutions of the modified 3-D MHD equations for the in near-the-Sun high latitude sub-alfvenic solar wind. The solution is obtained requiring electric fields and field-aligned electric currents in the high latitude near-the-Sun solar wind. Various scenario are explored self-consistently via a number of numerical experiments. The analogy with the high latitude Earth's magnetosphere is used for the interpretation of the results. Possible observational manifestations are discussed.

  3. Full-field 3D deformation measurement: comparison between speckle phase and displacement evaluation.

    PubMed

    Khodadad, Davood; Singh, Alok Kumar; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Sjödahl, Mikael

    2016-09-20

    The objective of this paper is to describe a full-field deformation measurement method based on 3D speckle displacements. The deformation is evaluated from the slope of the speckle displacement function that connects the different reconstruction planes. For our experiment, a symmetrical arrangement with four illuminations parallel to the planes (x,z) and (y,z) was used. Four sets of speckle patterns were sequentially recorded by illuminating an object from the four directions, respectively. A single camera is used to record the holograms before and after deformations. Digital speckle photography is then used to calculate relative speckle displacements in each direction between two numerically propagated planes. The 3D speckle displacements vector is calculated as a combination of the speckle displacements from the holograms recorded in each illumination direction. Using the speckle displacements, problems associated with rigid body movements and phase wrapping are avoided. In our experiment, the procedure is shown to give the theoretical accuracy of 0.17 pixels yielding the accuracy of 2×10-3 in the measurement of deformation gradients.

  4. Full-field 3D deformation measurement: comparison between speckle phase and displacement evaluation.

    PubMed

    Khodadad, Davood; Singh, Alok Kumar; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Sjödahl, Mikael

    2016-09-20

    The objective of this paper is to describe a full-field deformation measurement method based on 3D speckle displacements. The deformation is evaluated from the slope of the speckle displacement function that connects the different reconstruction planes. For our experiment, a symmetrical arrangement with four illuminations parallel to the planes (x,z) and (y,z) was used. Four sets of speckle patterns were sequentially recorded by illuminating an object from the four directions, respectively. A single camera is used to record the holograms before and after deformations. Digital speckle photography is then used to calculate relative speckle displacements in each direction between two numerically propagated planes. The 3D speckle displacements vector is calculated as a combination of the speckle displacements from the holograms recorded in each illumination direction. Using the speckle displacements, problems associated with rigid body movements and phase wrapping are avoided. In our experiment, the procedure is shown to give the theoretical accuracy of 0.17 pixels yielding the accuracy of 2×10-3 in the measurement of deformation gradients. PMID:27661605

  5. Fine resolution 3D temperature fields off Kerguelen from instrumented penguins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrassin, Jean-Benoît; Park, Young-Hyang; Le Maho, Yvon; Bost, Charles-André

    2004-12-01

    The use of diving animals as autonomous vectors of oceanographic instruments is rapidly increasing, because this approach yields cost-efficient new information and can be used in previously poorly sampled areas. However, methods for analyzing the collected data are still under development. In particular, difficulties may arise from the heterogeneous data distribution linked to animals' behavior. Here we show how raw temperature data collected by penguin-borne loggers were transformed to a regular gridded dataset that provided new information on the local circulation off Kerguelen. A total of 16 king penguins ( Aptenodytes patagonicus) were equipped with satellite-positioning transmitters and with temperature-time-depth recorders (TTDRs) to record dive depth and sea temperature. The penguins' foraging trips recorded during five summers ranged from 140 to 600 km from the colony and 11,000 dives >100 m were recorded. Temperature measurements recorded during diving were used to produce detailed 3D temperature fields of the area (0-200 m). The data treatment included dive location, determination of the vertical profile for each dive, averaging and gridding of those profiles onto 0.1°×0.1° cells, and optimal interpolation in both the horizontal and vertical using an objective analysis. Horizontal fields of temperature at the surface and 100 m are presented, as well as a vertical section along the main foraging direction of the penguins. Compared to conventional temperature databases (Levitus World Ocean Atlas and historical stations available in the area), the 3D temperature fields collected from penguins are extremely finely resolved, by one order finer. Although TTDRs were less accurate than conventional instruments, such a high spatial resolution of penguin-derived data provided unprecedented detailed information on the upper level circulation pattern east of Kerguelen, as well as the iron-enrichment mechanism leading to a high primary production over the Kerguelen

  6. Impact of helical boundary conditions on nonlinear 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veranda, M.; Bonfiglio, D.; Cappello, S.; Chacón, L.; Escande, D. F.

    2013-07-01

    Helical self-organized reversed-field pinch (RFP) regimes emerge both numerically—in 3D visco-resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations—and experimentally, as in the RFX-mod device at high current (IP above 1 MA). These states, called quasi-single helicity (QSH) states, are characterized by the action of a MHD mode that impresses a quasi-helical symmetry to the system, thus allowing a high degree of magnetic chaos healing. This is in contrast with the multiple helicity (MH) states, where magnetic fluctuations create a chaotic magnetic field degrading the confinement properties of the RFP. This paper reports an extensive numerical study performed in the frame of 3D visco-resistive MHD which considers the effect of helical magnetic boundary conditions, i.e. of a finite value of the radial magnetic field at the edge (magnetic perturbation, MP). We show that the system can be driven to a selected QSH state starting from both spontaneous QSH and MH regimes. In particular, a high enough MP can force a QSH helical self-organization with a helicity different from the spontaneous one. Moreover, MH states can be turned into QSH states with a selected helicity. A threshold in the amplitude of MP is observed above which is able to influence the system. Analysis of the magnetic topology of these simulations indicates that the dominant helical mode is able to temporarily sustain conserved magnetic structures in the core of the plasma. The region occupied by conserved magnetic surfaces increases reducing secondary modes' amplitude to experimental-like values.

  7. Torque-consistent 3D force balance and optimization of non-resonant fields in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong-Kyu

    2015-11-01

    A non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation in tokamaks breaks the toroidal symmetry and produces toroidal torque, which is well known as neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) effects. Although NTV torque is second order, it is the first-order change in the pressure anisotropy that drives currents associated with local torques and thereby modifies the field penetration in force balance. The force operator becomes non-Hermitian, but can be directly solved using parallel, toroidal, and radial force balance, leading to a modified Euler-Lagrange equation. The general perturbed equilibrium code (GPEC), which has been successfully developed to solve the modified Euler-Lagrange equation, gives the torque-consistent 3D force balance as well as self-consistent NTV torque. The self-shielding of the torque becomes apparent in the solutions in high β, which was implied in recent MARS-K applications. Furthermore, the full response matrix including the torque in GPEC provides a new and systematic way of optimizing torque and non-resonant fields. Recently the optimization of 3D fields for torque has been actively studied using the stellarator optimizing tools, but the efficiency and accuracy can be greatly improved by directly incorporating the torque response matrix. There are salient features uncovered by response with the torque, as the response can become invisible in amplitudes but only significant in toroidal phase shift. A perturbation in backward helicity is an example, in which NTV can be induced substantially but quietly without measurable response in amplitudes. A number of other GPEC applications will also be discussed, including the multi-mode responses in high- β tokamak plasmas and the new non-axisymmetric control coil (NCC) design in NSTX-U. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  8. 3D MHD Simulations of Laser Plasma Guiding in Curved Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roupassov, S.; Rankin, R.; Tsui, Y.; Capjack, C.; Fedosejevs, R.

    1999-11-01

    The guiding and confinement of laser produced plasma in a curved magnetic field has been investigated numerically. These studies were motivated by experiments on pulsed laser deposition of diamond-like films [1] in which a 1kG magnetic field in a curved solenoid geometry was utilized to steer a carbon plasma around a curved trajectory and thus to separate it from unwanted macroparticles produced by the laser ablation. The purpose of the modeling was to characterize the plasma dynamics during the propagation through the magnetic guide field and to investigate the effect of different magnetic field configurations. A 3D curvilinear ADI code developed on the basis of an existing Cartesian code [2] was employed to simulate the underlying resistive one-fluid MHD model. Issues such as large regions of low background density and nonreflective boundary conditions were addressed. Results of the simulations in a curved guide field will be presented and compared to experimental results. [1] Y.Y. Tsui, D. Vick and R. Fedosejevs, Appl. Phys. Lett. 70 (15), pp. 1953-57, 1997. [2] R. Rankin, and I. Voronkov, in "High Performance Computing Systems and Applications", pp. 59-69, Kluwer AP, 1998.

  9. The potential of 3D-FISH and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy for studies of 3D nuclear architecture: 3D structured illumination microscopy of defined chromosomal structures visualized by 3D (immuno)-FISH opens new perspectives for studies of nuclear architecture.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Yolanda; Smeets, Daniel; Fiedler, Susanne; Schmid, Volker J; Schermelleh, Lothar; Cremer, Thomas; Cremer, Marion

    2012-05-01

    Three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) has opened up new possibilities to study nuclear architecture at the ultrastructural level down to the ~100 nm range. We present first results and assess the potential using 3D-SIM in combination with 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (3D-FISH) for the topographical analysis of defined nuclear targets. Our study also deals with the concern that artifacts produced by FISH may counteract the gain in resolution. We address the topography of DAPI-stained DNA in nuclei before and after 3D-FISH, nuclear pores and the lamina, chromosome territories, chromatin domains, and individual gene loci. We also look at the replication patterns of chromocenters and the topographical relationship of Xist-RNA within the inactive X-territory. These examples demonstrate that an appropriately adapted 3D-FISH/3D-SIM approach preserves key characteristics of the nuclear ultrastructure and that the gain in information obtained by 3D-SIM yields new insights into the functional nuclear organization. PMID:22508100

  10. Computation of load performance and other parameters of extra high speed modified Lundell alternators from 3D-FE magnetic field solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, R.; Demerdash, N. A.

    1992-01-01

    The combined magnetic vector potential - magnetic scalar potential method of computation of 3D magnetic fields by finite elements, introduced in a companion paper, in combination with state modeling in the abc-frame of reference, are used for global 3D magnetic field analysis and machine performance computation under rated load and overload condition in an example 14.3 kVA modified Lundell alternator. The results vividly demonstrate the 3D nature of the magnetic field in such machines, and show how this model can be used as an excellent tool for computation of flux density distributions, armature current and voltage waveform profiles and harmonic contents, as well as computation of torque profiles and ripples. Use of the model in gaining insight into locations of regions in the magnetic circuit with heavy degrees of saturation is demonstrated. Experimental results which correlate well with the simulations of the load case are given.

  11. 2D-3D registration for brain radiation therapy using a 3D CBCT and a single limited field-of-view 2D kV radiograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munbodh, R.; Moseley, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    We report results of an intensity-based 2D-3D rigid registration framework for patient positioning and monitoring during brain radiotherapy. We evaluated two intensity-based similarity measures, the Pearson Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and Maximum Likelihood with Gaussian noise (MLG) derived from the statistics of transmission images. A useful image frequency band was identified from the bone-to-no-bone ratio. Validation was performed on gold-standard data consisting of 3D kV CBCT scans and 2D kV radiographs of an anthropomorphic head phantom acquired at 23 different poses with parameter variations along six degrees of freedom. At each pose, a single limited field of view kV radiograph was registered to the reference CBCT. The ground truth was determined from markers affixed to the phantom and visible in the CBCT images. The mean (and standard deviation) of the absolute errors in recovering each of the six transformation parameters along the x, y and z axes for ICC were varphix: 0.08(0.04)°, varphiy: 0.10(0.09)°, varphiz: 0.03(0.03)°, tx: 0.13(0.11) mm, ty: 0.08(0.06) mm and tz: 0.44(0.23) mm. For MLG, the corresponding results were varphix: 0.10(0.04)°, varphiy: 0.10(0.09)°, varphiz: 0.05(0.07)°, tx: 0.11(0.13) mm, ty: 0.05(0.05) mm and tz: 0.44(0.31) mm. It is feasible to accurately estimate all six transformation parameters from a 3D CBCT of the head and a single 2D kV radiograph within an intensity-based registration framework that incorporates the physics of transmission images.

  12. 3D Coincidence Imaging Disentangles Intense Field Double Detachment of SF6(–).

    PubMed

    Kandhasamy, Durai Murugan; Albeck, Yishai; Jagtap, Krishna; Strasser, Daniel

    2015-07-23

    The efficient intense field double detachment of molecular anions observed in SF6(–) is studied by 3D coincidence imaging of the dissociation products. The dissociation anisotropy and kinetic energy release distributions are determined for the energetically lowest double detachment channel by virtue of disentangling the SF5(+) + F fragmentation products. The observed nearly isotropic dissociation with respect to the linear laser polarization and surprisingly high kinetic energy release events suggest that the dissociation occurs on a highly excited state. Rydberg (SF6(+))* states composed of a highly repulsive dication core and a Rydberg electron are proposed to explain the observed kinetic energy release, accounting also for the efficient production of all possible cationic fragments at equivalent laser intensities.

  13. 3D phase field modelling of recrystallization in a low-carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.; Militzer, M.

    2012-12-01

    Intercritical annealing is a critical processing step to manufacture dual-phase (DP) steels. As part of modelling the microstructure evolution in an intercritical-annealing cycle, a 3D multi-phase field model has been employed to simulate recrystallization during heating of a low-carbon steel that is used to produce commercial DP600 grade. The cold-rolled microstructure obtained from metallographic observations is used as the initial structure in the model. The nucleation conditions and the effective interface mobility are employed as adjustable parameters to fit the experimentally measured kinetics of isothermal recrystallization and then applied to non-isothermal recrystallization. The model predictions are in good agreement with experimental data for recrystallization during continuous heating. The model provides realistic recrystallized microstructures as initial conditions for modelling the subsequent formation and decomposition of austenite.

  14. Terahertz 3D printed diffractive lens matrices for field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek, Krzesimir; Sypek, Maciej; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Suszek, Jarosław; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Feduniewicz-Żmuda, Anna; Yahniuk, Ivan; Yatsunenko, Sergey; Nowakowska-Siwińska, Anna; Coquillat, Dominique; But, Dmytro B; Rachoń, Martyna; Węgrzyńska, Karolina; Skierbiszewski, Czesław; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    We present the concept, the fabrication processes and the experimental results for materials and optics that can be used for terahertz field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays. More specifically, we propose 3D printed arrays of a new type - diffractive multi-zone lenses of which the performance is superior to that of previously used mono-zone diffractive or refractive elements and evaluate them with GaN/AlGaN field-effect transistor terahertz detectors. Experiments performed in the 300-GHz atmospheric window show that the lens arrays offer both a good efficiency and good uniformity, and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the terahertz field-effect transistor detectors by more than one order of magnitude. In practice, we tested 3 × 12 lens linear arrays with printed circuit board THz detector arrays used in postal security scanners and observed significant signal-to-noise improvements. Our results clearly show that the proposed technology provides a way to produce cost-effective, reproducible, flat optics for large-size field-effect transistor THz-detector focal plane arrays.

  15. 3D Printed Scintillators For Use in Field Emission Detection and Other Nuclear Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficenec, Karen

    2015-10-01

    In accelerator cavities, field emission electrons - electrons that get stripped away from the cavity walls due to the high electromagnetic field necessary to accelerate the main beam - are partially accelerated and can crash into the cavity walls, adding to the heat-load of the cryogenic system. Because these field electrons emit gamma rays when bent by the electromagnetic field, a scintillator, if made to fit the cavity enclosure, can detect their presence. Eliminating the waste of subtractive manufacturing techniques and allowing for the production of unique, varied shapes, 3D printing of scintillators may allow for an efficient detection system. UV light is used to start a chemical polymerization process that links the monomers of the liquid resin together into larger, intertwined molecules, forming the solid structure. Each shape requires slightly different calibration of its optimal printing parameters, such as slice thickness and exposure time to UV light. Thus far, calibration parameters have been optimized for cylinders of 20 mm diameter, cones of 30 mm diameter and 30 mm height, rectangular prisms 30 by 40 by 10 mm, and square pyramids 20 mm across. Calibration continues on creating holes in the prints (for optical fibers), as well as shapes with overhangs. Scintill This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1405857.

  16. Terahertz 3D printed diffractive lens matrices for field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek, Krzesimir; Sypek, Maciej; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Suszek, Jarosław; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Feduniewicz-Żmuda, Anna; Yahniuk, Ivan; Yatsunenko, Sergey; Nowakowska-Siwińska, Anna; Coquillat, Dominique; But, Dmytro B; Rachoń, Martyna; Węgrzyńska, Karolina; Skierbiszewski, Czesław; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    We present the concept, the fabrication processes and the experimental results for materials and optics that can be used for terahertz field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays. More specifically, we propose 3D printed arrays of a new type - diffractive multi-zone lenses of which the performance is superior to that of previously used mono-zone diffractive or refractive elements and evaluate them with GaN/AlGaN field-effect transistor terahertz detectors. Experiments performed in the 300-GHz atmospheric window show that the lens arrays offer both a good efficiency and good uniformity, and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the terahertz field-effect transistor detectors by more than one order of magnitude. In practice, we tested 3 × 12 lens linear arrays with printed circuit board THz detector arrays used in postal security scanners and observed significant signal-to-noise improvements. Our results clearly show that the proposed technology provides a way to produce cost-effective, reproducible, flat optics for large-size field-effect transistor THz-detector focal plane arrays. PMID:27607620

  17. Field calibration of binocular stereo vision based on fast reconstruction of 3D control field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Changjie; Fu, Luhua; Guo, Yin

    2015-08-01

    Construction of high-speed railway in China has entered a period of rapid growth. To accurately and quickly obtain the dynamic envelope curve of high-speed vehicle is an important guarantee for safe driving. The measuring system is based on binocular stereo vision. Considering the difficulties in field calibration such as environmental changes and time limits, carried out a field calibration method based on fast reconstruction of three-dimensional control field. With the rapid assembly of pre-calibrated three-dimensional control field, whose coordinate accuracy is guaranteed by manufacture accuracy and calibrated by V-STARS, two cameras take a quick shot of it at the same time. The field calibration parameters are then solved by the method combining linear solution with nonlinear optimization. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy can reach up to +/- 0.5mm, and more importantly, in the premise of guaranteeing accuracy, the speed of the calibration and the portability of the devices have been improved considerably.

  18. 3-D seismic data for field development: Landslide field case study

    SciTech Connect

    Raeuchle, S.K.; Carr, T.R.; Tucker, R.D. )

    1990-05-01

    The Landslide field is located on the extreme southern flank of the San Joaquin basin, approximately 25 mi south of Bakersfield, California. The field, discovered in 1985, has produced in excess 9 million bbl of oil with an estimated ultimate recovery of more than 13 MMBO. The Miocene Stevens sands, which form the reservoir units at Landslide field, are interpreted as a series of constructional submarine fan deposits. Deposition of the fans was controlled by paleotopography with an abrupt updip pinch-out of the sands to the southwest. The three-dimensional seismic data over the field was used to locate the bottom hole of the landslide 22X-30 development well as close to this abrupt updip pinchout as possible in order to maximize oil recovery. A location was selected two traces (330 ft) from the updip pinch-out as mapped on the seismic data. The well was successfully drilled during 1989, encountering 150 ft of net sand with initial production in excess of 1,500 bbl of oil/day. A pressure buildup test indicates the presence of a boundary approximately 200 ft from the well bore. This boundary is interpreted as the updip pinchout of the Stevens sands against the paleohigh. Based on examination of changes in amplitude, the absence or presence of reservoir-quality sand can be mapped across the paleohighs. Application of three-dimensional seismic data, integration with well data, and in particular reconstruction cuts tied closely to existing wells can be used to map the ultimate extent of the field and contribute to efficient development.

  19. Analysis of the 3D magnetic field and its errors for undulators with iron poles

    SciTech Connect

    Ingold, G.; Bahrdt, J.; Gaupp, A.

    1995-12-31

    The attainable field strength and field quality, such as the optical phase error, the electron beam displacement within the undulator and higher order multipoles of the magnetic field, are discussed. These issues are critical to the design and construction of short period undulators for use in short wavelength FEL or for operation in third generation light sources. We discuss two approaches: (i) For superferric undulators the construction of a full length device would rely on the optimum sorting of precision machined undulator segments. Magnetic data on segments with 20 periods (period length 8.80mm) will be presented. (ii) For hybrid undulators the sorting has to be done on individual poles and magnets. For this approach typical error sources such as machining tolerances, magnetization errors of the permanent magnet material and assembly errors are modeled in 3D and compared to induced errors on an existing hybrid undulator segment. In case of undulators having a full length of hundred periods at least five times as many individual parts have to be characterized. This should be done automatically where both the mechanical and magnetic data before and after the assembly of the magnetic structure are recorded in one step. A CNC programmable measuring device suitable for this task will shortly be presented.

  20. A direct approach for instantaneous 3D density field reconstruction from background-oriented schlieren (BOS) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, F.; Todoroff, V.; Plyer, A.; Le Besnerais, G.; Donjat, D.; Micheli, F.; Champagnat, F.; Cornic, P.; Le Sant, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new numerical method for reconstruction of instantaneous density volume from 3D background-oriented schlieren (3DBOS) measurements, with a validation on a dedicated flexible experimental BOS bench. In contrast to previous works, we use a direct formulation where density is estimated from measured deviation fields without the intermediate step of density gradient reconstruction. Regularization techniques are implemented to deal with the ill-posed problem encountered. The resulting high-dimensional optimization is conducted by conjugate gradient techniques. A parallel algorithm, implemented on graphics processing unit, helps to speed up the calculation. The resulting software is validated on synthetic BOS images of a 3D density field issued from a numerical simulation. Then, we describe a dedicated 3DBOS experimental facility which has been built to study various BOS settings and to assess the performance of the proposed numerical reconstruction process. Results on various datasets illustrate the potential of the method for flow characterization and measurement in real-world conditions.

  1. Microtissues in Cardiovascular Medicine: Regenerative Potential Based on a 3D Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Günter, Julia; Wolint, Petra; Bopp, Annina; Steiger, Julia; Cambria, Elena; Hoerstrup, Simon P.; Emmert, Maximilian Y.

    2016-01-01

    More people die annually from cardiovascular diseases than from any other cause. In particular, patients who suffer from myocardial infarction may be affected by ongoing adverse remodeling processes of the heart that may ultimately lead to heart failure. The introduction of stem and progenitor cell-based applications has raised substantial hope for reversing these processes and inducing cardiac regeneration. However, current stem cell therapies using single-cell suspensions have failed to demonstrate long-lasting efficacy due to the overall low retention rate after cell delivery to the myocardium. To overcome this obstacle, the concept of 3D cell culture techniques has been proposed to enhance therapeutic efficacy and cell engraftment based on the simulation of an in vivo-like microenvironment. Of great interest is the use of so-called microtissues or spheroids, which have evolved from their traditional role as in vitro models to their novel role as therapeutic agents. This review will provide an overview of the therapeutic potential of microtissues by addressing primarily cardiovascular regeneration. It will accentuate their advantages compared to other regenerative approaches and summarize the methods for generating clinically applicable microtissues. In addition, this review will illustrate the unique properties of the microenvironment within microtissues that makes them a promising next-generation therapeutic approach. PMID:27073399

  2. Physicochemical properties of 3D collagen-CS scaffolds for potential use in neural tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Pietrucha, Krystyna

    2015-09-01

    Collagen-based composite scaffolds have considerable potential due to their well-known ability to regenerate skin, bone and cartilage. However, the precise composition and structure of scaffolds that optimize their interaction with neural cells remains incompletely understood and yet to be explored. In the present study, a new family of bi-component 3D scaffolds consisting of collagen (Col) and chondroitin sulphate (CS) were synthesized using a two-stage process: multiple freeze-drying followed by carbodiimide modification. Col-CS matrices had an average pore diameter of 31 μm and a relatively high surface area to pore volume ratio. Importantly, the FTIR data indicated that the ratio between the intensity of amide III and 1452 cm(-1) for Col-CS scaffold was 0.87, which indicates that the Col triple helix was preserved during the formation of the bond between Col and CS. All experiments also clearly showed that the Col-CS matrices have a lower enzyme sensitivity and higher thermal resistance than Col alone. These differences are likely due to the relatively large amount of CS in the collagen sponges, which hinders access for attack at specific active sites of the Col triple helix. Improved binary composite scaffolds were designed for neural tissue engineering applications.

  3. Adaptive multi-GPU Exchange Monte Carlo for the 3D Random Field Ising Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Cristóbal A.; Huang, Wei; Deng, Youjin

    2016-08-01

    This work presents an adaptive multi-GPU Exchange Monte Carlo approach for the simulation of the 3D Random Field Ising Model (RFIM). The design is based on a two-level parallelization. The first level, spin-level parallelism, maps the parallel computation as optimal 3D thread-blocks that simulate blocks of spins in shared memory with minimal halo surface, assuming a constant block volume. The second level, replica-level parallelism, uses multi-GPU computation to handle the simulation of an ensemble of replicas. CUDA's concurrent kernel execution feature is used in order to fill the occupancy of each GPU with many replicas, providing a performance boost that is more notorious at the smallest values of L. In addition to the two-level parallel design, the work proposes an adaptive multi-GPU approach that dynamically builds a proper temperature set free of exchange bottlenecks. The strategy is based on mid-point insertions at the temperature gaps where the exchange rate is most compromised. The extra work generated by the insertions is balanced across the GPUs independently of where the mid-point insertions were performed. Performance results show that spin-level performance is approximately two orders of magnitude faster than a single-core CPU version and one order of magnitude faster than a parallel multi-core CPU version running on 16-cores. Multi-GPU performance is highly convenient under a weak scaling setting, reaching up to 99 % efficiency as long as the number of GPUs and L increase together. The combination of the adaptive approach with the parallel multi-GPU design has extended our possibilities of simulation to sizes of L = 32 , 64 for a workstation with two GPUs. Sizes beyond L = 64 can eventually be studied using larger multi-GPU systems.

  4. Accessing the Full Potential of Asteroseismology with Kepler using Realistic 3D Simulations of Stellar Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trampedach, Regner

    Asteroseismic analysis of stars is frequently hampered by the unknown surface effect: a systematic frequency shift of acoustic modes between observed and theoretical frequencies from 1D stellar structure models. If ignored, the surface effect will lead to the wrong set of physical parameters for the target star. This bias will also depend on the available modeset, as the surface effect increases with frequency. Well constrained low- frequency modes are needed for an unaffected reference, but are often not available. For F stars the surface effect seems to be of similar magnitude as the large frequency separation (the difference between modes of consecutive radial order and same spherical degree), severely limiting the possibility of unambiguous mode identification. Two rather different F-star models can be found to match the frequencies similarly well, and conflicting schemes have been proposed for discriminating between them. This situation worsens for evolved stars displaying avoided crossings between p-modes, and g-modes from the interior radiative zone. In such cases mode identification is even more challenging ― correct identification is however, also rewarded with frequencies that are highly sensitive to the structure of the core (and hence the age), which can therefore be exceedingly well constrained. The central objective of the proposed project is to evaluate the surface effect and implement appropriate corrections in an asteroseismic data-reduction pipeline. The surface effect is composed of a number of inherently 3D convective effects, which will be evaluated from a grid of realistic 3D hydrodynamical simulations of deep convective atmospheres. New formalisms need to be developed for this, and the results will be made available to the community. The theoretical findings will be validated against, in particular, Kepler observations. This project is of fundamental importance to all asteroseismic research and will advance the science goals of NASA

  5. A package for 3-D unstructured grid generation, finite-element flow solution and flow field visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh; Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Loehner, Rainald

    1990-01-01

    A set of computer programs for 3-D unstructured grid generation, fluid flow calculations, and flow field visualization was developed. The grid generation program, called VGRID3D, generates grids over complex configurations using the advancing front method. In this method, the point and element generation is accomplished simultaneously, VPLOT3D is an interactive, menudriven pre- and post-processor graphics program for interpolation and display of unstructured grid data. The flow solver, VFLOW3D, is an Euler equation solver based on an explicit, two-step, Taylor-Galerkin algorithm which uses the Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) concept for a wriggle-free solution. Using these programs, increasingly complex 3-D configurations of interest to aerospace community were gridded including a complete Space Transportation System comprised of the space-shuttle orbitor, the solid-rocket boosters, and the external tank. Flow solutions were obtained on various configurations in subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow regimes.

  6. An Evaluation of 3D Woven Orthogonal Composites' Potential in the Automotive Supply Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Dalia

    The automotive supply chain and its management can be a very complex process and comprises a long dynamic and complex network that consists of four primary segments: original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), first tier suppliers, sub tiers suppliers, and infrastructure suppliers. During the analysis of the current automotive industry it was identified that textile industry importance is considerable increasing as a part of the global automotive supply chain, because textile products are used for interior, exterior and even suspension parts and components. Automotive industry has an increasing demand for higher quality exterior panels with better functional properties and reduced weight. One of the main potentials for this demand is based on the three-dimensional woven composites technology innovations which can replace an existing technology. The new role of the textile industry could make important changes in the automotive supply chain industry, such as: changes in the size of the supply chain, the time to the market and the position of textile industry in the automotive supply chain structure. 3D composite materials from high performance fibers, such as glass and carbon, have been used for automotive applications in a limited way due to the low production rate and the lack of research and development. This research will contribute to the understanding of textile composites in transportation and the textile parameters that affect the performance characteristics of these materials. The research examines the performance characteristics of lighter and stronger 3D woven fabric composites made from fiberglass with the aim to improve fuel efficiency by reducing the total vehicle weight while maintaining safety standards. The performance characteristics of the 3D woven fabric composite can be designed by changing different construction parameters, such as picks density, pick roving linear density, arrangements of warp and z-yarns, and the number of warp and picks layers

  7. Transient 3D elastodynamic field in an embedded multilayered anisotropic plate.

    PubMed

    Mora, Pierric; Ducasse, Eric; Deschamps, Marc

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the ultrasonic response to a transient source that radiates ultrasonic waves in a 3D embedded multilayered anisotropic and dissipative plate. The source can be inside the plate or outside, in a fluid loading the plate for example. In the context of Non-Destructive Testing applied to composite materials, our goal is to create a robust algorithm to calculate ultrasonic field, irrespective of the source and receiver positions. The principle of the method described in this paper is well-established. This method is based on time analysis using the Laplace transform. In the present work, it has been customized for computing ultrasonic source interactions with multilayered dissipative anisotropic plates. The fields are transformed in the 2D Fourier wave-vector domain for the space variables related to the plate surface, and they are expressed in the partial-wave basis. Surprisingly, this method has been very little used in the ultrasonic community, while it is a useful tool which complements the much used technique based on generalized Lamb wave decomposition. By avoiding mode analysis - which can be problematic in some cases - exact numerical calculations (i.e., approximations by truncating infinite series that may be poorly convergent are not needed) can be made in a relatively short time for immersed plates and viscoelastic layers. Even for 3D cases, numerical costs are relatively low. Special attention is given to separate up- and down-going waves, which is a simple matter when using the Laplace transform. Numerical results show the effectiveness of this method. Three examples are presented here to investigate the quality of the model and the robustness of the algorithm: first, a comparison of experiment and simulation for a monolayer carbon-epoxy plate, where the diffracted field is due to a source located on the first free surface of the sample, for both dissipative and non-dissipative cases; second, the basic configuration of an

  8. CFD Simulation of 3D Flow field in a Gas Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    Dongjun Jiang; Shi Zeng

    2006-07-01

    A CFD method was used to study the whole flow field in a gas centrifuge. In this paper, the VSM (Vector Splitting Method) of the FVM (Finite Volume Method) was used to solve the 3D Navier-Stokes equations. An implicit second-order upwind scheme was adopted. The numerical simulation was successfully performed on a parallel cluster computer and a convergence result was obtained. The simulation shows that: in the withdrawal chamber, a strong detached shock wave is formed in front of the scoop; as the radial position increases, the shock becomes stronger and the distance to scoop front surface is smaller. An oblique shock forms in the clearance between the scoop and the centrifuge wall; behind the shock-wave, the radially-inward motion of gas is induced because of the imbalance of the pressure gradient and the centrifugal force. In the separation chamber, a countercurrent is introduced. This indicates that CFD method can be used to study the complex three-dimensional flow field of gas centrifuges. (authors)

  9. Observations of 3-D Electric Fields and Waves Associated With Reconnection at the Dayside Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder, F. D.; Ergun, R.; Goodrich, K.; Malaspina, D.; Eriksson, S.; Stawarz, J. E.; Sturner, A. P.; Holmes, J.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Phan, T.; Le Contel, O.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The phenomenon of magnetic reconnection, especially at electron scales, is still poorly understood. One process that warrants further investigation is the role of wave phenomenon in mediating magnetic reconnection. Previous observations have shown the presence of electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) as well as whistler mode waves near the dayside reconnection site. Additionally, recent simulations have suggested that whistler waves might be generated by electron phase space holes associated with ESWs as they propagate along the magnetic separatrix towards the diffusion region. Other observations have shown ESWs with distinct speeds and time scales, suggesting that different instabilities generate the ESWs. NASA's recently launched Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission presents a unique opportunity to investigate the roles of wave phenomena, such as ESWs and whistlers, in asymmetric reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. We will present 3-D electric and magnetic field data from magnetopause crossings by MMS during its first dayside science phase. Burst mode wave data and electron distributions from all four spacecraft will be analyzed to investigate the origin of these wave phenomena, as well as their impact on the reconnection electric field.

  10. 3D Loops Evolutions (Twists And Expansions) And Magnetic Fields Interactions Studied With SOHO/EIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portier-Fozzani, Fabrice

    1999-10-01

    I will present some results from my PHD/Thesis. With SOHO/EIT, 3D Technics such as stereovision and "vision by shape" were developped to study coronal structures evolution. To discribe loops morphology, we adapted with M. Aschwanden a torus fit which include twist evolution. On a quick magnetic flux emergence (August 5th 1997), the twist were decreasing while the loop expand. During a long time evolution (July - August 1996), flaring activities were well correlated with sudden decrease in the twist. These 2 results correspond to the evolution expected with the Parker's formula (1977). Magnetic field lines interactions were also analyzed. From multi-wavelengths observations, we had studied some morphological and topological changes which can be interpreted as interactions between open and closed field lines (ie between Coronal Holes and Active Region Loops). Then, relationship between CME/Flares formation and our different instabilities studied were analyzed in the aim to find, in the futur, good criteria concerning space weather.

  11. Experimental pencil beam kernels derivation for 3D dose calculation in flattening filter free modulated fields.

    PubMed

    Azcona, Juan Diego; Barbés, Benigno; Wang, Lilie; Burguete, Javier

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method to obtain the pencil-beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerator (linac) by deconvolution from experimental measurements at different depths. The formalism is applied to perform independent dose calculations in modulated fields. In our previous work a formalism was developed for ideal flat fluences exiting the linac's head. That framework could not deal with spatially varying energy fluences, so any deviation from the ideal flat fluence was treated as a perturbation. The present work addresses the necessity of implementing an exact analysis where any spatially varying fluence can be used such as those encountered in FFF beams. A major improvement introduced here is to handle the actual fluence in the deconvolution procedure. We studied the uncertainties associated to the kernel derivation with this method. Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from two linacs from different vendors, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water-equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. The 3D kernel for a FFF beam was obtained by deconvolution using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. Error uncertainty in the kernel derivation procedure was estimated to be within 0.2%. Eighteen modulated fields used clinically in different treatment localizations were irradiated at four measurement depths (total of fifty-four film measurements). Comparison through the gamma-index to their corresponding calculated absolute dose distributions showed a number of passing points (3%, 3mm) mostly above 99%. This new procedure is more reliable and robust than the previous one. Its ability to perform accurate independent dose calculations was

  12. Experimental pencil beam kernels derivation for 3D dose calculation in flattening filter free modulated fields.

    PubMed

    Azcona, Juan Diego; Barbés, Benigno; Wang, Lilie; Burguete, Javier

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method to obtain the pencil-beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerator (linac) by deconvolution from experimental measurements at different depths. The formalism is applied to perform independent dose calculations in modulated fields. In our previous work a formalism was developed for ideal flat fluences exiting the linac's head. That framework could not deal with spatially varying energy fluences, so any deviation from the ideal flat fluence was treated as a perturbation. The present work addresses the necessity of implementing an exact analysis where any spatially varying fluence can be used such as those encountered in FFF beams. A major improvement introduced here is to handle the actual fluence in the deconvolution procedure. We studied the uncertainties associated to the kernel derivation with this method. Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from two linacs from different vendors, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water-equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. The 3D kernel for a FFF beam was obtained by deconvolution using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. Error uncertainty in the kernel derivation procedure was estimated to be within 0.2%. Eighteen modulated fields used clinically in different treatment localizations were irradiated at four measurement depths (total of fifty-four film measurements). Comparison through the gamma-index to their corresponding calculated absolute dose distributions showed a number of passing points (3%, 3mm) mostly above 99%. This new procedure is more reliable and robust than the previous one. Its ability to perform accurate independent dose calculations was

  13. Experimental pencil beam kernels derivation for 3D dose calculation in flattening filter free modulated fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego Azcona, Juan; Barbés, Benigno; Wang, Lilie; Burguete, Javier

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method to obtain the pencil-beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerator (linac) by deconvolution from experimental measurements at different depths. The formalism is applied to perform independent dose calculations in modulated fields. In our previous work a formalism was developed for ideal flat fluences exiting the linac’s head. That framework could not deal with spatially varying energy fluences, so any deviation from the ideal flat fluence was treated as a perturbation. The present work addresses the necessity of implementing an exact analysis where any spatially varying fluence can be used such as those encountered in FFF beams. A major improvement introduced here is to handle the actual fluence in the deconvolution procedure. We studied the uncertainties associated to the kernel derivation with this method. Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from two linacs from different vendors, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water-equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. The 3D kernel for a FFF beam was obtained by deconvolution using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. Error uncertainty in the kernel derivation procedure was estimated to be within 0.2%. Eighteen modulated fields used clinically in different treatment localizations were irradiated at four measurement depths (total of fifty-four film measurements). Comparison through the gamma-index to their corresponding calculated absolute dose distributions showed a number of passing points (3%, 3mm) mostly above 99%. This new procedure is more reliable and robust than the previous one. Its ability to perform accurate independent dose calculations was

  14. 3-D water vapor field in the atmospheric boundary layer observed with scanning differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, Florian; Behrendt, Andreas; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) water vapor data of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are required to improve our understanding of land-atmosphere exchange processes. For this purpose, the scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) was developed as well as new analysis tools and visualization methods. The instrument determines 3-D fields of the atmospheric water vapor number density with a temporal resolution of a few seconds and a spatial resolution of up to a few tens of meters. We present three case studies from two field campaigns. In spring 2013, the UHOH DIAL was operated within the scope of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in western Germany. HD(CP)2 stands for High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction and is a German research initiative. Range-height indicator (RHI) scans of the UHOH DIAL show the water vapor heterogeneity within a range of a few kilometers up to an altitude of 2 km and its impact on the formation of clouds at the top of the ABL. The uncertainty of the measured data was assessed for the first time by extending a technique to scanning data, which was formerly applied to vertical time series. Typically, the accuracy of the DIAL measurements is between 0.5 and 0.8 g m-3 (or < 6 %) within the ABL even during daytime. This allows for performing a RHI scan from the surface to an elevation angle of 90° within 10 min. In summer 2014, the UHOH DIAL participated in the Surface Atmosphere Boundary Layer Exchange (SABLE) campaign in southwestern Germany. Conical volume scans were made which reveal multiple water vapor layers in three dimensions. Differences in their heights in different directions can be attributed to different surface elevation. With low-elevation scans in the surface layer, the humidity profiles and gradients can be related to different land cover such as maize, grassland, and forest as well as different surface layer

  15. 3D Photo Mosaicing of Tagiri Shallow Vent Field by an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Toshihiro; Kondo, Hayato; Ura, Tamaki; Sakamaki, Takashi; Mizushima, Hayato; Yanagisawa, Masao

    Although underwater visual observation is an ideal method for detailed survey of seafloors, it is currently a costly process that requires the use of Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) or Human Occupied Vehicles (HOVs), and can cover only a limited area. This paper proposes an innovative method to navigate an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to create both 2D and 3D photo mosaics of seafloors with high positioning accuracy without using any vision-based matching. The vehicle finds vertical pole-like acoustic reflectors to use as positioning landmarks using a profiling sonar based on a SLAM (Simultaneous Localization And Mapping) technique. These reflectors can be either artificial or natural objects, and so the method can be applied to shallow vent fields where conventional acoustic positioning is difficult, since bubble plumes can also be used as landmarks as well as artificial reflectors. Path-planning is performed in real-time based on the positions and types of landmarks so as to navigate safely and stably using landmarks of different types (artificial reflector or bubble plume) found at arbitrary times and locations. Terrain tracker switches control reference between depth and altitude from the seafloor based on a local map of hazardous area created in real-time using onboard perceptual sensors, in order to follow rugged terrains at an altitude of 1 to 2 meters, as this range is ideal for visual observation. The method was implemented in the AUV Tri-Dog 1 and experiments were carried out at Tagiri vent field, Kagoshima Bay in Japan. The AUV succeeded in fully autonomous observation for more than 160 minutes to create a photo mosaic with an area larger than 600 square meters, which revealed the spatial distribution of detailed features such as tube-worm colonies, bubble plumes and bacteria mats. A fine bathymetry of the same area was also created using a light-section ranging system mounted on the vehicle. Finally a 3 D representation of the environment was

  16. The 3-D topology of magnetic fields in and around sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2006-02-01

    a much larger variability of the Bright Point properties than expected, which puts their elementary nature in some doubt. In the conclusions of this work, the resulting 3-D topology of the sunspot is used in an attempt to develop a consistent picture of the development and the fine structure of sunspots.

  17. A Mean Field Analysis of the Exchange Coupling (J) For 2- and 3-D Structured Tetracyanoethylenide (TCNE -)-based Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, Amber C.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Miller, Joel S.

    2012-01-01

    Mean field expressions based on the simple Heisenberg model were derived to correlate the inter- and intralayer exchange coupling to the critical temperatures, Tc, for several TCNE (tetracyanoethylene) based magnets with extended 2- and 3-D structure types. These expressions were used to estimate the exchange coupling, J, for 2-D ferrimagnetic [MII(TCNE)(NCMe)2]+ (M = Mn, Fe), 3-D antiferromagnetic MnII(TCNE)[C4(CN)8]1/2, and 3-D ferrimagnetic MnII(TCNE)3/2(I3)1/2. The sign and magnitude of the exchange coupling are in accord with previously reported magnetic data.

  18. Non-Ideal ELM Stability and Non-Axisymmetric Field Penetration Calculations with M3D-C1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, N. M.; Chu, M. S.; Snyder, P. B.; Jardin, S. C.; Luo, X.

    2009-11-01

    Numerical studies of ELM stability and non-axisymmetric field penetration in diverted DIII-D and NSTX equilibria are presented, with resistive and finite Larmor radius effects included. These results are obtained with the nonlinear two-fluid code M3D-C1, which has recently been extended to allow linear non-axisymmetric calculations. Benchmarks of M3D-C1 with ideal codes ELITE and GATO show good agreement for the linear stability of peeling-ballooning modes in the ideal limit. New calculations of the resistive stability of ideally stable DIII-D equilibria are presented. M3D-C1 has also been used to calculate the linear response to non-axisymmetric external fields; these calculations are benchmarked with Surfmn and MARS-F. New numerical methods implemented in M3D-C1 are presented, including the treatment of boundary conditions with C^1 elements in a non-rectangular mesh.

  19. ``Avalanches'' in the ground state of the 3D Gaussian random field Ising model driven by an external field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frontera, Carlos; Vives, Eduard

    2002-08-01

    We present a numerical study of the exact ground states of the 3D Gaussian random field Ising model (G-RFIM) with an applied external field B. We combine a max-flow min-cut algorithm with an optimal procedure for determining all the ground states when B is swept from -∞ to ∞. The magnetization of finite lattices ( L3) is studied as a function of the degree of disorder in the system σ (standard deviation of the Gaussian random fields). The magnetization evolves as a sequence of jumps or "avalanches" with a certain size s. The statistical distribution p( s) becomes a power law p( s)˜ s- τ for a certain degree of disorder σc( L). The extrapolation of the results to L→∞ renders σc≃2.4±0.1 and τ≃1.70±0.07.

  20. 3D airflow dynamics over transverse ridges Mpekweni, South Africa: implications for dune field migration behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Derek; Cooper, Andrew; Green, Andrew; Beyers, Meiring; Wiles, Errol; Benallack, Keegan

    2016-04-01

    Un-vegetated dune fields provide excellent opportunities to examine airflow dynamics over various types and scales of dune landforms. The three dimensional surface over which lower boundary layers travel, help adjust surface airflow and consequently the aeolian response of the dunes themselves. The use of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modelling in recent studies now enables investigation of the 3D behaviour of airflow over complex terrain, providing new insights into heterogeneous surface flow and aeolian response of dune surfaces on a large (dunefield) scale. Using a largely un-vegetated coastal dune field site at Mpekweni, Eastern Cape, South Africa, a detailed (0.1m gridded) terrestrial laser scanning survey was conducted to create a high resolution topographical surface. Using local wind flow measurements and local met station records as input, CFD modelling was performed for a number of scenarios involving variable direction and magnitude to examine surface flow patterns across multiple dune forms. Near surface acceleration, expansion and separation of airflow inducing convergence and divergence (steering) of flow velocity streamlines are investigated. Flow acceleration over dune crests/brink lines is a key parameter in driving dune migration and slip face dynamics. Dune aspect ratio (height to length) is also important in determining the degree of crestal flow acceleration, with an increase in flow associated with increasing aspect ratios. Variations in dune height appear to be the most important parameter in driving general flow acceleration. The results from the study provide new insights into dune migration behaviour at this site as well as surface flow behaviour across multiple dune configurations and length scales within un-vegetated dune fields.

  1. Noise analysis for near-field 3D FM-CW radar imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.

    2015-05-01

    Near field radar imaging systems are used for demanding security applications including concealed weapon detection in airports and other high-security venues. Despite the near-field operation, phase noise and thermal noise can limit performance in several ways. Practical imaging systems can employ arrays with low gain antennas and relatively large signal distribution networks that have substantial losses which limit transmit power and increase the effective noise figure of the receiver chain, resulting in substantial thermal noise. Phase noise can also limit system performance. The signal coupled from transmitter to receiver is much larger than expected target signals. Phase noise from this coupled signal can set the system noise floor if the oscillator is too noisy. Frequency modulated continuous wave (FM-CW) radar transceivers used in short range systems are relatively immune to the effects of the coupled phase noise due to range correlation effects. This effect can reduce the phase-noise floor such that it is below the thermal noise floor for moderate performance oscillators. Phase noise is also manifested in the range response around bright targets, and can cause smaller targets to be obscured. Noise in synthetic aperture imaging systems is mitigated by the processing gain of the system. In this paper, the effects of thermal noise, phase noise, and processing gain are analyzed in the context of a near field 3-D FM-CW imaging radar as might be used for concealed weapon detection. In addition to traditional frequency domain analysis, a time-domain simulation is employed to graphically demonstrate the effect of these noise sources on a fast-chirping FM-CW system.

  2. Morphological features of the macerated cranial bones registered by the 3D vision system for potential use in forensic anthropology.

    PubMed

    Skrzat, Janusz; Sioma, Andrzej; Kozerska, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present potential usage of the 3D vision system for registering features of the macerated cranial bones. Applied 3D vision system collects height profiles of the object surface and from that data builds a three-dimensional image of the surface. This method appeared to be accurate enough to capture anatomical details of the macerated bones. With the aid of the 3D vision system we generated images of the surface of the human calvaria which was used for testing the system. Performed reconstruction visualized the imprints of the dural vascular system, cranial sutures, and the three-layer structure of the cranial bones observed in the cross-section. We figure out that the 3D vision system may deliver data which can enhance estimation of sex from the osteological material.

  3. Evaluation of 3D metrology potential using a multiple detector CDSEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakii, Hidemitsu; Yonekura, Isao; Nishiyama, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keishi; Komoto, Kenji; Murakawa, Tsutomu; Hiroyama, Mitsuo; Shida, Soichi; Kuribara, Masayuki; Iwai, Toshimichi; Matsumoto, Jun; Nakamura, Takayuki

    2012-06-01

    As feature sizes of semiconductor device structures have continuously decreased, needs for metrology tools with high precision and excellent linearity over actual pattern sizes have been growing. And it has become important to measure not only two-dimensional (2D) but also three-dimensional (3D) shapes of patterns at 22 nm node and beyond. To meet requirements for 3D metrology capabilities, various pattern metrology tools have been developed. Among those, we assume that CDSEM metrology is the most qualified candidate in the light of its non-destructive, high throughput measurement capabilities that are expected to be extended to the much-awaited 3D metrology technology. On the basis of this supposition, we have developed the 3D metrology system, in which side wall angles and heights of photomask patterns can be measured with high accuracy through analyzing CDSEM images generated by multi-channel detectors. In this paper, we will discuss our attempts to measure 3D shapes of defect patterns on a photomask by using Advantest's "Multi Vision Metrology SEM" E3630 (MVM-SEM' E3630).

  4. Potential of ILRIS3D Intensity Data for Planar Surfaces Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Kuei; Lu, Yao-Yu

    2009-01-01

    Intensity value based point cloud segmentation has received less attention because the intensity value of the terrestrial laser scanner is usually altered by receiving optics/hardware or the internal propriety software, which is unavailable to the end user. We offer a solution by assuming the terrestrial laser scanners are stable and the behavior of the intensity value can be characterized. Then, it is possible to use the intensity value for segmentation by observing its behavior, i.e., intensity value variation, pattern and presence of location of intensity values, etc. In this study, experiment results for characterizing the intensity data of planar surfaces collected by ILRIS3D, a terrestrial laser scanner, are reported. Two intensity formats, grey and raw, are employed by ILRIS3D. It is found from the experiment results that the grey intensity has less variation; hence it is preferable for point cloud segmentation. A warm-up time of approximate 1.5 hours is suggested for more stable intensity data. A segmentation method based on the visual cues of the intensity images sequence, which contains consecutive intensity images, is proposed in order to segment the 3D laser points of ILRIS3D. This method is unique to ILRIS3D data and does not require radiometric calibration. PMID:22346726

  5. Towards 3C-3D digital holographic fluid velocity vector field measurement—tomographic digital holographic PIV (Tomo-HPIV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, J.; Atkinson, C.

    2008-07-01

    Most unsteady and/or turbulent flows of geophysical and engineering interest have a highly three-dimensional (3D) complex topology and their experimental investigation is in pressing need of quantitative velocity measurement methods that are robust and can provide instantaneous 3C-3D velocity field data over a significant volumetric domain of the flow. This paper introduces and demonstrates a new method that uses multiple digital CCD array cameras to record in-line digital holograms of the same volume of seed particles from multiple orientations. This technique uses the same basic equipment as Tomo-PIV minus the camera lenses, it overcomes the depth-of-field problem of digital in-line holography and does not require the complex optical calibration of Tomo-PIV. The digital sensors can be oriented in an optimal manner to overcome the depth-of-field limitation of in-line holograms recorded using digital CCD or CMOS array cameras, resulting in a 3D reconstruction of the seed particles within the volume of interest, which can subsequently be analysed using 3D cross-correlation PIV analysis to yield a 3C-3D velocity field. A demonstration experiment of Tomo-HPIV using uniform translation with nominally 11 µm diameter seed particles shows that the 3D displacement derived from 3D cross-correlation Tomo-HPIV analysis can be measured within 5% of the imposed uniform translation, where the imposed uniform translation has an estimated standard uncertainty of 4.3%. So this paper proposes a multi-camera digital holographic imaging 3C-3D PIV method, which is identified as tomographic digital holographic PIV or Tomo-HPIV.

  6. A novel 3D embedded gate field effect transistor - Screen-grid FET - Device concept and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fobelets, K.; Ding, P. W.; Velazquez-Perez, J. E.

    2007-05-01

    A novel 3D field effect transistor on SOI - screen-grid FET (SGrFET) - is proposed and an analysis of its DC behaviour is presented by means of 2D TCAD analysis. The novel feature of the SGrFET is the design of 3D insulated gate cylinders embedded in the SOI body. This novel gate topology improves efficiency and allows great flexibility in device and gate geometry to optimize DC performance. The floating body effect is avoided and the double gating row configuration controls short channel effects. The traditional intimate relationship between gate length and source-drain distance is removed, resulting in easy control of drain induced barrier lowering, improved output conductance and ideal sub-threshold slope. The separation between the gate fingers in each row is the key factor to optimize the performance, whilst downscaling of the source-drain distance and oxide thickness is not essential from an operational point of view. The device exhibits a huge potential in low power electronics as given by an efficiency of transconductance " gm/ Id" of 39 S/A at VDS = 100 mV over a large gate voltage range and at a source-drain distance of 825 nm. We present the modelling results of the influence of gate cylinder distribution in the channel, channel doping, gate oxide thickness, gate finger distance and source-drain distance on the characteristics of the device.

  7. InSAR, GPS, triangulation and EDM combination in a 3D velocity field: Insight from Arenal volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Cyril; del Potro, Rodrigo; Biggs, Juliet; Gottsmann, Joachim; Ebmeier, Susanna; Van der Laat, Rodolfo

    2014-05-01

    Geodetic techniques provide useful information to detect and assess geophysical processes occurring at volcanoes. When the deformation signal is large, standard analyses and modelling can be carried out. However, when surface movements are subtle and several processes occur simultaneously, stochastic and multi-techniques assessment is required. Here we present a methodology that combines GPS, triangulation, trilateration and InSAR in a 3D velocity surface without any prior specific source assumption. The methodology is in 5 steps: design of the geodetic monitoring network, acquisition and post-processing of deformation observations, spatial integration, time series computation and finally spatial and temporal measurement integration. We apply this methodology to Arenal volcano in Costa Rica and provide an unprecedented insight of the volcano's deformation. The most significant improvements of this method are the reduction of campaign logistics, the unambiguous detection of the outliers, an increase in accuracy, a 3D velocity field accounting for all techniques and measurements. Although, the methodology is applied to GPS, triangulation, trilateration and INSAR geodetic networks with a steady motion, it has the potential to be extended to other geodetic techniques and where transient deformations are ongoing. The described methodology can be applied in volcano monitoring worldwide.

  8. Exploring the Potential of Aerial Photogrammetry for 3d Modelling of High-Alpine Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legat, K.; Moe, K.; Poli, D.; Bollmannb, E.

    2016-03-01

    cameras of Microsoft's UltraCam series and the in-house processing chain centred on the Dense-Image-Matching (DIM) software SURE by nFrames. This paper reports the work carried out at AVT for the surface- and terrain modelling of several high-alpine areas using DIM- and ALS-based approaches. A special focus is dedicated to the influence of terrain morphology, flight planning, GNSS/IMU measurements, and ground-control distribution in the georeferencing process on the data quality. Based on the very promising results, some general recommendations for aerial photogrammetry processing in high-alpine areas are made to achieve best possible accuracy of the final 3D-, 2.5D- and 2D products.

  9. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology. PMID:26028997

  10. 3D Printing and Its Urologic Applications.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Youssef; Feibus, Allison H; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    3D printing is the development of 3D objects via an additive process in which successive layers of material are applied under computer control. This article discusses 3D printing, with an emphasis on its historical context and its potential use in the field of urology.

  11. A quasi-Monte Carlo approach to efficient 3-D migration: Field data test

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, C.; Chen, J.; Schuster, G.T.; Smith, B.A.

    1999-10-01

    The quasi-Monte Carlo migration algorithm is applied to a 3-D seismic data set from West Texas. The field data were finely sampled at approximately 220-ft intervals in the in-line direction but were sampled coarsely at approximately 1,320-ft intervals in the cross-line direction. The traces at the quasi-Monte Carlo points were obtained by an interpolation of the regularly sampled traces. The subsampled traces at the quasi-Monte Carlo points were migrated, and the resulting images were compared to those obtained by migrating both regular and uniform grids of traces. Results show that, consistent with theory, the quasi-Monte Carlo migration images contain fewer migration aliasing artifacts than the regular or uniform grid images. For these data, quasi-Monte Carlo migration apparently requires fewer than half the number of the traces needed by regular-grid or uniform-grid migration to give images of comparable quality. These results agree with related migration tests on synthetic data computed for point scatterer models. Results suggest that better migration images might result from data recorded on a coarse quasi-random grid compared to regular or uniform coarse grids.

  12. Quantifying the 3D Odorant Concentration Field Used by Actively Tracking Blue Crabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, D. R.; Dickman, B. D.; Jackson, J. L.; Weissburg, M. J.

    2007-11-01

    Blue crabs and other aquatic organisms locate food and mates by tracking turbulent odorant plumes. The odorant concentration fluctuates unpredictably due to turbulent transport, and many characteristics of the fluctuation pattern have been hypothesized as useful cues for orienting to the odorant source. To make a direct linkage between tracking behavior and the odorant concentration signal, we developed a measurement system based the laser induced fluorescence technique to quantify the instantaneous 3D concentration field surrounding actively tracking blue crabs. The data suggest a correlation between upstream walking speed and the concentration of the odorant signal arriving at the antennule chemosensors, which are located near the mouth region. More specifically, we note an increase in upstream walking speed when high concentration bursts arrive at the antennules location. We also test hypotheses regarding the ability of blue crabs to steer relative to the plume centerline based on the signal contrast between the chemosensors located on their leg appendages. These chemosensors are located much closer to the substrate compared to the antennules and are separated by the width of the blue crab. In this case, it appears that blue crabs use the bilateral signal comparison to track along the edge of the plume.

  13. Optimizing Antenna Layout for ITER Low Field Side Reflectometer using 3D Ray Tracing Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury, Sarah; Zolfaghari, Ali

    2014-10-01

    The ITER Low Field Side Reflectometer (LFSR) is being designed to provide electron density profile measurements for both the core and edge plasma through the launching of millimeter waves into the plasma and the detection of the signal of the reflected wave by a receive antenna. Because the detection of the received signal is integral to the determination of the density profile, an important goal in designing the LFSR is to optimize the coupling between launch and receive antennas. This project investigates this subject by using Genray, a 3D ray tracing code, to simulate the propagation of millimeter waves launched into and reflected by the plasma for a typical ITER case. Based upon the results of the code, beam footprints will be estimated for different cases in which both the height and toroidal angle of the launch antenna are varied. The footprints will be compared, allowing conclusions to be drawn about the optimal antenna layout for the LFSR. This method will be carried out for various frequencies of both O-mode and X-mode waves, and the effect of the scrape-off layer of the plasma will also be considered.

  14. What Breaks Magnetic Field Lines in 3D Simulations of Low β Plasmas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swisdak, M. M.; Che, H.; Drake, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    During magnetic reconnection field lines must break and reconnect to release energy, but specifically how this happens has been unclear. Ion-electron drag arising from turbulence (anomalous resistivity) and thermal momentum transport are two mechanisms that have been widely invoked. Measurements of enhanced turbulence near reconnection sites in space and in the laboratory lend support to the anomalous resistivity idea, but there has been no demonstration from measurements that this turbulence produces the necessary enhanced drag. Here we report 3D computer simulations showing that neither of these mechanisms works in low-β plasmas. Instead, when the current layers that form during magnetic reconnection become too intense, they disintegrate and spread into a complex web of filaments that abruptly increases the transverse momentum transport (anomalous viscosity) and leads to an increase in the rate of reconnection. The filamentation is due to an instability that feeds on the gradient of the reconnection current and for which we derive the linear dispersion relation. We also show computer simulations of the instability and discuss the conditions under which it should appear.

  15. Broadband Near-Field Ground Motion Simulations in 3D Scattering Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imperatori, Walter; Mai, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The heterogeneous nature of Earth's crust is manifested in the scattering of propagating seismic waves. In recent years, different techniques have been developed to include such phenomenon in broadband ground-motion calculations, either considering scattering as a semi-stochastic or pure stochastic process. In this study, we simulate broadband (0-10 Hz) ground motions using a 3D finite-difference wave propagation solver using several 3D media characterized by Von Karman correlation functions with different correlation lengths and standard deviation values. Our goal is to investigate scattering characteristics and its influence on the seismic wave-field at short and intermediate distances from the source in terms of ground motion parameters. We also examine other relevant scattering-related phenomena, such as the loss of radiation pattern and the directivity breakdown. We first simulate broadband ground motions for a point-source characterized by a classic omega-squared spectrum model. Fault finiteness is then introduced by means of a Haskell-type source model presenting both sub-shear and super-shear rupture speed. Results indicate that scattering plays an important role in ground motion even at short distances from the source, where source effects are thought to be dominating. In particular, peak ground motion parameters can be affected even at relatively low frequencies, implying that earthquake ground-motion simulations should include scattering also for PGV calculations. At the same time, we find a gradual loss of the source signature in the 2-5 Hz frequency range, together with a distortion of the Mach cones in case of super-shear rupture. For more complex source models and truly heterogeneous Earth, these effects may occur even at lower frequencies. Our simulations suggest that Von Karman correlation functions with correlation length between several hundred meters and few kilometers, Hurst exponent around 0.3 and standard deviation in the 5-10% range

  16. 3D vacuum magnetic field modelling of the ITER ELM control coil during standard operating scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. E.; Orlov, D. M.; Wingen, A.; Wu, W.; Loarte, A.; Casper, T. A.; Schmitz, O.; Saibene, G.; Schaffer, M. J.; Daly, E.

    2013-09-01

    In-vessel, non-axisymmetric, control coils have proven to be an important option for mitigating and suppressing edge-localized modes (ELMs) in high performance operating regimes on a growing number of tokamaks. Additionally, an in-vessel non-axisymmetric ELM control coil is being considered in the ITER baseline design. In preparing for the initial operation of this coil set, a comprehensive study was carried out to characterize the linear superposition of the 3D vacuum magnetic field, produced by the ELM coil, on a series of equilibria representing nine standard ITER operating scenarios. Here, the spatial phase angle of toroidally distributed currents, specified with a cosine waveform, in the upper and lower rows of the ITER ELM coil (IEC) set is varied in 2° steps while holding the current in the equatorial row of coils constant. The peak current in each of the three toroidal rows of window-frame coils making up the IEC is scanned between 5 kAt and 90 kAt in 5 kAt steps and the width of the edge region covered by overlapping vacuum field magnetic islands is calculated. This width is compared to a vacuum field ELM suppression correlation criterion found in DIII-D. A minimum coil current satisfying the DIII-D criterion, along with an associated set of phase angles, is identified for each ITER operating scenario. These currents range from 20 kAt to 75 kAt depending on the operating scenario being used and the toroidal mode number (n) of the cosine waveform. Comparisons between the scaling of the divertor footprint area in cases with n = 3 perturbation fields versus those with n = 4 show significant advantages when using n = 3. In addition, it is found that the DIII-D correlation criterion can be satisfied in the event that various combinations of individual IEC window-frame coils need to be turned off due to malfunctioning components located inside the vacuum vessel. Details of these results for both the full set of 27 window-frame coils and various reduced sets

  17. Present-day stress field in subduction zones: Insights from 3D viscoelastic models and data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petricca, Patrizio; Carminati, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    3D viscoelastic FE models were performed to investigate the impact of geometry and kinematics on the lithospheric stress in convergent margins. Generic geometries were designed in order to resemble natural subduction. Our model predictions mirror the results of previous 2D models concerning the effects of lithosphere-mantle relative flow on stress regimes, and allow a better understanding of the lateral variability of the stress field. In particular, in both upper and lower plates, stress axes orientations depend on the adopted geometry and axes rotations occur following the trench shape. Generally stress axes are oriented perpendicular or parallel to the trench, with the exception of the slab lateral tips where rotations occur. Overall compression results in the upper plate when convergence rate is faster than mantle flow rate, suggesting a major role for convergence. In the slab, along-strike tension occurs at intermediate and deeper depths (> 100 km) in case of mantle flow sustaining the sinking lithosphere and slab convex geometry facing mantle flow or in case of opposing mantle flow and slab concave geometry facing mantle flow. Along-strike compression is predicted in case of sustaining mantle flow and concave slabs or in case of opposing mantle flow and convex slabs. The slab stress field is thus controlled by the direction of impact of mantle flow onto the slab and by slab longitudinal curvature. Slab pull produces not only tension in the bending region of subducted plate but also compression where upper and lower plates are coupled. A qualitative comparison between results and data in selected subductions indicates good match for South America, Mariana and Tonga-Kermadec subductions. Discrepancies, as for Sumatra-Java, emerge due to missing geometric (e.g., occurrence of fault systems and local changes in the orientation of plate boundaries) and rheological (e.g., plasticity associated with slab bending, anisotropy) complexities in the models.

  18. Automated bone segmentation from large field of view 3D MR images of the hip joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Schwarz, Raphael; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Accurate bone segmentation in the hip joint region from magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide quantitative data for examining pathoanatomical conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement through to varying stages of osteoarthritis to monitor bone and associated cartilage morphometry. We evaluate two state-of-the-art methods (multi-atlas and active shape model (ASM) approaches) on bilateral MR images for automatic 3D bone segmentation in the hip region (proximal femur and innominate bone). Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired at 3T from 30 volunteers. Image sequences included water-excitation dual echo stead state (FOV 38.6 × 24.1 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.61 mm) in all subjects and multi-echo data image combination (FOV 37.6 × 23.5 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.70 mm) for a subset of eight subjects. Following manual segmentation of femoral (head-neck, proximal-shaft) and innominate (ilium+ischium+pubis) bone, automated bone segmentation proceeded via two approaches: (1) multi-atlas segmentation incorporating non-rigid registration and (2) an advanced ASM-based scheme. Mean inter- and intra-rater reliability Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC) for manual segmentation of femoral and innominate bone were (0.970, 0.963) and (0.971, 0.965). Compared with manual data, mean DSC values for femoral and innominate bone volumes using automated multi-atlas and ASM-based methods were (0.950, 0.922) and (0.946, 0.917), respectively. Both approaches delivered accurate (high DSC values) segmentation results; notably, ASM data were generated in substantially less computational time (12 min versus 10 h). Both automated algorithms provided accurate 3D bone volumetric descriptions for MR-based measures in the hip region. The highly computational efficient ASM-based approach is more likely suitable for future clinical applications such as extracting bone-cartilage interfaces for potential cartilage segmentation.

  19. Automated bone segmentation from large field of view 3D MR images of the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S; Schwarz, Raphael; Engstrom, Craig; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-10-21

    Accurate bone segmentation in the hip joint region from magnetic resonance (MR) images can provide quantitative data for examining pathoanatomical conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement through to varying stages of osteoarthritis to monitor bone and associated cartilage morphometry. We evaluate two state-of-the-art methods (multi-atlas and active shape model (ASM) approaches) on bilateral MR images for automatic 3D bone segmentation in the hip region (proximal femur and innominate bone). Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired at 3T from 30 volunteers. Image sequences included water-excitation dual echo stead state (FOV 38.6 × 24.1 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.61 mm) in all subjects and multi-echo data image combination (FOV 37.6 × 23.5 cm, matrix 576 × 360, thickness 0.70 mm) for a subset of eight subjects. Following manual segmentation of femoral (head-neck, proximal-shaft) and innominate (ilium+ischium+pubis) bone, automated bone segmentation proceeded via two approaches: (1) multi-atlas segmentation incorporating non-rigid registration and (2) an advanced ASM-based scheme. Mean inter- and intra-rater reliability Dice's similarity coefficients (DSC) for manual segmentation of femoral and innominate bone were (0.970, 0.963) and (0.971, 0.965). Compared with manual data, mean DSC values for femoral and innominate bone volumes using automated multi-atlas and ASM-based methods were (0.950, 0.922) and (0.946, 0.917), respectively. Both approaches delivered accurate (high DSC values) segmentation results; notably, ASM data were generated in substantially less computational time (12 min versus 10 h). Both automated algorithms provided accurate 3D bone volumetric descriptions for MR-based measures in the hip region. The highly computational efficient ASM-based approach is more likely suitable for future clinical applications such as extracting bone-cartilage interfaces for potential cartilage segmentation.

  20. Potential Synaptic Connectivity of Different Neurons onto Pyramidal Cells in a 3D Reconstruction of the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Ropireddy, Deepak; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2011-01-01

    Most existing connectomic data and ongoing efforts focus either on individual synapses (e.g., with electron microscopy) or on regional connectivity (tract tracing). An individual pyramidal cell (PC) extends thousands of synapses over macroscopic distances (∼cm). The contrasting requirements of high-resolution and large field of view make it too challenging to acquire the entire synaptic connectivity for even a single typical cortical neuron. Light microscopy can image whole neuronal arbors and resolve dendritic branches. Analyzing connectivity in terms of close spatial appositions between axons and dendrites could thus bridge the opposite scales, from synaptic level to whole systems. In the mammalian cortex, structural plasticity of spines and boutons makes these “potential synapses” functionally relevant to learning capability and memory capacity. To date, however, potential synapses have only been mapped in the surrounding of a neuron and relative to its local orientation rather than in a system-level anatomical reference. Here we overcome this limitation by estimating the potential connectivity of different neurons embedded into a detailed 3D reconstruction of the rat hippocampus. Axonal and dendritic trees were oriented with respect to hippocampal cytoarchitecture according to longitudinal and transversal curvatures. We report the potential connectivity onto PC dendrites from the axons of a dentate granule cell, three CA3 PCs, one CA2 PC, and 13 CA3b interneurons. The numbers, densities, and distributions of potential synapses were analyzed in each sub-region (e.g., CA3 vs. CA1), layer (e.g., oriens vs. radiatum), and septo-temporal location (e.g., dorsal vs. ventral). The overall ratio between the numbers of actual and potential synapses was ∼0.20 for the granule and CA3 PCs. All potential connectivity patterns are strikingly dependent on the anatomical location of both pre-synaptic and post-synaptic neurons. PMID:21779242

  1. 3D Inversion of a Self-Potential Dataset for Contaminant Detection and Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsley, B. J.; Sogade, J.; Briggs, V.; Lambert, M.; Reppert, P.; Coles, D.; Morgan, F.; Rossabi, J.; Riha, B.; Shi, W.

    2003-12-01

    Due to the complicated nature of subsurface contaminant migration, it is difficult to determine the spatial extent and severity of contamination, which can provide essential information for efficient remediation efforts. Self-potential (SP) geophysics is employed to provide a minimally invasive, fast, and inexpensive method for remote in-situ detection and three-dimensional mapping of subsurface DNAPL (Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid) in conjunction with inverse methods. The self-potential method is commonly used to detect a variety of phenomena that are typically related to thermoelectric, electrochemical, or electrokinetic coupling processes. Surface self-potential surveys have been documented to show anomalies over areas known to be contaminated, but interpretation of these datasets is often mostly qualitative, and can be plagued with problems of non-uniqueness. In this study, oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, one of the mechanisms associated with the attenuation of chemicals released into the environment, provide an electrochemical source for the SP signal. Electrochemical potentials associated with subsurface zones of redox activity are analogous to localized 'batteries' buried within native earth materials, and produce an electric field that is remotely detected using electrodes placed at the surface and in nearby boreholes. Three-dimensional inversion of the self-potential data incorporating resistivity information is the necessary step in characterizing the source parameters, which are directly related to the redox activity, and therefore to the contaminant itself. Surface and borehole SP data are collected in order to help constrain the solution in depth, and resistivity information is taken from an induced polarization survey performed over the same area during this field excursion. Inversion results are correlated with contaminant concentration data sampled from a series of ground-truth boreholes within the region of interest.

  2. Extra high speed modified Lundell alternator parameters and open/short-circuit characteristics from global 3D-FE magnetic field solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, R.; Demerdash, N. A.

    1992-01-01

    The combined magnetic vector potential - magnetic scalar potential method of computation of 3D magnetic fields by finite elements, introduced in a companion paper, is used for global 3D field analysis and machine performance computations under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions for an example 14.3 kVA modified Lundell alternator, whose magnetic field is of intrinsic 3D nature. The computed voltages and currents under these machine test conditions were verified and found to be in very good agreement with corresponding test data. Results of use of this modelling and computation method in the study of a design alteration example, in which the stator stack length of the example alternator is stretched in order to increase voltage and volt-ampere rating, are given here. These results demonstrate the inadequacy of conventional 2D-based design concepts and the imperative of use of this type of 3D magnetic field modelling in the design and investigation of such machines.

  3. Research into a Single-aperture Light Field Camera System to Obtain Passive Ground-based 3D Imagery of LEO Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechis, K.; Pitruzzello, A.

    2014-09-01

    This presentation describes our ongoing research into using a ground-based light field camera to obtain passive, single-aperture 3D imagery of LEO objects. Light field cameras are an emerging and rapidly evolving technology for passive 3D imaging with a single optical sensor. The cameras use an array of lenslets placed in front of the camera focal plane, which provides angle of arrival information for light rays originating from across the target, allowing range to target and 3D image to be obtained from a single image using monocular optics. The technology, which has been commercially available for less than four years, has the potential to replace dual-sensor systems such as stereo cameras, dual radar-optical systems, and optical-LIDAR fused systems, thus reducing size, weight, cost, and complexity. We have developed a prototype system for passive ranging and 3D imaging using a commercial light field camera and custom light field image processing algorithms. Our light field camera system has been demonstrated for ground-target surveillance and threat detection applications, and this paper presents results of our research thus far into applying this technology to the 3D imaging of LEO objects. The prototype 3D imaging camera system developed by Northrop Grumman uses a Raytrix R5 C2GigE light field camera connected to a Windows computer with an nVidia graphics processing unit (GPU). The system has a frame rate of 30 Hz, and a software control interface allows for automated camera triggering and light field image acquisition to disk. Custom image processing software then performs the following steps: (1) image refocusing, (2) change detection, (3) range finding, and (4) 3D reconstruction. In Step (1), a series of 2D images are generated from each light field image; the 2D images can be refocused at up to 100 different depths. Currently, steps (1) through (3) are automated, while step (4) requires some user interaction. A key requirement for light field camera

  4. Reconstruction of lava fields based on 3D and conventional images. Arenal volcano, Costa Rica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, S.; Duarte, E.; Fernandez, E.

    2007-05-01

    , chemical composition, type of lava, velocity, etc. With all this information and photographs; real, visual and topographic images of the position and characters of the 1990s and 2000s lava flows, were obtained . An illustrative poster will be presented along with this abstract to show the construction process of such tool. Moreover, 3D animations will be present in the mentioned poster.

  5. Internal structure and volcanic hazard potential of Mt Tongariro, New Zealand, from 3D gravity and magnetic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Craig A.; Williams-Jones, Glyn

    2016-06-01

    A new 3D geophysical model of the Mt Tongariro Volcanic Massif (TgVM), New Zealand, provides a high resolution view of the volcano's internal structure and hydrothermal system, from which we derive implications for volcanic hazards. Geologically constrained 3D inversions of potential field data provides a greater level of insight into the volcanic structure than is possible from unconstrained models. A complex region of gravity highs and lows (± 6 mGal) is set within a broader, ~ 20 mGal gravity low. A magnetic high (1300 nT) is associated with Mt Ngauruhoe, while a substantial, thick, demagnetised area occurs to the north, coincident with a gravity low and interpreted as representing the hydrothermal system. The hydrothermal system is constrained to the west by major faults, interpreted as an impermeable barrier to fluid migration and extends to basement depth. These faults are considered low probability areas for future eruption sites, as there is little to indicate they have acted as magmatic pathways. Where the hydrothermal system coincides with steep topographic slopes, an increased likelihood of landslides is present and the newly delineated hydrothermal system maps the area most likely to have phreatic eruptions. Such eruptions, while small on a global scale, are important hazards at the TgVM as it is a popular hiking area with hundreds of visitors per day in close proximity to eruption sites. The model shows that the volume of volcanic material erupted over the lifespan of the TgVM is five to six times greater than previous estimates, suggesting a higher rate of magma supply, in line with global rates of andesite production. We suggest that our model of physical property distribution can be used to provide constraints for other models of dynamic geophysical processes occurring at the TgVM.

  6. Comparison of Phase-Based 3D Near-Field Source Localization Techniques for UHF RFID.

    PubMed

    Parr, Andreas; Miesen, Robert; Vossiek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present multiple techniques for phase-based narrowband backscatter tag localization in three-dimensional space with planar antenna arrays or synthetic apertures. Beamformer and MUSIC localization algorithms, known from near-field source localization and direction-of-arrival estimation, are applied to the 3D backscatter scenario and their performance in terms of localization accuracy is evaluated. We discuss the impact of different transceiver modes known from the literature, which evaluate different send and receive antenna path combinations for a single localization, as in multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems. Furthermore, we propose a new Singledimensional-MIMO (S-MIMO) transceiver mode, which is especially suited for use with mobile robot systems. Monte-Carlo simulations based on a realistic multipath error model ensure spatial correlation of the simulated signals, and serve to critically appraise the accuracies of the different localization approaches. A synthetic uniform rectangular array created by a robotic arm is used to evaluate selected localization techniques. We use an Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) setup to compare measurements with the theory and simulation. The results show how a mean localization accuracy of less than 30 cm can be reached in an indoor environment. Further simulations demonstrate how the distance between aperture and tag affects the localization accuracy and how the size and grid spacing of the rectangular array need to be adapted to improve the localization accuracy down to orders of magnitude in the centimeter range, and to maximize array efficiency in terms of localization accuracy per number of elements. PMID:27347976

  7. Comparison of Phase-Based 3D Near-Field Source Localization Techniques for UHF RFID.

    PubMed

    Parr, Andreas; Miesen, Robert; Vossiek, Martin

    2016-06-25

    In this paper, we present multiple techniques for phase-based narrowband backscatter tag localization in three-dimensional space with planar antenna arrays or synthetic apertures. Beamformer and MUSIC localization algorithms, known from near-field source localization and direction-of-arrival estimation, are applied to the 3D backscatter scenario and their performance in terms of localization accuracy is evaluated. We discuss the impact of different transceiver modes known from the literature, which evaluate different send and receive antenna path combinations for a single localization, as in multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems. Furthermore, we propose a new Singledimensional-MIMO (S-MIMO) transceiver mode, which is especially suited for use with mobile robot systems. Monte-Carlo simulations based on a realistic multipath error model ensure spatial correlation of the simulated signals, and serve to critically appraise the accuracies of the different localization approaches. A synthetic uniform rectangular array created by a robotic arm is used to evaluate selected localization techniques. We use an Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) setup to compare measurements with the theory and simulation. The results show how a mean localization accuracy of less than 30 cm can be reached in an indoor environment. Further simulations demonstrate how the distance between aperture and tag affects the localization accuracy and how the size and grid spacing of the rectangular array need to be adapted to improve the localization accuracy down to orders of magnitude in the centimeter range, and to maximize array efficiency in terms of localization accuracy per number of elements.

  8. Comparison of Phase-Based 3D Near-Field Source Localization Techniques for UHF RFID

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Andreas; Miesen, Robert; Vossiek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present multiple techniques for phase-based narrowband backscatter tag localization in three-dimensional space with planar antenna arrays or synthetic apertures. Beamformer and MUSIC localization algorithms, known from near-field source localization and direction-of-arrival estimation, are applied to the 3D backscatter scenario and their performance in terms of localization accuracy is evaluated. We discuss the impact of different transceiver modes known from the literature, which evaluate different send and receive antenna path combinations for a single localization, as in multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems. Furthermore, we propose a new Singledimensional-MIMO (S-MIMO) transceiver mode, which is especially suited for use with mobile robot systems. Monte-Carlo simulations based on a realistic multipath error model ensure spatial correlation of the simulated signals, and serve to critically appraise the accuracies of the different localization approaches. A synthetic uniform rectangular array created by a robotic arm is used to evaluate selected localization techniques. We use an Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) setup to compare measurements with the theory and simulation. The results show how a mean localization accuracy of less than 30 cm can be reached in an indoor environment. Further simulations demonstrate how the distance between aperture and tag affects the localization accuracy and how the size and grid spacing of the rectangular array need to be adapted to improve the localization accuracy down to orders of magnitude in the centimeter range, and to maximize array efficiency in terms of localization accuracy per number of elements. PMID:27347976

  9. Numerical Analysis of Thermal Remediation in 3D Field-Scale Fractured Geologic Media.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Falta, Ronald W; Murdoch, Lawrence C

    2015-01-01

    Thermal methods are promising for remediating fractured geologic media contaminated with volatile organic compounds, and the success of this process depends on the coupled heat transfer, multiphase flow, and thermodynamics. This study analyzed field-scale removal of trichloroethylene (TCE) and heat transfer behavior in boiling fractured geologic media using the multiple interacting continua method. This method can resolve local gradients in the matrix and is less computationally demanding than alternative methods like discrete fracture-matrix models. A 2D axisymmetric model was used to simulate a single element of symmetry in a repeated pattern of extraction wells inside a large heated zone and evaluate effects of parameter sensitivity on contaminant recovery. The results showed that the removal of TCE increased with matrix permeability, and the removal rate was more sensitive to matrix permeability than any other parameter. Increasing fracture density promoted TCE removal, especially when the matrix permeability was low (e.g., <10(-17) m(2)). A 3D model was used to simulate an entire treatment zone and the surrounding groundwater in fractured material, with the interaction between them being considered. Boiling was initiated in the center of the upper part of the heated region and expanded toward the boundaries. This boiling process resulted in a large increase in the TCE removal rate and spread of TCE to the vadose zone and the peripheries of the heated zone. The incorporation of extraction wells helped control the contaminant from migrating to far regions. After 22 d, more than 99.3% of TCE mass was recovered in the simulation. PMID:25040727

  10. Numerical Analysis of Thermal Remediation in 3D Field-Scale Fractured Geologic Media.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Falta, Ronald W; Murdoch, Lawrence C

    2015-01-01

    Thermal methods are promising for remediating fractured geologic media contaminated with volatile organic compounds, and the success of this process depends on the coupled heat transfer, multiphase flow, and thermodynamics. This study analyzed field-scale removal of trichloroethylene (TCE) and heat transfer behavior in boiling fractured geologic media using the multiple interacting continua method. This method can resolve local gradients in the matrix and is less computationally demanding than alternative methods like discrete fracture-matrix models. A 2D axisymmetric model was used to simulate a single element of symmetry in a repeated pattern of extraction wells inside a large heated zone and evaluate effects of parameter sensitivity on contaminant recovery. The results showed that the removal of TCE increased with matrix permeability, and the removal rate was more sensitive to matrix permeability than any other parameter. Increasing fracture density promoted TCE removal, especially when the matrix permeability was low (e.g., <10(-17) m(2)). A 3D model was used to simulate an entire treatment zone and the surrounding groundwater in fractured material, with the interaction between them being considered. Boiling was initiated in the center of the upper part of the heated region and expanded toward the boundaries. This boiling process resulted in a large increase in the TCE removal rate and spread of TCE to the vadose zone and the peripheries of the heated zone. The incorporation of extraction wells helped control the contaminant from migrating to far regions. After 22 d, more than 99.3% of TCE mass was recovered in the simulation.

  11. Non-bioengineered silk fibroin protein 3D scaffolds for potential biotechnological and tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Biman B; Kundu, Subhas C

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes a new source for fabricating high-strength, non-bioengineered silk gland fibroin 3D scaffolds from Indian tropical tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta using SDS for dissolution. The scaffolds were fabricated by freeze drying at different prefreezing temperatures for pore size and porosity optimization. Superior mechanical properties with compressive strength in the range of 972 kPa were observed. The matrices were degraded by proteases within 28 d of incubation. Biocompatibility was assessed by feline fibroblast culture in vitro and confocal microscopy further confirmed adherence, spreading, and proliferation of primary dermal fibroblasts. Results indicate nonmulberry 3D silk gland fibroin protein as an inexpensive, high-strength, slow biodegradable, biocompatible, and alternative natural biomaterial. [Figure: see text]. PMID:18702171

  12. Identifying High Potential Well Targets with 3D Seismic and Mineralogy

    SciTech Connect

    Mellors, R. J.

    2015-10-30

    Seismic reflection the primary tool used in petroleum exploration and production, but use in geothermal exploration is less standard, in part due to cost but also due to the challenges in identifying the highly-permeable zones essential for economic hydrothermal systems [e.g. Louie et al., 2011; Majer, 2003]. Newer technology, such as wireless sensors and low-cost high performance computing, has helped reduce the cost and effort needed to conduct 3D surveys. The second difficulty, identifying permeable zones, has been less tractable so far. Here we report on the use of seismic attributes from a 3D seismic survey to identify and map permeable zones in a hydrothermal area.

  13. Simulation of bootstrap current in 2D and 3D ideal magnetic fields in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, M.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Pedro, M.; Sauter, O.

    2016-09-01

    We aim to simulate the bootstrap current for a MAST-like spherical tokamak using two approaches for magnetic equilibria including externally caused 3D effects such as resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), the effect of toroidal ripple, and intrinsic 3D effects such as non-resonant internal kink modes. The first approach relies on known neoclassical coefficients in ideal MHD equilibria, using the Sauter (Sauter et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2834) expression valid for all collisionalities in axisymmetry, and the second approach being the quasi-analytic Shaing–Callen (Shaing and Callen 1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3315) model in the collisionless regime for 3D. Using the ideal free-boundary magnetohydrodynamic code VMEC, we compute the flux-surface averaged bootstrap current density, with the Sauter and Shaing–Callen expressions for 2D and 3D ideal MHD equilibria including an edge pressure barrier with the application of resonant magnetic perturbations, and equilibria possessing a saturated non-resonant 1/1 internal kink mode with a weak internal pressure barrier. We compare the applicability of the self-consistent iterative model on the 3D applications and discuss the limitations and advantages of each bootstrap current model for each type of equilibrium.

  14. Simulation of bootstrap current in 2D and 3D ideal magnetic fields in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, M.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Pedro, M.; Sauter, O.

    2016-09-01

    We aim to simulate the bootstrap current for a MAST-like spherical tokamak using two approaches for magnetic equilibria including externally caused 3D effects such as resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), the effect of toroidal ripple, and intrinsic 3D effects such as non-resonant internal kink modes. The first approach relies on known neoclassical coefficients in ideal MHD equilibria, using the Sauter (Sauter et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2834) expression valid for all collisionalities in axisymmetry, and the second approach being the quasi-analytic Shaing-Callen (Shaing and Callen 1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3315) model in the collisionless regime for 3D. Using the ideal free-boundary magnetohydrodynamic code VMEC, we compute the flux-surface averaged bootstrap current density, with the Sauter and Shaing-Callen expressions for 2D and 3D ideal MHD equilibria including an edge pressure barrier with the application of resonant magnetic perturbations, and equilibria possessing a saturated non-resonant 1/1 internal kink mode with a weak internal pressure barrier. We compare the applicability of the self-consistent iterative model on the 3D applications and discuss the limitations and advantages of each bootstrap current model for each type of equilibrium.

  15. Bound state solution of Dirac equation for 3D harmonics oscillator plus trigonometric scarf noncentral potential using SUSY QM approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cari, C. Suparmi, A.

    2014-09-30

    Dirac equation of 3D harmonics oscillator plus trigonometric Scarf non-central potential for spin symmetric case is solved using supersymmetric quantum mechanics approach. The Dirac equation for exact spin symmetry reduces to Schrodinger like equation. The relativistic energy and wave function for spin symmetric case are simply obtained using SUSY quantum mechanics method and idea of shape invariance.

  16. Segmentation of Image Data from Complex Organotypic 3D Models of Cancer Tissues with Markov Random Fields

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Sean; Guyon, Laurent; Nevalainen, Jaakko; Toriseva, Mervi

    2015-01-01

    Organotypic, three dimensional (3D) cell culture models of epithelial tumour types such as prostate cancer recapitulate key aspects of the architecture and histology of solid cancers. Morphometric analysis of multicellular 3D organoids is particularly important when additional components such as the extracellular matrix and tumour microenvironment are included in the model. The complexity of such models has so far limited their successful implementation. There is a great need for automatic, accurate and robust image segmentation tools to facilitate the analysis of such biologically relevant 3D cell culture models. We present a segmentation method based on Markov random fields (MRFs) and illustrate our method using 3D stack image data from an organotypic 3D model of prostate cancer cells co-cultured with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). The 3D segmentation output suggests that these cell types are in physical contact with each other within the model, which has important implications for tumour biology. Segmentation performance is quantified using ground truth labels and we show how each step of our method increases segmentation accuracy. We provide the ground truth labels along with the image data and code. Using independent image data we show that our segmentation method is also more generally applicable to other types of cellular microscopy and not only limited to fluorescence microscopy. PMID:26630674

  17. Segmentation of Image Data from Complex Organotypic 3D Models of Cancer Tissues with Markov Random Fields.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sean; Guyon, Laurent; Nevalainen, Jaakko; Toriseva, Mervi; Åkerfelt, Malin; Nees, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Organotypic, three dimensional (3D) cell culture models of epithelial tumour types such as prostate cancer recapitulate key aspects of the architecture and histology of solid cancers. Morphometric analysis of multicellular 3D organoids is particularly important when additional components such as the extracellular matrix and tumour microenvironment are included in the model. The complexity of such models has so far limited their successful implementation. There is a great need for automatic, accurate and robust image segmentation tools to facilitate the analysis of such biologically relevant 3D cell culture models. We present a segmentation method based on Markov random fields (MRFs) and illustrate our method using 3D stack image data from an organotypic 3D model of prostate cancer cells co-cultured with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). The 3D segmentation output suggests that these cell types are in physical contact with each other within the model, which has important implications for tumour biology. Segmentation performance is quantified using ground truth labels and we show how each step of our method increases segmentation accuracy. We provide the ground truth labels along with the image data and code. Using independent image data we show that our segmentation method is also more generally applicable to other types of cellular microscopy and not only limited to fluorescence microscopy.

  18. 3D bioprinting of neural stem cell-laden thermoresponsive biodegradable polyurethane hydrogel and potential in central nervous system repair.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Fu-Yu; Lin, Hsin-Hua; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2015-12-01

    The 3D bioprinting technology serves as a powerful tool for building tissue in the field of tissue engineering. Traditional 3D printing methods involve the use of heat, toxic organic solvents, or toxic photoinitiators for fabrication of synthetic scaffolds. In this study, two thermoresponsive water-based biodegradable polyurethane dispersions (PU1 and PU2) were synthesized which may form gel near 37 °C without any crosslinker. The stiffness of the hydrogel could be easily fine-tuned by the solid content of the dispersion. Neural stem cells (NSCs) were embedded into the polyurethane dispersions before gelation. The dispersions containing NSCs were subsequently printed and maintained at 37 °C. The NSCs in 25-30% PU2 hydrogels (∼680-2400 Pa) had excellent proliferation and differentiation but not in 25-30% PU1 hydrogels. Moreover, NSC-laden 25-30% PU2 hydrogels injected into the zebrafish embryo neural injury model could rescue the function of impaired nervous system. However, NSC-laden 25-30% PU1 hydrogels only showed a minor repair effect in the zebrafish model. In addition, the function of adult zebrafish with traumatic brain injury was rescued after implantation of the 3D-printed NSC-laden 25% PU2 constructs. Therefore, the newly developed 3D bioprinting technique involving NSCs embedded in the thermoresponsive biodegradable polyurethane ink offers new possibilities for future applications of 3D bioprinting in neural tissue engineering.

  19. Extension of the Optimized Virtual Fields Method to estimate viscoelastic material parameters from 3D dynamic displacement fields

    PubMed Central

    Connesson, N.; Clayton, E.H.; Bayly, P.V.; Pierron, F.

    2015-01-01

    In-vivo measurement of the mechanical properties of soft tissues is essential to provide necessary data in biomechanics and medicine (early cancer diagnosis, study of traumatic brain injuries, etc.). Imaging techniques such as Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) can provide 3D displacement maps in the bulk and in vivo, from which, using inverse methods, it is then possible to identify some mechanical parameters of the tissues (stiffness, damping etc.). The main difficulties in these inverse identification procedures consist in dealing with the pressure waves contained in the data and with the experimental noise perturbing the spatial derivatives required during the processing. The Optimized Virtual Fields Method (OVFM) [1], designed to be robust to noise, present natural and rigorous solution to deal with these problems. The OVFM has been adapted to identify material parameter maps from Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) data consisting of 3-dimensional displacement fields in harmonically loaded soft materials. In this work, the method has been developed to identify elastic and viscoelastic models. The OVFM sensitivity to spatial resolution and to noise has been studied by analyzing 3D analytically simulated displacement data. This study evaluates and describes the OVFM identification performances: different biases on the identified parameters are induced by the spatial resolution and experimental noise. The well-known identification problems in the case of quasi-incompressible materials also find a natural solution in the OVFM. Moreover, an a posteriori criterion to estimate the local identification quality is proposed. The identification results obtained on actual experiments are briefly presented. PMID:26146416

  20. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  1. Extended field-of-view and increased-signal 3D holographic illumination with time-division multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Samuel J; Allen, William E; Kauvar, Isaac; Andalman, Aaron S; Young, Noah P; Kim, Christina K; Marshel, James H; Wetzstein, Gordon; Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-12-14

    Phase spatial light modulators (SLMs) are widely used for generating multifocal three-dimensional (3D) illumination patterns, but these are limited to a field of view constrained by the pixel count or size of the SLM. Further, with two-photon SLM-based excitation, increasing the number of focal spots penalizes the total signal linearly--requiring more laser power than is available or can be tolerated by the sample. Here we analyze and demonstrate a method of using galvanometer mirrors to time-sequentially reposition multiple 3D holograms, both extending the field of view and increasing the total time-averaged two-photon signal. We apply our approach to 3D two-photon in vivo neuronal calcium imaging.

  2. Extended field-of-view and increased-signal 3D holographic illumination with time-division multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Samuel J; Allen, William E; Kauvar, Isaac; Andalman, Aaron S; Young, Noah P; Kim, Christina K; Marshel, James H; Wetzstein, Gordon; Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-12-14

    Phase spatial light modulators (SLMs) are widely used for generating multifocal three-dimensional (3D) illumination patterns, but these are limited to a field of view constrained by the pixel count or size of the SLM. Further, with two-photon SLM-based excitation, increasing the number of focal spots penalizes the total signal linearly--requiring more laser power than is available or can be tolerated by the sample. Here we analyze and demonstrate a method of using galvanometer mirrors to time-sequentially reposition multiple 3D holograms, both extending the field of view and increasing the total time-averaged two-photon signal. We apply our approach to 3D two-photon in vivo neuronal calcium imaging. PMID:26699047

  3. Extended field-of-view and increased-signal 3D holographic illumination with time-division multiplexing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Samuel J.; Allen, William E.; Kauvar, Isaac; Andalman, Aaron S.; Young, Noah P.; Kim, Christina K.; Marshel, James H.; Wetzstein, Gordon; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Phase spatial light modulators (SLMs) are widely used for generating multifocal three-dimensional (3D) illumination patterns, but these are limited to a field of view constrained by the pixel count or size of the SLM. Further, with two-photon SLM-based excitation, increasing the number of focal spots penalizes the total signal linearly—requiring more laser power than is available or can be tolerated by the sample. Here we analyze and demonstrate a method of using galvanometer mirrors to time-sequentially reposition multiple 3D holograms, both extending the field of view and increasing the total time-averaged two-photon signal. We apply our approach to 3D two-photon in vivo neuronal calcium imaging. PMID:26699047

  4. 3-D Modelling of Stretched Solitary Waves along Magnetic Field Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschietti, L.; Roth, I.; Carlson, C. W.; Berthomier, M.

    2001-12-01

    A model is presented for a new type of fast solitary waves which is observed by FAST in downward current regions of the auroral zone. The three-dimensional, coherent structures are electrostatic, have a positive potential, and move along the ambient magnetic field lines with speeds on the order of the electron drift. Their potential profile in the parallel direction, which can be directly measured, is flat-top whereby it cannot fit to the Gaussian shape used in previous work. Their potential profile in the perpendicular direction can only be inferred from a measured unipolar electric signal. We develop an extended BGK model which includes a flattened potential and an assumed cylindrical symmetry around a centric magnetic field line. The model envisions concentric shells of trapped electrons slowly drifting azimuthally while bouncing back and forth in the parallel direction. The electron dynamics is analysed in terms of three basic motions that occur on different time scales. These are defined by the cyclotron frequency Ω e, the bounce frequency ω b, and the azimuthal drift frequency ω γ , for which explicit analytical expressions are obtained. Subject to the ordering ω γ <<ωb<< Ωe, we calculate self-consistent distribution functions in terms of approximate constants of motion. Constraints on the parameters characterizing the amplitude and shape of the stretched solitary wave are discussed.

  5. A hybrid experimental-numerical technique for determining 3D velocity fields from planar 2D PIV data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, A.; Sigurdson, M.; Mezić, I.; Meinhart, C. D.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of 3D, three component velocity fields is central to the understanding and development of effective microfluidic devices for lab-on-chip mixing applications. In this paper we present a hybrid experimental-numerical method for the generation of 3D flow information from 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental data and finite element simulations of an alternating current electrothermal (ACET) micromixer. A numerical least-squares optimization algorithm is applied to a theory-based 3D multiphysics simulation in conjunction with 2D PIV data to generate an improved estimation of the steady state velocity field. This 3D velocity field can be used to assess mixing phenomena more accurately than would be possible through simulation alone. Our technique can also be used to estimate uncertain quantities in experimental situations by fitting the gathered field data to a simulated physical model. The optimization algorithm reduced the root-mean-squared difference between the experimental and simulated velocity fields in the target region by more than a factor of 4, resulting in an average error less than 12% of the average velocity magnitude.

  6. Small-Field Measurements of 3D Polymer Gel Dosimeters through Optical Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Cheng-Ting; Lee, Yao-Ting; Wu, Shin-Hua; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    With advances in therapeutic instruments and techniques, three-dimensional dose delivery has been widely used in radiotherapy. The verification of dose distribution in a small field becomes critical because of the obvious dose gradient within the field. The study investigates the dose distributions of various field sizes by using NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter. The dosimeter consists of 5% gelatin, 5% monomers, 3% cross linkers, and 5 mM THPC. After irradiation, a 24 to 96 hour delay was applied, and the gel dosimeters were read by a cone beam optical computed tomography (optical CT) scanner. The dose distributions measured by the NIPAM gel dosimeter were compared to the outputs of the treatment planning system using gamma evaluation. For the criteria of 3%/3 mm, the pass rates for 5 × 5, 3 × 3, 2 × 2, 1 × 1, and 0.5 × 0.5 cm2 were as high as 91.7%, 90.7%, 88.2%, 74.8%, and 37.3%, respectively. For the criteria of 5%/5 mm, the gamma pass rates of the 5 × 5, 3 × 3, and 2 × 2 cm2 fields were over 99%. The NIPAM gel dosimeter provides high chemical stability. With cone-beam optical CT readouts, the NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter has potential for clinical dose verification of small-field irradiation. PMID:26974434

  7. Small-Field Measurements of 3D Polymer Gel Dosimeters through Optical Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Shih, Tian-Yu; Wu, Jay; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Lee, Yao-Ting; Wu, Shin-Hua; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    With advances in therapeutic instruments and techniques, three-dimensional dose delivery has been widely used in radiotherapy. The verification of dose distribution in a small field becomes critical because of the obvious dose gradient within the field. The study investigates the dose distributions of various field sizes by using NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter. The dosimeter consists of 5% gelatin, 5% monomers, 3% cross linkers, and 5 mM THPC. After irradiation, a 24 to 96 hour delay was applied, and the gel dosimeters were read by a cone beam optical computed tomography (optical CT) scanner. The dose distributions measured by the NIPAM gel dosimeter were compared to the outputs of the treatment planning system using gamma evaluation. For the criteria of 3%/3 mm, the pass rates for 5 × 5, 3 × 3, 2 × 2, 1 × 1, and 0.5 × 0.5 cm2 were as high as 91.7%, 90.7%, 88.2%, 74.8%, and 37.3%, respectively. For the criteria of 5%/5 mm, the gamma pass rates of the 5 × 5, 3 × 3, and 2 × 2 cm2 fields were over 99%. The NIPAM gel dosimeter provides high chemical stability. With cone-beam optical CT readouts, the NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter has potential for clinical dose verification of small-field irradiation. PMID:26974434

  8. Small-Field Measurements of 3D Polymer Gel Dosimeters through Optical Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Shih, Tian-Yu; Wu, Jay; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Lee, Yao-Ting; Wu, Shin-Hua; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    With advances in therapeutic instruments and techniques, three-dimensional dose delivery has been widely used in radiotherapy. The verification of dose distribution in a small field becomes critical because of the obvious dose gradient within the field. The study investigates the dose distributions of various field sizes by using NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter. The dosimeter consists of 5% gelatin, 5% monomers, 3% cross linkers, and 5 mM THPC. After irradiation, a 24 to 96 hour delay was applied, and the gel dosimeters were read by a cone beam optical computed tomography (optical CT) scanner. The dose distributions measured by the NIPAM gel dosimeter were compared to the outputs of the treatment planning system using gamma evaluation. For the criteria of 3%/3 mm, the pass rates for 5 × 5, 3 × 3, 2 × 2, 1 × 1, and 0.5 × 0.5 cm2 were as high as 91.7%, 90.7%, 88.2%, 74.8%, and 37.3%, respectively. For the criteria of 5%/5 mm, the gamma pass rates of the 5 × 5, 3 × 3, and 2 × 2 cm2 fields were over 99%. The NIPAM gel dosimeter provides high chemical stability. With cone-beam optical CT readouts, the NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter has potential for clinical dose verification of small-field irradiation.

  9. Online Stereo 3D Simulation in Studying the Spherical Pendulum in Conservative Force Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabunov, Svetoslav S.

    2013-01-01

    The current paper aims at presenting a modern e-learning method and tool that is utilized in teaching physics in the universities. An online stereo 3D simulation is used for e-learning mechanics and specifically the teaching of spherical pendulum as part of the General Physics course for students in the universities. This approach was realized on…

  10. OpenMP for 3D potential boundary value problems solved by PIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KuŻelewski, Andrzej; Zieniuk, Eugeniusz

    2016-06-01

    The main purpose of this paper is examination of an application of modern parallel computing technique OpenMP to speed up the calculation in the numerical solution of parametric integral equations systems (PIES). The authors noticed, that solving more complex boundary problems by PIES sometimes requires large computing time. This paper presents the use of OpenMP and fast C++ linear algebra library Armadillo for boundary value problems modelled by 3D Laplace's equation and solved using PIES. The testing example shows that the use of mentioned technologies significantly increases speed of calculations in PIES.

  11. Polymorphism, crystal nucleation and growth in the phase-field crystal model in 2D and 3D.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gyula I; Tegze, György; Pusztai, Tamás; Tóth, Gergely; Gránásy, László

    2010-09-15

    We apply a simple dynamical density functional theory, the phase-field crystal (PFC) model of overdamped conservative dynamics, to address polymorphism, crystal nucleation, and crystal growth in the diffusion-controlled limit. We refine the phase diagram for 3D, and determine the line free energy in 2D and the height of the nucleation barrier in 2D and 3D for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation by solving the respective Euler-Lagrange (EL) equations. We demonstrate that, in the PFC model, the body-centered cubic (bcc), the face-centered cubic (fcc), and the hexagonal close-packed structures (hcp) compete, while the simple cubic structure is unstable, and that phase preference can be tuned by changing the model parameters: close to the critical point the bcc structure is stable, while far from the critical point the fcc prevails, with an hcp stability domain in between. We note that with increasing distance from the critical point the equilibrium shapes vary from the sphere to specific faceted shapes: rhombic dodecahedron (bcc), truncated octahedron (fcc), and hexagonal prism (hcp). Solving the equation of motion of the PFC model supplied with conserved noise, solidification starts with the nucleation of an amorphous precursor phase, into which the stable crystalline phase nucleates. The growth rate is found to be time dependent and anisotropic; this anisotropy depends on the driving force. We show that due to the diffusion-controlled growth mechanism, which is especially relevant for crystal aggregation in colloidal systems, dendritic growth structures evolve in large-scale isothermal single-component PFC simulations. An oscillatory effective pair potential resembling those for model glass formers has been evaluated from structural data of the amorphous phase obtained by instantaneous quenching. Finally, we present results for eutectic solidification in a binary PFC model. PMID:21386517

  12. Properties of the prominence magnetic field and plasma distributions as obtained from 3D whole-prominence fine structure modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, S.; Mackay, D. H.

    2016-07-01

    Aims: We analyze distributions of the magnetic field strength and prominence plasma (temperature, pressure, plasma β, and mass) using the 3D whole-prominence fine structure model. Methods: The model combines a 3D magnetic field configuration of an entire prominence, obtained from non-linear force-free field simulations, with a detailed semi-empirically derived description of the prominence plasma. The plasma is located in magnetic dips in hydrostatic equilibrium and is distributed along multiple fine structures within the 3D magnetic model. Results: We show that in the modeled prominence, the variations of the magnetic field strength and its orientation are insignificant on scales comparable to the smallest dimensions of the observed prominence fine structures. We also show the ability of the 3D whole-prominence fine structure model to reveal the distribution of the prominence plasma with respect to its temperature within the prominence volume. This provides new insights into the composition of the prominence-corona transition region. We further demonstrate that the values of the plasma β are small throughout the majority of the modeled prominences when realistic photospheric magnetic flux distributions and prominence plasma parameters are assumed. While this is generally true, we also find that in the region with the deepest magnetic dips, the plasma β may increase towards unity. Finally, we show that the mass of the modeled prominence plasma is in good agreement with the mass of observed non-eruptive prominences.

  13. How Students and Field Geologists Reason in Integrating Spatial Observations from Outcrops to Visualize a 3-D Geological Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastens, Kim A.; Agrawal, Shruti; Liben, Lynn S.

    2009-01-01

    Geologists and undergraduate students observed eight artificial "rock outcrops" in a realistically scaled field area, and then tried to envision a geological structure that might plausibly be formed by the layered rocks in the set of outcrops. Students were videotaped as they selected which of fourteen 3-D models they thought best represented the…

  14. Detection of ancient morphology and potential hydrocarbon traps using 3-D seismic data and attribute analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Heggland, R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the use of seismic attributes on 3D data to reveal Tertiary and Cretaceous geological features in Norwegian block 9/2. Some of the features would hardly be possible to map using only 2D seismic data. The method which involves a precise interpretation of horizons, attribute analysis and manipulation of colour displays, may be useful when studying morphology, faults and hydrocarbon traps. The interval of interest in this study was from 0 to 1.5 s TWT. Horizontal displays (timeslices and attribute maps), seemed to highlight very nicely geological features such as shallow channels, fractures, karst topography and faults. The attributes used for mapping these features were amplitude, total reflection energy (a volume or time interval attribute), dip and azimuth. The choice of colour scale and manipulation of colour displays were also critical for the results. The data examples clearly demonstrate how it is possible to achieve a very detailed mapping of geological features using 3D seismic data and attribute analysis. The results of this study were useful for the understanding of hydrocarbon migration paths and hydrocarbon traps.

  15. Toward real-time endoscopically-guided robotic navigation based on a 3D virtual surgical field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Hu, Danying; Hannaford, Blake; Seibel, Eric J.

    2015-03-01

    The challenge is to accurately guide the surgical tool within the three-dimensional (3D) surgical field for roboticallyassisted operations such as tumor margin removal from a debulked brain tumor cavity. The proposed technique is 3D image-guided surgical navigation based on matching intraoperative video frames to a 3D virtual model of the surgical field. A small laser-scanning endoscopic camera was attached to a mock minimally-invasive surgical tool that was manipulated toward a region of interest (residual tumor) within a phantom of a debulked brain tumor. Video frames from the endoscope provided features that were matched to the 3D virtual model, which were reconstructed earlier by raster scanning over the surgical field. Camera pose (position and orientation) is recovered by implementing a constrained bundle adjustment algorithm. Navigational error during the approach to fluorescence target (residual tumor) is determined by comparing the calculated camera pose to the measured camera pose using a micro-positioning stage. From these preliminary results, computation efficiency of the algorithm in MATLAB code is near real-time (2.5 sec for each estimation of pose), which can be improved by implementation in C++. Error analysis produced 3-mm distance error and 2.5 degree of orientation error on average. The sources of these errors come from 1) inaccuracy of the 3D virtual model, generated on a calibrated RAVEN robotic platform with stereo tracking; 2) inaccuracy of endoscope intrinsic parameters, such as focal length; and 3) any endoscopic image distortion from scanning irregularities. This work demonstrates feasibility of micro-camera 3D guidance of a robotic surgical tool.

  16. Assessment of entrainment and deposition for a potential landslide in Lushan area, central Taiwan by 3D discrete element simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Tang, C.; Hu, J.; Chan, Y.; Chi, C.

    2011-12-01

    The subtropical climate and annual average about four typhoons, combined with frequent earthquakes trigger the landslide hazards in mountainous area in Taiwan. The potential Lushan landslide area is located at a famous hotspring district of Nantou County in central Taiwan which slides frequently due to heavy rainfall during pouring rain or typhoon seasons. Lushan landslide demonstrates a typical deep-seated (up to 80 meters) creep deformation of a slate rock slope with high dip angles. Under the weathering effects, the slide surface is currently extending to the lower slope was formed by the coalescing of the joints on the upper eastern slope as well as the interface between the sandy slate and the slate on the upper western slope. In this study, we simulate the process of Lushan landslide by using PFC3D, which is conducted by adopting the 3D granular discrete element method. In this simulation, we assume the whole sliding block as an inhomogeneous layer of weaken slate. We extrapolate the slip plane depth according to the result of borehole, TDR and RIF profiles. The main landslide area is about 18 hectares and the volume is about 9 million cubic meters, which is filled with 30 thousand ball elements. The topography is represented by 25,620 wall elements based on the 5m digital elevation model. We set 9 monitoring balls on surface to monitor the velocity and run-out path. According to the field work, we defined the weak planes by the strike and dip of cleavage and joint. From our results, the run-out zone is about 40 hectares. The debris will cover whole Lushan hotspring district in 20 seconds and all rock mass will almost stop after 150 seconds. The predicted maximum velocity is about 40m/s. According to the velocity profile, we can see three and four times accelerations from monitored particles. The collision of particles during sliding and complex terrain explains the fluctuation of velocity profile with time. The numerical results of this study will provide

  17. Phase-Accuracy Comparisons and Improved Far-Field Estimates for 3-D Edge Elements on Tetrahedral Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monk, Peter; Parrott, Kevin

    2001-07-01

    Edge-element methods have proved very effective for 3-D electromagnetic computations and are widely used on unstructured meshes. However, the accuracy of standard edge elements can be criticised because of their low order. This paper analyses discrete dispersion relations together with numerical propagation accuracy to determine the effect of tetrahedral shape on the phase accuracy of standard 3-D edge-element approximations in comparison to other methods. Scattering computations for the sphere obtained with edge elements are compared with results obtained with vertex elements, and a new formulation of the far-field integral approximations for use with edge elements is shown to give improved cross sections over conventional formulations.

  18. 3D surface roughness recreation and data processing of granitic rocks and claystones, potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buocz, Ildikó; Török, Ákos; Rozgonyi-Boissinot, Nikoletta

    2015-04-01

    The determination and modelling of the stability of rock slopes, tunnels, or underground spaces, i.e. radioactive waste disposal facilities, is an important task in engineering. The appropriate estimation of the mechanical parameters for a realistic description of the behaviour of rocks results in higher safety and more economic design. The failure of stability is primarily due to the shear failure of the rock masses along fractures and joints: therefore the correct determination of the shear strength is crucial. One of the most important parameters influencing the shear strength along rock joints is their surface roughness. Although the quantification of surface roughness has been an open question during the past century, several attempts have been made, starting with 2D and continuing with 3D measurements, to provide engineers with a method for determining shear strength numerically. As technology evolved, the 3D methods became more popular and several scientists started to investigate the surface properties through laser scanning and different photogrammetrical methods. This paper shows a photogrammetric method for the 3D digital recreation of joint surfaces of granitic rock and claystone, both potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal. The rocks derived from Bátaapáti (South Hungary) and Mont Terri (North Switzerland) respectively. The samples are laboratory scaled specimens with an areal size of 50x50 mm. The software used is called ShapeMetrix3D, developed by 3GSM GmbH in Austria. The major steps of the creation of the 3D picture are presented, as well as the following data processing which leads to the quantification of the 3D surface roughness.

  19. Localization and visualization of excess chemical potential in statistical mechanical integral equation theory 3D-HNC-RISM.

    PubMed

    Du, Qi-Shi; Liu, Peng-Jun; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2008-02-01

    In this study the excess chemical potential of the integral equation theory, 3D-RISM-HNC [Q. Du, Q. Wei, J. Phys. Chem. B 107 (2003) 13463-13470], is visualized in three-dimensional form and localized at interaction sites of solute molecule. Taking the advantage of reference interaction site model (RISM), the calculation equations of chemical excess potential are reformulized according to the solute interaction sites s in molecular space. Consequently the solvation free energy is localized at every interaction site of solute molecule. For visualization of the 3D-RISM-HNC calculation results, the excess chemical potentials are described using radial and three-dimensional diagrams. It is found that the radial diagrams of the excess chemical potentials are more sensitive to the bridge functions than the radial diagrams of solvent site density distributions. The diagrams of average excess chemical potential provide useful information of solute-solvent electrostatic and van der Waals interactions. The local description of solvation free energy at active sites of solute in 3D-RISM-HNC may broaden the application scope of statistical mechanical integral equation theory in solution chemistry and life science.

  20. Wide-field hyperspectral 3D imaging of functionalized gold nanoparticles targeting cancer cells by reflected light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Patskovsky, Sergiy; Bergeron, Eric; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2015-05-01

    We present a new hyperspectral reflected light microscopy system with a scanned broadband supercontinuum light source. This wide-field and low phototoxic hyperspectral imaging system has been successful for performing spectral three-dimensional (3D) localization and spectroscopic identification of CD44-targeted PEGylated AuNPs in fixed cell preparations. Such spatial and spectral information is essential for the improvement of nanoplasmonic-based imaging, disease detection and treatment in complex biological environment. The presented system can be used for real-time 3D NP tracking as spectral sensors, thus providing new avenues in the spatio-temporal characterization and detection of bioanalytes. 3D image of the distribution of functionalized AuNPs attached to CD44-expressing MDA-MB-231 human cancer cells. PMID:24961507

  1. Optical low-cost and portable arrangement for full field 3D displacement measurement using a single camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Alba, E.; Felipe-Sesé, L.; Schmeer, S.; Díaz, F. A.

    2016-11-01

    In the current paper, an optical low-cost system for 3D displacement measurement based on a single camera and 3D digital image correlation is presented. The conventional 3D-DIC set-up based on a two-synchronized-cameras system is compared with a proposed pseudo-stereo portable system that employs a mirror system integrated in a device for a straightforward application achieving a novel handle and flexible device for its use in many scenarios. The proposed optical system splits the image by the camera into two stereo images of the object. In order to validate this new approach and quantify its uncertainty compared to traditional 3D-DIC systems, solid rigid in and out-of-plane displacements experiments have been performed and analyzed. The differences between both systems have been studied employing an image decomposition technique which performs a full image comparison. Therefore, results of all field of view are compared with those using a stereoscopy system and 3D-DIC, discussing the accurate results obtained with the proposed device not having influence any distortion or aberration produced by the mirrors. Finally, the adaptability of the proposed system and its accuracy has been tested performing quasi-static and dynamic experiments using a silicon specimen under high deformation. Results have been compared and validated with those obtained from a conventional stereoscopy system showing an excellent level of agreement.

  2. Magnetic field induced controllable self-assembly of maghemite nanocrystals: From 3D arrays to 1D nanochains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yan; Chen, Qianwang; Chen, Rongsheng

    2015-08-01

    A hydrothermal process has been used to synthesize walnut-like maghemite superstructures which can be further self-assembled in a controllable manner into ordered three-dimensional (3D) architectures and one-dimensional (1D) nanochains in the presence of different external magnetic field. The assembly behavior of the maghemite nanoparticles isclosely related to the van der Waals interactions and external-field-induced magnetic dipole interactions. The magnetic properties of these nanostructures are also investigated.

  3. Potential hazards of viewing 3-D stereoscopic television, cinema and computer games: a review.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Peter A

    2011-03-01

    The visual stimulus provided by a 3-D stereoscopic display differs from that of the real world because the image provided to each eye is produced on a flat surface. The distance from the screen to the eye remains fixed, providing a single focal distance, but the introduction of disparity between the images allows objects to be located geometrically in front of, or behind, the screen. Unlike in the real world, the stimulus to accommodation and the stimulus to convergence do not match. Although this mismatch is used positively in some forms of Orthoptic treatment, a number of authors have suggested that it could negatively lead to the development of asthenopic symptoms. From knowledge of the zone of clear, comfortable, single binocular vision one can predict that, for people with normal binocular vision, adverse symptoms will not be present if the discrepancy is small, but are likely if it is large, and that what constitutes 'large' and 'small' are idiosyncratic to the individual. The accommodation-convergence mismatch is not, however, the only difference between the natural and the artificial stimuli. In the former case, an object located in front of, or behind, a fixated object will not only be perceived as double if the images fall outside Panum's fusional areas, but it will also be defocused and blurred. In the latter case, however, it is usual for the producers of cinema, TV or computer game content to provide an image that is in focus over the whole of the display, and as a consequence diplopic images will be sharply in focus. The size of Panum's fusional area is spatial frequency-dependent, and because of this the high spatial frequencies present in the diplopic 3-D image will provide a different stimulus to the fusion system from that found naturally.

  4. Transient Hydraulic Tomography in the Field: 3-D K Estimation and Validation in a Highly Heterogeneous Unconfined Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochstetler, D. L.; Barrash, W.; Kitanidis, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Characterizing subsurface hydraulic properties is essential for predicting flow and transport, and thus, for making informed decisions, such as selection and execution of a groundwater remediation strategy; however, obtaining accurate estimates at the necessary resolution with quantified uncertainty is an ongoing challenge. For over a decade, the development of hydraulic tomography (HT) - i.e., conducting a series of discrete interval hydraulic tests, observing distributed pressure signals, and analyzing the data through inversion of all tests together - has shown promise as a subsurface imaging method. Numerical and laboratory 3-D HT studies have enhanced and validated such methodologies, but there have been far fewer 3-D field characterization studies. We use 3-D transient hydraulic tomography (3-D THT) to characterize a highly heterogeneous unconfined alluvial aquifer at an active industrial site near Assemini, Italy. With 26 pumping tests conducted from 13 isolated vertical locations, and pressure responses measured at 63 spatial locations through five clusters of continuous multichannel tubing, we recorded over 800 drawdown curves during the field testing. Selected measurements from each curve were inverted in order to obtain an estimate of the distributed hydraulic conductivity field K(x) as well as uniform ("effective") values of specific storage Ss and specific yield Sy. The estimated K values varied across seven orders of magnitude, suggesting that this is one of the most heterogeneous sites at which HT has ever been conducted. Furthermore, these results are validated using drawdown observations from seven independent tests with pumping performed at multiple locations other than the main pumping well. The validation results are encouraging, especially given the uncertain nature of the problem. Overall, this research demonstrates the ability of 3-D THT to provide high-resolution of structure and local K at a non-research site at the scale of a contaminant

  5. Next-generation seismic experiments - II: wide-angle, multi-azimuth, 3-D, full-waveform inversion of sparse field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Joanna; Warner, Michael; Arnoux, Gillean; Hooft, Emilie; Toomey, Douglas; VanderBeek, Brandon; Wilcock, William

    2016-02-01

    3-D full-waveform inversion (FWI) is an advanced seismic imaging technique that has been widely adopted by the oil and gas industry to obtain high-fidelity models of P-wave velocity that lead to improvements in migrated images of the reservoir. Most industrial applications of 3-D FWI model the acoustic wavefield, often account for the kinematic effect of anisotropy, and focus on matching the low-frequency component of the early arriving refractions that are most sensitive to P-wave velocity structure. Here, we have adopted the same approach in an application of 3-D acoustic, anisotropic FWI to an ocean-bottom-seismometer (OBS) field data set acquired across the Endeavour oceanic spreading centre in the northeastern Pacific. Starting models for P-wave velocity and anisotropy were obtained from traveltime tomography; during FWI, velocity is updated whereas anisotropy is kept fixed. We demonstrate that, for the Endeavour field data set, 3-D FWI is able to recover fine-scale velocity structure with a resolution that is 2-4 times better than conventional traveltime tomography. Quality assurance procedures have been employed to monitor each step of the workflow; these are time consuming but critical to the development of a successful inversion strategy. Finally, a suite of checkerboard tests has been performed which shows that the full potential resolution of FWI can be obtained if we acquire a 3-D survey with a slightly denser shot and receiver spacing than is usual for an academic experiment. We anticipate that this exciting development will encourage future seismic investigations of earth science targets that would benefit from the superior resolution offered by 3-D FWI.

  6. The GaOH-HGaO potential energy hypersurface and the necessity of correlating the 3d electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Claude A., Jr.; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Kim, Seung-Joon; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    1996-06-01

    The ground state potential energy hypersurface of the GaOH-HGaO system has been investigated using high level ab initio molecular electronic structure theory. The geometries and physical properties of two equilibrium structures, one isomerization transition state and one inversion transition state were determined at the self-consistent field (SCF), configuration interaction with single and double excitations (CISD), coupled cluster with single and double excitations (CCSD), and CCSD with perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] levels of theory with four sets of basis functions. It has been found that freezing the 3d electrons of the Ga atom in the correlation procedures is not appropriate for this system. For the energy difference ΔE (GaOH-HGaO) the freezing of the 3d electrons results in an error of 25 kcal/mol! The dipole moments, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and infrared (IR) intensities are predicted for the four stationary points. At the highest level of theory employed in this study, CCSD(T) using triple zeta plus double polarization with higher angular momentum and diffuse functions [TZ2P(f,d)+diff] basis set, the bent GaOH was found to be 41.9 kcal/mol more stable than the linear HGaO species; with the zero-point vibrational energy (ZPVE) correction, the energy separation becomes 40.4 kcal/mol. The classical barrier height for the exothermic isomerization (1,2 hydrogen shift) reaction HGaO→GaOH is determined to be 44.5 kcal/mol and the barrier height with the ZPVE correction 42.3 kcal/mol. The classical barrier to linearity for the bent GaOH molecule is determined to be 1.7 kcal/mol and the barrier height with the ZPVE correction to be 1.2 kcal/mol. The predicted dipole moments of GaOH and HGaO are 1.41 and 4.45 Debye, respectively. The effects of electron correlation reduce the dipole moment of HGaO by the sizable amount of 1.2 Debye. The two equilibrium species may be suitable for microwave spectroscopic investigation. Furthermore, they may also

  7. 9C-3D seismic interpretation of the Bakken Formation, Banner Field, North Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comegys, Lillian R.

    The Bakken Petroleum System is a multi-reservoir play with estimated total undiscovered resources of 3.649 BBO oil and 1.85 TCF natural gas in the United States portion of the Williston Basin (Pollastro 2008). The presence of natural fractures in all three members of the Bakken Formation have been linked to high initial production (IP) and cumulative production from the Antelope Field and better reservoir potential in the Elm Coulee Field and Sanish Fields (Sturm and Gomez 2009; Honsberger 2012; Theloy 2011). Therefore, the ability of seismic data to determine the presence, orientation, and density of natural fractures is an important achievement for petroleum exploration and exploitation. The STAMPEDE 9-component seismic survey is located in Mountrail County, North Dakota, in the Banner Field, southeast of the Parshall and Sanish Fields. It is the goal of the Reservoir Characterization Project to analyze the structural influences on reservoir properties in the STAMPEDE survey area using the compressional and pure shear seismic volumes supplemented by the public well information available on the North Dakota Industrial Commission website. Fracturing induced by basement faulting and lithology changes is detectable using multicomponent seismic data in the Stampede seismic survey. Shear wave splitting analysis delineates zones of different fracture orientation and density. These areas correlate to interpreted fault intersections and the predicted area of increased fracture frequency based on facies changes in the Middle Bakken Member and its mechanical stratigraphy. Wrench fault mechanics are at work in the study area, creating isolated convergent and divergent stress regimes in the separate fault blocks. Main fault interpretations are based on shear wave isochron mapping, wireline log mapping, seismic panel observations. Fracture interpretations were made on the analysis of shear time and amplitude anisotropy maps and the correlation of a P-wave Velocity Variation

  8. Fully automated measurement of field-dependent AMS using MFK1-FA Kappabridge equipped with 3D rotator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadima, Martin; Studynka, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Low-field magnetic susceptibility of paramagnetic and diamagnetic minerals is field-independent by definition being also field-independent in pure magnetite. On the other hand, in pyrrhotite, hematite and high-Ti titanomagnetite it may be clearly field-dependent. Consequently, the field-dependent AMS enables the magnetic fabric of the latter group of minerals to be separated from the whole-rock AMS. The methods for the determination of the field-dependent AMS consist of separate measurements of each specimen in several fields within the Rayleigh Law range and subsequent processing in which the field-independent and field-dependent AMS components are calculated. The disadvantage of this technique is that each specimen must be measured several times, which is relatively laborious and time consuming. Recently, a new 3D rotator was developed for the MFK1-FA Kappabridge, which rotates the specimen simultaneously about two axes with different velocities. The measurement is fully automated in such a way that, once the specimen is inserted into the rotator, it requires no additional manipulation to measure the full AMS tensor. Consequently, the 3D rotator enables to measure the AMS tensors in the pre-set field intensities without any operator interference. Whole procedure is controlled by newly developed Safyr5 software; once the measurements are finished, the acquired data are immediately processed and can be visualized in a standard way.

  9. Mechanisms of clay smear formation in 3D - a field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettermann, Michael; Tronberens, Sebastian; Urai, Janos; Asmus, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Clay smears in sedimentary basins are important factors defining the sealing properties of faults. However, as clay smears are highly complex 3D structures, processes involved in the formation and deformation of clay smears are not well identified and understood. To enhance the prediction of sealing properties of clay smears extensive studies of these structures are necessary including the 3D information. We present extraordinary outcrop data from an open cast lignite mine (Hambach) in the Lower Rhine Embayment, Germany. The faults formed at a depth of 150 m, and have Shale Gouge Ratios between 0.1 and 0.3. Material in the fault zones is layered, with sheared sand, sheared clay and tectonically mixed sand-clay gouge. We studied the 3D thickness distribution of clay smear from a series of thin-spaced incremental cross-sections and several cross-sections in larger distances along the fault. Additionally, we excavated two large clay smear surfaces. Our observations show that clay smears are strongly affected by R- and R'-shears, mostly at the footwall side of our outcrops. These shears can locally cross and offset clay smears, forming holes. Thinnest parts of the clay smears are often located close to source layer cutoffs. Investigating the 3D thickness of the clay smears shows a heterogeneous distribution, rather than a continuous thinning of the smear with increasing distance to the source layers. We found two types of layered clay smears: one with continuous sheared sand between two clay smears providing vertical pathways for fluid flow, and one which consists of overlapping clay patches separated by sheared sand that provide a tortuous pathway across the clay smear. On smaller scale we identified grain-scale mixing as an important process for the formation of clay smears. Sand can be entrained into the clay smear by mixing from the surrounding host rock as well as due to intense shearing of sand lenses that were incorporated into the smear. This causes clay smears

  10. Unraveling near-field and far-field relationships for 3D SERS substrates--a combined experimental and theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kurouski, Dmitry; Large, Nicolas; Chiang, Naihao; Greeneltch, Nathan; Carron, Keith T; Seideman, Tamar; Schatz, George C; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2016-03-01

    Simplicity and low cost has positioned inkjet paper- and fabric-based 3D substrates as two of the most commonly used surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) platforms for the detection and the identification of chemical and biological analytes down to the nanogram and femtogram levels. The relationship between far-field and near-field properties of these 3D SERS platforms remains poorly understood and warrants more detailed characterization. Here, we investigate the extremely weak optical scattering observed from commercial and home-fabricated paper-, as well as fabric-based 3D SERS substrates. Using wavelength scanned surface-enhanced Raman excitation spectroscopy (WS-SERES) and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations we were able to determine their near-field SERS properties and correlate them with morphological and far-field properties. It was found that nanoparticle dimers, trimers, and higher order nanoparticle clusters primarily determine the near-field properties of these substrates. At the same time, the far-field response of 3D SERS substrates either originates primarily from the monomers or cannot be clearly defined. Using FDTD we demonstrate that LSPR bands of nanoparticle aggregates near perfectly overlap with the maxima of the near-field surface-enhanced Raman scattering responses of the 3D SERS substrates. This behaviour of far-field spectroscopic properties and near-field surface-enhanced Raman scattering has not been previously observed for 2D SERS substrates, known as nanorod arrays. The combination of these analytical approaches provides a full spectroscopic characterization of 3D SERS substrates, while FDTD simulation can be used to design new 3D SERS substrates with tailored spectral characteristics.

  11. Reinterpretation of nappe structures in the Central Alps Evidence from 3D foliation field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxelon, M.; Mancktelow, N. S.

    2003-04-01

    The Lepontine Alps represent the classic region for both, fold nappe development at mid-crustal levels and fold interference patterns from outcrop to regional scale. They have also been proposed as models for rapid burial and exhumation. However, before such models can be applied or critically assessed, the geometry of the units involved must be accurately known in three dimensions and this is a challenging task in this complex region. The three-dimensional geometry of the Lepontine nappes is not established unequivocally, as the integration and visualisation of structural data reflecting at least five different deformation phases has not yet been achieved satisfactorily. The present study focusses on a combination of new structural mapping in critical and/or contradictory areas, existing observations and their geostatistical assessment with modern computer-based tools (Editeur Géologique, Gocad) in order to develop a testable three-dimensional model of the geometry of the Lepontine Nappes in the Central Alps. Here we present a regional-scale three dimensional model of the southern central part of the Lepontine Region, bordered by the Swiss-Italian frontier in the east and Valle Leventina to the west and by Biasca and Locarno to the north and south. The model visualises a geostatistical calculation of the dominant foliation field in three dimensions, based on field measurements. The present day tectonostratigraphy and nappe geometry are mainly influenced by the three earliest recognisable Alpine deformation phases D_1 to D_3. D_1 structures are associated with first-time crustal nappe emplacement. Lithologies that are interpreted as nappe separators - mainly Mesozoic sediments such as "Bündnerschiefer" - have mostly been interleaved between the nappes during D_1, which entails strong isoclinal folding and pronounced boudinage of the infolded lithologies, with the development of a penetrative foliation S_1. S_1 and the infolded Mesozoic have been intensely

  12. Measurements of stress fields near a grain boundary: Exploring blocked arrays of dislocations in 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Collins, D. M.; Tarleton, E.; Hofmann, F.; Tischler, J.; Liu, W.; Xu, R.; Wilkinson, A. J.; Britton, T. B.

    2015-06-24

    The interaction between dislocation pile-ups and grain boundaries gives rise to heterogeneous stress distributions when a structural metal is subjected to mechanical loading. Such stress heterogeneity leads to preferential sites for damage nucleation and therefore is intrinsically linked to the strength and ductility of polycrystalline metals. To date the majority of conclusions have been drawn from 2D experimental investigations at the sample surface, allowing only incomplete observations. Our purpose here is to significantly advance the understanding of such problems by providing quantitative measurements of the effects of dislocation pile up and grain boundary interactions in 3D. This is accomplished through the application of differential aperture X-ray Laue micro-diffraction (DAXM) and high angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) techniques. Our analysis demonstrates a similar strain characterization capability between DAXM and HR-EBSD and the variation of stress intensity in 3D reveals that different parts of the same grain boundary may have different strengths in resisting slip transfer, likely due to the local grain boundary curvature.

  13. Measurements of stress fields near a grain boundary: Exploring blocked arrays of dislocations in 3D

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Y.; Collins, D. M.; Tarleton, E.; Hofmann, F.; Tischler, J.; Liu, W.; Xu, R.; Wilkinson, A. J.; Britton, T. B.

    2015-06-24

    The interaction between dislocation pile-ups and grain boundaries gives rise to heterogeneous stress distributions when a structural metal is subjected to mechanical loading. Such stress heterogeneity leads to preferential sites for damage nucleation and therefore is intrinsically linked to the strength and ductility of polycrystalline metals. To date the majority of conclusions have been drawn from 2D experimental investigations at the sample surface, allowing only incomplete observations. Our purpose here is to significantly advance the understanding of such problems by providing quantitative measurements of the effects of dislocation pile up and grain boundary interactions in 3D. This is accomplished throughmore » the application of differential aperture X-ray Laue micro-diffraction (DAXM) and high angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) techniques. Our analysis demonstrates a similar strain characterization capability between DAXM and HR-EBSD and the variation of stress intensity in 3D reveals that different parts of the same grain boundary may have different strengths in resisting slip transfer, likely due to the local grain boundary curvature.« less

  14. 3D galaxy clustering with future wide-field surveys: Advantages of a spherical Fourier-Bessel analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Upcoming spectroscopic galaxy surveys are extremely promising to help in addressing the major challenges of cosmology, in particular in understanding the nature of the dark universe. The strength of these surveys, naturally described in spherical geometry, comes from their unprecedented depth and width, but an optimal extraction of their three-dimensional information is of utmost importance to best constrain the properties of the dark universe. Aims: Although there is theoretical motivation and novel tools to explore these surveys using the 3D spherical Fourier-Bessel (SFB) power spectrum of galaxy number counts Cℓ(k,k'), most survey optimisations and forecasts are based on the tomographic spherical harmonics power spectrum C(ij)_ℓ. The goal of this paper is to perform a new investigation of the information that can be extracted from these two analyses in the context of planned stage IV wide-field galaxy surveys. Methods: We compared tomographic and 3D SFB techniques by comparing the forecast cosmological parameter constraints obtained from a Fisher analysis. The comparison was made possible by careful and coherent treatment of non-linear scales in the two analyses, which makes this study the first to compare 3D SFB and tomographic constraints on an equal footing. Nuisance parameters related to a scale- and redshift-dependent galaxy bias were also included in the computation of the 3D SFB and tomographic power spectra for the first time. Results: Tomographic and 3D SFB methods can recover similar constraints in the absence of systematics. This requires choosing an optimal number of redshift bins for the tomographic analysis, which we computed to be N = 26 for zmed ≃ 0.4, N = 30 for zmed ≃ 1.0, and N = 42 for zmed ≃ 1.7. When marginalising over nuisance parameters related to the galaxy bias, the forecast 3D SFB constraints are less affected by this source of systematics than the tomographic constraints. In addition, the rate of increase of the

  15. A versatile and low-cost 3D acquisition and processing pipeline for collecting mass of archaeological findings on the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattet, E.; Devogelaere, J.; Raffin, R.; Bergerot, L.; Daniel, M.; Jockey, Ph.; De Luca, L.

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, advances in the fields of photogrammetry and computer vision have produced several solutions for generating 3D reconstruction starting from simple images. Even if the potentialities of the image-based 3D reconstruction approach are nowadays very well-known in terms of reliability, accuracy and flexibility, there is still a lack of low-cost, open-source and automated solutions for collecting mass of archaeological findings, specially if one consider the real (and non theoretical) contextual aspects of a digitization campaign on the field (number of objects to acquire, available time, lighting conditions, equipment transport, budget, etc...) as well as the accuracy requirements for an in-depth shape analysis and classification purpose. In this paper we present a prototype system (integrating hardware and software) for the 3D acquisition, geometric reconstruction, documentation and archiving of large collections of archaeological findings. All the aspects of our approach are based on high-end image-based modeling techniques and designed basing on an accurate analysis of the typical field conditions of an archaeological campaign, as well as on the specific requirements of archaeological finding documentation and analysis. This paper presents all the aspects integrated into the prototype: - a hardware development of a transportable photobooth for the automated image acquisition consisting of a turntable and three DSLR controlled by a microcontroller; - an automatic image processing pipeline (based on Apero/Micmac) including mask generation, tie-point extraction, bundle adjustment, multi-view stereo correlation, point cloud generation, surface reconstruction; - a versatile (off-line/on-line) portable database for associating descriptive attributes (archaeological description) to the 3D digitizations on site; - a platform for data-gathering, archiving and sharing collections of 3D digitizations on the Web. The presentation and the assessment of this

  16. Tangible 3D printouts of scientific data volumes with FOSS - an emerging field for research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwe, Peter; Klump, Jens; Wickert, Jens; Ludwig, Marcel; Frigeri, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    Humans are very good in using both hands and eyes for tactile pattern recognition: The german verb for understanding, "begreifen" literally means "getting a (tactile) grip on a matter". This proven and time honoured concept has been in use since prehistoric times. While the amount of scientific data continues to grow, researchers still need all the support to help them visualize the data content before their inner eye. Immersive data-visualisations are helpful, yet fail to provide tactile feedback as provided from tangible objects. The need for tangible representations of geospatial information to solve real world problems eventually led to the advent of 3d-globes by M. Behaim in the 15th century and has continued since. The production of a tangible representation of a scientific data set with some fidelity is just the final step of an arc, leading from the physical world into scientific reasoning and back: The process starts with a physical observation, or a model, by a sensor which produces a data stream which is turned into a geo-referenced data set. This data is turned into a volume representation which is converted into command sequences for the printing device, leading to the creation of a 3d-printout. Finally, the new specimen has to be linked to its metadata to ensure its scientific meaning and context. On the technical side, the production of a tangible data-print has been realized as a pilot workflow based on the Free and Open Source Geoinformatics tools GRASS GIS and Paraview to convert scientific data volume into stereolithography datasets (stl) for printing on a RepRap printer. The initial motivation to use tangible representations of complex data was the task of quality assessments on tsunami simulation data sets in the FP7 TRIDEC project (www.tridec-online.eu). For this, 3d-prints of space time cubes of tsunami wave spreading patterns were produced. This was followed by print-outs of volume data derived from radar sounders (MARSIS, SHARAD) imaging

  17. On solving the 3-D phase field equations by employing a parallel-adaptive mesh refinement (Para-AMR) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z.; Xiong, S. M.

    2015-05-01

    An algorithm comprising adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and parallel (Para-) computing capabilities was developed to efficiently solve the coupled phase field equations in 3-D. The AMR was achieved based on a gradient criterion and the point clustering algorithm introduced by Berger (1991). To reduce the time for mesh generation, a dynamic regridding approach was developed based on the magnitude of the maximum phase advancing velocity. Local data at each computing process was then constructed and parallel computation was realized based on the hierarchical grid structure created during the AMR. Numerical tests and simulations on single and multi-dendrite growth were performed and results show that the proposed algorithm could shorten the computing time for 3-D phase field simulation for about two orders of magnitude and enable one to gain much more insight in understanding the underlying physics during dendrite growth in solidification.

  18. 3D Printed Potential and Free Energy Surfaces for Teaching Fundamental Concepts in Physical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaliakin, Danil S.; Zaari, Ryan R.; Varganov, Sergey A.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching fundamental physical chemistry concepts such as the potential energy surface, transition state, and reaction path is a challenging task. The traditionally used oversimplified 2D representation of potential and free energy surfaces makes this task even more difficult and often confuses students. We show how this 2D representation can be…

  19. High-Performance Stable Field Emission with Ultralow Turn on Voltage from rGO Conformal Coated TiO2 Nanotubes 3D Arrays.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Yogyata; Kedawat, Garima; Kumar, Pawan; Dwivedi, Jaya; Singh, V N; Gupta, R K; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A facile method to produce conformal coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) on vertically aligned titanium oxide (TiO2) nanotubes three dimensional (3D) arrays (NTAs) is demonstrated for enhanced field emission display applications. These engineered nano arrays exhibit efficient electron field emission properties such as high field emission current density (80 mA/cm(2)), low turn-on field (1.0 V/μm) and field enhancement factor (6000) with high emission current stability. Moreover, these enhancements observed in nano arrays attribute to the contribution of low work function with non-rectifying barriers, which allow an easy injection of electrons from the conduction band of TiO2 into the Fermi level of reduced graphene oxide under external electric field. The obtained results are extremely advantageous for its potential application in field emission devices. PMID:26152895

  20. High-Performance Stable Field Emission with Ultralow Turn on Voltage from rGO Conformal Coated TiO2 Nanotubes 3D Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Yogyata; Kedawat, Garima; Kumar, Pawan; Dwivedi, Jaya; Singh, V. N.; Gupta, R. K.; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2015-07-01

    A facile method to produce conformal coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) on vertically aligned titanium oxide (TiO2) nanotubes three dimensional (3D) arrays (NTAs) is demonstrated for enhanced field emission display applications. These engineered nano arrays exhibit efficient electron field emission properties such as high field emission current density (80 mA/cm2), low turn-on field (1.0 V/μm) and field enhancement factor (6000) with high emission current stability. Moreover, these enhancements observed in nano arrays attribute to the contribution of low work function with non-rectifying barriers, which allow an easy injection of electrons from the conduction band of TiO2 into the Fermi level of reduced graphene oxide under external electric field. The obtained results are extremely advantageous for its potential application in field emission devices.

  1. High-Performance Stable Field Emission with Ultralow Turn on Voltage from rGO Conformal Coated TiO2 Nanotubes 3D Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Yogyata; Kedawat, Garima; Kumar, Pawan; Dwivedi, Jaya; Singh, V. N.; Gupta, R. K.; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A facile method to produce conformal coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) on vertically aligned titanium oxide (TiO2) nanotubes three dimensional (3D) arrays (NTAs) is demonstrated for enhanced field emission display applications. These engineered nano arrays exhibit efficient electron field emission properties such as high field emission current density (80 mA/cm2), low turn-on field (1.0 V/μm) and field enhancement factor (6000) with high emission current stability. Moreover, these enhancements observed in nano arrays attribute to the contribution of low work function with non-rectifying barriers, which allow an easy injection of electrons from the conduction band of TiO2 into the Fermi level of reduced graphene oxide under external electric field. The obtained results are extremely advantageous for its potential application in field emission devices. PMID:26152895

  2. A Bayesian 3D data fusion and unsupervised joint segmentation approach for stochastic geological modelling using Hidden Markov random fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Wellmann, Florian

    2016-04-01

    It is generally accepted that 3D geological models inferred from observed data will contain a certain amount of uncertainties. The uncertainty quantification and stochastic sampling methods are essential for gaining the insight into the geological variability of subsurface structures. In the community of deterministic or traditional modelling techniques, classical geo-statistical methods using boreholes (hard data sets) are still most widely accepted although suffering certain drawbacks. Modern geophysical measurements provide us regional data sets in 2D or 3D spaces either directly from sensors or indirectly from inverse problem solving using observed signal (soft data sets). We propose a stochastic modelling framework to extract subsurface heterogeneity from multiple and complementary types of data. In the presented work, subsurface heterogeneity is considered as the "hidden link" among multiple spatial data sets as well as inversion results. Hidden Markov random field models are employed to perform 3D segmentation which is the representation of the "hidden link". Finite Gaussian mixture models are adopted to characterize the statistical parameters of the multiple data sets. The uncertainties are quantified via a Gibbs sampling process under the Bayesian inferential framework. The proposed modelling framework is validated using two numerical examples. The model behavior and convergence are also well examined. It is shown that the presented stochastic modelling framework is a promising tool for the 3D data fusion in the communities of geological modelling and geophysics.

  3. Dynamic complex optical fields for optical manipulation, 3D microscopy, and photostimulation of neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daria, Vincent R.; Stricker, Christian; Bekkers, John; Redman, Steve; Bachor, Hans

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate a multi-functional system capable of multiple-site two-photon excitation of photo-sensitive compounds as well as transfer of optical mechanical properties on an array of mesoscopic particles. We use holographic projection of a single Ti:Sapphire laser operating in femtosecond pulse mode to show that the projected three-dimensional light patterns have sufficient spatiotemporal photon density for multi-site two-photon excitation of biological fluorescent markers and caged neurotransmitters. Using the same laser operating in continuous-wave mode, we can use the same light patterns for non-invasive transfer of both linear and orbital angular momentum on a variety of mesoscopic particles. The system also incorporates high-speed scanning using acousto-optic modulators to rapidly render 3D images of neuron samples via two-photon microscopy.

  4. Study of dendritic growth and coarsening using a 3-D phase field model: Implementation of the Para-AMR algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z.; Xiong, S. M.

    2015-06-01

    To efficiently solve the coupled phase field equations in 3-D, an algorithm comprising of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and parallel (Para-) computing capabilities was developed. Dendritic growth and subsequent coarsening were studied by employing the model to simulate multi-dendrite growth under isothermal conditions. Quantitative comparison including decrease of interface area (S) and nonlinear growing of the characteristic length (ratio between solid volume V and surface area S i.e. V/S) as time was performed between the simulation results and these predicted by the existing theories. In particular, various mechanisms including growth of lower curvature area in expense of higher curvature one, coalescence of neighbouring dendrite arms and groove advancement at the root of higher order arms for dendritic coarsening were identified and successfully revealed via the 3-D phase field simulation. In addition, results showed that the proposed algorithm could greatly shorten the computing time for 3-D phase field simulation and enable one to gain much more insight in understanding the underlying physics during dendrite growth in solidification.

  5. The application and realization of 3D geosimulation and forecast in the field of bank collapse research based on GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongyuan; He, Zongyi; Qi, Qingwen

    2008-10-01

    With the development of computer science, many kinds of three dimensional software come to the world one after another, and have been applied in many fields, such as PC games, military simulation and geographical information system (GIS) and so on, among which the application of the technique of three dimensional geo-simulation in GIS field has provided new platform, new ideas, and a new significant direction for the development of GIS. This paper is to discuss the methods and realization of three-dimensional(3D) geosimulation in the field of bank collapse based on GIS, with the research of bank collapse as the cut-in point, which is the important direction in the research of geological disasters, and to give 3D simulation result of the reservoir bank, taking the related data in three gorges reservoir area as the example, and at the same time to give the result of 3D simulation about bank collapse forecast, and at last to appraise these results.

  6. 3D model of small-scale density cavities in the auroral magnetosphere with field-aligned current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespalov, P. A.; Misonova, V. G.; Savina, O. N.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a 3D model of small-scale density cavities stimulated by an auroral field-aligned current and an oscillating field-aligned current of kinetic Alfvén waves. It is shown that when the field-aligned current increases so that the electron drift velocity exceeds a value of the order of the electron thermal velocity, the plasma becomes unstable to the formation of cavities with low density and strong electric field. The condition of instability is associated with the value of the background magnetic field. In the case of a relatively weak magnetic field (where the electron gyro-radius is greater than the ion acoustic wavelength), the current instability can lead to the formation of one-dimensional cavities along the magnetic field. In the case of a stronger magnetic field (where the ion acoustic wavelength is greater than the electron gyro-radius, but still is less than the ion gyro-radius), the instability can lead to the formation of 3D density cavities. In this case, the spatial scales of the cavity, both along and across the background magnetic field, can be comparable, and at the earlier stage of the cavity formation they are of the order of the ion acoustic wavelength. Rarefactions of the cavity density are accompanied by an increase in the electric field and are limited by the pressure of bipolar electric fields that occur within them. The estimates of typical density cavity characteristics and the results of numerical solutions agree with known experimental data: small-scale structures with a sufficiently strong electric field are observed in the auroral regions with strong field-aligned current.

  7. Detailed 3D models of the induced electric field of transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, F. S.; Lancaster, J. L.; Fox, P. T.

    2007-05-01

    Previous models neglected contributions from current elements spanning the full geometric extent of wires in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coils. A detailed account of TMS coil wiring geometry is shown to provide significant improvements in the accuracy of electric field (E-field) models. Modeling E-field dependence based on the TMS coil's wire width, height, shape and number of turns clearly improved the fit of calculated-to-measured E-fields near the coil body. Detailed E-field models were accurate up to the surface of the coil body (within 0.5% of measured) where simple models were often inadequate (up to 32% different from measured).

  8. Gas phase synthesis and field emission properties of 3D aligned double walled carbon nanotube/anatase hybrid architectures.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ravi K; Engstler, Jörg; Navitski, Aliaksandr; Sakharuk, Vitali; Müller, Günter; Schneider, Jörg J

    2011-08-01

    A 3D hybrid architecture composed of macroscopic, vertically aligned CNT blocks which are formed via a metal catalyzed CVD process followed by deposition of TiO(2) on the CNT side walls in nanocrystalline or amorphous form is presented. The morphology of the deposited TiO(2) can be tailored by the deposition method employed. Depositing TiO(2) from the gas phase by employing the organometallic precursor Ti[OCH(CH(3))(2)](4) leads to formation of nanocrystalline anatase or rutile particles with a dense coverage on the surface and within the 3D CNT scaffold. Phase pure TiO(2) (anatase) is formed between 500 and 700 °C, while higher temperatures resulted in rutile modification of TiO(2). Below 500 °C, TiO(2) forms an amorphous oxide layer. At higher temperatures such initially formed TiO(2) layers segregate into particles which tend to crystallize. In contrast, when generating TiO(2) by oxidation of Ti metal which is deposited by vaporization onto the 3D CNT block array, and subsequently oxidized in air or controlled O(2) atmosphere this leads to a porous layer with a particular nanostructure on top of the CNT blocks. First studies of the fabrication and field emission of the new 3D CNT/TiO(2) hybrid cathodes display good and stable FE characteristics with onset fields for current density of 1 μA cm(-2) of 1.7 to 1.9 V μm(-1), while the average field enhancement factor is in the range between 2000 and 2500 depending on the O(2) base pressure during the measurements.

  9. Modeling Recent Large Earthquakes Using the 3-D Global Wave Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjörleifsdóttir, V.; Kanamori, H.; Tromp, J.

    2003-04-01

    We use the spectral-element method (SEM) to accurately compute waveforms at periods of 40 s and longer for three recent large earthquakes using 3D Earth models and finite source models. The M_w~7.6, Jan~26, 2001, Bhuj, India event had a small rupture area and is well modeled at long periods with a point source. We use this event as a calibration event to investigate the effects of 3-D Earth models on the waveforms. The M_w~7.9, Nov~11, 2001, Kunlun, China, event exhibits a large directivity (an asymmetry in the radiation pattern) even at periods longer than 200~s. We used the source time function determined by Kikuchi and Yamanaka (2001) and the overall pattern of slip distribution determined by Lin et al. to guide the wave-form modeling. The large directivity is consistent with a long fault, at least 300 km, and an average rupture speed of 3±0.3~km/s. The directivity at long periods is not sensitive to variations in the rupture speed along strike as long as the average rupture speed is constant. Thus, local variations in rupture speed cannot be ruled out. The rupture speed is a key parameter for estimating the fracture energy of earthquakes. The M_w~8.1, March~25, 1998, event near the Balleny Islands on the Antarctic Plate exhibits large directivity in long period surface waves, similar to the Kunlun event. Many slip models have been obtained from body waves for this earthquake (Kuge et al. (1999), Nettles et al. (1999), Antolik et al. (2000), Henry et al. (2000) and Tsuboi et al. (2000)). We used the slip model from Henry et al. to compute SEM waveforms for this event. The synthetic waveforms show a good fit to the data at periods from 40-200~s, but the amplitude and directivity at longer periods are significantly smaller than observed. Henry et al. suggest that this event comprised two subevents with one triggering the other at a distance of 100 km. To explain the observed directivity however, a significant amount of slip is required between the two subevents

  10. Quantification of gully volume using very high resolution DSM generated through 3D reconstruction from airborne and field digital imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Carlos; Zarco-Tejada, Pablo; Laredo, Mario; Gómez, Jose Alfonso

    2013-04-01

    Major advances have been made recently in automatic 3D photo-reconstruction techniques using uncalibrated and non-metric cameras (James and Robson, 2012). However, its application on soil conservation studies and landscape feature identification is currently at the outset. The aim of this work is to compare the performance of a remote sensing technique using a digital camera mounted on an airborne platform, with 3D photo-reconstruction, a method already validated for gully erosion assessment purposes (Castillo et al., 2012). A field survey was conducted in November 2012 in a 250 m-long gully located in field crops on a Vertisol in Cordoba (Spain). The airborne campaign was conducted with a 4000x3000 digital camera installed onboard an aircraft flying at 300 m above ground level to acquire 6 cm resolution imagery. A total of 990 images were acquired over the area ensuring a large overlap in the across- and along-track direction of the aircraft. An ortho-mosaic and the digital surface model (DSM) were obtained through automatic aerial triangulation and camera calibration methods. For the field-level photo-reconstruction technique, the gully was divided in several reaches to allow appropriate reconstruction (about 150 pictures taken per reach) and, finally, the resulting point clouds were merged into a unique mesh. A centimetric-accuracy GPS provided a benchmark dataset for gully perimeter and distinguishable reference points in order to allow the assessment of measurement errors of the airborne technique and the georeferenciation of the photo-reconstruction 3D model. The uncertainty on the gully limits definition was explicitly addressed by comparison of several criteria obtained by 3D models (slope and second derivative) with the outer perimeter obtained by the GPS operator identifying visually the change in slope at the top of the gully walls. In this study we discussed the magnitude of planimetric and altimetric errors and the differences observed between the

  11. New local potential useful for genome annotation and 3D modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Cohen, Fred E.

    2003-07-17

    A new potential energy function representing the conformational preferences of sequentially local regions of a protein backbone is presented. This potential is derived from secondary structure probabilities such as those produced by neural network-based prediction methods. The potential is applied to the problem of remote homolog identification, in combination with a distance dependent inter-residue potential and position-based scoring matrices. This fold recognition jury is implemented in a Java application called JThread. These methods are benchmarked on several test sets, including one released entirely after development and parameterization of JThread. In benchmark tests to identify known folds structurally similar (but not identical) to the native structure of a sequence, JThread performs significantly better than PSI-BLAST, with 10 percent more structures correctly identified as the most likely structural match in a fold library, and 20 percent more structures correctly narrowed down to a set of five possible candidates. JThread also significantly improves the average sequence alignment accuracy, from 53 percent to 62 percent of residues correctly aligned. Reliable fold assignments and alignments are identified, making the method useful for genome annotation. JThread is applied to predicted open reading frames (ORFs) from the genomes of Mycoplasma genitalium and Drosophila melanogaster, identifying 20 new structural annotations in the former and 801 in the latter.

  12. Approximating the 3D Character of a Van Der Waals Atom-Solid Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, L. W.

    2016-10-01

    A truncated Fourier decomposition of the atom-substrate potential energy is developed for three-dimensional models of van der Waals systems, specifically for adsorption on the basal plane surface of graphite or the (111) face of a face-centered-cubic lattice. This provides a framework for analysis of a priori calculations of physical adsorption energies.

  13. A 3-D QSAR-BASED IDENTIFICATION ALGORITHM FOR POTENTIAL ESTROGEN RECEPTOR LIGANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reports concerning the lethal effects of solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on amphibians suggest that this stressor has the potential to impact some amphibian populations. In this study embryos and larvae of three anuran species, Rana pipiens, R. clamitans, and R. septe...

  14. Visualization of Potential Energy Function Using an Isoenergy Approach and 3D Prototyping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teplukhin, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    In our three-dimensional world, one can plot, see, and comprehend a function of two variables at most, V(x,y). One cannot plot a function of three or more variables. For this reason, visualization of the potential energy function in its full dimensionality is impossible even for the smallest polyatomic molecules, such as triatomics. This creates…

  15. Evaluating the Potential of Rtk-Uav for Automatic Point Cloud Generation in 3d Rapid Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazeli, H.; Samadzadegan, F.; Dadrasjavan, F.

    2016-06-01

    During disaster and emergency situations, 3D geospatial data can provide essential information for decision support systems. The utilization of geospatial data using digital surface models as a basic reference is mandatory to provide accurate quick emergency response in so called rapid mapping activities. The recipe between accuracy requirements and time restriction is considered critical in this situations. UAVs as alternative platforms for 3D point cloud acquisition offer potentials because of their flexibility and practicability combined with low cost implementations. Moreover, the high resolution data collected from UAV platforms have the capabilities to provide a quick overview of the disaster area. The target of this paper is to experiment and to evaluate a low-cost system for generation of point clouds using imagery collected from a low altitude small autonomous UAV equipped with customized single frequency RTK module. The customized multi-rotor platform is used in this study. Moreover, electronic hardware is used to simplify user interaction with the UAV as RTK-GPS/Camera synchronization, and beside the synchronization, lever arm calibration is done. The platform is equipped with a Sony NEX-5N, 16.1-megapixel camera as imaging sensor. The lens attached to camera is ZEISS optics, prime lens with F1.8 maximum aperture and 24 mm focal length to deliver outstanding images. All necessary calibrations are performed and flight is implemented over the area of interest at flight height of 120 m above the ground level resulted in 2.38 cm GSD. Earlier to image acquisition, 12 signalized GCPs and 20 check points were distributed in the study area and measured with dualfrequency GPS via RTK technique with horizontal accuracy of σ = 1.5 cm and vertical accuracy of σ = 2.3 cm. results of direct georeferencing are compared to these points and experimental results show that decimeter accuracy level for 3D points cloud with proposed system is achievable, that is suitable

  16. Tomographic reconstruction of circularly polarized high-harmonic fields: 3D attosecond metrology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong; Tao, Zhensheng; Hernández-García, Carlos; Matyba, Piotr; Carr, Adra; Knut, Ronny; Kfir, Ofer; Zusin, Dimitry; Gentry, Christian; Grychtol, Patrik; Cohen, Oren; Plaja, Luis; Becker, Andreas; Jaron-Becker, Agnieszka; Kapteyn, Henry; Murnane, Margaret

    2016-02-01

    Bright, circularly polarized, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray high-harmonic beams can now be produced using counter-rotating circularly polarized driving laser fields. Although the resulting circularly polarized harmonics consist of relatively simple pairs of peaks in the spectral domain, in the time domain, the field is predicted to emerge as a complex series of rotating linearly polarized bursts, varying rapidly in amplitude, frequency, and polarization. We extend attosecond metrology techniques to circularly polarized light by simultaneously irradiating a copper surface with circularly polarized high-harmonic and linearly polarized infrared laser fields. The resulting temporal modulation of the photoelectron spectra carries essential phase information about the EUV field. Utilizing the polarization selectivity of the solid surface and by rotating the circularly polarized EUV field in space, we fully retrieve the amplitude and phase of the circularly polarized harmonics, allowing us to reconstruct one of the most complex coherent light fields produced to date. PMID:26989782

  17. Tomographic reconstruction of circularly polarized high-harmonic fields: 3D attosecond metrology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong; Tao, Zhensheng; Hernández-García, Carlos; Matyba, Piotr; Carr, Adra; Knut, Ronny; Kfir, Ofer; Zusin, Dimitry; Gentry, Christian; Grychtol, Patrik; Cohen, Oren; Plaja, Luis; Becker, Andreas; Jaron-Becker, Agnieszka; Kapteyn, Henry; Murnane, Margaret

    2016-02-01

    Bright, circularly polarized, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray high-harmonic beams can now be produced using counter-rotating circularly polarized driving laser fields. Although the resulting circularly polarized harmonics consist of relatively simple pairs of peaks in the spectral domain, in the time domain, the field is predicted to emerge as a complex series of rotating linearly polarized bursts, varying rapidly in amplitude, frequency, and polarization. We extend attosecond metrology techniques to circularly polarized light by simultaneously irradiating a copper surface with circularly polarized high-harmonic and linearly polarized infrared laser fields. The resulting temporal modulation of the photoelectron spectra carries essential phase information about the EUV field. Utilizing the polarization selectivity of the solid surface and by rotating the circularly polarized EUV field in space, we fully retrieve the amplitude and phase of the circularly polarized harmonics, allowing us to reconstruct one of the most complex coherent light fields produced to date.

  18. Tomographic reconstruction of circularly polarized high-harmonic fields: 3D attosecond metrology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cong; Tao, Zhensheng; Hernández-García, Carlos; Matyba, Piotr; Carr, Adra; Knut, Ronny; Kfir, Ofer; Zusin, Dimitry; Gentry, Christian; Grychtol, Patrik; Cohen, Oren; Plaja, Luis; Becker, Andreas; Jaron-Becker, Agnieszka; Kapteyn, Henry; Murnane, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Bright, circularly polarized, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray high-harmonic beams can now be produced using counter-rotating circularly polarized driving laser fields. Although the resulting circularly polarized harmonics consist of relatively simple pairs of peaks in the spectral domain, in the time domain, the field is predicted to emerge as a complex series of rotating linearly polarized bursts, varying rapidly in amplitude, frequency, and polarization. We extend attosecond metrology techniques to circularly polarized light by simultaneously irradiating a copper surface with circularly polarized high-harmonic and linearly polarized infrared laser fields. The resulting temporal modulation of the photoelectron spectra carries essential phase information about the EUV field. Utilizing the polarization selectivity of the solid surface and by rotating the circularly polarized EUV field in space, we fully retrieve the amplitude and phase of the circularly polarized harmonics, allowing us to reconstruct one of the most complex coherent light fields produced to date. PMID:26989782

  19. Can symmetry transitions of complex fields enable 3-d control of fluid vorticity?

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James E.; Solis, Kyle Jameson

    2015-08-01

    Methods of inducing vigorous noncontact fluid flow are important to technologies involving heat and mass transfer and fluid mixing, since they eliminate the need for moving parts, pipes and seals, all of which compromise system reliability. Unfortunately, traditional noncontact flow methods are few, and have limitations of their own. We have discovered two classes of fields that can induce fluid vorticity without requiring either gravity or a thermal gradient. The first class we call Symmetry-Breaking Rational Fields. These are triaxial fields comprised of three orthogonal components, two ac and one dc. The second class is Rational Triad Fields, which differ in that all three components are alternating. In this report we quantify the induced vorticity for a wide variety of fields and consider symmetry transitions between these field types. These transitions give rise to orbiting vorticity vectors, a technology for non-contact, non-stationary fluid mixing.

  20. Assessing soil water storage distribution under sprinkler irrigation by coupling 3D simulations and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Uday; Shabeeb, Ahmed; dragonetti, giovanna; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Coppola, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    This work analyzed the variability of sprinkler irrigation application over a bare soil, both in terms of water application efficiency and uniformity, by integrating and comparing the information on the irrigation depth data (ID), as measured by catch cans, soil water storage in the upper root zone, as measured by TDR probes, and a 3D simulations of water flow in soils. Three irrigation tests were performed at three different pressures (2, 3 and 4 bar). A lateral water redistribution was observed and simulated after each irrigation event by comparing spatial distributions of site-specific water application efficiency (AEs), as well as ratios of site-specific actual water storage increase (SWEs) and irrigation depth (IDs) to the water content before irrigation. Because of soil water redistribution processes, distribution uniformity based on soil storages was systematically higher than the catch can uniformity. The obvious consequence of lateral water redistribution processes was that the soil smoothing action on non-uniformity observed at the surface increased both with depth and over time. At a given depth the uniformity of soil water storages always attained the same value, whatever the pressure considered and the catch can-based uniformity coefficient. It was concluded that, for the case of random distribution of ID, the uniformity of water storages is driven by the soil behavior rather than by the irrigation system.

  1. Correlations of Surface Deformation and 3D Flow Field in a Compliant Wall Turbulent Channel Flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Zhang, Cao; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    This study focuses on the correlations between surface deformation and flow features, including velocity, vorticity and pressure, in a turbulent channel flow over a flat, compliant Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wall. The channel centerline velocity is 2.5 m/s, and the friction Reynolds number is 2.3x103. Analysis is based on simultaneous measurements of the time resolved 3D velocity and surface deformation using tomographic PIV and Mach-Zehnder Interferometry. The volumetric pressure distribution is calculated plane by plane by spatially integrating the material acceleration using virtual boundary, omni-directional method. Conditional sampling based on local high/low pressure and deformation events reveals the primary flow structures causing the deformation. High pressure peaks appear at the interface between sweep and ejection, whereas the negative deformations peaks (dent) appear upstream, under the sweeps. The persistent phase lag between flow and deformations are presumably caused by internal damping within the PDMS. Some of the low pressure peaks and strong ejections are located under the head of hairpin vortices, and accordingly, are associated with positive deformation (bump). Others bumps and dents are correlated with some spanwise offset large inclined quasi-streamwise vortices that are not necessarily associated with hairpins. Sponsored by ONR.

  2. An improved version of NCOREL: A computer program for 3-D nonlinear supersonic potential flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siclari, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A computer code called NCOREL (for Nonconical Relaxation) has been developed to solve for supersonic full potential flows over complex geometries. The method first solves for the conical at the apex and then marches downstream in a spherical coordinate system. Implicit relaxation techniques are used to numerically solve the full potential equation at each subsequent crossflow plane. Many improvements have been made to the original code including more reliable numerics for computing wing-body flows with multiple embedded shocks, inlet flow through simulation, wake model and entropy corrections. Line relaxation or approximate factorization schemes are optionally available. Improved internal grid generation using analytic conformal mappings, supported by a simple geometric Harris wave drag input that was originally developed for panel methods and internal geometry package are some of the new features.

  3. 3-D visualization of electrostatic fields on a helicopter in flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammann, John F.; Hull, David M.

    2008-02-01

    Aircraft in flight typically charge via electrostatic processes; this charge is the source of measurable electric fields. Nearby objects may perturb this field, so there is interest in developing electrostatic sensors that can sense nearby objects like power lines by measuring their effects on the field. A major obstacle to developing these sensors is that there are often large variations in the field due to other causes. The problem is particularly difficult for helicopters where the rotating blades cause large periodic variations in field intensity. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has developed a model that predicts these self-generated variations so they can be cancelled out and the smaller variations from other objects can be seen. A new code is presented that was developed at ARL for visualization of the complex fields present on helicopters. The fields are different on virtually every part of the aircraft and vary with both the main and tail rotor positions. The code combines a large number of different quasi-static calculations in a single animated display where field strengths are "painted" as textures on the aircraft model. The code allows the user to view the time variations from any viewpoint in stereo. The stereo viewing is very important for clear and easy interpretation of the complex field patterns produced by the models.

  4. The scattering potential of partial derivative wavefields in 3D elastic orthorhombic media: An inversion prospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ju-Won; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2016-07-01

    Multi-parameter full waveform inversion (FWI) applied to an elastic orthorhombic model description of the subsurface requires in theory a nine-parameter representation of each pixel of the model. Even with optimal acquisition on the Earth surface that includes large offsets, full azimuth, and multi component sensors, the potential for tradeoff between the elastic orthorhombic parameters are large. The first step to understanding such trade-off is analysing the scattering potential of each parameter, and specifically, its scattering radiation patterns. We investigate such radiation patterns for diffraction and for scattering from a horizontal reflector considering a background isotropic model. The radiation patterns show considerable potential for trade-off between the parameters and the potentially limited resolution in their recovery. The radiation patterns of C11, C22 and C33 are well separated so that we expect to recover these parameters with limited trade-offs. However, the resolution of their recovery represented by recovered range of model wavenumbers varies between these parameters. We can only invert for the short wavelength components (reflection) of C33 while we can mainly invert for the long wavelength components (transmission) of the elastic coefficients C11 and C22 if we have large enough offsets. The elastic coefficients C13, C23 and C12 suffer from strong trade-offs with C55, C44 and C66, respectively. The trade-offs between C13 and C55, as well as C23 and C44, can be partially mitigated if we acquire P-SV and SV-SV waves. However, to reduce the trade-offs between C12 and C66, we require credible SH-SH waves. The analytical radiation patterns of the elastic constants are supported by numerical gradients of these parameters.

  5. The scattering potential of partial derivative wavefields in 3-D elastic orthorhombic media: an inversion prospective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ju-Won; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2016-09-01

    Multiparameter full waveform inversion (FWI) applied to an elastic orthorhombic model description of the subsurface requires in theory a nine-parameter representation of each pixel of the model. Even with optimal acquisition on the Earth surface that includes large offsets, full azimuth, and multicomponent sensors, the potential for trade-off between the elastic orthorhombic parameters are large. The first step to understanding such trade-off is analysing the scattering potential of each parameter, and specifically, its scattering radiation patterns. We investigate such radiation patterns for diffraction and for scattering from a horizontal reflector considering a background isotropic model. The radiation patterns show considerable potential for trade-off between the parameters and the potentially limited resolution in their recovery. The radiation patterns of C11, C22, and C33 are well separated so that we expect to recover these parameters with limited trade-offs. However, the resolution of their recovery represented by recovered range of model wavenumbers varies between these parameters. We can only invert for the short wavelength components (reflection) of C33 while we can mainly invert for the long wavelength components (transmission) of the elastic coefficients C11 and C22 if we have large enough offsets. The elastic coefficients C13, C23, and C12 suffer from strong trade-offs with C55, C44, and C66, respectively. The trade-offs between C13 and C55, as well as C23 and C44, can be partially mitigated if we acquire P-SV and SV-SV waves. However, to reduce the trade-offs between C12 and C66, we require credible SH-SH waves. The analytical radiation patterns of the elastic constants are supported by numerical gradients of these parameters.

  6. 3-D heterogeneous field data versus 2-D simulations. How can it be accomplished in a sedimentary porous formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvini, G.; Salandin, P.

    2009-12-01

    To analyze the impact of the hydraulic conductivity K spatial variability in a real field case (as an example to delimitate a well catchment), numerical simulations can be reasonably developed in a two-dimensional vertical average context. Nevertheless the plume evolution is a consequence of a more complex three-dimensional heterogeneous structure whose vertical variability dominates the dispersion phenomena at local scale. In larger domains, the effect of the vertical heterogeneity combines itself with that one due to the horizontal variability of K, and only when the plume has travelled a large number of (horizontal) integral scales, its evolution can be analyzed in a regional context, under the hypothesis that the transmissivity spatial distribution prevails. Until this limit is reached, the vertical and horizontal variability of K are combined to give a fully 3-D dispersion process. In all these situations, to successfully accomplish the 3-D heterogeneous structure of the aquifer in 2-D simulations, more than the planimetric depth-averaged variability of K must be accounted for. To define the uncertainty related to the use of different planimetric schematizations of the real hydraulic conductivity spatial distribution, we present here the results of some numerical experiments that compare the 3-D plume evolution with 2-D simulations developed by tacking into account different hydraulic conductivity distribution schematization, by considering a hierarchical architecture of media also. This description of a sedimentary formation combined with the finite size of the plume requires theoretical and numerical tools able to take into account the flow field inhomogeneity and the ergodicity lack that characterize the transport phenomena. Following this way it will be possible to quantify / reduce the uncertainty related to a 2-D schematization in a large number of real cases where the domain spans between the local and the regional scale and whose dimension may lead to

  7. Full potential solution of transonic quasi-3-D flow through a cascade using artificial compressability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, C.; Adamczyk, J.

    1981-01-01

    The three-dimensional flow in a turbomachinery blade row was approximated by correcting for streamtube convergence and radius change in the throughflow direction. The method is a fully conservative solution of the full potential equation incorporating the finite volume technique on body fitted periodic mesh, with an artificial density imposed in the transonic region to insure stability and the capture of shock waves. Comparison of results for several supercritical blades shows good agreement with their hodograph solutions. Other calculations for these profiles as well as standard NACA blade sections indicate that this is a useful scheme analyzing both the design and off-design performance of turbomachinery blading.

  8. 3D graphics, virtual reality, and motion-onset visual evoked potentials in neurogaming.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, R; Wilson, S; Coyle, D

    2016-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) offers movement-free control of a computer application and is achieved by reading and translating the cortical activity of the brain into semantic control signals. Motion-onset visual evoked potentials (mVEP) are neural potentials employed in BCIs and occur when motion-related stimuli are attended visually. mVEP dynamics are correlated with the position and timing of the moving stimuli. To investigate the feasibility of utilizing the mVEP paradigm with video games of various graphical complexities including those of commercial quality, we conducted three studies over four separate sessions comparing the performance of classifying five mVEP responses with variations in graphical complexity and style, in-game distractions, and display parameters surrounding mVEP stimuli. To investigate the feasibility of utilizing contemporary presentation modalities in neurogaming, one of the studies compared mVEP classification performance when stimuli were presented using the oculus rift virtual reality headset. Results from 31 independent subjects were analyzed offline. The results show classification performances ranging up to 90% with variations in conditions in graphical complexity having limited effect on mVEP performance; thus, demonstrating the feasibility of using the mVEP paradigm within BCI-based neurogaming. PMID:27590974

  9. 3D graphics, virtual reality, and motion-onset visual evoked potentials in neurogaming.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, R; Wilson, S; Coyle, D

    2016-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) offers movement-free control of a computer application and is achieved by reading and translating the cortical activity of the brain into semantic control signals. Motion-onset visual evoked potentials (mVEP) are neural potentials employed in BCIs and occur when motion-related stimuli are attended visually. mVEP dynamics are correlated with the position and timing of the moving stimuli. To investigate the feasibility of utilizing the mVEP paradigm with video games of various graphical complexities including those of commercial quality, we conducted three studies over four separate sessions comparing the performance of classifying five mVEP responses with variations in graphical complexity and style, in-game distractions, and display parameters surrounding mVEP stimuli. To investigate the feasibility of utilizing contemporary presentation modalities in neurogaming, one of the studies compared mVEP classification performance when stimuli were presented using the oculus rift virtual reality headset. Results from 31 independent subjects were analyzed offline. The results show classification performances ranging up to 90% with variations in conditions in graphical complexity having limited effect on mVEP performance; thus, demonstrating the feasibility of using the mVEP paradigm within BCI-based neurogaming.

  10. Wave Phase-Sensitive Transformation of 3d-Straining of Mechanical Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, I. N.; Speranskiy, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    It is the area of research of oscillatory processes in elastic mechanical systems. Technical result of innovation is creation of spectral set of multidimensional images which reflect time-correlated three-dimensional vector parameters of metrological, and\\or estimated, and\\or design parameters of oscillations in mechanical systems. Reconstructed images of different dimensionality integrated in various combinations depending on their objective function can be used as homeostatic profile or cybernetic image of oscillatory processes in mechanical systems for an objective estimation of current operational conditions in real time. The innovation can be widely used to enhance the efficiency of monitoring and research of oscillation processes in mechanical systems (objects) in construction, mechanical engineering, acoustics, etc. Concept method of vector vibrometry based on application of vector 3D phase- sensitive vibro-transducers permits unique evaluation of real stressed-strained states of power aggregates and loaded constructions and opens fundamental innovation opportunities: conduct of continuous (on-line regime) reliable monitoring of turboagregates of electrical machines, compressor installations, bases, supports, pipe-lines and other objects subjected to damaging effect of vibrations; control of operational safety of technical systems at all the stages of life cycle including design, test production, tuning, testing, operational use, repairs and resource enlargement; creation of vibro-diagnostic systems of authentic non-destructive control of anisotropic characteristics of materials resistance of power aggregates and loaded constructions under outer effects and operational flaws. The described technology is revolutionary, universal and common for all branches of engineering industry and construction building objects.

  11. Testing the Low-Cost Rpas Potential in 3d Cultural Heritage Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognesi, M.; Furini, A.; Russo, V.; Pellegrinelli, A.; Russo, P.

    2015-02-01

    In order to analyze the potential as well as the limitations of low-cost RPAS photogrammetric systems for architectural cultural heritage reconstruction, some tests were performed by a small RPAS equipped with an ultralight camera. The tests were carried out in a site of remarkable historical interest. A great amount of images were taken with camera's optical axis in vertical and oblique position. Images were processed by the commercial software PhotoScan of Agisoft and numerous models were realized, each of them was compared with an accurate TLS model used as a reference. The test, despite some problems found, has provided good results in terms of accuracy (average error <2cm) and reliability.

  12. Event-related potentials in response to 3-D auditory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Tatsuo; Okubo, Osami; Fujita, Yukihiko; Kohira, Ryutaro; Arakawa, Chikako; Endo, Ayumi; Haruyama, Wakako; Imai, Yuki; Mugishima, Hideo

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate auditory spatial cognitive function, age correlations for event-related potentials (ERPs) in response to auditory stimuli with a Doppler effect were studied in normal children. A sound with a Doppler effect is perceived as a moving audio image. A total of 99 normal subjects (age range, 4-21 years) were tested. In the task-relevant oddball paradigm, P300 and key-press reaction time were elicited using auditory stimuli (1000 Hz fixed and enlarged tones with a Doppler effect). From the age of 4 years, the P300 latency for the enlarged tone with a Doppler effect shortened more rapidly with age than did the P300 latency for tone-pips, and the latencies for the different conditions became similar towards the late teens. The P300 of auditory stimuli with a Doppler effect may be used to evaluate auditory spatial cognitive function in children.

  13. Full potential solution of a transonic quasi-3-D flow through a cascade using artificial compressibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, C.; Adamczyk, J.

    1981-01-01

    A reliable method is presented for calculating the flowfield about a cascade of arbitrary 2-D airfoils. The method approximates the three-dimensional flow in a turbomachinery blade row by correcting for streamtube convergence and radius change in the throughflow direction. The method is a fully conservative solution of the full potential equation incorporating the finite volume technique on a body-fitted periodic mesh, with an artificial density imposed in the transonic region to ensure stability and the capture of shock waves. Comparison of results for several supercritical blades shows good agreement with their hodograph solutions. Other calculations for these profiles as well as standard NACA blade sections indicate that this is a useful scheme for analyzing both the design and off-design performance of turbomachinery blading.

  14. Metric Potential of a 3D Measurement System Based on Digital Compact Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Ablanedo, Enoc; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Ramón; Arias-Sánchez, Pedro; Armesto, Julia

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an optical measuring system based on low cost, high resolution digital cameras. Once the cameras are synchronised, the portable and adjustable system can be used to observe living beings, bodies in motion, or deformations of very different sizes. Each of the cameras has been modelled individually and studied with regard to the photogrammetric potential of the system. We have investigated the photogrammetric precision obtained from the crossing of rays, the repeatability of results, and the accuracy of the coordinates obtained. Systematic and random errors are identified in validity assessment of the definition of the precision of the system from crossing of rays or from marking residuals in images. The results have clearly demonstrated the capability of a low-cost multiple-camera system to measure with sub-millimetre precision. PMID:22408520

  15. 3-D RPIC Simulations of Relativistic Jets: Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets into ambient plasmas show that acceleration occurs in relativistic shocks. The Weibel instability created in shocks is responsible for particle acceleration, and generation and amplification of highly inhomogeneous, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection in relativistic jets. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than the synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understand the complex time evolution and spectral structure in relativistic jets and gamma-ray bursts. We will present recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration and magnetic field generation. We will also calculate associated self-consistent emission from relativistic shocks.

  16. Rapid 3-D forward modeling of gravity and gravity gradient tensor fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longwei, C.; Dai, S.; Zhang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Three-dimensional inversion are the key process in gravity exploration. In the commonly used scheme of inversion, the subsurface of the earth is usually divided into many small prism blocks (or grids) with variable density values. A key task in gravity inversion is to calculate the composite fields (gravity and gravity gradient tensor) generated by all these grids, this is known as forward modeling. In general forward modeling is memory-demanding and time-consuming. One scheme to rapidly calculate the fields is to implement it in Fourier domain and use fast Fourier transform algorithm. The advantage of the Fourier domain method is, obviously, much faster. However, the intrinsic edge effect of the Fourier domain method degrades the precision of the calculated fields. We have developed an innovative scheme to directly calculate the fields in spatial domain. There are two key points in this scheme. One key point is spatial discretization. Spatial convolution formula is discretized using an approach similar to normal difference method. A key idea during discretization is to use the analytical formula of a cubic prism, and this makes the resultant discrete formula have clear physical meaning: it embodies the superposition principle of the fields and is the exact formula to calculate the fields generated by all grids. The discretization only requires the grids have the same dimension in horizontal directions, and grids in different layers may have different dimension in vertical direction, and this offers more flexibility for inversion. Another key point is discrete convolution calculation. We invoke a high efficient two-dimensional discrete convolution algorithm, and it guarantees both time-saving and memory-saving. Its memory cost has the same order as the number of grids. Numerical test result shows that for a model with a dimension of 1000x1000x201 grids, it takes about 300s to calculate the fields on 1000x1000 field points in a personal computer with 3.4-GHz CPU

  17. FLASHFLOOD: a 3D field-based similarity search and alignment method for flexible molecules.

    PubMed

    Pitman, M C; Huber, W K; Horn, H; Krämer, A; Rice, J E; Swope, W C

    2001-07-01

    A three-dimensional field-based similarity search and alignment method for flexible molecules is introduced. The conformational space of a flexible molecule is represented in terms of fragments and torsional angles of allowed conformations. A user-definable property field is used to compute features of fragment pairs. Features are generalizations of CoMMA descriptors that characterize local regions of the property field by its local moments. The features are invariant under coordinate system transformations. Features taken from a query molecule are used to form alignments with fragment pairs in the database. An assembly algorithm is then used to merge the fragment pairs into full structures, aligned to the query. Key to the method is the use of a context adaptive descriptor scaling procedure as the basis for similarity. This allows the user to tune the weights of the various feature components based on examples relevant to the particular context under investigation. The property fields may range from simple, phenomenological fields, to fields derived from quantum mechanical calculations. We apply the method to the dihydrofolate/methotrexate benchmark system, and show that when one injects relevant contextual information into the descriptor scaling procedure, better results are obtained more efficiently. We also show how the method works and include computer times for a query from a database that represents approximately 23 million conformers of seventeen flexible molecules.

  18. Pre- and post- scission particle emission in 3D Langevin calculations with various macroscopic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, K.; Nadtochy, P. N.; Schmitt, C.; Wasiak, P.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Bonnet, E.; Chbihi, A.; Frankland, J.; Gruyer, D.; Wieleczko, J.-P.

    2013-12-01

    The fission dynamics described by solving differential equations of the Langevin type in three dimensional space of the deformation parameters is very sensitive on the choice of the macroscopic components such as potential energy models. The mass or charge distribution or total kinetic energy has been already shown to be different when one uses the Finite Range Liquid Drop Model or Lublin - Strasbourg Drop model. Also the shape-dependent congruence or shape-dependent Wigner energy and A0 terms are important especially for the fission of medium mass nuclei. We would like to make step forward and answer the question about the varying of the post-scission multiplicity by including different PES. Up to now there are only few experimental data for the medium mass nuclei where the pre- and post- scission emission has been estimated and isotopic distributions have been shown. The isotopic distributions of the fission products for light compound nucleus such as 111 In with two beam energies (Ebeam = 10.6 AMeV and 5.9 AMeV) and two heavy systems: 229Np with Ebeam = 7.4 AMeV and 260 No (Ebeam = 6 AMeV and 7.5 AMeV) have been studied theoretically. The agreement with the experimental data is discussed.

  19. The NCOREL computer program for 3D nonlinear supersonic potential flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siclari, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    An innovative computational technique (NCOREL) was established for the treatment of three dimensional supersonic flows. The method is nonlinear in that it solves the nonconservative finite difference analog of the full potential equation and can predict the formation of supercritical cross flow regions, embedded and bow shocks. The method implicitly computes a conical flow at the apex (R = 0) of a spherical coordinate system and uses a fully implicit marching technique to obtain three dimensional cross flow solutions. This implies that the radial Mach number must remain supersonic. The cross flow solutions are obtained by using type dependent transonic relaxation techniques with the type dependency linked to the character of the cross flow velocity (i.e., subsonic/supersonic). The spherical coordinate system and marching on spherical surfaces is ideally suited to the computation of wing flows at low supersonic Mach numbers due to the elimination of the subsonic axial Mach number problems that exist in other marching codes that utilize Cartesian transverse marching planes.

  20. Skin Dose in Longitudinal and Transverse Linac-MRIs using Monte-Carlo and realistic 3D MRI field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyvanloo Shahrestanaky, Amirmohamad

    The integration of a clinical linear accelerator (linac) with a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system would provide real-time tumor tracking. The magnetic fields of linac-MR systems modify the path of contaminant electrons in photon beams, which alters patient skin dose. In this work, we used Monte Carlo calculations that incorporate realistic 3D magnetic field models of longitudinal and transverse linac-MR systems to accurately quantify the changes in skin dose. The results show that fringe fields of realistic 3D B-fields decay rapidly and have a very small magnitude at the linac’s head. As a result, for longitudinal linac-MR systems only a small increase in the entrance skin dose is predicted. For transverse linac-MR systems, changes to the entrance skin dose are small for most scenarios. On the exit side, however, a fairly large increase is observed for perpendicular beams due to the electron return effect, but significantly drops for large oblique angles of incidence.

  1. 3-D seismic over the Fausse Pointe Field: A case history of acquisition in a harsh environment

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, P.M.; Nester, D.C.; Martin, J.A.; Moles, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    A 50 square mile 3D seismic survey was successfully acquired over Fausse Point Field in the latter half of 1994. The geophysical and logistical challenges of this project were immense. The steep dips and extensive range of target depths required a large shoot area with a relatively fine sampling interval. The surface, while essentially flat, included areas of cane field, crawfish ponds, thick brush, swamp, open lakes and deep canals -- all typical of southern Louisiana. Planning and permitting of the survey began in late 1993. Field operations began in June 1994 and were complete in January 1995. Field personnel numbered 150 at the peak of operations. More than 19,000 crew hours were required to complete the job at a cost of over 5,000,000. The project was complete on time and on budget. The resulting images of the salt dome and surrounding rocks are not only beautiful but are revealing many opportunities for new hydrocarbon development.

  2. Magnetic fields end-face effect investigation of HTS bulk over PMG with 3D-modeling numerical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yujie; Lu, Yiyun

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the magnetic fields end-face effect of high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk over a permanent magnetic guideway (PMG) is researched with 3D-modeling numerical method. The electromagnetic behavior of the bulk is simulated using finite element method (FEM). The framework is formulated by the magnetic field vector method (H-method). A superconducting levitation system composed of one rectangular HTS bulk and one infinite long PMG is successfully investigated using the proposed method. The simulation results show that for finite geometrical HTS bulk, even the applied magnetic field is only distributed in x-y plane, the magnetic field component Hz which is along the z-axis can be observed interior the HTS bulk.

  3. Build-and-fill sequences: How subtle paleotopography affects 3-D heterogeneity of potential reservoir facies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKirahan, J.R.; Goldstein, R.H.; Franseen, E.K.

    2005-01-01

    This study analyzes the three-dimensional variability of a 20-meter-thick section of Pennsylvanian (Missourian) strata over a 600 km2 area of northeastern Kansas, USA. It hypothesizes that sea-level changes interact with subtle variations in paleotopography to influence the heterogeneity of potential reservoir systems in mixed carbonate-silidclastic systems, commonly produdng build-and-fill sequences. For this analysis, ten lithofacies were identified: (1) phylloid algal boundstone-packstone, (2) skeletal wackestone-packstone, (3) peloidal, skeletal packstone, (4) sandy, skeletal grainstone-packstone, (5) oolite grainstone-packstone, (6) Osagia-brachiopod packstone, (7) fossiliferous siltstone, (8) lenticular bedded-laminated siltstone and fine sandstone, (9) organic-rich mudstone and coal, and (10) massive mudstone. Each facies can be related to depositional environment and base-level changes to develop a sequence stratigraphy consisting of three sequence boundaries and two flooding surfaces. Within this framework, eighteen localities are used to develop a threedimensional framework of the stratigraphy and paleotopography. The studied strata illustrate the model of "build-and-fill". In this example, phylloid algal mounds produce initial relief, and many of the later carbonate and silidclastic deposits are focused into subtle paleotopographic lows, responding to factors related to energy, source, and accommodation, eventually filling the paleotopography. After initial buildup of the phylloid algal mounds, marine and nonmarine siliciclastics, with characteristics of both deltaic lobes and valley fills, were focused into low areas between mounds. After a sea-level rise, oolitic carbonates formed on highs and phylloid algal facies accumulated in lows. A shift in the source direction of siliciclastics resulted from flooding or filling of preexisting paleotopographic lows. Fine-grained silidclastics were concentrated in paleotopographic low areas and resulted in clay

  4. Dynamical system of scalar field from 2-dimension to 3-D and its cosmological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Wei; Tu, Hong; Huang, Jiasheng; Shu, Chenggang

    2016-09-01

    We give the three-dimensional dynamical autonomous systems for most of the popular scalar field dark energy models including (phantom) quintessence, (phantom) tachyon, K-essence, and general non-canonical scalar field models, change the dynamical variables from variables (x, y, λ ) to observable related variables (w_{φ }, Ω _{φ }, λ ), and show the intimate relationships between those scalar fields that the three-dimensional system of K-essence can reduce to (phantom) tachyon, general non-canonical scalar field can reduce to (phantom) quintessence and K-essence can also reduce to (phantom) quintessence for some special cases. For the applications of the three-dimensional dynamical systems, we investigate several special cases and give the exactly dynamical solutions in detail. In the end of this paper, we argue that it is more convenient and also has more physical meaning to express the differential equations of dynamical systems in (w_{φ }, Ω _{φ }, λ ) instead of variables (x, y, λ ) and to investigate the dynamical system in three dimensions instead of two dimensions. We also raise a question about the possibility of the chaotic behavior in the spatially flat single scalar field FRW cosmological models in the presence of ordinary matter.

  5. Pipe3D, a pipeline to analyze Integral Field Spectroscopy Data: II. Analysis sequence and CALIFA dataproducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Pérez, E.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; García-Benito, R.; Ibarra-Mede, H. J.; González, J. J.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Sánchez-Menguiano, L.; Ascasibar, Y.; Bitsakis, T.; Law, D.; Cano-Díaz, M.; López-Cobá, C.; Marino, R. A.; Gil de Paz, A.; López-Sánchez, A. R.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Galbany, L.; Mast, D.; Abril-Melgarejo, V.; Roman-Lopes, A.

    2016-04-01

    We present Pipe3D, an analysis pipeline based on the FIT3D fitting tool, developed to explore the properties of the stellar populations and ionized gas of integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. Pipe3D was created to provide coherent, simple to distribute, and comparable dataproducts, independently of the origin of the data, focused on the data of the most recent IFU surveys (e.g., CALIFA, MaNGA, and SAMI), and the last generation IFS instruments (e.g., MUSE). In this article we describe the different steps involved in the analysis of the data, illustrating them by showing the dataproducts derived for NGC 2916, observed by CALIFA and P-MaNGA. As a practical example of the pipeline we present the complete set of dataproducts derived for the 200 datacubes that comprises the V500 setup of the CALIFA Data Release 2 (DR2), making them freely available through the network. Finally, we explore the hypothesis that the properties of the stellar populations and ionized gas of galaxies at the effective radius are representative of the overall average ones, finding that this is indeed the case.

  6. Dosimetric Comparison Between Intensity-Modulated with Coplanar Field and 3D Conformal Radiotherapy with Noncoplanar Field for Postocular Invasion Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Tu Wenyong; Liu Lu Zeng Jun; Yin Weidong; Li Yun

    2010-07-01

    This study presents a dosimetric optimization effort aiming to compare noncoplanar field (NCF) on 3 dimensions conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and coplanar field (CF) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning for postocular invasion tumor. We performed a planning study on the computed tomography data of 8 consecutive patients with localized postocular invasion tumor. Four fields NCF 3D-CRT in the transverse plane with gantry angles of 0-10 deg., 30-45 deg., 240-270 deg., and 310-335 deg. degrees were isocentered at the center of gravity of the target volume. The geometry of the beams was determined by beam's eye view. The same constraints were prepared with between CF IMRT optimization and NCF 3D-CRT treatment. The maximum point doses (D max) for the different optic pathway structures (OPS) with NCF 3D-CRT treatment should differ in no more than 3% from those with the NCF IMRT plan. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were obtained for all targets and organ at risk (OAR) with both treatment techniques. Plans with NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT constraints on target dose in homogeneity were computed, as well as the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) in the target volume. The PTV coverage was optimal with both NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT plans in the 8 tumor sites. No difference was noted between the two techniques for the average D{sub max} and D{sub min} dose. NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT will yield similar results on CI. However, HI was a significant difference between NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT plan (p < 0.001). Physical endpoints for target showed the mean target dose to be low in the CF IMRT plan, caused by a large target dose in homogeneity (p < 0.001). The impact of NCF 3D-CRT versus CF IMRT set-up is very slight. NCF3D-CRT is one of the treatment options for postocular invasion tumor. However, constraints for OARs are needed.

  7. LDA measurement of the passage flow field in a 3-D airfoil cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauter, R. C.; Fleeter, S.

    1986-01-01

    Three-dimensional internal flow computational models are currently being developed to predict the flow through turbomachinery blade rows. For these codes to be of quantitative value, they must be verified with data obtained in experiments which model the fundamental flow phenomena. In this paper, the complete three-dimensional flow field through a subsonic annular cascade of cambered airfoils is experimentally quantified. In particular, detailed three-dimensional data are obtained to quantify the inlet velocity profile, the cascade passage velocity field, and the exit region flow field. The primary instrumentation for acquiring these data is a single-channel Laser Doppler Anemometer operating in the backscatter mode, with chordwise distributions of airfoil surface static pressure taps also utilized. Appropriate data are correlated with predictions from the MERIDL/TSONIC codes.

  8. The MUSE 3D view of the Hubble Deep Field South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, R.; Brinchmann, J.; Richard, J.; Contini, T.; Drake, A.; Franx, M.; Tacchella, S.; Vernet, J.; Wisotzki, L.; Blaizot, J.; Bouché, N.; Bouwens, R.; Cantalupo, S.; Carollo, C. M.; Carton, D.; Caruana, J.; Clément, B.; Dreizler, S.; Epinat, B.; Guiderdoni, B.; Herenz, C.; Husser, T.-O.; Kamann, S.; Kerutt, J.; Kollatschny, W.; Krajnovic, D.; Lilly, S.; Martinsson, T.; Michel-Dansac, L.; Patricio, V.; Schaye, J.; Shirazi, M.; Soto, K.; Soucail, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Urrutia, T.; Weilbacher, P.; de Zeeuw, T.

    2015-03-01

    We observed Hubble Deep Field South with the new panoramic integral-field spectrograph MUSE that we built and have just commissioned at the VLT. The data cube resulting from 27 h of integration covers one arcmin2 field of view at an unprecedented depth with a 1σ emission-line surface brightness limit of 1 × 10-19 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2, and contains ~90 000 spectra. We present the combined and calibrated data cube, and we performed a first-pass analysis of the sources detected in the Hubble Deep Field South imaging. We measured the redshifts of 189 sources up to a magnitude I814 = 29.5, increasing the number of known spectroscopic redshifts in this field by more than an order of magnitude. We also discovered 26 Lyα emitting galaxies that are not detected in the HST WFPC2 deep broad-band images. The intermediate spectral resolution of 2.3 Å allows us to separate resolved asymmetric Lyα emitters, [O ii]3727 emitters, and C iii]1908 emitters, and the broad instantaneous wavelength range of 4500 Å helps to identify single emission lines, such as [O iii]5007, Hβ, and Hα, over a very wide redshift range. We also show how the three-dimensional information of MUSE helps to resolve sources that are confused at ground-based image quality. Overall, secure identifications are provided for 83% of the 227 emission line sources detected in the MUSE data cube and for 32% of the 586 sources identified in the HST catalogue. The overall redshift distribution is fairly flat to z = 6.3, with a reduction between z = 1.5 to 2.9, in the well-known redshift desert. The field of view of MUSE also allowed us to detect 17 groups within the field. We checked that the number counts of [O ii]3727 and Lyα emitters are roughly consistent with predictions from the literature. Using two examples, we demonstrate that MUSE is able to provide exquisite spatially resolved spectroscopic information on the intermediate-redshift galaxies present in the field. Thisunique data set can be used for a

  9. Application of digital interferogram evaluation techniques to the measurement of 3-D flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Friedhelm; Yu, Yung H.

    1987-01-01

    A system for digitally evaluating interferograms, based on an image processing system connected to a host computer, was implemented. The system supports one- and two-dimensional interferogram evaluations. Interferograms are digitized, enhanced, and then segmented. The fringe coordinates are extracted, and the fringes are represented as polygonal data structures. Fringe numbering and fringe interpolation modules are implemented. The system supports editing and interactive features, as well as graphic visualization. An application of the system to the evaluation of double exposure interferograms from the transonic flow field around a helicopter blade and the reconstruction of the three dimensional flow field is given.

  10. Web-based Visualization and Query of semantically segmented multiresolution 3D Models in the Field of Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, M.; Agugiaro, G.; Billen, N.; Loos, L.; Zipf, A.

    2014-05-01

    Many important Cultural Heritage sites have been studied over long periods of time by different means of technical equipment, methods and intentions by different researchers. This has led to huge amounts of heterogeneous "traditional" datasets and formats. The rising popularity of 3D models in the field of Cultural Heritage in recent years has brought additional data formats and makes it even more necessary to find solutions to manage, publish and study these data in an integrated way. The MayaArch3D project aims to realize such an integrative approach by establishing a web-based research platform bringing spatial and non-spatial databases together and providing visualization and analysis tools. Especially the 3D components of the platform use hierarchical segmentation concepts to structure the data and to perform queries on semantic entities. This paper presents a database schema to organize not only segmented models but also different Levels-of-Details and other representations of the same entity. It is further implemented in a spatial database which allows the storing of georeferenced 3D data. This enables organization and queries by semantic, geometric and spatial properties. As service for the delivery of the segmented models a standardization candidate of the OpenGeospatialConsortium (OGC), the Web3DService (W3DS) has been extended to cope with the new database schema and deliver a web friendly format for WebGL rendering. Finally a generic user interface is presented which uses the segments as navigation metaphor to browse and query the semantic segmentation levels and retrieve information from an external database of the German Archaeological Institute (DAI).

  11. 3D modeling of the total electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation using the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, F. S.; Lancaster, J. L.; Fox, P. T.

    2009-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians with a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this paper, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistically shaped head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. Secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes typically range from 20% to 35% of the primary E-field's magnitude. The direction of the secondary E-field was generally in opposition to the primary E-field; however, for some locations, this was not the case (i.e. going from high to low conductivity tissues). These findings show that realistically shaped head geometries are important for accurate modeling of the total E-field.

  12. Computational chemistry study of 3D-structure-function relationships for enzymes based on Markov models for protein electrostatic, HINT, and van der Waals potentials.

    PubMed

    Concu, Riccardo; Podda, Gianni; Uriarte, Eugenio; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2009-07-15

    In a significant work, Dobson and Doig (J Mol Biol 2003, 330, 771) illustrated protein prediction as enzymatic or not from spatial structure without resorting to alignments. They used 52 protein features and a nonlinear support vector machine model to classify more than 1000 proteins collected from the PDB with a 77% overall accuracy. The most useful features were: the secondary-structure content, the amino acid frequencies, the number of disulphide bonds, and the largest cleft size. Working on the same dataset used by D&D, in this article we reported a good and simple model, based on the Markov chain models (MCM), to classify protein 3D structures as enzymatic or not, taking into consideration the spatial structure without resorting to alignments. Here we define, for the first time, a general MCM to calculate the electrostatic potential, molecular vibrations, van der Waals (vdw) interactions, and hydrophobic interactions (HINT) and use them in comparative studies of potential fields and/or protein function prediction. The dataset is composed of 1371 proteins divided into 689 enzymes and 682 nonenzymes, all proteins were collected from the PDB. The best model we found was a linear model carried out with the linear discriminant analysis; it was able to classify 74.18% of the proteins using only two electrostatic potentials. In the work described here, we define 3D-HINT potentials (mu(k)) and use them for the first time to derive a classifier for protein enzymes. We analyzed ROC curves, domain of applicability, parametric assumptions, desirability maps, and also tested other nonlinear artificial neural network models which did not improve the linear model. In closing, this MCM allows a fast calculation and comparison of different potentials deriving into accurate protein 3D structure-function relationships, notably simpler than the previous.

  13. Configuration and Evaluation of a Dual-Doppler 3-D Wind Field System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Winifred C.

    2014-01-01

    Current LSP, GSDO, and SLS space vehicle operations are halted when wind speeds from specific directions exceed defined thresholds and when lightning is a threat. Strong winds and lightning are difficult parameters for the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) to forecast, yet are important in the protection of customer vehicle operations and the personnel that conduct them. A display of the low-level horizontal wind field to reveal areas of high winds or convergence would be a valuable tool for forecasters in assessing the timing of high winds, or convection initiation and subsequent lightning occurrence. This is especially important for areas where no weather observation platforms exist. Developing a dual-Doppler radar capability would provide such a display to assist forecasters in predicting high winds and convection initiation. The wind fields can also be used to initialize a local mesoscale numerical weather prediction model to help improve the model forecast winds, convection initiation, and other phenomena. The 45 WS and NWS MLB tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a dual- Doppler wind field display using data from the 45th Space Wing radar, known as the Weather Surveillance Radar (WSR), NWS MLB Weather Surveillance Radar 1988 Doppler (KMLB), and the Orlando International Airport Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (KMCO). They also stipulated that the software used should be freely available. The AMU evaluated two software packages and, with concurrence from NWS MLB and the 45 WS, chose the Warning Decision Support System-Integrated Information (WDSS-II). The AMU collected data from two significant weather cases: a tornadic event on 14 April 2013 and a severe wind and hail event on 12 February 2014. For the 14 April case, the data were from WSR and KMLB. For the 12 February case, the data were from KMCO and KMLB. The AMU installed WDSS-II on a Linux PC, then processed and quality controlled the radar data for display and analysis using WDSS-II tools

  14. Magnetic fields near spacecraft-explored comets: 3D MHD numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. B.; Alexashov, D. B.; Lebedev, M. G.

    2015-05-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of the interaction between the solar wind and a cometary ionosphere is presented. The model accounts for photoionization of the neutral component of the cometary outflow and the resonance charge exchange between charged and neutral particles, together with the interplanetary magnetic field. The numerical implementation of the model is performed on the basis of the second-order shock-fitting Godunov method generalized to cover MHD flows. The results of the calculations are analysed with emphasis on the behaviour of the interplanetary magnetic field disturbed by the cometary outflow. The comparison of the numerical results with the spaceboard measured data obtained during the spacecraft flybys near comets Halley and Grigg-Skjellerup shows their good agreement, thus giving promise that the model will be capable to adequately describe the plasma and magnetic surrounding of comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the Rosetta spacecraft encounter.

  15. A 3D model of crustal magnetization at the Pinacate Volcanic Field, NW Sonora, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Abdeslem, Juan; Calmus, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The Pinacate Volcanic Field (PVF) is located near the western border of the southern Basin and Range province, in the State of Sonora NW Mexico, and within the Gulf of California Extensional Province. This volcanic field contains the shield volcano Santa Clara, which mainly consists of basaltic to trachytic volcanic rocks, and reaches an altitude of ~ 1200 m. The PVF disrupts a series of discontinuous ranges of low topographic relief aligned in a NW direction, which consist mainly of Proterozoic metamorphic rocks and Proterozoic through Paleogene granitoids. The PVF covers an area of approximately 60 by 55 km, and includes more than 400 well-preserved cinder cones and vents and eight maar craters. It was active from about 1.7 Ma until about 13 ka. We have used the ages and magnetic polarities of the volcanic rocks, along with mapped magnetic anomalies and their inverse modeling to determine that the Pinacate Volcanic Field was formed during two volcanic episodes. The oldest one built the Santa Clara shield volcano of basaltic and trachytic composition, and occurred during the geomagnetic Matuyama Chron of reverse polarity, which also includes the normal polarity Jaramillo and Olduvai Subchrons, thus imprinting both normal and reverse magnetization in the volcanic products. The younger Pinacate series of basaltic composition represents monogenetic volcanic activity that extends all around the PVF and occurred during the subsequent geomagnetic Brunhes Chron of normal polarity. Magnetic anomalies toward the north of the Santa Clara volcano are the most intense in the PVF, and their inverse modeling indicates the presence of a large subsurface body magnetized in the present direction of the geomagnetic field. This suggests that the magma chambers at depth cooled below the Curie temperature during the Brunhes Chron.

  16. Contact-Free Templating of 3-D Colloidal Structures Using Spatially Nonuniform AC Electric Fields.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Joshua; Wood, Jeffery A; Docoslis, Aristides

    2016-09-20

    The formation of ordered and regularly shaped structures of colloidal particles with the aid of spatially nonuniform electric fields is a modern research area of great interest. This work illustrates how alternating current (AC) electrokinetic effects (dielectrophoresis, electroosmosis) can serve as contact-free templates, inside which colloidal microspheres can assemble into a variety of shapes and sizes. We show how three-dimensional colloidal structures of square, circular, and diamond shape of many tens of micrometers in size can be reproducibly formed with a single set of quadrupolar microelectrodes. Numerical simulations performed help to explain the role of AC electroosmosis and AC dielectrophoresis on the shaping of these structures as a function of applied voltage and frequency. We also demonstrate how the templating repertoire is further enhanced with the simultaneous application of a second, individually controlled AC electric field, which enables a variety of asymmetric colloidal structures to be produced using the same set of quadrupolar microelectrodes. As the preservation of shape and size of such electric-field templated structures after medium evaporation still remains a big challenge, here we also report on a novel method that permits the stabilization and isolation of these particle assemblies through medium gelation and subsequent hydrogel removal with a UV/ozone treatment.

  17. Contact-Free Templating of 3-D Colloidal Structures Using Spatially Nonuniform AC Electric Fields.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Joshua; Wood, Jeffery A; Docoslis, Aristides

    2016-09-20

    The formation of ordered and regularly shaped structures of colloidal particles with the aid of spatially nonuniform electric fields is a modern research area of great interest. This work illustrates how alternating current (AC) electrokinetic effects (dielectrophoresis, electroosmosis) can serve as contact-free templates, inside which colloidal microspheres can assemble into a variety of shapes and sizes. We show how three-dimensional colloidal structures of square, circular, and diamond shape of many tens of micrometers in size can be reproducibly formed with a single set of quadrupolar microelectrodes. Numerical simulations performed help to explain the role of AC electroosmosis and AC dielectrophoresis on the shaping of these structures as a function of applied voltage and frequency. We also demonstrate how the templating repertoire is further enhanced with the simultaneous application of a second, individually controlled AC electric field, which enables a variety of asymmetric colloidal structures to be produced using the same set of quadrupolar microelectrodes. As the preservation of shape and size of such electric-field templated structures after medium evaporation still remains a big challenge, here we also report on a novel method that permits the stabilization and isolation of these particle assemblies through medium gelation and subsequent hydrogel removal with a UV/ozone treatment. PMID:27541583

  18. 3-D RPIC simulations of relativistic jets: Particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing (relativistic) jets and shocks, e.g., supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the .shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration in jets.

  19. 3D magnetic field configuration of small-scale reconnection events in the solar plasma atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, T.

    2015-10-15

    The outer solar atmosphere, i.e., the corona and the chromosphere, is replete with small energy-release events, which are accompanied by transient brightening and jet-like ejections. These events are considered to be magnetic reconnection events in the solar plasma, and their dynamics have been studied using recent advanced observations from the Hinode spacecraft and other observatories in space and on the ground. These events occur at different locations in the solar atmosphere and vary in their morphology and amount of the released energy. The magnetic field configurations of these reconnection events are inferred based on observations of magnetic fields at the photospheric level. Observations suggest that these magnetic configurations can be classified into two groups. In the first group, two anti-parallel magnetic fields reconnect to each other, yielding a 2D emerging flux configuration. In the second group, helical or twisted magnetic flux tubes are parallel or at a relative angle to each other. Reconnection can occur only between anti-parallel components of the magnetic flux tubes and may be referred to as component reconnection. The latter configuration type may be more important for the larger class of small-scale reconnection events. The two types of magnetic configurations can be compared to counter-helicity and co-helicity configurations, respectively, in laboratory plasma collision experiments.

  20. Quantum 3D spin-glass system on the scales of space-time periods of external electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gevorkyan, A. S.

    2012-10-15

    A dielectric medium consisting of rigidly polarized molecules has been treated as a quantum 3D disordered spin system. It is shown that using Birkhoff's ergodic hypothesis the initial 3D disordered spin problem on scales of space-time periods of external field is reduced to two conditionally separable 1D problems. The first problem describes a 1D disordered N-particle quantum system with relaxation in random environment while the second one describes statistical properties of ensemble of disordered 1D steric spin chains of certain length. Basing on constructions which are developed in both problems, the coefficient of polarizability related to collective orientational effects under the influence of external field was calculated. On the basis of these investigations the equation of Clausius-Mossotti (CM) has been generalized as well as the equation for permittivity. It is shown that under the influence of weak standing electromagnetic fields in the equation of CM arising of catastrophe is possible, that can substantially change behavior of permittivity in the X-ray region on the macroscopic scale of space.

  1. Inferring the 3D gravitational field of the Milky Way with stellar streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian Michael

    2016-06-01

    We develop two new methods to measure the structure of matter around the Milky Way using stellar tidal streams from disrupting dwarf galaxies and globular clusters. The dark matter halo of the Milky Way is expected to be triaxial and filled with substructure, but measurements of the shape and profile of dark matter around the Galaxy are highly uncertain and often contradictory. We demonstrate that kinematic data from near-future surveys for stellar streams or shells produced by tidal disruption of stellar systems around the Milky Way will provide precise measures of the gravitational potential to test these predictions. We develop a probabilistic method for inferring the Galactic potential with tidal streams based on the idea that the stream stars were once close in phase space and test this method on synthetic datasets generated from N-body simulations of satellite disruption with observational uncertainties chosen to mimic current and near-future surveys of various stars. We find that with just four well-measured stream stars, we can infer properties of a triaxial potential with precisions of order 5--7 percent. We then demonstrate that, if the Milky Way's dark matter halo is triaxial and is not fully integrable (as is expected), an appreciable fraction of orbits will be chaotic. We examine the influence of chaos on the phase-space morphology of cold tidal streams and show that streams even in weakly chaotic regions look very different from those in regular regions. We discuss the implications of this fact given that we see several long, thin streams in the Galactic halo; our results suggest that long, cold streams around our Galaxy must exist only on regular (or very nearly regular) orbits and potentially provide a map of the regular regions of the Milky Way potential. We then apply this understanding of stream formation along chaotic orbits to the interpretation of a newly-discovered, puzzling stellar stream near the Galactic bulge. We conclude that the

  2. Stress field sensitivity analysis within Mesozoic successions in the Swiss Alpine foreland using 3-D-geomechanical-numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Karsten; Hergert, Tobias; Heidbach, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    The in situ stress conditions are of key importance for the evaluation of radioactive waste repositories. In stage two of the Swiss site selection program, the three siting areas of high-level radioactive waste are located in the Alpine foreland in northern Switzerland. The sedimentary succession overlays the basement, consisting of variscan crystalline rocks as well as partly preserved Permo-Carboniferous deposits in graben structures. The Mesozoic sequence represents nearly the complete era and is covered by Cenozoic Molasse deposits as well as Quaternary sediments, mainly in the valleys. The target horizon (designated host rock) is an >100 m thick argillaceous Jurassic deposit (Opalinus Clay). To enlighten the impact of site-specific features on the state of stress within the sedimentary succession, 3-D-geomechanical-numerical models with elasto-plastic rock properties are set up for three potential siting areas. The lateral extent of the models ranges between 12 and 20 km, the vertical extent is up to a depth of 2.5 or 5 km below sea level. The sedimentary sequence plus the basement are separated into 10 to 14 rock mechanical units. The Mesozoic succession is intersected by regional fault zones; two or three of them are present in each model. The numerical problem is solved with the finite element method with a resolution of 100-150 m laterally and 10-30 m vertically. An initial stress state is established for all models taking into account the depth-dependent overconsolidation ratio in Opalinus Clay in northern Switzerland. The influence of topography, rock properties, friction on the faults as well as the impact of tectonic shortening on the state of stress is investigated. The tectonic stress is implemented with lateral displacement boundary conditions, calibrated on stress data that are compiled in Northern Switzerland. The model results indicate that the stress perturbation by the topography is significant to depths greater than the relief contrast. The

  3. Developments in digital in-line holography enable validated measurement of 3D particle field dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert

    2013-12-01

    Digital in-line holography is an optical technique which can be applied to measure the size, three-dimensional position, and three-component velocity of disperse particle fields. This work summarizes recent developments at Sandia National Laboratories focused on improvement in measurement accuracy, experimental validation, and applications to multiphase flows. New routines are presented which reduce the uncertainty in measured position along the optical axis to a fraction of the particle diameter. Furthermore, application to liquid atomization highlights the ability to measure complex, three-dimensional structures. Finally, investigation of particles traveling at near sonic conditions prove accuracy despite significant experimental noise due to shock-waves.

  4. 3D FEM analyses on flow field characteristics of the valveless piezoelectric pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Zhang, Jianhui; Shi, Weidong; Wang, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Due to the special transportation and heat transfer characteristics, the fractal-like Y-shape branching tube is used in valveless piezoelectric pumps as a no-moving-part valve. However, there have been little analyses on the flow resistance of the valveless piezoelectric pump, which is critical to the performance of the valveless piezoelectric pump with fractal-like Y-shape branching tubes. Flow field of the piezoelectric pump is analyzed by the finite element method, and the pattern of the velocity streamlines is revealed, which can well explain the difference of total flow resistances of the piezoelectric pump. Besides, simplified numerical method is employed to calculate the export flow rate of piezoelectric pump, and the flow field of the piezoelectric pump is presented. The FEM computation shows that the maximum flow rate is 16.4 mL/min. Compared with experimental result, the difference between them is just 55.5%, which verifies the FEM method. The reasons of the difference between dividing and merging flow resistance of the valveless piezoelectric pump with fractal-like Y-shape branching tubes are also investigated in this method. The proposed research provides the instruction to design of novel piezoelectric pump and a rapid method to analyse the pump flow rate.

  5. Modelling of plasma response to 3D external magnetic field perturbations in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Sun, Youwen; Liu, Yueqiang; Gu, Shuai; Liu, Yue; Wang, Huihui; Zhou, Lina; Guo, Wenfeng

    2016-11-01

    Sustained mitigation and/or suppression of type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) has been achieved in EAST high-confinement plasmas, utilizing the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields produced by two rows of magnetic coils located just inside the vacuum vessel. Systematic toroidal modelling of the plasma response to these RMP fields with various coil configurations (with dominant toroidal mode number n  = 1, 2, 3, 4) in EAST is, for the first time, carried out by using the MARS-F code (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681), with results reported here. In particular, the plasma response is computed with varying coil phasing (the toroidal phase difference of the coil currents) between the upper and lower rows of coils, from 0 to 360°. Four figures of merit, constructed based on the MARS-F computations, are used to determine the optimal coil phasing. The modelled results, taking into account the plasma response, agree well with the experimental observations in terms of the coil phasing for both the mitigated and the suppressed ELM cases in EAST experiments. This study provides a crucial confirmation of the role of the plasma edge peeling response in ELM control, complementing similar studies carried out for other tokamak devices.

  6. 3D FEM analyses on flow field characteristics of the valveless piezoelectric pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Zhang, Jianhui; Shi, Weidong; Wang, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Due to the special transportation and heat transfer characteristics, the fractal-like Y-shape branching tube is used in valveless piezoelectric pumps as a no-moving-part valve. However, there have been little analyses on the flow resistance of the valveless piezoelectric pump, which is critical to the performance of the valveless piezoelectric pump with fractal-like Y-shape branching tubes. Flow field of the piezoelectric pump is analyzed by the finite element method, and the pattern of the velocity streamlines is revealed, which can well explain the difference of total flow resistances of the piezoelectric pump. Besides, simplified numerical method is employed to calculate the export flow rate of piezoelectric pump, and the flow field of the piezoelectric pump is presented. The FEM computation shows that the maximum flow rate is 16.4 mL/min. Compared with experimental result, the difference between them is just 55.5%, which verifies the FEM method. The reasons of the difference between dividing and merging flow resistance of the valveless piezoelectric pump with fractal-like Y-shape branching tubes are also investigated in this method. The proposed research provides the instruction to design of novel piezoelectric pump and a rapid method to analyse the pump flow rate.

  7. Source fields reconstruction with 3D mapping by means of the virtual acoustic volume concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, S.; Totaro, N.; Guyader, J. L.; Schaeffer, M.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the theoretical framework of the virtual acoustic volume concept and two related inverse Patch Transfer Functions (iPTF) identification methods (called u-iPTF and m-iPTF depending on the chosen boundary conditions for the virtual volume). They are based on the application of Green's identity on an arbitrary closed virtual volume defined around the source. The reconstruction of sound source fields combines discrete acoustic measurements performed at accessible positions around the source with the modal behavior of the chosen virtual acoustic volume. The mode shapes of the virtual volume can be computed by a Finite Element solver to handle the geometrical complexity of the source. As a result, it is possible to identify all the acoustic source fields at the real surface of an irregularly shaped structure and irrespective of its acoustic environment. The m-iPTF method is introduced for the first time in this paper. Conversely to the already published u-iPTF method, the m-iPTF method needs only acoustic pressure and avoids particle velocity measurements. This paper is focused on its validation, both with numerical computations and by experiments on a baffled oil pan.

  8. Automated 3D Volumetry of the Pulmonary Arteries based on Magnetic Resonance Angiography Has Potential for Predicting Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rengier, Fabian; Wörz, Stefan; Melzig, Claudius; Ley, Sebastian; Fink, Christian; Benjamin, Nicola; Partovi, Sasan; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Rohr, Karl; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Grünig, Ekkehard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate feasibility of automated 3D volumetry of central pulmonary arteries based on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), to assess pulmonary artery volumes in patients with pulmonary hypertension compared to healthy controls, and to investigate the potential of the technique for predicting pulmonary hypertension. Methods MRA of pulmonary arteries was acquired at 1.5T in 20 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and 21 healthy normotensive controls. 3D model-based image analysis software was used for automated segmentation of main, right and left pulmonary arteries (MPA, RPA and LPA). Volumes indexed to vessel length and mean, minimum and maximum diameters along the entire vessel course were assessed and corrected for body surface area (BSA). For comparison, diameters were also manually measured on axial reconstructions and double oblique multiplanar reformations. Analyses were performed by two cardiovascular radiologists, and by one radiologist again after 6 months. Results Mean volumes of MPA, RPA and LPA for patients/controls were 5508 ± 1236/3438 ± 749, 3522 ± 934/1664 ± 468 and 3093 ± 692/1812 ± 474 μl/(cm length x m2 BSA) (all p<0.001). Mean, minimum and maximum diameters along the entire vessel course were also significantly increased in patients compared to controls (all p<0.001). Intra- and interobserver agreement were excellent for both volume and diameter measurements using 3D segmentation (intraclass correlation coefficients 0.971–0.999, p<0.001). Area under the curve for predicting pulmonary hypertension using volume was 0.998 (95% confidence interval 0.990–1.0, p<0.001), compared to 0.967 using manually measured MPA diameter (95% confidence interval 0.910–1.0, p<0.001). Conclusions Automated MRA-based 3D volumetry of central pulmonary arteries is feasible and demonstrated significantly increased volumes and diameters in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension compared to healthy controls. Pulmonary artery

  9. Patient-Specific 3D Pretreatment and Potential 3D Online Dose Verification of Monte Carlo-Calculated IMRT Prostate Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Boggula, Ramesh; Jahnke, Lennart; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Fast and reliable comprehensive quality assurance tools are required to validate the safety and accuracy of complex intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for prostate treatment. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the COMPASS system for both off-line and potential online procedures for the verification of IMRT treatment plans. Methods and Materials: COMPASS has a dedicated beam model and dose engine, it can reconstruct three-dimensional dose distributions on the patient anatomy based on measured fluences using either the MatriXX two-dimensional (2D) array (offline) or a 2D transmission detector (T2D) (online). For benchmarking the COMPASS dose calculation, various dose-volume indices were compared against Monte Carlo-calculated dose distributions for five prostate patient treatment plans. Gamma index evaluation and absolute point dose measurements were also performed in an inhomogeneous pelvis phantom using extended dose range films and ion chamber for five additional treatment plans. Results: MatriXX-based dose reconstruction showed excellent agreement with the ion chamber (<0.5%, except for one treatment plan, which showed 1.5%), film ({approx}100% pixels passing gamma criteria 3%/3 mm) and mean dose-volume indices (<2%). The T2D based dose reconstruction showed good agreement as well with ion chamber (<2%), film ({approx}99% pixels passing gamma criteria 3%/3 mm), and mean dose-volume indices (<5.5%). Conclusion: The COMPASS system qualifies for routine prostate IMRT pretreatment verification with the MatriXX detector and has the potential for on-line verification of treatment delivery using T2D.

  10. 3D effects of edge magnetic field configuration on divertor/scrape-off layer transport and optimization possibilities for a future reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Xu, Y.; Ida, K.; Corre, Y.; Feng, Y.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Tabares, F. L.; Evans, T. E.; Coenen, J. W.; Liang, Y.; Bader, A.; Itoh, K.; Yamada, H.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Ciraolo, G.; Tafalla, D.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Guo, H. Y.; Cui, Z. Y.; Reiter, D.; Asakura, N.; Wenzel, U.; Morita, S.; Ohno, N.; Peterson, B. J.; Masuzaki, S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper assesses the three-dimensional (3D) effects of the edge magnetic field structure on divertor/scrape-off layer transport, based on an inter-machine comparison of experimental data and on the recent progress of 3D edge transport simulation. The 3D effects are elucidated as a consequence of competition between transports parallel (\\parallel ) and perpendicular (\\bot ) to the magnetic field, in open field lines cut by divertor plates, or in magnetic islands. The competition has strong impacts on divertor functions, such as determination of the divertor density regime, impurity screening and detachment control. The effects of magnetic perturbation on the edge electric field and turbulent transport are also discussed. Parameterization to measure the 3D effects on the edge transport is attempted for the individual divertor functions. Based on the suggested key parameters, an operation domain of the 3D divertor configuration is discussed for future devices.

  11. Formulation and stability evaluation of 3D alginate beads potentially useful for cumulus-oocyte complexes culture.

    PubMed

    Dorati, Rossella; Genta, Ida; Ferrari, Michela; Vigone, Giulia; Merico, Valeria; Garagna, Silvia; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Conti, Bice

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian follicle encapsulation in synthetic or natural matrixes based on biopolymers is potentially a promising approach to in vitro maturation (IVM) process, since it maintains follicle 3D organisation by preventing its flattening and consequent disruption of gap junctions, preserving the functional relationship between oocyte and companion follicle cells. The aim of the work was to optimise physico-chemical parameters of alginate microcapsules for perspective IVM under 3D environments. On this purpose alginate and cross-linking agent concentrations were investigated. Alginate concentration between 0.75% and 0.125% w/w and Mg(2+), Ba(2+), Ca(2+ )at concentration between 100 and 20 mM were tested. Follicle encapsulation was obtained by on purpose modified diffusion setting gelation technique, and evaluated together with beads, chemical and mechanical stability in standard and stressing conditions. Beads permeability was tested towards albumin, fetuin, pyruvate, glucose, pullulan. Results demonstrated that 0.25% alginate cross-linked in 100 mM CaCl2 beads is suitable to follicle encapsulation. PMID:26791322

  12. Multi-modal digital holographic microscopy for wide-field fluorescence and 3D phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Xiangyu; Xia, Peng; Matoba, Osamu; Nitta, Koichi; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Multi-modal digital holographic microscopy is a combination of epifluorescence microscopy and digital holographic microscopy, the main function of which is to obtain images from fluorescence intensity and quantified phase contrasts, simultaneously. The proposed system is mostly beneficial to biological studies, with the reason that often the studies are depending on fluorescent labeling techniques to detect certain intracellular molecules, while phase information reflecting properties of unstained transparent elements. This paper is presenting our latest researches on applications such as randomly moving micro-fluorescent beads and living cells of Physcomitrella patens. The experiments are succeeded on obtaining a succession of wide-field fluorescent images and holograms from micro-beads, and different depths focusing is realized via numerical reconstruction. Living cells of Physcomitrella patens are recorded in the static manner, the reconstruction distance indicates thickness of cellular structure. These results are implementing practical applications toward many biomedical science researches.

  13. High thick layer-by-layer 3D multiscale fibrous scaffolds for enhanced cell infiltration and it's potential in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shalumon, K T; Chennazhi, K P; Nair, Shantikumar V; Jayakumar, R

    2013-12-01

    This work explains the fabrication and potential applicability of high thick three dimensional (3-D) electrospun multiscale fibrous scaffolds in tissue engineering by focusing on the possible fabrication techniques. Multiscale fibrous scaffold of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was fabricated by combining nano and micro fibers in optimum concentrations. Finely chopped multiscale fibers were allowed to undergo compression, freeze-drying, resin embedding, cryo-grinding and layering techniques to make 3D scaffolds and the layer-by-layer method was found to be most suitable for 3-D scaffold fabrication. Cell studies in layered 3D scaffolds were performed using MG 63 cells and infiltration was observed using SEM and confocal microscope. Since the layered high thick 3D scaffold perfectly complies with the requirements, this could be proposed as one of the suitable methods for constructing 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. PMID:24266265

  14. 3D transient electromagnetic simulation using a modified correspondence principle for wave and diffusion fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Ji, Y.; Egbert, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    The fictitious time domain method (FTD), based on the correspondence principle for wave and diffusion fields, has been developed and used over the past few years primarily for marine electromagnetic (EM) modeling. Here we present results of our efforts to apply the FTD approach to land and airborne TEM problems which can reduce the computer time several orders of magnitude and preserve high accuracy. In contrast to the marine case, where sources are in the conductive sea water, we must model the EM fields in the air; to allow for topography air layers must be explicitly included in the computational domain. Furthermore, because sources for most TEM applications generally must be modeled as finite loops, it is useful to solve directly for the impulse response appropriate to the problem geometry, instead of the point-source Green functions typically used for marine problems. Our approach can be summarized as follows: (1) The EM diffusion equation is transformed to a fictitious wave equation. (2) The FTD wave equation is solved with an explicit finite difference time-stepping scheme, with CPML (Convolutional PML) boundary conditions for the whole computational domain including the air and earth , with FTD domain source corresponding to the actual transmitter geometry. Resistivity of the air layers is kept as low as possible, to compromise between efficiency (longer fictitious time step) and accuracy. We have generally found a host/air resistivity contrast of 10-3 is sufficient. (3)A "Modified" Fourier Transform (MFT) allow us recover system's impulse response from the fictitious time domain to the diffusion (frequency) domain. (4) The result is multiplied by the Fourier transformation (FT) of the real source current avoiding time consuming convolutions in the time domain. (5) The inverse FT is employed to get the final full waveform and full time response of the system in the time domain. In general, this method can be used to efficiently solve most time-domain EM

  15. Wide-field-of-view image pickup system for multiview volumetric 3D displays using multiple RGB-D cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuan; Kakeya, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    A real-time and wide-field-of-view image pickup system for coarse integral volumetric imaging (CIVI) is realized. This system is to apply CIVI display for live action videos generated by the real-time 3D reconstruction. By using multiple RGB-D cameras from different directions, a complete surface of the objects and a wide field of views can be shown in our CIVI displays. A prototype system is constructed and it works as follows. Firstly, image features and depth data are used for a fast and accurate calibration. Secondly, 3D point cloud data are obtained by each RGB-D camera and they are all converted into the same coordinate system. Thirdly, multiview images are constructed by perspective transformation from different viewpoints. Finally, the image for each viewpoint is divided depending on the depth of each pixel for a volumetric view. The experiments show a better result than using only one RGB-D camera and the whole system works on the real-time basis.

  16. 3D Online Submicron Scale Observation of Mixed Metal Powder's Microstructure Evolution in High Temperature and Microwave Compound Fields

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Hu, Xiao-fang; Xiao, Yu; Xiao, Ti-qiao

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the influence on the mechanical properties caused by microstructure evolution of metal powder in extreme environment, 3D real-time observation of the microstructure evolution of Al-Ti mixed powder in high temperature and microwave compound fields was realized by using synchrotron radiation computerized topography (SR-CT) technique; the spatial resolution was enhanced to 0.37 μm/pixel through the designed equipment and the introduction of excellent reconstruction method for the first time. The process of microstructure evolution during sintering was clearly distinguished from 2D and 3D reconstructed images. Typical sintering parameters such as sintering neck size, porosity, and particle size of the sample were presented for quantitative analysis of the influence on the mechanical properties and the sintering kinetics during microwave sintering. The neck size-time curve was obtained and the neck growth exponent was 7.3, which indicated that surface diffusion was the main diffusion mechanism; the reason was the eddy current loss induced by the external microwave fields providing an additional driving force for mass diffusion on the particle surface. From the reconstructed images and the curve of porosity and average particle size versus temperature, it was believed that the presence of liquid phase aluminum accelerated the densification and particle growth. PMID:24737986

  17. Full-physics 3D heterogeneous simulations of electromagnetic induction fields on level and deformed sea ice

    SciTech Connect

    Samluk, Jesse P.; Geiger, Cathleen A.; Weiss, Chester J.; Kolodzey, James

    2015-10-01

    In this article we explore simulated responses of electromagnetic (EM) signals relative to in situ field surveys and quantify the effects that different values of conductivity in sea ice have on the EM fields. We compute EM responses of ice types with a three-dimensional (3-D) finite-volume discretization of Maxwell's equations and present 2-D sliced visualizations of their associated EM fields at discrete frequencies. Several interesting observations result: First, since the simulator computes the fields everywhere, each gridcell acts as a receiver within the model volume, and captures the complete, coupled interactions between air, snow, sea ice and sea water as a function of their conductivity; second, visualizations demonstrate how 1-D approximations near deformed ice features are violated. But the most important new finding is that changes in conductivity affect EM field response by modifying the magnitude and spatial patterns (i.e. footprint size and shape) of current density and magnetic fields. These effects are demonstrated through a visual feature we define as 'null lines'. Null line shape is affected by changes in conductivity near material boundaries as well as transmitter location. Our results encourage the use of null lines as a planning tool for better ground-truth field measurements near deformed ice types.

  18. Full-physics 3D heterogeneous simulations of electromagnetic induction fields on level and deformed sea ice

    DOE PAGES

    Samluk, Jesse P.; Geiger, Cathleen A.; Weiss, Chester J.; Kolodzey, James

    2015-10-01

    In this article we explore simulated responses of electromagnetic (EM) signals relative to in situ field surveys and quantify the effects that different values of conductivity in sea ice have on the EM fields. We compute EM responses of ice types with a three-dimensional (3-D) finite-volume discretization of Maxwell's equations and present 2-D sliced visualizations of their associated EM fields at discrete frequencies. Several interesting observations result: First, since the simulator computes the fields everywhere, each gridcell acts as a receiver within the model volume, and captures the complete, coupled interactions between air, snow, sea ice and sea water asmore » a function of their conductivity; second, visualizations demonstrate how 1-D approximations near deformed ice features are violated. But the most important new finding is that changes in conductivity affect EM field response by modifying the magnitude and spatial patterns (i.e. footprint size and shape) of current density and magnetic fields. These effects are demonstrated through a visual feature we define as 'null lines'. Null line shape is affected by changes in conductivity near material boundaries as well as transmitter location. Our results encourage the use of null lines as a planning tool for better ground-truth field measurements near deformed ice types.« less

  19. Modelling of 3D fields due to ferritic inserts and test blanket modules in toroidal geometry at ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Äkäslompolo, Simppa; Cavinato, Mario; Koechl, Florian; Kurki-Suonio, Taina; Li, Li; Parail, Vassili; Saibene, Gabriella; Särkimäki, Konsta; Sipilä, Seppo; Varje, Jari

    2016-06-01

    Computations in toroidal geometry are systematically performed for the plasma response to 3D magnetic perturbations produced by ferritic inserts (FIs) and test blanket modules (TBMs) for four ITER plasma scenarios: the 15 MA baseline, the 12.5 MA hybrid, the 9 MA steady state, and the 7.5 MA half-field helium plasma. Due to the broad toroidal spectrum of the FI and TBM fields, the plasma response for all the n  =  1-6 field components are computed and compared. The plasma response is found to be weak for the high-n (n  >  4) components. The response is not globally sensitive to the toroidal plasma flow speed, as long as the latter is not reduced by an order of magnitude. This is essentially due to the strong screening effect occurring at a finite flow, as predicted for ITER plasmas. The ITER error field correction coils (EFCC) are used to compensate the n  =  1 field errors produced by FIs and TBMs for the baseline scenario for the purpose of avoiding mode locking. It is found that the middle row of the EFCC, with a suitable toroidal phase for the coil current, can provide the best correction of these field errors, according to various optimisation criteria. On the other hand, even without correction, it is predicted that these n  =  1 field errors will not cause substantial flow damping for the 15 MA baseline scenario.

  20. Automated torso organ segmentation from 3D CT images using conditional random field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimura, Yukitaka; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Mori, Kensaku

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a segmentation method for torso organs using conditional random field (CRF) from medical images. A lot of methods have been proposed to enable automated extraction of organ regions from volumetric medical images. However, it is necessary to adjust empirical parameters of them to obtain precise organ regions. In this paper, we propose an organ segmentation method using structured output learning which is based on probabilistic graphical model. The proposed method utilizes CRF on three-dimensional grids as probabilistic graphical model and binary features which represent the relationship between voxel intensities and organ labels. Also we optimize the weight parameters of the CRF using stochastic gradient descent algorithm and estimate organ labels for a given image by maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation. The experimental result revealed that the proposed method can extract organ regions automatically using structured output learning. The error of organ label estimation was 6.6%. The DICE coefficients of right lung, left lung, heart, liver, spleen, right kidney, and left kidney are 0.94, 0.92, 0.65, 0.67, 0.36, 0.38, and 0.37, respectively.

  1. Mitigation of Alfvén activity in a tokamak by externally applied static 3D fields.

    PubMed

    Bortolon, A; Heidbrink, W W; Kramer, G J; Park, J-K; Fredrickson, E D; Lore, J D; Podestà, M

    2013-06-28

    The application of static magnetic field perturbations to a tokamak plasma is observed to alter the dynamics of high-frequency bursting Alfvén modes that are driven unstable by energetic ions. In response to perturbations with an amplitude of δB/B∼0.01 at the plasma boundary, the mode amplitude is reduced, the bursting frequency is increased, and the frequency chirp is smaller. For modes of weaker bursting character, the magnetic perturbation induces a temporary transition to a saturated continuous mode. Calculations of the perturbed distribution function indicate that the 3D perturbation affects the orbits of fast ions that resonate with the bursting modes. The experimental evidence represents an important demonstration of the possibility of controlling fast-ion instabilities through "phase-space engineering" of the fast-ion distribution function, by means of externally applied perturbation fields.

  2. Mitigation of Alfvén Activity in a Tokamak by Externally Applied Static 3D Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolon, A.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Kramer, G. J.; Park, J.-K.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Lore, J. D.; Podestà, M.

    2013-06-01

    The application of static magnetic field perturbations to a tokamak plasma is observed to alter the dynamics of high-frequency bursting Alfvén modes that are driven unstable by energetic ions. In response to perturbations with an amplitude of δB/B˜0.01 at the plasma boundary, the mode amplitude is reduced, the bursting frequency is increased, and the frequency chirp is smaller. For modes of weaker bursting character, the magnetic perturbation induces a temporary transition to a saturated continuous mode. Calculations of the perturbed distribution function indicate that the 3D perturbation affects the orbits of fast ions that resonate with the bursting modes. The experimental evidence represents an important demonstration of the possibility of controlling fast-ion instabilities through “phase-space engineering” of the fast-ion distribution function, by means of externally applied perturbation fields.

  3. Study of the 3D Coronal Magnetic Field of Active Region 11117 Around the Time of a Confined Flare Using a Data-Driven CESE-MHD Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Feng, X.; Wu, S.; Hu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Non-potentiality of the solar coronal magnetic field accounts for the solar explosion like flares and CMEs. We apply a data-driven CESE-MHD model to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) coronal magnetic field of NOAA active region (AR) 11117 around the time of a C-class confined flare occurred on 2010 October 25. The CESE-MHD model, based on the spacetime conservation-element and solution-element scheme, is designed to focus on the magnetic-field evolution and to consider a simplified solar atomsphere with finite plasma β. Magnetic vector-field data derived from the observations at the photoshpere is inputted directly to constrain the model. Assuming that the dynamic evolution of the coronal magnetic field can be approximated by successive equilibria, we solve a time sequence of MHD equilibria basing on a set of vector magnetograms for AR 11117 taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) around the time of flare. The model qualitatively reproduces the basic structures of the 3D magnetic field, as supported by the visual similarity between the field lines and the coronal loops observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), which shows that the coronal field can indeed be well characterized by the MHD equilibrium in most time. The magnetic configuration changes very limited during the studied time interval of two hours. A topological analysis reveals that the small flare is correlated with a bald patch (BP, where the magnetic field is tangent to the photoshpere), suggesting that the energy release of the flare can be understood by magnetic reconnection associated with the BP separatrices. The total magnetic flux and energy keep increasing slightly in spite of the flare, while the magnetic free energy drops during the flare with an amount of 1.7 × 1030 erg, which can be interpreted as the energy budget released by the minor C-class flare.

  4. Present-Day 3D Velocity Field of Eastern North America Based on Continuous GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, Mohammad Ali; Cocard, Marc; Santerre, Rock

    2016-07-01

    The Saint Lawrence River valley in eastern Canada was studied using observations of continuously operating GPS (CGPS) stations. The area is one of the most seismically active regions in eastern North America characterized by many earthquakes, which is also subject to an ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment. We present the current three-dimensional velocity field of eastern North America obtained from more than 14 years (9 years on average) of data at 112 CGPS stations. Bernese GNSS and GITSA software were used for CGPS data processing and position time series analysis, respectively. The results show the counterclockwise rotation of the North American plate in the No-Net-Rotation model with the average of 16.8 ± 0.7 mm/year constrained to ITRF 2008. We also present an ongoing uplift model for the study region based on the present-day CGPS observations. The model shows uplift all over eastern Canada with the maximum rate of 13.7 ± 1.2 mm/year and subsidence to the south mainly over northern USA with a typical rate of -1 to -2 mm/year and the minimum value of -2.7 ± 1.4 mm/year. We compared our model with the rate of radial displacements from the ICE-5G model. Both models agree within 0.02 mm/year at the best stations; however, our model shows a systematic spatial tilt compared to ICE-5G. The misfits between two models amount to the maximum relative subsidence of -6.1 ± 1.1 mm/year to the east and maximum relative uplift of 5.9 ± 2.7 mm/year to the west. The intraplate horizontal velocities are radially outward from the centers of maximum uplift and are inward to the centers of maximum subsidence with the typical velocity of 1-1.6 ± 0.4 mm/year that is in agreement with the ICE-5G model to the first order.

  5. Optimization and Use of 3D sintered porous material in medical field for mixing fibrin glue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmotte, Y.; Laroumanie, H.; Brossard, G.

    2012-04-01

    In medical field, Mixing of two or more chemical components (liquids and/or gases) is extremely important as improper mixing can affect the physico-chemical properties of the final product. At Baxter Healthcare Corporation, we are using a sintered porous material (PM) as a micro-mixer in medical device for mixing Fibrinogen and Thrombin in order to obtain a homogeneous polymerized Fibrin glue clot used in surgery. First trials were carried out with an interconnected PM from Porvair® (made of PE - porosity: 40% - permeability: 18Darcy). The injection rate is very low, usually about 10mL/min (Re number about 50) which keeps fluids in a laminar flow. Such a low flow rate does not favour mixing of fluids having gradient of viscosity if a mixer is not used. Promising results that were obtained lead the team to understand this ability to mix fluids which will be presented in the poster. Topology of porous media (PM) which associates a solid phase with interconnected (or not) porous structure is known and used in many commodity products. Researches on PM usually focus on flows inside this structure. By opposition to transport and filtration capacity, as well as mechanic and thermic properties, mixing is rarely associated with PM. However over the past few years, we shown that some type of PM have a real capacity to mix certain fluids. Poster will also describe the problematic of mixing complex biological fluids as fibrinogen and Thrombin. They indeed present a large viscosity difference (ratio about 120) limiting the diffusion and the interaction between the two solutions. As those products are expensive, we used Water (1cPo) and Glycerol 87% (120cPo) which are matching the viscosities of Thrombin and Fibrinogen. A parametric investigation of the "porous micro-mixer" as well as a scale up investigation was carried out to examine the influence of both diffusion and advection to successful mix fluids of different viscosity. Experiments were implemented with Planar Laser

  6. A novel vector potential formulation of 3D Navier-Stokes equations with through-flow boundaries by a local meshless method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. L.; Tsai, C. H.; Wu, C. S.

    2015-11-01

    An alternative vector potential formulation is used to solve the Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations in 3D incompressible viscous flow problems with and without through-flow boundaries. Difficulties of the vector potential formulation include the implementation of boundary conditions for through-flow boundaries and the numerical treatment of fourth-order partial differential equations. The advantages on the other hand are the automatic satisfaction of the continuity equation; and pressure is decoupled from the velocity. The objective of this paper is to introduce the appropriate gauge and boundary conditions on the vector potential formulation by a localized meshless method. To handle the divergence-free property, a Coulomb gauge condition is enforced on the vector potential to ensure its existence and uniqueness mathematically. We further improve the algorithm to through-flow problems for the boundary conditions of vector potential by introducing the concept of Stokes' theorem. Based on this innovation, there is no need to include an additional variable to tackle the through-flow fields. This process will greatly simplify the imposition of boundary conditions by the vector potential approach. Under certain conditions, the coupled fourth-order partial differential equations can be easily solved by using this meshless local differential quadrature (LDQ) method. Due to the LDQ capability to deal with the high order differential equations, this algorithm is very attractive to solve this fourth-order vector potential formulation for the N-S equations as comparing to the conventional numerical schemes such as finite element or finite difference methods. The proposed vector potential formulation is simpler and has improved accuracy and efficiency compared to other pressure-free or pressure-coupled algorithms. This investigation can be regarded as the first complete study to obtain the N-S solutions by vector potential formulation through a LDQ method. Two classic 3D benchmark

  7. Toward acquiring comprehensive radiosurgery field commissioning data using the PRESAGE®/ optical-CT 3D dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clift, Corey; Thomas, Andrew; Adamovics, John; Chang, Zheng; Das, Indra; Oldham, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Achieving accurate small field dosimetry is challenging. This study investigates the utility of a radiochromic plastic PRESAGE® read with optical-CT for the acquisition of radiosurgery field commissioning data from a Novalis Tx system with a high-definition multileaf collimator (HDMLC). Total scatter factors (Sc, p), beam profiles, and penumbrae were measured for five different radiosurgery fields (5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 mm) using a commercially available optical-CT scanner (OCTOPUS, MGS Research). The percent depth dose (PDD), beam profile and penumbra of the 10 mm field were also measured using a higher resolution in-house prototype CCD-based scanner. Gafchromic EBT® film was used for independent verification. Measurements of Sc, p made with PRESAGE® and film agreed with mini-ion chamber commissioning data to within 4% for every field (range 0.2-3.6% for PRESAGE®, and 1.6-3.6% for EBT). PDD, beam profile and penumbra measurements made with the two PRESAGE®/optical-CT systems and film showed good agreement with the high-resolution diode commissioning measurements with a competitive resolution (0.5 mm pixels). The in-house prototype optical-CT scanner allowed much finer resolution compared with previous applications of PRESAGE®. The advantages of the PRESAGE® system for small field dosimetry include 3D measurements, negligible volume averaging, directional insensitivity, an absence of beam perturbations, energy and dose rate independence.

  8. Computer-aided detection of lung nodules: false positive reduction using a 3D gradient field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zhanyu; Sahiner, Berkman; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Wei, Jun; Bogot, Naama; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Zhou, Chuan

    2004-05-01

    We are developing a computer-aided detection system to aid radiologists in diagnosing lung cancer in thoracic computed tomographic (CT) images. The purpose of this study was to improve the false-positive (FP) reduction stage of our algorithm by developing and incorporating a gradient field technique. This technique extracts 3D shape information from the gray-scale values within a volume of interest. The gradient field feature values are higher for spherical objects, and lower for elongated and irregularly-shaped objects. A data set of 55 thin CT scans from 40 patients was used to evaluate the usefulness of the gradient field technique. After initial nodule candidate detection and rule-based first stage FP reduction, there were 3487 FP and 65 true positive (TP) objects in our data set. Linear discriminant classifiers with and without the gradient field feature were designed for the second stage FP reduction. The accuracy of these classifiers was evaluated using the area Az under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The Az values were 0.93 and 0.91 with and without the gradient field feature, respectively. The improvement with the gradient field feature was statistically significant (p=0.01).

  9. EDITORIAL: 15th Workshop on MHD Stability Control: 3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control 15th Workshop on MHD Stability Control: 3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttery, Richard

    2011-08-01

    This annual workshop on MHD Stability Control has been held since 1996 with a focus on understanding and developing control of MHD instabilities for future fusion reactors. The workshop generally covers a wide range of stability topics: from disruptions, to tearing modes, error fields, ELMs, resistive wall modes (RWMs) and ideal MHD. It spans many device types, particularly tokamaks, stellarators and reversed field pinches, to pull out commonalities in the physics and improve understanding. In 2010 the workshop was held on 15-17 November at the University of Wisconsin in Madison and was combined with the annual US-Japan MHD Workshop. The theme was `3D Magnetic Field Effects in MHD Control', with a focus on multidisciplinary sessions exploring issues of plasma response to 3D fields, the manifestation of such fields in the plasma, and how they influence stability. This has been a topic of renewed interest, with utilisation of 3D fields for ELM control now planned in ITER, and a focus on the application of such fields for error field correction, disruption avoidance, and RWM control. Key issues included the physics of the interaction, types of coils and harmonic spectra needed to control instabilities, and subsidiary effects such as braking (or rotating) the plasma. More generally, a wider range of issues were discussed including RWM physics, tearing mode physics, disruption mitigation, ballooning stability, the snowflake divertor concept, and the line tied pinch! A novel innovation to the meeting was a panel discussion session, this year on Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity, which ran well; more will be tried next year. In this special section of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion we present several of the invited and contributed papers from the 2010 workshop, which have been subject to the normal refereeing procedures of the journal. These papers give a sense of the exceptional quality of the presentations at this workshop, all of which may be found at http

  10. Impact of integrated 3D reservoir modeling/flow simulation on development of deepwater sands, Mars Field, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lerch, C.S.; Johnston, J.R.; Juedeman, M.E.

    1996-12-31

    Prospect Mars is a major Gulf of Mexico deep water oil discovery made under joint partnership between operator Shell Offshore Inc. and partner British Petroleum Inc. The discovery lies in 3000 feet of water, located 130 miles southeast of New Orleans, Louisiana. The field was discovered in 1989 and to date 14 significant reservoir intervals from 10,000 to 19000 feet below sea level have been penetrated. Estimated recoverable reserves for the first phase of field development are in excess of 500 MMBE and development plans include installation of a 24 slot tension leg platform and two subsea wells, with first production in mid-1996. Over a two year period a comprehensive effort was directed at creating a new set of reservoir models utilizing an integrated software package developed at Shell E&P Technology Co. This package is able to incorporate pertinent geological, geophysical, and petrophysical data into 3-D reservoir models which can be used to: (1) estimate reservoir quantity, quality, and continuity, (2) predict reservoir production performance, (3) select development well locations, and (4) facilitate reserve estimation. This software allows interpretations from 3-D seismic, well control, and analog outcrops to be effectively integrated and passed to the reservoir model for flow simulation. This integrated effort at modeling ensured a more realistic reservoir picture upon which to base field development. Almost all the development wells pre-drilled prior to platform installation have been affected or designed based on these reservoir models and well results have been used to keep the models updated and evergreen.

  11. Assessing the Potential of Low-Cost 3D Cameras for the Rapid Measurement of Plant Woody Structure

    PubMed Central

    Nock, Charles A; Taugourdeau, Olivier; Delagrange, Sylvain; Messier, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Detailed 3D plant architectural data have numerous applications in plant science, but many existing approaches for 3D data collection are time-consuming and/or require costly equipment. Recently, there has been rapid growth in the availability of low-cost, 3D cameras and related open source software applications. 3D cameras may provide measurements of key components of plant architecture such as stem diameters and lengths, however, few tests of 3D cameras for the measurement of plant architecture have been conducted. Here, we measured Salix branch segments ranging from 2–13 mm in diameter with an Asus Xtion camera to quantify the limits and accuracy of branch diameter measurement with a 3D camera. By scanning at a variety of distances we also quantified the effect of scanning distance. In addition, we also test the sensitivity of the program KinFu for continuous 3D object scanning and modeling as well as other similar software to accurately record stem diameters and capture plant form (<3 m in height). Given its ability to accurately capture the diameter of branches >6 mm, Asus Xtion may provide a novel method for the collection of 3D data on the branching architecture of woody plants. Improvements in camera measurement accuracy and available software are likely to further improve the utility of 3D cameras for plant sciences in the future. PMID:24287538

  12. Screening Method for the Discovery of Potential Bioactive Cysteine-Containing Peptides Using 3D Mass Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oosten, Luuk N.; Pieterse, Mervin; Pinkse, Martijn W. H.; Verhaert, Peter D. E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Animal venoms and toxins are a valuable source of bioactive peptides with pharmacologic relevance as potential drug leads. A large subset of biologically active peptides discovered up till now contain disulfide bridges that enhance stability and activity. To discover new members of this class of peptides, we developed a workflow screening specifically for those peptides that contain inter- and intra-molecular disulfide bonds by means of three-dimensional (3D) mass mapping. Two intrinsic properties of the sulfur atom, (1) its relatively large negative mass defect, and (2) its isotopic composition, allow for differentiation between cysteine-containing peptides and peptides lacking sulfur. High sulfur content in a peptide decreases the normalized nominal mass defect (NMD) and increases the normalized isotopic shift (NIS). Hence in a 3D plot of mass, NIS, and NMD, peptides with sulfur appear in this plot with a distinct spatial localization compared with peptides that lack sulfur. In this study we investigated the skin secretion of two frog species; Odorrana schmackeri and Bombina variegata. Peptides from the crude skin secretions were separated by nanoflow LC, and of all eluting peptides high resolution zoom scans were acquired in order to accurately determine both monoisotopic mass and average mass. Both the NMD and the NIS were calculated from the experimental data using an in-house developed MATLAB script. Candidate peptides exhibiting a low NMD and high NIS values were selected for targeted de novo sequencing, and this resulted in the identification of several novel inter- and intra-molecular disulfide bond containing peptides.

  13. 3D Reservoir Modeling of Semutang Gas Field: A lonely Gas field in Chittagong-Tripura Fold Belt, with Integrated Well Log, 2D Seismic Reflectivity and Attributes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehin, Z.; Woobaidullah, A. S. M.; Snigdha, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    are an improved subsurface image of the seismic data (model), a porosity prediction for the reservoir, a reservoir quality map and also a fault map. The result shows a complex geologic model which may contribute to the economic potential of the field. For better understanding, 3D seismic survey, uncertainty and attributes analysis are necessary.

  14. INCREASING OIL RECOVERY THROUGH ADVANCED REPROCESSING OF 3D SEISMIC, GRANT CANYON AND BACON FLAT FIELDS, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    Eric H. Johnson; Don E. French

    2001-06-01

    Makoil, Inc., of Orange, California, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy has reprocessed and reinterpreted the 3D seismic survey of the Grant Canyon area, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada. The project was supported by Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG26-00BC15257. The Grant Canyon survey covers an area of 11 square miles, and includes Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat oil fields. These fields have produced over 20 million barrels of oil since 1981, from debris slides of Devonian rocks that are beneath 3,500 to 5,000 ft of Tertiary syntectonic deposits that fill the basin of Railroad Valley. High-angle and low-angle normal faults complicate the trap geometry of the fields, and there is great variability in the acoustic characteristics of the overlying valley fill. These factors combine to create an area that is challenging to interpret from seismic reflection data. A 3D seismic survey acquired in 1992-93 by the operator of the fields has been used to identify development and wildcat locations with mixed success. Makoil believed that improved techniques of processing seismic data and additional well control could enhance the interpretation enough to improve the chances of success in the survey area. The project involved the acquisition of hardware and software for survey interpretation, survey reprocessing, and reinterpretation of the survey. SeisX, published by Paradigm Geophysical Ltd., was chosen as the interpretation software, and it was installed on a Dell Precision 610 computer work station with the Windows NT operating system. The hardware and software were selected based on cost, possible addition of compatible modeling software in the future, and the experience of consulting geophysicists in the Billings area. Installation of the software and integration of the hardware into the local office network was difficult at times but was accomplished with some technical support from Paradigm and Hewlett Packard, manufacturer of some of the network equipment. A

  15. 3D Visualization of near real-time remote-sensing observation for hurricanes field campaign using Google Earth API

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Turk, J.; Vu, Q.; Knosp, B.; Hristova-Veleva, S. M.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Poulsen, W. L.; Licata, S.

    2009-12-01

    NASA is planning a new field experiment, the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP), in the summer of 2010 to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. The DC-8 aircraft and the Global Hawk Unmanned Airborne System (UAS) will be deployed loaded with instruments for measurements including lightning, temperature, 3D wind, precipitation, liquid and ice water contents, aerosol and cloud profiles. During the field campaign, both the spaceborne and the airborne observations will be collected in real-time and integrated with the hurricane forecast models. This observation-model integration will help the campaign achieve its science goals by allowing team members to effectively plan the mission with current forecasts. To support the GRIP experiment, JPL developed a website for interactive visualization of all related remote-sensing observations in the GRIP’s geographical domain using the new Google Earth API. All the observations are collected in near real-time (NRT) with 2 to 5 hour latency. The observations include a 1KM blended Sea Surface Temperature (SST) map from GHRSST L2P products; 6-hour composite images of GOES IR; stability indices, temperature and vapor profiles from AIRS and AMSU-B; microwave brightness temperature and rain index maps from AMSR-E, SSMI and TRMM-TMI; ocean surface wind vectors, vorticity and divergence of the wind from QuikSCAT; the 3D precipitation structure from TRMM-PR and vertical profiles of cloud and precipitation from CloudSAT. All the NRT observations are collected from the data centers and science facilities at NASA and NOAA, subsetted, re-projected, and composited into hourly or daily data products depending on the frequency of the observation. The data products are then displayed on the 3D Google Earth plug-in at the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) website. The data products offered by the TCIS in the Google Earth display include image overlays, wind vectors, clickable

  16. Calibrating MMS Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux Measurements and Characterizing 3D Electric Field Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuster, J. R.; Torbert, R. B.; Vaith, H.; Argall, M. R.; Li, G.; Chen, L. J.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Le Contel, O.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    The electron drift instruments (EDIs) onboard each MMS spacecraft are designed with large geometric factors (~0.01cm2 str) to facilitate detection of weak (~100 nA) electron beams fired and received by the two gun-detector units (GDUs) when EDI is in its "electric field mode" to determine the local electric and magnetic fields. A consequence of the large geometric factor is that "ambient mode" electron flux measurements (500 eV electrons having 0°, 90°, or 180° pitch angle) can vary depending on the orientation of the EDI instrument with respect to the magnetic field, a nonphysical effect that requires a correction. Here, we present determinations of the θ- and ø-dependent correction factors for the eight EDI GDUs, where θ (ø) is the polar (azimuthal) angle between the GDU symmetry axis and the local magnetic field direction, and compare the corrected fluxes with those measured by the fast plasma instrument (FPI). Using these corrected, high time resolution (~1,000 samples per second) ambient electron fluxes, combined with the unprecedentedly high resolution 3D electric field measurements taken by the spin-plane and axial double probes (SDP and ADP), we are equipped to accurately detect electron-scale current layers and electric field waves associated with the non-Maxwellian (anisotropic and agyrotropic) particle distribution functions predicted to exist in the reconnection diffusion region. We compare initial observations of the diffusion region with distributions and wave analysis from PIC simulations of asymmetric reconnection applicable for modeling reconnection at the Earth's magnetopause, where MMS will begin Science Phase 1 as of September 1, 2015.

  17. Modeling electric fields inside the LUX detector in 3D using 83mKr calibration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvrznikova, Lucie; LUX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment is a 350 kg two-phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber designed for the direct detection of weakly interacting massive particles, a leading dark matter candidate. LUX operates on the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. Weekly calibrations using a homogeneous injection of a monoenergetic 83mKr source enable us to monitor xenon within the active region. For this project, a 3D model of the electric fields inside the LUX detector was created using COMSOL Multiphysics software. A simulation of electrons drifting in the detector then produces a set of computational predictions. These are then reconciled with the 83mKr data to confirm the accuracy of the field model. The result of this work is a more accurate understanding of the electric field inside the active region. This model, in conjuction with these methods, may now be used to study other phenomena such as possible surface charge buildup in detector materials.

  18. 3-D seismic results in the discovery of significant reserves bypassed for 55 years in the Chocolate Bayou Field

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, A.; Plant, C.; Davis, C.

    1994-12-31

    The Chocolate Bayou Field is located 25 miles south of Houston, in Southeast Brazoria County, Texas. Discovered in 1938, the field has produced over 2 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and 65 million barrels of oil from approximately 30 sands and 300 wellbores. The majority of the production is from the sands of the upper and middle Frio (Oligocene) section. Accumulation is found on structural highs on both the downthrown and upthrown side of a major basinward growth fault. A 3-D seismic survey was conducted over the field in 1988 in an effort to locate bypassed reserves. Interpretation of the data revealed and unexpected paleo structure associated with a buried and previously undetected counter-regional fault located almost 3 miles south of the structural crest at the Upper Frio level. Detailed structural and isochron mapping with adequate depth conversions indicated that the structure was prospective for trapping of the Lower Frio Sand which were well developed but wet under the Upper Frio structural crest. Although the feature was located on the absolute edge of the survey, the data were adequate to locate two wells which have now been completed in the Lower Frio (RA{sub 4}) section. The sands ranged in thickness from 65 to 115 feet of net pay with porosities from 27 to 30% with sustained production rates in excess of 10,000 million cubic feet of gas and 140 barrels of oil per day per completion.

  19. The 3-D strain patterns in Turkey using geodetic velocity fields from the RTK-CORS (TR) network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutoglu, Hakan Senol; Toker, Mustafa; Mekik, Cetin

    2016-03-01

    This study presents our use of GPS data to obtain and quantify the full continuous strain tensor using a 3-D velocity field in Turkey. In this study, GPS velocities improve the estimation of short-term strain tensor fields for determining the seismic hazard of Turkey. The tensorial analysis presents different aspects of deformation, such as the normal and shear strains, including their directions, the compressional and extensional strains. This analysis is appropriate for the characterizing the state of the current seismic deformation. GPS velocity data from continuous measurements (2009-2012) to estimate deformations were processed using the GAMIT/GLOBK software. Using high-rate GPS data from permanent 146 GNSS stations (RTK-CORS-TR network), the strain distribution was determined and interpolated using a biharmonic spline technique. We show the strain field patterns within axial and plane form at several critical locations, and discuss these results within the context of the seismic and tectonic deformation of Turkey. We conclude that the knowledge of the crustal strain patterns provides important information on the location of the main faults and strain accumulation for the hazard assessment. The results show an agreement between the seismic and tectonic strains confirming that there are active crustal deformations in Turkey.

  20. 3D tomographic reconstruction of the internal velocity field of an immiscible drop in a shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerdraon, Paul; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Landel, Julien R.; Peaudecerf, Francois J.

    2015-11-01

    We study experimentally the internal flow of a drop attached to a flat substrate and immersed in an immiscible shear flow. Transport inside the drop can play a crucial role in cleaning applications. Internal advection can enhance the mass transfer across the drop surface, thus increasing the cleaning rate. We used microlitre water-glycerol drops on a hydrophobic substrate. The drops were spherical and did not deform significantly under the shear flow. An oil phase of relative viscosity 0.01 to 1 was flowed over the drop. Typical Reynolds numbers inside the drops were of the order of 0.1 to 10. Using confocal microscopy, we performed 3D tomographic reconstruction of the flow field in the drop. The in-plane velocity field was measured using micro-PIV, and the third velocity component was computed from incompressibility. To our knowledge, this study gives the first experimental measurement of the three-dimensional internal velocity field of a drop in a shear flow. Numerical simulations and theoretical models published in the past 30 years predict a toroidal internal recirculation flow, for which the entire surface flows streamwise. However, our measurements reveal a qualitatively different picture with a two-lobed recirculation, featuring two stagnation points at the surface and a reverse surface flow closer to the substrate. This finding appears to be independent of Reynolds number and viscosity ratio in the ranges studied; we conjecture that the observed flow is due to the effect of surfactants at the drop surface.

  1. Combined 3D-QSAR, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics study of tacrine derivatives as potential acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, An; Hu, Jianping; Wang, Lirong; Zhong, Guochen; Pan, Jian; Wu, Zeyu; Hui, Ailing

    2015-10-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is one of the key targets of drugs for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tacrine is an approved drug with AChE-inhibitory activity. In this paper, 3D-QSAR, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics were carried out in order to study 60 tacrine derivatives and their AChE-inhibitory activities. 3D-QSAR modeling resulted in an optimal CoMFA model with q(2) = 0.552 and r(2) = 0.983 and an optimal CoMSIA model with q(2) = 0.581 and r(2) = 0.989. These QSAR models also showed that the steric and H-bond fields of these compounds are important influences on their activities. The interactions between these inhibitors and AChE were further explored through molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. A few key residues (Tyr70, Trp84, Tyr121, Trp279, and Phe330) at the binding site of AChE were identified. The results of this study improve our understanding of the mechanisms of AChE inhibitors and afford valuable information that should aid the design of novel potential AChE inhibitors. Graphical Abstract Superposition of backbone atoms of the lowest-energy structure obtained from MD simulation (magenta) onto those of the structure of the initial molecular docking model (green).

  2. Controls on hydrothermal fluid flow within the Rotokawa geothermal field, New Zealand: insights from 3D geological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardsley, C.; Sewell, S.; Cumming, W. B.; Minnick, M.; Rowland, J. V.; O'Brien, J.; Price, L.

    2012-12-01

    Identifying permeable zones is essential for economically viable exploration and development of conventional geothermal reservoirs with naturally high permeability. Except very close to boreholes, the resolution of geological and geophysical tools is at a much larger scale than the centimetre aperture of most geothermal fluid pathways important to production. A case study from the >250°C Rotokawa Geothermal Field, currently producing 175 MWe within the Taupo Volcanic Zone in New Zealand, illustrates how a 3D visualization of a subset of available data that are conceptually relevant at the scales of interest has enhanced the understanding of fluid flow within this system. Geoscience data sets including subsurface formation geometry and permeable zones in wells; the natural state temperature pattern deduced from wells and MT resistivity; microearthquakes (MEQ) induced by injection, and surface geology have been integrated with engineering data including production pressure responses and injection rates to constrain the location and general hydraulic properties of one of the most influential faults in the field. Stratigraphic offsets of >500 m, recorded in core and cuttings from wells drilled on either side of the field, confirm the presence of this fault, initially suspected based on a surface lineation of eight young (<22 ka) hydrothermal eruption craters. The 3D visualization of the MEQ occurrence pattern in space and time helps constrain the mechanism of the MEQs themselves and, importantly, the confinement of most of the MEQs to the eastern side of the fault closest to the injection wells. Hosted within the Mesozoic meta-sedimentary basement formation, this has provided an important conceptual constraint that explains the lack of injection fluid on the western side of this fault. Further to this, if this fault is acting as a barrier at the Mesozoic meta-sedimentary level today, this could imply a switch in the behaviour of this structure as it is inferred, based

  3. Theory of the zero-field splitting of 6S(3d5)-state ions in cubic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan-Lun, Yu; Tao, Tan

    1994-02-01

    A study is made of the zero-field splitting (ZFS) of 6S(3d5) ions in cubic crystals, based on an extended crystal-field (CF) model which assumes two constants ζte and ζtt in the description of the spin-orbit (SO) interaction. In addition to the recognized origin for the ZFS, namely, the combined effect of the CF and the SO couplings, a second source is found to arise from the SO interaction alone through a difference between ζte and ζtt caused by covalency. To understand this second effect, we have investigated the SO coupling processes which contribute to the ZFS, using the Macfarlane-Zdansky perturbation procedure. Processes in which the couplings are all between states of different configurations tm2e5-m are found to make a positive contribution proportional to ζ4te. Other processes contribute negatively through a term in ζ2teζ2tt. The ZFS is thus determined by the relative magnitudes of these two parts, and a small difference between ζte and ζtt will cause a great change in its value. Application of this new theory is successfully made to Mn2+ ions in tetrahedral II-VI compounds and in fluoroperovskites.

  4. Sparse field level set method for non-convex Hamiltonians in 3D plasma etching profile simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radjenović, Branislav; Lee, Jae Koo; Radmilović-Radjenović, Marija

    2006-01-01

    Level set method [S. Osher, J. Sethian, J. Comput. Phys. 79 (1988) 12] is a highly robust and accurate computational technique for tracking moving interfaces in various application domains. It originates from the idea to view the moving front as a particular level set of a higher dimensional function, so the topological merging and breaking, sharp gradients and cusps can form naturally, and the effects of curvature can be easily incorporated. The resulting equations, describing interface surface evolution, are of Hamilton-Jacobi type and they are solved using techniques developed for hyperbolic equations. In this paper we describe an extension of the sparse field method for solving level set equations in the case of non-convex Hamiltonians, which are common in the simulations of the profile surface evolution during plasma etching and deposition processes. Sparse field method itself, developed by Whitaker [R. Whitaker, Internat. J. Comput. Vision 29 (3) (1998) 203] and broadly used in image processing community, is an alternative to the usual combination of narrow band and fast marching procedures for the computationally effective solving of level set equations. The developed procedure is applied to the simulations of 3D feature profile surface evolution during plasma etching process, that include the effects of ion enhanced chemical etching and physical sputtering, which are the primary causes of the Hamiltonian non-convexity.

  5. An improved and extended GPS-derived 3D velocity field of the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) in Fennoscandia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidberg, Martin; Johansson, Jan M.; Scherneck, Hans-Georg; Davis, James L.

    2007-03-01

    We present a new GPS-derived 3D velocity field for the Fennoscandia glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) area. This new solution is based upon ˜3,000 days of continuous GPS observations obtained from the permanent networks in Fennoscandia. The period encompasses a prolongated phase of stable observation conditions after the northern autumn of 1996. Several significant improvements have led to smaller uncertainties and lower systematic errors in the new solutions compared to our previous results. The GPS satellite elevation cut-off angle was lowered to 10°, we fixed ambiguities to integers where possible, and only a few hardware changes occurred over the entire network. The GAMIT/GLOBK software package was used for the GPS analysis and reference frame realization. Our new results confirmed earlier findings of maximum discrepancies between GIA models and observations in northern Finland. The reason may be related to overestimated ice-sheet thickness and glaciation period in the north. In general, the new solutions are more coherent in the velocity field, as some of the perturbations are now avoided. We compared GPS-derived GIA rates with sea-level rates from tide-gauge observations, repeated precise leveling, and with GIA model computations, which showed consistency.

  6. 3D velocity field of present-day crustal motion of the Tibetan Plateau derived from GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, W.

    2013-12-01

    Using the measurements of 564 GPS stations around the Tibetan plateau for over 10 years, we derived a high-resolution 3D velocity field for the present-day crustal motion of the plateau with improved precision. The horizontal velocity field of the plateau relative to stable Eurasia displays in details the crustal movement and tectonic deformation features of India-Eurasia continental collision zone with thrust compression, lateral extrusion and clockwise rotation. The vertical velocities reveal that the plateau is still rising as a whole relative to its stable north neighbor. However, in some subregions uplift is insignificant or even negative. The main features of the vertical crustal deformation are: a) The Himalayan range is rising at a rate of ~3mm/yr, the most significant in the whole plateau. The uplift rate of the Himalayan range is ~6mm/a relative to its south foot; b) The mid-eastern plateau has an typical uplift rate between 1~2 mm/a, and some high mountain ranges in this area have surprising uplift rates as large as 2~3mm/a; c) In the mid-southern plateau, there is a basin and endorheic subregion with a series of NE striking normal faults, showing obvious sinking with the rates between 0 to -4mm/a; d) The present-day rising and sinking subregions generally correspond well to the Cenozoic orogenic belts and basins, respectively; e) At the southeastern corner of the plateau, although the horizontal velocity field demonstrates an outstanding clockwise rotation and fan-like front of a flow zone, the vertical velocity field does not show a general uplift or incline trend. Horizontal GPS velocities of the Tibetan plateau relative to stable Eurasia Vertical GPS velocities of the Tibetan plateau relative to its stable northern neighbor

  7. Corrections to traditional methods of verifying tangential-breast 3D monitor-unit calculations: use of an equivalent triangle to estimate effective fields.

    PubMed

    Prado, Karl L; Kirsner, Steven M; Erice, Rolly C

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative method for correctly estimating the effective field size of tangential-breast fields. The method uses an "equivalent triangle" to verify intact breast tangential field monitor-unit settings calculated by a 3D planning system to within 2%. The effects on verification calculations of loss of full scatter due to beam oblique incidence, proximity to field boundaries, and reduced scattering volumes are handled properly. The methodology is validated by comparing calculations performed by the 3D planning system with the respective verification estimates. The accuracy of this technique is established for dose calculations both with and without heterogeneity corrections.

  8. A 3D MOF constructed from dysprosium(III) oxalate and capping ligands: ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cai-Ming; Zhang, De-Qing; Zhu, Dao-Ben

    2016-04-01

    A novel 3D MOF based on dysprosium(iii) oxalate and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), {[Dy(C2O4)1.5phen]·0.5H2O}n (1), has been hydrothermally synthesized. The Dy(3+) ion acts as a typical Y-shaped node, linking to each other to generate an interesting 3D topology structure. Complex 1 is the first 3D DyMOF displaying both ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation. PMID:26961387

  9. A 3D MOF constructed from dysprosium(III) oxalate and capping ligands: ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cai-Ming; Zhang, De-Qing; Zhu, Dao-Ben

    2016-04-01

    A novel 3D MOF based on dysprosium(iii) oxalate and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), {[Dy(C2O4)1.5phen]·0.5H2O}n (1), has been hydrothermally synthesized. The Dy(3+) ion acts as a typical Y-shaped node, linking to each other to generate an interesting 3D topology structure. Complex 1 is the first 3D DyMOF displaying both ferromagnetic coupling and field-induced two-step magnetic relaxation.

  10. 3D Non-destructive morphological analysis of a solid oxide fuel cell anode using full-field X-ray nano-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karen Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen; Cronin, J. Scott; Yuan, Qingxi; Yakal-Kremski, Kyle J.; Barnett, Scott A.; Wang, Jun

    2012-11-01

    An accurate 3D morphological analysis is critically needed to study the process-structure-property relationship in many application fields such as battery electrodes, fuel cells and porous materials for sensing and actuating. Here we present the application of a newly developed full field X-ray nano-scale transmission microscopy (TXM) imaging for a non-destructive, comprehensive 3D morphology analysis of a porous Ni-YSZ solid oxide fuel cell anode. A unique combination of improved 3D resolution and large analyzed volume (˜3600 μm3) yields structural data with excellent statistical accuracy. 3D morphological parameters quantified include phase volume fractions, surface and interfacial area densities, phase size distribution, directional connectivity, tortuosity, and electrochemically active triple phase boundary density. A prediction of electrochemical anode polarization resistance based on this microstructural data yielded good agreement with a measured anode resistance via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The Mclachlan model is used to estimate the anode electrical conductivity.

  11. The geothermal field below the city of Berlin, Germany: Results from structurally and parametrically improved 3D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, Maximilian; Sippel, Judith; Cacace, Mauro; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the influence of the geological structure and geophysical parametrization of model units on the geothermal field as calculated by 3D numerical simulations of coupled fluid and heat transport for the subsurface of Berlin, Germany. The study area is located in the Northeast German Basin which is filled with several kilometers of sediments. This sedimentary infill includes the clastic sedimentary units Middle Buntsandstein and Sedimentary Rotliegend which are of particular interest for geothermal exploration. Previous studies conducted in the Northeast German Basin have already shown the geometries and properties of the geological units majorly control the distribution of subsurface temperatures. In this study we followed a two-step approach, where we first improved an existing structural model by integrating newly available 57 geological cross-sections, well data and deep seismics (down to ~4 km). Secondly, we performed a sensitivity analysis investigating the effects of varying physical fluid and rock properties on the subsurface temperature field. The results of this study show, that the structural configuration of model units exerts the highest influence on the geothermal field (up to ± 23 K at 1000 m below sea level). Here, the Rupelian clay aquitard, displaying a heterogeneous thickness distribution, locally characterized by hydrogeological windows (i.e. domains of no thickness) enabling intra-aquifer groundwater circulation has been identified as major controlling factor. The new structural configuration of this unit (more continuous, less numerous hydrogeological windows) also leads to a reduction of the influence of different boundary conditions and heat transport mechanisms considered. Additionally, the models results show that calculated temperatures highly depend on geophysical properties of model units whereas the hydraulic conductivity of the Cenozoic succession was identified as most dominant, leading to changes

  12. Field Trial Results of a 14-channel GPR Integrated with a U.S. Program for 3-D Utility Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anspach, James H.

    2013-04-01

    utilities were mostly undetectable. Through a ground-truthing program of test holes to expose utilities, the depth values derived from the enhanced GPR were fairly consistent and within 15 cm of actual depth. The incomplete underground picture determined by the enhanced GPR reinforces previous studies that show that the mapping of existing underground utilities is a multi-tool effort that takes highly trained and skilled field technicians and data interpreters. The addition of a new GPR tool is valuable in determining continuous depth profiles of imaged utilities. A second and significant benefit is the interpretation of other geotechnical data that benefit project designers. This might include showing geometry, location, intensity, and depths of either areas of anomalies, or of known structures, such as paving thickness, substrate thickness, voids, water table, soil lenses, boulders, bedrock, and so forth. The Florida Department of Transportation has decided to take advantage of this new technology and has entered into an experimental contract with Cardno TBE to incorporate several enhanced GPR arrays with traditional utility detection tools. The goal of this contract will be to provide a 3-D model of existing underground utilities for use in automated construction. The GPR 3-D data model will be melded with conventional subsurface utility engineering and mapping practices and will be required to follow the ASCE 38 standard for utility data reliability.

  13. Fully automated prostate segmentation in 3D MR based on normalized gradient fields cross-correlation initialization and LOGISMOS refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yin; Fotin, Sergei V.; Periaswamy, Senthil; Kunz, Justin; Haldankar, Hrishikesh; Muradyan, Naira; Cornud, François; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Manual delineation of the prostate is a challenging task for a clinician due to its complex and irregular shape. Furthermore, the need for precisely targeting the prostate boundary continues to grow. Planning for radiation therapy, MR-ultrasound fusion for image-guided biopsy, multi-parametric MRI tissue characterization, and context-based organ retrieval are examples where accurate prostate delineation can play a critical role in a successful patient outcome. Therefore, a robust automated full prostate segmentation system is desired. In this paper, we present an automated prostate segmentation system for 3D MR images. In this system, the prostate is segmented in two steps: the prostate displacement and size are first detected, and then the boundary is refined by a shape model. The detection approach is based on normalized gradient fields cross-correlation. This approach is fast, robust to intensity variation and provides good accuracy to initialize a prostate mean shape model. The refinement model is based on a graph-search based framework, which contains both shape and topology information during deformation. We generated the graph cost using trained classifiers and used coarse-to-fine search and region-specific classifier training. The proposed algorithm was developed using 261 training images and tested on another 290 cases. The segmentation performance using mean DSC ranging from 0.89 to 0.91 depending on the evaluation subset demonstrates state of the art performance. Running time for the system is about 20 to 40 seconds depending on image size and resolution.

  14. Investigation of drilling failure of Well A1, E-Field, onshore Niger Delta, Nigeria, using 3-D seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinmosin, A.; Oladele, S.; Oriade, O. F.

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed at investigating reasons for failure of Well A1 that is surrounded by hydrocarbon discoveries in onshore Niger delta with a view to propose optimal location for a new well through interpretation of new 3-D seismic data. Sands encountered by Well A1 were delineated and tied to seismic. Structural closure was mapped and reservoirs at various depths were stacked and sectioned. Porosity, Net to Gross, and Gross Rock Volume of the reservoirs were computed. Well A1 was correlated to a nearby Well K4 and a good correlation was observed. A fault assisted multi reservoirs Prospect-E with south-westerly shift with depth was delineated on the hanging wall of structure building E-Fault whose closing contours is expected to trap hydrocarbon. Petrophysical properties of the reservoirs range from fair to good. Well A1 either perforated prospect-E beneath the oil water contact, completely missed prospect-E or punctured the wet foot wall of E-fault. Consequently, Well A1 could not impact the objective sands and only able to produce water. Well A1 failed because of wrong surface positioning which unsuccessfully targeted the shifting reservoirs. A successful exploratory well in E-Field would be a gently south-westerly deviated well whose vertical section would encounter the shallower sands and deviated section targeting the deeper sands with surface location at about 1 km southeast of Well A1.

  15. External control of the Drosophila melanogaster egg to imago development period by specific combinations of 3D low-frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Vladimir I; Khmelinskii, Igor

    2016-01-01

    We report that the duration of the egg-to-imago development period of the Drosophila melanogaster, and the imago longevity, are both controllable by combinations of external 3-dimensional (3D) low-frequency electric and magnetic fields (LFEMFs). Both these periods may be reduced or increased by applying an appropriate configuration of external 3D LFEMFs. We report that the longevity of D. melanogaster imagoes correlates with the duration of the egg-to-imago development period of the respective eggs. We infer that metabolic processes in both eggs and imago are either accelerated (resulting in reduced time periods) or slowed down (resulting in increased time periods). We propose that external 3D LFEMFs induce electric currents in live systems as well as mechanical vibrations on sub-cell, whole-cell and cell-group levels. These external fields induce media polarization due to ionic motion and orientation of electric dipoles that could moderate the observed effects. We found that the longevity of D. melanogaster imagoes is affected by action of 3D LFEMFs on the respective eggs in the embryonic development period (EDP). We interpret this effect as resulting from changes in the regulation mechanism of metabolic processes in D. melanogaster eggs, inherited by the resulting imagoes. We also tested separate effects of either 3D electric or 3D magnetic fields, which were significantly weaker.

  16. MONTE GENEROSO ROCKFALL FIELD TEST (SWITZERLAND): Real size experiment to constraint 2D and 3D rockfall simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humair, F.; Matasci, B.; Carrea, D.; Pedrazzini, A.; Loye, A.; Pedrozzi, G.; Nicolet, P.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2012-04-01

    account the results of the experimental testing are performed and compared with the a-priori simulations. 3D simulations were performed using a software that takes into account the effect of the forest cover in the blocky trajectory (RockyFor 3D) and an other that neglects this aspect (Rotomap; geo&soft international). 2D simulation (RocFall; Rocscience) profiles were located in the blocks paths deduced from 3D simulations. The preliminary results show that: (1) high speed movies are promising and allow us to track the blocks using video software, (2) the a-priori simulations tend to overestimate the runout distance which is certainly due to an underestimation of the obstacles as well as the breaking of the failing rocks which is not taken into account in the models, (3) the trajectories deduced from both a-priori simulation and real size experiment highlights the major influence of the channelized slope morphology on rock paths as it tends to follow the flow direction. This indicates that the 2D simulation have to be performed along the line of flow direction.

  17. Predicting the natural state of fractured carbonate reservoirs: An Andector Field, West Texas test of a 3-D RTM simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncay, K.; Romer, S.; Ortoleva, P.; Hoak, T.; Sundberg, K.

    1998-12-31

    The power of the reaction, transport, mechanical (RTM) modeling approach is that it directly uses the laws of geochemistry and geophysics to extrapolate fracture and other characteristics from the borehole or surface to the reservoir interior. The objectives of this facet of the project were to refine and test the viability of the basin/reservoir forward modeling approach to address fractured reservoir in E and P problems. The study attempts to resolve the following issues: role of fracturing and timing on present day location and characteristics; clarifying the roles and interplay of flexure dynamics, changing rock rheological properties, fluid pressuring and tectonic/thermal histories on present day reservoir location and characteristics; and test the integrated RTM modeling/geological data approach on a carbonate reservoir. Sedimentary, thermal and tectonic data from Andector Field, West Texas, were used as input to the RTM basin/reservoir simulator to predict its preproduction state. The results were compared with data from producing reservoirs to test the RTM modeling approach. The effects of production on the state of the field are discussed in a companion report. The authors draw the following conclusions: RTM modeling is an important new tool in fractured reservoir E and P analysis; the strong coupling of RTM processes and the geometric and tensorial complexity of fluid flow and stresses require the type of fully coupled, 3-D RTM model for fracture analysis as pioneered in this project; flexure analysis cannot predict key aspects of fractured reservoir location and characteristics; fracture history over the lifetime of a basin is required to understand the timing of petroleum expulsion and migration and the retention properties of putative reservoirs.

  18. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation

    DOE PAGES

    None, None

    2015-09-28

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles inside a bunch is one of the most importance collective effects in beam dynamics, becoming even more significant as the energy of the particle beam is lowered to accommodate analytical and low-Z material imaging purposes such as in the time resolved Ultrafast Electron Microscope (UEM) development currently underway at Michigan State University. In addition, space charge effects are the key limiting factor in the development of ultrafast atomic resolution electron imaging and diffraction technologies and are also correlated with an irreversible growth in rms beam emittance due to fluctuating components of the nonlinear electron dynamics.more » In the short pulse regime used in the UEM, space charge effects also lead to virtual cathode formation in which the negative charge of the electrons emitted at earlier times, combined with the attractive surface field, hinders further emission of particles and causes a degradation of the pulse properties. Space charge and virtual cathode effects and their remediation are core issues for the development of the next generation of high-brightness UEMs. Since the analytical models are only applicable for special cases, numerical simulations, in addition to experiments, are usually necessary to accurately understand the space charge effect. In this paper we will introduce a grid-free differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm, which calculates the 3D space charge field for n charged particles in arbitrary distribution with an efficiency of O(n), and the implementation of the algorithm to a simulation code for space charge dominated photoemission processes.« less

  19. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-09-28

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles inside a bunch is one of the most importance collective effects in beam dynamics, becoming even more significant as the energy of the particle beam is lowered to accommodate analytical and low-Z material imaging purposes such as in the time resolved Ultrafast Electron Microscope (UEM) development currently underway at Michigan State University. In addition, space charge effects are the key limiting factor in the development of ultrafast atomic resolution electron imaging and diffraction technologies and are also correlated with an irreversible growth in rms beam emittance due to fluctuating components of the nonlinear electron dynamics. In the short pulse regime used in the UEM, space charge effects also lead to virtual cathode formation in which the negative charge of the electrons emitted at earlier times, combined with the attractive surface field, hinders further emission of particles and causes a degradation of the pulse properties. Space charge and virtual cathode effects and their remediation are core issues for the development of the next generation of high-brightness UEMs. Since the analytical models are only applicable for special cases, numerical simulations, in addition to experiments, are usually necessary to accurately understand the space charge effect. In this paper we will introduce a grid-free differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm, which calculates the 3D space charge field for n charged particles in arbitrary distribution with an efficiency of O(n), and the implementation of the algorithm to a simulation code for space charge dominated photoemission processes.

  20. Reactivating of a mature oil field in the Finca-Yopales area, Venezuela, Using 3-D seismic

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, M.; Betancourt, H.

    1996-08-01

    The area of Finca-Yopales is located in the Eastern Venezuelan Basin in the Anzoategui State where Corpoven has the Trico and Yopales Norte fields. Based on the interpretation of 134 km{sup 2} of 3-D seismic and the geologic interpretation from 145 wells in the area, we define a better geological and structural model. We were also able to map 6 seismic reflectors corresponding to the units A8, F7, L4U and SI from the Oficina Formation, U2 top of Merecure Formation and the top of the Cretaceous, in order to generate a fault plane for all the area which was converted to depth with a lineal relationship which was obtained from wells available. From this interpretation we obtain the structural levels B4, J2, M1 and U2 which are references for the area, those being regional and trangressive events. The main feature of the structure is a high at the southeast of the area and three fault systems of Cretaceous, Miocene and post-Miocene age. This area has been exploited for a long time, having more than 93% of the inactive drilled wells. The total production up to April, 1995 is 59.14 MMbls; the Trico field is the most prolific, with more than 95% of the production. The sands L`s, U`s, O`s and S`s are the most prospective. This paper present the evaluation of the area and the analysis of the reservoir where we increased the computed reserves.

  1. Integrated 3D reservoir modeling at Ram-Powell field: A turbidite reservoir in the eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lerch, C.S.; Bramlett, K.W.; Butler, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ram Powell is a stratigraphically trapped sequence of turbidite reservoirs in 2,500-4,000 ft of water in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico. The discovery was made in 1985 and the field has been the subject of extensive geoscience and engineering studies. In spite of this work there is still significant uncertainty in Ram Powell reserves. The Ram Powell development plan is underway, with fabrication of a tension-leg platform and 60,000 b/d plus 200 MMcf/d facility. Drilling will include 7 high rate horizontal wells and 3 water injection wells. Reserves accessed in this development scheme are approximately 250 million barrels equivalent. Model-based seismic inversion (constrained by 12 appraisal penetrations, rock property data and seismic interpretation) was employed over the main reservoir interval (J, L and N sands) to create models that are consistent with 3D seismic data. These models were used in several simulation studies including element models to determine optimal well placement, and full-field models to predict overall reservoir performance. The results of the study both reduced and enabled management of reservoir volume uncertainty; they were critical for determining the number, horizontal length and placement of wells (vertically and areally). The results also provided the basis for a proposal to increase the facility capacity limits to 70,000 b/d plus 260 MMcf/d. Some significant leanings are (1) model-based inversion is now in a production mode that can be rapidly applied to reservoir problems, (2) many reservoir complexities are simply below seismic resolution and inversion is unable to add with certainty significantly more resolution and, (3) detailed reservoir models that reflect reservoir conditions and are easily manipulated are required for reservoir optimization.

  2. Remote Sensing of the 3D Wind and Turbulence Field by Coherent Doppler Lidars for Wind Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöholm, M.; Courtney, M. S.; Enevoldsen, K. M.; Lindelöw, P.; Mann, J.; Mikkelsen, T.

    2008-12-01

    anemometer has already recently provided some initial prospective results of this approach to measure the 3D wind and turbulence field.

  3. SU-E-T-596: Axillary Nodes Radiotherapy Boost Field Dosimetric Impact Study: Oblique Field and Field Optimization in 3D Conventional Breast Cancer Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Su, M; Sura, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric impact of two axillary nodes (AX) boost techniques: (1) posterior-oblique optimized field boost (POB), (2) traditional posterior-anterior boost (PAB) with field optimization (O-PAB), for a postmastectomy breast patient with positive axillary lymph nodes. Methods: Five patients, 3 left and 2 right chest walls, were included in this study. All patients were simulated in 5mm CT slice thickness. Supraclavicular (SC) and level I/II/III AX were contoured based on the RTOG atlas guideline. Five treatment plans, (1) tangential chest wall, (2) oblique SC including AX, (3) PAB, O-PAB and POB, were created for each patient. Three plan sums (PS) were generated by sum one of (3) plan with plan (1) and (2). The field optimization was done through PS dose distribution, which included a field adjustment, a fractional dose, a calculation location and a gantry angle selection for POB. A dosimetric impact was evaluated by comparing a SC and AX coverage, a PS maximum dose, an irradiated area percentage volume received dose over 105% prescription dose (V105), an ipsi-laterial mean lung dose (MLD), an ipsi-laterial mean humeral head dose (MHHD), a mean heart dose (MHD) (for left case only) and their DVH amount these three technique. Results: O-PAB, POB and PAB dosimetric results showed that there was no significant different on SC and AX coverage (p>0.43) and MHD (p>0.16). The benefit of sparing lung irradiation from PAB to O-PAB to POB was significant (p<0.004). PAB showed a highest PS maximum dose (p<0.005), V105 (p<0.023) and MLD (compared with OPAB, p=0.055). MHHD showed very sensitive to the patient arm positioning and anatomy. O-PAB convinced a lower MHHD than PAB (p=0.03). Conclusion: 3D CT contouring plays main role in accuracy radiotherapy. Dosimetric advantage of POB and O-PAB was observed for a better normal tissue irradiation sparing.

  4. Verification of the NIKE3D structural analysis code by comparison against the analytic solution for a spherical cavity under a far-field uniaxial stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kansa, E.J.

    1989-01-01

    The original scope of this task was to simulate the stresses and displacements of a hard rock tunnel experimental design using a suitable three-dimensional finite element code. NIKE3D was selected as a suitable code for performing these primarily approximate linearly elastic 3D analyses, but it required modifications to include initial stress, shear traction boundary condition and excavation options. During the summer of 1988, such capabilities were installed in a special version of NIKE3D. Subsequently, we verified both the LLNL's commonly used version of NIKE3D and our private modified version against the analytic solution for a spherical cavity in an elastic material deforming under a far-field uniaxial stress. We find the results produced by the unmodified and modified versions of NIKE3D to be in good agreement with the analytic solutions, except near the cavity, where the errors in the stress field are large. As can be expected from a code based on a displacement finite element formulation, the displacements are much more accurate than the stresses calculated from the 8-noded brick elements. To reduce these errors to acceptable levels, the grid must be refined further near the cavity wall. The level of grid refinement required to simulate accurately tunneling problems that do not have spatial symmetry in three dimensions using the current NIKE3D code is likely to exceed the memory capacity of the largest CRAY 1 computers at LLNL. 8 refs., 121 figs.

  5. Statistically-driven 3D fiber reconstruction and denoising from multi-slice cardiac DTI using a Markov random field model.

    PubMed

    Lekadir, Karim; Lange, Matthias; Zimmer, Veronika A; Hoogendoorn, Corné; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2016-01-01

    The construction of subject-specific dense and realistic 3D meshes of the myocardial fibers is an important pre-requisite for the simulation of cardiac electrophysiology and mechanics. Current diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) techniques, however, provide only a sparse sampling of the 3D cardiac anatomy based on a limited number of 2D image slices. Moreover, heart motion affects the diffusion measurements, thus resulting in a significant amount of noisy fibers. This paper presents a Markov random field (MRF) approach for dense reconstruction of 3D cardiac fiber orientations from sparse DTI 2D slices. In the proposed MRF model, statistical constraints are used to relate the missing and the known fibers, while a consistency term is encoded to ensure that the obtained 3D meshes are locally continuous. The validation of the method using both synthetic and real DTI datasets demonstrates robust fiber reconstruction and denoising, as well as physiologically meaningful estimations of cardiac electrical activation.

  6. Computing and monitoring potential of public spaces by shading analysis using 3d lidar data and advanced image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwolinski, A.; Jarzemski, M.

    2015-04-01

    The paper regards specific context of public spaces in "shadow" of tall buildings located in European cities. Majority of tall buildings in European cities were built in last 15 years. Tall buildings appear mainly in city centres, directly at important public spaces being viable environment for inhabitants with variety of public functions (open spaces, green areas, recreation places, shops, services etc.). All these amenities and services are under direct impact of extensive shading coming from the tall buildings. The paper focuses on analyses and representation of impact of shading from tall buildings on various public spaces in cities using 3D city models. Computer environment of 3D city models in cityGML standard uses 3D LiDAR data as one of data types for definition of 3D cities. The structure of cityGML allows analytic applications using existing computer tools, as well as developing new techniques to estimate extent of shading coming from high-risers, affecting life in public spaces. These measurable shading parameters in specific time are crucial for proper functioning, viability and attractiveness of public spaces - finally it is extremely important for location of tall buildings at main public spaces in cities. The paper explores impact of shading from tall buildings in different spatial contexts on the background of using cityGML models based on core LIDAR data to support controlled urban development in sense of viable public spaces. The article is prepared within research project 2TaLL: Application of 3D Virtual City Models in Urban Analyses of Tall Buildings, realized as a part of Polish-Norway Grants.

  7. Examining In-Cloud Convective Turbulence in Relation to Total Lightning and the 3D Wind Field of Severe Thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Momar, S. A.; Deierling, W.; Williams, J. K.; Hoffman, E. G.

    2014-12-01

    Convectively induced turbulence (CIT) is commonly listed as a cause or factor in weather-related commercial aviation accidents. In-cloud CIT is generated in part by shears between convective updrafts and downdrafts. Total lightning is also dependent on a robust updraft and the resulting storm electrification. The relationship between total lightning and turbulence could prove useful in operational aviation settings with the use of future measurements from the geostationary lightning mapper (GLM) onboard the GOES-R satellite. Providing nearly hemispheric coverage of total lightning, the GLM could help identify CIT in otherwise data-sparse locations. For a severe thunderstorm case on 7 June 2012 in northeast Colorado, in-cloud eddy dissipation rate estimates from the NCAR/NEXRAD Turbulence Detection Algorithm were compared with cloud electrification data from the Colorado Lightning Mapping Array and radar products from the Denver, Colorado WSR-88D. These comparisons showed that high concentrations of very high frequency (VHF) source densities emitted by lightning occurred near and downstream of the storm's convective core. Severe turbulence was also shown to occur near this area, extending near the melting level of the storm and spreading upward and outward. Additionally, increases/decreases in VHF sources and turbulence volumes occurred within a few minutes of each other; although, light turbulence was shown to increase near one storm's dissipation. This may be due to increased shear from the now downdraft dominate storm. The 3D wind field from this case, obtained by either a dual-Doppler or a Variational Doppler Radar Assimilation System (VDRAS) analysis, will also be examined to further study the relationships between total lightning and thunderstorm kinematics. If these results prove to be robust, lightning may serve as a strong indicator of the location of moderate or greater turbulence.

  8. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability.

  9. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  10. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  11. Influence of extremely low frequency, low energy electromagnetic fields and combined mechanical stimulation on chondrocytes in 3-D constructs for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Hilz, Florian M; Ahrens, Philipp; Grad, Sibylle; Stoddart, Martin J; Dahmani, Chiheb; Wilken, Frauke L; Sauerschnig, Martin; Niemeyer, Philipp; Zwingmann, Jörn; Burgkart, Rainer; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Rüdiger; Südkamp, Norbert P; Weyh, Thomas; Imhoff, Andreas B; Alini, Mauro; Salzmann, Gian M

    2014-02-01

    Articular cartilage, once damaged, has very low regenerative potential. Various experimental approaches have been conducted to enhance chondrogenesis and cartilage maturation. Among those, non-invasive electromagnetic fields have shown their beneficial influence for cartilage regeneration and are widely used for the treatment of non-unions, fractures, avascular necrosis and osteoarthritis. One very well accepted way to promote cartilage maturation is physical stimulation through bioreactors. The aim of this study was the investigation of combined mechanical and electromagnetic stress affecting cartilage cells in vitro. Primary articular chondrocytes from bovine fetlock joints were seeded into three-dimensional (3-D) polyurethane scaffolds and distributed into seven stimulated experimental groups. They either underwent mechanical or electromagnetic stimulation (sinusoidal electromagnetic field of 1 mT, 2 mT, or 3 mT; 60 Hz) or both within a joint-specific bioreactor and a coil system. The scaffold-cell constructs were analyzed for glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA content, histology, and gene expression of collagen-1, collagen-2, aggrecan, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), Sox9, proteoglycan-4 (PRG-4), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-3 and -13). There were statistically significant differences in GAG/DNA content between the stimulated versus the control group with highest levels in the combined stimulation group. Gene expression was significantly higher for combined stimulation groups versus static control for collagen 2/collagen 1 ratio and lower for MMP-13. Amongst other genes, a more chondrogenic phenotype was noticed in expression patterns for the stimulated groups. To conclude, there is an effect of electromagnetic and mechanical stimulation on chondrocytes seeded in a 3-D scaffold, resulting in improved extracellular matrix production.

  12. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  13. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  14. Simultaneous full-field 3-D vibrometry of the human eardrum using spatial-bandwidth multiplexed holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleghi, Morteza; Guignard, Jérémie; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J.

    2015-11-01

    Holographic interferometric methods typically require the use of three sensitivity vectors in order to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) information. Methods based on multiple directions of illumination have limited applications when studying biological tissues that have temporally varying responses such as the tympanic membrane (TM). Therefore, to measure 3-D displacements in such applications, the measurements along all the sensitivity vectors have to be done simultaneously. We propose a multiple-illumination directions approach to measure 3-D displacements from a single-shot hologram that contains displacement information from three sensitivity vectors. The hologram of an object of interest is simultaneously recorded with three incoherently superimposed pairs of reference and object beams. The incident off-axis angles of the reference beams are adjusted such that the frequency components of the multiplexed hologram are completely separate. Because of the differences in the directions and wavelengths of the reference beams, the positions of each reconstructed image corresponding to each sensitivity vector are different. We implemented a registration algorithm to accurately translate individual components of the hologram into a single global coordinate system to calculate 3-D displacements. The results include magnitudes and phases of 3-D sound-induced motions of a human cadaveric TM at several excitation frequencies showing modal and traveling wave motions on its surface.

  15. Simultaneous full-field 3-D vibrometry of the human eardrum using spatial-bandwidth multiplexed holography

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghi, Morteza; Guignard, Jérémie; Furlong, Cosme; Rosowski, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Holographic interferometric methods typically require the use of three sensitivity vectors in order to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) information. Methods based on multiple directions of illumination have limited applications when studying biological tissues that have temporally varying responses such as the tympanic membrane (TM). Therefore, to measure 3-D displacements in such applications, the measurements along all the sensitivity vectors have to be done simultaneously. We propose a multiple-illumination directions approach to measure 3-D displacements from a single-shot hologram that contains displacement information from three sensitivity vectors. The hologram of an object of interest is simultaneously recorded with three incoherently superimposed pairs of reference and object beams. The incident off-axis angles of the reference beams are adjusted such that the frequency components of the multiplexed hologram are completely separate. Because of the differences in the directions and wavelengths of the reference beams, the positions of each reconstructed image corresponding to each sensitivity vector are different. We implemented a registration algorithm to accurately translate individual components of the hologram into a single global coordinate system to calculate 3-D displacements. The results include magnitudes and phases of 3-D sound-induced motions of a human cadaveric TM at several excitation frequencies showing modal and traveling wave motions on its surface. PMID:25984986

  16. Identification of potential influenza virus endonuclease inhibitors through virtual screening based on the 3D-QSAR model.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Lee, C; Chong, Y

    2009-01-01

    Influenza endonucleases have appeared as an attractive target of antiviral therapy for influenza infection. With the purpose of designing a novel antiviral agent with enhanced biological activities against influenza endonuclease, a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) model was generated based on 34 influenza endonuclease inhibitors. The comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA) with a steric, electrostatic and hydrophobic (SEH) model showed the best correlative and predictive capability (q(2) = 0.763, r(2) = 0.969 and F = 174.785), which provided a pharmacophore composed of the electronegative moiety as well as the bulky hydrophobic group. The CoMSIA model was used as a pharmacophore query in the UNITY search of the ChemDiv compound library to give virtual active compounds. The 3D-QSAR model was then used to predict the activity of the selected compounds, which identified three compounds as the most likely inhibitor candidates.

  17. Imagining Technology-Enhanced Learning with Heritage Artefacts: Teacher-Perceived Potential of 2D and 3D Heritage Site Visualisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lackovic, Natasa; Crook, Charles; Cobb, Sue; Shalloe, Sally; D'Cruz, Mirabelle

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is much to be realised in the educational potential of national and world heritage sites. Such sites need to be supported in sharing their resources with a wide and international public, especially within formal education. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) heritage site visualisations could serve this need. Our…

  18. The fast multipole method in the differential algebra framework for the calculation of 3D space charge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He

    2013-01-01

    The space charge effect is one of the most important collective effects in beam dynamic studies. In many cases, numerical simulations are inevitable in order to get a clear understanding of this effect. The particle-particle interaction algorithms and the article-in-cell algorithms are widely used in space charge effect simulations. But they both have difficulties in dealing with highly correlated beams with abnormal distributions or complicated geometries. We developed a new algorithm to calculate the three dimensional self-field between charged particles by combining the differential algebra (DA) techniques with the fast multi-pole method (FMM). The FMM hierarchically decomposes the whole charged domain into many small regions. For each region it uses multipole expansions to represent the potential/field contributions from the particles far away from the region and then converts the multipole expansions into a local expansion inside the region. The potential/field due to the far away particles is calculated from the expansions and the potential/field due to the nearby particles is calculated from the Coulomb force law. The DA techniques are used in the calculation, translation and converting of the expansions. The new algorithm scales linearly with the total number of particles and it is suitable for any arbitrary charge distribution. Using the DA techniques, we can calculate both the potential/field and its high order derivatives, which will be useful for the purpose of including the space charge effect into transfer maps in the future. We first present the single level FMM, which decomposes the whole domain into boxes of the same size. It works best for charge distributions that are not overly non-uniform. Then we present the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA), which decomposes the whole domain into different sized boxes according to the charge density. Finer boxes are generated where the higher charge density exists; thus the algorithm works for any

  19. 3D Aerosol-Cloud Radiative Interaction Observed in Collocated MODIS and ASTER Images of Cumulus Cloud Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Guoyong; Marshak, Alexander; Cahalan, Robert F.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kleidman, Richard G.

    2007-01-01

    3D aerosol-cloud interaction is examined by analyzing two images containing cumulus clouds in biomass burning regions in Brazil. The research consists of two parts. The first part focuses on identifying 3D clo ud impacts on the reflectance of pixel selected for the MODIS aerosol retrieval based purely on observations. The second part of the resea rch combines the observations with radiative transfer computations to identify key parameters in 3D aerosol-cloud interaction. We found that 3D cloud-induced enhancement depends on optical properties of nearb y clouds as well as wavelength. The enhancement is too large to be ig nored. Associated biased error in 1D aerosol optical thickness retrie val ranges from 50% to 140% depending on wavelength and optical prope rties of nearby clouds as well as aerosol optical thickness. We caution the community to be prudent when applying 1D approximations in comp uting solar radiation in dear regions adjacent to clouds or when usin g traditional retrieved aerosol optical thickness in aerosol indirect effect research.

  20. 3D-CFD Investigation of Contrails and Volatile Aerosols Produced in the Near-Field of an Aircraft Wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, F.; Ghedhaifi, W.; Vancassel, X.; Khou, J. C.; Montreuil, E.

    2015-12-01

    Civil aviation contributes to degradation of air quality around airport (SOx, NOx, speciated hydrocarbons,…) and climate change through its emissions of greenhouse gases (CO2, water vapor), as well as particulate matters. These particles include soot particles formed in the combustor, volatile aerosols and contrails generated in the aircraft wake. Although the aircraft emissions represent today only about 3% of all those produced on the surface of the earth by other anthropogenic sources, they are mostly released in the very sensitive region of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. These emissions have a radiative effect reinforced by specific physical and chemical processes at high altitudes, such as cloud formation and ozone production. In this context, most of the work to-date assessed that the actual effect of aviation on the climate are affected by very large uncertainties, partly due to lack of knowledge on the mechanisms of new particles formation and growth processes in the exhaust plume of the aircraft. The engine exhaust gases are mixed in the ambient air under the influence of the interaction between the jet engine and the wing tip vortices. The characteristics of vortices as well as their interaction with the jet depend on the aircraft airframe especially on the wing geometry and the engine position (distance from the wing tip). The aim of this study is to examine the influence of aircraft parameters on contrail formation using a 3D CFD calculation based on a RANS (Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes) approach. Numerical simulations have been performed using CEDRE, the multiphysics ONERA code for energetics. CEDRE is a CFD code using finite volume methods and unstructured meshes. These meshes are especially appropriate when complex geometries are used. A transport model has been used for condensation of water vapor onto ice particles. Growth is evaluated using a modified Fick's law to mass transfer on particles. In this study, different aircraft

  1. Possibilities and limitations of the ART-Sample algorithm for reconstruction of 3D temperature fields and the influence of opaque obstacles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanyang; Herman, Cila

    2013-01-01

    The need for the measurement of complex, unsteady, three-dimensional (3D) temperature distributions arises in a variety of engineering applications, and tomographic techniques are applied to accomplish this goal. Holographic interferometry (HI), one of the optical methods used for visualizing temperature fields, combined with tomographic reconstruction techniques requires multi-directional interferometric data to recover the 3D information. However, the presence of opaque obstacles (such as solid objects in the flow field and heaters) in the measurement volume, prevents the probing light beams from traversing the entire measurement volume. As a consequence, information on the average value of the field variable will be lost in regions located in the shade of the obstacle. The capability of the ART-Sample tomographic reconstruction method to recover 3D temperature distributions both in unobstructed temperature fields and in the presence of opaque obstacles is discussed in this paper. A computer code for tomographic reconstruction of 3D temperature fields from 2D projections was developed. In the paper, the reconstruction accuracy is discussed quantitatively both without and with obstacles in the measurement volume for a set of phantom functions mimicking realistic temperature distributions. The reconstruction performance is optimized while minimizing the number of irradiation directions (experimental hardware requirements) and computational effort. For the smooth temperature field both with and without obstacles, the reconstructions produced by this algorithm are good, both visually and using quantitative criteria. The results suggest that the location and the size of the obstacle and the number of viewing directions will affect the reconstruction of the temperature field. When the best performance parameters of the ART-Sample algorithm identified in this paper are used to reconstruct the 3D temperature field, the 3D reconstructions with and without obstacle are

  2. Cognitive MMN and P300 in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease: A high density EEG-3D vector field tomography approach.

    PubMed

    Papadaniil, Chrysa D; Kosmidou, Vasiliki E; Tsolaki, Anthoula; Tsolaki, Magda; Kompatsiaris, Ioannis Yiannis; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2016-10-01

    Precise preclinical detection of dementia for effective treatment and stage monitoring is of great importance. Miscellaneous types of biomarkers, e.g., biochemical, genetic, neuroimaging, and physiological, have been proposed to diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD), the usual suspect behind manifested cognitive decline, and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a neuropathology prior to AD that does not affect cognitive functions. Event related potential (ERP) methods constitute a non-invasive, inexpensive means of analysis and have been proposed as sensitive biomarkers of cognitive impairment; besides, various ERP components are strongly linked with working memory, attention, sensory processing and motor responses. In this study, an auditory oddball task is employed, to acquire high density electroencephalograhy recordings from healthy elderly controls, MCI and AD patients. The mismatch negativity (MMN) and P300 ERP components are then extracted and their relationship with neurodegeneration is examined. Then, the neural activation at these components is reconstructed using the 3D vector field tomography (3D-VFT) inverse solution. The results reveal a decline of both ERPs amplitude, and a statistically significant prolongation of their latency as cognitive impairment advances. For the MMN, higher brain activation is usually localized in the inferior frontal and superior temporal gyri in the controls. However, in AD, parietal sites exhibit strong activity. Stronger P300 generators are mostly found in the frontal lobe for the controls, but in AD they often shift to the temporal lobe. Reduction in inferior frontal source strength and the switch of the maximum intensity area to parietal and superior temporal sites suggest that these areas, especially the former, are of particular significance when neurodegenerative disorders are investigated. The modulation of MMN and P300 can serve to produce biomarkers of dementia and its progression, and brain imaging can further contribute

  3. Invariant joint distribution of a stationary random field and its derivatives: Euler characteristic and critical point counts in 2 and 3D

    SciTech Connect

    Pogosyan, Dmitry; Gay, Christophe; Pichon, Christophe

    2009-10-15

    The full moments expansion of the joint probability distribution of an isotropic random field, its gradient, and invariants of the Hessian are presented in 2 and 3D. It allows for explicit expression for the Euler characteristic in ND and computation of extrema counts as functions of the excursion set threshold and the spectral parameter, as illustrated on model examples.

  4. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  5. Models for the 3D axisymmetric gravitational potential of the Milky Way galaxy. A detailed modelling of the Galactic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, D. A.; Lépine, J. R. D.; Dias, W. S.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: Galaxy mass models based on simple and analytical functions for density and potential pairs have been widely proposed in the literature. Disk models that are constrained solely by kinematic data only provide information about the global disk structure very near the Galactic plane. We attempt to circumvent this issue by constructing disk mass models whose three-dimensional structures are constrained by a recent Galactic star counts model in the near-infrared and also by observations of the hydrogen distribution in the disk. Our main aim is to provide models for the gravitational potential of the Galaxy that are fully analytical but also give a more realistic description of the density distribution in the disk component. Methods: We produced fitted mass models from the disk model, which is directly based on the observations divided into thin and thick stellar disks and H I and H2 disks subcomponents, by combining three Miyamoto-Nagai disk profiles of any model order (1, 2, or 3) for each disk subcomponent. The Miyamoto-Nagai disks are combined with models for the bulge and dark halo components and the total set of parameters is adjusted by observational kinematic constraints. A model that includes a ring density structure in the disk, beyond the solar Galactic radius, is also investigated. Results: The Galactic mass models return very good matches to the imposed observational constraints. In particular, the model with the ring density structure provides a greater contribution of the disk to the rotational support inside the solar circle. The gravitational potential models and their associated force-fields are described in analytically closed forms. Conclusions: The simple and analytical models for the mass distribution in the Milky Way and their associated three-dimensional gravitational potential are able to reproduce the observed kinematic constraints and, in addition, they are also compatible with our best knowledge of the stellar and gas distributions in

  6. The potential of Ge-doped optical fibre TL dosimetry for 3D verification of high energy IMRT photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, Noramaliza M.; Hussein, M.; Bradley, D. A.; Nisbet, A.

    2010-07-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is a technique widely used in the treatment of patients with prostate cancer, the most commonly occurring male cancer in the United States and Western Europe. The technique has many attractive features, promising improved radiotherapy over that provided by conventional techniques, including enabling the tumour to be treated with a uniform high dose, capability for shaping the radiation beams to match the shape of the tumour and potentially improving patient outcome. However, there are a number of concerns involving high photon energy IMRT (>10 MV), including greater radiation leakage and the possibility of photo-neutron production. The aim of the present study is to investigate the potential of Ge-doped optical fibre thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry in determining typical out-of-field doses for high energy IMRT. Commercial Ge-doped optical fibres have been employed as the TL dosimeters, offering features such as high sensitivity, cost-effectiveness and small size. Extensive measurements have been made, examining reproducibility, sensitivity, energy response and linearity with dose. Screening for sensitivity to dose of the individual fibres and subsequent selection has led to an overall coefficient of variation (CV) of better than 4 %. Use has been made of an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO) for photon irradiation measurements delivered over the range of nominal energies 6-15 MV as typically used in IMRT treatment of prostate cancer. Comparison has been made with TLD-100 measurements, the latter being corrected at 15 MV for their response to thermal neutrons. The study has demonstrated the Ge-doped optical fibre TL dosimeters to offer good potential for use in IMRT radiotherapy when using 6 MV photons, also indicating a need to correct their response to neutrons when conducting 15 MV irradiations.

  7. Augmented 3D super-resolution of fluorescence-free nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation and a least-cubic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Kim, Kyungsoo; Lee, Seungah; Chakkarapani, Suresh Kumar; Fang, Ning; Kang, Seong Ho

    2016-09-13

    Augmented three-dimensional (3D) subdiffraction-limited resolution of fluorescence-free single-nanoparticles was achieved with wavelength-dependent enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination and a least-cubic algorithm. Various plasmonic nanoparticles on a glass slide (i.e., gold nanoparticles, GNPs; silver nanoparticles, SNPs; and gold nanorods, GNRs) were imaged and sliced in the z-direction to a thickness of 10 nm. Single-particle images were then compared with simulation data. The 3D coordinates of individual GNP, SNP, and GNR nanoparticles (x, y, z) were resolved by fitting the data with 3D point spread functions using a least-cubic algorithm and collation. Final, 3D super-resolution microscopy (SRM) images were obtained by resolving 3D coordinates and their Cramér-Rao lower bound-based localization precisions in an image space (530 nm × 530 nm × 300 nm) with a specific voxel size (2.5 nm × 2.5 nm × 5 nm). Compared with the commonly used least-square method, the least-cubic method was more useful for finding the center in asymmetric cases (i.e., nanorods) with high precision and accuracy. This novel 3D fluorescence-free SRM technique was successfully applied to resolve the positions of various nanoparticles on glass and gold nanospots (in vitro) as well as in a living single cell (in vivo) with subdiffraction limited resolution in 3D.

  8. Augmented 3D super-resolution of fluorescence-free nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation and a least-cubic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Kim, Kyungsoo; Lee, Seungah; Chakkarapani, Suresh Kumar; Fang, Ning; Kang, Seong Ho

    2016-09-01

    Augmented three-dimensional (3D) subdiffraction-limited resolution of fluorescence-free single-nanoparticles was achieved with wavelength-dependent enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination and a least-cubic algorithm. Various plasmonic nanoparticles on a glass slide (i.e., gold nanoparticles, GNPs; silver nanoparticles, SNPs; and gold nanorods, GNRs) were imaged and sliced in the z-direction to a thickness of 10 nm. Single-particle images were then compared with simulation data. The 3D coordinates of individual GNP, SNP, and GNR nanoparticles (x, y, z) were resolved by fitting the data with 3D point spread functions using a least-cubic algorithm and collation. Final, 3D super-resolution microscopy (SRM) images were obtained by resolving 3D coordinates and their Cramér-Rao lower bound-based localization precisions in an image space (530 nm × 530 nm × 300 nm) with a specific voxel size (2.5 nm × 2.5 nm × 5 nm). Compared with the commonly used least-square method, the least-cubic method was more useful for finding the center in asymmetric cases (i.e., nanorods) with high precision and accuracy. This novel 3D fluorescence-free SRM technique was successfully applied to resolve the positions of various nanoparticles on glass and gold nanospots (in vitro) as well as in a living single cell (in vivo) with subdiffraction limited resolution in 3D.

  9. Augmented 3D super-resolution of fluorescence-free nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation and a least-cubic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Kim, Kyungsoo; Lee, Seungah; Chakkarapani, Suresh Kumar; Fang, Ning; Kang, Seong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Augmented three-dimensional (3D) subdiffraction-limited resolution of fluorescence-free single-nanoparticles was achieved with wavelength-dependent enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination and a least-cubic algorithm. Various plasmonic nanoparticles on a glass slide (i.e., gold nanoparticles, GNPs; silver nanoparticles, SNPs; and gold nanorods, GNRs) were imaged and sliced in the z-direction to a thickness of 10 nm. Single-particle images were then compared with simulation data. The 3D coordinates of individual GNP, SNP, and GNR nanoparticles (x, y, z) were resolved by fitting the data with 3D point spread functions using a least-cubic algorithm and collation. Final, 3D super-resolution microscopy (SRM) images were obtained by resolving 3D coordinates and their Cramér-Rao lower bound-based localization precisions in an image space (530 nm × 530 nm × 300 nm) with a specific voxel size (2.5 nm × 2.5 nm × 5 nm). Compared with the commonly used least-square method, the least-cubic method was more useful for finding the center in asymmetric cases (i.e., nanorods) with high precision and accuracy. This novel 3D fluorescence-free SRM technique was successfully applied to resolve the positions of various nanoparticles on glass and gold nanospots (in vitro) as well as in a living single cell (in vivo) with subdiffraction limited resolution in 3D. PMID:27619347

  10. Augmented 3D super-resolution of fluorescence-free nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation and a least-cubic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Kim, Kyungsoo; Lee, Seungah; Chakkarapani, Suresh Kumar; Fang, Ning; Kang, Seong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Augmented three-dimensional (3D) subdiffraction-limited resolution of fluorescence-free single-nanoparticles was achieved with wavelength-dependent enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination and a least-cubic algorithm. Various plasmonic nanoparticles on a glass slide (i.e., gold nanoparticles, GNPs; silver nanoparticles, SNPs; and gold nanorods, GNRs) were imaged and sliced in the z-direction to a thickness of 10 nm. Single-particle images were then compared with simulation data. The 3D coordinates of individual GNP, SNP, and GNR nanoparticles (x, y, z) were resolved by fitting the data with 3D point spread functions using a least-cubic algorithm and collation. Final, 3D super-resolution microscopy (SRM) images were obtained by resolving 3D coordinates and their Cramér-Rao lower bound-based localization precisions in an image space (530 nm × 530 nm × 300 nm) with a specific voxel size (2.5 nm × 2.5 nm × 5 nm). Compared with the commonly used least-square method, the least-cubic method was more useful for finding the center in asymmetric cases (i.e., nanorods) with high precision and accuracy. This novel 3D fluorescence-free SRM technique was successfully applied to resolve the positions of various nanoparticles on glass and gold nanospots (in vitro) as well as in a living single cell (in vivo) with subdiffraction limited resolution in 3D. PMID:27619347

  11. The dimension added by 3D scanning and 3D printing of meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vet, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    An overview for the 3D photodocumentation of meteorites is presented, focussing on two 3D scanning methods in relation to 3D printing. The 3D photodocumention of meteorites provides new ways for the digital preservation of culturally, historically or scientifically unique meteorites. It has the potential for becoming a new documentation standard of meteorites that can exist complementary to traditional photographic documentation. Notable applications include (i.) use of physical properties in dark flight-, strewn field-, or aerodynamic modelling; (ii.) collection research of meteorites curated by different museum collections, and (iii.) public dissemination of meteorite models as a resource for educational users. The possible applications provided by the additional dimension of 3D illustrate the benefits for the meteoritics community.

  12. The Best of Both Worlds: 3D X-ray Microscopy with Ultra-high Resolution and a Large Field of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Gelb, J.; Yang, Y.; Guan, Y.; Wu, W.; Chen, J.; Tian, Y.

    2011-09-01

    3D visualizations of complex structures within various samples have been achieved with high spatial resolution by X-ray computed nanotomography (nano-CT). While high spatial resolution generally comes at the expense of field of view (FOV). Here we proposed an approach that stitched several 3D volumes together into a single large volume to significantly increase the size of the FOV while preserving resolution. Combining this with nano-CT, 18-μm FOV with sub-60-nm resolution has been achieved for non-destructive 3D visualization of clustered yeasts that were too large for a single scan. It shows high promise for imaging other large samples in the future.

  13. Geostatistical modelling with 3D+T data: soil moisture, temperature, and electrical conductivity at the field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasch, Caley K.; Hengl, Tomislav; Gräler, Benedikt; Meyer, Hanna; Magney, Troy; Brown, David J.

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic soil data collected using automated sensor networks can facilitate our understanding of soil processes, but highly dimensional data may be difficult to analyze in a manner that incorporates correlation in properties through 3-dimensions and time (3D+T). We demonstrate two approaches to making continuous predictions of dynamic soil properties from fixed point observations. For this analysis, we used the Cook Farm data set, which includes hourly measurements of soil volumetric water content, temperature, and electrical conductivity at 42 points and five depths, collected over five years. We compare performance of two modeling frameworks. In the first framework we used random forest algorithms to fit a 3D+T regression model to make predictions of all three soil variables from 2- and 3-dimensional, temporal, and spatio-temporal covariates. In the second framework we developed a 3D+T kriging model after detrending the observations for depth-dependent seasonal effects. The results show that both models accurately predicted soil temperature, but the kriging model outperformed the regression model according to cross-validation; it explained 37%, 96%, and 16% of the variability in water content, temperature, and electrical conductivity respectively versus 34%, 93%, and 4% explained by the random forest model. The full random forest regression model had high goodness-of-fit for all variables, which was reduced in cross-validation. Temporal model components (i.e. day of the year) explained most of the variability in observations. The seamless predictions of 3D+T data produced from this analysis can assist in understanding soil processes and how they change through a season, under different land management scenarios, and how they relate to other environmental processes.

  14. Representation of protein 3D structures in spherical (ρ, ϕ, θ) coordinates and two of its potential applications.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Vicente M

    2011-09-01

    Three-dimensional objects can be represented using cartesian, spherical or cylindrical coordinate systems, among many others. Currently all protein 3D structures in the PDB are in cartesian coordinates. We wanted to explore the possibility that protein 3D structures, especially the globular type (spheroproteins), when represented in spherical coordinates might find useful novel applications. A Fortran program was written to transform protein 3D structure files in cartesian coordinates (x,y,z) to spherical coordinates (ρ, ϕ, θ), with the centroid of the protein molecule as origin. We present here two applications, namely, (1) separation of the protein outer layer (OL) from the inner core (IC); and (2) identifying protrusions and invaginations on the protein surface. In the first application, ϕ and θ were partitioned into suitable intervals and the point with maximum ρ in each such 'ϕ-θ bin' was determined. A suitable cutoff value for ρ is adopted, and for each ϕ-θ bin, all points with ρ values less than the cutoff are considered part of the IC, and those with ρ values equal to or greater than the cutoff are considered part of the OL. We show that this separation procedure is successful as it gives rise to an OL that is significantly more enriched in hydrophilic amino acid residues, and an IC that is significantly more enriched in hydrophobic amino acid residues, as expected. In the second application, the point with maximum ρ in each ϕ-θ bin are sequestered and their frequency distribution constructed (i.e., maximum ρ's sorted from lowest to highest, collected into 1.50Å-intervals, and the frequency in each interval plotted). We show in such plots that invaginations on the protein surface give rise to subpeaks or shoulders on the lagging side of the main peak, while protrusions give rise to similar subpeaks or shoulders, but on the leading side of the main peak. We used the dataset of Laskowski et al. (1996) to demonstrate both applications.

  15. Representation of protein 3D structures in spherical (ρ, ϕ, θ) coordinates and two of its potential applications.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Vicente M

    2011-09-01

    Three-dimensional objects can be represented using cartesian, spherical or cylindrical coordinate systems, among many others. Currently all protein 3D structures in the PDB are in cartesian coordinates. We wanted to explore the possibility that protein 3D structures, especially the globular type (spheroproteins), when represented in spherical coordinates might find useful novel applications. A Fortran program was written to transform protein 3D structure files in cartesian coordinates (x,y,z) to spherical coordinates (ρ, ϕ, θ), with the centroid of the protein molecule as origin. We present here two applications, namely, (1) separation of the protein outer layer (OL) from the inner core (IC); and (2) identifying protrusions and invaginations on the protein surface. In the first application, ϕ and θ were partitioned into suitable intervals and the point with maximum ρ in each such 'ϕ-θ bin' was determined. A suitable cutoff value for ρ is adopted, and for each ϕ-θ bin, all points with ρ values less than the cutoff are considered part of the IC, and those with ρ values equal to or greater than the cutoff are considered part of the OL. We show that this separation procedure is successful as it gives rise to an OL that is significantly more enriched in hydrophilic amino acid residues, and an IC that is significantly more enriched in hydrophobic amino acid residues, as expected. In the second application, the point with maximum ρ in each ϕ-θ bin are sequestered and their frequency distribution constructed (i.e., maximum ρ's sorted from lowest to highest, collected into 1.50Å-intervals, and the frequency in each interval plotted). We show in such plots that invaginations on the protein surface give rise to subpeaks or shoulders on the lagging side of the main peak, while protrusions give rise to similar subpeaks or shoulders, but on the leading side of the main peak. We used the dataset of Laskowski et al. (1996) to demonstrate both applications. PMID

  16. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E. J.; Park, J. -K.; Marmar, E. S.; Ahn, J. -W.; Berkery, J. W.; Burrell, K. H.; Canik, J. M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Ferraro, N. M.; Garofalo, A. M.; Gates, D. A.; Greenwald, M.; Kim, K.; King, J. D.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lazerson, S. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lore, J. D.; Menard, J. E.; Nazikian, R.; Shafer, M. W.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Reiman, A. H.; Rice, J. E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sugiyama, L.; Turnbull, A. D.; Volpe, F.; Wang, Z. R.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2014-09-30

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10-4 of the main axisymmetric field, such “3D” fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data, in

  17. Basis set limit electronic excitation energies, ionization potentials, and electron affinities for the 3d transition metal atoms: Coupled cluster and multireference methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabanov, Nikolai B.; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2006-08-01

    Recently developed correlation consistent basis sets for the first row transition metal elements Sc-Zn have been utilized to determine complete basis set (CBS) scalar relativistic electron affinities, ionization potentials, and 4s23dn -2-4s1dn -1 electronic excitation energies with single reference coupled cluster methods [CCSD(T), CCSDT, and CCSDTQ] and multireference configuration interaction with three reference spaces: 3d4s, 3d4s4p, and 3d4s4p3d'. The theoretical values calculated with the highest order coupled cluster techniques at the CBS limit, including extrapolations to full configuration interaction, are well within 1kcal/mol of the corresponding experimental data. For the early transition metal elements (Sc-Mn) the internally contracted multireference averaged coupled pair functional method yielded excellent agreement with experiment; however, the atomic properties for the late transition metals (Mn-Zn) proved to be much more difficult to describe with this level of theory, even with the largest reference function of the present work.

  18. 3D Cloud Radiative Effects on Aerosol Optical Thickness Retrievals in Cumulus Cloud Fields in the Biomass Burning Region in Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Guo-Yong; Marshak, Alexander; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol amount in clear regions of a cloudy atmosphere is a critical parameter in studying the interaction between aerosols and clouds. Since the global cloud cover is about 50%, cloudy scenes are often encountered in any satellite images. Aerosols are more or less transparent, while clouds are extremely reflective in the visible spectrum of solar radiation. The radiative transfer in clear-cloudy condition is highly three- dimensional (3D). This paper focuses on estimating the 3D effects on aerosol optical thickness retrievals using Monte Carlo simulations. An ASTER image of cumulus cloud fields in the biomass burning region in Brazil is simulated in this study. The MODIS products (i-e., cloud optical thickness, particle effective radius, cloud top pressure, surface reflectance, etc.) are used to construct the cloud property and surface reflectance fields. To estimate the cloud 3-D effects, we assume a plane-parallel stratification of aerosol properties in the 60 km x 60 km ASTER image. The simulated solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere is compared with plane-parallel calculations. Furthermore, the 3D cloud radiative effects on aerosol optical thickness retrieval are estimated.

  19. Large scale 3D geometry of deformation structures in the Aar massif and overlying Helvetic nappes (Central Alps, Switzerland) - A combined remote sensing and field work approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumberger, R.; Wehrens, Ph.; Herwegh, M.

    2012-04-01

    Allowing deep insight into the formation history of a rock complex, shear zones, faults and joint systems represent