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Sample records for 3d radiative transfer

  1. SB3D User Manual, Santa Barbara 3D Radiative Transfer Model

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hirok, William

    1999-01-01

    SB3D is a three-dimensional atmospheric and oceanic radiative transfer model for the Solar spectrum. The microphysics employed in the model are the same as used in the model SBDART. It is assumed that the user of SB3D is familiar with SBDART and IDL. SB3D differs from SBDART in that computations are conducted on media in three-dimensions rather than a single column (i.e. plane-parallel), and a stochastic method (Monte Carlo) is employed instead of a numerical approach (Discrete Ordinates) for estimating a solution to the radiative transfer equation. Because of these two differences between SB3D and SBDART, the input and running of SB3D is more unwieldy and requires compromises between model performance and computational expense. Hence, there is no one correct method for running the model and the user must develop a sense to the proper input and configuration of the model.

  2. Modeling radiative transfer in heterogeneous 3D vegetation canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastellu-Etchegorry, J. P.; Demarez, V.; Pinel, Veronique; Zagolski, Francis

    1995-01-01

    The DART (discrete anisotropic radiative transfer) model simulates radiative transfer in heterogeneous 3-D scenes; here, a forest plantation. Similarly to Kimes model, the scene is divided into a rectangular cell matrix, i.e., a building block for simulating larger scenes. Cells are parallelipipedic. The scene encompasses different landscape features (i.e., trees with leaves and trunks, grass, water, and soil) with specific optical (reflectance, transmittance) and structural (LAI, LAD) characteristics. Radiation directions are subdivided into contiguous sectors with possibly uneven spacing. Topography, hot spot, and multiple interactions (scattering, attenuation) within cells are modeled. Two major steps are distinguished: (1) Illumination of cells by direct sun radiation. Actual locations of within cell scattering are determined for optimizing scattering computation. (2) Interception and scattering of previously scattered radiation. Diffuse atmospheric radiation is input at this level. Multiple scattering is represented with a spherical harmonic decomposition, for reducing data volume. The model iterates on step 2 for all cells, and stops with the energetic equilibrium. This model predicts the bi-directional reflectance factors of 3D canopies, with each scene component contribution; it was successfully tested with homogeneous covers. It gives also the radiation regime with canopies, and consequently some information about volume distribution of photosynthesis rates and primary production.

  3. Computing Radiative Transfer in a 3D Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Allmen, Paul; Lee, Seungwon

    2012-01-01

    A package of software computes the time-dependent propagation of a narrow laser beam in an arbitrary three- dimensional (3D) medium with absorption and scattering, using the transient-discrete-ordinates method and a direct integration method. Unlike prior software that utilizes a Monte Carlo method, this software enables simulation at very small signal-to-noise ratios. The ability to simulate propagation of a narrow laser beam in a 3D medium is an improvement over other discrete-ordinate software. Unlike other direct-integration software, this software is not limited to simulation of propagation of thermal radiation with broad angular spread in three dimensions or of a laser pulse with narrow angular spread in two dimensions. Uses for this software include (1) computing scattering of a pulsed laser beam on a material having given elastic scattering and absorption profiles, and (2) evaluating concepts for laser-based instruments for sensing oceanic turbulence and related measurements of oceanic mixed-layer depths. With suitable augmentation, this software could be used to compute radiative transfer in ultrasound imaging in biological tissues, radiative transfer in the upper Earth crust for oil exploration, and propagation of laser pulses in telecommunication applications.

  4. 3D Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Cloud System-Resolving Models: Forward Modelling and Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Howard Barker; Jason Cole

    2012-05-17

    Utilization of cloud-resolving models and multi-dimensional radiative transfer models to investigate the importance of 3D radiation effects on the numerical simulation of cloud fields and their properties.

  5. 3D Monte Carlo radiation transfer modelling of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. Louise; Christison, Craig; Brown, C. Tom A.; Wood, Kenneth; Valentine, Ronan M.; Moseley, Harry

    2015-06-01

    The effects of ageing and skin type on Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) for different treatment methods have been theoretically investigated. A multilayered Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer model is presented where both daylight activated PDT and conventional PDT are compared. It was found that light penetrates deeper through older skin with a lighter complexion, which translates into a deeper effective treatment depth. The effect of ageing was found to be larger for darker skin types. The investigation further strengthens the usage of daylight as a potential light source for PDT where effective treatment depths of about 2 mm can be achieved.

  6. Parameterization and Analysis of 3-D Solar Radiative Transfer in Clouds: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Y. Harrington

    2012-09-21

    This document reports on the research that we have done over the course of our two-year project. The report also covers the research done on this project during a 1 year no-cost extension of the grant. Our work has had two main, inter-related thrusts: The first thrust was to characterize the response of stratocumulus cloud structure and dynamics to systematic changes in cloud infrared radiative cooling and solar heating using one-dimensional radiative transfer models. The second was to couple a three-dimensional (3-D) solar radiative transfer model to the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model that we use to simulate stratocumulus. The purpose of the studies with 3-D radiative transfer was to examine the possible influences of 3-D photon transport on the structure, evolution, and radiative properties of stratocumulus. While 3-D radiative transport has been examined in static cloud environments, few studies have attempted to examine whether the 3-D nature of radiative absorption and emission influence the structure and evolution of stratocumulus. We undertook this dual approach because only a small number of LES simulations with the 3-D radiative transfer model are possible due to the high computational costs. Consequently, LES simulations with a 1-D radiative transfer solver were used in order to examine the portions of stratocumulus parameter space that may be most sensitive to perturbations in the radiative fields. The goal was then to explore these sensitive regions with LES using full 3-D radiative transfer. Our overall goal was to discover whether 3-D radiative processes alter cloud structure and evolution, and whether this may have any indirect implications for cloud radiative properties. In addition, we collaborated with Dr. Tamas Varni, providing model output fields for his attempt at parameterizing 3-D radiative effects for cloud models.

  7. Parameterization and analysis of 3-D radiative transfer in clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Varnai, Tamas

    2012-03-16

    This report provides a summary of major accomplishments from the project. The project examines the impact of radiative interactions between neighboring atmospheric columns, for example clouds scattering extra sunlight toward nearby clear areas. While most current cloud models don't consider these interactions and instead treat sunlight in each atmospheric column separately, the resulting uncertainties have remained unknown. This project has provided the first estimates on the way average solar heating is affected by interactions between nearby columns. These estimates have been obtained by combining several years of cloud observations at three DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility sites (in Alaska, Oklahoma, and Papua New Guinea) with simulations of solar radiation around the observed clouds. The importance of radiative interactions between atmospheric columns was evaluated by contrasting simulations that included the interactions with those that did not. This study provides lower-bound estimates for radiative interactions: It cannot consider interactions in cross-wind direction, because it uses two-dimensional vertical cross-sections through clouds that were observed by instruments looking straight up as clouds drifted aloft. Data from new DOE scanning radars will allow future radiative studies to consider the full three-dimensional nature of radiative processes. The results reveal that two-dimensional radiative interactions increase overall day-and-night average solar heating by about 0.3, 1.2, and 4.1 Watts per meter square at the three sites, respectively. This increase grows further if one considers that most large-domain cloud simulations have resolutions that cannot specify small-scale cloud variability. For example, the increases in solar heating mentioned above roughly double for a fairly typical model resolution of 1 km. The study also examined the factors that shape radiative interactions between atmospheric columns and

  8. 3D radiative transfer in colliding wind binaries: Application of the SimpleX algorithm to 3D SPH simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas; Clementel, Nicola; Kruip, Chael; Icke, Vincent; Gull, Theodore

    2014-09-01

    We present the first results of full 3D radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in a massive binary system. We accomplish this by applying the SIMPLEX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Delaunay grid to recent 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the colliding winds in the binary system η Carinae. We use SIMPLEX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium, in 3D, at the resolution of the original SPH simulations. We show how the SIMPLEX simulations can be used to generate synthetic spectral data cubes for comparison to data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph as part of a multi-cycle program to map changes in η Car's extended interacting wind structures across one binary cycle. Comparison of the HST observations to the SIMPLEX models can help lead to more accurate constraints on the orbital, stellar, and wind parameters of the η Car system, such as the primary's mass-loss rate and the companion's temperature and luminosity. While we initially focus specifically on the η Car binary, the numerical methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR140, WR137, WR19) and dusty 'pinwheel' (WR104, WR98a) binary systems. One of the biggest remaining mysteries is how dust can form and survive in such systems that contain a hot, luminous O star. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SIMPLEX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where dust can form and survive in these unique objects.

  9. A study on radiative transfer effects in 3-D cloudy atmosphere using satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okata, M.; Nakajima, T.; Suzuki, K.; Inoue, T.; Nakajima, T. Y.; Okamoto, H.

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluates 3-D cloud effects on the radiation budget with a combined use of active sensor cloud profiling radar/CloudSat and imager Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer/Aqua data on the A-train. An algorithm is devised for constructing 3-D cloud fields based on satellite-observed cloud information. The 3-D cloud fields thus constructed are used to calculate the broadband solar and thermal radiative fluxes with a 3-D radiative transfer code developed by the authors. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of cloud morphology on solar radiative transfer in cloudy atmosphere. For this purpose, 3-D cloud fields are constructed with the new satellite-based method, to which full 3D-RT (radiative transfer) simulations are applied. The simulated 3-D radiation fields are then used to examine and quantify errors of existing typical plane-parallel approximations, i.e., Plane-Parallel Approximation, Independent Pixel Approximation and Tilted Independent Pixel Approximation. Such 3D-RT simulations also serve to address another objective of this study, i.e., to devise an accurate approximation and to characterize the observed specific 3D-RT effects by the cloud morphology based on knowledge of idealized 3D-RT effects. We introduce a modified approach based on an optimum value of diffusivity factor to better approximate the radiative fluxes for arbitrary solar zenith angle determined from the results of 3-D radiative transfer simulations to redeem the overcorrections of these approximations for large solar zenith angles (SZAs). This new approach, called Slant path Independent Pixel Approximation, is found to be better than other approximations when SZA is large for some cloud cases. Based on the SZA dependence of the errors of these approximations relative to 3-D computations, satellite-observed real cloud cases are found to fall into either of three types of different morphologies, i.e., isolated cloud type, upper cloud-roughened type and lower

  10. Numerical non-LTE 3D radiative transfer using a multigrid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjørgen, Johan P.; Leenaarts, Jorrit

    2017-03-01

    Context. 3D non-LTE radiative transfer problems are computationally demanding, and this sets limits on the size of the problems that can be solved. So far, multilevel accelerated lambda iteration (MALI) has been the method of choice to perform high-resolution computations in multidimensional problems. The disadvantage of MALI is that its computing time scales as O(n2), with n the number of grid points. When the grid becomes finer, the computational cost increases quadratically. Aims: We aim to develop a 3D non-LTE radiative transfer code that is more efficient than MALI. Methods: We implement a non-linear multigrid, fast approximation storage scheme, into the existing Multi3D radiative transfer code. We verify our multigrid implementation by comparing with MALI computations. We show that multigrid can be employed in realistic problems with snapshots from 3D radiative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations as input atmospheres. Results: With multigrid, we obtain a factor 3.3-4.5 speed-up compared to MALI. With full-multigrid, the speed-up increases to a factor 6. The speed-up is expected to increase for input atmospheres with more grid points and finer grid spacing. Conclusions: Solving 3D non-LTE radiative transfer problems using non-linear multigrid methods can be applied to realistic atmospheres with a substantial increase in speed.

  11. 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer modeling of η Carinae's colliding winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, T. I.; Clementel, N.; Gull, T. R.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Paardekooper, J.-P.; Icke, V.

    We present results of full 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in the massive binary system η Carinae. We accomplish this by applying the SimpleX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Voronoi-Delaunay grid to recent 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the binary colliding winds. We use SimpleX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium, in 3D, at the resolution of the original SPH simulations. We investigate several computational domain sizes and Luminous Blue Variable primary star mass-loss rates. We furthermore present new methods of visualizing and interacting with output from complex 3D numerical simulations, including 3D interactive graphics and 3D printing. While we initially focus on η Car, the methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR 140, WR 137, WR 19) and dusty `pinwheel' (WR 104, WR 98a) binary systems. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SimpleX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where various observed time-variable emission and absorption lines form in these unique objects.

  12. A 3D radiative transfer framework . VII. Arbitrary velocity fields in the Eulerian frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seelmann, A. M.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Baron, E.

    2010-11-01

    Aims: A solution of the radiative-transfer problem in 3D with arbitrary velocity fields in the Eulerian frame is presented. The method is implemented in our 3D radiative transfer framework and used in the PHOENIX/3D code. It is tested by comparison to our well-tested 1D co-moving frame radiative transfer code, where the treatment of a monotonic velocity field is implemented in the Lagrangian frame. The Eulerian formulation does not need much additional memory and is useable on state-of-the-art computers, even large-scale applications with 1000's of wavelength points are feasible. Methods: In the Eulerian formulation of the problem, the photon is seen by the atom at a Doppler-shifted wavelength depending on its propagation direction, which leads to a Doppler-shifted absorption and emission. This leads to a different source function and a different Λ^* operator in the radiative transfer equations compared to the static case. Results: The results of the Eulerian 3D spherical calculations are compared to our well-tested 1D Lagrangian spherical calculations, the agreement is, up to vmax = 1 × 103 km s-1 very good. Test calculation in other geometries are also shown.

  13. A Review of 3D Radiative Transfer in Atmospheric Science: History and Outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiscombe, W. J.

    2006-12-01

    3D radiative transfer has, until recently, remained a marginal subject within atmospheric science. While some measurement techniques like lidar and radar are inherently 3D, the simplifying assumptions made in the use of such data have alleviated any need to deal with 3D radiative transfer. Cloud scenes are obviously 3D, but the crude resolution of past atmospheric models (GCMs) required clouds to be treated as 1D. Measured radiative fluxes containing 3D cloud effects were simply time-averaged until all their 3D-ness was apparently beaten out of them. The main subject which has propelled 3D radiative transfer onto center stage is, nevertheless, clouds. This is because conventional GCMs are being challenged by GCMs that have their large-scale parametrizations of cloud-related processes replaced by explicit cloud-system-resolving models. Within these new GCMs, 3D radiative transfer cannot be ignored since cloud fluctuations are resolved explicitly down to scales where 1D and 3D radiative transfer can differ markedly. This talk will attempt to identify the high points in the development of the 3D cloud radiation field. My own career interleaved with much of this history, including the strong move away from just using computers and toward field observations, and also the effort to fit the new knowledge into climate models. The 3D cloud radiation field began in the 1970s, but attracted few adherents because of severe limitations on computer time and memory, and also because of ignorance of cloud structure (beyond the qualitative classifications which had ruled for 170 years). The earliest landmarks were Monte Carlo calcuations for cubic clouds, whose main point was the drastic errors incurred by ignoring cloud 3D-ness. This line of development ramified until the early 1990s, leading finally to randomly placed cubes with sizes drawn from a probability distribution. A parallel line of development began with the landmark paper of Lovejoy in 1982, which showed that cloud

  14. 3D Hydrodynamical and Radiative Transfer Modeling of Eta Carinae's Colliding Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madura, Thomas Ignatius; Clementel, Nicola; Gull, Theodore R.; Kruip, Chael J. H.; Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Icke, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    We present the results of full 3D hydrodynamical and radiative transfer simulations of the colliding stellar winds in the massive binary system Eta Carinae (Clementel, Madura, et al. 2014, MNRAS, 443, 2475 and Clementel, Madura, et al. 2015, MNRAS, 447, 2445). We accomplish this by applying the SimpleX algorithm for 3D radiative transfer on an unstructured Voronoi-Delaunay grid to 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the binary colliding winds. We use SimpleX to obtain detailed ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium in 3D. We investigate several computational domain sizes and Luminous Blue Variable primary-star mass-loss rates. We show how the SimpleX simulations can be used to generate synthetic spectral data cubes for comparison to data obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph as part of a multi-cycle program to map changes in Eta Carinae's spatially extended interacting wind structures across one binary cycle. Comparison of the HST observations to the SimpleX models can help lead to more accurate constraints on the orbital, stellar, and wind parameters of the Eta Carinae system, such as the LBV primary's mass-loss rate and the companion star's temperature and luminosity. We furthermore present new methods of visualizing and interacting with output from complex 3D numerical simulations, including 3D interactive graphics and 3D printing (Madura et al. 2015, arXiv:1503.00716). While we initially focus specifically on Eta Carinae, the methods employed can be applied to numerous other colliding wind (WR 140, WR 137, WR 19) and dusty ‘pinwheel’ (WR 112, WR 104, WR 98a) binary systems. Coupled with 3D hydrodynamical simulations, SimpleX simulations have the potential to help determine the regions where dust can form and survive in these unique objects.

  15. 3D Radiative Transfer models of Planetary Nebulae with CRONOS and CLOUDY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederwanger, F.; Öttl, Silvia; Kimeswenger, S.; Kissmann, R.; Reitberger, K.

    2014-04-01

    We present our ideas about a new setup for a full 3D radiative transfer hydrodynamic (RT-HD) computation for planetary nebulae (PNe). The setup is based on the 3D MHD code CRONOS, using low dissipative conservation numerical schemes for hydrodynamics and MHD (Kissmann et al. 2009), and on CLOUDY (Ferland et al. 2013). New to our ideas is the implementation of CLOUDY for the radiative terms. While in previous works internal cooling was calculated using analytical cooling curves from Dalgarno&McCray (1972) for the lower temperatures and from Gerritsen&Icke (1997) for the high temperature regime, we intend to use the sophisticated physics of CLOUDY in a similar way as for CLOUDY 3D (Morisset, 2011). The hydrodynamic calculations provide the density and velocity structure. Repeatedly, a CLOUDY model is calculated to derive cooling, absorption and radiative pressure acceleration terms for the hydro code. We show the feasibility of this setup for symmetric and asymmetric geometries of PNe. Euclidean grids are used to avoid imprinting. We present first tests for this setup and first results on the numerical stability. These simulations were run using different geometries, like e.g. disks. Another group is working on 3D models of particle acceleration in radiatively driven colliding winds of massive star binary systems. Although this is a completely different energy regime, binary systems are of great interest for asymmetric PNe as well. The setup allows us simulations using any arbitrary geometry.

  16. A Parallel Numerical Algorithm To Solve Linear Systems Of Equations Emerging From 3D Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichert, Viktoria; Arkenberg, Mario; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2016-10-01

    Highly resolved state-of-the-art 3D atmosphere simulations will remain computationally extremely expensive for years to come. In addition to the need for more computing power, rethinking coding practices is necessary. We take a dual approach by introducing especially adapted, parallel numerical methods and correspondingly parallelizing critical code passages. In the following, we present our respective work on PHOENIX/3D. With new parallel numerical algorithms, there is a big opportunity for improvement when iteratively solving the system of equations emerging from the operator splitting of the radiative transfer equation J = ΛS. The narrow-banded approximate Λ-operator Λ* , which is used in PHOENIX/3D, occurs in each iteration step. By implementing a numerical algorithm which takes advantage of its characteristic traits, the parallel code's efficiency is further increased and a speed-up in computational time can be achieved.

  17. Partial redistribution in 3D non-LTE radiative transfer in solar-atmosphere models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhorukov, Andrii V.; Leenaarts, Jorrit

    2017-01-01

    Context. Resonance spectral lines such as H I Ly α, Mg II H&K, and Ca II H&K that form in the solar chromosphere, are influenced by the effects of 3D radiative transfer as well as partial redistribution (PRD). So far no one has modeled these lines including both effects simultaneously owing to the high computing demands of existing algorithms. Such modeling is, however, indispensable for accurate diagnostics of the chromosphere. Aims: We present a computationally tractable method to treat PRD scattering in 3D model atmospheres using a 3D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) radiative transfer code. Methods: To make the method memory-friendly, we use the hybrid approximation for the redistribution integral. To make the method fast, we use linear interpolation on equidistant frequency grids. We verify our algorithm against computations with the RH code and analyze it for stability, convergence, and usefulness of acceleration using model atoms of Mg II with the H&K lines and H I with the Ly α line treated in PRD. Results: A typical 3D PRD solution can be obtained in a model atmosphere with 252 × 252 × 496 coordinate points in 50 000-200 000 CPU hours, which is a factor ten slower than computations assuming complete redistribution. We illustrate the importance of the joint action of PRD and 3D effects for the Mg II H&K lines for disk-center intensities, as well as the center-to-limb variation. Conclusions: The proposed method allows for the simulation of PRD lines in a time series of radiation-magnetohydrodynamic models, in order to interpret observations of chromospheric lines at high spatial resolution.

  18. PORTA: A Massively Parallel Code for 3D Non-LTE Polarized Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štěpán, J.

    2014-10-01

    The interpretation of the Stokes profiles of the solar (stellar) spectral line radiation requires solving a non-LTE radiative transfer problem that can be very complex, especially when the main interest lies in modeling the linear polarization signals produced by scattering processes and their modification by the Hanle effect. One of the main difficulties is due to the fact that the plasma of a stellar atmosphere can be highly inhomogeneous and dynamic, which implies the need to solve the non-equilibrium problem of generation and transfer of polarized radiation in realistic three-dimensional stellar atmospheric models. Here we present PORTA, a computer program we have developed for solving, in three-dimensional (3D) models of stellar atmospheres, the problem of the generation and transfer of spectral line polarization taking into account anisotropic radiation pumping and the Hanle and Zeeman effects in multilevel atoms. The numerical method of solution is based on a highly convergent iterative algorithm, whose convergence rate is insensitive to the grid size, and on an accurate short-characteristics formal solver of the Stokes-vector transfer equation which uses monotonic Bezier interpolation. In addition to the iterative method and the 3D formal solver, another important feature of PORTA is a novel parallelization strategy suitable for taking advantage of massively parallel computers. Linear scaling of the solution with the number of processors allows to reduce the solution time by several orders of magnitude. We present useful benchmarks and a few illustrations of applications using a 3D model of the solar chromosphere resulting from MHD simulations. Finally, we present our conclusions with a view to future research. For more details see Štěpán & Trujillo Bueno (2013).

  19. A Radiative Transfer Case Study for 3-d cloud effects in the UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerkötter, Ralf; Degünther, Markus

    Satellite UV mapping is usually based on the independent pixel approximation (IPA) which neglects horizontal photon transport between adjacent columns. Horizontal inhomogeneity of cloud fields therefore causes uncertainties in the derived UV radiation fields. While these effects are small for large pixel satellites, the broken-cloud errors increase as the pixel size decreases. By comparing results of 1-d and 3-d UV radiative transfer calculations for three selected cloud scenes that cover a rather broad range of cloud inhomogeneity the main 3-d cloud effects on the atmospheric UV transmission are identified and quantified in their order of magnitude. With respect to the different spatial resolutions of satellite instruments it is further shown how 3-d cloud effects average out with increasing spatial scale. It turns out that locally the IPA cause maximum uncertainties up to ±100% for a spatial resolution of about 1 × 1 km² (e.g., AVHRR), they are reduced to ±10% for a resolution of about 15 × 15 km² and below 5% for a resolution greater than 30 km (e.g., TOMS).

  20. Retrieval of cloud microphysical parameters from INSAT-3D: a feasibility study using radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinya, John; Bipasha, Paul S.

    2016-05-01

    Clouds strongly modulate the Earths energy balance and its atmosphere through their interaction with the solar and terrestrial radiation. They interact with radiation in various ways like scattering, emission and absorption. By observing these changes in radiation at different wavelength, cloud properties can be estimated. Cloud properties are of utmost importance in studying different weather and climate phenomena. At present, no satellite provides cloud microphysical parameters over the Indian region with high temporal resolution. INSAT-3D imager observations in 6 spectral channels from geostationary platform offer opportunity to study continuous cloud properties over Indian region. Visible (0.65 μm) and shortwave-infrared (1.67 μm) channel radiances can be used to retrieve cloud microphysical parameters such as cloud optical thickness (COT) and cloud effective radius (CER). In this paper, we have carried out a feasibility study with the objective of cloud microphysics retrieval. For this, an inter-comparison of 15 globally available radiative transfer models (RTM) were carried out with the aim of generating a Look-up- Table (LUT). SBDART model was chosen for the simulations. The sensitivity of each spectral channel to different cloud properties was investigated. The inputs to the RT model were configured over our study region (50°S - 50°N and 20°E - 130°E) and a large number of simulations were carried out using random input vectors to generate the LUT. The determination of cloud optical thickness and cloud effective radius from spectral reflectance measurements constitutes the inverse problem and is typically solved by comparing the measured reflectances with entries in LUT and searching for the combination of COT and CER that gives the best fit. The products are available on the website www.mosdac.gov.in

  1. High-resolution 3D dust radiative transfer in galaxies with DART-Ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natale, Giovanni; Popescu, Cristina C.; Tuffs, Richard. J.; Debattista, Victor P.; Grootes, Meiert W.

    2015-02-01

    DART-Ray is a 3D ray-tracing dust radiative transfer (RT) code that can be used to derive stellar and dust emission maps of galaxy models and simulations with arbitrary geometries. In addition to the previously published RT algorithm, we have now included in DART-Ray the possibility of calculating the stocastically heated dust emission from each volume element within a galaxy. To show the capabilities of the code, we performed a high-resolution (26 pc) RT calculation for a galaxy N-body+SPH simulation. The simulated galaxy we considered is characterized by a nuclear disc and a flocculent spiral structure. We analysed the derived galaxy maps for the global and local effects of dust on the galaxy attenuation as well as the contribution of scattered radiation to the predicted observed emission. In addition, by performing an additional RT calculation including only the stellar volume emissivity due to young stellar populations (SPs), we derived the contribution to the total dust emission powered by young and old SPs. Full details of this work will be presented in a forthcoming publication.

  2. 3D Time Dependent Stokes Vector Radiative Transfer in an Atmosphere-Ocean System Including a Stochastic Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    phase matrix were determined by letting the elements of the reduced phase matrix ( ˜ P ij = Pij /P11) be equal to those of the reduced Rayleigh...for the solution of 3-D Radiative Transfer Problems”, JQSRT. 45. 47-56, (1991) 3. A. Sánchez, T.F. Smith, and W. F. Krajewski “A three-dimensional...F. Krajewski , “A Multi-dimensional Discrete Ordinates Method for Polarized Radiative Transfer, Part I: Validation for Randomly Oriented

  3. 3D Radiative Transfer in Eta Carinae: Application of the SimpleX Algorithm to 3D SPH Simulations of Binary Colliding Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clementel, N.; Madura, T. I.; Kruip, C.J.H.; Icke, V.; Gull, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    Eta Carinae is an ideal astrophysical laboratory for studying massive binary interactions and evolution, and stellar wind-wind collisions. Recent three-dimensional (3D) simulations set the stage for understanding the highly complex 3D flows in eta Car. Observations of different broad high- and low-ionization forbidden emission lines provide an excellent tool to constrain the orientation of the system, the primary's mass-loss rate, and the ionizing flux of the hot secondary. In this work we present the first steps towards generating synthetic observations to compare with available and future HST/STIS data. We present initial results from full 3D radiative transfer simulations of the interacting winds in eta Car.We use the SimpleX algorithm to post-process the output from 3D SPH simulations and obtain the ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium assuming three different mass-loss rates for the primary star. The resultant ionization maps of both species constrain the regions where the observed forbidden emission lines can form. Including collisional ionization is necessary to achieve a better description of the ionization states, especially in the areas shielded from the secondary's radiation. We find that reducing the primary's mass-loss rate increases the volume of ionized gas, creating larger areas where the forbidden emission lines can form.We conclude that post processing 3D SPH data with SimpleX is a viable tool to create ionization maps for eta Car.

  4. 3D Radiative Transfer in Eta Carinae: Application of the SimpleX Algorithm to 3D SPH Simulations of Binary Colliding Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clementel, N.; Madura, T. I.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Icke, V.; Gull, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    Eta Carinae is an ideal astrophysical laboratory for studying massive binary interactions and evolution, and stellar wind-wind collisions. Recent three-dimensional (3D) simulations set the stage for understanding the highly complex 3D flows in Eta Car. Observations of different broad high- and low-ionization forbidden emission lines provide an excellent tool to constrain the orientation of the system, the primary's mass-loss rate, and the ionizing flux of the hot secondary. In this work we present the first steps towards generating synthetic observations to compare with available and future HST/STIS data. We present initial results from full 3D radiative transfer simulations of the interacting winds in Eta Car. We use the SimpleX algorithm to post-process the output from 3D SPH simulations and obtain the ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium assuming three different mass-loss rates for the primary star. The resultant ionization maps of both species constrain the regions where the observed forbidden emission lines can form. Including collisional ionization is necessary to achieve a better description of the ionization states, especially in the areas shielded from the secondary's radiation. We find that reducing the primary's mass-loss rate increases the volume of ionized gas, creating larger areas where the forbidden emission lines can form. We conclude that post processing 3D SPH data with SimpleX is a viable tool to create ionization maps for Eta Car.

  5. 3D Time Dependent Stokes Vector Radiative Transfer in an Atmosphere-Ocean System Including a Stochastic Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    An efficient method for the solution of 3-D Radiative Transfer Problems”, JQSRT. 45. 47-56, (1991) 3. A. Sánchez, T.F. Smith, and W. F. Krajewski ...Haferman, T. F. Smith, and W. F. Krajewski , “A Multi-dimensional Discrete Ordinates Method for Polarized Radiative Transfer, Part I: Validation for...Operator Theory of Radiative Transfer. II. Scattering from Maritime Haze,” Appl. Opt. l2, 1071-1084 (1973). PUBLICATIONS 1. P . Zhai, G. W. Kattawar

  6. A fast hybrid (3-D/1-D) model for thermal radiative transfer in cirrus via successive orders of scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchez, Thomas; Davis, Anthony B.; Cornet, Céline; Szczap, Fredéric; Platnick, Steven; Dubuisson, Philippe; Thieuleux, François

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the impact of cirrus cloud heterogeneity on the direct emission by cloud or surface and on the scattering by ice particles in the thermal infrared (TIR). Realistic 3-D cirri are modeled with the 3DCLOUD code, and top-of-atmosphere radiances are simulated by the 3-D Monte Carlo radiative transfer (RT) algorithm 3DMCPOL for two (8.65 μm and 12.05 μm) channels of the Imaging Infrared Radiometer on CALIPSO. At nadir, comparisons of 1-D and 3-D RT show that 3-D radiances are larger than their 1-D counterparts for direct emission but smaller for scattered radiation. For our cirrus cases, 99% of the 3-D total radiance is computed by the third scattering order, which corresponds to 90% of the total computational effort, but larger optical thicknesses need more scattering orders. To radically accelerate the 3-D RT computations (using only few percent of 3-D RT time with a Monte Carlo code), even in the presence of large optical depths, we develop a hybrid model based on exact 3-D direct emission, the first scattering order from 1-D in each homogenized column, and an empirical adjustment linearly dependent on the optical thickness to account for higher scattering orders. Good agreement is found between the hybrid model and the exact 3-D radiances for two very different cirrus models without changing the empirical parameters. We anticipate that a future deterministic implementation of the hybrid model will be fast enough to process multiangle thermal imagery in a practical tomographic reconstruction of 3-D cirrus fields.

  7. A Fast Hybrid (3-D/1-D) Model for Thermal Radiative Transfer in Cirrus via Successive Orders of Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fauchez, Thomas; Davis, Anthony B.; Cornet, Celine; Szczap, Frederic; Platnick, Steven; Dubuisson, Philippe; Thieuleux, Francois

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the impact of cirrus cloud heterogeneity on the direct emission by cloud or surface and on the scattering by ice particles in the thermal infrared (TIR). Realistic 3-D cirri are modeled with the 3DCLOUD code, and top-of-atmosphere radiances are simulated by the 3-D Monte Carlo radiative transfer (RT) algorithm 3DMCPOL for two (8.65 micrometers and 12.05 micrometers) channels of the Imaging Infrared Radiometer on CALIPSO. At nadir, comparisons of 1-D and 3-D RT show that 3-D radiances are larger than their 1-D counterparts for direct emission but smaller for scattered radiation. For our cirrus cases, 99% of the 3-D total radiance is computed by the third scattering order, which corresponds to 90% of the total computational effort, but larger optical thicknesses need more scattering orders. To radically accelerate the 3-D RT computations (using only few percent of 3-D RT time with a Monte Carlo code), even in the presence of large optical depths, we develop a hybrid model based on exact 3-D direct emission, the first scattering order from 1-D in each homogenized column, and an empirical adjustment linearly dependent on the optical thickness to account for higher scattering orders. Good agreement is found between the hybrid model and the exact 3-D radiances for two very different cirrus models without changing the empirical parameters. We anticipate that a future deterministic implementation of the hybrid model will be fast enough to process multiangle thermal imagery in a practical tomographic reconstruction of 3-D cirrus fields.

  8. First 3D radiative transfer with scattering for domain-decomposed MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, W.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents an implementation of the Gauss Seidel solver for radiative transfer with scattering in the Oslo Stagger Code. It fully supports MPI parallelism through domain decomposition of the simulation box, enabling fast computation of radiative transfer at a high resolution. Continuum and line opacities are treated with either a multigroup method or opacity sampling. Line scattering probabilities are estimated using the van Regemorter approximation for de-excitation rates of electron collisions. A solar-type test simulation with continuum and line scattering exhibits a steeper temperature gradient due to decreased radiative heating above the optical surface when compared with the strict local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) case. The classical van Regemorter approximation may overestimate the importance of line scattering, implying that the true temperature structure will be in between the LTE case and the scattering case considered here. It is demonstrated that continuum scattering is unimportant in the case of the Sun.

  9. FURN3D: A computer code for radiative heat transfer in pulverized coal furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1992-08-01

    A computer code FURN3D has been developed for assessing the impact of burning different coals on heat absorption pattern in pulverized coal furnaces. The code is unique in its ability to conduct detailed spectral calculations of radiation transport in furnaces fully accounting for the size distributions of char, soot and ash particles, ash content, and ash composition. The code uses a hybrid technique of solving the three-dimensional radiation transport equation for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. The technique achieves an optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy by combining the discrete ordinate method (S[sub 4]), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P, approximation in different range of optical thicknesses. The code uses spectroscopic data for estimating the absorption coefficients of participating gases C0[sub 2], H[sub 2]0 and CO. It invokes Mie theory for determining the extinction and scattering coefficients of combustion particulates. The optical constants of char, soot and ash are obtained from dispersion relations derived from reflectivity, transmissivity and extinction measurements. A control-volume formulation is adopted for determining the temperature field inside the furnace. A simple char burnout model is employed for estimating heat release and evolution of particle size distribution. The code is written in Fortran 77, has modular form, and is machine-independent. The computer memory required by the code depends upon the number of grid points specified and whether the transport calculations are performed on spectral or gray basis.

  10. FURN3D: A computer code for radiative heat transfer in pulverized coal furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1992-08-01

    A computer code FURN3D has been developed for assessing the impact of burning different coals on heat absorption pattern in pulverized coal furnaces. The code is unique in its ability to conduct detailed spectral calculations of radiation transport in furnaces fully accounting for the size distributions of char, soot and ash particles, ash content, and ash composition. The code uses a hybrid technique of solving the three-dimensional radiation transport equation for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. The technique achieves an optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy by combining the discrete ordinate method (S{sub 4}), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P, approximation in different range of optical thicknesses. The code uses spectroscopic data for estimating the absorption coefficients of participating gases C0{sub 2}, H{sub 2}0 and CO. It invokes Mie theory for determining the extinction and scattering coefficients of combustion particulates. The optical constants of char, soot and ash are obtained from dispersion relations derived from reflectivity, transmissivity and extinction measurements. A control-volume formulation is adopted for determining the temperature field inside the furnace. A simple char burnout model is employed for estimating heat release and evolution of particle size distribution. The code is written in Fortran 77, has modular form, and is machine-independent. The computer memory required by the code depends upon the number of grid points specified and whether the transport calculations are performed on spectral or gray basis.

  11. Specular reflection treatment for the 3D radiative transfer equation solved with the discrete ordinates method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Hardy, D.; Favennec, Y.; Rousseau, B.; Hecht, F.

    2017-04-01

    The contribution of this paper relies in the development of numerical algorithms for the mathematical treatment of specular reflection on borders when dealing with the numerical solution of radiative transfer problems. The radiative transfer equation being integro-differential, the discrete ordinates method allows to write down a set of semi-discrete equations in which weights are to be calculated. The calculation of these weights is well known to be based on either a quadrature or on angular discretization, making the use of such method straightforward for the state equation. Also, the diffuse contribution of reflection on borders is usually well taken into account. However, the calculation of accurate partition ratio coefficients is much more tricky for the specular condition applied on arbitrary geometrical borders. This paper presents algorithms that calculate analytically partition ratio coefficients needed in numerical treatments. The developed algorithms, combined with a decentered finite element scheme, are validated with the help of comparisons with analytical solutions before being applied on complex geometries.

  12. 3D radiative transfer simulations of Eta Carinae's inner colliding winds - II. Ionization structure of helium at periastron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementel, N.; Madura, T. I.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Paardekooper, J.-P.

    2015-06-01

    Spectral observations of the massive colliding wind binary Eta Carinae show phase-dependent variations, in intensity and velocity, of numerous helium emission and absorption lines throughout the entire 5.54-yr orbit. Approaching periastron, the 3D structure of the wind-wind interaction region (WWIR) gets highly distorted due to the eccentric (e ˜ 0.9) binary orbit. The secondary star (ηB) at these phases is located deep within the primary's dense wind photosphere. The combination of these effects is thought to be the cause of the particularly interesting features observed in the helium lines at periastron. We perform 3D radiative transfer simulations of η Car's interacting winds at periastron. Using the SIMPLEX radiative transfer algorithm, we post-process output from 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of the inner 150 au of the η Car system for two different primary star mass-loss rates (dot{M}_{η A}). Using previous results from simulations at apastron as a guide for the initial conditions, we compute 3D helium ionization maps. We find that, for higher dot{M}_{η A}, ηB He0+-ionizing photons are not able to penetrate into the pre-shock primary wind. He+ due to ηB is only present in a thin layer along the leading arm of the WWIR and in a small region close to the stars. Lowering dot{M}_{η A} allows ηB's ionizing photons to reach the expanding unshocked secondary wind on the apastron side of the system, and create a low fraction of He+ in the pre-shock primary wind. With apastron on our side of the system, our results are qualitatively consistent with the observed variations in strength and radial velocity of η Car's helium emission and absorption lines, which helps better constrain the regions where these lines arise.

  13. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, W.-L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; ...

    2015-05-19

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada, using the global CCSM4 (Community Climate System Model version 4; Community Atmosphere Model/Community Land Model – CAM4/CLM4) with a 0.23° × 0.31° resolution for simulations over 6 years. In a 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation (3-D–PP (plane-parallel)) adjustment to ensure that the energy balance atmore » the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization. We show that deviations in the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher-elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while it decreases for higher elevations, with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases at higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.« less

  14. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W. -L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Leung, L. R.; Hsu, H. -H.

    2015-05-19

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada, using the global CCSM4 (Community Climate System Model version 4; Community Atmosphere Model/Community Land Model – CAM4/CLM4) with a 0.23° × 0.31° resolution for simulations over 6 years. In a 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation (3-D–PP (plane-parallel)) adjustment to ensure that the energy balance at the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization. We show that deviations in the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher-elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while it decreases for higher elevations, with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases at higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.

  15. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  16. High-resolution, 3D radiative transfer modeling. I. The grand-design spiral galaxy M 51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Looze, Ilse; Fritz, Jacopo; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, George J.; Cortese, Luca; Boquien, Médéric; Boselli, Alessandro; Camps, Peter; Cooray, Asantha; Cormier, Diane; Davies, Jon I.; De Geyter, Gert; Hughes, Thomas M.; Jones, Anthony P.; Karczewski, Oskar Ł.; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Lu, Nanyao; Madden, Suzanne C.; Rémy-Ruyer, Aurélie; Spinoglio, Luigi; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Viaene, Sebastien; Wilson, Christine D.

    2014-11-01

    Context. Dust reprocesses about half of the stellar radiation in galaxies. The thermal re-emission by dust of absorbed energy is considered to be driven merely by young stars so is often applied to tracing the star formation rate in galaxies. Recent studies have argued that the old stellar population might be responsible for a non-negligible fraction of the radiative dust heating. Aims: In this work, we aim to analyze the contribution of young (≲100 Myr) and old (~10 Gyr) stellar populations to radiative dust heating processes in the nearby grand-design spiral galaxy M 51 using radiative transfer modeling. High-resolution 3D radiative transfer (RT) models are required to describe the complex morphologies of asymmetric spiral arms and clumpy star-forming regions and to model the propagation of light through a dusty medium. Methods: In this paper, we present a new technique developed to model the radiative transfer effects in nearby face-on galaxies. We construct a high-resolution 3D radiative transfer model with the Monte-Carlo code SKIRT to account for the absorption, scattering, and non-local thermal equilibrium (NLTE) emission of dust in M 51. The 3D distribution of stars is derived from the 2D morphology observed in the IRAC 3.6 μm, GALEX FUV, Hα, and MIPS 24 μm wavebands, assuming an exponential vertical distribution with an appropriate scale height. The dust geometry is constrained through the far-ultraviolet (FUV) attenuation, which is derived from the observed total-infrared-to-far-ultraviolet luminosity ratio. The stellar luminosity, star formation rate, and dust mass have been scaled to reproduce the observed stellar spectral energy distribution (SED), FUV attenuation, and infrared SED. Results: The dust emission derived from RT calculations is consistent with far-infrared and submillimeter observations of M 51, implying that the absorbed stellar energy is balanced by the thermal re-emission of dust. The young stars provide 63% of the energy for

  17. Accelerating 3D radiative transfer for realistic OCO-2 cloud-aerosol scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, S.; Massie, S. T.; Platnick, S. E.; Song, S.

    2014-12-01

    The recently launched NASA OCO-2 satellite is expected to provide important information about the carbon dioxide distribution in the troposphere down to Earth's surface. Among the challenges in accurately retrieving CO2 concentration from the hyperspectral observations in each of the three OCO-2 bands are cloud and aerosol impacts on the observed radiances. Preliminary studies based on idealized cloud fields have shown that they can lead to spectrally dependent radiance perturbations which differ from band to band and may lead to biases in the derived products. Since OCO-2 was inserted into the A-Train, it is only natural to capitalize on sensor synergies with other instruments, in this case on the cloud and aerosol scene context that is provided by MODIS and CALIOP. Our approach is to use cloud imagery (especially for inhomogeneous scenes) for predicting the hyperspectral observations within a collocated OCO-2 footprint and comparing with the observations, which allows a systematic assessment of the causes for biases in the retrievals themselves, and their manifestation in spectral residuals for various different cloud types and distributions. Simulating a large number of cases with line-by-line calculations using a 3D code is computationally prohibitive even on large parallel computers. Therefore, we developed a number of acceleration approaches. In this contribution, we will analyze them in terms of their speed and accuracy, using cloud fields from airborne imagery collected during a recent NASA field experiment (SEAC4RS) as proxy for different types of inhomogeneous cloud fields. The broader goal of this effort is to improve OCO-2 retrievals in the vicinity of cloud fields, and to extend the range of conditions under which the instrument will provide useful results.

  18. Mapping tropical biodiversity using spectroscopic imagery : characterization of structural and chemical diversity with 3-D radiative transfer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feret, J. B.; Gastellu-Etchegorry, J. P.; Lefèvre-Fonollosa, M. J.; Proisy, C.; Asner, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    The accelerating loss of biodiversity is a major environmental trend. Tropical ecosystems are particularly threatened due to climate change, invasive species, farming and natural resources exploitation. Recent advances in remote sensing of biodiversity confirmed the potential of high spatial resolution spectroscopic imagery for species identification and biodiversity mapping. Such information bridges the scale-gap between small-scale, highly detailed field studies and large-scale, low-resolution satellite observations. In order to produce fine-scale resolution maps of canopy alpha-diversity and beta-diversity of the Peruvian Amazonian forest, we designed, applied and validated a method based on spectral variation hypothesis to CAO AToMS (Carnegie Airborne Observatory Airborne Taxonomic Mapping System) images, acquired from 2011 to 2013. There is a need to understand on a quantitative basis the physical processes leading to this spectral variability. This spectral variability mainly depends on canopy chemistry, structure, and sensor's characteristics. 3D radiative transfer modeling provides a powerful framework for the study of the relative influence of each of these factors in dense and complex canopies. We simulated series of spectroscopic images with the 3D radiative model DART, with variability gradients in terms of leaf chemistry, individual tree structure, spatial and spectral resolution, and applied methods for biodiversity mapping. This sensitivity study allowed us to determine the relative influence of these factors on the radiometric signal acquired by different types of sensors. Such study is particularly important to define the domain of validity of our approach, to refine requirements for the instrumental specifications, and to help preparing hyperspectral spatial missions to be launched at the horizon 2015-2025 (EnMAP, PRISMA, HISUI, SHALOM, HYSPIRI, HYPXIM). Simulations in preparation include topographic variations in order to estimate the robustness

  19. 3D Time Dependent Stokes Vector Radiative Transfer in an Atmosphere-Ocean System Including a Stochastic Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    RaDyO platforms, the R/ P FLoating Instrument Platform (FLIP) and the R/V Kilo Moana (KM), are usually different. Among other important results, it is... Krajewski “A three-dimensional atmospheric radiative transfer model based on the discrete ordinates method”, Atmos. Res. 33, 283-308, (1994), 4. J. L...Haferman, T. F. Smith, and W. F. Krajewski , “A Multi-dimensional Discrete Ordinates Method for Polarized Radiative Transfer, Part I: Validation for

  20. A WRF simulation of the impact of 3-D radiative transfer on surface hydrology over the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, K. N.; Gu, Y.; Leung, L. R.; Lee, W. L.; Fovell, R. G.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate 3-D mountains/snow effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, applied at a 30 km grid resolution, is used in conjunction with a 3-D radiative transfer parameterization covering a time period from 1 November 2007 to 31 May 2008, during which abundant snowfall occurred. A comparison of the 3-D WRF simulation with the observed snow water equivalent (SWE) and precipitation from Snowpack Telemetry (SNOTEL) sites shows reasonable agreement in terms of spatial patterns and daily and seasonal variability, although the simulation generally has a positive precipitation bias. We show that 3-D mountain features have a profound impact on the diurnal and monthly variation of surface radiative and heat fluxes, and on the consequent elevation-dependence of snowmelt and precipitation distributions. In particular, during the winter months, large deviations (3-D-PP, in which PP denotes the plane-parallel approach) of the monthly mean surface solar flux are found in the morning and afternoon hours due to shading effects for elevations below 2.5 km. During spring, positive deviations shift to the earlier morning. Over mountaintops higher than 3 km, positive deviations are found throughout the day, with the largest values of 40–60 W m-2 occurring at noon during the snowmelt season of April to May. The monthly SWE deviations averaged over the entire domain show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, which leads to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher elevation areas, positive SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Overall, this study shows that deviations of SWE due to 3-D radiation effects range from an increase of 18% at the lowest elevation range (1.5–2 km) to a decrease of 8% at the highest elevation range (above 3 km

  1. 3-D radiative transfer in large-eddy simulations - experiences coupling the TenStream solver to the UCLA-LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakub, Fabian; Mayer, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    The recently developed 3-D TenStream radiative transfer solver was integrated into the University of California, Los Angeles large-eddy simulation (UCLA-LES) cloud-resolving model. This work documents the overall performance of the TenStream solver as well as the technical challenges of migrating from 1-D schemes to 3-D schemes. In particular the employed Monte Carlo spectral integration needed to be reexamined in conjunction with 3-D radiative transfer. Despite the fact that the spectral sampling has to be performed uniformly over the whole domain, we find that the Monte Carlo spectral integration remains valid. To understand the performance characteristics of the coupled TenStream solver, we conducted weak as well as strong-scaling experiments. In this context, we investigate two matrix preconditioner: geometric algebraic multigrid preconditioning (GAMG) and block Jacobi incomplete LU (ILU) factorization and find that algebraic multigrid preconditioning performs well for complex scenes and highly parallelized simulations. The TenStream solver is tested for up to 4096 cores and shows a parallel scaling efficiency of 80-90 % on various supercomputers. Compared to the widely employed 1-D delta-Eddington two-stream solver, the computational costs for the radiative transfer solver alone increases by a factor of 5-10.

  2. Parameterization of 3D Radiative Transfer over Mountains and Investigation of its Impact on Surface Hydrology over the Western United States Using WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Y.; Liou, K.; Leung, L.; Lee, W.; Fovell, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    Modern climate models have used a plane-parallel (PP) radiative transfer approach in physics parameterizations; however, the potential errors that arise from neglecting three-dimensional (3D) interactions between radiation and mountains/snow on climate simulations have not been studied and quantified. We have developed a surface solar radiation parameterization based on the regression analysis of flux deviations between 3D and conventional PP radiative transfer models, which has been incorporated into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to investigate the impact of the spatial and temporal distribution and variation of surface solar fluxes on surface hydrology. Using the Rocky and Sierra-Nevada Mountains in the Western United States as a testbed, the WRF model with the incorporation of the 3D parameterization is applied at a 30 km grid resolution covering a time period from November 1, 2007 to May 31, 2008 during which abundant snowfall occurred. Comparison of the 3D WRF simulation with the observed snow water equivalent (SWE) and precipitation from Snowpack Telemetry (SNOTEL) sites shows reasonable agreement in terms of spatial patterns and daily and seasonal variability, although the simulation generally has a positive precipitation bias. We show that 3D mountain features have a profound impact on the diurnal and monthly variation of surface radiative and heat fluxes and on the consequent elevation-dependence of snowmelt and precipitation distributions. For lower elevations, positive deviations (3D - PP) of the monthly mean surface solar flux are found in the morning and afternoon hours, while negative deviations are shown between 10 am-2 pm during the winter months, leading to reduced diurnal variations. Over the mountain tops above 3 km, positive deviations are found throughout the day, with the largest values of 40 - 60 W/m2 occurring at noon during the snowmelt season of April to May. The monthly SWE deviations averaged over the entire domain

  3. Comparison of ground-based UV irradiance measurements with satellite-derived values and 1-D- and 3-D-radiative transfer model calculations in mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J. E.; Arola, A.; Blumthaler, M.; Fitzka, M.; Kift, R.; Kreuter, A.; Rieder, H. E.; Simic, S.; Webb, A.; Weihs, P.

    2009-04-01

    Since the discovery of anthropogenic ozone depletion more than 30 year ago, the scientific community has shown an increasing interest in UV-B radiation. Nowadays, ground-based high quality measurements of spectrally resolved UV-radiation are available. On the other hand, 1-D- and 3-D models have been developed, that describe the radiative transfer through the atmosphere physically very accurately. Another approach for determining the UV-irradiance at the surface of the earth is the use of satellite-based reflectance measurements as input for retrieval algorithms. At the moment, the research focuses on the impact of clouds on UV-radiation, but the impact of mountains on UV-radiation, especially in combination with high surface albedo due to snowcover, is also very strong and detailed comparisons between measurements and modelling are lacking. Therefore, three measurement campaigns had been conducted in alpine areas of Austria (Innsbruck and Hoher Sonnblick). The goal was to investigate the impact of alpine terrain in combination with snowcover on spectral UV-irradiance and actinic flux. This contribution uses the ground-based UV-irradiance measurements to evaluate three different UV-irradiance calculation methods. Results from three different calculation methods (satellite retrieval, 1-D- and 3-D radiative transfer model) for UV radiation in terms of UV-Index, erythemally weighted daily doses and spectrally resolved UV-Irradiance at 305, 310, 324 and 380nm are presented and compared with ground-based high quality measurements. The real case study is performed in very inhomogenous terrain under clear sky conditions. The values of the different methods are not only compared for the measurements sites, but additionally the impact of altitude is investigated. So far it seems, that 1-D simulations show the best agreement (±10%) with the measurements whereas the 3-D model simulations and satellite retrieved values differ much more. Satellite retrieved values

  4. 3D Time Dependent Stokes Vector Radiative Transfer in an Atmosphere-Ocean System Including a Stochastic Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    1 m 440 nm (b) 488 nm (c) 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 510 nm D oL P (d) 532 nm (e) 555 nm (f) -90 -45 0 45 90 135 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 650 nm (g) -90...1 m 440 nm (b) 488 nm (c) -90 -45 0 45 90 510 nm A oL P (d) 532 nm (e) 555 nm (f) -90 -45 0 45 90 135 -90 -45 0 45 90 650 nm (g) -90 -45 0 45 90 135...47-56, (1991) 3. A. Sánchez, T.F. Smith, and W. F. Krajewski “A three-dimensional atmospheric radiative transfer model based on the discrete

  5. 3D Time Dependent Stokes Vector Radiative Transfer in an Atmosphere-Ocean System Including a Stochastic Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    vector Monte Carlo code to calculate what is known as SOES (Spatial Offset Elastic Scattering ). We have used our method to calculate the SOES signal... scattering properties, such as different single scattering albedo, different phase function and different phase matrix. Our new 3D vector Monte Carlo ...feature about the asymptotic light field is that it depends profoundly on both the single scattering albedo as well as the phase function of the medium

  6. Collaborative Project. 3D Radiative Transfer Parameterization Over Mountains/Snow for High-Resolution Climate Models. Fast physics and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, Kuo-Nan

    2016-02-09

    Under the support of the aforementioned DOE Grant, we have made two fundamental contributions to atmospheric and climate sciences: (1) Develop an efficient 3-D radiative transfer parameterization for application to intense and intricate inhomogeneous mountain/snow regions. (2) Innovate a stochastic parameterization for light absorption by internally mixed black carbon and dust particles in snow grains for understanding and physical insight into snow albedo reduction in climate models. With reference to item (1), we divided solar fluxes reaching mountain surfaces into five components: direct and diffuse fluxes, direct- and diffuse-reflected fluxes, and coupled mountain-mountain flux. “Exact” 3D Monte Carlo photon tracing computations can then be performed for these solar flux components to compare with those calculated from the conventional plane-parallel (PP) radiative transfer program readily available in climate models. Subsequently, Parameterizations of the deviations of 3D from PP results for five flux components are carried out by means of the multiple linear regression analysis associated with topographic information, including elevation, solar incident angle, sky view factor, and terrain configuration factor. We derived five regression equations with high statistical correlations for flux deviations and successfully incorporated this efficient parameterization into WRF model, which was used as the testbed in connection with the Fu-Liou-Gu PP radiation scheme that has been included in the WRF physics package. Incorporating this 3D parameterization program, we conducted simulations of WRF and CCSM4 to understand and evaluate the mountain/snow effect on snow albedo reduction during seasonal transition and the interannual variability for snowmelt, cloud cover, and precipitation over the Western United States presented in the final report. With reference to item (2), we developed in our previous research a geometric-optics surface-wave approach (GOS) for the

  7. 3D radiative transfer effects in multi-angle/multispectral radio-polarimetric signals from a mixture of clouds and aerosols viewed by a non-imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Garay, Michael J.; Xu, Feng; Qu, Zheng; Emde, Claudia

    2013-09-01

    When observing a spatially complex mix of aerosols and clouds in a single relatively large field-of-view, nature entangles their signals non-linearly through polarized radiation transport processes that unfold in the 3D position and direction spaces. In contrast, any practical forward model in a retrieval algorithm will use only 1D vector radiative transfer (vRT) in a linear mixing technique. We assess the difference between the observed and predicted signals using synthetic data from a high-fidelity 3D vRT model with clouds generated using a Large Eddy Simulation model and an aerosol climatology. We find that this difference is signal—not noise—for the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS), an instrument developed by NASA. Moreover, the worst case scenario is also the most interesting case, namely, when the aerosol burden is large, hence hase the most impact on the cloud microphysics and dynamics. Based on our findings, we formulate a mitigation strategy for these unresolved cloud adjacency effects assuming that some spatial information is available about the structure of the clouds at higher resolution from "context" cameras, as was planned for NASA's ill-fated Glory mission that was to carry the APS but failed to reach orbit. Application to POLDER (POLarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances) data from the period when PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar) was in the A-train is briefly discussed.

  8. 3D radiative transfer simulations of Eta Carinae's inner colliding winds - I. Ionization structure of helium at apastron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementel, N.; Madura, T. I.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Paardekooper, J.-P.; Gull, T. R.

    2015-03-01

    The highly eccentric binary system Eta Carinae (η Car) shows numerous time-variable emission and absorption features. These observational signatures are the result of interactions between the complex three-dimensional (3D) wind-wind collision regions and photoionization by the luminous stars. Specifically, helium presents several interesting spectral features that provide important clues on the geometry and physical proprieties of the system and the individual stars. We use the SIMPLEX algorithm to post-process 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation output of the interacting winds in η Car in order to obtain the fractions of ionized helium assuming three different primary star (ηA) mass-loss rates. The resultant ionization maps constrain the regions where helium is singly- and doubly-ionized. We find that reducing ηA's mass-loss rate (dot{M}_{η A}) increases the volume of He+. Lowering dot{M}_{η A} produces large variations in the volume of He+ in the pre-shock ηA wind on the periastron side of the system. Our results show that binary orientations in which apastron is on our side of the system are more consistent with available observations. We suggest that small variations in dot{M}_{η A} might explain the observed increase in He I absorption in recent decades, although numerous questions regarding this scenario remain open. We also propose that the absence of broad He I lines in the spectra of η Car between its 1890's eruption and ˜1944 might be explained by ηB's He0+-ionizing photons not being able to penetrate the wind-wind interaction region, due to a higher dot{M}_{η A} at that time (by a factor ≳2, compared to the present value).

  9. The thermal structure and the location of the snow line in the protosolar nebula: Axisymmetric models with full 3-D radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, M.; Dullemond, C. P.; Kama, M.; Dominik, C.

    2011-03-01

    The precise location of the water ice condensation front (‘snow line’) in the protosolar nebula has been a debate for a long time. Its importance stems from the expected substantial jump in the abundance of solids beyond the snow line, which is conducive to planet formation, and from the higher ‘stickiness’ in collisions of ice-coated dust grains, which may help the process of coagulation of dust and the formation of planetesimals. In an optically thin nebula, the location of the snow line is easily calculated to be around 3 AU, subject to brightness variations of the young Sun. However, in its first 5-10 myr, the solar nebula was optically thick, implying a smaller snowline radius due to shielding from direct sunlight, but also a larger radius because of viscous heating. Several models have attempted to treat these opposing effects. However, until recently treatments beyond an approximate 1 + 1D radiative transfer were unfeasible. We revisit the problem with a fully self-consistent 3D treatment in an axisymmetric disk model, including a density-dependent treatment of the dust and ice sublimation. We find that the location of the snow line is very sensitive to the opacities of the dust grains and the mass accretion rate of the disk. We show that previous approximate treatments are quite efficient at determining the location of the snow line if the energy budget is locally dominated by viscous accretion. Using this result we derive an analytic estimate of the location of the snow line that compares very well with results from this and previous studies. Using solar abundances of the elements we compute the abundance of dust and ice and find that the expected jump in solid surface density at the snow line is smaller than previously assumed. We further show that in the inner few AU the refractory species are also partly evaporated, leading to a significantly smaller solid state surface density in the regions where the rocky planets were formed.

  10. Photon Scattering in 3D Radiative MHD Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, Wolfgang

    2009-09-01

    Recent results from 3D time-dependent radiative hydrodynamic simulations of stellar atmospheres are presented, which include the effects of coherent scattering in the radiative transfer treatment. Rayleigh scattering and electron scattering are accounted for in the source function, requiring an iterative solution of the transfer equation. Opacities and scattering coefficients are treated in the multigroup opacity approximation. The impact of scattering on the horizontal mean temperature structure is investigated, which is an important diagnostic for model atmospheres, with implications for line formation and stellar abundance measurements. We find that continuum scattering is not important for the atmosphere of a metal-poor Sun with metailicity [Fe/H] = -3.0, similar to the previously investigated photosphere at solar metallicity.

  11. Calculations of non-gray gas radiative heat transfer by coupling the discrete ordinates method with the Leckner model in 3D rectangular enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi Azarkhavarani, M. E.; Hosseini Abardeh, R.; Rahmani, M.

    2016-11-01

    In this study a new approach for radiation heat flux calculations by coupling the discrete ordinates method with the Leckner global model is introduced. The aim is to analyze the radiative heat transfer problem within a three-dimensional enclosure filled with non-gray gas mixture of {H}2{O} and {C}{O}2. A computer code developed by this approach is applied to radiative calculations in three groups of well-known test cases published previously; considering homogeneous and inhomogeneous isothermal and non-isothermal participating media. All results are compared with well-known calculations based on statistical narrow band model. Also a new series of predictions for a medium with non-black walls and various mixture of {H}2{O} and {C}{O}2 is performed to demonstrate the applicability of the Leckner model. The effect of different compositions of {H}2{O} and {C}{O}2 on the radiative transfer within modern combustors is also examined. Based on the results obtained, it is believed that the discrete ordinates method coupled with the Leckner global model despite of its inherent simplicity and low computational cost is sufficiently accurate. For its convenient use, this method is suitable for a wide range of engineering calculations of participating media as well as for its link to previously written computational fluid dynamics codes.

  12. FlexyDos3D: a deformable anthropomorphic 3D radiation dosimeter: radiation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deene, Y.; Skyt, P. S.; Hil, R.; Booth, J. T.

    2015-02-01

    Three dimensional radiation dosimetry has received growing interest with the implementation of highly conformal radiotherapy treatments. The radiotherapy community faces new challenges with the commissioning of image guided and image gated radiotherapy treatments (IGRT) and deformable image registration software. A new three dimensional anthropomorphically shaped flexible dosimeter, further called ‘FlexyDos3D’, has been constructed and a new fast optical scanning method has been implemented that enables scanning of irregular shaped dosimeters. The FlexyDos3D phantom can be actuated and deformed during the actual treatment. FlexyDos3D offers the additional advantage that it is easy to fabricate, is non-toxic and can be molded in an arbitrary shape with high geometrical precision. The dosimeter formulation has been optimized in terms of dose sensitivity. The influence of the casting material and oxygen concentration has also been investigated. The radiophysical properties of this new dosimeter are discussed including stability, spatial integrity, temperature dependence of the dosimeter during radiation, readout and storage, dose rate dependence and tissue equivalence. The first authors Y De Deene and P S Skyt made an equivalent contribution to the experimental work presented in this paper.

  13. Boosting infrared energy transfer in 3D nanoporous gold antennas.

    PubMed

    Garoli, D; Calandrini, E; Bozzola, A; Ortolani, M; Cattarin, S; Barison, S; Toma, A; De Angelis, F

    2017-01-05

    The applications of plasmonics to energy transfer from free-space radiation to molecules are currently limited to the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum due to the intrinsic optical properties of bulk noble metals that support strong electromagnetic field confinement only close to their plasma frequency in the visible/ultraviolet range. In this work, we show that nanoporous gold can be exploited as a plasmonic material for the mid-infrared region to obtain strong electromagnetic field confinement, co-localized with target molecules into the nanopores and resonant with their vibrational frequency. The effective optical response of the nanoporous metal enables the penetration of optical fields deep into the nanopores, where molecules can be loaded thus achieving a more efficient light-matter coupling if compared to bulk gold. In order to realize plasmonic resonators made of nanoporous gold, we develop a nanofabrication method based on polymeric templates for metal deposition and we obtain antenna arrays resonating at mid-infrared wavelengths selected by design. We then coat the antennas with a thin (3 nm) silica layer acting as the target dielectric layer for optical energy transfer. We study the strength of the light-matter coupling at the vibrational absorption frequency of silica at 1240 cm(-1) through the analysis of the experimental Fano lineshape that is benchmarked against identical structures made of bulk gold. The boost in the optical energy transfer from free-space mid-infrared radiation to molecular vibrations in nanoporous 3D nanoantenna arrays can open new application routes for plasmon-enhanced physical-chemical reactions.

  14. Radiative transfer with scattering for domain-decomposed 3D MHD simulations of cool stellar atmospheres. Numerical methods and application to the quiet, non-magnetic, surface of a solar-type star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayek, W.; Asplund, M.; Carlsson, M.; Trampedach, R.; Collet, R.; Gudiksen, B. V.; Hansteen, V. H.; Leenaarts, J.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: We present the implementation of a radiative transfer solver with coherent scattering in the new BIFROST code for radiative magneto-hydrodynamical (MHD) simulations of stellar surface convection. The code is fully parallelized using MPI domain decomposition, which allows for large grid sizes and improved resolution of hydrodynamical structures. We apply the code to simulate the surface granulation in a solar-type star, ignoring magnetic fields, and investigate the importance of coherent scattering for the atmospheric structure. Methods: A scattering term is added to the radiative transfer equation, requiring an iterative computation of the radiation field. We use a short-characteristics-based Gauss-Seidel acceleration scheme to compute radiative flux divergences for the energy equation. The effects of coherent scattering are tested by comparing the temperature stratification of three 3D time-dependent hydrodynamical atmosphere models of a solar-type star: without scattering, with continuum scattering only, and with both continuum and line scattering. Results: We show that continuum scattering does not have a significant impact on the photospheric temperature structure for a star like the Sun. Including scattering in line-blanketing, however, leads to a decrease of temperatures by about 350 K below log10 τ5000 ⪉ -4. The effect is opposite to that of 1D hydrostatic models in radiative equilibrium, where scattering reduces the cooling effect of strong LTE lines in the higher layers of the photosphere. Coherent line scattering also changes the temperature distribution in the high atmosphere, where we observe stronger fluctuations compared to a treatment of lines as true absorbers.

  15. 3D Radiative Transfer Effects in Multi-Angle/Multi-Spectral Radio-Polarimetric Signals from a Mixture of Clouds and Aerosols Viewed by a Non-Imaging Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Garay, Michael J.; Xu, Feng; Qu, Zheng; Emde, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    When observing a spatially complex mix of aerosols and clouds in a single relatively large field-of-view, nature entangles their signals non-linearly through polarized radiation transport processes that unfold in the 3D position and direction spaces. In contrast, any practical forward model in a retrieval algorithm will use only 1D vector radiative transfer (vRT) in a linear mixing technique. We assess the difference between the observed and predicted signals using synthetic data from a high-fidelity 3D vRT model with clouds generated using a Large Eddy Simulation model and an aerosol climatology. We find that this difference is signal--not noise--for the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS), an instrument developed by NASA. Moreover, the worst case scenario is also the most interesting case, namely, when the aerosol burden is large, hence hase the most impact on the cloud microphysics and dynamics. Based on our findings, we formulate a mitigation strategy for these unresolved cloud adjacency effects assuming that some spatial information is available about the structure of the clouds at higher resolution from "context" cameras, as was planned for NASA's ill-fated Glory mission that was to carry the APS but failed to reach orbit. Application to POLDER (POLarization and Directionality of Earth Reflectances) data from the period when PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar) was in the A-train is briefly discussed.

  16. Solar radiation transport in the cloudy atmosphere: a 3D perspective on observations and climate impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Marshak, Alexander

    2010-02-01

    The interplay of sunlight with clouds is a ubiquitous and often pleasant visual experience, but it conjures up major challenges for weather, climate, environmental science and beyond. Those engaged in the characterization of clouds (and the clear air nearby) by remote sensing methods are even more confronted. The problem comes, on the one hand, from the spatial complexity of real clouds and, on the other hand, from the dominance of multiple scattering in the radiation transport. The former ingredient contrasts sharply with the still popular representation of clouds as homogeneous plane-parallel slabs for the purposes of radiative transfer computations. In typical cloud scenes the opposite asymptotic transport regimes of diffusion and ballistic propagation coexist. We survey the three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric radiative transfer literature over the past 50 years and identify three concurrent and intertwining thrusts: first, how to assess the damage (bias) caused by 3D effects in the operational 1D radiative transfer models? Second, how to mitigate this damage? Finally, can we exploit 3D radiative transfer phenomena to innovate observation methods and technologies? We quickly realize that the smallest scale resolved computationally or observationally may be artificial but is nonetheless a key quantity that separates the 3D radiative transfer solutions into two broad and complementary classes: stochastic and deterministic. Both approaches draw on classic and contemporary statistical, mathematical and computational physics.

  17. Solar Radiation Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere: A 3D Perspective on Observations and Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Marshak, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The interplay of sunlight with clouds is a ubiquitous and often pleasant visual experience, but it conjures up major challenges for weather, climate, environmental science and beyond. Those engaged in the characterization of clouds (and the clear air nearby) by remote sensing methods are even more confronted. The problem comes, on the one hand, from the spatial complexity of real clouds and, on the other hand, from the dominance of multiple scattering in the radiation transport. The former ingredient contrasts sharply with the still popular representation of clouds as homogeneous plane-parallel slabs for the purposes of radiative transfer computations. In typical cloud scenes the opposite asymptotic transport regimes of diffusion and ballistic propagation coexist. We survey the three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric radiative transfer literature over the past 50 years and identify three concurrent and intertwining thrusts: first, how to assess the damage (bias) caused by 3D effects in the operational 1D radiative transfer models? Second, how to mitigate this damage? Finally, can we exploit 3D radiative transfer phenomena to innovate observation methods and technologies? We quickly realize that the smallest scale resolved computationally or observationally may be artificial but is nonetheless a key quantity that separates the 3D radiative transfer solutions into two broad and complementary classes: stochastic and deterministic. Both approaches draw on classic and contemporary statistical, mathematical and computational physics.

  18. Irreducible 3D Radiative Transfer Effects in Multi-angle/Multi-spectral Radio-Polarimetric Signals (Not Noise!) from a Mixture of Clouds and Aerosol in a Single Large-Footprint Pixel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. B.; Qu, Z.; Emde, C.; Xu, F.; Marshak, A.

    2013-12-01

    Although the Glory satellite mission failed at launch, the atmospheric observation strategy implemented in its Aerosol Polarization Sensor (APS) is alive and well since it is at least possible that another one will be built and launched. This strategy is based on APS's along-track scanning spectro-polarimetric measurement system that captures the three main Stokes vector elements (I,Q,U) at a large number (>200) viewing directions for 9 wavelengths emanating from a single pixel that is ~7 km in diameter at nadir and stretches into a ~7 x 20 km^2 ellipse at the most oblique views to be considered (~70 degrees). Two cloud cameras (CCs) were also onboard Glory to provide spatial context. If the relatively large APS footprint is cloud-free or fully-cloudy, then a 1D vector radiative transfer (RT) model is adequate for predicting the APS signals and, upon iteration over its input parameters, aerosol and cloud property retrievals are expected to be of high quality. And this level of accuracy is indeed required to make a real breakthrough in climate modeling where the radiative properties of aerosols and clouds remain one of the main sources of uncertainty. However, the CCs will often show that the APS's field-of-view is a spatially complex cloud scene, but where we are mostly interested in the ambient aerosols. Moreover, it is precisely these aerosols in contact with clouds that will influence their microphysical and optical properties, leading to the manifold indirect aerosol effects on the climate system that need to be far better understood in order to improve their representation in climate models. Therefore, the research presented here addresses the challenge of characterizing simultaneously aerosols and clouds in a single APS observation. Access to polarization can, at least in principle, be used to separate clouds and aerosols using the cloud-bow directions that will often be sampled by APS. In practice, however, we need to assess the extent of 3D polarized RT

  19. 3D treatment planning and intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Purdy, J A

    1999-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) image-based treatment planning and new delivery technologies have spurred the implementation of external beam radiation therapy techniques, in which the high-dose region is conformed much more closely to the target volume than previously possible, thus reducing the volume of normal tissues receiving a high dose. This form of external beam irradiation is referred to as 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). 3DCRT is not just an add-on to the current radiation oncology process; it represents a radical change in practice, particularly for the radiation oncologist. Defining target volumes and organs at risk in 3D by drawing contours on CT images on a slice-by-slice basis, as opposed to drawing beam portals on a simulator radiograph, can be challenging, because radiation oncologists are generally not well trained in cross-sectional imaging. Currently, the 3DCRT approach will increase the time and effort required by physicians inexperienced with 3D treatment planning. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a more advanced form of 3DCRT, but there is considerable developmental work remaining. The instrumentation and methods used for IMRT quality assurance procedures and testing are not well established. Computer optimization cost functions are too simplistic, and thus time-consuming. Subjective plan evaluation by the radiation oncologist is still the norm. In addition, many fundamental questions regarding IMRT remain unanswered. For example, the radiobiophysical consequences of altered time-dose-fraction are unknown. Also, the fact that there is much greater dose heterogeneity for both the target and normal critical structures with IMRT compared to traditional irradiation techniques challenges current radiation oncology planning principles. However, this new process of planning and treatment delivery shows significant potential for improving the therapeutic ratio. In addition, while inefficient today, these systems, when fully developed

  20. Do Fractal Models of Clouds Produces the Right 3D Radiative Effects?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Stochastic fractal models of clouds are often used to study 3D radiative effects and their influence on the remote sensing of cloud properties. Since it is important that the cloud models produce a correct radiative response, some researchers require the model parameters to match observed cloud properties such as scale-independent optical thickness variability. Unfortunately, matching these properties does not necessarily imply that the cloud models will cause the right 3D radiative effects. First, the matched properties alone only influence the 3D effects but do not completely determine them. Second, in many cases the retrieved cloud properties have been already biased by 3D radiative effects, and so the models may not match the true real clouds. Finally, the matched cloud properties cannot be considered independent from the scales at which they have been retrieved. This paper proposes an approach that helps ensure that fractal cloud models are realistic and produce the right 3D effects. The technique compares the results of radiative transfer simulations for the model clouds to new direct observations of 3D radiative effects in satellite images.

  1. VISRAD, 3-D Target Design and Radiation Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovkin, Igor; Macfarlane, Joseph; Golovkina, Viktoriya

    2016-10-01

    The 3-D view factor code VISRAD is widely used in designing HEDP experiments at major laser and pulsed-power facilities, including NIF, OMEGA, OMEGA-EP, ORION, LMJ, Z, and PLX. It simulates target designs by generating a 3-D grid of surface elements, utilizing a variety of 3-D primitives and surface removal algorithms, and can be used to compute the radiation flux throughout the surface element grid by computing element-to-element view factors and solving power balance equations. Target set-up and beam pointing are facilitated by allowing users to specify positions and angular orientations using a variety of coordinates systems (e.g., that of any laser beam, target component, or diagnostic port). Analytic modeling for laser beam spatial profiles for OMEGA DPPs and NIF CPPs is used to compute laser intensity profiles throughout the grid of surface elements. We will discuss recent improvements to the software package and plans for future developments.

  2. Lévy/Anomalous Diffusion as a Mean-Field Theory for 3D Cloud Effects in Shortwave Radiative Transfer: Empirical Support, New Analytical Formulation, and Impact on Atmospheric Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyrev, S.; Davis, A.; Marshak, A.; Stanley, H. E.

    2001-12-01

    Two-stream radiation transport models, as used in all current GCM parameterization schemes, are mathematically equivalent to ``standard'' diffusion theory where the physical picture is a slow propagation of the diffuse radiation by Gaussian random walks. The space/time spread (technically, the Green function) of this diffusion process is described exactly by a Gaussian distribution; from the statistical physics viewpoint, this follows from the convergence of the sum of many (rescaled) steps between scattering events with a finite variance. This Gaussian picture follows directly from first principles (the radiative transfer equation) under the assumptions of horizontal uniformity and large optical depth, i.e., there is a homogeneous plane-parallel cloud somewhere in the column. The first-order effect of 3D variability of cloudiness, the main source of scattering, is to perturb the distribution of single steps between scatterings which, modulo the ``1-g'' rescaling, can be assumed effectively isotropic. The most natural generalization of the Gaussian distribution is the 1-parameter family of symmetric Lévy-stable distributions because the sum of many zero-mean random variables with infinite variance, but finite moments of order q < α (0 < α < 2), converge to them. It has been shown on heuristic grounds that for these Lévy-based random walks the typical number of scatterings is now (1-g)τ α for transmitted light. The appearance of a non-rational exponent is why this is referred to as ``anomalous'' diffusion. Note that standard/Gaussian diffusion is retrieved in the limit α = 2-. Lévy transport theory has been successfully used in the statistical physics literature to investigate a wide variety of systems with strongly nonlinear dynamics; these applications range from random advection in turbulent fluids to the erratic behavior of financial time-series and, most recently, self-regulating ecological systems. We will briefly survey the state

  3. 3D measurement of absolute radiation dose in grid therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapp, J. V.; Warrington, A. P.; Partridge, M.; Philps, A.; Leach, M. O.; Webb, S.

    2004-01-01

    Spatially fractionated radiotherapy through a grid is a concept which has a long history and was routinely used in orthovoltage radiation therapy in the middle of last century to minimize damage to the skin and subcutaneous tissue. With the advent of megavoltage radiotherapy and its skin sparing effects the use of grids in radiotherapy declined in the 1970s. However there has recently been a revival of the technique for use in palliative treatments with a single fraction of 10 to 20 Gy. In this work the absolute 3D dose distribution in a grid irradiation is measured for photons using a combination of film and gel dosimetry.

  4. Towards a 3D Space Radiation Transport Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Tripathl, R. K.; Cicomptta, F. A.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Tweed, J.

    2002-01-01

    High-speed computational procedures for space radiation shielding have relied on asymptotic expansions in terms of the off-axis scatter and replacement of the general geometry problem by a collection of flat plates. This type of solution was derived for application to human rated systems in which the radius of the shielded volume is large compared to the off-axis diffusion limiting leakage at lateral boundaries. Over the decades these computational codes are relatively complete and lateral diffusion effects are now being added. The analysis for developing a practical full 3D space shielding code is presented.

  5. MO-B-BRD-01: Creation of 3D Printed Phantoms for Clinical Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ehler, E.

    2015-06-15

    is used to 3D print individualized physical models of patient’s unique anatomy for aid in planning complex and challenging surgical procedures. Methods, techniques and imaging requirements for 3D printing anatomic models from imaging data will be discussed. Specific applications currently being used in the radiology clinic will be detailed. Standardized phantoms for radiation therapy are abundant. However, custom phantom designs can be advantageous for both clinical tasks and research. 3D printing is a useful method of custom fabrication that allows one to construct custom objects relatively quickly. Possibilities for custom radiotherapy phantoms range from 3D printing a hollow shell and filling the shell with tissue equivalent materials to fully printing the entire phantom with materials that are tissue equivalent as well as suitable for 3D printing. A range of materials available for use in radiotherapy phantoms and in the case of phantoms for dosimetric measurements, this choice is critical. The necessary steps required will be discussed including: modalities of 3D model generation, 3D model requirements for 3D printing, generation of machine instructions from the 3D model, and 3D printing techniques, choice of phantoms material, and troubleshooting techniques for each step in the process. Case examples of 3D printed phantoms will be shown. Learning Objectives: Understand the types of 3D modeling software required to design your device, the file formats required for data transfer from design software to 3D printer, and general troubleshooting techniques for each step of the process. Learn the differences between materials and design for photons vs. electrons vs. protons. Understand the importance of material choice and design geometries for your custom phantoms. Learn specific steps of quality assurance and quality control for 3D printed beam filters and compensators for proton therapy. Learn of special 3D printing applications for imaging. Cunha: Research

  6. 3D modeling of satellite spectral images, radiation budget and energy budget of urban landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastellu-Etchegorry, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    DART EB is a model that is being developed for simulating the 3D (3 dimensional) energy budget of urban and natural scenes, possibly with topography and atmosphere. It simulates all non radiative energy mechanisms (heat conduction, turbulent momentum and heat fluxes, water reservoir evolution, etc.). It uses DART model (Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer) for simulating radiative mechanisms: 3D radiative budget of 3D scenes and their remote sensing images expressed in terms of reflectance or brightness temperature values, for any atmosphere, wavelength, sun/view direction, altitude and spatial resolution. It uses an innovative multispectral approach (ray tracing, exact kernel, discrete ordinate techniques) over the whole optical domain. This paper presents two major and recent improvements of DART for adapting it to urban canopies. (1) Simulation of the geometry and optical characteristics of urban elements (houses, etc.). (2) Modeling of thermal infrared emission by vegetation and urban elements. The new DART version was used in the context of the CAPITOUL project. For that, districts of the Toulouse urban data base (Autocad format) were translated into DART scenes. This allowed us to simulate visible, near infrared and thermal infrared satellite images of Toulouse districts. Moreover, the 3D radiation budget was used by DARTEB for simulating the time evolution of a number of geophysical quantities of various surface elements (roads, walls, roofs). Results were successfully compared with ground measurements of the CAPITOUL project.

  7. Composite manufacturing: Simulation of 3-D resin transfer molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Cheng Ping

    1998-10-01

    A technique was developed for simulating the resin transfer molding (RTM) process. The major feature of the technique is a computational steering system that enables the user to make changes during the simulation. Specifically, at any instance, the user can inspect the progress of the resin front. On the basis of the observed resin front position, the user can, as needed, change the port and vent locations, open and close ports and vents, adjust the inlet and exit pressures or flow rates, and reorient the mold with respect to the gravitational field. Additionally, the user can "rewind" the simulator to any previous time in the mold filling process, make any of the above changes and then continue the simulation. The technique is augmented by a computer code which has three main components, the Simulator, the Graphics User Interface (GUI), and the Global Data Storage. The Simulator is a finite element code that calculates the resin flow inside the fiber preform. The GUI serves as the interface between the user and the Simulator; it provides the commands to the Simulator and displays the results. The Global Data Storage is the module that manages the exchange of data between the GUI and the Simulator. The computer code (designated as SUPERTMsb-3D) is suitable for simulating the resin flow inside two-dimensional as well as three-dimensional fiber preforms of arbitrary shapes. The use of this computer code is illustrated through sample problems. These problems demonstrate how (with this code) the designer can establish the port and vent locations, opening and closing sequences of ports and vents such that the fiber preform is filled completely in the shortest time with the fewest number of vents.

  8. Radiation Coupling with the FUN3D Unstructured-Grid CFD Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.

    2012-01-01

    The HARA radiation code is fully-coupled to the FUN3D unstructured-grid CFD code for the purpose of simulating high-energy hypersonic flows. The radiation energy source terms and surface heat transfer, under the tangent slab approximation, are included within the fluid dynamic ow solver. The Fire II flight test, at the Mach-31 1643-second trajectory point, is used as a demonstration case. Comparisons are made with an existing structured-grid capability, the LAURA/HARA coupling. The radiative surface heat transfer rates from the present approach match the benchmark values within 6%. Although radiation coupling is the focus of the present work, convective surface heat transfer rates are also reported, and are seen to vary depending upon the choice of mesh connectivity and FUN3D ux reconstruction algorithm. On a tetrahedral-element mesh the convective heating matches the benchmark at the stagnation point, but under-predicts by 15% on the Fire II shoulder. Conversely, on a mixed-element mesh the convective heating over-predicts at the stagnation point by 20%, but matches the benchmark away from the stagnation region.

  9. Stochastic Radiative transfer and real cloudiness

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, F.

    1995-09-01

    Plane-parallel radiative transfer modeling of clouds in GCMs is thought to be an inadequate representation of the effects of real cloudiness. A promising new approach for studying the effects of cloud horizontal inhomogeneity is stochastic radiative transfer, which computes the radiative effects of ensembles of cloud structures described by probability distributions. This approach is appropriate because cloud information is inherently statistical, and it is the mean radiative effect of complex 3D cloud structure that is desired. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  10. HERO - A 3D general relativistic radiative post-processor for accretion discs around black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yucong; Narayan, Ramesh; Sadowski, Aleksander; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2015-08-01

    HERO (Hybrid Evaluator for Radiative Objects) is a 3D general relativistic radiative transfer code which has been tailored to the problem of analysing radiation from simulations of relativistic accretion discs around black holes. HERO is designed to be used as a post-processor. Given some fixed fluid structure for the disc (i.e. density and velocity as a function of position from a hydrodynamic or magnetohydrodynamic simulation), the code obtains a self-consistent solution for the radiation field and for the gas temperatures using the condition of radiative equilibrium. The novel aspect of HERO is that it combines two techniques: (1) a short-characteristics (SC) solver that quickly converges to a self-consistent disc temperature and radiation field, with (2) a long-characteristics (LC) solver that provides a more accurate solution for the radiation near the photosphere and in the optically thin regions. By combining these two techniques, we gain both the computational speed of SC and the high accuracy of LC. We present tests of HERO on a range of 1D, 2D, and 3D problems in flat space and show that the results agree well with both analytical and benchmark solutions. We also test the ability of the code to handle relativistic problems in curved space. Finally, we discuss the important topic of ray defects, a major limitation of the SC method, and describe our strategy for minimizing the induced error.

  11. Characterization of a parallel beam CCD optical-CT apparatus for 3D radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstajić, Nikola; Doran, Simon J.

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the initial steps we have taken in establishing CCD based optical-CT as a viable alternative for 3-D radiation dosimetry. First, we compare the optical density (OD) measurements from a high quality test target and variable neutral density filter (VNDF). A modulation transfer function (MTF) of individual projections is derived for three positions of the sinusoidal test target within the scanning tank. Our CCD is then characterized in terms of its signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Finally, a sample reconstruction of a scan of a PRESAGETM (registered trademark of Heuris Pharma, NJ, Skillman, USA.) dosimeter is given, demonstrating the capabilities of the apparatus.

  12. Fast multilevel radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paletou, Frédéric; Léger, Ludovick

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of recent advances in the field of numerical radiative transfer relies on approximate operator methods better known in astrophysics as Accelerated Lambda-Iteration (ALI). A superior class of iterative schemes, in term of rates of convergence, such as Gauss-Seidel and Successive Overrelaxation methods were therefore quite naturally introduced in the field of radiative transfer by Trujillo Bueno & Fabiani Bendicho (1995); it was thoroughly described for the non-LTE two-level atom case. We describe hereafter in details how such methods can be generalized when dealing with non-LTE unpolarised radiation transfer with multilevel atomic models, in monodimensional geometry.

  13. Study of Shortwave Spectra in Fully 3D Environment: Synergy Between Scanning Radars and Spectral Radiation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2012-01-01

    The main theme for our research is the understanding and closure of the surface spectral shortwave radiation problem in fully 3D cloud situations by combining the new ARM scanning radars, shortwave spectrometers, and microwave radiometers with the arsenal of radiative transfer tools developed by our group. In particular, we define first a large number of cloudy test cases spanning all 3D possibilities not just the customary uniform-overcast ones. Second, for each case, we define a "Best Estimate of Clouds That Affect Shortwave Radiation" using all relevant ARM instruments, notably the new scanning radars, and contribute this to the ARM Archive. Third, we test the ASR-signature radiative transfer model RRTMG_SW for those cases, focusing on the near-IR because of long-standing problems in this spectral region, and work with the developers to improve RRTMG_SW in order to increase its penetration into the modeling community.

  14. Simulation of solar radiative transfer in cumulus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Zuev, V.E.; Titov, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    This work presents a 3-D model of radiative transfer which is used to study the relationship between the spatial distribution of cumulus clouds and fluxes (albedo and transmittance) of visible solar radiation.

  15. Radiation Effects in 3D Integrated SOl SRAM Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-23

    Comparing Neutrons and Protons Data Monoenergetic neutrons and protons are used to characterize single event effects in electronics circuits, and are...for proton irradiation with energies between 4.8 and 500 MeV. Results are compared with 14-MeV neutron irradiation. Single event upset cross-section...fabricating circuits for space applications. singIe event effects, SOl, fully depleted, 3D integration, neutron , protons, upset cross-section U U U U SAR

  16. Gas flow environmental and heat transfer nonrotating 3D program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geil, T.; Steinhoff, J.

    1983-01-01

    A complete set of benchmark quality data for the flow and heat transfer within a large rectangular turning duct is being compiled. These data will be used to evaluate and verify three dimensional internal viscous flow models and computational codes. The analytical objective is to select such a computational code and define the capabilities of this code to predict the experimental results. Details of the proper code operation will be defined and improvements to the code modeling capabilities will be formulated.

  17. Radiation Transport in 3D Heterogeneous Materials: DNS

    SciTech Connect

    Graziani, F

    2003-07-09

    In order to develop a phenomenological approach to transport in 3D heterogeneous media, we have performed direct numerical simulation studies. Using an algorithm based on the lattice random walk to generate random media, we have performed radiographic shots of the sample and digitized both the chord length and optical depth distributions. The optical depth distribution is then used to compute an effective mean free path. As theory predicts, the atomically averaged mean free path is always a minimum value. We have also demonstrated a dependency of mean free path on the distribution of random material.

  18. Parameterization of Solar Radiative Fluxes For 3d-inhomogeneous Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schewski, M.; Macke, A.

    radiative fluxes for 3d clouds appears to be a promis- ing approach.

  19. Representing 3-D cloud radiation effects in two-stream schemes: 1. Longwave considerations and effective cloud edge length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Sophia A. K.; Hogan, Robin J.; Klinger, Carolin; Chiu, J. Christine; Mayer, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    Current weather and climate models neglect 3-D radiative transfer through cloud sides, which can change the cloud radiative effect (CRE) significantly. This two-part paper describes the development of the SPeedy Algorithm for Radiative TrAnsfer through CloUd Sides (SPARTACUS) to capture these effects efficiently in a two-stream radiation scheme for use in global models. The present paper concerns the longwave spectral region, where not much work has been done previously, although the limited previous work has suggested that radiative transfer through cloud sides increases the longwave surface CRE of shallow cumulus by around 30%. To assist the development of a longwave capability for SPARTACUS, we use a reference case of an isolated, isothermal, optically thick, cubic cloud in vacuum, for which 3-D effects increase CRE by exactly 200%. It is shown that for any cloud shape, the 3-D effect can be represented in SPARTACUS provided that correct account is made for (1) the effective zenith angle of diffuse radiation emitted from a cloud, (2) the spatial distribution of fluxes in the cloud, (3) cloud clustering that enhances the interception of emitted radiation by neighboring clouds, and (4) radiative smoothing leading to the effective cloud edge length being less than the measured value. We find empirically that the circumference of an ellipse fitted to a horizontal cross section through a cumulus cloud provides a good estimate of the radiatively effective cloud edge length, which provides some guidance to how cloud observations could be analyzed to extract their most important properties for radiation.

  20. 3-D Measurement of Recycling and Radiation in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norval, Ryan; Goetz, John; Schmitz, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    The MST reversed-field pinch (RFP) can undergo spontaneous transition to a helical core state, associated with the growth of the innermost resonant magnetic mode. Currently multiple 2-D imaging cameras are in place allowing for nearly full vessel viewing and measurement of recycling and impurities fluxes. The transition from the standard to helical RFP causes an observable change in edge plasma. While in the helical state the plasma wall interaction (PWI) on MSTs poloidal limiter strongly correlates with the helicity of the core mode. PWI on the toroidal limiter overall is reduced, with the remaining PWI sites corresponding the helicity of the core mode, or the locations of diagnostic limiters and the error fields they create. EIRENE, a neutral particle code use for modeling edge plasmas, is used to compute the neutral profiles based on measured recycling fluxes. EIRENE computes the radiative and charge exchange power losses. Comparison is made between the standard and helical RFP plasmas. Bolometer measurements of total radiation are currently in progress to supplement the modeling. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. Parallel beam optical tomography apparatus for 3D radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstajic, Nikola; Doran, Simon J.

    2005-06-01

    Since the discovery of X rays radiotherapy has had the same aim - to deliver a precisely measured dose of radiation to a defined tumour volume with minimal damage to surrounding healthy tissue. Recent developments in radiotherapy such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can generate complex shapes of dose distributions. Until recently it has not been possible to verify that the delivered dose matches the planned dose. However, one often wants to know the real three-dimensional dose distribution. Three-dimensional radiation dosimeters have been developed since the early 1980s. Most chemical formulations involve a radiosensitive species immobilised in space by gelling agent. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and optical techniques have been the most successful gel scanning techniques so far. Optical techniques rely on gels changing colour once irradiated. Parallel beam optical tomography has been developed at the University of Surrey since the late 1990s. The apparatus involves light emitting diode light source collimated to a wide (12cm) parallel beam. The beam is attenuated or scattered (depending on the chemical formulation) as it passes through the gel. Focusing optics projects the beam onto a CCD chip. The dosimeter sits on a rotation stage. The tomography scan involves continuously rotating the dosimeter and taking CCD images. Once the dosimeter has been rotated over 180 degrees the images are processed by filtered back projection. The work presented discusses the optics of the apparatus in more detail.

  2. Transfer of Learning between 2D and 3D Sources during Infancy: Informing Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The ability to transfer learning across contexts is an adaptive skill that develops rapidly during early childhood. Learning from television is a specific instance of transfer of learning between a two-dimensional (2D) representation and a three-dimensional (3D) object. Understanding the conditions under which young children might accomplish this…

  3. 3D unstructured-mesh radiation transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, J.

    1997-12-31

    Three unstructured-mesh radiation transport codes are currently being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The first code is ATTILA, which uses an unstructured tetrahedral mesh in conjunction with standard Sn (discrete-ordinates) angular discretization, standard multigroup energy discretization, and linear-discontinuous spatial differencing. ATTILA solves the standard first-order form of the transport equation using source iteration in conjunction with diffusion-synthetic acceleration of the within-group source iterations. DANTE is designed to run primarily on workstations. The second code is DANTE, which uses a hybrid finite-element mesh consisting of arbitrary combinations of hexahedra, wedges, pyramids, and tetrahedra. DANTE solves several second-order self-adjoint forms of the transport equation including the even-parity equation, the odd-parity equation, and a new equation called the self-adjoint angular flux equation. DANTE also offers three angular discretization options: $S{_}n$ (discrete-ordinates), $P{_}n$ (spherical harmonics), and $SP{_}n$ (simplified spherical harmonics). DANTE is designed to run primarily on massively parallel message-passing machines, such as the ASCI-Blue machines at LANL and LLNL. The third code is PERICLES, which uses the same hybrid finite-element mesh as DANTE, but solves the standard first-order form of the transport equation rather than a second-order self-adjoint form. DANTE uses a standard $S{_}n$ discretization in angle in conjunction with trilinear-discontinuous spatial differencing, and diffusion-synthetic acceleration of the within-group source iterations. PERICLES was initially designed to run on workstations, but a version for massively parallel message-passing machines will be built. The three codes will be described in detail and computational results will be presented.

  4. 3-D Simulations Of AGN Feedback via Radiation and Radiation-driven Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosawa, Ryuichi; Proga, D.

    2009-01-01

    We present numerical studies of non-axisymmetric, time-dependent gas hydrodynamic in a relatively large scale ( 10 pc). We consider the gas under the influence of the gravity of a super massive black hole (SMBH) and the radiation produced by a radiatively efficient flow accreting onto the SMBH. We examine two cases: (1) the formation of an outflow from the accretion of the ambient gas without rotation and (2) that with rotation. Our 3-D simulations of a non-rotating gas show small yet noticeable non-axisymmetric small-scale features inside the outflow; however, the outflow as a whole and the inflow do not seem to suffer from any large-scale instability. In the rotating case, the non-axisymmetric features are very prominent, especially in the outflow which consists of many cold dense clouds entrained in a smoother hot component. The 3-D outflow becomes non-axisymmetric due to the shear and thermal instabilities. We find that gas rotation increases the outflow thermal energy flux, but it reduces the outflow mass and kinetic energy fluxes and the outflow collimation. The virial mass estimated from the kinematics of the cold clouds found in our 3-D simulations of rotating gas underestimates the actual mass used in the simulations by about 40%. Overall the large scale outflow significantly reduces the rate at which mass accretes onto the SMBH. This work was supported by NASA through grant HST-AR-11276 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  5. Heterogeneously Assembled Metamaterials and Metadevices via 3D Modular Transfer Printing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seungwoo; Kang, Byungsoo; Keum, Hohyun; Ahmed, Numair; Rogers, John A.; Ferreira, Placid M.; Kim, Seok; Min, Bumki

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterials have made the exotic control of the flow of electromagnetic waves possible, which is difficult to achieve with natural materials. In recent years, the emergence of functional metadevices has shown immense potential for the practical realization of highly efficient photonic devices. However, complex and heterogeneous architectures that enable diverse functionalities of metamaterials and metadevices have been challenging to realize because of the limited manufacturing capabilities of conventional fabrication methods. Here, we show that three-dimensional (3D) modular transfer printing can be used to construct diverse metamaterials in complex 3D architectures on universal substrates, which is attractive for achieving on-demand photonic properties. Few repetitive processing steps and rapid constructions are additional advantages of 3D modular transfer printing. Thus, this method provides a fascinating route to generate flexible and stretchable 2D/3D metamaterials and metadevices with heterogeneous material components, complex device architectures, and diverse functionalities. PMID:27283594

  6. Laser Transfer of Metals and Metal Alloys for Digital Microfabrication of 3D Objects.

    PubMed

    Zenou, Michael; Sa'ar, Amir; Kotler, Zvi

    2015-09-02

    3D copper logos printed on epoxy glass laminates are demonstrated. The structures are printed using laser transfer of molten metal microdroplets. The example in the image shows letters of 50 µm width, with each letter being taller than the last, from a height of 40 µm ('s') to 190 µm ('l'). The scanning microscopy image is taken at a tilt, and the topographic image was taken using interferometric 3D microscopy, to show the effective control of this technique.

  7. Toward 3D Printing of Pure Metals by Laser-Induced Forward Transfer.

    PubMed

    Visser, Claas Willem; Pohl, Ralph; Sun, Chao; Römer, Gert-Willem; Huis in 't Veld, Bert; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-07-15

    3D printing of common metals is highly challenging because metals are generally solid at room conditions. Copper and gold pillars are manufactured with a resolution below 5 μm and a height up to 2 mm, using laser-induced forward transfer to create and eject liquid metal droplets. The solidified drop's shape is crucial for 3D printing and is discussed as a function of the laser energy.

  8. 3D photomechanical model of tooth enamel ablation by Er-laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Andrey V.; Shatilova, Ksenia V.; Skrypnik, Alexei V.

    2014-02-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) photomechanical model of human tooth enamel ablation is described. It takes into account: the structural peculiarities of enamel, Er-laser beam energy spatial distribution and laser radiation attenuation in the tissue. Dynamics change of enamel coefficient of absorption during ablation is also discussed. We consider the 3D photomechanical model of incomplete removal (modification) of the enamel rods by the pressure of water contained in the enamel pores and heated by laser radiation, and complete removal (ablation) of the enamel rods as result of hydroxyapatite heated by laser radiation and evaporation. Modeling results are in close agreement with the experimental results.

  9. A study of the earth radiation budget using a 3D Monte-Carlo radiative transer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okata, M.; Nakajima, T.; Sato, Y.; Inoue, T.; Donovan, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the earth's radiation budget when data are available from satellite-borne active sensors, i.e. cloud profiling radar (CPR) and lidar, and a multi-spectral imager (MSI) in the project of the Earth Explorer/EarthCARE mission. For this purpose, we first developed forward and backward 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes that can treat a broadband solar flux calculation including thermal infrared emission calculation by k-distribution parameters of Sekiguchi and Nakajima (2008). In order to construct the 3D cloud field, we tried the following three methods: 1) stochastic cloud generated by randomized optical thickness each layer distribution and regularly-distributed tilted clouds, 2) numerical simulations by a non-hydrostatic model with bin cloud microphysics model and 3) Minimum cloud Information Deviation Profiling Method (MIDPM) as explained later. As for the method-2 (numerical modeling method), we employed numerical simulation results of Californian summer stratus clouds simulated by a non-hydrostatic atmospheric model with a bin-type cloud microphysics model based on the JMA NHM model (Iguchi et al., 2008; Sato et al., 2009, 2012) with horizontal (vertical) grid spacing of 100m (20m) and 300m (20m) in a domain of 30km (x), 30km (y), 1.5km (z) and with a horizontally periodic lateral boundary condition. Two different cell systems were simulated depending on the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration. In the case of horizontal resolution of 100m, regionally averaged cloud optical thickness, , and standard deviation of COT, were 3.0 and 4.3 for pristine case and 8.5 and 7.4 for polluted case, respectively. In the MIDPM method, we first construct a library of pair of observed vertical profiles from active sensors and collocated imager products at the nadir footprint, i.e. spectral imager radiances, cloud optical thickness (COT), effective particle radius (RE) and cloud top temperature (Tc). We then select a

  10. Development of a patient-specific 3D dose evaluation program for QA in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Suk; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Cao, Yuan Jie; Shim, Jang Bo; Yang, Dae Sik; Park, Young Je; Yoon, Won Sup; Kim, Chul Yong

    2015-03-01

    We present preliminary results for a 3-dimensional dose evaluation software system ( P DRESS, patient-specific 3-dimensional dose real evaluation system). Scanned computed tomography (CT) images obtained by using dosimetry were transferred to the radiation treatment planning system (ECLIPSE, VARIAN, Palo Alto, CA) where the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) nasopharynx plan was designed. We used a 10 MV photon beam (CLiX, VARIAN, Palo Alto, CA) to deliver the nasopharynx treatment plan. After irradiation, the TENOMAG dosimeter was scanned using a VISTA ™ scanner. The scanned data were reconstructed using VistaRecon software to obtain a 3D dose distribution of the optical density. An optical-CT scanner was used to readout the dose distribution in the gel dosimeter. Moreover, we developed the P DRESS by using Flatform, which were developed by our group, to display the 3D dose distribution by loading the DICOM RT data which are exported from the radiotherapy treatment plan (RTP) and the optical-CT reconstructed VFF file, into the independent P DRESS with an ioniz ation chamber and EBT film was used to compare the dose distribution calculated from the RTP with that measured by using a gel dosimeter. The agreement between the normalized EBT, the gel dosimeter and RTP data was evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative methods, such as the isodose distribution, dose difference, point value, and profile. The profiles showed good agreement between the RTP data and the gel dosimeter data, and the precision of the dose distribution was within ±3%. The results from this study showed significantly discrepancies between the dose distribution calculated from the treatment plan and the dose distribution measured by a TENOMAG gel and by scanning with an optical CT scanner. The 3D dose evaluation software system ( P DRESS, patient specific dose real evaluation system), which were developed in this study evaluates the accuracies of the three-dimensional dose

  11. Turbomachinery Heat Transfer and Loss Modeling for 3D Navier-Stokes Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth; Ameri, Ali

    2005-01-01

    This report's contents focus on making use of NASA Glenn on-site computational facilities,to develop, validate, and apply models for use in advanced 3D Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes to enhance the capability to compute heat transfer and losses in turbomachiney.

  12. Final Report – Study of Shortwave Spectra in Fully 3D Environment. Synergy Between Scanning Radars and Spectral Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan

    2015-09-14

    ARM set out 20 years ago to “close” the radiation problem, that is, to improve radiation models to the point where they could routinely predict the observed spectral radiation fluxes knowing the optical properties of the surface and of gases, clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere. Only then could such radiation models form a proper springboard for global climate model (GCM) parameterizations of spectral radiation. Sustained efforts have more or less achieved that goal with regard to longwave radiation; ASR models now routinely predict ARM spectral longwave radiances to 1–2%. Similar efforts in the shortwave have achieved far less; the successes are mainly for carefully selected 1D stratiform cloud cases. Such cases amount, even with the most optimistic interpretation, to no more than 30% of all cases at SGP. The problem has not been lack of effort but lack of appropriate instruments.The new ARM stimulus-funded instruments, with their new capabilities, will dramatically improve this situation and once again make progress possible on the shortwave problem. The new shortwave spectrometers will provide a reliable, calibrated record including the near infrared – and for other climatic regimes than SGP. The new scanning radars will provide the 3D cloud view, making it possible to tackle fully 3D situations. Thus, our main theme for the project is the understanding and closure of the surface spectral shortwave radiation problem in fully 3D cloud situations by combining the new ARM scanning radars and shortwave spectrometers with the arsenal of radiative transfer tools.

  13. Representing 3-D cloud radiation effects in two-stream schemes: 2. Matrix formulation and broadband evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Robin J.; Schäfer, Sophia A. K.; Klinger, Carolin; Chiu, J. Christine; Mayer, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    Estimating the impact of radiation transport through cloud sides on the global energy budget is hampered by the lack of a fast radiation scheme suitable for use in global atmospheric models that can represent these effects in both the shortwave and longwave. This two-part paper describes the development of such a scheme, which we refer to as the Speedy Algorithm for Radiative Transfer through Cloud Sides (SPARTACUS). The principle of the method is to add extra terms to the two-stream equations to represent lateral transport between clear and cloudy regions, which vary in proportion to the length of cloud edge as a function of height. The present paper describes a robust and accurate method for solving the coupled system of equations in both the shortwave and longwave in terms of matrix exponentials. This solver has been coupled to a correlated-k model for gas absorption. We then confirm the accuracy of SPARTACUS by performing broadband comparisons with fully 3-D radiation calculations by the Monte Carlo model "MYSTIC" for a cumulus cloud field, examining particularly the percentage change in cloud radiative effect (CRE) when 3-D effects are introduced. In the shortwave, SPARTACUS correctly captures this change to CRE, which varies with solar zenith angle between -25% and +120%. In the longwave, SPARTACUS captures well the increase in radiative cooling of the cloud, although it is only able to correctly simulate the 30% increase in surface CRE (around 4 W m-2) if an approximate correction is made for cloud clustering.

  14. 3D Aerosol-Cloud Radiative Interaction Observed in Collocated MODIS and ASTER Images of Cumulus Cloud Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Guoyong; Marshak, Alexander; Cahalan, Robert F.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kleidman, Richard G.

    2007-01-01

    3D aerosol-cloud interaction is examined by analyzing two images containing cumulus clouds in biomass burning regions in Brazil. The research consists of two parts. The first part focuses on identifying 3D clo ud impacts on the reflectance of pixel selected for the MODIS aerosol retrieval based purely on observations. The second part of the resea rch combines the observations with radiative transfer computations to identify key parameters in 3D aerosol-cloud interaction. We found that 3D cloud-induced enhancement depends on optical properties of nearb y clouds as well as wavelength. The enhancement is too large to be ig nored. Associated biased error in 1D aerosol optical thickness retrie val ranges from 50% to 140% depending on wavelength and optical prope rties of nearby clouds as well as aerosol optical thickness. We caution the community to be prudent when applying 1D approximations in comp uting solar radiation in dear regions adjacent to clouds or when usin g traditional retrieved aerosol optical thickness in aerosol indirect effect research.

  15. Application of a 3D volumetric display for radiation therapy treatment planning I: quality assurance procedures.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xing; Kirk, Michael Collins; Napoli, Josh; Stutsman, Sandy; Zusag, Tom; Khelashvili, Gocha; Chu, James

    2009-07-17

    To design and implement a set of quality assurance tests for an innovative 3D volumetric display for radiation treatment planning applications. A genuine 3D display (Perspecta Spatial 3D, Actuality-Systems Inc., Bedford, MA) has been integrated with the Pinnacle TPS (Philips Medical Systems, Madison WI), for treatment planning. The Perspecta 3D display renders a 25 cm diameter volume that is viewable from any side, floating within a translucent dome. In addition to displaying all 3D data exported from Pinnacle, the system provides a 3D mouse to define beam angles and apertures and to measure distance. The focus of this work is the design and implementation of a quality assurance program for 3D displays and specific 3D planning issues as guided by AAPM Task Group Report 53. A series of acceptance and quality assurance tests have been designed to evaluate the accuracy of CT images, contours, beams, and dose distributions as displayed on Perspecta. Three-dimensional matrices, rulers and phantoms with known spatial dimensions were used to check Perspecta's absolute spatial accuracy. In addition, a system of tests was designed to confirm Perspecta's ability to import and display Pinnacle data consistently. CT scans of phantoms were used to confirm beam field size, divergence, and gantry and couch angular accuracy as displayed on Perspecta. Beam angles were verified through Cartesian coordinate system measurements and by CT scans of phantoms rotated at known angles. Beams designed on Perspecta were exported to Pinnacle and checked for accuracy. Dose at sampled points were checked for consistency with Pinnacle and agreed within 1% or 1 mm. All data exported from Pinnacle to Perspecta was displayed consistently. The 3D spatial display of images, contours, and dose distributions were consistent with Pinnacle display. When measured by the 3D ruler, the distances between any two points calculated using Perspecta agreed with Pinnacle within the measurement error.

  16. Realistic 3D coherent transfer function inverse filtering of complex fields

    PubMed Central

    Cotte, Yann; Toy, Fatih M.; Arfire, Cristian; Kou, Shan Shan; Boss, Daniel; Bergoënd, Isabelle; Depeursinge, Christian

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel technique for three-dimensional (3D) image processing of complex fields. It consists in inverting the coherent image formation by filtering the complex spectrum with a realistic 3D coherent transfer function (CTF) of a high-NA digital holographic microscope. By combining scattering theory and signal processing, the method is demonstrated to yield the reconstruction of a scattering object field. Experimental reconstructions in phase and amplitude are presented under non-design imaging conditions. The suggested technique is best suited for an implementation in high-resolution diffraction tomography based on sample or illumination rotation. PMID:21833359

  17. Inverse cascades sustained by the transfer rate of angular momentum in a 3D turbulent flow.

    PubMed

    López-Caballero, Miguel; Burguete, Javier

    2013-03-22

    The existence of energy cascades as signatures of conserved magnitudes is one of the universal characteristics of turbulent flows. In homogeneous 3D turbulence, the energy conservation produces a direct cascade from large to small scales, although in 2D, it produces an inverse cascade pointing towards small wave numbers. In this Letter, we present the first evidence of an inverse cascade in a fully developed 3D experimental turbulent flow where the conserved magnitude is the angular momentum. Two counterrotating flows collide in a central region where very large fluctuations are produced, generating a turbulent drag that transfers the external torque between different fluid layers.

  18. Inverse Cascades Sustained by the Transfer Rate of Angular Momentum in a 3D Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Caballero, Miguel; Burguete, Javier

    2013-03-01

    The existence of energy cascades as signatures of conserved magnitudes is one of the universal characteristics of turbulent flows. In homogeneous 3D turbulence, the energy conservation produces a direct cascade from large to small scales, although in 2D, it produces an inverse cascade pointing towards small wave numbers. In this Letter, we present the first evidence of an inverse cascade in a fully developed 3D experimental turbulent flow where the conserved magnitude is the angular momentum. Two counterrotating flows collide in a central region where very large fluctuations are produced, generating a turbulent drag that transfers the external torque between different fluid layers.

  19. Realistic 3D coherent transfer function inverse filtering of complex fields.

    PubMed

    Cotte, Yann; Toy, Fatih M; Arfire, Cristian; Kou, Shan Shan; Boss, Daniel; Bergoënd, Isabelle; Depeursinge, Christian

    2011-08-01

    We present a novel technique for three-dimensional (3D) image processing of complex fields. It consists in inverting the coherent image formation by filtering the complex spectrum with a realistic 3D coherent transfer function (CTF) of a high-NA digital holographic microscope. By combining scattering theory and signal processing, the method is demonstrated to yield the reconstruction of a scattering object field. Experimental reconstructions in phase and amplitude are presented under non-design imaging conditions. The suggested technique is best suited for an implementation in high-resolution diffraction tomography based on sample or illumination rotation.

  20. Oxygen ingress study of 3D printed gaseous radiation detector enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Steer, Christopher A.; Durose, Aaron

    2015-07-01

    As part of our ongoing studies into the potential application of 3D printing techniques to gaseous radiation detectors, we have studied the ability of 3D printed enclosures to resist environmental oxygen ingress. A set of cuboid and hexagonal prism shaped enclosures with wall thicknesses of 4 mm, 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm were designed and printed in nylon using a EOSINT P 730 Selective Laser Sintering 3D printer system These test enclosures provide a comparison of different environmental gas ingress for different 3D printing techniques. The rate of change of oxygen concentration was found to be linear, decreasing as the wall thickness increases. It was also found that the hexagonal prism geometry produced a lower rate of change of oxygen concentration compared with the cuboid shaped enclosures. Possible reasons as to why these results were obtained are discussed The implications for the this study for deployable systems are also discussed (authors)

  1. Gray and multigroup radiation transport through 3D binary stochastic media with different sphere radii distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Gordon L.

    2017-03-01

    Gray and multigroup radiation is transported through 3D media consisting of spheres randomly placed in a uniform background. Comparisons are made between using constant radii spheres and three different distributions of sphere radii. Because of the computational cost of 3D calculations, only the lowest angle order, n=1, is tested. If the mean chord length is held constant, using different radii distributions makes little difference. This is true for both gray and multigroup solutions. 3D transport solutions are compared to 2D and 1D solutions with the same mean chord lengths. 2D disk and 3D sphere media give solutions that are nearly identical while 1D slab solutions are fundamentally different.

  2. New insights on pulsating white dwarfs from 3D radiation-hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Fontaine, Gilles; Ludwig, Hans-Günter; Gianninas, Alexandros; Kilic, Mukremin

    We have recently computed a grid of 3D radiation-hydrodynamical simulations for the atmosphere of pure-hydrogen DA white dwarfs in the range 5.0 < log g < 9.0. Our grid covers the full ZZ Ceti instability strip where pulsating DA white dwarfs are located. We have significantly improved the theoretical framework to study these objects by removing the free parameters of 1D convection, which were previously a major modeling hurdle. We present improved atmospheric parameter determinations based on spectroscopic fits with 3D model spectra, allowing for an updated definition of the empirical edges of the ZZ Ceti instability strip. Our 3D simulations also precisely predict the depth of the convection zones, narrowing down the internal layers where pulsation are being driven. We hope that these 3D effects will be included in asteroseismic models in the future to predict the region of the HR diagram where white dwarfs are expected to pulsate.

  3. Gray and multigroup radiation transport through 3D binary stochastic media with different sphere radii distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Gordon Lee

    2016-12-06

    Here, gray and multigroup radiation is transported through 3D media consisting of spheres randomly placed in a uniform background. Comparisons are made between using constant radii spheres and three different distributions of sphere radii. Because of the computational cost of 3D calculations, only the lowest angle order, n=1, is tested. If the mean chord length is held constant, using different radii distributions makes little difference. This is true for both gray and multigroup solutions. 3D transport solutions are compared to 2D and 1D solutions with the same mean chord lengths. 2D disk and 3D sphere media give solutions that aremore » nearly identical while 1D slab solutions are fundamentally different.« less

  4. Gray and multigroup radiation transport through 3D binary stochastic media with different sphere radii distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Gordon Lee

    2016-12-06

    Here, gray and multigroup radiation is transported through 3D media consisting of spheres randomly placed in a uniform background. Comparisons are made between using constant radii spheres and three different distributions of sphere radii. Because of the computational cost of 3D calculations, only the lowest angle order, n=1, is tested. If the mean chord length is held constant, using different radii distributions makes little difference. This is true for both gray and multigroup solutions. 3D transport solutions are compared to 2D and 1D solutions with the same mean chord lengths. 2D disk and 3D sphere media give solutions that are nearly identical while 1D slab solutions are fundamentally different.

  5. Low-mass gas envelopes around accreting cores embedded in radiative 3D discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lega, Elena; Lambrechts, Michiel

    2016-10-01

    Planets with a core mass larger than few Earth masses and a gaseous envelope not exceeding about 10% of the total mass budget are common. Such planets are present in the Solar System (Uranus, Neptune) and are frequently observed around other stars.Our knowledge about the evolution of gas envelopes is mainly based on 1D models. However, such models cannot investigate the complex interaction between the forming envelope and the surrounding gas disc.In this work we perform 3D hydrodynamics simulations accounting for energy transfer and radiative cooling using the FARGOCA code (Lega et al., MNRAS 440, 2014). In addition to the usually considered heatingsources, namely viscous and compressional heating, we have modeled the energy deposited by the accretion of solids.We show that the thermal evolution of the envelope of a 5 Earth mass core is mainly dominated by compressional heating for accretion rates lower than 5 Earth masses per 105 years.Additionally, we demonstrate efficient gas circulation through the envelope. Under certain conditions, the competition between gas circulation and cooling of the envelope can efficiently delay the onset of runaway accretion. This could help in explaining the population of planets with low-mass gas envelope.

  6. SKIRT: Stellar Kinematics Including Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, Maarten; Dejonghe, Herwig; Davies, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    SKIRT is a radiative transfer code based on the Monte Carlo technique. The name SKIRT, acronym for Stellar Kinematics Including Radiative Transfer, reflects the original motivation for its creation: it has been developed to study the effects of dust absorption and scattering on the observed kinematics of dusty galaxies. In a second stage, the SKIRT code was extended with a module to self-consistently calculate the dust emission spectrum under the assumption of local thermal equilibrium. This LTE version of SKIRT has been used to model the dust extinction and emission of various types of galaxies, as well as circumstellar discs and clumpy tori around active galactic nuclei. A new, extended version of SKIRT code can perform efficient 3D radiative transfer calculations including a self-consistent calculation of the dust temperature distribution and the associated FIR/submm emission with a full incorporation of the emission of transiently heated grains and PAH molecules.

  7. IM3D: A parallel Monte Carlo code for efficient simulations of primary radiation displacements and damage in 3D geometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong Gang; Yang, Yang; Short, Michael P.; Ding, Ze Jun; Zeng, Zhi; Li, Ju

    2015-01-01

    SRIM-like codes have limitations in describing general 3D geometries, for modeling radiation displacements and damage in nanostructured materials. A universal, computationally efficient and massively parallel 3D Monte Carlo code, IM3D, has been developed with excellent parallel scaling performance. IM3D is based on fast indexing of scattering integrals and the SRIM stopping power database, and allows the user a choice of Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) or Finite Element Triangle Mesh (FETM) method for constructing 3D shapes and microstructures. For 2D films and multilayers, IM3D perfectly reproduces SRIM results, and can be ∼102 times faster in serial execution and > 104 times faster using parallel computation. For 3D problems, it provides a fast approach for analyzing the spatial distributions of primary displacements and defect generation under ion irradiation. Herein we also provide a detailed discussion of our open-source collision cascade physics engine, revealing the true meaning and limitations of the “Quick Kinchin-Pease” and “Full Cascades” options. The issues of femtosecond to picosecond timescales in defining displacement versus damage, the limitation of the displacements per atom (DPA) unit in quantifying radiation damage (such as inadequacy in quantifying degree of chemical mixing), are discussed. PMID:26658477

  8. Utrecht Radiative Transfer Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Utrecht course ``The Generation and Transport of Radiation'' teaches basic radiative transfer to second-year students. It is a much-expanded version of the first chapter of Rybicki & Lightman's ``Radiative Processes in Astrophysics''. After this course, students understand why intensity is measured per steradian, have an Eddington-Barbier feel for optically thick line formation, and know that scattering upsets LTE. The text is a computer-aided translation by Ruth Peterson of my 1992 Dutch-language course. My aim is to rewrite this course in non-computer English and make it web-available at some time. In the meantime, copies of the Peterson translation are made yearly at Uppsala -- ask them, not me. Eventually it should become a textbook. The Utrecht course ``Radiative Transfer in Stellar Atmospheres'' is a 30-hour course for third-year students. It treats NLTE line formation in plane-parallel stellar atmospheres at a level intermediate between the books by Novotny and Boehm-Vitense, and Mihalas' ``Stellar Atmospheres''. After this course, students appreciate that epsilon is small, that radiation can heat or cool, and that computers have changed the field. This course is web-available since 1995 and is regularly improved -- but remains incomplete. Eventually it should become a textbook. The three Utrecht exercise sets ``Stellar Spectra A: Basic Line Formation'', ``Stellar Spectra B: LTE Line Formation'', and ``Stellar Spectra C: NLTE Line Formation'' are IDL-based computer exercises for first-year, second-year, and third-year students, respectively. They treat spectral classification, Saha-Boltzmann population statistics, the curve of growth, the FAL-C solar atmosphere model, the role of H-minus in the solar continuum, LTE formation of Fraunhofer lines, inversion tactics, the Feautrier method, classical lambda iteration, and ALI computation. The first two sets are web-available since 1998; the third will follow. Acknowledgement. Both courses owe much to previous

  9. Using the full scale 3D solid anthropometric model in radiation oncology positioning and verification.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuh-Ping; Wu, Ching-Jung

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the full size solid 3D Anthropometric Model using in the positioning and verification process for radiation treatment planning of the skull of cancer patients in radiotherapy. In order to obtain a full scale 3D, solid Anthropometric Model, data is first collected through computed tomography and optical scanning. Through surface reconstruction, a model is made of the patients skull, after which rapid prototyping and rapid tooling is applied to acquire a 1:1 solid model, thus, it can replace the patient for the tumor positioning and verification in radiotherapy. The 3D Anthropometric Model are not only provide a clear picture of the external appearance, but also allow insight into the internal structure of organic bodies, which is of great advantage in radiotherapy. During radiotherapy planning, 3D Anthropometric Model can be used to simulate all kinds of situations on the simulator and the linear accelerator, without the patient needing to be present, so that the medical physicist or dosimetrist will be able to design a precise treatment plan that is tailored to the patient. The 3D Anthropometric Model production system can effectively help us solve problems related to r adiotherapy positioning and verification, helping both radiotherapists and cancer patients. We expect that the application of 3D Anthropometric Model can reduce the time that needs to be spent on pretreatment procedures and enhance the quality of health care for cancer patients.

  10. Printing Functional 3D Microdevices by Laser-Induced Forward Transfer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Pohl, Ralph; Qi, Lehua; Römer, Gert-Willem; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Visser, Claas Willem

    2017-03-01

    Slender, out-of-plane metal microdevices are made in a new spatial domain, by using laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) of metals. Here, a thermocouple with a thickness of 10 µm and a height of 250 µm, consisting of platinum and gold pillars is demonstrated. Multimaterial LIFT enables manufacturing in the micrometer to millimeter range, i.e., between lithography and other 3D printing technologies.

  11. Transfer of learning between 2D and 3D sources during infancy: Informing theory and practice

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The ability to transfer learning across contexts is an adaptive skill that develops rapidly during early childhood. Learning from television is a specific instance of transfer of learning between a 2-Dimensional (2D) representation and a 3-Dimensional (3D) object. Understanding the conditions under which young children might accomplish this particular kind of transfer is important because by 2 years of age 90% of US children are viewing television on a daily basis. Recent research shows that children can imitate actions presented on television using the corresponding real-world objects, but this same research also shows that children learn less from television than they do from live demonstrations until they are at least 3 years old; termed the video deficit effect. At present, there is no coherent theory to account for the video deficit effect; how learning is disrupted by this change in context is poorly understood. The aims of the present review are (1) to review the conditions under which children transfer learning between 2D images and 3D objects during early childhood, and (2) to integrate developmental theories of memory processing into the transfer of learning from media literature using Hayne’s (2004) developmental representational flexibility account. The review will conclude that studies on the transfer of learning between 2D and 3D sources have important theoretical implications for general developmental theories of cognitive development, and in particular the development of a flexible representational system, as well as policy implications for early education regarding the potential use and limitations of media as effective teaching tools during early childhood. PMID:20563302

  12. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-D Cultures After Charged Particle Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Kidane, Yared H.; Huff, Janice L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluated the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Current risk models for assessment of space radiation-induced cancer have large uncertainties because the models for adverse health effects following radiation exposure are founded on epidemiological analyses of human populations exposed to low-LET radiation. Reducing these uncertainties requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. In order to better quantify these radiation quality effects in biological systems, we are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models for space radiation research. These models hold promise for risk assessment as they provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information.

  13. Fast 3D Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) Imaging of the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, He; Jones, Craig K.; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Barker, Peter B.; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2010-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI can detect low-concentration compounds with exchangeable protons through saturation transfer to water. CEST imaging is generally slow, as it requires acquisition of saturation images at multiple frequencies. In addition, multi-slice imaging is complicated by saturation effects differing from slice to slice because of relaxation losses. In this study, a fast three-dimensional (3D) CEST imaging sequence is presented that allows whole-brain coverage for a frequency-dependent saturation spectrum (z-spectrum, 26 frequencies) in less than 10 min. The approach employs a 3D gradient- and spin-echo (GRASE) readout using a prototype 32-channel phased-array coil, combined with two-dimensional SENSE accelerations. Results from a homogenous protein-containing phantom at 3T show that the sequence produced a uniform contrast across all slices. To show translational feasibility, scans were also performed on five healthy human subjects. Results for CEST images at 3.5ppm downfield of the water resonance, so-called amide proton transfer (APT) images, show that lipid signals are sufficiently suppressed and artifacts caused by B0 inhomogeneity can be removed in post-processing. The scan time and image quality of these in vivo results show that 3D CEST MRI using GRASE acquisition is feasible for whole-brain CEST studies at 3T in a clinical time frame. PMID:20632402

  14. Real-time 3D radiation risk assessment supporting simulation of work in nuclear environments.

    PubMed

    Szőke, I; Louka, M N; Bryntesen, T R; Bratteli, J; Edvardsen, S T; RøEitrheim, K K; Bodor, K

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the latest developments at the Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) in Norway, in the field of real-time 3D (three-dimensional) radiation risk assessment for the support of work simulation in nuclear environments. 3D computer simulation can greatly facilitate efficient work planning, briefing, and training of workers. It can also support communication within and between work teams, and with advisors, regulators, the media and public, at all the stages of a nuclear installation's lifecycle. Furthermore, it is also a beneficial tool for reviewing current work practices in order to identify possible gaps in procedures, as well as to support the updating of international recommendations, dissemination of experience, and education of the current and future generation of workers.IFE has been involved in research and development into the application of 3D computer simulation and virtual reality (VR) technology to support work in radiological environments in the nuclear sector since the mid 1990s. During this process, two significant software tools have been developed, the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, and a number of publications have been produced to contribute to improving the safety culture in the nuclear industry.This paper describes the radiation risk assessment techniques applied in earlier versions of the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, for visualising radiation fields and calculating dose, and presents new developments towards implementing a flexible and up-to-date dosimetric package in these 3D software tools, based on new developments in the field of radiation protection. The latest versions of these 3D tools are capable of more accurate risk estimation, permit more flexibility via a range of user choices, and are applicable to a wider range of irradiation situations than their predecessors.

  15. Scripting in Radiation Therapy: An Automatic 3D Beam-Naming System

    SciTech Connect

    Holdsworth, Clay; Hummel-Kramer, Sharon M.; Phillips, Mark

    2011-10-01

    Scripts can be executed within the radiation treatment planning software framework to reduce human error, increase treatment planning efficiency, reduce confusion, and promote consistency within an institution or even among institutions. Scripting is versatile, and one application is an automatic 3D beam-naming system that describes the position of the beam relative to the patient in 3D space. The naming system meets the need for nomenclature that is conducive for clear and accurate communication of beam entry relative to patient anatomy. In radiation oncology in particular, where miscommunication can cause significant harm to patients, a system that minimizes error is essential. Frequent sharing of radiation treatment information occurs not only among members within a department but also between different treatment centers. Descriptions of treatment beams are perhaps the most commonly shared information about a patient's course of treatment in radiation oncology. Automating the naming system by the use of a script reduces the potential for human error, improves efficiency, enforces consistency, and would allow an institution to convert to a new naming system with greater ease. This script has been implemented in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Washington Medical Center since December 2009. It is currently part of the dosimetry protocol and is accessible by medical dosimetrists, radiation oncologists, and medical physicists. This paper highlights the advantages of using an automatic 3D beam-naming script to flawlessly and quickly identify treatment beams with unique names. Scripting in radiation treatment planning software has many uses and great potential for improving clinical care.

  16. SU-C-213-03: Custom 3D Printed Boluses for Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, B; Yang, M; Yan, Y; Rahimi, A; Chopra, R; Jiang, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a clinical workflow and to commission the process of creating custom 3d printed boluses for radiation therapy. Methods: We designed a workflow to create custom boluses using a commercial 3D printer. Contours of several patients were deformably mapped to phantoms where the test bolus contours were designed. Treatment plans were created on the phantoms following our institutional planning guideline. The DICOM file of the bolus contours were then converted to stereoLithography (stl) file for the 3d printer. The boluses were printed on a commercial 3D printer using polylactic acid (PLA) material. Custom printing parameters were optimized in order to meet the requirement of bolus composition. The workflow was tested on multiple anatomical sites such as skull, nose and chest wall. The size of boluses varies from 6×9cm2 to 12×25cm2. To commission the process, basic CT and dose properties of the printing materials were measured in photon and electron beams and compared against water and soft superflab bolus. Phantoms were then scanned to confirm the placement of custom boluses. Finally dose distributions with rescanned CTs were compared with those computer-generated boluses. Results: The relative electron density(1.08±0.006) of the printed boluses resemble those of liquid tap water(1.04±0.004). The dosimetric properties resemble those of liquid tap water(1.04±0.004). The dosimetric properties were measured at dmax with an ion chamber in electron and photon open beams. Compared with solid water and soft bolus, the output difference was within 1% for the 3D printer material. The printed boluses fit well to the phantom surfaces on CT scans. The dose distribution and DVH based on the printed boluses match well with those based on TPS generated boluses. Conclusion: 3d printing provides a cost effective and convenient solution for patient-specific boluses in radiation therapy.

  17. 3D Radiation Nonideal Magnetohydrodynamical Simulations of the Inner Rim in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, M.; Fromang, S.; Turner, N. J.; Benisty, M.

    2017-02-01

    Many planets orbit within 1 au of their stars, raising questions about their origins. Particularly puzzling are the planets found near the silicate sublimation front. We investigate conditions near the front in the protostellar disk around a young intermediate-mass star, using the first global 3D radiation nonideal MHD simulations in this context. We treat the starlight heating; the silicate grains’ sublimation and deposition at the local, time-varying temperature and density; temperature-dependent ohmic dissipation; and various initial magnetic fields. The results show magnetorotational turbulence around the sublimation front at 0.5 au. The disk interior to 0.8 au is turbulent, with velocities exceeding 10% of the sound speed. Beyond 0.8 au is the dead zone, cooler than 1000 K and with turbulence orders of magnitude weaker. A local pressure maximum just inside the dead zone concentrates solid particles, favoring their growth. Over many orbits, a vortex develops at the dead zone’s inner edge, increasing the disk’s thickness locally by around 10%. We synthetically observe the results using Monte Carlo transfer calculations, finding that the sublimation front is near-infrared bright. The models with net vertical magnetic fields develop extended, magnetically supported atmospheres that reprocess extra starlight, raising the near-infrared flux 20%. The vortex throws a nonaxisymmetric shadow on the outer disk. At wavelengths > 2 μ {{m}}, the flux varies several percent on monthly timescales. The variations are more regular when the vortex is present. The vortex is directly visible as an arc at ultraviolet through near-infrared wavelengths, given sub-au spatial resolution.

  18. Chemically tuned linear energy transfer dependent quenching in a deformable, radiochromic 3D dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høye, Ellen Marie; Skyt, Peter S.; Balling, Peter; Muren, Ludvig P.; Taasti, Vicki T.; Swakoń, Jan; Mierzwińska, Gabriela; Rydygier, Marzena; Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen B. B.

    2017-02-01

    Most solid-state detectors, including 3D dosimeters, show lower signal in the Bragg peak than expected, a process termed quenching. The purpose of this study was to investigate how variation in chemical composition of a recently developed radiochromic, silicone-based 3D dosimeter influences the observed quenching in proton beams. The dependency of dose response on linear energy transfer, as calculated through Monte Carlo simulations of the dosimeter, was investigated in 60 MeV proton beams. We found that the amount of quenching varied with the chemical composition: peak-to-plateau ratios (1 cm into the plateau) ranged from 2.2 to 3.4, compared to 4.3 using an ionization chamber. The dose response, and thereby the quenching, was predominantly influenced by the curing agent concentration, which determined the dosimeter’s deformation properties. The dose response was found to be linear at all depths. All chemical compositions of the dosimeter showed dose-rate dependency; however this was not dependent on the linear energy transfer. Track-structure theory was used to explain the observed quenching effects. In conclusion, this study shows that the silicone-based dosimeter has potential for use in measuring 3D-dose-distributions from proton beams.

  19. Fast and slow radiation-driven wind solutions using ZEUS-3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, I.; Curé, M.; ud-Doula, A.; Santillán, A.

    2014-10-01

    Currently, the theory of radiation-driven winds of massive stars possess three known solutions for the velocity and density profiles of the stellar winds, namely: the fast, Ω -slow and δ -slow solutions. In order to confirm their stability we use a time-dependent numerical hydrodynamic code called ZEUS-3D, and then we compare their results with the stationary solutions from our numerical hydrodynamic code. ZEUS-3D needs an initial trial solution to start to integrate, for this we use the stationary solution (from our code) or a β-law for the velocity field. In both cases we obtain the same results. Fast and both slow stationary solutions are attained in ZEUS-3D and are all stable. Furthermore, there is a very good agreement with the velocity and density fields from ZEUS-3D and our code, having differences between the terminal velocities lower than 3%. In addition, we found that ZEUS-3D is very sensitive to the boundary conditions (base density and velocity profile), in some cases we obtain kinks in the velocity profiles, similar to the ones obtained by Madura et al. (2007) for stars with high rotation. Such kinks are most likely the result of the wind being mass overloaded, but further investigation is needed to understand its nature better. Currently, we are exploring the effects of small perturbation at the base of the wind in order to study possible transitions or oscillations between δ-slow and fast solutions.

  20. The history and principles of chemical dosimetry for 3-D radiation fields: gels, polymers and plastics.

    PubMed

    Doran, Simon J

    2009-03-01

    Over recent decades, modern protocols of external beam radiotherapy have been developed that involve very steep dose gradients and are thus extremely sensitive to errors in treatment delivery. A recent credentialling study by the Radiological Physics Center at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (Texas, USA) has noted potentially significant inaccuracies in test treatments at a variety of institutions. 3-D radiation dosimetry (often referred to as "gel dosimetry") may have an important role in commissioning new treatment protocols, to help prevent this type of error. This article discusses the various techniques of 3-D radiation dosimetry, with a focus on the types of radiosensitive samples used and on the optical computed tomography readout technique.

  1. High resolution 3D dosimetry for microbeam radiation therapy using optical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McErlean, C.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Adamovics, J.; Leach, M. O.; Doran, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    Optical Computed Tomography (CT) is a promising technique for dosimetry of Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT), providing high resolution 3D dose maps. Here different MRT irradiation geometries are visualised showing the potential of Optical CT as a tool for future MRT trials. The Peak-to-Valley dose ratio (PVDR) is calculated to be 7 at a depth of 3mm in the radiochromic dosimeter PRESAGE®. This is significantly lower than predicted values and possible reasons for this are discussed.

  2. Gamma Radiation Induces Micronucleated Reticulocytes in 3-D Bone Marrow Bioreactors in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongliang; Dertinger, Stephen D.; Hyrien, Ollivier; David Wu, J. H.; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2009-01-01

    Radiation injury to the bone marrow is potentially lethal due to the potent DNA-damaging effects on cells of the hematopoietic system, including bone marrow stem cell, progenitor, and the precursor cell populations. Investigation of radiation genotoxic effects on bone marrow progenitor/precursor cells has been challenged by the lack of optimal in vitro surrogate organ culture systems, and the overall difficulty to sustain lineage-specific proliferation and differentiation of hematopoiesis in vitro. We report the investigation of radiation genotoxic effects in bone marrow cultures of C57Bl/6 mice established in 3-D bioreactors, which sustain long-term bone marrow cultures. For these studies, genotoxicity is measured by the induction of micronucleated reticulocytes (MN-RET). The kinetics and dose-response relationship of MN-RET induction in response to gamma-radiation of bioreactor-maintained bone marrow cultures are presented. Our data showed that 3-D long-term bone marrow cultures had sustained erythropoiesis capable of generating reticulocytes up to 8 weeks. The peak time-interval of viable cell output and percentage of reticulocytes increased steadily and reached the initial peak between the 14th to 21st days after inoculations. This was followed by a rebound or staying relatively constant until week 8. The percentage of MN-RET reached the maximum between 24 and 32 hours post 1 Gy gamma-ray. There was a near linear MN-RET induction by gamma radiation from 0 Gy to 1.0 Gy, followed by an attenuated increase to 1.5 – 2.0 Gy. The MN-RET response showed a downtrend beyond 2 Gy. Our data suggest that bone marrow culture in the 3-D bioreactor may be a useful organ culture system for the investigation of radiation genotoxic effect in vitro. PMID:19786117

  3. LRAT: Lightning Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phanord, Dieudonne D.

    1993-01-01

    In this report, we extend to cloud physics the work done for single and multiple scattering of electromagnetic waves. We consider the scattering of light, visible or infrared, by a spherical cloud represented by a statistically homogeneous ensemble of configurations of N identical spherical water droplets whose centers are uniformly distributed in its volume V. The ensemble is specified by the average number rho of scatterers in unit volume and by rho f(R) with f(R) as the distribution function for separations R of pairs. The incident light, vector-phi(sub 0) a plane electromagnetic wave with harmonic time dependence, is from outside the cloud. The propagation parameter kappa(sub 0) and the index of refraction eta(sub 0) determine physically the medium outside the distribution of scatterers. We solve the interior problem separately to obtain the bulk parameters for the scatterer equivalent to the ensemble of spherical droplets. With the interior solution or the equivalent medium approach, the multiple scattering problem is reduced to that of an equivalent single scatterer excited from outside illumination. A dispersion relation which determines the bulk propagation parameter K and the bulk index of refraction eta of the cloud is given in terms of the vector equivalent scattering amplitude vector-G and the dyadic scattering amplitude tilde-g of the single object in isolation. Based on this transfer model we will have the ability to consider clouds composed of inhomogeneous distribution of water and/or ice particles and we will be able to take into account particle size distributions within the cloud. We will also be able to study the effects of cloud composition (i.e., particle shape, size, composition, orientation, location) on the polarization of the single or the multiple scattered waves. Finally, this study will provide a new starting point for studying the problem of lightning radiative transfer.

  4. New 3D Silicon detectors for dosimetry in Microbeam Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerch, M. L. F.; Dipuglia, A.; Cameron, M.; Fournier, P.; Davis, J.; Petasecca, M.; Cornelius, I.; Perevertaylo, V.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) involves the use of a spatially fractionated beam of synchrotron generated X-rays to treat tumours. MRT treatment is delivered via an array of high dose ‘peaks’ separated by low dose ‘valleys’. A good Peak to Valley Dose Ratio (PVDR) is an important indicator of successful treatment outcomes. MRT dosimetry requires a radiation hard detector with high spatial resolution, large dynamic range, which is ideally real-time and tissue equivalent. We have developed a Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) and very recently, a new 3D MESA SSD to meet the very stringent requirements of MRT dosimetry. We have compared these detectors through the characterisation of the MRT radiation field at the Australian Synchrotron Imaging and Medical Beamline. The EPI SSD was able to measure the microbeam profiles and PVDRs, however the effective spatial resolution was limited by the detector alignment options available at the time. The geometry of the new 3D MESA SSD is less sensitive to this alignment restriction was able to measure the microbeam profiles within 2 μm of that expected. The 3D MESA SSD measured PVDRs were possibly affected by undesired and slow charge collection outside the sensitive volume and additional scattering from the device substrate.

  5. A range/depth modulation transfer function (RMTF) framework for characterizing 3D imaging LADAR performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staple, Bevan; Earhart, R. P.; Slaymaker, Philip A.; Drouillard, Thomas F., II; Mahony, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    3D imaging LADARs have emerged as the key technology for producing high-resolution imagery of targets in 3-dimensions (X and Y spatial, and Z in the range/depth dimension). Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. continues to make significant investments in this technology to enable critical NASA, Department of Defense, and national security missions. As a consequence of rapid technology developments, two issues have emerged that need resolution. First, the terminology used to rate LADAR performance (e.g., range resolution) is inconsistently defined, is improperly used, and thus has become misleading. Second, the terminology does not include a metric of the system"s ability to resolve the 3D depth features of targets. These two issues create confusion when translating customer requirements into hardware. This paper presents a candidate framework for addressing these issues. To address the consistency issue, the framework utilizes only those terminologies proposed and tested by leading LADAR research and standards institutions. We also provide suggestions for strengthening these definitions by linking them to the well-known Rayleigh criterion extended into the range dimension. To address the inadequate 3D image quality metrics, the framework introduces the concept of a Range/Depth Modulation Transfer Function (RMTF). The RMTF measures the impact of the spatial frequencies of a 3D target on its measured modulation in range/depth. It is determined using a new, Range-Based, Slanted Knife-Edge test. We present simulated results for two LADAR pulse detection techniques and compare them to a baseline centroid technique. Consistency in terminology plus a 3D image quality metric enable improved system standardization.

  6. 3D ultrasound Nakagami imaging for radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Shelton, Joseph; Bruner, Debrorah; Tridandapani, Srini; Liu, Tian

    2014-03-01

    Radiation-induced vaginal fibrosis is a debilitating side-effect affecting up to 80% of women receiving radiotherapy for their gynecological (GYN) malignancies. Despite the significant incidence and severity, little research has been conducted to identify the pathophysiologic changes of vaginal toxicity. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that ultrasound Nakagami shape and PDF parameters can be used to quantify radiation-induced vaginal toxicity. These Nakagami parameters are derived from the statistics of ultrasound backscattered signals to capture the physical properties (e.g., arrangement and distribution) of the biological tissues. In this paper, we propose to expand this Nakagami imaging concept from 2D to 3D to fully characterize radiation-induced changes to the vaginal wall within the radiation treatment field. A pilot study with 5 post-radiotherapy GYN patients was conducted using a clinical ultrasound scanner (6 MHz) with a mechanical stepper. A serial of 2D ultrasound images, with radio-frequency (RF) signals, were acquired at 1 mm step size. The 2D Nakagami shape and PDF parameters were calculated from the RF signal envelope with a sliding window, and then 3D Nakagami parameter images were generated from the parallel 2D images. This imaging method may be useful as we try to monitor radiation-induced vaginal injury, and address vaginal toxicities and sexual dysfunction in women after radiotherapy for GYN malignancies.

  7. Computation of Solar Radiative Fluxes by 1D and 3D Methods Using Cloudy Atmospheres Inferred from A-train Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Howard W.; Kato, Serji; Wehr, T.

    2012-01-01

    The main point of this study was to use realistic representations of cloudy atmospheres to assess errors in solar flux estimates associated with 1D radiative transfer models. A scene construction algorithm, developed for the EarthCARE satellite mission, was applied to CloudSat, CALIPSO, and MODIS satellite data thus producing 3D cloudy atmospheres measuring 60 km wide by 13,000 km long at 1 km grid-spacing. Broadband solar fluxes and radiances for each (1 km)2 column where then produced by a Monte Carlo photon transfer model run in both full 3D and independent column approximation mode (i.e., a 1D model).

  8. Heat Transfer Affected by Transverse Magnetic Field using 3D Modeling of Arc Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Tatsuro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-10-01

    Gas shielded metal arc welding is used to join the various metal because this is the high quality joining technology. Thus, this welding is used for a welding of large buildings such as bridges and LNG tanks. However, the welding defect caused by the heat transfer decrement may occur with increasing the wind velocity. This is because that the convection loss increases because the arc deflects to leeward side with increasing the wind velocity. In order to prevent from the arc deflection, it is used that the transverse magnetic field is applied to the arc. However, the arc deflection occurs with increasing the transverse magnetic field excessively. The energy balance of the arc is changed with increasing the convection loss caused by the arc deflection, and the heat transfer to the anode decreases. Therefore, the analysis including the arc and anode is necessary to elucidate the heat transfer to the anode. In this paper, the heat transfer affected by the transverse magnetic field using 3D modeling of the arc plasma is elucidated. The heat transfer to the anode is calculated by using the EMTF(electromagnetic thermal fluid) simulation with increasing the transverse magnetic field. As a result, the heat transfer decreased with increasing the transverse magnetic field.

  9. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry (IC3DDose)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thwaites, David; Baldock, Clive

    2013-06-01

    IC3DDose 2013, the 7th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry held in Sydney, Australia from 4-8 November 2012, grew out of the DosGel series, which began as DosGel99, the 1st International Workshop on Radiation Therapy Gel Dosimetry in Lexington, Kentucky. Since 1999 subsequent DoSGel conferences were held in Brisbane, Australia (2001), Ghent, Belgium (2004), Sherbrooke, Canada (2006) and Crete, Greece (2008). In 2010 the conference was held on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina and underwent a name-change to IC3DDose. The aim of the first workshop was to bring together individuals, both researchers and users, with an interest in 3D radiation dosimetry techniques, with a mix of presentations from basic science to clinical applications, which has remained an objective for all of the meetings. One rationale of DosGel99 was stated as supporting the increasing clinical implementation of gel dosimetry, as the technique appeared, at that time, to be leaving the laboratories of gel dosimetry enthusiasts and entering clinical practice. Clearly by labelling the first workshop as the 1st, there was a vision of a continuing series, which has been fulfilled. On the other hand, the expectation of widespread clinical use of gel dosimetry has perhaps not been what was hoped for and anticipated. Nevertheless the rapidly increasing demand for advanced high-precision 3D radiotherapy technology and techniques has continued apace. The need for practical and accurate 3D dosimetry methods for development and quality assurance has only increased. By the 6th meeting, held in South Carolina in 2010, the Conference Scientific Committee recognised the wider developments in 3D systems and methods and decided to widen the scope, whilst keeping the same span from basic science to applications. This was signalled by a change of name from 'Dosgel' to 'IC3DDose', a name that has continued to this latest conference. The conference objectives were: to enhance the quality and accuracy of

  10. Melanin Transfer in Human 3D Skin Equivalents Generated Exclusively from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gledhill, Karl; Guo, Zongyou; Umegaki-Arao, Noriko; Higgins, Claire A.; Itoh, Munenari; Christiano, Angela M.

    2015-01-01

    The current utility of 3D skin equivalents is limited by the fact that existing models fail to recapitulate the cellular complexity of human skin. They often contain few cell types and no appendages, in part because many cells found in the skin are difficult to isolate from intact tissue and cannot be expanded in culture. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) present an avenue by which we can overcome this issue due to their ability to be differentiated into multiple cell types in the body and their unlimited growth potential. We previously reported generation of the first human 3D skin equivalents from iPSC-derived fibroblasts and iPSC-derived keratinocytes, demonstrating that iPSCs can provide a foundation for modeling a complex human organ such as skin. Here, we have increased the complexity of this model by including additional iPSC-derived melanocytes. Epidermal melanocytes, which are largely responsible for skin pigmentation, represent the second most numerous cell type found in normal human epidermis and as such represent a logical next addition. We report efficient melanin production from iPSC-derived melanocytes and transfer within an entirely iPSC-derived epidermal-melanin unit and generation of the first functional human 3D skin equivalents made from iPSC-derived fibroblasts, keratinocytes and melanocytes. PMID:26308443

  11. 3D histomorphometric quantification of trabecular bones by computed microtomography using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, L P; Braz, D; Barroso, R C; Oliveira, L F; Pinheiro, C J G; Dreossi, D; Tromba, G

    2010-12-01

    Conventional bone histomorphometry is an important method for quantitative evaluation of bone microstructure. X-ray computed microtomography is a non-invasive technique, which can be used to evaluate histomorphometric indices in trabecular bones (BV/TV, BS/BV, Tb.N, Tb.Th, Tb.Sp). In this technique, 3D images are used to quantify the whole sample, differently from the conventional one, in which the quantification is performed in 2D slices and extrapolated for 3D case. In this work, histomorphometric quantification using synchrotron 3D X-ray computed microtomography was performed to quantify the bone structure at different skeletal sites as well as to investigate the effects of bone diseases on quantitative understanding of bone architecture. The images were obtained at Synchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) beamline, at ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility, Italy. Concerning the obtained results for normal and pathological bones from same skeletal sites and individuals, from our results, a certain declining bone volume fraction was achieved. The results obtained could be used in forming the basis for comparison of the bone microarchitecture and can be a valuable tool for predicting bone fragility.

  12. 4D VMAT, gated VMAT, and 3D VMAT for stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, E.; Loewen, S. K.; Nichol, A.; Otto, K.

    2013-02-01

    Four-dimensional volumetric modulated arc therapy (4D VMAT) is a treatment strategy for lung cancers that aims to exploit relative target and tissue motion to improve organ at risk (OAR) sparing. The algorithm incorporates the entire patient respiratory cycle using 4D CT data into the optimization process. Resulting treatment plans synchronize the delivery of each beam aperture to a specific phase of target motion. Stereotactic body radiation therapy treatment plans for 4D VMAT, gated VMAT, and 3D VMAT were generated on three patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Tumour motion ranged from 1.4-3.4 cm. The dose and fractionation scheme was 48 Gy in four fractions. A B-spline transformation model registered the 4D CT images. 4D dose volume histograms (4D DVH) were calculated from total dose accumulated at the maximum exhalation. For the majority of OARs, gated VMAT achieved the most radiation sparing but treatment times were 77-148% longer than 3D VMAT. 4D VMAT plan qualities were comparable to gated VMAT, but treatment times were only 11-25% longer than 3D VMAT. 4D VMAT's improvement of healthy tissue sparing can allow for further dose escalation. Future study could potentially adapt 4D VMAT to irregular patient breathing patterns.

  13. 3D modelling of coupled mass and heat transfer of a convection-oven roasting process.

    PubMed

    Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Gernaey, Krist V; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2013-04-01

    A 3D mathematical model of coupled heat and mass transfer describing oven roasting of meat has been developed from first principles. The proposed mechanism for the mass transfer of water is modified and based on a critical literature review of the effect of heat on meat. The model equations are based on a conservation of mass and energy, coupled through Darcy's equations of porous media - the water flow is mainly pressure-driven. The developed model together with theoretical and experimental assessments were used to explain the heat and water transport and the effect of the change in microstructure (permeability, water binding capacity and elastic modulus) that occur during the meat roasting process. The developed coupled partial differential equations were solved by using COMSOL Multiphysics®3.5 and state variables are predicted as functions of both position and time. The proposed mechanism was partially validated by experiments in a convection oven where temperatures were measured online.

  14. 3-D joint inversion of the magnetotelluric phase tensor and vertical magnetic transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tietze, Kristina; Ritter, Oliver; Egbert, Gary D.

    2015-11-01

    With advancing computational resources, 3-D inversion techniques have become feasible in recent years and are now a more widely used tool for magnetotelluric (MT) data interpretation. Galvanic distortion caused by small-scale near-surface inhomogeneities remains an obstacle for 3-D MT inversion which so far has experienced little attention. If not considered properly, the effect on 3-D inversion can be immense and result in erroneous subsurface models and interpretations. To tackle the problem we implemented inversion of the distortion-free phase tensor into the ModEM inversion package. The dimensionless phase tensor components describe only variations of the conductivity structure. When inverting these data, particular care has to be taken of the conductivity structure in the a priori model, which provides the reference frame when transferring the information from phase tensors into absolute conductivity values. Our results obtained with synthetic data show that phase tensor inversion can recover the regional conductivity structure in presence of galvanic distortion if the a priori model provides a reasonable assumption for the regional resistivity average. Joint inversion of phase tensor data and vertical magnetic transfer functions improves recovery of the absolute resistivity structure and is less dependent on the prior model. We also used phase tensor inversion for a data set of more than 250 MT sites from the central San Andreas fault, California, where a number of sites showed significant galvanic distortion. We find the regional structure of the phase tensor inversion results compatible with previously obtained models from impedance inversion. In the vicinity of distorted sites, phase tensor inversion models exhibit more homogeneous/smoother conductivity structures.

  15. Cationized pullulan 3D matrices as new materials for gene transfer.

    PubMed

    San Juan, Aurélie; Hlawaty, Hanna; Chaubet, Frédéric; Letourneur, Didier; Feldman, Laurent J

    2007-08-01

    This study deals with the development of a novel biocompatible cationized pullulan three-dimensional matrix for gene delivery. A water-soluble cationic polysaccharide, diethylaminoethyl-pullulan (DEAE-pullulan), was first synthesized and characterized. Fluorescence quenching and gel retardation assays evidenced the complexation in solution of DNA with DEAE-pullulan, but not with neutral pullulan. On cultured smooth muscle cells (SMCs) incubated with DEAE-pullulan and a plasmid vector expressing a secreted form of alkaline phosphatase (pSEAP), SEAP activity was 150-fold higher than with pSEAP alone or pSEAP with neutral pullulan. DEAE-pullulan was then chemically crosslinked using phosphorus oxychloride. The resulting matrices were obtained in less than a minute and molded as discs of 12 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness. Such DEAE-pullulan 3D matrices were loaded with up to 50 microg of plasmid DNA, with a homogeneous plasmid loading observed with YOYO-1 fluorescence staining. Moreover, the DEAE-pullulan matrix was shown to protect pSEAP from DNase I degradation. Incubation of cultured SMCs with pSEAP-loaded DEAE-pullulan matrices resulted in significant gene transfer without cell toxicity. This study suggests that these cationized pullulan 3D matrices could be useful biomaterials for local gene transfer.

  16. PREFACE: 8th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry (IC3DDose)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Lars E.; Bäck, S.; Ceberg, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    IC3DDose 2014, the 8th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry was held in Ystad, Sweden, from 4-7 September 2014. This grew out of the DosGel series, which began as DosGel99, the 1st International Workshop on Radiation Therapy Gel Dosimetry in Lexington, Kentucky. Since 1999 subsequent DoSGel conferences were held in Brisbane, Australia (2001), Ghent, Belgium (2004), Sherbrooke, Canada (2006) and Crete, Greece (2008). In 2010 the conference was held on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina and underwent a name-change to IC3DDose. The 7th and last meeting was held in Sydney, Australia from 4-8 November 2012. It is worth remembering that the conference series started at the very beginning of the intensity modulated radiotherapy era and that the dosimeters being developed then were, to some extent, ahead of the clinical need of radiotherapy. However, since then the technical developments in radiation therapy have been dramatic, with dynamic treatments, including tracking, gating and volumetric modulated arc therapy, widely introduced in the clinic with the need for 3D dosimetry thus endless. This was also reflected by the contributions at the meeting in Ystad. Accordingly the scope of the meeting has also broadened to IC3DDOSE - I See Three-Dimensional Dose. A multitude of dosimetry techniques and radiation detectors are now represented, all with the common denominator: three-dimensional or 3D. Additionally, quality assurance (QA) procedures and other aspects of clinical dosimetry are represented. The implementation of new dosimetric techniques in radiotherapy is a process that needs every kind of caution, carefulness and thorough validation. Therefore, the clinical needs, reformulated as the aims for IC3DDOSE - I See Three-Dimensional Dose, are: • Enhance the quality and accuracy of radiation therapy treatments through improved clinical dosimetry. • Investigate and understand the dosimetric challenges of modern radiation treatment techniques. • Provide

  17. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Allison; de Bever, Josh; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  18. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Allison; Bever, Josh de; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  19. Evaluation of a 3D diamond detector for medical radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanxheri, K.; Servoli, L.; Oh, A.; Munoz Sanchez, F.; Forcolin, G. T.; Murphy, S. A.; Aitkenhead, A.; Moore, C. J.; Morozzi, A.; Passeri, D.; Bellini, M.; Corsi, C.; Lagomarsino, S.; Sciortino, S.

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic diamond has several properties that are particularly suited to applications in medical radiation dosimetry. It is tissue equivalent, not toxic and shows a high resistance to radiation damage, low leakage current and stability of response. It is an electrical insulator, robust and realizable in small size; due to these features there are several examples of diamond devices, mainly planar single-crystalline chemical vapor depositation (sCVD) diamond, used for relative dose measurement in photon beams. Thanks to a new emerging technology, diamond devices with 3-dimensional structures are produced by using laser pulses to create graphitic paths in the diamond bulk. The necessary bias voltage to operate such detector decreases considerably while the signal response and radiation resistance increase. In order to evaluate the suitability of this new technology for measuring the dose delivered by radiotherapy beams in oncology a 3D polycrystalline (pCVD) diamond detector designed for single charged particle detection has been tested and the photon beam profile has been studied. The good linearity and high sensitivity to the dose observed in the 3D diamond, opens the way to the possibility of realizing a finely segmented device with the potential for dose distribution measurement in a single exposure for small field dosimetry that nowadays is still extremely challenging.

  20. A 3-D liver segmentation method with parallel computing for selective internal radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Goryawala, Mohammed; Guillen, Magno R; Cabrerizo, Mercedes; Barreto, Armando; Gulec, Seza; Barot, Tushar C; Suthar, Rekha R; Bhatt, Ruchir N; Mcgoron, Anthony; Adjouadi, Malek

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a new 3-D liver segmentation method in support of the selective internal radiation treatment as a treatment for liver tumors. This 3-D segmentation is based on coupling a modified k-means segmentation method with a special localized contouring algorithm. In the segmentation process, five separate regions are identified on the computerized tomography image frames. The merit of the proposed method lays in its potential to provide fast and accurate liver segmentation and 3-D rendering as well as in delineating tumor region(s), all with minimal user interaction. Leveraging of multicore platforms is shown to speed up the processing of medical images considerably, making this method more suitable in clinical settings. Experiments were performed to assess the effect of parallelization using up to 442 slices. Empirical results, using a single workstation, show a reduction in processing time from 4.5 h to almost 1 h for a 78% gain. Most important is the accuracy achieved in estimating the volumes of the liver and tumor region(s), yielding an average error of less than 2% in volume estimation over volumes generated on the basis of the current manually guided segmentation processes. Results were assessed using the analysis of variance statistical analysis.

  1. Recent Developments in the VISRAD 3-D Target Design and Radiation Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfarlane, Joseph; Woodruff, P.; Golovkin, I.

    2011-10-01

    The 3-D view factor code VISRAD is widely used in designing HEDP experiments at major laser and pulsed-power facilities, including NIF, OMEGA, OMEGA-EP, ORION, Z, and PLX. It simulates target designs by generating a 3-D grid of surface elements, utilizing a variety of 3-D primitives and surface removal algorithms, and can be used to compute the radiation flux throughout the surface element grid by computing element-to-element view factors and solving power balance equations. Target set-up and beam pointing are facilitated by allowing users to specify positions and angular orientations using a variety of coordinates systems (e . g . , that of any laser beam, target component, or diagnostic port). Analytic modeling for laser beam spatial profiles for OMEGA DPPs and NIF CPPs is used to compute laser intensity profiles throughout the grid of surface elements. VISRAD includes a variety of user-friendly graphics for setting up targets and displaying results, can readily display views from any point in space, and can be used to generate image sequences for animations. We will discuss recent improvements to the software package and plans for future developments.

  2. Radiation Quality Effects on Transcriptome Profiles in 3-d Cultures After Particle Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Z. S.; Kidane, Y. H.; Huff, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the differential effects of low- and high-LET radiation on 3-D organotypic cultures in order to investigate radiation quality impacts on gene expression and cellular responses. Reducing uncertainties in current risk models requires new knowledge on the fundamental differences in biological responses (the so-called radiation quality effects) triggered by heavy ion particle radiation versus low-LET radiation associated with Earth-based exposures. We are utilizing novel 3-D organotypic human tissue models that provide a format for study of human cells within a realistic tissue framework, thereby bridging the gap between 2-D monolayer culture and animal models for risk extrapolation to humans. To identify biological pathway signatures unique to heavy ion particle exposure, functional gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) was used with whole transcriptome profiling. GSEA has been used extensively as a method to garner biological information in a variety of model systems but has not been commonly used to analyze radiation effects. It is a powerful approach for assessing the functional significance of radiation quality-dependent changes from datasets where the changes are subtle but broad, and where single gene based analysis using rankings of fold-change may not reveal important biological information. We identified 45 statistically significant gene sets at 0.05 q-value cutoff, including 14 gene sets common to gamma and titanium irradiation, 19 gene sets specific to gamma irradiation, and 12 titanium-specific gene sets. Common gene sets largely align with DNA damage, cell cycle, early immune response, and inflammatory cytokine pathway activation. The top gene set enriched for the gamma- and titanium-irradiated samples involved KRAS pathway activation and genes activated in TNF-treated cells, respectively. Another difference noted for the high-LET samples was an apparent enrichment in gene sets involved in cycle cycle/mitotic control. It is

  3. Radiative transfer dynamo effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munirov, Vadim R.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields in rotating and radiating astrophysical plasma can be produced due to a radiative interaction between plasma layers moving relative to each other. The efficiency of current drive, and with it the associated dynamo effect, is considered in a number of limits. It is shown here, however, that predictions for these generated magnetic fields can be significantly higher when kinetic effects, previously neglected, are taken into account.

  4. Radiative transfer dynamo effect

    DOE PAGES

    Munirov, Vadim R.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-01-17

    Here, magnetic fields in rotating and radiating astrophysical plasma can be produced due to a radiative interaction between plasma layers moving relative to each other. The efficiency of current drive, and with it the associated dynamo effect, is considered in a number of limits. It is shown here, however, that predictions for these generated magnetic fields can be significantly higher when kinetic effects, previously neglected, are taken into account.

  5. Displaying 3D radiation dose on endoscopic video for therapeutic assessment and surgical guidance.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jimmy; Hope, Andrew J; Cho, B C John; Sharpe, Michael B; Dickie, Colleen I; DaCosta, Ralph S; Jaffray, David A; Weersink, Robert A

    2012-10-21

    We have developed a method to register and display 3D parametric data, in particular radiation dose, on two-dimensional endoscopic images. This registration of radiation dose to endoscopic or optical imaging may be valuable in assessment of normal tissue response to radiation, and visualization of radiated tissues in patients receiving post-radiation surgery. Electromagnetic sensors embedded in a flexible endoscope were used to track the position and orientation of the endoscope allowing registration of 2D endoscopic images to CT volumetric images and radiation doses planned with respect to these images. A surface was rendered from the CT image based on the air/tissue threshold, creating a virtual endoscopic view analogous to the real endoscopic view. Radiation dose at the surface or at known depth below the surface was assigned to each segment of the virtual surface. Dose could be displayed as either a colorwash on this surface or surface isodose lines. By assigning transparency levels to each surface segment based on dose or isoline location, the virtual dose display was overlaid onto the real endoscope image. Spatial accuracy of the dose display was tested using a cylindrical phantom with a treatment plan created for the phantom that matched dose levels with grid lines on the phantom surface. The accuracy of the dose display in these phantoms was 0.8-0.99 mm. To demonstrate clinical feasibility of this approach, the dose display was also tested on clinical data of a patient with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy, with estimated display accuracy of ∼2-3 mm. The utility of the dose display for registration of radiation dose information to the surgical field was further demonstrated in a mock sarcoma case using a leg phantom. With direct overlay of radiation dose on endoscopic imaging, tissue toxicities and tumor response in endoluminal organs can be directly correlated with the actual tissue dose, offering a more nuanced assessment of normal tissue

  6. 3D visualization of HIV transfer at the virological synapse between dendritic cells and T cells

    PubMed Central

    Felts, Richard L.; Narayan, Kedar; Estes, Jacob D.; Shi, Dan; Trubey, Charles M.; Fu, Jing; Hartnell, Lisa M.; Ruthel, Gordon T.; Schneider, Douglas K.; Nagashima, Kunio; Bess, Julian W.; Bavari, Sina; Lowekamp, Bradley C.; Bliss, Donald; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2010-01-01

    The efficiency of HIV infection is greatly enhanced when the virus is delivered at conjugates between CD4+ T cells and virus-bearing antigen-presenting cells such as macrophages or dendritic cells via specialized structures known as virological synapses. Using ion abrasion SEM, electron tomography, and superresolution light microscopy, we have analyzed the spatial architecture of cell-cell contacts and distribution of HIV virions at virological synapses formed between mature dendritic cells and T cells. We demonstrate the striking envelopment of T cells by sheet-like membrane extensions derived from mature dendritic cells, resulting in a shielded region for formation of virological synapses. Within the synapse, filopodial extensions emanating from CD4+ T cells make contact with HIV virions sequestered deep within a 3D network of surface-accessible compartments in the dendritic cell. Viruses are detected at the membrane surfaces of both dendritic cells and T cells, but virions are not released passively at the synapse; instead, virus transfer requires the engagement of T-cell CD4 receptors. The relative seclusion of T cells from the extracellular milieu, the burial of the site of HIV transfer, and the receptor-dependent initiation of virion transfer by T cells highlight unique aspects of cell-cell HIV transmission. PMID:20624966

  7. Validation of Heat Transfer and Film Cooling Capabilities of the 3-D RANS Code TURBO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Ameri, Ali; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The capabilities of the 3-D unsteady RANS code TURBO have been extended to include heat transfer and film cooling applications. The results of simulations performed with the modified code are compared to experiment and to theory, where applicable. Wilcox s k-turbulence model has been implemented to close the RANS equations. Two simulations are conducted: (1) flow over a flat plate and (2) flow over an adiabatic flat plate cooled by one hole inclined at 35 to the free stream. For (1) agreement with theory is found to be excellent for heat transfer, represented by local Nusselt number, and quite good for momentum, as represented by the local skin friction coefficient. This report compares the local skin friction coefficients and Nusselt numbers on a flat plate obtained using Wilcox's k-model with the theory of Blasius. The study looks at laminar and turbulent flows over an adiabatic flat plate and over an isothermal flat plate for two different wall temperatures. It is shown that TURBO is able to accurately predict heat transfer on a flat plate. For (2) TURBO shows good qualitative agreement with film cooling experiments performed on a flat plate with one cooling hole. Quantitatively, film effectiveness is under predicted downstream of the hole.

  8. Monitoring of resin transfer in CFRP molding using 3D-DIC technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dingding; Arakawa, Kazuo; Uchino, Masakazu

    2014-06-01

    Vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) is a manufacturing process that is used to make large and complex composite structures. While promising, VARTM still suffers from relatively low fiber volume fractions and high void content in the final products. The infusion step of VARTM is very important, because the quality of the final product is usually decided by this process. Consequently, a comprehensive understanding of the infusion process is essential. In this study, a three-dimensional digital image correlation (3D-DIC) testing system was set up to research the entire infusion process through the monitor of the thickness change of the laminates in this process. Two distinct VARTM processes, with and without a rigid cover mold, were designed to be studied. The 3D-DIC technique proved to be a valid method that not only can monitor the thickness evolution of isolated points but also can give a full-field distribution of the thickness change of the laminate. The results showed that, without the use of a rigid cover mold, the stack of reinforcements initially shrank and then expanded as the resin filled the cavities before closing the inlet, while when using a rigid cover mold there was an additional expansion period before the shrinkage occurred. Such an expansion stage could promote the flow of the resin, shortening the infusion time.

  9. Microstructure analysis of the secondary pulmonary lobules by 3D synchrotron radiation CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Y.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Umetani, K.; Nakano, Y.; Ohmatsu, H.; Moriyama, N.; Itoh, H.

    2014-03-01

    Recognition of abnormalities related to the lobular anatomy has become increasingly important in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of lung abnormalities at clinical routines of CT examinations. This paper aims a 3-D microstructural analysis of the pulmonary acinus with isotropic spatial resolution in the range of several micrometers by using micro CT. Previously, we demonstrated the ability of synchrotron radiation micro CT (SRμCT) using offset scan mode in microstructural analysis of the whole part of the secondary pulmonary lobule. In this paper, we present a semiautomatic method to segment the acinar and subacinar airspaces from the secondary pulmonary lobule and to track small vessels running inside alveolar walls in human acinus imaged by the SRμCT. The method beains with and segmentation of the tissues such as pleural surface, interlobular septa, alveola wall, or vessel using a threshold technique and 3-D connected component analysis. 3-D air space are then conustructed separated by tissues and represented branching patterns of airways and airspaces distal to the terminal bronchiole. A graph-partitioning approach isolated acini whose stems are interactively defined as the terminal bronchiole in the secondary pulmonary lobule. Finally, we performed vessel tracking using a non-linear sate space which captures both smoothness of the trajectories and intensity coherence along vessel orientations. Results demonstrate that the proposed method can extract several acinar airspaces from the 3-D SRμCT image of secondary pulmonary lobule and that the extracted acinar airspace enable an accurate quantitative description of the anatomy of the human acinus for interpretation of the basic unit of pulmonary structure and function.

  10. Characterisation of PRESAGE: A new 3-D radiochromic solid polymer dosemeter for ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Adamovics, J; Maryanski, M J

    2006-01-01

    For the past 50 years there has been interest in developing 3-D dosemeters for ionising radiation. Particular emphasis has been put on those dosemeters that change their optical properties in proportion to the absorbed dose. Many of the dosemeters that have been evaluated have had limitations such as lack of transparency, diffusion of the image of the dose distribution or poor stability of baseline optical density. Many of these performance limitations have been overcome by the development of PRESAGE, an optically clear polyurethane-based radiochromic 3-D dosemeter. The solid PRESAGE dosemeter is formulated with a free radical initiator and a leuco dye and it does not require a container to maintain its shape. The polyurethane matrix is tissue equivalent and prevents the diffusion of the dose distribution image. There is a linear dose-response, which is independent of both photon energy and dose rate. Simple precautions such as preventing long-term exposure to additional ionising radiation including ultraviolet and controlling storage temperatures prevent the bleaching of the radiochromic response field within the irradiated dosemeter.

  11. Improved time-space method for 3-D heat transfer problems including global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, T.S.; Wakashima, Shinichiro

    1999-07-01

    In this paper, the Time-Space Method (TSM) which has been proposed for solving general heat transfer and fluid flow problems was improved in order to cover global and urban warming. The TSM is effective in almost all-transient heat transfer and fluid flow problems, and has been already applied to the 2-D melting problems (or moving boundary problems). The computer running time will be reduced to only 1/100th--1/1000th of the existing schemes for 2-D and 3-D problems. However, in order to apply to much larger-scale problems, for example, global warming, urban warming and general ocean circulation, the SOR method (or other iterative methods) in four dimensions is somewhat tedious and provokingly slow. Motivated by the above situation, the authors improved the speed of iteration of the previous TSM by introducing the following ideas: (1) Timewise chopping: Time domain is chopped into small peaches to save memory requirement; (2) Adaptive iteration: Converged region is eliminated for further iteration; (3) Internal selective iteration: Equation with slow iteration speed in iterative procedure is selectively iterated to accelerate entire convergence; and (4) False transient integration: False transient term is added to the Poisson-type equation and the relevant solution is regarded as a parabolic equation. By adopting the above improvements, the higher-order finite different schemes and the hybrid mesh, the computer running time for the TSM is reduced to some 1/4600th of the conventional explicit method for a typical 3-D natural convection problem in a closed cavity. The proposed TSM will be more efficacious for large-scale environmental problems, such as global warming, urban warming and general ocean circulation, in which a tremendous computing time would be required.

  12. Analysis of the radiative lifetime of Pr{sup 3+} d-f emission

    SciTech Connect

    Zych, Aleksander; Lange, Matthijs de; Mello Donega, Celso de; Meijerink, Andries

    2012-07-01

    The radiative lifetime of excited states is governed by Fermi's Golden Rule. For many applications, the radiative decay rate is an important parameter. For example, for scintillators materials in PET scanners, a short response time is crucial and it has been realized that the d-f emission of Pr{sup 3+} is faster than for the widely applied d-f emission from Ce{sup 3+}. In this paper, the radiative decay rate of d-f emission from Pr{sup 3+} is systematically investigated in a wide variety of host lattices, including scintillators materials. The variation in the decay rate is analyzed based on Fermi's Golden Rule. The trend observed is best described using a full cavity model to correct for local-field effects and a {lambda}{sup 3} factor to account for the energy of the transition. Still, there is a considerable scatter of the experimental data around the best fit to these data. The variation is explained by uncertainties in the refractive indices and a variation in the transition dipole moment of the d-f transition for Pr{sup 3+}. Based on the results, the shortest radiative lifetime that can be achieved for Pr{sup 3+} d-f emission is predicted to be {approx}6 ns.

  13. Radiation-induced second cancers: the impact of 3D-CRT and IMRT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Eric J.; Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2003-01-01

    Information concerning radiation-induced malignancies comes from the A-bomb survivors and from medically exposed individuals, including second cancers in radiation therapy patients. The A-bomb survivors show an excess incidence of carcinomas in tissues such as the gastrointestinal tract, breast, thyroid, and bladder, which is linear with dose up to about 2.5 Sv. There is great uncertainty concerning the dose-response relationship for radiation-induced carcinogenesis at higher doses. Some animal and human data suggest a decrease at higher doses, usually attributed to cell killing; other data suggest a plateau in dose. Radiotherapy patients also show an excess incidence of carcinomas, often in sites remote from the treatment fields; in addition there is an excess incidence of sarcomas in the heavily irradiated in-field tissues. The transition from conventional radiotherapy to three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) involves a reduction in the volume of normal tissues receiving a high dose, with an increase in dose to the target volume that includes the tumor and a limited amount of normal tissue. One might expect a decrease in the number of sarcomas induced and also (less certain) a small decrease in the number of carcinomas. All around, a good thing. By contrast, the move from 3D-CRT to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) involves more fields, and the dose-volume histograms show that, as a consequence, a larger volume of normal tissue is exposed to lower doses. In addition, the number of monitor units is increased by a factor of 2 to 3, increasing the total body exposure, due to leakage radiation. Both factors will tend to increase the risk of second cancers. Altogether, IMRT is likely to almost double the incidence of second malignancies compared with conventional radiotherapy from about 1% to 1.75% for patients surviving 10 years. The numbers may be larger for longer survival (or for younger patients), but the ratio should remain the same.

  14. The Secular Changes of the 3-D Profile of the Synchrotron Radiation around Jupiter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, D. E.; de Pater, I.; Sault, R. J.

    2000-10-01

    We present a summary of Jupiter data taken over a seventeen year span (1981-1998) by the Very Large Array at ~ 20.0 cm. At this wavelength the emission is dominated by synchrotron radiation, which is roughly proportional to the product of the electron number density and magnetic field strength (Ne B). At each epoch 8--12 hours of data were taken, which allowed us to examine Jupiter during an entire rotation period. We mapped the azimuthal structure of the synchrotron radiation by using a 3-D reconstruction techinique developed by Sault et al. (AA 324 1190--1196, 1997). We have applied this technique to all the data to produce plots of the latitude, radial distance, and peak intensity vs. Jovian longitude (System III). The results show a remarkable constancy of the shape of the synchrotron radiation and hence both the particle distribution and magnetic field. Throughout all epochs, the data show nearly the same latitudinal structure. Furthermore, the radial distance of the synchrotron radiation has generally remained the same in the 17-year span. As we expected, the only change appears to have been the intensity of the synchrotron radiation as a function of time. There are certain epochs (e.g. 1987) which seem clearly (though modestly) brighter than others (e.g. 1981, 1995) at all longitudes. Does this suggest a seasonal or other periodic effect on Jupiter? Also seen is an expected anti-correlation between the azimuthally averaged radial distance and azimuthally averaged peak intensity of the synchrotron radiation. We examine these trends by comparing the data to radial diffusion models. The data analysis and research has been supported by NASA grant NAG5-6890.

  15. HEROIC: 3D general relativistic radiative post-processor with comptonization for black hole accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Ramesh; Zhu, Yucong; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Saḑowski, Aleksander

    2016-03-01

    We describe Hybrid Evaluator for Radiative Objects Including Comptonization (HEROIC), an upgraded version of the relativistic radiative post-processor code HERO described in a previous paper, but which now Includes Comptonization. HEROIC models Comptonization via the Kompaneets equation, using a quadratic approximation for the source function in a short characteristics radiation solver. It employs a simple form of accelerated lambda iteration to handle regions of high scattering opacity. In addition to solving for the radiation field, HEROIC also solves for the gas temperature by applying the condition of radiative equilibrium. We present benchmarks and tests of the Comptonization module in HEROIC with simple 1D and 3D scattering problems. We also test the ability of the code to handle various relativistic effects using model atmospheres and accretion flows in a black hole space-time. We present two applications of HEROIC to general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics simulations of accretion discs. One application is to a thin accretion disc around a black hole. We find that the gas below the photosphere in the multidimensional HEROIC solution is nearly isothermal, quite different from previous solutions based on 1D plane parallel atmospheres. The second application is to a geometrically thick radiation-dominated accretion disc accreting at 11 times the Eddington rate. Here, the multidimensional HEROIC solution shows that, for observers who are on axis and look down the polar funnel, the isotropic equivalent luminosity could be more than 10 times the Eddington limit, even though the spectrum might still look thermal and show no signs of relativistic beaming.

  16. Computation of Solar Radiative Fluxes by 1D and 3D Methods Using Cloudy Atmospheres Inferred from A-train Satellite Data.

    PubMed

    Barker, H W; Kato, S; Wehr, T

    This study used realistic representations of cloudy atmospheres to assess errors in solar flux estimates associated with 1D radiative transfer models. A scene construction algorithm, developed for the EarthCARE mission, was applied to CloudSat, CALIPSO and MODIS satellite data thus producing 3D cloudy atmospheres measuring 61 km wide by 14,000 km long at 1 km grid-spacing. Broadband solar fluxes and radiances were then computed by a Monte Carlo photon transfer model run in both full 3D and 1D independent column approximation modes. Results were averaged into 1,303 (50 km)(2) domains. For domains with total cloud fractions Ac  < 0.7 top-of-atmosphere (TOA) albedos tend to be largest for 3D transfer with differences increasing with solar zenith angle. Differences are largest for Ac  > 0.7 and characterized by small bias yet large random errors. Regardless of Ac , differences between 3D and 1D transfer rarely exceed ±30 W m(-2) for net TOA and surface fluxes and ±10 W m(-2) for atmospheric absorption. Horizontal fluxes through domain sides depend on Ac with ∼20% of cases exceeding ±30 W m(-2); the largest values occur for Ac  > 0.7. Conversely, heating rate differences rarely exceed ±20%. As a cursory test of TOA radiative closure, fluxes produced by the 3D model were averaged up to (20 km)(2) and compared to values measured by CERES. While relatively little attention was paid to optical properties of ice crystals and surfaces, and aerosols were neglected entirely, ∼30% of the differences between 3D model estimates and measurements fall within ±10 W m(-2); this is the target agreement set for EarthCARE. This, coupled with the aforementioned comparison between 3D and 1D transfer, leads to the recommendation that EarthCARE employ a 3D transport model when attempting TOA radiative closure.

  17. Auroral resonance line radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gladstone, G.R. )

    1992-02-01

    A model is developed for simulating the two-dimensional radiative transfer of resonance line emissions in auroras. The method of solution utilizes Fourier decomposition of the horizontal dependence in the intensity field so that the two-dimensional problem becomes a set of one-dimensional problems having different horizontal wavenumbers. The individual one-dimensional problems are solved for using a Feautrier-type solution of the differential-integral form of the radiative transfer equation. In the limit as the horizontal wavenumber becomes much larger than the local line-center extinction coefficient, the scattering integral becomes considerably simplified, and the final source function is evaluated in closed form. The two-dimensional aspects of the model are tested against results for nonresonance radiative transfer studies, and the resonance line part of the model is tested against results of existing plane-parallel resonance line radiative transfer codes. Finally, the model is used to simulate the intensity field of O{sub I} 1,304{angstrom} for hard and soft auroras of various Gaussian horizontal widths. The results demonstrate the importance of considering the effects of two-dimensional radiative transfer when analyzing auroral resonance line data.

  18. 3D quantification of brain microvessels exposed to heavy particle radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintermüller, C.; Coats, J. S.; Obenaus, A.; Nelson, G.; Krucker, T.; Stampanoni, M.

    2009-09-01

    Space radiation with high energy particles and cosmic rays presents a significant hazard to spaceflight crews. Recent reviews of the health risk to astronauts from ionizing radiation concluded to establish a level of risk which may indicate the possible performance decrements and decreased latency of late dysfunction syndromes (LDS) of the brain. A hierarchical imaging approach developed at ETH Zürich and PSI, which relies on synchrotron based X-ray Tomographic Microscopy (SRXTM), was used to visualize and analyze 3D vascular structures down to the capillary level in their precise anatomical context. Various morphological parameters, such as overall vessel volume, vessel thickness and spacing, are extracted to characterize the vascular structure within a region of interest. For a first quantification of the effect of high energy particles on the vasculature we scanned a set of 6 animals, all of same age. The animals were irradiated with 1 Gy, 2 Gy and 4 Gy of 600MeV 56Fe heavy particles simulating the space radiation environment. We found that with increasing dose the diameter of vessels and the overall vessel volume are decreased whereas the vessel spacing is increased. As these parameters reflect blood flow in three-dimensional space they can be used as indicators for the degree of vascular efficiency which can have an impact on the function and development of lung tissue or tumors.

  19. New Insights on Pulsating White Dwarfs from 3D Radiation-Hydrodynamical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Fontaine, Gilles; Ludwig, Hans-Günter

    2015-08-01

    We have recently computed a grid of 3D radiation-hydrodynamical simulations for the atmosphere of 70 pure-hydrogen DA white dwarfs in the range 7.0 < log g < 9.0. This includes the full ZZ Ceti instability strip where DA white dwarfs are pulsating, by far the most common type of degenerate pulsators. We have significantly improved the theoretical framework to study these objects by removing the free parameters of 1D convection, which were previously a major modeling hurdle. We will compare our new models with the observed sample of ZZ Ceti stars and highlight the improved derived properties of these objects. In particular, the new spectroscopically determined 3D atmospheric parameters allow for an improved definition of instability strip edges. We have also made new predictions for the size of convection zones, which significantly impact the position where the pulsations are driven, and the region of the HR diagram where white dwarfs are expected to pulsate. Finally, we will present new results from non-adiabatic pulsation calculations.

  20. Post-processing of 3D-printed parts using femtosecond and picosecond laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingareev, Ilya; Gehlich, Nils; Bonhoff, Tobias; Meiners, Wilhelm; Kelbassa, Ingomar; Biermann, Tim; Richardson, Martin C.

    2014-03-01

    Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D-printing, is a near-net shape manufacturing approach, delivering part geometry that can be considerably affected by various process conditions, heat-induced distortions, solidified melt droplets, partially fused powders, and surface modifications induced by the manufacturing tool motion and processing strategy. High-repetition rate femtosecond and picosecond laser radiation was utilized to improve surface quality of metal parts manufactured by laser additive techniques. Different laser scanning approaches were utilized to increase the ablation efficiency and to reduce the surface roughness while preserving the initial part geometry. We studied post-processing of 3D-shaped parts made of Nickel- and Titanium-base alloys by utilizing Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) as additive manufacturing techniques. Process parameters such as the pulse energy, the number of layers and their spatial separation were varied. Surface processing in several layers was necessary to remove the excessive material, such as individual powder particles, and to reduce the average surface roughness from asdeposited 22-45 μm to a few microns. Due to the ultrafast laser-processing regime and the small heat-affected zone induced in materials, this novel integrated manufacturing approach can be used to post-process parts made of thermally and mechanically sensitive materials, and to attain complex designed shapes with micrometer precision.

  1. Doppler effects on 3-D non-LTE radiation transport and emission spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliani, J. L.; Davis, J.; DasGupta, A.; Apruzese, John P.; Jennings, Christopher A.; Clark, R. W.; Ampleford, David J.; Bailey, James E.; Thornhill, Joseph W.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Rochau, Gregory Alan; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Hansen, Stephanie B.

    2010-10-01

    Spatially and temporally resolved X-ray emission lines contain information about temperatures, densities, velocities, and the gradients in a plasma. Extracting this information from optically thick lines emitted from complex ions in dynamic, three-dimensional, non-LTE plasmas requires self-consistent accounting for both non-LTE atomic physics and non-local radiative transfer. We present a brief description of a hybrid-structure spectroscopic atomic model coupled to an iterative tabular on-the-spot treatment of radiative transfer that can be applied to plasmas of arbitrary material composition, conditions, and geometries. The effects of Doppler line shifts on the self-consistent radiative transfer within the plasma and the emergent emission and absorption spectra are included in the model. Sample calculations for a two-level atom in a uniform cylindrical plasma are given, showing reasonable agreement with more sophisticated transport models and illustrating the potential complexity - or richness - of radially resolved emission lines from an imploding cylindrical plasma. Also presented is a comparison of modeled L- and K-shell spectra to temporally and radially resolved emission data from a Cu:Ni plasma. Finally, some shortcomings of the model and possible paths for improvement are discussed.

  2. 3D Cloud Radiative Effects on Aerosol Optical Thickness Retrievals in Cumulus Cloud Fields in the Biomass Burning Region in Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Guo-Yong; Marshak, Alexander; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol amount in clear regions of a cloudy atmosphere is a critical parameter in studying the interaction between aerosols and clouds. Since the global cloud cover is about 50%, cloudy scenes are often encountered in any satellite images. Aerosols are more or less transparent, while clouds are extremely reflective in the visible spectrum of solar radiation. The radiative transfer in clear-cloudy condition is highly three- dimensional (3D). This paper focuses on estimating the 3D effects on aerosol optical thickness retrievals using Monte Carlo simulations. An ASTER image of cumulus cloud fields in the biomass burning region in Brazil is simulated in this study. The MODIS products (i-e., cloud optical thickness, particle effective radius, cloud top pressure, surface reflectance, etc.) are used to construct the cloud property and surface reflectance fields. To estimate the cloud 3-D effects, we assume a plane-parallel stratification of aerosol properties in the 60 km x 60 km ASTER image. The simulated solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere is compared with plane-parallel calculations. Furthermore, the 3D cloud radiative effects on aerosol optical thickness retrieval are estimated.

  3. Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation measurements on 3d and 4f ferromagnets using polarized positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasuso, A.; Maekawa, M.; Fukaya, Y.; Yabuuchi, A.; Mochizuki, I.

    2012-01-01

    We measured the Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation (DBAR) spectra of 3d (Fe, Co, and Ni) and 4f (Gd, Tb, and Dy) ferromagnets under a magnetic field by using spin-polarized positrons from a 68Ge-68Ga source. The results showed that the DBAR spectra of these metals have notably different magnetic-field dependences. The differences among Fe, Co, and Ni reflect that the upper minority spin bands of Fe and Co are nearly empty while those of Ni are still mostly occupied. For the rare-earth metals instead of the inner 4f electrons, 5d electrons that mediate the exchange interaction of the 4f electrons are primarily responsible for the magnetic-field effects on the DBAR spectra. Furthermore, the magnetic-field effects on the DBAR spectra of Gd, Tb, and Dy vanished above the Curie temperatures of the magnetic-phase transition for these metals.

  4. An investigation of PRESAGE® 3D dosimetry for IMRT and VMAT radiation therapy treatment verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jake; Juang, Titania; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize three formulations of PRESAGE® dosimeters (DEA-1, DEA-2, and DX) and to identify optimal readout timing and procedures for accurate in-house 3D dosimetry. The optimal formulation and procedure was then applied for the verification of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment technique. PRESAGE® formulations were studied for their temporal stability post-irradiation, sensitivity, and linearity of dose response. Dosimeters were read out using a high-resolution optical-CT scanner. Small volumes of PRESAGE® were irradiated to investigate possible differences in sensitivity for large and small volumes (‘volume effect’). The optimal formulation and read-out technique was applied to the verification of two patient treatments: an IMRT plan and a VMAT plan. A gradual decrease in post-irradiation optical-density was observed in all formulations with DEA-1 exhibiting the best temporal stability with less than 4% variation between 2-22 h post-irradiation. A linear dose response at the 4 h time point was observed for all formulations with an R2 value >0.99. A large volume effect was observed for DEA-1 with sensitivity of the large dosimeter being ~63% less than the sensitivity of the cuvettes. For the IMRT and VMAT treatments, the 3D gamma passing rates for 3%/3 mm criteria using absolute measured dose were 99.6 and 94.5% for the IMRT and VMAT treatments, respectively. In summary, this work shows that accurate 3D dosimetry is possible with all three PRESAGE® formulations. The optimal imaging windows post-irradiation were 3-24 h, 2-6 h, and immediately for the DEA-1, DEA-2, and DX formulations, respectively. Because of the large volume effect, small volume cuvettes are not yet a reliable method for calibration of larger dosimeters to absolute dose. Finally, PRESAGE® is observed to be a useful method of 3D verification when careful consideration is given

  5. An investigation of PRESAGE® 3D dosimetry for IMRT and VMAT radiation therapy treatment verification

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Jake; Juang, Titania; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize three formulations of PRESAGE® dosimeters (DEA-1, DEA-2, and DX) and to identify optimal readout timing and procedures for accurate in-house 3D dosimetry. The optimal formulation and procedure was then applied for the verification of an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment technique. PRESAGE® formulations were studied for their temporal stability postirradiation, sensitivity, and linearity of dose response. Dosimeters were read out using a high-resolution optical-CT scanner. Small volumes of PRESAGE® were irradiated to investigate possible differences in sensitivity for large and small volumes (‘volume effect’). The optimal formulation and read-out technique was applied to the verification of two patient treatments: an IMRT plan and a VMAT plan. A gradual decrease in post-irradiation optical-density was observed in all formulations with DEA-1 exhibiting the best temporal stability with less than 4% variation between 2–22 h post-irradiation. A linear dose response at the 4 h time point was observed for all formulations with an R2 value >0.99. A large volume effect was observed for DEA-1 with sensitivity of the large dosimeter being ~63% less than the sensitivity of the cuvettes. For the IMRT and VMAT treatments, the 3D gamma passing rates for 3%/3 mm criteria using absolute measured dose were 99.6 and 94.5% for the IMRT and VMAT treatments, respectively. In summary, this work shows that accurate 3D dosimetry is possible with all three PRESAGE® formulations. The optimal imaging windows post-irradiation were 3–24 h, 2–6 h, and immediately for the DEA-1, DEA-2, and DX formulations, respectively. Because of the large volume effect, small volume cuvettes are not yet a reliable method for calibration of larger dosimeters to absolute dose. Finally, PRESAGE® is observed to be a useful method of 3D verification when careful consideration is given to the

  6. Effects of 3D microlens transfer into fused silica substrate by CF4/O2 dry etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigaliūnas, Viktoras; Jucius, Dalius; Lazauskas, Algirdas; Andrulevičius, Mindaugas; Sakaliūnienė, Jolita; Abakevičienė, Brigita; Kopustinskas, Vitoldas; Smetona, Saulius; Tamulevičius, Sigitas

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, 3D microoptical elements find a variety of applications from light emitting diodes and household appliances to precise medical endoscopes. Such elements, fabricated in a fused silica substrate by combining 3D e-beam patterning and dry etching, can be used as a mold for the high throughput replication in polymeric materials by UV nanoimprint technique. Flexible and precise control of 3D shape in the resist layer can be achieved by e-beam patterning, but it is also very important to know peculiarities of 3D pattern transfer from resist layer into the fused silica substrate. This paper reports on the effects of PMMA 3D microlens pattern transfer into fused silica substrate by CF4/O2 dry etching. It is demonstrated that etching rate ratio between PMMA and fused silica changes during plasma treatment. Thus, the resulting shape of transferred 3D profile is different from the shape in PMMA and this variation must be assessed during the design phase.

  7. Clinical Outcome of Patients Treated With 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-CRT) for Prostate Cancer on RTOG 9406

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, Jeff; Winter, Kathryn; Roach, Mack; Markoe, Arnold; Sandler, Howard M.; Ryu, Janice; Parliament, Matthew; Purdy, James A.; Valicenti, Richard K.; Cox, James D.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Report of clinical cancer control outcomes on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9406, a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) dose escalation trial for localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: RTOG 9406 is a Phase I/II multi-institutional dose escalation study of 3D-CRT for men with localized prostate cancer. Patients were registered on five sequential dose levels: 68.4 Gy, 73.8 Gy, 79.2 Gy, 74 Gy, and 78 Gy with 1.8 Gy/day (levels I-III) or 2.0 Gy/day (levels IV and V). Neoadjuvant hormone therapy (NHT) from 2 to 6 months was allowed. Protocol-specific, American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), and Phoenix biochemical failure definitions are reported. Results: Thirty-four institutions enrolled 1,084 patients and 1,051 patients are analyzable. Median follow-up for levels I, II, III, IV, and V was 11.7, 10.4, 11.8, 10.4, and 9.2 years, respectively. Thirty-six percent of patients received NHT. The 5-year overall survival was 90%, 87%, 88%, 89%, and 88% for dose levels I-V, respectively. The 5-year clinical disease-free survival (excluding protocol prostate-specific antigen definition) for levels I-V is 84%, 78%, 81%, 82%, and 82%, respectively. By ASTRO definition, the 5-year disease-free survivals were 57%, 59%, 52%, 64% and 75% (low risk); 46%, 52%, 54%, 56%, and 63% (intermediate risk); and 50%, 34%, 46%, 34%, and 61% (high risk) for levels I-V, respectively. By the Phoenix definition, the 5-year disease-free survivals were 68%, 73%, 67%, 84%, and 80% (low risk); 70%, 62%, 70%, 74%, and 69% (intermediate risk); and 42%, 62%, 68%, 54%, and 67% (high risk) for levels I-V, respectively. Conclusion: Dose-escalated 3D-CRT yields favorable outcomes for localized prostate cancer. This multi-institutional experience allows comparison to other experiences with modern radiation therapy.

  8. Inverse cascades sustained by the transfer rate of angular momentum in a 3D turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burguete, Javier; Lopez-Caballero, Miguel

    2013-11-01

    The existence of energy cascades as signatures of conserved magnitudes is one of the universal characteristics of turbulent flows. In this work we present the evidence of an inverse cascade in a fully developed 3D experimental turbulent flow where the conserved magnitude is the angular momentum. We analyze the behavior of a fluid in a closed cavity where two inhomogeneous and strongly turbulent flows collide in a thin region. The experimental volume is a closed cylinder (diameter of 20 cm) where two impellers rotate in opposite directions. A key characteristic of this setup the high stability of the propellers (the instantaneous fluctuations are below 0 . 1 %). We have performed PIV and LDA measurements of the velocity fields. Typical characteristics of the turbulent flow in this setup are: turbulence intensity 50 % , the Reλ = 900 , the Taylor microscale λT = 1 . 8 mm and the integral scale LI = 15 mm. The analysis of the data series reveal that below the injection scales an inverse cascade can be identified (-1/3 in time, -7/3 in space) that can be explained as the transfer of angular momentum between the diferent fluid layers. A. de la Torre, J. Burguete, Phys Rev Lett 99 (2007) 054101. M. Lopez-Caballero, J. Burguete, Phys Rev Lett 110 (2013) 124501.

  9. The 1999 Izmit, Turkey, earthquake: A 3D dynamic stress transfer model of intraearthquake triggering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.; Dolan, J.F.; Hartleb, R.; Day, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Before the August 1999 Izmit (Kocaeli), Turkey, earthquake, theoretical studies of earthquake ruptures and geological observations had provided estimates of how far an earthquake might jump to get to a neighboring fault. Both numerical simulations and geological observations suggested that 5 km might be the upper limit if there were no transfer faults. The Izmit earthquake appears to have followed these expectations. It did not jump across any step-over wider than 5 km and was instead stopped by a narrower step-over at its eastern end and possibly by a stress shadow caused by a historic large earthquake at its western end. Our 3D spontaneous rupture simulations of the 1999 Izmit earthquake provide two new insights: (1) the west- to east-striking fault segments of this part of the North Anatolian fault are oriented so as to be low-stress faults and (2) the easternmost segment involved in the August 1999 rupture may be dipping. An interesting feature of the Izmit earthquake is that a 5-km-long gap in surface rupture and an adjacent 25° restraining bend in the fault zone did not stop the earthquake. The latter observation is a warning that significant fault bends in strike-slip faults may not arrest future earthquakes.

  10. Dynamic implicit 3D adaptive mesh refinement for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    B. Philip; Z. Wang; M.A. Berrill; M. Birke; M. Pernice

    2014-04-01

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered often exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multi-physics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multi-physics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton–Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  11. Dynamic implicit 3D adaptive mesh refinement for non-equilibrium radiation diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, B.; Wang, Z.; Berrill, M. A.; Birke, M.; Pernice, M.

    2014-04-01

    The time dependent non-equilibrium radiation diffusion equations are important for solving the transport of energy through radiation in optically thick regimes and find applications in several fields including astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. The associated initial boundary value problems that are encountered often exhibit a wide range of scales in space and time and are extremely challenging to solve. To efficiently and accurately simulate these systems we describe our research on combining techniques that will also find use more broadly for long term time integration of nonlinear multi-physics systems: implicit time integration for efficient long term time integration of stiff multi-physics systems, local control theory based step size control to minimize the required global number of time steps while controlling accuracy, dynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to minimize memory and computational costs, Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov methods on AMR grids for efficient nonlinear solution, and optimal multilevel preconditioner components that provide level independent solver convergence.

  12. EFFICIENT THREE-DIMENSIONAL NLTE DUST RADIATIVE TRANSFER WITH SKIRT

    SciTech Connect

    Baes, Maarten; Verstappen, Joris; De Looze, Ilse; Fritz, Jacopo; Saftly, Waad; Vidal Perez, Edgardo; Stalevski, Marko; Valcke, Sander

    2011-10-01

    We present an updated version of SKIRT, a three-dimensional (3D) Monte Carlo radiative transfer code developed to simulate dusty galaxies. The main novel characteristics of the SKIRT code are the use of a stellar foam to generate random positions, an efficient combination of eternal forced scattering and continuous absorption, and a new library approach that links the radiative transfer code to the DustEM dust emission library. This approach enables a fast, accurate, and self-consistent calculation of the dust emission of arbitrary mixtures of transiently heated dust grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, even for full 3D models containing millions of dust cells. We have demonstrated the accuracy of the SKIRT code through a set of simulations based on the edge-on spiral galaxy UGC 4754. The models we ran were gradually refined from a smooth, two-dimensional, local thermal equilibrium (LTE) model to a fully 3D model that includes non-LTE (NLTE) dust emission and a clumpy structure of the dusty interstellar medium. We find that clumpy models absorb UV and optical radiation less efficiently than smooth models with the same amount of dust, and that the dust in clumpy models is on average both cooler and less luminous. Our simulations demonstrate that, given the appropriate use of optimization techniques, it is possible to efficiently and accurately run Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations of arbitrary 3D structures of several million dust cells, including a full calculation of the NLTE emission by arbitrary dust mixtures.

  13. Cascaded systems analysis of the 3D noise transfer characteristics of flat-panel cone-beam CT.

    PubMed

    Tward, Daniel J; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2008-12-01

    The physical factors that govern 2D and 3D imaging performance may be understood from quantitative analysis of the spatial-frequency-dependent signal and noise transfer characteristics [e.g., modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ)] along with a task-based assessment of performance (e.g., detectability index). This paper advances a theoretical framework based on cascaded systems analysis for calculation of such metrics in cone-beam CT (CBCT). The model considers the 2D projection NPS propagated through a series of reconstruction stages to yield the 3D NPS and allows quantitative investigation of tradeoffs in image quality associated with acquisition and reconstruction techniques. While the mathematical process of 3D image reconstruction is deterministic, it is shown that the process is irreversible, the associated reconstruction parameters significantly affect the 3D DQE and NEQ, and system optimization should consider the full 3D imaging chain. Factors considered in the cascade include: system geometry; number of projection views; logarithmic scaling; ramp, apodization, and interpolation filters; 3D back-projection; and 3D sampling (noise aliasing). The model is validated in comparison to experiment across a broad range of dose, reconstruction filters, and voxel sizes, and the effects of 3D noise correlation on detectability are explored. The work presents a model for the 3D NPS, DQE, and NEQ of CBCT that reduces to conventional descriptions of axial CT as a special case and provides a fairly general framework that can be applied to the design and optimization of CBCT systems for various applications.

  14. Dosimetry in brain tumor phantom at 15 MV 3D conformal radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common, aggressive, highly malignant and infiltrative of all brain tumors with low rate of control. The main goal of this work was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution into a GBM simulator inside a head phantom exposed to a 15 MV 3D conformal radiation therapy in order to validate internal doses. A head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI) was used on the experiments. Such phantom holds the following synthetic structures: brain and spinal cord, skull, cervical and thoracic vertebrae, jaw, hyoid bone, laryngeal cartilages, head and neck muscles and skin. Computer tomography (CT) of the simulator was taken, capturing a set of contrasted references. Therapy Radiation planning (TPS) was performed based on those CT images, satisfying a 200 cGy prescribed dose split in three irradiation fields. The TPS assumed 97% of prescribed dose cover the prescribed treatment volume (PTV). Radiochromic films in a solid water phantom provided dose response as a function of optical density. Spatial dosimetric distribution was generated by radiochromic film samples at coronal, sagittal-anterior and sagittal-posterior positions, inserted into tumor simulator and brain. The spatial dose profiles held 70 to 120% of the prescribed dose. In spite of the stratified profile, as opposed to the smooth dose profile from TPS, the tumor internal doses were within a 5% deviation from 214.4 cGy evaluated by TPS. 83.2% of the points with a gamma value of less than 1 (3%/3mm) for TPS and experimental values, respectively. At the tumor, measured at coronal section, a few dark spots in the film caused the appearance of outlier points in 13-15% of dose deviation percentage. And, as final conclusion, such dosimeter choice and the physical anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom provided an efficient method for validating radiotherapy protocols. PMID:23829593

  15. Study of a non-diffusing radiochromic gel dosimeter for 3D radiation dose imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Craig Michael

    2000-12-01

    This thesis investigates the potential of a new radiation gel dosimeter, based on nitro-blue tetrazolium (NBTZ) suspended in a gelatin mold. Unlike all Fricke based gel dosimeters this dosimeter does not suffer from diffusive loss of image stability. Images are obtained by an optical tomography method. Nitro blue tetrazolium is a common biological indicator that when irradiated in an aqueous medium undergoes reduction to a highly colored formazan, which has an absorbance maximum at 525nm. Tetrazolium is water soluble while the formazan product is insoluble. The formazan product sticks to the gelatin matrix and the dose image is maintained for three months. Methods to maximize the sensitivity of the system were evaluated. It was found that a chemical detergent, Triton X-100, in combination with sodium formate, increased the dosimeter sensitivity significantly. An initial G-value of formazan production for a dosimeter composed of 1mM NBTZ, gelatin, and water was on the order of 0.2. The addition of Triton and formate produced a G-value in excess of 5.0. The effects of NBTZ, triton, formate, and gel concentration were all investigated. All the gels provided linear dose vs. absorbance plots for doses from 0 to >100 Gy. It was determined that gel concentration had minimal if any effect on sensitivity. Sensitivity increased slightly with increasing NBTZ concentration. Triton and formate individually and together provided moderate to large increases in dosimeter sensitivity. The dosimeter described in this work can provide stable 3D radiation dose images for all modalities of radiation therapy equipment. Methods to increase sensitivity are developed and discussed.

  16. Design and production of 3D printed bolus for electron radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Su, Shiqin; Moran, Kathryn; Robar, James L

    2014-07-08

    This is a proof-of-concept study demonstrating the capacity for modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) dose distributions using 3D printed bolus. Previous reports have involved bolus design using an electron pencil beam model and fabrication using a milling machine. In this study, an in-house algorithm is presented that optimizes the dose distribution with regard to dose coverage, conformity, and homogeneity within the planning target volume (PTV). The algorithm takes advantage of a commercial electron Monte Carlo dose calculation and uses the calculated result as input. Distances along ray lines from the distal side of 90% isodose line to distal surface of the PTV are used to estimate the bolus thickness. Inhomogeneities within the calculation volume are accounted for using the coefficient of equivalent thickness method. Several regional modulation operators are applied to improve the dose coverage and uniformity. The process is iterated (usually twice) until an acceptable MERT plan is realized, and the final bolus is printed using solid polylactic acid. The method is evaluated with regular geometric phantoms, anthropomorphic phantoms, and a clinical rhabdomyosarcoma pediatric case. In all cases the dose conformity are improved compared to that with uniform bolus. For geometric phantoms with air or bone inhomogeneities, the dose homogeneity is markedly improved. The actual printed boluses conform well to the surface of complex anthropomorphic phantoms. The correspondence of the dose distribution between the calculated synthetic bolus and the actual manufactured bolus is shown. For the rhabdomyosarcoma patient, the MERT plan yields a reduction of mean dose by 38.2% in left kidney relative to uniform bolus. MERT using 3D printed bolus appears to be a practical, low-cost approach to generating optimized bolus for electron therapy. The method is effective in improving conformity of the prescription isodose surface and in sparing immediately adjacent normal

  17. Intrafractional 3D localization using kilovoltage digital tomosynthesis for sliding-window intensity modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Hunt, Margie; Pham, Hai; Tang, Grace; Mageras, Gig

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To implement novel imaging sequences integrated into intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and determine 3D positions for intrafractional patient motion monitoring and management. Method In one method, we converted a static gantry IMRT beam into a series of arcs in which dose index and multileaf collimator positions for all control points were unchanged, but gantry angles were modified to oscillate ±3° around the original angle. Kilovoltage (kV) projections were acquired continuously throughout delivery and reconstructed to provide a series of 6° arc digital tomosynthesis (DTS) images which served to evaluate the in-plane positions of embedded-fiducials/vertebral-body. To obtain out-of-plane positions via triangulation, a 20° gantry rotation with beam hold-off was inserted during delivery to produce a pair of 6° DTS images separated by 14°. In a second method, the gantry remained stationary, but both kV source and detector moved over a 15° longitudinal arc using pitch and translational adjustment of the robotic arms. Evaluation of localization accuracy in an anthropomorphic Rando phantom during simulated intrafractional motion used programmed couch translations from customized scripts. Purpose-built software was used to reconstruct DTS images, register them to reference template images and calculate 3D fiducial positions. Result No significant dose difference (<0.5%) was found between the original and converted IMRT beams. For a typical hypofractionated spine treatment, 200 single DTS (6° arc) and 10 paired DTS (20° arc) images were acquired for each IMRT beam, providing in-plane and out-of-plane monitoring every 1.6 and 34.5 seconds, respectively. Mean ± standard deviation error in predicted position was −0.3±0.2 mm, −0.1±0.1 mm in-plane, and 0.2±0.4 mm out-of-plane with rotational gantry, 0.8±0.1 mm, −0.7±0.3 mm in-plane and 1.1±0.1 mm out-of-plane with translational source/detector. Conclusion Acquiring 3D fiducial positions

  18. Intrafractional 3D localization using kilovoltage digital tomosynthesis for sliding-window intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Hunt, Margie; Pham, Hai; Tang, Grace; Mageras, Gig

    2015-09-07

    To implement novel imaging sequences integrated into intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and determine 3D positions for intrafractional patient motion monitoring and management.In one method, we converted a static gantry IMRT beam into a series of arcs in which dose index and multileaf collimator positions for all control points were unchanged, but gantry angles were modified to oscillate ± 3° around the original angle. Kilovoltage (kV) projections were acquired continuously throughout delivery and reconstructed to provide a series of 6° arc digital tomosynthesis (DTS) images which served to evaluate the in-plane positions of embedded-fiducials/vertebral-body. To obtain out-of-plane positions via triangulation, a 20° gantry rotation with beam hold-off was inserted during delivery to produce a pair of 6° DTS images separated by 14°. In a second method, the gantry remained stationary, but both kV source and detector moved over a 15° longitudinal arc using pitch and translational adjustment of the robotic arms. Evaluation of localization accuracy in an anthropomorphic Rando phantom during simulated intrafractional motion used programmed couch translations from customized scripts. Purpose-built software was used to reconstruct DTS images, register them to reference template images and calculate 3D fiducial positions.No significant dose difference (<0.5%) was found between the original and converted IMRT beams. For a typical hypofractionated spine treatment, 200 single DTS (6° arc) and 10 paired DTS (20° arc) images were acquired for each IMRT beam, providing in-plane and out-of-plane monitoring every 1.6 and 34.5 s, respectively. Mean ± standard deviation error in predicted position was -0.3 ± 0.2 mm, -0.1 ± 0.1 mm in-plane, and 0.2 ± 0.4 mm out-of-plane with rotational gantry, 0.8 ± 0.1 mm, -0.7 ± 0.3 mm in-plane and 1.1 ± 0.1 mm out-of-plane with translational source/detector.Acquiring 3D fiducial positions from kV-DTS during fixed gantry

  19. Search for secular changes in the 3D profile of the synchrotron radiation around Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, David E.; de Pater, Imke; Sault, R. J.

    2003-09-01

    We present a summary of Jupiter data taken over an eighteen year span (1981-1998) by the Very Large Array at ˜21.0 cm. At this wavelength the emission is dominated by synchrotron radiation, which is roughly proportional to the product of the electron number density and magnetic field strength ( NeB). At each epoch 8-12 hours of data were taken, which allowed us to examine Jupiter during an entire rotation period. We mapped the longitudinal structure of the synchrotron radiation by using a 3D reconstruction technique developed by Sault et al. [Astron. Astrophys. 324 (1997) 1190] which enabled us to produce plots of the latitude, radial distance, and peak intensity vs. jovian longitude (System III). The results show the shape of the synchrotron radiation has remained stable (except, of course, during the period of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts). Specifically, the latitudinal structure has remained nearly constant. Furthermore, the general dependence of the radial intensity profile has remained the same throughout the years, though radial distance has slightly, though significantly, changed. This constancy implies that the spatial structure of both the particle distribution and magnetic field have varied little over the eighteen year span. The primary changes in the synchrotron radiation have been seen in the intensity of emission as a function of time. There are certain epochs (e.g., 1987) which show more emissivity than others (e.g., 1981, 1995) at all longitudes. When each epoch is longitudinally averaged, there may be an anti-correlation between the radial distance and corresponding peak intensities of the synchrotron radiation, as one might expect if radial diffusion is important. We examine these trends by comparing the data to plots of the total intensity at 13 cm (by Klein et al., in: Rucker, H.O., et al., Planetary Radio Emissions V. Austrian Acad. Sci. Press, Vienna, p. 221). Overall, variations in our 21-cm data are similar to those measured at 13 cm, but

  20. Introducing the depth transfer curve for 3D capture system characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goma, Sergio R.; Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas

    2011-03-01

    3D technology has recently made a transition from movie theaters to consumer electronic devices such as 3D cameras and camcorders. In addition to what 2D imaging conveys, 3D content also contains information regarding the scene depth. Scene depth is simulated through the strongest brain depth cue, namely retinal disparity. This can be achieved by capturing an image by horizontally separated cameras. Objects at different depths will be projected with different horizontal displacement on the left and right camera images. These images, when fed separately to either eye, leads to retinal disparity. Since the perception of depth is the single most important 3D imaging capability, an evaluation procedure is needed to quantify the depth capture characteristics. Evaluating depth capture characteristics subjectively is a very difficult task since the intended and/or unintended side effects from 3D image fusion (depth interpretation) by the brain are not immediately perceived by the observer, nor do such effects lend themselves easily to objective quantification. Objective evaluation of 3D camera depth characteristics is an important tool that can be used for "black box" characterization of 3D cameras. In this paper we propose a methodology to evaluate the 3D cameras' depth capture capabilities.

  1. Radiative transfer in spherical atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkofen, W.; Wehrse, R.

    A method for defining spherical model atmospheres in radiative/convective and hydrostatic equilibrium is presented. A finite difference form is found for the transfer equation and a matrix operator is developed as the discrete space analog (in curvilinear coordinates) of a formal integral in plane geometry. Pressure is treated as a function of temperature. Flux conservation is maintained within the energy equation, although the correct luminosity transport must be assigned for any given level of the atmosphere. A perturbed integral operator is used in a complete linearization of the transfer and constraint equations. Finally, techniques for generating stable solutions in economical computer time are discussed.

  2. Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction Using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D) Improves Chest CT Image Quality and Reduces Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Miyara, Tetsuhiro; Honda, Osamu; Kamiya, Hisashi; Murata, Kiyoshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Moriya, Hiroshi; Koyama, Mitsuhiro; Noma, Satoshi; Kamiya, Ayano; Tanaka, Yuko; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the advantages of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D) for image quality improvement and dose reduction for chest computed tomography (CT). Methods Institutional Review Boards approved this study and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-eight subjects underwent chest CT at five institutions using identical scanners and protocols. During a single visit, each subject was scanned using different tube currents: 240, 120, and 60 mA. Scan data were converted to images using AIDR3D and a conventional reconstruction mode (without AIDR3D). Using a 5-point scale from 1 (non-diagnostic) to 5 (excellent), three blinded observers independently evaluated image quality for three lung zones, four patterns of lung disease (nodule/mass, emphysema, bronchiolitis, and diffuse lung disease), and three mediastinal measurements (small structure visibility, streak artifacts, and shoulder artifacts). Differences in these scores were assessed by Scheffe's test. Results At each tube current, scans using AIDR3D had higher scores than those without AIDR3D, which were significant for lung zones (p<0.0001) and all mediastinal measurements (p<0.01). For lung diseases, significant improvements with AIDR3D were frequently observed at 120 and 60 mA. Scans with AIDR3D at 120 mA had significantly higher scores than those without AIDR3D at 240 mA for lung zones and mediastinal streak artifacts (p<0.0001), and slightly higher or equal scores for all other measurements. Scans with AIDR3D at 60 mA were also judged superior or equivalent to those without AIDR3D at 120 mA. Conclusion For chest CT, AIDR3D provides better image quality and can reduce radiation exposure by 50%. PMID:25153797

  3. Design and testing of indigenous cost effective three dimensional radiation field analyser (3D RFA).

    PubMed

    Ganesh, K M; Pichandi, A; Nehru, R M; Ravikumar, M

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study is to design and validate an indigenous three dimensional Radiation Field Analyser (3D RFA). The feed system made for X, Y and Z axis movements is of lead screw with deep ball bearing mechanism made up of stain less steel driven by stepper motors with accuracy less than 0.5 mm. The telescopic column lifting unit was designed using linear actuation technology for lifting the water phantom. The acrylic phantom with dimensions of 800 x 750 x 570 mm was made with thickness of 15 mm. The software was developed in visual basic programming language, classified into two types, viz. beam analyzer software and beam acquisition software. The premeasurement checks were performed as per TG 106 recommendations. The physical parameters of photon PDDs such as Dmax, D10, D20 and Quality Index (QI), and the electron PDDs such as R50, Rp, E0, Epo and X-ray contamination values can be obtained instantaneously by using the developed RFA system. Also the results for profile data such as field size, central axis deviation, penumbra, flatness and symmetry calculated according to various protocols can be obtained for both photon and electron beams. The result of PDDs for photon beams were compared with BJR25 supplement values and the profile data were compared with TG 40 recommendation. The results were in agreement with standard protocols.

  4. Large area 3-D optical coherence tomography imaging of lumpectomy specimens for radiation treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cuihuan; Kim, Leonard; Barnard, Nicola; Khan, Atif; Pierce, Mark C.

    2016-02-01

    Our long term goal is to develop a high-resolution imaging method for comprehensive assessment of tissue removed during lumpectomy procedures. By identifying regions of high-grade disease within the excised specimen, we aim to develop patient-specific post-operative radiation treatment regimens. We have assembled a benchtop spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system with 1320 nm center wavelength. Automated beam scanning enables "sub-volumes" spanning 5 mm x 5 mm x 2 mm (500 A-lines x 500 B-scans x 2 mm in depth) to be collected in under 15 seconds. A motorized sample positioning stage enables multiple sub-volumes to be acquired across an entire tissue specimen. Sub-volumes are rendered from individual B-scans in 3D Slicer software and en face (XY) images are extracted at specific depths. These images are then tiled together using MosaicJ software to produce a large area en face view (up to 40 mm x 25 mm). After OCT imaging, specimens were sectioned and stained with HE, allowing comparison between OCT image features and disease markers on histopathology. This manuscript describes the technical aspects of image acquisition and reconstruction, and reports initial qualitative comparison between large area en face OCT images and HE stained tissue sections. Future goals include developing image reconstruction algorithms for mapping an entire sample, and registering OCT image volumes with clinical CT and MRI images for post-operative treatment planning.

  5. ARTIST: Adaptable Radiative Transfer Innovations for Submillimeter Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Jes; Brinch, Christian; Girart, Josep Miquel; Padovani, Marco; Frau, Pau; Schaaf, Reinhold; Kuiper, Rolf; Bertoldi, Frank; Hogerheijde, Michiel; Juhasz, Attila; Vlemmings, Wouter

    2014-02-01

    ARTIST is a suite of tools for comprehensive multi-dimensional radiative transfer calculations of dust and line emission, as well as their polarization, to help interpret observations from submillimeter telescopes. The ARTIST package consists of LIME, a radiative transfer code that uses adaptive gridding allowing simulations of sources with arbitrary multi-dimensional (1D, 2D, 3D) and time-dependent structures, thus ensuring rapid convergence; the DustPol and LinePol tools for modeling the polarization of the line and dust emission; and an interface run from Python scripts that manages the interaction between a general model library and LIME, and a graphical interface to simulate images.

  6. Nonlinear response matrix methods for radiative transfer. [Radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.F. Jr.; Lewis, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear response matrix formalism is presented for the solution of time-dependent radiative transfer problems. The essential feature of the method is that within each computational cell the temperature is calculated in response to the incoming photons from all frequency groups. Thus the updating of the temperature distribution is placed within the iterative solution of the spaceangle transport problem, instead of being placed outside of it. The method is formulated for both grey and multifrequency problems and applied in slab geometry. The method is compared to the more conventional source iteration technique. 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. Radiation and polarization signatures of the 3D multizone time-dependent hadronic blazar model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haocheng; Diltz, Chris; Bottcher, Markus

    2016-09-23

    We present a newly developed time-dependent three-dimensional multizone hadronic blazar emission model. By coupling a Fokker–Planck-based lepto-hadronic particle evolution code, 3DHad, with a polarization-dependent radiation transfer code, 3DPol, we are able to study the time-dependent radiation and polarization signatures of a hadronic blazar model for the first time. Our current code is limited to parameter regimes in which the hadronic γ-ray output is dominated by proton synchrotron emission, neglecting pion production. Our results demonstrate that the time-dependent flux and polarization signatures are generally dominated by the relation between the synchrotron cooling and the light-crossing timescale, which is largely independent of the exact model parameters. We find that unlike the low-energy polarization signatures, which can vary rapidly in time, the high-energy polarization signatures appear stable. Lastly, future high-energy polarimeters may be able to distinguish such signatures from the lower and more rapidly variable polarization signatures expected in leptonic models.

  8. Radiation and polarization signatures of the 3D multizone time-dependent hadronic blazar model

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Haocheng; Diltz, Chris; Bottcher, Markus

    2016-09-23

    We present a newly developed time-dependent three-dimensional multizone hadronic blazar emission model. By coupling a Fokker–Planck-based lepto-hadronic particle evolution code, 3DHad, with a polarization-dependent radiation transfer code, 3DPol, we are able to study the time-dependent radiation and polarization signatures of a hadronic blazar model for the first time. Our current code is limited to parameter regimes in which the hadronic γ-ray output is dominated by proton synchrotron emission, neglecting pion production. Our results demonstrate that the time-dependent flux and polarization signatures are generally dominated by the relation between the synchrotron cooling and the light-crossing timescale, which is largely independent ofmore » the exact model parameters. We find that unlike the low-energy polarization signatures, which can vary rapidly in time, the high-energy polarization signatures appear stable. Lastly, future high-energy polarimeters may be able to distinguish such signatures from the lower and more rapidly variable polarization signatures expected in leptonic models.« less

  9. Coolant side heat transfer with rotation: User manual for 3D-TEACH with rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, S. A.; James, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    This program solves the governing transport equations in Reynolds average form for the flow of a 3-D, steady state, viscous, heat conducting, multiple species, single phase, Newtonian fluid with combustion. The governing partial differential equations are solved in physical variables in either a Cartesian or cylindrical coordinate system. The effects of rotation on the momentum and enthalpy calculations modeled in Cartesian coordinates are examined. The flow of the fluid should be confined and subsonic with a maximum Mach number no larger than 0.5. This manual describes the operating procedures and input details for executing a 3D-TEACH computation.

  10. Studies of 3D-cloud optical depth from small to very large values, and of the radiation and remote sensing impacts of larger-drop clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Wiscombe, Warren; Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Chiu, Christine

    2007-05-04

    We have basically completed all the goals stated in the previous proposal and published or submitted journal papers thereon, the only exception being First-Principles Monte Carlo which has taken more time than expected. We finally finished the comprehensive book on 3D cloud radiative transfer (edited by Marshak and Davis and published by Springer), with many contributions by ARM scientists; this book was highlighted in the 2005 ARM Annual Report. We have also completed (for now) our pioneering work on new models of cloud drop clustering based on ARM aircraft FSSP data, with applications both to radiative transfer and to rainfall. This clustering work was highlighted in the FY07 “Our Changing Planet” (annual report of the US Climate Change Science Program). Our group published 22 papers, one book, and 5 chapters in that book, during this proposal period. All are listed at the end of this section. Below, we give brief highlights of some of those papers.

  11. Numerical simulation of turbulent heat transfer past a backward-facing step: 2D/3D RANS versus IDDES solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, E. M.; Smirnovsky, A. A.; Schur, N. A.; Zaitsev, D. K.; Smirnov, P. E.

    2016-09-01

    The contribution covers results of numerical study of air flow and heat transfer past a backward-facing step at the Reynolds number of 28,000. The numerical simulation was carried out under conditions of the experiments of Vogel&Eaton (1985), where nominally 2D fluid dynamics and heat transfer in a channel with expansion ratio of 1.25 was investigated. Two approaches were used for turbulence modelling. First, the Menter SST turbulence model was used to perform refined 2D and 3D RANS steady-state computations. The 3D analysis was undertaken to evaluate effects of boundary layers developing on the sidewalls of the experimental channel. Then, 3D time-dependent computations were carried out using the vortex-resolving IDDES method and applying the spanwise-periodicity conditions. Comparative computations were performed using an in-house finite-volume code SINF/Flag-S and the ANSYS Fluent. The codes produced practically identical RANS solutions, showing in particular a difference of 4% in the central-line peak Stanton number calculated in 2D and 3D cases. The IDDES results obtained with two codes are in a satisfactory agreement. Comparing with the experimental data, the IDDES produces the best agreement for the wall friction, whereas the RANS solutions show superiority in predictions of the local Stanton number distribution.

  12. Radiative Transfer in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, L.; Aiello, S.; Belleni-Morante, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract Protoplanetary disks are the precursors of planetary systems. All building materials needed to assembly the planetary systems are supplied by these reservoirs, including many organic molecules [1,2]. Thus, the physical and chemical properties in Protoplanetary disks set the boundary conditions for the formation and evolution of planets and other solar system bodies. In standard radiative scenario structure and chemistry of protoplanetary disks depend strongly on the nature of central star around which they formed. The dust temperature is manly set by the stellar luminosity, while the chemistry of the whole disk depends on the UV and X ray fluxes [3,4,6,8]. Therefore, a knowledge as accurate as possible of the radiative transfer (RT) inside disks is a prerequisite for their modelling. Actually, real disks are complex, stratified and inhomogeneous environments requiring a detailed dust mixture modelling and the ability to follow the radiation transfer across radial and vertical gradients. Different energetic processes as the mass accretion processes onto the star surface, the viscous dissipative heating dominating the midplane region, and the flared atmospheres radiation reprocessing, have a significant role in the disk structuring [4,5,8]. During the last 10 years many authors suggested various numerical and analytical techniques to resolve the disk temperature structure providing vertical temperature profiles and disk SED databases [4,6]. In this work we present the results of our semi analytical and numerical model solving the radiative transfer problem in two separate interesting disk regions: 1) Disk atmospheres at large radius, r > 10 AU. 2) Vertical disk structure over 1 < r < 10 AU and 10 < r < 100 AU. A simplified analytical approach based on P-N approximation [7] for a rectified disk surface (suitable for limited range of r) is compared and contrasted with a more accurate Monte Carlo integration [5]. Our code can handle arbitrary dust

  13. SU-E-J-49: Design and Fabrication of Custom 3D Printed Phantoms for Radiation Therapy Research and Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, C; Xing, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose The rapid proliferation of affordable 3D printing techniques has enabled the custom fabrication of items ranging from paper weights to medical implants. This study investigates the feasibility of utilizing the technology for developing novel phantoms for use in radiation therapy quality assurance (QA) procedures. Methods A phantom for measuring the geometric parameters of linear accelerator (LINAC) on-board imaging (OBI) systems was designed using SolidWorks. The design was transferred to a 3D printer and fabricated using a fused deposition modeling (FDM) technique. Fiducials were embedded in the phantom by placing 1.6 mm diameter steel balls in predefined holes and securing them with silicone. Several MV and kV images of the phantom were collected and the visibility and geometric accuracy were evaluated. A second phantom, for use in the experimental evaluation of a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy dosimeter, was designed to secure several applicator needles in water. The applicator was fabricated in the same 3D printer and used for experiments. Results The general accuracy of printed parts was determined to be 0.1 mm. The cost of materials for the imaging and QA phantoms were $22 and $5 respectively. Both the plastic structure and fiducial markers of the imaging phantom were visible in MV and kV images. Fiducial marker locations were determined to be within 1mm of desired locations, with the discrepancy being attributed to the fiducial attachment process. The HDR phantom secured the applicators within 0.5 mm of the desired locations. Conclusion 3D printing offers an inexpensive method for fabricating custom phantoms for use in radiation therapy quality assurance. While the geometric accuracy of such parts is limited compared to more expensive methods, the phantoms are still highly functional and provide a unique opportunity for rapid fabrication of custom phantoms for use in radiation therapy QA and research.

  14. 3D finite element model for writing long-period fiber gratings by CO2 laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Coelho, João M P; Nespereira, Marta; Abreu, Manuel; Rebordão, José

    2013-08-12

    In the last years, mid-infrared radiation emitted by CO2 lasers has become increasing popular as a tool in the development of long-period fiber gratings. However, although the development and characterization of the resulting sensing devices have progressed quickly, further research is still necessary to consolidate functional models, especially regarding the interaction between laser radiation and the fiber's material. In this paper, a 3D finite element model is presented to simulate the interaction between laser radiation and an optical fiber and to determine the resulting refractive index change. Dependence with temperature of the main parameters of the optical fiber materials (with special focus on the absorption of incident laser radiation) is considered, as well as convection and radiation losses. Thermal and residual stress analyses are made for a standard single mode fiber, and experimental results are presented.

  15. 3D Finite Element Model for Writing Long-Period Fiber Gratings by CO2 Laser Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, João M. P.; Nespereira, Marta; Abreu, Manuel; Rebordão, José

    2013-01-01

    In the last years, mid-infrared radiation emitted by CO2 lasers has become increasing popular as a tool in the development of long-period fiber gratings. However, although the development and characterization of the resulting sensing devices have progressed quickly, further research is still necessary to consolidate functional models, especially regarding the interaction between laser radiation and the fiber's material. In this paper, a 3D finite element model is presented to simulate the interaction between laser radiation and an optical fiber and to determine the resulting refractive index change. Dependence with temperature of the main parameters of the optical fiber materials (with special focus on the absorption of incident laser radiation) is considered, as well as convection and radiation losses. Thermal and residual stress analyses are made for a standard single mode fiber, and experimental results are presented. PMID:23941908

  16. Involved-Site Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Versus 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Early Stage Supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ciammella, Patrizia; Piva, Cristina; Ragona, Riccardo; Botto, Barbara; Gavarotti, Paolo; Merli, Francesco; Vitolo, Umberto; Iotti, Cinzia; Ricardi, Umberto

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows for margin reduction and highly conformal dose distribution, with consistent advantages in sparing of normal tissues. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare involved-site IG-IMRT with involved-site 3D conformal RT (3D-CRT) in the treatment of early stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) involving the mediastinum, with efficacy and toxicity as primary clinical endpoints. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 90 stage IIA HL patients treated with either involved-site 3D-CRT or IG-IMRT between 2005 and 2012 in 2 different institutions. Inclusion criteria were favorable or unfavorable disease (according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria), complete response after 3 to 4 cycles of an adriamycin- bleomycin-vinblastine-dacarbazine (ABVD) regimen plus 30 Gy as total radiation dose. Exclusion criteria were chemotherapy other than ABVD, partial response after ABVD, total radiation dose other than 30 Gy. Clinical endpoints were relapse-free survival (RFS) and acute toxicity. Results: Forty-nine patients were treated with 3D-CRT (54.4%) and 41 with IG-IMRT (45.6%). Median follow-up time was 54.2 months for 3D-CRT and 24.1 months for IG-IMRT. No differences in RFS were observed between the 2 groups, with 1 relapse each. Three-year RFS was 98.7% for 3D-CRT and 100% for IG-IMRT. Grade 2 toxicity events, mainly mucositis, were recorded in 32.7% of 3D-CRT patients (16 of 49) and in 9.8% of IG-IMRT patients (4 of 41). IG-IMRT was significantly associated with a lower incidence of grade 2 acute toxicity (P=.043). Conclusions: RFS rates at 3 years were extremely high in both groups, albeit the median follow-up time is different. Acute tolerance profiles were better for IG-IMRT than for 3D-CRT. Our preliminary results support the clinical safety and efficacy of advanced RT planning and delivery techniques in patients affected with early stage HL, achieving complete

  17. SU-E-T-03: 3D GPU-Accelerated Secondary Checks of Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, F; Perez, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Redundant treatment verifications in conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques are traditionally performed with single point calculations. New solutions can replace these checks with 3D treatment plan verifications. This work describes a software tool (Mobius3D, Mobius Medical Systems) that uses a GPU-accelerated collapsed cone algorithm to perform 3D independent verifications of TPS calculations. Methods: Mobius3D comes with reference beam models for common linear accelerators. The system uses an independently developed collapsed cone algorithm updated with recent enhancements. 144 isotropically-spaced cones are used for each voxel for calculations. These complex calculations can be sped up by using GPUs. Mobius3D calculate dose using DICOM information coming from TPS (CT, RT Struct, RT Plan RT Dose). DVH-metrics and 3D gamma tests can be used to compare both TPS and secondary calculations. 170 patients treated with all common techniques as 3DCFRT (including wedged), static and dynamic IMRT and VMAT have been successfully verified with this solution. Results: Calculation times are between 3–5 minutes for 3DCFRT treatments and 15–20 for most complex dMLC and VMAT plans. For all PTVs mean dose and 90% coverage differences are (1.12±0.97)% and (0.68±1.19)%, respectively. Mean dose discrepancies for all OARs is (0.64±1.00)%. 3D gamma (global, 3%/3 mm) analysis shows a mean passing rate of (97.8 ± 3.0)% for PTVs and (99.0±3.0)% for OARs. 3D gamma pasing rate for all voxels in CT has a mean value of (98.5±1.6)%. Conclusion: Mobius3D is a powerful tool to verify all modalities of radiation therapy treatments. Dose discrepancies calculated by this system are in good agreement with TPS. The use of reference beam data results in time savings and can be used to avoid the propagation of errors in original beam data into our QA system. GPU calculations permit enhanced collapsed cone calculations with reasonable calculation times.

  18. Design and Fabrication of Kidney Phantoms for Internal Radiation Dosimetry Using 3D Printing Technology.

    PubMed

    Tran-Gia, Johannes; Schlögl, Susanne; Lassmann, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Currently, the validation of multimodal quantitative imaging and absorbed dose measurements is impeded by the lack of suitable, commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms of variable sizes and shapes. To demonstrate the potential of 3-dimensional (3D) printing techniques for quantitative SPECT/CT imaging, a set of kidney dosimetry phantoms and their spherical counterparts was designed and manufactured with a fused-deposition-modeling 3D printer. Nuclide-dependent SPECT/CT calibration factors were determined to assess the accuracy of quantitative imaging for internal renal dosimetry.

  19. Ultra-high-resolution 3D digitalized imaging of the cerebral angioarchitecture in rats using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng-Qi; Zhou, Luo; Deng, Qian-Fang; Xie, Yuan-Yuan; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; Cao, Yu-Ze; Zhang, Ji-Wen; Chen, Xu-Meng; Yin, Xian-Zhen; Xiao, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The angioarchitecture is a fundamental aspect of brain development and physiology. However, available imaging tools are unsuited for non-destructive cerebral mapping of the functionally important three-dimensional (3D) vascular microstructures. To address this issue, we developed an ultra-high resolution 3D digitalized angioarchitectural map for rat brain, based on synchrotron radiation phase contrast imaging (SR-PCI) with pixel size of 5.92 μm. This approach provides a systematic and detailed view of the cerebrovascular anatomy at the micrometer level without any need for contrast agents. From qualitative and quantitative perspectives, the present 3D data provide a considerable insight into the spatial vascular network for whole rodent brain, particularly for functionally important regions of interest, such as the hippocampus, pre-frontal cerebral cortex and the corpus striatum. We extended these results to synchrotron-based virtual micro-endoscopy, thus revealing the trajectory of targeted vessels in 3D. The SR-PCI method for systematic visualization of cerebral microvasculature holds considerable promise for wider application in life sciences, including 3D micro-imaging in experimental models of neurodevelopmental and vascular disorders. PMID:26443231

  20. Mechanistic and quantitative studies of bystander response in 3D tissues for low-dose radiation risk estimations

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, Sally A.

    2013-06-12

    We have used the MatTek 3-dimensional human skin model to study the gene expression response of a 3D model to low and high dose low LET radiation, and to study the radiation bystander effect as a function of distance from the site of irradiation with either alpha particles or low LET protons. We have found response pathways that appear to be specific for low dose exposures, that could not have been predicted from high dose studies. We also report the time and distance dependent expression of a large number of genes in bystander tissue. the bystander response in 3D tissues showed many similarities to that described previously in 2D cultured cells, but also showed some differences.

  1. Heat transfer in 3-D serpentine channels with right-angle turns

    SciTech Connect

    Chintada, S.; Ko, K.H.; Anand, N.K.

    1999-12-01

    Laminar flow and heat transfer in square serpentine channels with right-angle turns, which have applications in heat exchangers, were numerically studied. A finite volume code in FORTRAN was developed to solve this problem. For solving the flow field, a colocated-grid formulation was used, as opposed to the staggered-grid formulation, and the SIMPLE algorithm was used to link the velocity and pressure. The line-by-line method was used to solve the algebraic equations. The temperature field was solved for the uniform-wall-heat-flux boundary condition. The developed numerical code was validated by solving for fully developed flow and heat transfer in a square straight channel. The grid-independent solution was established for a reference case of serpentine channel with the highest Reynolds number. Periodically fully developed flow and heat transfer fields in serpentine channels were solved for different geometry parameters, for different Reynolds numbers, and for two different Prandtl numbers (for air and water, respectively). The enhancement of the heat transfer mechanism was explained by studying the plotted flow-field velocity vectors in different planes. The heat transfer performance of serpentine channels is better than that for straight channels for Pr = 7.0 and is worse than that for straight channels for Pr = 0.7.

  2. 3D Space Radiation Transport in a Shielded ICRU Tissue Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2014-01-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code capable of simulating High Charge (Z) and Energy (HZE) and light ions (including neutrons) under space-like boundary conditions with enhanced neutron and light ion propagation was recently developed for a simple homogeneous shield object. Monte Carlo benchmarks were used to verify the methodology in slab and spherical geometry, and the 3D corrections were shown to provide significant improvement over the straight-ahead approximation in some cases. In the present report, the new algorithms with well-defined convergence criteria are extended to inhomogeneous media within a shielded tissue slab and a shielded tissue sphere and tested against Monte Carlo simulation to verify the solution methods. The 3D corrections are again found to more accurately describe the neutron and light ion fluence spectra as compared to the straight-ahead approximation. These computationally efficient methods provide a basis for software capable of space shield analysis and optimization.

  3. Exploring Rotations Due to Radiation Pressure: 2-D to 3-D Transition Is Interesting!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waxman, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation pressure is an important topic within a standard physics course (see, in particular, Refs. 1 and 2). The physics of radiation pressure is described, the magnitude of it is derived, both for the case of a perfectly absorbing surface and of a perfect reflector, and various applications of this interesting effect are discussed, such as…

  4. Investigation of mass transfer intensification under power ultrasound irradiation using 3D computational simulation: A comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Sajjadi, Baharak; Asgharzadehahmadi, Seyedali; Asaithambi, Perumal; Raman, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Parthasarathy, Rajarathinam

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims at investigating the influence of acoustic streaming induced by low-frequency (24kHz) ultrasound irradiation on mass transfer in a two-phase system. The main objective is to discuss the possible mass transfer improvements under ultrasound irradiation. Three analyses were conducted: i) experimental analysis of mass transfer under ultrasound irradiation; ii) comparative analysis between the results of the ultrasound assisted mass transfer with that obtained from mechanically stirring; and iii) computational analysis of the systems using 3D CFD simulation. In the experimental part, the interactive effects of liquid rheological properties, ultrasound power and superficial gas velocity on mass transfer were investigated in two different sonicators. The results were then compared with that of mechanical stirring. In the computational part, the results were illustrated as a function of acoustic streaming behaviour, fluid flow pattern, gas/liquid volume fraction and turbulence in the two-phase system and finally the mass transfer coefficient was specified. It was found that additional turbulence created by ultrasound played the most important role on intensifying the mass transfer phenomena compared to that in stirred vessel. Furthermore, long residence time which depends on geometrical parameters is another key for mass transfer. The results obtained in the present study would help researchers understand the role of ultrasound as an energy source and acoustic streaming as one of the most important of ultrasound waves on intensifying gas-liquid mass transfer in a two-phase system and can be a breakthrough in the design procedure as no similar studies were found in the existing literature.

  5. Identifying cell and molecular stress after radiation in a three-dimensional (3-D) model of oral mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Lambros, Maria Polikandritou; Parsa, Cyrus; Mulamalla, HariChandana; Orlando, Robert; Lau, Bernard; Huang, Ying; Pon, Doreen; Chow, Moses

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} We irradiated a 3-D human oral cell culture of keratinocytes and fibroblasts with 12 and 2 Gy. {yields} 6 h after irradiation the histopathology and apoptosis of the 3-D culture were evaluated. Microarrays were used to assess the gene expression in the irradiated 3-D tissue. {yields} 12 Gy induced significant histopathologic changes and cellular apoptosis. {yields} 12 Gy significantly affected genes of the NF-kB pathway, inflammatory cytokines and DAMPs. -- Abstract: Mucositis is a debilitating adverse effect of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. It is important to develop a simple and reliable in vitro model, which can routinely be used to screen new drugs for prevention and treatment of mucositis. Furthermore, identifying cell and molecular stresses especially in the initiation phase of mucositis in this model will help towards this end. We evaluated a three-dimensional (3-D) human oral cell culture that consisted of oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts as a model of oral mucositis. The 3-D cell culture model was irradiated with 12 or 2 Gy. Six hours after the irradiation we evaluated microscopic sections of the cell culture for evidence of morphologic changes including apoptosis. We used microarrays to compare the expression of several genes from the irradiated tissue with identical genes from tissue that was not irradiated. We found that irradiation with 12 Gy induced significant histopathologic effects including cellular apoptosis. Irradiation significantly affected the expression of several genes of the NF-kB pathway and several inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1B, 1L-8, NF-kB1, and FOS compared to tissue that was not irradiated. We identified significant upregulation of several genes that belong to damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as HMB1, S100A13, SA10014, and SA10016 in the 3-D tissues that received 12 Gy but not in tissues that received 2 Gy. In conclusion, this model quantifies radiation damage and this

  6. Direct observation of multistep energy transfer in LHCII with fifth-order 3D electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengyang; Lambrev, Petar H.; Wells, Kym L.; Garab, Győző; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2015-07-01

    During photosynthesis, sunlight is efficiently captured by light-harvesting complexes, and the excitation energy is then funneled towards the reaction centre. These photosynthetic excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways are complex and proceed in a multistep fashion. Ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is an important tool to study EET processes in photosynthetic complexes. However, the multistep EET processes can only be indirectly inferred by correlating different cross peaks from a series of 2DES spectra. Here we directly observe multistep EET processes in LHCII using ultrafast fifth-order three-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (3DES). We measure cross peaks in 3DES spectra of LHCII that directly indicate energy transfer from excitons in the chlorophyll b (Chl b) manifold to the low-energy level chlorophyll a (Chl a) via mid-level Chl a energy states. This new spectroscopic technique allows scientists to move a step towards mapping the complete complex EET processes in photosynthetic systems.

  7. Direct observation of multistep energy transfer in LHCII with fifth-order 3D electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhengyang; Lambrev, Petar H.; Wells, Kym L.; Garab, Győző; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2015-01-01

    During photosynthesis, sunlight is efficiently captured by light-harvesting complexes, and the excitation energy is then funneled towards the reaction centre. These photosynthetic excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways are complex and proceed in a multistep fashion. Ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is an important tool to study EET processes in photosynthetic complexes. However, the multistep EET processes can only be indirectly inferred by correlating different cross peaks from a series of 2DES spectra. Here we directly observe multistep EET processes in LHCII using ultrafast fifth-order three-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (3DES). We measure cross peaks in 3DES spectra of LHCII that directly indicate energy transfer from excitons in the chlorophyll b (Chl b) manifold to the low-energy level chlorophyll a (Chl a) via mid-level Chl a energy states. This new spectroscopic technique allows scientists to move a step towards mapping the complete complex EET processes in photosynthetic systems. PMID:26228055

  8. Chaotic advection and heat transfer in two similar 2-D periodic flows and in their corresponding 3-D periodic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinsard, G.; Dufour, S.; Saatdjian, E.; Mota, J. P. B.

    2016-03-01

    Chaotic advection can effectively enhance the heat transfer rate between a boundary and fluids with high Prandtl number. These fluids are usually highly viscous and thus turbulent agitation is not a viable solution since the energy required to mix the fluid would be prohibitive. Here, we analyze previously obtained results on chaotic advection and heat transfer in two similar 2-D periodic flows and on their corresponding 3-D periodic flows when an axial velocity component is superposed. The two flows studied are the flow between eccentric rotating cylinders and the flow between confocal ellipses. For both of these flows the analysis is simplified because the Stokes equations can be solved analytically to obtain a closed form solution. For both 2-D periodic flows, we show that chaotic heat transfer is enhanced by the displacement of the saddle point location during one period. Furthermore, the enhancement by chaotic advection in the elliptical geometry is approximately double that obtained in the cylindrical geometry because there are two saddle points instead of one. We also explain why, for high eccentricity ratios, there is no heat transfer enhancement in the cylindrical geometry. When an axial velocity component is added to both of these flows so that they become 3-D, previous work has shown that there is an optimum modulation frequency for which chaotic advection and heat transfer enhancement is a maximum. Here we show that the optimum modulation frequency can be derived from results without an axial flow. We also explain by physical arguments other previously unanswered questions in the published data.

  9. Observation of 2p3d(1Po)→1s3d(1De) radiative transition in He-like Si, S, and Cl ions.

    PubMed

    Kasthurirangan, S; Saha, J K; Agnihotri, A N; Bhattacharyya, S; Misra, D; Kumar, A; Mukherjee, P K; Santos, J P; Costa, A M; Indelicato, P; Mukherjee, T K; Tribedi, L C

    2013-12-13

    We present an experimental determination of the 2p3d(1Po)→1s3d(1De) x-ray line emitted from He-like Si, S, and Cl projectile ions, excited in collisions with thin carbon foils, using a high-resolution bent-crystal spectrometer. A good agreement between the observation and state-of-the-art relativistic calculations using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock formalism including the Breit interaction and QED effects implies the dominance of fluorescent decay over the autoionization process for the 2p3d(^{1}P^{o}) state of He-like heavy ions. This is the first observation of the fluorescence-active doubly excited states in He-like Si, S, and Cl ions.

  10. 3D printer generated thorax phantom with mobile tumor for radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Rulon; Liacouras, Peter; Thomas, Andrew; Kang, Minglei; Lin, Liyong; Simone, Charles B

    2015-07-01

    This article describes the design, construction, and properties of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a moving surrogate tumor. This novel phantom permits detection of dose both inside and outside a moving tumor and within the substitute lung tissue material. A 3D printer generated the thorax shell composed of a chest wall, spinal column, and posterior regions of the phantom. Images of a computed tomography scan of the thorax from a patient with lung cancer provided the template for the 3D printing. The plastic phantom is segmented into two materials representing the muscle and bones, and its geometry closely matches a patient. A surrogate spherical plastic tumor controlled by a 3D linear stage simulates a lung tumor's trajectory during normal breathing. Sawdust emulates the lung tissue in terms of average and distribution in Hounsfield numbers. The sawdust also provides a forgiving medium that permits tumor motion and sandwiching of radiochromic film inside the mobile surrogate plastic tumor for dosimetry. A custom cork casing shields the film and tumor and eliminates film bending during extended scans. The phantom, lung tissue surrogate, and radiochromic film are exposed to a seven field plan based on an ECLIPSE plan for 6 MV photons from a Trilogy machine delivering 230 cGy to the isocenter. The dose collected in a sagittal plane is compared to the calculated plan. Gamma analysis finds 8.8% and 5.5% gamma failure rates for measurements of large amplitude trajectory and static measurements relative to the large amplitude plan, respectively. These particular gamma analysis results were achieved using parameters of 3% dose and 3 mm, for regions receiving doses >150 cGy. The plan assumes a stationary detection grid unlike the moving radiochromic film and tissues. This difference was experimentally observed and motivated calculated dose distributions that incorporated the phase of the tumor periodic motion. These calculations modestly improve agreement between

  11. 3D printer generated thorax phantom with mobile tumor for radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Rulon; Liacouras, Peter; Thomas, Andrew; Kang, Minglei; Lin, Liyong; Simone, Charles B.

    2015-07-15

    This article describes the design, construction, and properties of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a moving surrogate tumor. This novel phantom permits detection of dose both inside and outside a moving tumor and within the substitute lung tissue material. A 3D printer generated the thorax shell composed of a chest wall, spinal column, and posterior regions of the phantom. Images of a computed tomography scan of the thorax from a patient with lung cancer provided the template for the 3D printing. The plastic phantom is segmented into two materials representing the muscle and bones, and its geometry closely matches a patient. A surrogate spherical plastic tumor controlled by a 3D linear stage simulates a lung tumor’s trajectory during normal breathing. Sawdust emulates the lung tissue in terms of average and distribution in Hounsfield numbers. The sawdust also provides a forgiving medium that permits tumor motion and sandwiching of radiochromic film inside the mobile surrogate plastic tumor for dosimetry. A custom cork casing shields the film and tumor and eliminates film bending during extended scans. The phantom, lung tissue surrogate, and radiochromic film are exposed to a seven field plan based on an ECLIPSE plan for 6 MV photons from a Trilogy machine delivering 230 cGy to the isocenter. The dose collected in a sagittal plane is compared to the calculated plan. Gamma analysis finds 8.8% and 5.5% gamma failure rates for measurements of large amplitude trajectory and static measurements relative to the large amplitude plan, respectively. These particular gamma analysis results were achieved using parameters of 3% dose and 3 mm, for regions receiving doses >150 cGy. The plan assumes a stationary detection grid unlike the moving radiochromic film and tissues. This difference was experimentally observed and motivated calculated dose distributions that incorporated the phase of the tumor periodic motion. These calculations modestly improve agreement between

  12. Focusing optics of a parallel beam CCD optical tomography apparatus for 3D radiation gel dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Krstajić, Nikola; Doran, Simon J

    2006-04-21

    Optical tomography of gel dosimeters is a promising and cost-effective avenue for quality control of radiotherapy treatments such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Systems based on a laser coupled to a photodiode have so far shown the best results within the context of optical scanning of radiosensitive gels, but are very slow ( approximately 9 min per slice) and poorly suited to measurements that require many slices. Here, we describe a fast, three-dimensional (3D) optical computed tomography (optical-CT) apparatus, based on a broad, collimated beam, obtained from a high power LED and detected by a charged coupled detector (CCD). The main advantages of such a system are (i) an acquisition speed approximately two orders of magnitude higher than a laser-based system when 3D data are required, and (ii) a greater simplicity of design. This paper advances our previous work by introducing a new design of focusing optics, which take information from a suitably positioned focal plane and project an image onto the CCD. An analysis of the ray optics is presented, which explains the roles of telecentricity, focusing, acceptance angle and depth-of-field (DOF) in the formation of projections. A discussion of the approximation involved in measuring the line integrals required for filtered backprojection reconstruction is given. Experimental results demonstrate (i) the effect on projections of changing the position of the focal plane of the apparatus, (ii) how to measure the acceptance angle of the optics, and (iii) the ability of the new scanner to image both absorbing and scattering gel phantoms. The quality of reconstructed images is very promising and suggests that the new apparatus may be useful in a clinical setting for fast and accurate 3D dosimetry.

  13. 3D printer generated thorax phantom with mobile tumor for radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Rulon; Liacouras, Peter; Thomas, Andrew; Kang, Minglei; Lin, Liyong; Simone, Charles B.

    2015-07-01

    This article describes the design, construction, and properties of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a moving surrogate tumor. This novel phantom permits detection of dose both inside and outside a moving tumor and within the substitute lung tissue material. A 3D printer generated the thorax shell composed of a chest wall, spinal column, and posterior regions of the phantom. Images of a computed tomography scan of the thorax from a patient with lung cancer provided the template for the 3D printing. The plastic phantom is segmented into two materials representing the muscle and bones, and its geometry closely matches a patient. A surrogate spherical plastic tumor controlled by a 3D linear stage simulates a lung tumor's trajectory during normal breathing. Sawdust emulates the lung tissue in terms of average and distribution in Hounsfield numbers. The sawdust also provides a forgiving medium that permits tumor motion and sandwiching of radiochromic film inside the mobile surrogate plastic tumor for dosimetry. A custom cork casing shields the film and tumor and eliminates film bending during extended scans. The phantom, lung tissue surrogate, and radiochromic film are exposed to a seven field plan based on an ECLIPSE plan for 6 MV photons from a Trilogy machine delivering 230 cGy to the isocenter. The dose collected in a sagittal plane is compared to the calculated plan. Gamma analysis finds 8.8% and 5.5% gamma failure rates for measurements of large amplitude trajectory and static measurements relative to the large amplitude plan, respectively. These particular gamma analysis results were achieved using parameters of 3% dose and 3 mm, for regions receiving doses >150 cGy. The plan assumes a stationary detection grid unlike the moving radiochromic film and tissues. This difference was experimentally observed and motivated calculated dose distributions that incorporated the phase of the tumor periodic motion. These calculations modestly improve agreement between

  14. 3-D aluminum nanostructure with microhole array synthesized by femtosecond laser radiation for enhanced light extinction.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Abdul Salam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2013-11-14

    This article presents 3-D aluminum micro-nanostructures for enhanced light absorption. Periodic microhole arrays were created by firing a train of femtosecond laser pulses at megahertz pulse frequency onto the surface of an aluminum target at ambient conditions. The laser trains ablated the target surface and created microholes leading to the generation of deposited nanostructures inside and around the microholes. These micro-nanostructures showed enhanced light absorption, which is attributed to surface plasmonics induced by the generation of both nano- and microstructures. These micro-nanostructures may be promising for solar cell applications.

  15. 3-D aluminum nanostructure with microhole array synthesized by femtosecond laser radiation for enhanced light extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Abdul Salam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2013-11-01

    This article presents 3-D aluminum micro-nanostructures for enhanced light absorption. Periodic microhole arrays were created by firing a train of femtosecond laser pulses at megahertz pulse frequency onto the surface of an aluminum target at ambient conditions. The laser trains ablated the target surface and created microholes leading to the generation of deposited nanostructures inside and around the microholes. These micro-nanostructures showed enhanced light absorption, which is attributed to surface plasmonics induced by the generation of both nano- and microstructures. These micro-nanostructures may be promising for solar cell applications.

  16. 3-D aluminum nanostructure with microhole array synthesized by femtosecond laser radiation for enhanced light extinction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This article presents 3-D aluminum micro-nanostructures for enhanced light absorption. Periodic microhole arrays were created by firing a train of femtosecond laser pulses at megahertz pulse frequency onto the surface of an aluminum target at ambient conditions. The laser trains ablated the target surface and created microholes leading to the generation of deposited nanostructures inside and around the microholes. These micro-nanostructures showed enhanced light absorption, which is attributed to surface plasmonics induced by the generation of both nano- and microstructures. These micro-nanostructures may be promising for solar cell applications. PMID:24225364

  17. Simulation of 3-D radiation beam patterns propagated through a planar interface from ultrasonic phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Song, Sung-Jin; Kim, Chang-Hwan

    2002-05-01

    Phased array transducers are quite often mounted on solid wedges with specific angles in many practical ultrasonic inspections of thin plates <10 mm in their thickness or welded joints with convex crowns. For the reliable application of phased array techniques with testing set-up, it is essential to have thorough understanding on the characteristics of radiation beam pattern produced in the interrogated medium. To address such a need, this paper proposes a systematic way to calculate full 3-D radiation beam patterns produced in the interrogated solid medium by phased array transducers mounted on a solid wedge. In order to investigate the characteristics of radiation beam patterns in steel, simulation is carried out for 7.5 MHz array transducers mounted on an acrylic wedge with the angle of 15.45 degrees with various of steering angles and/or focal planes.

  18. SU-E-T-419: Fabricating Cerrobend Grids with 3D Printing for Spatially Modulated Radiation Therapy: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X; Driewer, J; Lei, Y; Zheng, D; Li, S; Zhang, Q; Zhang, M; Zhou, S; Cullip, T; Chang, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Grid therapy has promising applications in the radiation treatment of bulky and large tumors. However, research and applications of grid therapy is limited by the accessibility of the specialized blocks that produce the grid of pencil-like radiation beams. In this study, a Cerrobend grid block was fabricated using a 3D printing technique. Methods: A grid block mold was designed with divergent tubes following beam central rays. The mold was printed using a resin with the working temperature below 230 °C. The melted Cerrobend liquid at 120°oC was cast into the resin mold to yield a block with a thickness of 7.4 cm. The grid had a hexagonal pattern, with each pencil beam diameter of 1.4 cm at the iso-center plane; the distance between the beam centers was 2 cm. The dosimetric properties of the grid block were studied using radiographic film and small field dosimeters. Results: the grid block was fabricated to be mounted at the third accessory mount of a Siemens Oncor linear accelerator. Fabricating a grid block using 3D printing is similar to making cutouts for traditional radiotherapy photon blocks, with the difference being that the mold was created by a 3D printer rather than foam. In this study, the valley-to-peak ratio for a 6MV photon grid beam was 20% at dmax, and 30% at 10 cm depth, respectively. Conclusion: We have demonstrated a novel process for implementing grid radiotherapy using 3D printing techniques. Compared to existing approaches, our technique combines reduced cost, accessibility, and flexibility in customization with efficient delivery. This lays the groundwork for future studies to improve our understanding of the efficacy of grid therapy and apply it to improve cancer treatment.

  19. Identifying cell and molecular stress after radiation in a three-dimensional (3-D) model of oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Lambros, Maria Polikandritou; Parsa, Cyrus; Mulamalla, HariChandana; Orlando, Robert; Lau, Bernard; Huang, Ying; Pon, Doreen; Chow, Moses

    2011-02-04

    Mucositis is a debilitating adverse effect of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. It is important to develop a simple and reliable in vitro model, which can routinely be used to screen new drugs for prevention and treatment of mucositis. Furthermore, identifying cell and molecular stresses especially in the initiation phase of mucositis in this model will help towards this end. We evaluated a three-dimensional (3-D) human oral cell culture that consisted of oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts as a model of oral mucositis. The 3-D cell culture model was irradiated with 12 or 2 Gy. Six hours after the irradiation we evaluated microscopic sections of the cell culture for evidence of morphologic changes including apoptosis. We used microarrays to compare the expression of several genes from the irradiated tissue with identical genes from tissue that was not irradiated. We found that irradiation with 12 Gy induced significant histopathologic effects including cellular apoptosis. Irradiation significantly affected the expression of several genes of the NF-kB pathway and several inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1B, 1L-8, NF-kB1, and FOS compared to tissue that was not irradiated. We identified significant upregulation of several genes that belong to damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as HMB1, S100A13, SA10014, and SA10016 in the 3-D tissues that received 12 Gy but not in tissues that received 2 Gy. In conclusion, this model quantifies radiation damage and this is an important first step towards the development 3-D tissue as a screening tool.

  20. Influence of 3D Radiative Effects on Satellite Retrievals of Cloud Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    When cloud properties are retrieved from satellite observations, the calculations apply 1D theory to the 3D world: they only consider vertical structures and ignore horizontal cloud variability. This presentation discusses how big the resulting errors can be in the operational retrievals of cloud optical thickness. A new technique was developed to estimate the magnitude of potential errors by analyzing the spatial patterns of visible and infrared images. The proposed technique was used to set error bars for optical depths retrieved from new MODIS measurements. Initial results indicate that the 1 km resolution retrievals are subject to abundant uncertainties. Averaging over 50 by 50 km areas reduces the errors, but does not remove them completely; even in the relatively simple case of high sun (30 degree zenith angle), about a fifth of the examined areas had biases larger than ten percent. As expected, errors increase substantially for more oblique illumination.

  1. Aerosols, Chemistry, and Radiative Forcing: A 3-D Model Analysis of Satellite and ACE-Asia data (ACMAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Torres, Omar; Zhao, Xue-Peng

    2005-01-01

    We propose a research project to incorporate a global 3-D model and satellite data into the multi-national Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia (ACE-Asia) mission. Our objectives are (1) to understand the physical, chemical, and optical properties of aerosols and the processes that control those properties over the Asian-Pacific region, (2) to investigate the interaction between aerosols and tropospheric chemistry, and (3) to determine the aerosol radiative forcing over the Asia-Pacific region. We will use the Georgia TecWGoddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model to link satellite observations and the ACE-Asia measurements. First, we will use the GOCART model to simulate aerosols and related species, and evaluate the model with satellite and in-situ observations. Second, the model generated aerosol vertical profiles and compositions will be used to validate the satellite products; and the satellite data will be used for during- and post- mission analysis. Third, we will use the model to analyze and interpret both satellite and ACE- Asia field campaign data and investigate the aerosol-chemistry interactions. Finally, we will calculate aerosol radiative forcing over the Asian-Pacific region, and assess the influence of Asian pollution in the global atmosphere. We propose a research project to incorporate a global 3-D model and satellite data into

  2. Calculation of the nuclear material inventory in a sealed vault by 3D radiation mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Adsley, Ian; Klepikov, Alexander; Tur, Yevgeniy; Wells, David

    2013-07-01

    The paper relates to the determination of the amount of nuclear material contained in a closed, concrete lined vault at the Aktau fast breeder reactor in Kazakhstan. This material had been disposed into the vault after examination in an experimental hot cell directly above the vault. In order to comply with IAEA Safeguards requirements it was necessary to determine the total quantities of nuclear materials - enriched uranium and plutonium - that were held with Kazakhstan. Although it was possible to determine the inventory of all of the accessible nuclear material - the quantity remaining in the vault was unknown. As part of the Global Threat Reduction Programme the UK Government funded a project to determine the inventory of these nuclear materials in this vault. This involved drilling three penetrations through the concrete lined roof of the vault; this enabled the placement of lights and a camera into the vault through two penetrations; while the third penetration enabled a lightweight manipulator arm to be introduced into the vault. This was used to provide a detailed 3D mapping of the dose rate within the vault and it also enabled the collection of samples for radionuclide analysis. The deconvolution of the 3D dose rate profile within the vault enabled the determination of the gamma emitting source distribution on the floor and walls of the vault. The samples were analysed to determine the fingerprint of those radionuclides producing the gamma dose - namely {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co - to the nuclear materials. The combination of the dose rate source terms on the surfaces of the vault and the fingerprint then enabled the quantities of nuclear materials to be determined. The project was a major success and enabled the Kazakhstan Government to comply with IAEA Safeguards requirements. It also enabled the UK DECC Ministry to develop a technology of national (and international) use. Finally the technology was well received by IAEA Safeguards as an acceptable

  3. 3D sensitive voxel detector of ionizing radiation based on Timepix device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, P.; Jakubek, J.; Vykydal, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Position sensitive detectors are evolving towards higher segmentation geometries from 0D (single pad) over 1D (strip) to 2D (pixel) detectors. Each step has brought up substantial expansion in the field of applications. The next logical step in this evolution is to design a 3D, i.e. voxel detector. The voxel detector can be constructed from 2D volume element detectors arranged in layers forming a 3D matrix of sensitive elements — voxels. Such detectors can effectively record tracks of energetic particles. By proper analysis of these tracks it is possible to determine the type, direction and energy of the primary particle. One of the prominent applications of such device is in the localization and identification of gamma and neutron sources in the environment. It can be also used for emission and transmission radiography in many fields where standard imagers are currently utilized. The qualitative properties of current imagers such as: spatial resolution, efficiency, directional sensitivity, energy sensitivity and selectivity (background suppression) can be improved. The first prototype of a voxel detector was built using a number of Timepix devices. Timepix is hybrid semiconductor detector consisting of a segmented semiconductor sensor bump-bonded to a readout chip. Each sensor contains 256x256 square pixels of 55 μm size. The voxel detector prototype was successfully tested to prove the concept functionality. The detector has a modular architecture with a daisy chain connection of the individual detector layers. This permits easy rearrangement due to its modularity, while keeping a single readout system for a variable number of detector layers. A limitation of this approach is the relatively large inter-layer distance (4 mm) compared to the pixel thickness (0.3 mm). Therefore the next step in the design is to decrease the space between the 2D detectors.

  4. TU-CD-207-04: Radiation Exposure Comparisons of CESM with 2D FFDM and 3D Tomosynthesis Mammography

    SciTech Connect

    James, J; Boltz, T; Pavlicek, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: While mammography is considered the standard for front-line breast cancer screening, image sensitivity and specificity can be affected by factors like dense breast tissue. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) shows promising initial results for dense breasts but comes at the cost of increased dose compared with full-field-digital-mammography (FFDM). The goal of this study is to quantitatively assess the dose increase of CESM in comparison with 2D-FFDM and 3D-Tomo at varying breast thickness. Methods: The experiments were conducted on a Hologic-Selenia-Dimensions system that performed 2D-FFDM, 3D-Tomo and CESM (high and low energies) on regular (50/50) and dense (70/30) breast tissue-mimicking phantoms. Both the phantoms had 6, 1-cm thick slabs (total thickness 6cm), compressed at 20-lbs using an 18×24 paddle. A single exposure was performed for each of the 3 mammo techniques with the following settings: AEC-Auto; Focal Spot-Large; kVp-Auto; mAs- Auto, Target/Filter combination-Auto; AEC Sensor/Exposure compensation Step-2/0. Average glandular dose (AGD) in mGy was obtained and compared as a function of breast thickness (1 – 6 cm) for both the phantom types. Results: The study shows that dose from the total CESM from 50/50 phantom at a breast thickness of a) 4.5 cm was 37.5% higher than 2D-FFDM and 30% higher than 3D-Tomo, b) 6 cm was 36.2% higher than 2D-FFDM and 41% higher than 3D-Tomo. For a dense breast tissue of 70/30 phantom, it was found that CESM dose at a breast thickness of: a) 4.5 cm was 33.3% higher than 2D-FFDM and 28.8% higher than 3D-Tomo, b) 6 cm was 35.4% higher than 2D-FFDM and 48.0% higher than 3D-Tomo. The overall CESM dose for the dense breast phantom was 12.5% higher at 4.5cm and 35% higher at 6 cm compared to the 50/50 phantom. Conclusion: This quantitative comparison study showed that CESM technique has an increased radiation dose compared to conventional 2D-FFDM and 3D-Tomo.

  5. On the use of flux limiters in the discrete ordinates method for 3D radiation calculations in absorbing and scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoy, William F.; DesJardin, Paul E.

    2010-05-01

    The application of flux limiters to the discrete ordinates method (DOM), SN, for radiative transfer calculations is discussed and analyzed for 3D enclosures for cases in which the intensities are strongly coupled to each other such as: radiative equilibrium and scattering media. A Newton-Krylov iterative method (GMRES) solves the final systems of linear equations along with a domain decomposition strategy for parallel computation using message passing libraries in a distributed memory system. Ray effects due to angular discretization and errors due to domain decomposition are minimized until small variations are introduced by these effects in order to focus on the influence of flux limiters on errors due to spatial discretization, known as numerical diffusion, smearing or false scattering. Results are presented for the DOM-integrated quantities such as heat flux, irradiation and emission. A variety of flux limiters are compared to "exact" solutions available in the literature, such as the integral solution of the RTE for pure absorbing-emitting media and isotropic scattering cases and a Monte Carlo solution for a forward scattering case. Additionally, a non-homogeneous 3D enclosure is included to extend the use of flux limiters to more practical cases. The overall balance of convergence, accuracy, speed and stability using flux limiters is shown to be superior compared to step schemes for any test case.

  6. Radiative heat transfer in porous uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S.L.

    1992-12-01

    Due to low thermal conductivity and high emissivity of UO{sub 2}, it has been suggested that radiative heat transfer may play a significant role in heat transfer through pores of UO{sub 2} fuel. This possibility was computationally investigated and contribution of radiative heat transfer within pores to overall heat transport in porous UO{sub 2} quantified. A repeating unit cell was developed to model approximately a porous UO{sub 2} fuel system, and the heat transfer through unit cells representing a wide variety of fuel conditions was calculated using a finite element computer program. Conduction through solid fuel matrix as wekk as pore gas, and radiative exchange at pore surface was incorporated. A variety of pore compositions were investigated: porosity, pore size, shape and orientation, temperature, and temperature gradient. Calculations were made in which pore surface radiation was both modeled and neglected. The difference between yielding the integral contribution of radiative heat transfer mechanism to overall heat transport. Results indicate that radiative component of heat transfer within pores is small for conditions representative of light water reactor fuel, typically less than 1% of total heat transport. It is much larger, however, for conditions present in liquid metal fast breeder reactor fuel; during restructuring of this fuel type early in life, the radiative heat transfer mode was shown to contribute as much as 10-20% of total heat transport in hottest regions of fuel.

  7. LavaSIM: the effect of heat transfer in 3D on lava flow characteristics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, E.

    2013-12-01

    Characteristics of lava flow are governed by many parameters like lava viscosity, effusion rate, ground topography, etc. The accuracy and applicability of lava flow simulation code is evaluated whether the numerical simulation can reproduce these features quantitatively, which is important from both strategic and scientific points of views. Many lava flow simulation codes are so far proposed, and they are classified into two categories, i.e., the deterministic and the probabilistic models. LavaSIM is one of the former category models, and has a disadvantage of time consuming. But LavaSIM can solves the equations of continuity, motion, energy by step and has an advantage in the calculation of three-dimensional analysis with solid-liquid two phase flow, including the heat transfer between lava, solidified crust, air, water and ground, and three-dimensional convection in liquid lava. In other word, we can check the detailed structure of lava flow by LavaSIM. Therefore, this code can produce both channeled and fan-dispersive flows. The margin of the flow is solidified by cooling and these solidified crusts control the behavior of successive lava flow. In case of a channel flow, the solidified margin supports the stable central main flow and elongates the lava flow distance. The cross section of lava flow shows that the liquid lava flows between solidified crusts. As for the lava extrusion flow rate, LavaSIM can include the time function as well as the location of the vents. In some cases, some parts of the solidified wall may be broken by the pressure of successive flow and/or re-melting. These mechanisms could characterize complex features of the observed lava flows at many volcanoes in the world. To apply LavaSIM to the benchmark tests organized by V-hub is important to improve the lava flow evaluation technique.

  8. 3D CFD ELECTROCHEMICAL AND HEAT TRANSFER MODEL OF AN INTERNALLY MANIFOLDED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Grant L. Hawkes; James E. O'Brien; Greg Tao

    2011-11-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis cell performance and steam electrolysis in an internally manifolded planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) stack. This design is being evaluated at the Idaho National Laboratory for hydrogen production from nuclear power and process heat. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, operating potential, steam-electrode gas composition, oxygen-electrode gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Single-cell and five-cell results will be presented. Flow distribution through both models is discussed. Flow enters from the bottom, distributes through the inlet plenum, flows across the cells, gathers in the outlet plenum and flows downward making an upside-down ''U'' shaped flow pattern. Flow and concentration variations exist downstream of the inlet holes. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Effects of variations in operating temperature, gas flow rate, oxygen-electrode and steam-electrode current density, and contact resistance from the base case are presented. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicate the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition. Results are discussed for using this design in the electrolysis mode. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production, cell thermal

  9. Optimal matching of 3D film-measured and planned doses for intensity-modulated radiation therapy quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Park, Sung Yong; Park, Dong Hyun; Lee, Se Byeong; Kim, Dae Yong; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2007-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is one of the most complex applications of radiotherapy that requires patient-specific quality assurance (QA). Here, we describe a novel method of 3-dimensional (3D) dose-verification using 12 acrylic slabs in a 3D phantom (30 x 30 x 12 cm(3)) with extended dose rate (EDR2) films, which is both faster than conventionally used methods, and clinically useful. With custom-written software modules written in Microsoft Excel Visual Basic Application, the measured and planned dose distributions for the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes were superimposed by matching their origins, and the point doses were compared at all matched positions. Then, an optimization algorithm was used to correct the detected setup errors. The results show that this optimization method significantly reduces the average maximum dose difference by 7.73% and the number of points showing dose differences of more than 5% by 8.82% relative to the dose differences without an optimization. Our results indicate that the dose difference was significantly decreased with optimization and this optimization method is statistically reliable and effective. The results of 3D optimization are discussed in terms of various patient-specific QA data obtained from statistical analyses.

  10. The feasibility assessment of radiation dose of movement 3D NIPAM gel by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Chih-Ming; Leung, Joseph Hang; Ng, Yu-Bun; Cheng, Chih-Wu; Sun, Jung-Chang; Lin, Ping-Chin; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung

    2015-11-01

    NIPAM dosimeter is widely accepted and recommended for its 3D distribution and accuracy in dose absorption. Up to the moment, most research works on dose measurement are based on a fixed irradiation target without the consideration of the effect from physiological motion. We present a study to construct a respiratory motion simulating patient anatomical and dosimetry model for the study of dosimetic effect of organ motion. The dose on fixed and motion targets was measured by MRI after a dose adminstration of 1, 2, 5, 8, and 10 Gy from linear accelerator. Comparison of two situations is made. The average sensitivity of fixed NIPAM was 0.1356 s-1/Gy with linearity R2=0.998. The average sensitivity of movement NIPAM was 0.1366 s-1/Gy with linearity R2=0.998 both having only 0.001 of the sensitivity difference. The difference between the two based on dose rate dependency, position and depth was not significant. There was thus no apparent impact on NIPAM dosimeter from physiological motion. The high sensitivity, linearity and stability of NIPAM dosimeter proved to be an ideal apparatus in the dose measurement in these circumstances.

  11. Three Dimensional Radiative Transfer In Tropical Deep Convective Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Giuseppe, F.

    In this study the focus is on the interaction between short-wave radiation with a field of tropical deep convective events generated using a 3D cloud resolving model (CRM) to assess the significance of 3D radiative transport (3DRT). It is not currently un- derstood what magnitude of error is involved when a two stream approximation is used to describe the radiative transfer through such a cloud field. It seems likely that deep convective clouds could be the most complex to represent, and that the error in neglecting horizontal transport could be relevant in these cases. The field here con- sidered has an extention of roughly 90x90 km, approximately equivalent to the grid box dimension of many global models. The 3DRT results are compared both with the calculations obtained by an Independent Pixel Approximation (IPA) approch and by the Plane Parallel radiative scheme (PP) implemented in ECMWF's Forecast model. The differences between the three calculations are used to assess both problems in current GCM's representation of radiative heating and inaccuracies in the dynamical response of CRM simulations due to the Independent Column Approximation (ICA). The understanding of the mechanisms involved in the main 3DRT/1D differences is the starting point for the future attempt to develop a parameterization procedure.

  12. Development and Validation of a Polarimetric-MCScene 3D Atmospheric Radiation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, Alexander; Hawes, Frederick; Fox, Marsha

    2016-03-15

    Polarimetric measurements can substantially enhance the ability of both spectrally resolved and single band imagery to detect the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, providing data for locating and identifying facilities, materials, and processes of undeclared and proliferant nuclear weapons programs worldwide. Unfortunately, models do not exist that efficiently and accurately predict spectral polarized signatures for the materials of interest embedded in complex 3D environments. Having such a model would enable one to test hypotheses and optimize both the enhancement of scene contrast and the signal processing for spectral signature extraction. The Phase I set the groundwork for development of fully validated polarimetric spectral signature and scene simulation models. This has been accomplished 1. by (a) identifying and downloading state-of-the-art surface and atmospheric polarimetric data sources, (b) implementing tools for generating custom polarimetric data, and (c) identifying and requesting US Government funded field measurement data for use in validation; 2. by formulating an approach for upgrading the radiometric spectral signature model MODTRAN to generate polarimetric intensities through (a) ingestion of the polarimetric data, (b) polarimetric vectorization of existing MODTRAN modules, and (c) integration of a newly developed algorithm for computing polarimetric multiple scattering contributions; 3. by generating an initial polarimetric model that demonstrates calculation of polarimetric solar and lunar single scatter intensities arising from the interaction of incoming irradiances with molecules and aerosols; 4. by developing a design and implementation plan to (a) automate polarimetric scene construction and (b) efficiently sample polarimetric scattering and reflection events, for use in a to be developed polarimetric version of the existing first-principles synthetic scene simulation model, MCScene; and 5. by planning a validation field

  13. 2D-3D registration for brain radiation therapy using a 3D CBCT and a single limited field-of-view 2D kV radiograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munbodh, R.; Moseley, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    We report results of an intensity-based 2D-3D rigid registration framework for patient positioning and monitoring during brain radiotherapy. We evaluated two intensity-based similarity measures, the Pearson Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and Maximum Likelihood with Gaussian noise (MLG) derived from the statistics of transmission images. A useful image frequency band was identified from the bone-to-no-bone ratio. Validation was performed on gold-standard data consisting of 3D kV CBCT scans and 2D kV radiographs of an anthropomorphic head phantom acquired at 23 different poses with parameter variations along six degrees of freedom. At each pose, a single limited field of view kV radiograph was registered to the reference CBCT. The ground truth was determined from markers affixed to the phantom and visible in the CBCT images. The mean (and standard deviation) of the absolute errors in recovering each of the six transformation parameters along the x, y and z axes for ICC were varphix: 0.08(0.04)°, varphiy: 0.10(0.09)°, varphiz: 0.03(0.03)°, tx: 0.13(0.11) mm, ty: 0.08(0.06) mm and tz: 0.44(0.23) mm. For MLG, the corresponding results were varphix: 0.10(0.04)°, varphiy: 0.10(0.09)°, varphiz: 0.05(0.07)°, tx: 0.11(0.13) mm, ty: 0.05(0.05) mm and tz: 0.44(0.31) mm. It is feasible to accurately estimate all six transformation parameters from a 3D CBCT of the head and a single 2D kV radiograph within an intensity-based registration framework that incorporates the physics of transmission images.

  14. International prevalidation studies of the EpiDerm 3D human reconstructed skin micronucleus (RSMN) assay: transferability and reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Aardema, Marilyn J; Barnett, Brenda C; Khambatta, Zubin; Reisinger, Kerstin; Ouedraogo-Arras, Gladys; Faquet, Brigitte; Ginestet, Anne-Claire; Mun, Greg C; Dahl, Erica L; Hewitt, Nicola J; Corvi, Raffallea; Curren, Rodger D

    2010-08-30

    Recently, a novel in vitro reconstructed skin micronucleus (RSMN) assay incorporating the EpiDerm 3D human skin model (Curren et al., Mutat. Res. 607 (2006) 192-204; Mun et al., Mutat. Res. 673 (2009) 92-99) has been shown to produce comparable data when utilized in three different laboratories in the United States (Hu et al., Mutat. Res. 673 (2009) 100-108). As part of a project sponsored by the European cosmetics companies trade association (COLIPA), with a contribution from the European Center for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM), international prevalidation studies of the RSMN assay have been initiated. The assay was transferred and optimized in two laboratories in Europe, where dose-dependent, reproducibly positive results for mitomycin C and vinblastine sulfate were obtained. Further intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility of the RSMN assay was established by testing three coded chemicals, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, cyclohexanone, and mitomycin C. All chemicals were correctly identified by all laboratories as either positive or negative. These results support the international inter-laboratory and inter-experimental reproducibility of the assay and reinforce the conclusion that the RSMN assay in the EpiDerm 3D human skin model is a valuable in vitro method for assessment of genotoxicity of dermally applied chemicals.

  15. 3D position of radiation sources using an automated gamma camera and ML algorithm with energy-dependent response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonho; Wehe, David

    2004-09-01

    Portable γ-ray imaging systems operating from 100keV to 3MeV are used in nuclear medicine, astrophysics and industrial applications. 2D images of γ-rays are common in many fields using radiation-detection systems (Appl. Opt. 17 (3) (1978) 337; IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. Ns- 31 (1984) 771; IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS- 44 (3) (1997) 911). In this work, the 3D position of a radiation source is determined by a portable gamma-ray imaging system. 2D gamma-ray images were obtained from different positions of the gamma camera and the third dimension, the distance between the detector and the radiation source, was calculated using triangulation. The imaging system consists of a 4×4 array of CsI(Tl) detectors coupled to photodiode detectors that are mounted on an automated table which can precisely position the angular axis of the camera. Lead shields the detector array from the background radiation. Additionally, a CCD camera is attached to the top of the gamma camera and provides coincident 2D visual information. The inferred distances from the center of the two measurement points and a radiation source had less than a 3% error within a range of 3m. The radiation image from the gamma camera and the visual image from CCD camera are superimposed into one combined image using a maximum-likelihood (ML) algorithm to make the image more precise. The response functions for the ML algorithm depend on the energy of incident radiation, and are obtained from both experiments and simulations. The energy-dependent response functions are shown to yield better imaging performance compared with the fixed energy response function commonly used previously.

  16. Modeling 3D conjugate heat and mass transfer for turbulent air drying of Chilean papaya in a direct contact dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemus-Mondaca, Roberto A.; Vega-Gálvez, Antonio; Zambra, Carlos E.; Moraga, Nelson O.

    2017-01-01

    A 3D model considering heat and mass transfer for food dehydration inside a direct contact dryer is studied. The k- ɛ model is used to describe turbulent air flow. The samples thermophysical properties as density, specific heat, and thermal conductivity are assumed to vary non-linearly with temperature. FVM, SIMPLE algorithm based on a FORTRAN code are used. Results unsteady velocity, temperature, moisture, kinetic energy and dissipation rate for the air flow are presented, whilst temperature and moisture values for the food also are presented. The validation procedure includes a comparison with experimental and numerical temperature and moisture content results obtained from experimental data, reaching a deviation 7-10 %. In addition, this turbulent k- ɛ model provided a better understanding of the transport phenomenon inside the dryer and sample.

  17. The 3D Radiative Effects of Clouds in Aerosol Retrieval: Can we Remove Them?

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Berg, Larry K.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ferrare, Richard; Hostetler, Chris A.

    2009-09-30

    We outline a new method, called the ratio method, developed to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) under broken cloud conditions and present validation results from sensitivity and case studies. Results of the sensitivity study demonstrate that the ratio method, which exploits ratios of reflectances in the visible spectral range, has the potential for accurate AOD retrievals under different observational conditions and random errors in input data. Also, we examine the performance of the ratio method using aircraft data collected during the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) and the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS). Results of the case study suggest that the ratio method has the ability to retrieve AOD from multi-spectral aircraft observations of the reflected solar radiation.

  18. A Bayesian mixture model relating dose to critical organs and functional complication in 3D conformal radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy D; Taylor, Jeremy M G; Ten Haken, Randall K; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2005-10-01

    A goal of cancer radiation therapy is to deliver maximum dose to the target tumor while minimizing complications due to irradiation of critical organs. Technological advances in 3D conformal radiation therapy has allowed great strides in realizing this goal; however, complications may still arise. Critical organs may be adjacent to tumors or in the path of the radiation beam. Several mathematical models have been proposed that describe the relationship between dose and observed functional complication; however, only a few published studies have successfully fit these models to data using modern statistical methods which make efficient use of the data. One complication following radiation therapy of head and neck cancers is the patient's inability to produce saliva. Xerostomia (dry mouth) leads to high susceptibility to oral infection and dental caries and is, in general, unpleasant and an annoyance. We present a dose-damage-injury model that subsumes any of the various mathematical models relating dose to damage. The model is a nonlinear, longitudinal mixed effects model where the outcome (saliva flow rate) is modeled as a mixture of a Dirac measure at zero and a gamma distribution whose mean is a function of time and dose. Bayesian methods are used to estimate the relationship between dose delivered to the parotid glands and the observational outcome-saliva flow rate. A summary measure of the dose-damage relationship is modeled and assessed by a Bayesian chi(2) test for goodness-of-fit.

  19. 3D measurement of the radiation distribution in a water phantom in a hadron therapy beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opalka, L.; Granja, C.; Hartmann, B.; Jakubek, J.; Jaekel, O.; Martisikova, M.; Pospisil, S.; Solc, J.

    2012-01-01

    Hadron therapy is a highly precise radio-therapeutic method with many advantages especially in cases when the tumour is close to sensitive organs where standard treatments cannot be used. For reliable treatment planning it is necessary to have calculation tools for maximization of the dose delivered to the targeted tissue and minimization of the dose outside of it. While the main physical processes in material irradiated by hadron beams are known, in reality the processes involved are complex so that analytical computations are impossible. Thus, the planning tools to incorporate simplified models and numerical approximations and an experimental method for high precision verification of the models within phantoms is desired. The development of sensitive, high resolution and online methods for measurement of the radiation environment inside of the irradiated object is the aim of this work. Such measurements are made possible by the resolving power of the state-of-the-art pixel detector Timepix. This quantum counting imaging device is able to record the characteristic shapes of the particle traces including their energies deposited in the detector. All these data recorded for each event allow to estimate the particle type, its energy and direction of flight. Event-by-event analysis is done using pattern recognition of the characteristic traces. The objective of the experiment is the detection and characterization of secondary radiation generated by the primary therapeutic beams in tissue equivalent material (water). Measurements were performed inside of a water phantom irradiated by a carbon beam at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT).

  20. Angular radiation transfer in inhomogeneous dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, E. A.; El Ghazaly, A. A.; Krim, M. S. Abdel

    1988-10-01

    The equation of radiative transfer for an inhomogeneous dispersive finite medium subject to general boundary conditions is solved. The Padé approximation technique is used to calculate the angular distribution of radiation. Numerical results for the [0/1] Padé approximant lead to numerical results that compare with the exact results.

  1. Radiation heat transfer shapefactors for combustion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, A. F.; Johansson, O.; Abrous, A.

    1987-01-01

    The computation of radiation heat transfer through absorbing media is commonly done through the zoning method which relies upon values of the geometric mean transmittance and absorptance. The computation of these values is difficult and expensive, particularly if many spectral bands are used. This paper describes the extension of a scan line algorithm, based upon surface-surface radiation, to the computation of surface-gas and gas-gas radiation transmittances.

  2. 3D unmanned aerial vehicle radiation mapping for assessing contaminant distribution and mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P. G.; Kwong, S.; Smith, N. T.; Yamashiki, Y.; Payton, O. D.; Russell-Pavier, F. S.; Fardoulis, J. S.; Richards, D. A.; Scott, T. B.

    2016-10-01

    Following the events of March 2011 at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, significant quantities of radioactive material were released into the local and wider global environment. At five years since the incident, much expense is being currently devoted to the remediation of a large portion of eastern Japan contaminated primarily by radiocesium, yet further significant expenditure will be required over the succeeding decades to complete this clean-up. People displaced from their homes by the incident are now increasingly keen to return, making it more important than ever to provide accurate quantification and representation of any residual radiological contamination. Presented here is the use of an unmanned aerial vehicle equipped with a laser rangefinder unit to generate a three dimensional point-cloud of an area onto which a radiation contamination map, also obtained concurrently via the unmanned aerial platform, can be rendered. An exemplar site of an un-remediated farm consisting of multiple stepped rice paddy fields with a dedicated irrigation system was used for this work. The results obtained show that heightened radiological contamination exists around the site within the drainage network where material is observed to have collected, having been transported by transient water runoff events. These results obtained in May 2014 suggest that a proportion of the fallout material is highly mobile within the natural environment and is likely to be transported further through the system over the succeeding years.

  3. Incorporation of gantry angle correction for 3D dose prediction in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sumida, Iori; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yamada, Yuji; Yagi, Masashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Pretreatment dose verification with beam-by-beam analysis for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is commonly performed with a gantry angle of 0° using a 2D diode detector array. Any changes in multileaf collimator (MLC) position between the actual treatment gantry angle and 0° may result in deviations from the planned dose. We evaluated the effects of MLC positioning errors between the actual treatment gantry angles and nominal gantry angles. A gantry angle correction (GAC) factor was generated by performing a non-gap test at various gantry angles using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). To convert pixel intensity to dose at the MLC abutment positions, a non-gap test was performed using an EPID and a film at 0° gantry angle. We then assessed the correlations between pixel intensities and doses. Beam-by-beam analyses for 15 prostate IMRT cases as patient-specific quality assurance were performed with a 2D diode detector array at 0° gantry angle to determine the relative dose error for each beam. The resulting relative dose error with or without GAC was added back to the original dose grid for each beam. We compared the predicted dose distributions with or without GAC for film measurements to validate GAC effects. A gamma pass rate with a tolerance of 2%/2 mm was used to evaluate these dose distributions. The gamma pass rate with GAC was higher than that without GAC (P = 0.01). The predicted dose distribution improved with GAC, although the dosimetric effect to a patient was minimal. PMID:25742866

  4. Incorporation of gantry angle correction for 3D dose prediction in intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Iori; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yamada, Yuji; Yagi, Masashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Pretreatment dose verification with beam-by-beam analysis for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is commonly performed with a gantry angle of 0° using a 2D diode detector array. Any changes in multileaf collimator (MLC) position between the actual treatment gantry angle and 0° may result in deviations from the planned dose. We evaluated the effects of MLC positioning errors between the actual treatment gantry angles and nominal gantry angles. A gantry angle correction (GAC) factor was generated by performing a non-gap test at various gantry angles using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). To convert pixel intensity to dose at the MLC abutment positions, a non-gap test was performed using an EPID and a film at 0° gantry angle. We then assessed the correlations between pixel intensities and doses. Beam-by-beam analyses for 15 prostate IMRT cases as patient-specific quality assurance were performed with a 2D diode detector array at 0° gantry angle to determine the relative dose error for each beam. The resulting relative dose error with or without GAC was added back to the original dose grid for each beam. We compared the predicted dose distributions with or without GAC for film measurements to validate GAC effects. A gamma pass rate with a tolerance of 2%/2 mm was used to evaluate these dose distributions. The gamma pass rate with GAC was higher than that without GAC (P = 0.01). The predicted dose distribution improved with GAC, although the dosimetric effect to a patient was minimal.

  5. Limited Advantages of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Over 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in the Adjuvant Management of Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alani, Shlomo; Soyfer, Viacheslav; Strauss, Natan; Schifter, Dan; Corn, Benjamin W.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Although chemoradiotherapy was considered the standard adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer, a recent Phase III trial (Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy [MAGIC]) did not include radiotherapy in the randomization scheme because it was considered expendable. Given radiotherapy's potential, efforts needed to be made to optimize its use for treating gastric cancer. We assessed whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) could improve upon our published results in patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal therapy. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach were treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy using a noncoplanar four-field arrangement. Subsequently, a nine-field IMRT plan was designed using a CMS Xio IMRT version 4.3.3 module. Two IMRT beam arrangements were evaluated: beam arrangement 1 consisted of gantry angles of 0 deg., 53 deg., 107 deg., 158 deg., 204 deg., 255 deg., and 306 deg.. Beam arrangement 2 consisted of gantry angles of 30 deg., 90 deg., 315 deg., and 345 deg.; a gantry angle of 320 deg./couch, 30 deg.; and a gantry angle of 35{sup o}/couch, 312{sup o}. Both the target volume coverage and the dose deposition in adjacent critical organs were assessed in the plans. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the clinical target volume, kidneys, spine, and liver. Results: Comparison of the clinical target volumes revealed satisfactory coverage by the 95% isodose envelope using either IMRT or 3D conformal therapy. However, IMRT was only marginally better than 3D conformal therapy at protecting the spine and kidneys from radiation. Conclusions: IMRT confers only a marginal benefit in the adjuvant treatment of gastric cancer and should be used only in the small subset of patients with risk factors for kidney disease or those with a preexisting nephropathy.

  6. A Patient-Specific Polylactic Acid Bolus Made by a 3D Printer for Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Min; Chun, MinSoo; Han, Ji Hye; Kim, Jung-in

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and advantages of a patient-specific breast bolus made using a 3D printer technique. Methods We used the anthropomorphic female phantom with breast attachments, which volumes are 200, 300, 400, 500 and 650 cc. We simulated the treatment for a right breast patient using parallel opposed tangential fields. Treatment plans were used to investigate the effect of unwanted air gaps under bolus on the dose distribution of the whole breast. The commercial Super-Flex bolus and 3D-printed polylactic acid (PLA) bolus were applied to investigate the skin dose of the breast with the MOSFET measurement. Two boluses of 3 and 5 mm thicknesses were selected. Results There was a good agreement between the dose distribution for a virtual bolus generated by the TPS and PLA bolus. The difference in dose distribution between the virtual bolus and Super-Flex bolus was significant within the bolus and breast due to unwanted air gaps. The average differences between calculated and measured doses in a 200 and 300 cc with PLA bolus were not significant, which were -0.7% and -0.6% for 3mm, and -1.1% and -1.1% for 5 mm, respectively. With the Super-Flex bolus, however, significant dose differences were observed (-5.1% and -3.2% for 3mm, and -6.3% and -4.2% for 5 mm). Conclusion The 3D-printed solid bolus can reduce the uncertainty of the daily setup and help to overcome the dose discrepancy by unwanted air gaps in the breast cancer radiation therapy. PMID:27930717

  7. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 01: 3D Pre-treatment Dose Verification for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Asuni, G; Beek, T van; Van Utyven, E; McCowan, P; McCurdy, B.M.C.

    2014-08-15

    Radical treatment techniques such as stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are becoming popular and they involve delivery of large doses in fewer fractions. Due to this feature of SBRT, a high-resolution, pre-treatment dose verification method that makes use of a 3D patient representation would be appropriate. Such a technique will provide additional information about dose delivered to the target volume(s) and organs-at-risk (OARs) in the patient volume compared to 2D verification methods. In this work, we investigate an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based pre-treatment QA method which provides an accurate reconstruction of the 3D-dose distribution in the patient model. Customized patient plans are delivered ‘in air’ and the portal images are collected using the EPID in cine mode. The images are then analysed to determine an estimate of the incident energy fluence. This is then passed to a collapsed-cone convolution dose algorithm which reconstructs a 3D patient dose estimate on the CT imaging dataset. To date, the method has been applied to 5 SBRT patient plans. Reconstructed doses were compared to those calculated by the TPS. Reconstructed mean doses were mostly within 3% of those in the TPS. DVHs of target volumes and OARs compared well. The Chi pass rates using 3%/3mm in the high dose region are greater than 97% in all cases. These initial results demonstrate clinical feasibility and utility of a robust, efficient, effective and convenient pre-treatment QA method using EPID. Research sponsored in part by Varian Medical Systems.

  8. SPHRAY: A Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Ray Tracer for Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altay, Gabriel; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Pelupessy, Inti

    2011-03-01

    SPHRAY, a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) ray tracer, is designed to solve the 3D, time dependent, radiative transfer (RT) equations for arbitrary density fields. The SPH nature of SPHRAY makes the incorporation of separate hydrodynamics and gravity solvers very natural. SPHRAY relies on a Monte Carlo (MC) ray tracing scheme that does not interpolate the SPH particles onto a grid but instead integrates directly through the SPH kernels. Given initial conditions and a description of the sources of ionizing radiation, the code will calculate the non-equilibrium ionization state (HI, HII, HeI, HeII, HeIII, e) and temperature (internal energy/entropy) of each SPH particle. The sources of radiation can include point like objects, diffuse recombination radiation, and a background field from outside the computational volume. The MC ray tracing implementation allows for the quick introduction of new physics and is parallelization friendly. A quick Axis Aligned Bounding Box (AABB) test taken from computer graphics applications allows for the acceleration of the raytracing component. We present the algorithms used in SPHRAY and verify the code by performing all the test problems detailed in the recent Radiative Transfer Comparison Project of Iliev et. al. The Fortran 90 source code for SPHRAY and example SPH density fields are made available online.

  9. Session on modeling of radiative transfer processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flatau, Piotr

    1993-01-01

    The session on modeling of radiative transfer processes is reviewed. Six critical issues surfaced in the discussion concerning scale-interactive radiative processes relevent to the mesoscale convective systems (MCS's). These issues are the need to expand basic knowledge of how MCS's influence climate through extensive cloud shields and increased humidity in the upper troposphere; to improve radiation parameterizations used in mesoscale and General Circulation Model (GCM) models; to improve our basic understanding of the influence of radiation on MCS dynamics due to diabatic heating, production of condensate, and vertical and horizontal heat fluxes; to quantify our understanding of radiative impacts of MCS's on the surface and free atmosphere energy budgets; to quantify and identify radiative and microphysical processes important in the evolution of MCS's; and to improve the capability to remotely sense MCS radiative properties from space and ground-based systems.

  10. The advantages of complementing MT profiles in 3-D environments with geomagnetic transfer function and interstation horizontal magnetic transfer function data: results from a synthetic case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanyà, Joan; Ogaya, Xènia; Jones, Alan G.; Rath, Volker; Vozar, Jan; Meqbel, Naser

    2016-12-01

    As a consequence of measuring time variations of the electric and the magnetic field, which are related to current flow and charge distribution, magnetotelluric (MT) data in 2-D and 3-D environments are not only sensitive to the geoelectrical structures below the measuring points but also to any lateral anomalies surrounding the acquisition site. This behaviour complicates the characterization of the electrical resistivity distribution of the subsurface, particularly in complex areas. In this manuscript we assess the main advantages of complementing the standard MT impedance tensor (Z) data with interstation horizontal magnetic tensor (H) and geomagnetic transfer function (T) data in constraining the subsurface in a 3-D environment beneath a MT profile. Our analysis was performed using synthetic responses with added normally distributed and scattered random noise. The sensitivity of each type of data to different resistivity anomalies was evaluated, showing that the degree to which each site and each period is affected by the same anomaly depends on the type of data. A dimensionality analysis, using Z, H and T data, identified the presence of the 3-D anomalies close to the profile, suggesting a 3-D approach for recovering the electrical resistivity values of the subsurface. Finally, the capacity for recovering the geoelectrical structures of the subsurface was evaluated by performing joint inversion using different data combinations, quantifying the differences between the true synthetic model and the models from inversion process. Four main improvements were observed when performing joint inversion of Z, H and T data: (1) superior precision and accuracy at characterizing the electrical resistivity values of the anomalies below and outside the profile; (2) the potential to recover high electrical resistivity anomalies that are poorly recovered using Z data alone; (3) improvement in the characterization of the bottom and lateral boundaries of the anomalies with low

  11. Radiative transfer in moving media : basic mathematical methods for radiative transfer in spherically symmetrical moving media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, K. K., Wilson, S. J.

    The advancement of observational techniques over the years has led to the discovery of a large number of stars exhibiting complex spectral structures, thus necessitating the search for new techniques and methods to study radiative transfer in such stars with moving envelopes. This led to the introduction of the concept of "photon escape probability" and the wisdom of expressing the transfer equations in "comoving frames" (CMF). Radiative transfer problems in spherically moving media form a branch of mathematical physics which uses mathematics of a very distinctive kind. Radiative Transfer in Moving Media records the basic mathematical methodologies, both analytical and numerical, developed for solving radiation transfer problems in spherically symmetric moving media, in the consideration of macroscopic velocity fields only. Part I contains the basic notions of radiation-matter interaction in participating media and constructs the relevant transfer equations to be solved in the subsequent chapters. Part II considers the basic mathematical methods for solving the transfer problems in extensive moving atmospheres when it is observed in the lab frame. Part III introduces the analytical and numerical methods for solving radiative transfer problems in spherically symmetric moving atmospheres when expressed in the comoving frame. This book is addressed to graduate students and researchers in Astrophysics, in particular to those studying radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres.

  12. Survey of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Japan by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Yasushi Hiraoka, Masahiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Narita, Yuichiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Onishi, Hiroshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To recognize the current status of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in Japan, using a nationwide survey conducted by the Japan 3-D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy Group. Methods and Materials: The questionnaire was sent by mail to 117 institutions. Ninety-four institutions (80%) responded by the end of November 2005. Fifty-three institutions indicated that they have already started SBRT, and 38 institutions had been reimbursed by insurance. Results: A total of 1111 patients with histologically confirmed lung cancer were treated. Among these patients, 637 had T1N0M0 and 272 had T2N0M0 lung cancer. Metastatic lung cancer was found in 702 and histologically unconfirmed lung tumor in 291 patients. Primary liver cancer was found in 207 and metastatic liver cancer in 76 patients. The most frequent schedule used for primary lung cancer was 48Gy in 4 fractions at 22 institutions (52%), followed by 50Gy in 5 fractions at 11 institutions (26%) and 60Gy in 8 fractions at 4 institutions (10%). The tendency was the same for metastatic lung cancer. The average number of personnel involved in SBRT was 1.8 radiation oncologists, including 1.1 certified radiation oncologists, 2.8 technologists, 0.7 nurses, and 0.6 certified quality assurance personnel and 0.3 physicists. The most frequent amount of time for treatment planning was 61-120min, for quality assurance was 50-60min, and for treatment was 30min. There were 14 (0.6% of all cases) reported Grade 5 complications: 11 cases of radiation pneumonitis, 2 cases of hemoptysis, and 1 case of radiation esophagitis. Conclusion: The current status of SBRT in Japan was surveyed.

  13. Assessment of a 3-D boundary layer code to predict heat transfer and flow losses in a turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, V. N.

    1983-01-01

    The prediction of the complete flow field in a turbine passage is an extremely difficult task due to the complex three dimensional pattern which contains separation and attachment lines, a saddle point and horseshoe vortex. Whereas, in principle such a problem can be solved using full Navier-Stokes equations, in reality methods based on a Navier-Stokes solution procedure encounter difficulty in accurately predicting surface quantities (e.g., heat transfer) due to grid limitations imposed by the speed and size of the existing computers. On the other hand the overall problem is strongly three dimensional and too complex to be analyzed by the current design methods based on inviscid and/or viscous strip theories. Thus there is a strong need for enhancing the current prediction techniques through inclusion of 3-D viscous effects. A potentially simple and cost effective way to achieve this is to use a prediction method based on three dimensional boundary layer (3-DBL) theory. The major objective of this program is to assess the applicability of such a 3-DBL approach for the prediction of heat loads, boundary layer growth, pressure losses and streamline skewing in critical areas of a turbine passage. A brief discussion of the physical problem addressed here along with the overall approach is presented.

  14. Mitigation of Lethal Radiation Syndrome in Mice by Intramuscular Injection of 3D Cultured Adherent Human Placental Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Gaberman, Elena; Pinzur, Lena; Levdansky, Lilia; Tsirlin, Maria; Netzer, Nir; Aberman, Zami; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to high lethal dose of ionizing radiation results in acute radiation syndrome with deleterious systemic effects to different organs. A primary target is the highly sensitive bone marrow and the hematopoietic system. In the current study C3H/HeN mice were total body irradiated by 7.7 Gy. Twenty four hrs and 5 days after irradiation 2×10(6) cells from different preparations of human derived 3D expanded adherent placental stromal cells (PLX) were injected intramuscularly. Treatment with batches consisting of pure maternal cell preparations (PLX-Mat) increased the survival of the irradiated mice from ∼27% to 68% (P<0.001), while cell preparations with a mixture of maternal and fetal derived cells (PLX-RAD) increased the survival to ∼98% (P<0.0001). The dose modifying factor of this treatment for both 50% and 37% survival (DMF50 and DMF37) was∼1.23. Initiation of the more effective treatment with PLX-RAD injection could be delayed for up to 48 hrs after irradiation with similar effect. A delayed treatment by 72 hrs had lower, but still significantly effect (p<0.05). A faster recovery of the BM and improved reconstitution of all blood cell lineages in the PLX-RAD treated mice during the follow-up explains the increased survival of the cells treated irradiated mice. The number of CD45+/SCA1+ hematopoietic progenitor cells within the fast recovering population of nucleated BM cells in the irradiated mice was also elevated in the PLX-RAD treated mice. Our study suggests that IM treatment with PLX-RAD cells may serve as a highly effective "off the shelf" therapy to treat BM failure following total body exposure to high doses of radiation. The results suggest that similar treatments may be beneficial also for clinical conditions associated with severe BM aplasia and pancytopenia.

  15. Mitigation of Lethal Radiation Syndrome in Mice by Intramuscular Injection of 3D Cultured Adherent Human Placental Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaberman, Elena; Pinzur, Lena; Levdansky, Lilia; Tsirlin, Maria; Netzer, Nir; Aberman, Zami; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to high lethal dose of ionizing radiation results in acute radiation syndrome with deleterious systemic effects to different organs. A primary target is the highly sensitive bone marrow and the hematopoietic system. In the current study C3H/HeN mice were total body irradiated by 7.7 Gy. Twenty four hrs and 5 days after irradiation 2×106 cells from different preparations of human derived 3D expanded adherent placental stromal cells (PLX) were injected intramuscularly. Treatment with batches consisting of pure maternal cell preparations (PLX-Mat) increased the survival of the irradiated mice from ∼27% to 68% (P<0.001), while cell preparations with a mixture of maternal and fetal derived cells (PLX-RAD) increased the survival to ∼98% (P<0.0001). The dose modifying factor of this treatment for both 50% and 37% survival (DMF50 and DMF37) was∼1.23. Initiation of the more effective treatment with PLX-RAD injection could be delayed for up to 48 hrs after irradiation with similar effect. A delayed treatment by 72 hrs had lower, but still significantly effect (p<0.05). A faster recovery of the BM and improved reconstitution of all blood cell lineages in the PLX-RAD treated mice during the follow-up explains the increased survival of the cells treated irradiated mice. The number of CD45+/SCA1+ hematopoietic progenitor cells within the fast recovering population of nucleated BM cells in the irradiated mice was also elevated in the PLX-RAD treated mice. Our study suggests that IM treatment with PLX-RAD cells may serve as a highly effective “off the shelf” therapy to treat BM failure following total body exposure to high doses of radiation. The results suggest that similar treatments may be beneficial also for clinical conditions associated with severe BM aplasia and pancytopenia. PMID:23823334

  16. A 3D Monte Carlo model of radiation affecting cells, and its application to neuronal cells and GCR irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Kim, Angela; Vazquez, Marcelo E.; Guida, Peter; Kim, Myung-Hee; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    A 3D Monte Carlo model of radiation transport in matter is applied to study the effect of heavy ion radiation on human neuronal cells. Central nervous system effects, including cognitive impairment, are suspected from the heavy ion component of galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) during space missions. The model can count, for instance, the number of direct hits from ions, which will have the most affect on the cells. For comparison, the remote hits, which are received through δ-rays from the projectile traversing space outside the volume of the cell, are also simulated and their contribution is estimated. To simulate tissue effects from irradiation, cellular matrices of neuronal cells, which were derived from confocal microscopy, were simulated in our model. To produce this realistic model of the brain tissue, image segmentation was used to identify cells in the images of cells cultures. The segmented cells were inserted pixel by pixel into the modeled physical space, which represents a volume of interacting cells with periodic boundary conditions (PBCs). PBCs were used to extrapolate the model results to the macroscopic tissue structures. Specific spatial patterns for cell apoptosis are expected from GCR, as heavy ions produce concentrated damage along their trajectories. The apoptotic cell patterns were modeled based on the action cross sections for apoptosis, which were estimated from the available experimental data. The cell patterns were characterized with an autocorrelation function, which values are higher for non-random cell patterns, and the values of the autocorrelation function were compared for X rays and Fe ion irradiations. The autocorrelation function indicates the directionality effects present in apoptotic neuronal cells from GCR.

  17. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 07: Design and production of 3D printed bolus for electron radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Shiqin; Moran, Kathryn; Robar, James L.

    2014-08-15

    This is a proof-of-concept study demonstrating the capacity for modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) using 3D printed bolus. Previous reports have involved bolus design using an electron pencil beam model and fabrication using a milling machine. In this study, an in-house algorithm is presented that optimizes the dose distribution with regard to dose coverage, conformity and homogeneity within planning target volume (PTV). The algorithm uses calculated result of a commercial electron Monte Carlo dose calculation as input. Distances along ray lines from distal side of 90% isodose to distal surface of PTV are used to estimate the bolus thickness. Inhomogeneities within the calculation volume are accounted for using coefficient of equivalent thickness method. Several regional modulation operators are applied to improve dose coverage and uniformity. The process is iterated (usually twice) until an acceptable MERT plan is realized, and the final bolus is printed using solid polylactic acid. The method is evaluated with regular geometric phantoms, anthropomorphic phantoms and a clinical rhabdomyosarcoma pediatric case. In all cases the dose conformity is improved compared to that with uniform bolus. The printed boluses conform well to the surface of complex anthropomorphic phantoms. For the rhabdomyosarcoma patient, the MERT plan yields a reduction of mean dose by 38.2% in left kidney relative to uniform bolus. MERT using 3D printed bolus appears to be a practical, low cost approach to generating optimized bolus for electron therapy. The method is effective in improving conformity of prescription isodose surface and in sparing immediately adjacent normal tissues.

  18. FACET: a radiation view factor computer code for axisymmetric, 2D planar, and 3D geometries with shadowing

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.

    1983-08-01

    The computer code FACET calculates the radiation geometric view factor (alternatively called shape factor, angle factor, or configuration factor) between surfaces for axisymmetric, two-dimensional planar and three-dimensional geometries with interposed third surface obstructions. FACET was developed to calculate view factors for input to finite-element heat-transfer analysis codes. The first section of this report is a brief review of previous radiation-view-factor computer codes. The second section presents the defining integral equation for the geometric view factor between two surfaces and the assumptions made in its derivation. Also in this section are the numerical algorithms used to integrate this equation for the various geometries. The third section presents the algorithms used to detect self-shadowing and third-surface shadowing between the two surfaces for which a view factor is being calculated. The fourth section provides a user's input guide followed by several example problems.

  19. Automotive Underhood Thermal Management Analysis Using 3-D Coupled Thermal-Hydrodynamic Computer Models: Thermal Radiation Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Pannala, S; D'Azevedo, E; Zacharia, T

    2002-02-26

    The goal of the radiation modeling effort was to develop and implement a radiation algorithm that is fast and accurate for the underhood environment. As part of this CRADA, a net-radiation model was chosen to simulate radiative heat transfer in an underhood of a car. The assumptions (diffuse-gray and uniform radiative properties in each element) reduce the problem tremendously and all the view factors for radiation thermal calculations can be calculated once and for all at the beginning of the simulation. The cost for online integration of heat exchanges due to radiation is found to be less than 15% of the baseline CHAD code and thus very manageable. The off-line view factor calculation is constructed to be very modular and has been completely integrated to read CHAD grid files and the output from this code can be read into the latest version of CHAD. Further integration has to be performed to accomplish the same with STAR-CD. The main outcome of this effort is to obtain a highly scalable and portable simulation capability to model view factors for underhood environment (for e.g. a view factor calculation which took 14 hours on a single processor only took 14 minutes on 64 processors). The code has also been validated using a simple test case where analytical solutions are available. This simulation capability gives underhood designers in the automotive companies the ability to account for thermal radiation - which usually is critical in the underhood environment and also turns out to be one of the most computationally expensive components of underhood simulations. This report starts off with the original work plan as elucidated in the proposal in section B. This is followed by Technical work plan to accomplish the goals of the project in section C. In section D, background to the current work is provided with references to the previous efforts this project leverages on. The results are discussed in section 1E. This report ends with conclusions and future scope of

  20. Tests of Exoplanet Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Joseph; Challener, Ryan; DeLarme, Emerson; Cubillos, Patricio; Blecic, Jasmina; Foster, Austin; Garland, Justin

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric radiative transfer codes are used both to predict planetary spectra and in retrieval algorithms to interpret data. Observational plans, theoretical models, and scientific results thus depend on the correctness of these calculations. Yet, the calculations are complex and the codes implementing them are often written without modern software-verification techniques. In the process of writing our own code, we became aware of several others with artifacts of unknown origin and even outright errors in their spectra. We present a series of tests to verify atmospheric radiative-transfer codes. These include: simple, single-line line lists that, when combined with delta-function abundance profiles, should produce a broadened line that can be verified easily; isothermal atmospheres that should produce analytically-verifiable blackbody spectra at the input temperatures; and model atmospheres with a range of complexities that can be compared to the output of other codes. We apply the tests to our own code, Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) and to several other codes. The test suite is open-source software. We propose this test suite as a standard for verifying current and future radiative transfer codes, analogous to the Held-Suarez test for general circulation models. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G.

  1. Groups in the radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikoghossian, Arthur

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents a group-theoretical description of radiation transfer in inhomogeneous and multi-component atmospheres with the plane-parallel geometry. It summarizes and generalizes the results obtained recently by the author for some standard transfer problems of astrophysical interest with allowance of the angle and frequency distributions of the radiation field. We introduce the concept of composition groups for media with different optical and physical properties. Group representations are derived for two possible cases of illumination of a composite finite atmosphere. An algorithm for determining the reflectance and transmittance of inhomogeneous and multi-component atmospheres is described. The group theory is applied also to determining the field of radiation inside an inhomogeneous atmosphere. The concept of a group of optical depth translations is introduced. The developed theory is illustrated with the problem of radiation diffusion with partial frequency distribution assuming that the inhomogeneity is due to depth-variation of the scattering coefficient. It is shown that once reflectance and transmittance of a medium are determined, the internal field of radiation in the source-free atmosphere is found without solving any new equations. The transfer problems for a semi-infinite atmosphere and an atmosphere with internal sources of energy are discussed. The developed theory allows to derive summation laws for the mean number of scattering events underwent by the photons in the course of diffusion in the atmosphere.

  2. Numerical 3D modeling of heat transfer in human tissues for microwave radiometry monitoring of brown fat metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Dario B.; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Salahi, Sara; Colebeck, Erin; Topsakal, Erdem; Pereira, Pedro J. S.; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2013-02-01

    Background: Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in whole body metabolism and could potentially mediate weight gain and insulin sensitivity. Although some imaging techniques allow BAT detection, there are currently no viable methods for continuous acquisition of BAT energy expenditure. We present a non-invasive technique for long term monitoring of BAT metabolism using microwave radiometry. Methods: A multilayer 3D computational model was created in HFSSTM with 1.5 mm skin, 3-10 mm subcutaneous fat, 200 mm muscle and a BAT region (2-6 cm3) located between fat and muscle. Based on this model, a log-spiral antenna was designed and optimized to maximize reception of thermal emissions from the target (BAT). The power absorption patterns calculated in HFSSTM were combined with simulated thermal distributions computed in COMSOL® to predict radiometric signal measured from an ultra-low-noise microwave radiometer. The power received by the antenna was characterized as a function of different levels of BAT metabolism under cold and noradrenergic stimulation. Results: The optimized frequency band was 1.5-2.2 GHz, with averaged antenna efficiency of 19%. The simulated power received by the radiometric antenna increased 2-9 mdBm (noradrenergic stimulus) and 4-15 mdBm (cold stimulus) corresponding to increased 15-fold BAT metabolism. Conclusions: Results demonstrated the ability to detect thermal radiation from small volumes (2-6 cm3) of BAT located up to 12 mm deep and to monitor small changes (0.5 °C) in BAT metabolism. As such, the developed miniature radiometric antenna sensor appears suitable for non-invasive long term monitoring of BAT metabolism.

  3. 3-D Transient Heat Transfer Analysis of Slab Heating Characteristics in a Reheating Furnace in Hot Strip Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, J. Y.; Lee, Y. W.; Lin, C. N.; Wang, C. H.

    2016-05-01

    A three-dimensional mathematical transient heat transfer model for the prediction of temperature distribution within the slab has been developed by considering the thermal radiation in the walking-beam-type reheating furnace chamber. The steel slabs are heated up through the non-firing, preheating, 1st-heating, 2nd-heating, and soaking zones in the furnace, respectively, where the furnace wall temperature is function of time. Comparison with the in-situ experimental data from Steel Company in Taiwan shows that the present heat transfer model works well for the prediction of thermal behavior of the slab in the reheating furnace. The effects of different skid button height (H=60mm, 90mm, and 120mm) and different gap distance between two slabs (S=50mm, 75mm, and 100mm) on the slab skid mark formation and temperature profiles are investigated. It is found that the skid mark severity decreases with an increase in the skid button height. The effect of gap distance is important only for the slab edge planes, while it is insignificant for the slab central planes.

  4. Sunrise: Radiation transfer through interstellar dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Patrik

    2013-03-01

    Sunrise is a Monte Carlo radiation transfer code for calculating absorption and scattering of light to study the effects of dust in hydrodynamic simulations of interacting galaxies. It uses an adaptive mesh refinement grid to describe arbitrary geometries of emitting and absorbing/scattering media, with spatial dynamical range exceeding 104; it can efficiently generate images of the emerging radiation at arbitrary points in space and spectral energy distributions of simulated galaxies run with the Gadget, Gasoline, Arepo, Enzo or ART codes. In addition to the monochromatic radiative transfer typically used by Monte Carlo codes, Sunrise can propagate a range of wavelengths simultaneously. This "polychromatic" algorithm gives significant improvements in efficiency and accuracy when spectral features are calculated.

  5. SU-C-213-01: 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantom Composed of Bone and Soft Tissue Substitute Plastics for Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ehler, E; Sterling, D; Higgins, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 3D printed phantoms constructed of multiple tissue approximating materials could be useful in both clinical and research aspects of radiotherapy. This work describes a 3D printed phantom constructed with tissue substitute plastics for both bone and soft tissue; air cavities were included as well. Methods: 3D models of an anonymized nasopharynx patient were generated for air cavities, soft tissues, and bone, which were segmented by Hounsfield Unit (HU) thresholds. HU thresholds were chosen to define air-to-soft tissue boundaries of 0.65 g/cc and soft tissue-to-bone boundaries of 1.18 g/cc based on clinical HU to density tables. After evaluation of several composite plastics, a bone tissue substitute was identified as an acceptable material for typical radiotherapy x-ray energies, composed of iron and PLA plastic. PET plastic was determined to be an acceptable soft tissue substitute. 3D printing was performed on a consumer grade dual extrusion fused deposition model 3D printer. Results: MVCT scans of the 3D printed heterogeneous phantom were acquired. Rigid image registration of the patient and the 3D printed phantom scans was performed. The average physical density of the soft tissue and bone regions was 1.02 ± 0.08 g/cc and 1.39 ± 0.14 g/cc, respectively, for the patient kVCT scan. In the 3D printed phantom MVCT scan, the average density of the soft tissue and bone was 1.01 ± 0.09 g/cc and 1.44 ± 0.12 g/cc, respectively. Conclusion: A patient specific phantom, constructed of heterogeneous tissue substitute materials was constructed by 3D printing. MVCT of the 3D printed phantom showed realistic tissue densities were recreated by the 3D printing materials. Funding provided by intra-department grant by University of Minnesota Department of Radiation Oncology.

  6. Viktor V. Sobolev and radiative transfer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagirner, Dmitrij I.

    2016-11-01

    Invited review A detailed review of V.V. Sobolev's contributions to the theory of radiative transfer is presented. First, the basic problems of the theory of monochromatic scattering are formulated, which were introduced and solved approximately by the founders of the theory (E. Milne, A. Eddington, and others). Then the fundamental contribution by academician V.A. Ambartsumian, Sobolev's scientific adviser, to the analytical radiative transfer theory is summarized. Academician V.V. Sobolev continued and profoundly developed this theory. He pioneered new areas of the theory of multiple light scattering: the scattering of polarized radiation; the theory of a time-dependent radiation field; and the scattering in inhomogeneous media, in plane-parallel media with reflecting boundaries, and in media expanding with a velocity gradient. He proposed new approximate methods for solving the problems of anisotropic monochromatic scattering as well as scattering in spectral lines in stationary and expanding media which are still in use today. The most important Sobolev's contribution was to the exact analytical theory of radiative transfer. He proposed the probability method to solve radiative transfer problems and the probabilistic treatment of scattering processes; he introduced and justified the approximation of CFR in spectral lines; he developed the resolvent method for the exact solution to the basic integral equation describing monochromatic scattering and scattering in spectral lines; and he developed the theory of anisotropic scattering to analytic perfection. V.V. Sobolev applied these solutions to the interpretation of observation data for many astrophysical objects: photometric, polarimetric, and spectral characteristics of planetary atmospheres; spectra of stationary and non-stationary stars; and polarization of X-ray sources and quasars. V.V. Sobolev coauthored several papers with his students. The publications by Sobolev's disciples that continued his research

  7. Three-dimensional radiative transfer on a massively parallel computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vath, H. M.

    1994-01-01

    We perform 3D radiative transfer calculations in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) in the simple two-level atom approximation on the Mas-Par MP-1, which contains 8192 processors and is a single instruction multiple data (SIMD) machine, an example of the new generation of massively parallel computers. On such a machine, all processors execute the same command at a given time, but on different data. To make radiative transfer calculations efficient, we must re-consider the numerical methods and storage of data. To solve the transfer equation, we adopt the short characteristic method and examine different acceleration methods to obtain the source function. We use the ALI method and test local and non-local operators. Furthermore, we compare the Ng and the orthomin methods of acceleration. We also investigate the use of multi-grid methods to get fast solutions for the NLTE case. In order to test these numerical methods, we apply them to two problems with and without periodic boundary conditions.

  8. Infrared radiative energy transfer in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the radiative interactions in various energy transfer processes in gaseous systems. Both gray and non-gray radiative formulations for absorption and emission by molecular gases are presented. The gray gas formulations are based on the Planck mean absorption coefficient and the non-gray formulations are based on the wide band model correlations for molecular absorption. Various relations for the radiative flux and divergence of radiative flux are developed. These are useful for different flow conditions and physical problems. Specific plans for obtaining extensive results for different cases are presented. The procedure developed was applied to several realistic problems. Results of selected studies are presented.

  9. SU-E-T-300: Dosimetric Comparision of 4D Radiation Therapy and 3D Radiation Therapy for the Liver Tumor Based On 4D Medical Image

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Yin, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to determine the dosimetric benefit to normal tissues by tracking liver tumor dose in four dimensional radiation therapy (4DRT) on ten phases of four dimensional computer tomagraphy(4DCT) images. Methods: Target tracking each phase with the beam aperture for ten liver cancer patients were converted to cumulative plan and compared to the 3D plan with a merged target volume based on 4DCT image in radiation treatment planning system (TPS). The change in normal tissue dose was evaluated in the plan by using the parameters V5, V10, V15, V20,V25, V30, V35 and V40 (volumes receiving 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40Gy, respectively) in the dose-volume histogram for the liver; mean dose for the following structures: liver, left kidney and right kidney; and maximum dose for the following structures: bowel, duodenum, esophagus, stomach and heart. Results: There was significant difference between 4D PTV(average 115.71cm3 )and ITV(169.86 cm3). When the planning objective is 95% volume of PTV covered by the prescription dose, the mean dose for the liver, left kidney and right kidney have an average decrease 23.13%, 49.51%, and 54.38%, respectively. The maximum dose for bowel, duodenum,esophagus, stomach and heart have an average decrease 16.77%, 28.07%, 24.28%, 4.89%, and 4.45%, respectively. Compared to 3D RT, radiation volume for the liver V5, V10, V15, V20, V25, V30, V35 and V40 by using the 4D plans have a significant decrease(P≤0.05). Conclusion: The 4D plan method creates plans that permit better sparing of the normal structures than the commonly used ITV method, which delivers the same dosimetric effects to the target.

  10. Dosimetric study for cervix carcinoma treatment using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compensation based on 3D intracavitary brachytherapy technique

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Gang; Wang, Pei; Lang, Jinyi; Tian, Yin; Luo, Yangkun; Fan, Zixuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compensation based on 3D high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) boost technique (ICBT + IMRT) has been used in our hospital for advanced cervix carcinoma patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric results of the four different boost techniques (the conventional 2D HDR intracavitary brachytherapy [CICBT], 3D optimized HDR intracavitary brachytherapy [OICBT], and IMRT-alone with the applicator in situ). Material and methods For 30 patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma, after the completion of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for whole pelvic irradiation 45 Gy/25 fractions, five fractions of ICBT + IMRT boost with 6 Gy/fractions for high risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and 5 Gy/fractions for intermediate risk clinical target volume (IRCTV) were applied. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were acquired using an in situ CT/MRI-compatible applicator. The gross tumor volume (GTV), the high/intermediate-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV/IRCTV), bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were contoured by CT scans. Results For ICBT + IMRT plan, values of D90, D100 of HRCTV, D90, D100, and V100 of IRCTV significantly increased (p < 0.05) in comparison to OICBT and CICBT. The D2cc values for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were significantly lower than that of CICBT and IMRT alone. In all patients, the mean rectum V60 Gy values generated from ICBT + IMRT and OICBT techniques were very similar but for bladder and sigmoid, the V60 Gy values generated from ICBT + IMRT were higher than that of OICBT. For the ICBT + IMRT plan, the standard deviations (SD) of D90 and D2cc were found to be lower than other three treatment plans. Conclusions The ICBT + IMRT technique not only provides good target coverage but also maintains low doses (D2cc) to the OAR. ICBT + IMRT is an optional technique to boost parametrial region or tumor of large size and irregular shape

  11. Reconstructing 3-D maps of the local viscoelastic properties using a finite-amplitude modulated radiation force.

    PubMed

    Giannoula, Alexia; Cobbold, Richard; Bezerianos, Anastasios

    2014-02-01

    A modulated acoustic radiation force, produced by two confocal tone-burst ultrasound beams of slightly different frequencies (i.e. 2.0 MHz ± Δf/2, where Δf is the difference frequency), can be used to remotely generate modulated low-frequency (Δf ≤ 500 Hz) shear waves in attenuating media. By appropriately selecting the duration of the two beams, the energy of the generated shear waves can be concentrated around the difference frequency (i.e., Δf ± Δf/2). In this manner, neither their amplitude nor their phase information is distorted by frequency-dependent effects, thereby, enabling a more accurate reconstruction of the viscoelastic properties. Assuming a Voigt viscoelastic model, this paper describes the use of a finite-element-method model to simulate three-dimensional (3-D) shear-wave propagation in viscoelastic media containing a spherical inclusion. Nonlinear propagation is assumed for the two ultrasound beams, so that higher harmonics are developed in the force and shear spectrum. Finally, an inverse reconstruction algorithm is used to extract 3-D maps of the local shear modulus and viscosity from the simulated shear-displacement fields based on the fundamental and second-harmonic component. The quality of the reconstructed maps is evaluated using the contrast between the inclusion and the background and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). It is shown that the shear modulus can be accurately reconstructed based on the fundamental component, such that the observed contrast deviates from the true contrast by a root-mean-square-error (RMSE) of only 0.38 and the CNR is greater than 30 dB. If the second-harmonic component is used, the RMSE becomes 1.54 and the corresponding CNR decreases by approximately 10-15 dB. The reconstructed shear viscosity maps based on the second harmonic are shown to be of higher quality than those based on the fundamental. The effects of noise are also investigated and a fusion operation between the two spectral components is

  12. Modeling of Radiative Transfer in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VonAllmen, Paul; Turner, Neal

    2007-01-01

    This program implements a spectral line, radiative transfer tool for interpreting Spitzer Space Telescope observations by matching them with models of protostellar disks for improved understanding of planet and star formation. The Spitzer Space Telescope detects gas phase molecules in the infrared spectra of protostellar disks, with spectral lines carrying information on the chemical composition of the material from which planets form. Input to the software includes chemical models developed at JPL. The products are synthetic images and spectra for comparison with Spitzer measurements. Radiative transfer in a protostellar disk is primarily affected by absorption and emission processes in the dust and in molecular gases such as H2, CO, and HCO. The magnitude of the optical absorption and emission is determined by the population of the electronic, vibrational, and rotational energy levels. The population of the molecular level is in turn determined by the intensity of the radiation field. Therefore, the intensity of the radiation field and the population of the molecular levels are inter-dependent quantities. To meet the computational challenges of solving for the coupled radiation field and electronic level populations in disks having wide ranges of optical depths and spatial scales, the tool runs in parallel on the JPL Dell Cluster supercomputer with C++ and Fortran compiler with a Message Passing Interface. Because this software has been developed on a distributed computing platform, the modeling of systems previously beyond the reach of available computational resources is possible.

  13. RRTM: A rapid radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    Mlawer, E.J.; Taubman, S.J.; Clough, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    A rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) for the calculation of longwave clear-sky fluxes and cooling rates has been developed. The model, which uses the correlated-k method, is both accurate and computationally fast. The foundation for RRTM is the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) from which the relevant k-distributions are obtained. LBLRTM, which has been extensively validated against spectral observations e.g., the high-resolution sounder and the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, is used to validate the flux and cooling rate results from RRTM. Validations of RRTM`s results have been performed for the tropical, midlatitude summer, and midlatitude winter atmospheres, as well as for the four Intercomparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) cases from the Spectral Radiance Experiment (SPECTRE). Details of some of these validations are presented below. RRTM has the identical atmospheric input module as LBLRTM, facilitating intercomparisons with LBLRTM and application of the model at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed sites.

  14. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIATION TRANSFER IN YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, B. A.; Honor, J.; Robitaille, T. P.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Dong, R.; Wolff, M. J.; Wood, K.

    2013-08-15

    We have updated our publicly available dust radiative transfer code (HOCHUNK3D) to include new emission processes and various three-dimensional (3D) geometries appropriate for forming stars. The 3D geometries include warps and spirals in disks, accretion hotspots on the central star, fractal clumping density enhancements, and misaligned inner disks. Additional axisymmetric (2D) features include gaps in disks and envelopes, ''puffed-up inner rims'' in disks, multiple bipolar cavity walls, and iteration of disk vertical structure assuming hydrostatic equilibrium (HSEQ). We include the option for simple power-law envelope geometry, which, combined with fractal clumping and bipolar cavities, can be used to model evolved stars as well as protostars. We include non-thermal emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains, and external illumination from the interstellar radiation field. The grid structure was modified to allow multiple dust species in each cell; based on this, a simple prescription is implemented to model dust stratification. We describe these features in detail, and show example calculations of each. Some of the more interesting results include the following: (1) outflow cavities may be more clumpy than infalling envelopes. (2) PAH emission in high-mass stars may be a better indicator of evolutionary stage than the broadband spectral energy distribution slope; and related to this, (3) externally illuminated clumps and high-mass stars in optically thin clouds can masquerade as young stellar objects. (4) Our HSEQ models suggest that dust settling is likely ubiquitous in T Tauri disks, in agreement with previous observations.

  15. Enhancing radiative energy transfer through thermal extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yixuan; Liu, Baoan; Shen, Sheng; Yu, Zongfu

    2016-06-01

    Thermal radiation plays an increasingly important role in many emerging energy technologies, such as thermophotovoltaics, passive radiative cooling and wearable cooling clothes [1]. One of the fundamental constraints in thermal radiation is the Stefan-Boltzmann law, which limits the maximum power of far-field radiation to P0 = σT4S, where σ is the Boltzmann constant, S and T are the area and the temperature of the emitter, respectively (Fig. 1a). In order to overcome this limit, it has been shown that near-field radiations could have an energy density that is orders of magnitude greater than the Stefan-Boltzmann law [2-7]. Unfortunately, such near-field radiation transfer is spatially confined and cannot carry radiative heat to the far field. Recently, a new concept of thermal extraction was proposed [8] to enhance far-field thermal emission, which, conceptually, operates on a principle similar to oil immersion lenses and light extraction in light-emitting diodes using solid immersion lens to increase light output [62].Thermal extraction allows a blackbody to radiate more energy to the far field than the apparent limit of the Stefan-Boltzmann law without breaking the second law of thermodynamics. Thermal extraction works by using a specially designed thermal extractor to convert and guide the near-field energy to the far field, as shown in Fig. 1b. The same blackbody as shown in Fig. 1a is placed closely below the thermal extractor with a spacing smaller than the thermal wavelength. The near-field coupling transfers radiative energy with a density greater than σT4. The thermal extractor, made from transparent and high-index or structured materials, does not emit or absorb any radiation. It transforms the near-field energy and sends it toward the far field. As a result, the total amount of far-field radiative heat dissipated by the same blackbody is greatly enhanced above SσT4, where S is the area of the emitter. This paper will review the progress in thermal

  16. Quantification of Radiation Biomarkers in Leukocytes of Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Different Modalities of 3D-CRT or IMRT.

    PubMed

    Zahnreich, Sebastian; Ebersberger, Anne; Karle, Heiko; Kaina, Bernd; Schmidberger, Heinz

    2016-11-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether the quantification of radiation biomarkers in peripheral leukocytes of 111 breast cancer patients after adjuvant treatment with different modalities of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) revealed any difference in the patients' radiation burden by out-of-field doses and an associated risk of second malignancies. Whole-breast radiation therapy was performed by 3D-CRT using either a hard wedge (n = 32) or a virtual wedge (n = 49) at dose rates of 3 and 6 Gy per min each. Patients receiving additional radiotherapy to lymph nodes were treated by 3D-CRT (n = 21) or IMRT (n = 9). DNA damage was measured as γ-H2AX foci (n = 111) and as unstable chromosomal aberrations (n = 15) in leukocytes drawn 30 min and 24 h after the first radiation fraction, respectively. The individual basal yield and radiation sensitivity ex vivo were assessed in leukocytes obtained before the first treatment. After radiation therapy, the average rate of γ-H2AX foci and chromosomal aberrations per leukocyte were dependent on multiple parameters of irradiation: the treatment volume, the administered equivalent whole-body dose, the number of monitor units and the beam-on time. Different modalities of radiation therapy caused significant variations in the levels of both radiation biomarkers irrespective of the treatment volume and administered dose, and in particular, a twofold higher rate after IMRT compared to 3D-CRT. Any deviation in biomarker response between radiation therapy techniques was directed by a linear dependence on the absolute beam-on time. However, the dispersion of γ-H2AX foci in peripheral leukocytes after radiation therapy correlated very well with the relative distribution of dose in the whole-body volume for each radiation therapy technique. In conclusion, the induction of radiation biomarkers in leukocytes of breast cancer patients by different radiotherapy

  17. Efficient stream distributions in radiative transfer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, C.

    1974-01-01

    This paper discusses a new, computationally-efficient method for approximating the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer with a finite set of coupled differential equations for discrete streams. The method uses recommended spatial distributions of streams that are quite different from those typically used in that they are based on the symmetry of several regular Platonic solids. To facilitate the use of such distributions, an explicit, one-parameter relationship between the physical radiance and the abstract stream is formulated. The parameter is used to determine the minimum number of streams required in the radiative transfer model. Accuracy and computational efficiency are shown to be served best by choosing a stream distribution that is invariant to a large number of three space rotations. For various values of the above-mentioned parameter, the resulting recommended stream distribution is shown to be more computationally efficient than more conventional stream distributions. Finally, the incorporation of polarization in the stream definition is described.

  18. Radiative Transfer in Decretion Disks of Be Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panoglou, D.; Faes, D. M.; Carciofi, A. C.; Okazaki, A. T.; Rivinius, Th.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we explore the effect of binarity on the decretion disk of Be stars in order to explain their variability. To this aim, we performed smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations on Be binary systems, following the matter ejected isotropically from the equator of the Be star towards the base of an isothermal decretion disk. We let the system evolve long enough to be considered at steady state, and focus on the effect of viscosity for coplanar prograde binary orbits. The disk structure is found to be locked to the orbital phase and to exhibit a dependence on the azimuthal angle. Additionally, we present the first results from detailed non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) radiative transfer calculations of the disk structure computed with the SPH code. This is achieved by the use of the three-dimensional (3D) Monte Carlo code HDUST, which can produce predictions with respect to a series of observables.

  19. Statistical concepts in radiative transfer through inhomogeneous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, C.; Jefferies, J. T.

    1990-01-01

    The theory of radiative transfer in inhomogeneous media is extended to handle transfer for scale lengths small compared to the scale size of the inhomogeneity. This is called the microscopic domain of inhomogeneous radiative transfer. A concept called the vector intensity distribution is introduced to characterize the statistical properties of radiation in various species of medium. Radiative transfer in an inhomogeneous atmosphere is expressed in terms of the evolution of this vector intensity distribution and its various moments along the optical path.

  20. Hybrid MV-kV 3D respiratory motion tracking during radiation therapy with low imaging dose.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huagang; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Zhixiang; Nath, Ravinder; Liu, Wu

    2012-12-21

    A novel real-time adaptive MV-kV imaging framework for image-guided radiation therapy is developed to reduce the thoracic and abdominal tumor targeting uncertainty caused by respiration-induced intrafraction motion with ultra-low patient imaging dose. In our method, continuous stereoscopic MV-kV imaging is used at the beginning of a radiation therapy delivery for several seconds to measure the implanted marker positions. After this stereoscopic imaging period, the kV imager is switched off except for the times when no fiducial marker is detected in the cine-MV images. The 3D time-varying marker positions are estimated by combining the MV 2D projection data and the motion correlations between directional components of marker motion established from the stereoscopic imaging period and updated afterwards; in particular, the most likely position is assumed to be the position on the projection line that has the shortest distance to the first principal component line segment constructed from previous trajectory points. An adaptive windowed auto-regressive prediction is utilized to predict the marker position a short time later (310 ms and 460 ms in this study) to allow for tracking system latency. To demonstrate the feasibility and evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, computer simulations were performed for both arc and fixed-gantry deliveries using 66 h of retrospective tumor motion data from 42 patients treated for thoracic or abdominal cancers. The simulations reveal that using our hybrid approach, a smaller than 1.2 mm or 1.5 mm root-mean-square tracking error can be achieved at a system latency of 310 ms or 460 ms, respectively. Because the kV imaging is only used for a short period of time in our method, extra patient imaging dose can be reduced by an order of magnitude compared to continuous MV-kV imaging, while the clinical tumor targeting accuracy for thoracic or abdominal cancers is maintained. Furthermore, no additional hardware is required

  1. Hybrid MV-kV 3D respiratory motion tracking during radiation therapy with low imaging dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huagang; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Zhixiang; Nath, Ravinder; Liu, Wu

    2012-12-01

    A novel real-time adaptive MV-kV imaging framework for image-guided radiation therapy is developed to reduce the thoracic and abdominal tumor targeting uncertainty caused by respiration-induced intrafraction motion with ultra-low patient imaging dose. In our method, continuous stereoscopic MV-kV imaging is used at the beginning of a radiation therapy delivery for several seconds to measure the implanted marker positions. After this stereoscopic imaging period, the kV imager is switched off except for the times when no fiducial marker is detected in the cine-MV images. The 3D time-varying marker positions are estimated by combining the MV 2D projection data and the motion correlations between directional components of marker motion established from the stereoscopic imaging period and updated afterwards; in particular, the most likely position is assumed to be the position on the projection line that has the shortest distance to the first principal component line segment constructed from previous trajectory points. An adaptive windowed auto-regressive prediction is utilized to predict the marker position a short time later (310 ms and 460 ms in this study) to allow for tracking system latency. To demonstrate the feasibility and evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, computer simulations were performed for both arc and fixed-gantry deliveries using 66 h of retrospective tumor motion data from 42 patients treated for thoracic or abdominal cancers. The simulations reveal that using our hybrid approach, a smaller than 1.2 mm or 1.5 mm root-mean-square tracking error can be achieved at a system latency of 310 ms or 460 ms, respectively. Because the kV imaging is only used for a short period of time in our method, extra patient imaging dose can be reduced by an order of magnitude compared to continuous MV-kV imaging, while the clinical tumor targeting accuracy for thoracic or abdominal cancers is maintained. Furthermore, no additional hardware is required with the

  2. Radiative transfer in a plane stratified dielectric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilheit, T. T., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A model is developed for calculating radiative transfer in a stratified dielectric. This model is used to show that the reflectivity of a stratified dielectric is primarily determined by gradients in the real part of the refractive index over distances on the order of 1/10 wavelength in the medium. The effective temperature of the medium is determined by the thermodynamic temperature profile over distances of the order delta T.

  3. Introductory Tools for Radiative Transfer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, D.; Kuai, L.; Natraj, V.; Yung, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Satellite data are currently so voluminous that, despite their unprecedented quality and potential for scientific application, only a small fraction is analyzed due to two factors: researchers' computational constraints and a relatively small number of researchers actively utilizing the data. Ultimately it is hoped that the terabytes of unanalyzed data being archived can receive scientific scrutiny but this will require a popularization of the methods associated with the analysis. Since a large portion of complexity is associated with the proper implementation of the radiative transfer model, it is reasonable and appropriate to make the model as accessible as possible to general audiences. Unfortunately, the algorithmic and conceptual details that are necessary for state-of-the-art analysis also tend to frustrate the accessibility for those new to remote sensing. Several efforts have been made to have web- based radiative transfer calculations, and these are useful for limited calculations, but analysis of more than a few spectra requires the utilization of home- or server-based computing resources. We present a system that is designed to allow for easier access to radiative transfer models with implementation on a home computing platform in the hopes that this system can be utilized in and expanded upon in advanced high school and introductory college settings. This learning-by-doing process is aided through the use of several powerful tools. The first is a wikipedia-style introduction to the salient features of radiative transfer that references the seminal works in the field and refers to more complicated calculations and algorithms sparingly5. The second feature is a technical forum, commonly referred to as a tiki-wiki, that addresses technical and conceptual questions through public postings, private messages, and a ranked searching routine. Together, these tools may be able to facilitate greater interest in the field of remote sensing.

  4. Relativistic radiative transfer in relativistic spherical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Relativistic radiative transfer in relativistic spherical flows is numerically examined under the fully special relativistic treatment. We first derive relativistic formal solutions for the relativistic radiative transfer equation in relativistic spherical flows. We then iteratively solve the relativistic radiative transfer equation, using an impact parameter method/tangent ray method, and obtain specific intensities in the inertial and comoving frames, as well as moment quantities, and the Eddington factor. We consider several cases; a scattering wind with a luminous central core, an isothermal wind without a core, a scattering accretion on to a luminous core, and an adiabatic accretion on to a dark core. In the typical wind case with a luminous core, the emergent intensity is enhanced at the center due to the Doppler boost, while it reduces at the outskirts due to the transverse Doppler effect. In contrast to the plane-parallel case, the behavior of the Eddington factor is rather complicated in each case, since the Eddington factor depends on the optical depth, the flow velocity, and other parameters.

  5. DOSIS & DOSIS 3D: radiation measurements with the DOSTEL instruments onboard the Columbus Laboratory of the ISS in the years 2009-2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas; Burmeister, Sönke; Matthiä, Daniel; Przybyla, Bartos; Reitz, Günther; Bilski, Pawel; Hajek, Michael; Sihver, Lembit; Szabo, Julianna; Ambrozova, Iva; Vanhavere, Filip; Gaza, Ramona; Semones, Edward; Yukihara, Eduardo G.; Benton, Eric R.; Uchihori, Yukio; Kodaira, Satoshi; Kitamura, Hisashi; Boehme, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    The natural radiation environment in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) differs significantly in composition and energy from that found on Earth. The space radiation field consists of high energetic protons and heavier ions from Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR), as well as of protons and electrons trapped in the Earth's radiation belts (Van Allen belts). Protons and some heavier particles ejected in occasional Solar Particle Events (SPEs) might in addition contribute to the radiation exposure in LEO. All sources of radiation are modulated by the solar cycle. During solar maximum conditions SPEs occur more frequently with higher particle intensities. Since the radiation exposure in LEO exceeds exposure limits for radiation workers on Earth, the radiation exposure in space has been recognized as a main health concern for humans in space missions from the beginning of the space age on. Monitoring of the radiation environment is therefore an inevitable task in human spaceflight. Since mission profiles are always different and each spacecraft provides different shielding distributions, modifying the radiation environment measurements needs to be done for each mission. The experiments "Dose Distribution within the ISS (DOSIS)" (2009-2011) and "Dose Distribution within the ISS 3D (DOSIS 3D)" (2012-onwards) onboard the Columbus Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) use a detector suite consisting of two silicon detector telescopes (DOSimetry TELescope = DOSTEL) and passive radiation detector packages (PDP) and are designed for the determination of the temporal and spatial variation of the radiation environment. With the DOSTEL instruments' changes of the radiation composition and the related exposure levels in dependence of the solar cycle, the altitude of the ISS and the influence of attitude changes of the ISS during Space Shuttle dockings inside the Columbus Laboratory have been monitored. The absorbed doses measured at the end of May 2016 reached up to 286

  6. Radiative transfer effects in primordial hydrogen recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Ali-Haiemoud, Yacine; Hirata, Christopher M.; Grin, Daniel

    2010-12-15

    The calculation of a highly accurate cosmological recombination history has been the object of particular attention recently, as it constitutes the major theoretical uncertainty when predicting the angular power spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. Lyman transitions, in particular the Lyman-{alpha} line, have long been recognized as one of the bottlenecks of recombination, due to their very low escape probabilities. The Sobolev approximation does not describe radiative transfer in the vicinity of Lyman lines to a sufficient degree of accuracy, and several corrections have already been computed in other works. In this paper, we compute the impact of some radiative transfer effects that were previously ignored, or for which previous treatments were incomplete. First, the effect of Thomson scattering in the vicinity of the Lyman-{alpha} line is evaluated, using a full redistribution kernel incorporated into a radiative transfer code. The effect of feedback of distortions generated by the optically thick deuterium Lyman-{alpha} line blueward of the hydrogen line is investigated with an analytic approximation. It is shown that both effects are negligible during cosmological hydrogen recombination. Second, the importance of high-lying, nonoverlapping Lyman transitions is assessed. It is shown that escape from lines above Ly{gamma} and frequency diffusion in Ly{beta} and higher lines can be neglected without loss of accuracy. Third, a formalism generalizing the Sobolev approximation is developed to account for the overlap of the high-lying Lyman lines, which is shown to lead to negligible changes to the recombination history. Finally, the possibility of a cosmological hydrogen recombination maser is investigated. It is shown that there is no such maser in the purely radiative treatment presented here.

  7. A comparative analysis of 3D conformal deep inspiratory-breath hold and free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Kelli A; Read, Paul W; Morris, Monica M; Reardon, Michael A; Geesey, Constance; Wijesooriya, Krishni

    2013-01-01

    Patients undergoing radiation for left-sided breast cancer have increased rates of coronary artery disease. Free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (FB-IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal deep inspiratory-breath hold (3D-DIBH) reduce cardiac irradiation. The purpose of this study is to compare the dose to organs at risk in FB-IMRT vs 3D-DIBH for patients with left-sided breast cancer. Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer had 2 computed tomography scans: free breathing and voluntary DIBH. Optimization of the IMRT plan was performed on the free-breathing scan using 6 noncoplanar tangential beams. The 3D-DIBH plan was optimized on the DIBH scan and used standard tangents. Mean volumes of the heart, the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), the total lung, and the right breast receiving 5% to 95% (5% increments) of the prescription dose were calculated. Mean volumes of the heart and the LAD were lower (p<0.05) in 3D-DIBH for volumes receiving 5% to 80% of the prescription dose for the heart and 5% for the LAD. Mean dose to the LAD and heart were lower in 3D-DIBH (p≤0.01). Mean volumes of the total lung were lower in FB-IMRT for dose levels 20% to 75% (p<0.05), but mean dose was not different. Mean volumes of the right breast were not different for any dose; however, mean dose was lower for 3D-DIBH (p = 0.04). 3D-DIBH is an alternative approach to FB-IMRT that provides a clinically equivalent treatment for patients with left-sided breast cancer while sparing organs at risk with increased ease of implementation.

  8. A comparative analysis of 3D conformal deep inspiratory–breath hold and free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Kelli A.; Read, Paul W.; Morris, Monica M.; Reardon, Michael A.; Geesey, Constance; Wijesooriya, Krishni

    2013-07-01

    Patients undergoing radiation for left-sided breast cancer have increased rates of coronary artery disease. Free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (FB-IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal deep inspiratory–breath hold (3D-DIBH) reduce cardiac irradiation. The purpose of this study is to compare the dose to organs at risk in FB-IMRT vs 3D-DIBH for patients with left-sided breast cancer. Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer had 2 computed tomography scans: free breathing and voluntary DIBH. Optimization of the IMRT plan was performed on the free-breathing scan using 6 noncoplanar tangential beams. The 3D-DIBH plan was optimized on the DIBH scan and used standard tangents. Mean volumes of the heart, the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), the total lung, and the right breast receiving 5% to 95% (5% increments) of the prescription dose were calculated. Mean volumes of the heart and the LAD were lower (p<0.05) in 3D-DIBH for volumes receiving 5% to 80% of the prescription dose for the heart and 5% for the LAD. Mean dose to the LAD and heart were lower in 3D-DIBH (p≤0.01). Mean volumes of the total lung were lower in FB-IMRT for dose levels 20% to 75% (p<0.05), but mean dose was not different. Mean volumes of the right breast were not different for any dose; however, mean dose was lower for 3D-DIBH (p = 0.04). 3D-DIBH is an alternative approach to FB-IMRT that provides a clinically equivalent treatment for patients with left-sided breast cancer while sparing organs at risk with increased ease of implementation.

  9. New BNL 3D-Trench Electrode Si Detectors for Radiation Hard Detectors for sLHC and for X-ray Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Li Z.

    2011-05-11

    A new international-patent-pending (PCT/US2010/52887) detector type, named here as 3D-Trench electrode Si detectors, is proposed in this work. In this new 3D electrode configuration, one or both types of electrodes are etched as trenches deep into the Si (fully penetrating with SOI or supporting wafer, or non-fully penetrating into 50-90% of the thickness), instead of columns as in the conventional ('standard') 3D electrode Si detectors. With trench etched electrodes, the electric field in the new 3D electrode detectors are well defined without low or zero field regions. Except near both surfaces of the detector, the electric field in the concentric type 3D-Trench electrode Si detectors is nearly radial with little or no angular dependence in the circular and hexangular (concentric-type) pixel cell geometries. In the case of parallel plate 3D trench pixels, the field is nearly linear (like the planar 2D electrode detectors), with simple and well-defined boundary conditions. Since each pixel cell in a 3D-Trench electrode detector is isolated from others by highly doped trenches, it is an electrically independent cell. Therefore, an alternative name 'Independent Coaxial Detector Array', or ICDA, is assigned to an array of 3D-Trench electrode detectors. The electric field in the detector can be reduced by a factor of nearly 10 with an optimal 3D-Trench configuration where the junction is on the surrounding trench side. The full depletion voltage in this optimal configuration can be up to 7 times less than that of a conventional 3D detector, and even a factor of two less than that of a 2D planar detector with a thickness the same as the electrode spacing in the 3D-Trench electrode detector. In the case of non-fully penetrating trench electrodes, the processing is true one-sided with backside being unprocessed. The charge loss due to the dead space associated with the trenches is insignificant as compared to that due to radiation-induced trapping in sLHC environment

  10. A framework for geometry acquisition, 3-D printing, simulation, and measurement of head-related transfer functions with a focus on hearing-assistive devices

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Stine; Paulsen, Rasmus R.; Larsen, Martin; Laugesen, Søren; Mihocic, Michael; Majdak, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Individual head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) are essential in applications like fitting hearing-assistive devices (HADs) for providing accurate sound localization performance. Individual HRTFs are usually obtained through intricate acoustic measurements. This paper investigates the use of a three-dimensional (3D) head model for acquisition of individual HRTFs. Two aspects were investigated; whether a 3D-printed model can replace measurements on a human listener and whether numerical simulations can replace acoustic measurements. For this purpose, HRTFs were acoustically measured for four human listeners and for a 3D printed head model of one of these listeners. Further, HRTFs were simulated by applying the finite element method to the 3D head model. The monaural spectral features and spectral distortions were very similar between re-measurements and between human and printed measurements, however larger deviations were observed between measurement and simulation. The binaural cues were in agreement among all HRTFs of the same listener, indicating that the 3D model is able to provide localization cues potentially accessible to HAD users. Hence, the pipeline of geometry acquisition, printing, and acoustic measurements or simulations, seems to be a promising step forward towards in-silico design of HADs. PMID:28239188

  11. Recommendations from gynaecological (GYN) GEC ESTRO working group (II): concepts and terms in 3D image-based treatment planning in cervix cancer brachytherapy-3D dose volume parameters and aspects of 3D image-based anatomy, radiation physics, radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Pötter, Richard; Haie-Meder, Christine; Van Limbergen, Erik; Barillot, Isabelle; De Brabandere, Marisol; Dimopoulos, Johannes; Dumas, Isabelle; Erickson, Beth; Lang, Stefan; Nulens, An; Petrow, Peter; Rownd, Jason; Kirisits, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The second part of the GYN GEC ESTRO working group recommendations is focused on 3D dose-volume parameters for brachytherapy of cervical carcinoma. Methods and parameters have been developed and validated from dosimetric, imaging and clinical experience from different institutions (University of Vienna, IGR Paris, University of Leuven). Cumulative dose volume histograms (DVH) are recommended for evaluation of the complex dose heterogeneity. DVH parameters for GTV, HR CTV and IR CTV are the minimum dose delivered to 90 and 100% of the respective volume: D90, D100. The volume, which is enclosed by 150 or 200% of the prescribed dose (V150, V200), is recommended for overall assessment of high dose volumes. V100 is recommended for quality assessment only within a given treatment schedule. For Organs at Risk (OAR) the minimum dose in the most irradiated tissue volume is recommended for reporting: 0.1, 1, and 2 cm3; optional 5 and 10 cm3. Underlying assumptions are: full dose of external beam therapy in the volume of interest, identical location during fractionated brachytherapy, contiguous volumes and contouring of organ walls for >2 cm3. Dose values are reported as absorbed dose and also taking into account different dose rates. The linear-quadratic radiobiological model-equivalent dose (EQD2)-is applied for brachytherapy and is also used for calculating dose from external beam therapy. This formalism allows systematic assessment within one patient, one centre and comparison between different centres with analysis of dose volume relations for GTV, CTV, and OAR. Recommendations for the transition period from traditional to 3D image-based cervix cancer brachytherapy are formulated. Supplementary data (available in the electronic version of this paper) deals with aspects of 3D imaging, radiation physics, radiation biology, dose at reference points and dimensions and volumes for the GTV and CTV (adding to [Haie-Meder C, Pötter R, Van Limbergen E et al. Recommendations from

  12. Genotoxic Effects of Low- and High-LET Radiation on Human Epithelial Cells Grown in 2-D Versus 3-D Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Z. S.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Huff, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Risk estimation for radiation-induced cancer relies heavily on human epidemiology data obtained from terrestrial irradiation incidents from sources such as medical and occupational exposures as well as from the atomic bomb survivors. No such data exists for exposures to the types and doses of high-LET radiation that will be encountered during space travel; therefore, risk assessment for space radiation requires the use of data derived from cell culture and animal models. The use of experimental models that most accurately replicate the response of human tissues is critical for precision in risk projections. This work compares the genotoxic effects of radiation on normal human epithelial cells grown in standard 2-D monolayer culture compared to 3-D organotypic co-culture conditions. These 3-D organotypic models mimic the morphological features, differentiation markers, and growth characteristics of fully-differentiated normal human tissue and are reproducible using defined components. Cultures were irradiated with 2 Gy low-LET gamma rays or varying doses of high-LET particle radiation and genotoxic damage was measured using a modified cytokinesis block micronucleus assay. Our results revealed a 2-fold increase in residual damage in 2 Gy gamma irradiated cells grown under organotypic culture conditions compared to monolayer culture. Irradiation with high-LET particle radiation gave similar results, while background levels of damage were comparable under both scenarios. These observations may be related to the phenomenon of "multicellular resistance" where cancer cells grown as 3-D spheroids or in vivo exhibit an increased resistance to killing by chemotherapeutic agents compared to the same cells grown in 2-D culture. A variety of factors are likely involved in mediating this process, including increased cell-cell communication, microenvironment influences, and changes in cell cycle kinetics that may promote survival of damaged cells in 3-D culture that would

  13. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  14. Evaluation of three different radiative transfer equation solvers for combined conduction and radiation heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yujia; Zhang, Xiaobing; Howell, John R.

    2016-11-01

    This work investigates the performance of P1 method, FVM and SP3 method for 2D combined conduction and radiation heat transfer problem. Results based on the Monte Carlo method coupled with the energy equation are used as the benchmark solutions. Effects of the conduction-radiation parameter and optical thickness are considered. Performance analyses in term of the accuracy of heat flux and temperature predictions and of computing time are presented and analyzed.

  15. Efficient Radiative Transfer Computations in the Atmosphere.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    absorptance, A = 1 - r , the net flux at level Z is given by equation (5) Net Flux, F (Z) = I - I, = B(Zsfc) -B(Ztop) A (ZtopZ) Zsfc - sft A (Z’,Z)dB(Z’) (5) ztop 11... F . Alyea, N. Phillips and R . Prinn, 1975; A three dimensional dynamical-chemical model of atmos- pheric ozone, J. Atmos. Sci., 32:170-194. 4...AD-ADO? 289 AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH F /0 41/I EFFICIENT RADIATIVE TRANSFER COMPUTATIONS IN THE ATNOSI*ERE.fUI JAN 81 C R POSEY

  16. Acute Toxicity After Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Compared to 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wortel, Ruud C.; Incrocci, Luca; Pos, Floris J.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Witte, Marnix G.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Herk, Marcel van; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows significant dose reductions to organs at risk in prostate cancer patients. However, clinical data identifying the benefits of IG-IMRT in daily practice are scarce. The purpose of this study was to compare dose distributions to organs at risk and acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity levels of patients treated to 78 Gy with either IG-IMRT or 3D-CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with 3D-CRT (n=215) and IG-IMRT (n=260) receiving 78 Gy in 39 fractions within 2 randomized trials were selected. Dose surface histograms of anorectum, anal canal, and bladder were calculated. Identical toxicity questionnaires were distributed at baseline, prior to fraction 20 and 30 and at 90 days after treatment. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade ≥1, ≥2, and ≥3 endpoints were derived directly from questionnaires. Univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression analyses were applied. Results: The median volumes receiving 5 to 75 Gy were significantly lower (all P<.001) with IG-IMRT for anorectum, anal canal, and bladder. The mean dose to the anorectum was 34.4 Gy versus 47.3 Gy (P<.001), 23.6 Gy versus 44.6 Gy for the anal canal (P<.001), and 33.1 Gy versus 43.2 Gy for the bladder (P<.001). Significantly lower grade ≥2 toxicity was observed for proctitis, stool frequency ≥6/day, and urinary frequency ≥12/day. IG-IMRT resulted in significantly lower overall RTOG grade ≥2 GI toxicity (29% vs 49%, respectively, P=.002) and overall GU grade ≥2 toxicity (38% vs 48%, respectively, P=.009). Conclusions: A clinically meaningful reduction in dose to organs at risk and acute toxicity levels was observed in IG-IMRT patients, as a result of improved technique and tighter margins. Therefore reduced late toxicity levels can be expected as well; additional research is needed to quantify such reductions.

  17. SU-E-J-200: A Dosimetric Analysis of 3D Versus 4D Image-Based Dose Calculation for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, M; Rouabhi, O; Flynn, R; Xia, J; Bayouth, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric difference between 3D and 4Dweighted dose calculation using patient specific respiratory trace and deformable image registration for stereotactic body radiation therapy in lung tumors. Methods: Two dose calculation techniques, 3D and 4D-weighed dose calculation, were used for dosimetric comparison for 9 lung cancer patients. The magnitude of the tumor motion varied from 3 mm to 23 mm. Breath-hold exhale CT was used for 3D dose calculation with ITV generated from the motion observed from 4D-CT. For 4D-weighted calculation, dose of each binned CT image from the ten breathing amplitudes was first recomputed using the same planning parameters as those used in the 3D calculation. The dose distribution of each binned CT was mapped to the breath-hold CT using deformable image registration. The 4D-weighted dose was computed by summing the deformed doses with the temporal probabilities calculated from their corresponding respiratory traces. Dosimetric evaluation criteria includes lung V20, mean lung dose, and mean tumor dose. Results: Comparing with 3D calculation, lung V20, mean lung dose, and mean tumor dose using 4D-weighted dose calculation were changed by −0.67% ± 2.13%, −4.11% ± 6.94% (−0.36 Gy ± 0.87 Gy), −1.16% ± 1.36%(−0.73 Gy ± 0.85 Gy) accordingly. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that conventional 3D dose calculation method may overestimate the lung V20, MLD, and MTD. The absolute difference between 3D and 4D-weighted dose calculation in lung tumor may not be clinically significant. This research is supported by Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc and Iowa Center for Research By Undergraduates.

  18. Detecting Radiation-Induced Injury Using Rapid 3D Variogram Analysis of CT Images of Rat Lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Murphy, Mark K.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Carson, James P.

    2013-10-01

    A new heterogeneity analysis approach to discern radiation-induced lung damage was tested on CT images of irradiated rats. The method, combining octree decomposition with variogram analysis, demonstrated a significant correlation with radiation exposure levels, whereas conventional measurements and pulmonary function tests did not. The results suggest the new approach may be highly sensitive for assessing even subtle radiation-induced changes

  19. A Comparison of Helical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, and 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Poppe, Matthew M.; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning J.; Zhou Jinghao; Nelson, Carl; Jabbour, Salma K.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed dosimetric differences in pancreatic cancer radiotherapy via helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (HIMRT), linac-based IMRT, and 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) with regard to successful plan acceptance and dose to critical organs. Dosimetric analysis was performed in 16 pancreatic cases that were planned to 54 Gy; both post-pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 8) and unresected (n = 8) cases were compared. Without volume modification, plans met constraints 75% of the time with HIMRT and IMRT and 13% with 3D-CRT. There was no statistically significantly improvement with HIMRT over conventional IMRT in reducing liver V35, stomach V45, or bowel V45. HIMRT offers improved planning target volume (PTV) dose homogeneity compared with IMRT, averaging a lower maximum dose and higher volume receiving the prescription dose (D100). HIMRT showed an increased mean dose over IMRT to bowel and liver. Both HIMRT and IMRT offer a statistically significant improvement over 3D-CRT in lowering dose to liver, stomach, and bowel. The results were similar for both unresected and resected patients. In pancreatic cancer, HIMRT offers improved dose homogeneity over conventional IMRT and several significant benefits to 3D-CRT. Factors to consider before incorporating IMRT into pancreatic cancer therapy are respiratory motion, dose inhomogeneity, and mean dose.

  20. SKIRT: The design of a suite of input models for Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, M.; Camps, P.

    2015-09-01

    The Monte Carlo method is the most popular technique to perform radiative transfer simulations in a general 3D geometry. The algorithms behind and acceleration techniques for Monte Carlo radiative transfer are discussed extensively in the literature, and many different Monte Carlo codes are publicly available. On the contrary, the design of a suite of components that can be used for the distribution of sources and sinks in radiative transfer codes has received very little attention. The availability of such models, with different degrees of complexity, has many benefits. For example, they can serve as toy models to test new physical ingredients, or as parameterised models for inverse radiative transfer fitting. For 3D Monte Carlo codes, this requires algorithms to efficiently generate random positions from 3D density distributions. We describe the design of a flexible suite of components for the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SKIRT. The design is based on a combination of basic building blocks (which can be either analytical toy models or numerical models defined on grids or a set of particles) and the extensive use of decorators that combine and alter these building blocks to more complex structures. For a number of decorators, e.g. those that add spiral structure or clumpiness, we provide a detailed description of the algorithms that can be used to generate random positions. Advantages of this decorator-based design include code transparency, the avoidance of code duplication, and an increase in code maintainability. Moreover, since decorators can be chained without problems, very complex models can easily be constructed out of simple building blocks. Finally, based on a number of test simulations, we demonstrate that our design using customised random position generators is superior to a simpler design based on a generic black-box random position generator.

  1. Radiation Heat Transfer in 3 Dimensions for Semi-Transparent Materials....

    SciTech Connect

    2010-12-02

    The RAD3D software solves the critical heat transfer mechanisms that occur in production glass furnaces. The code includes state-of-the-art solution algorithms for efficient radiant interaction of the heating elements, furnace walls and internal furnace components. The code specifically solves the coupled radiative and conductive heating of semi-transparent materials such as glass to calculate the temperature distribution in the glass during processing.

  2. Transfer of radiative heat through clothing ensembles.

    PubMed

    Lotens, W A; Pieters, A M

    1995-06-01

    A mathematical model was designed to calculate the temperature and dry heat transfer in the various layers of a clothing ensemble, and the total heat loss of a human who is irradiated for a certain fraction of his or her area. The clothing ensemble that is irradiated by an external heat source is considered to be composed of underclothing, trapped air, and outer fabric. The model was experimentally tested with heat balance methods, using subjects, varying the activity, wind, and radiation characteristics of the outer garment of two-layer ensembles. In two experiments the subjects could only give off dry heat because they were wrapped in plastic foil. The model appeared to be correct within about 1 degree C (rms error) and 10 Wm-2 (rms error). In a third experiment, sweat evaporation was also taken into account, showing that the resulting physiological heat load of 10 to 30% of the intercepted additional radiation is compensated by additional sweating. The resulting heat strain was rather mild. It is concluded that the mathematical model is a valid tool for the investigation of heat transfer through two-layer ensembles in radiant environments.

  3. Radiative Transfer and Retrievals in EOF Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen; Smith, William L.; Schluessel, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) is a hyperspectral sensor with 8461 spectral channels and a nominal spectral resolution of 0.25 cm(sup -1). It is computationally intensive to perform radiative transfer calculations and inversions using all these channels. We will present a Principal Component-based Radiative Transfer Model (PCRTM) and a retrieval algorithm which perform all the necessary calculations in EOF domain. Since the EOFs are orthogonal to each other, only about 100 principal components are needed to represent the information content of the 8461 channels. The PCRTM provides the EOF coefficients and associated derivatives with respect to atmospheric and surface parameters needed by the inversion algorithm. The inversion algorithm is based on a non-linear Levenberg-Marquardt method with climatology covariance and a priori information as constraints. The retrieved parameters include atmospheric temperature, moisture and ozone profiles, cloud parameters, surface skin temperature, and surface emissivities. To make the retrieval system even more compact and stable. The atmospheric vertical profiles are compressed into the EOF space as well. The surface emissivities are also compressed into EOF space.

  4. Comparison of several radiation effects in human MCF10A mammary epithelial cells cultured as 2D monolayers or 3D acinar stuctures in matrigel.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Fen; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Peng, Yuanlin; Chuang, Eric Y; Bedford, Joel S

    2009-06-01

    It has been argued that the cell-cell and cell-matrix interaction networks in normal tissues are disrupted by radiation and that this largely controls many of the most important cellular radiation responses. This has led to the broader assertion that individual cells in normal tissue or a 3D normal-tissue-like culture will respond to radiation very differently than the same cells in a 2D monolayer culture. While many studies have shown that, in some cases, cell-cell contact in spheroids of transformed or tumor cell lines can alter radiation responses relative to those for the same cells in monolayer cultures, a question remains regarding the possible effect of the above-mentioned disruption of signaling networks that operate more specifically for cells in normal tissues or in a 3D tissue-like context. To test the generality of this notion, we used human MCF-10A cells, an immortalized mammary epithelial cell line that produces acinar structures in culture with many properties of human mammary ducts. We compared the dose responses for these cells in the 2D monolayer and in 3D ductal or acinar structures. The responses examined were reproductive cell death, induction of chromosomal aberrations, and the levels of gamma-H2AX foci in cells after single acute gamma-ray doses and immediately after 20 h of irradiation at a dose rate of 0.0017 Gy/min. We found no significant differences in the dose responses of these cells in 2D or 3D growth conditions. While this does not mean that such differences cannot occur in other situations, it does mean that they do not generally or necessarily occur.

  5. RELAP5-3D Modeling of Heat Transfer Components (Intermediate Heat Exchanger and Helical-Coil Steam Generator) for NGNP Application

    SciTech Connect

    N. A. Anderson; P. Sabharwall

    2014-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant project is aimed at the research and development of a helium-cooled high-temperature gas reactor that could generate both electricity and process heat for the production of hydrogen. The heat from the high-temperature primary loop must be transferred via an intermediate heat exchanger to a secondary loop. Using RELAP5-3D, a model was developed for two of the heat exchanger options a printed-circuit heat exchanger and a helical-coil steam generator. The RELAP5-3D models were used to simulate an exponential decrease in pressure over a 20 second period. The results of this loss of coolant analysis indicate that heat is initially transferred from the primary loop to the secondary loop, but after the decrease in pressure in the primary loop the heat is transferred from the secondary loop to the primary loop. A high-temperature gas reactor model should be developed and connected to the heat transfer component to simulate other transients.

  6. Radiation energy transfer in RNA polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempner, E. S.; Salovey, R.; Bernstein, S. L.

    1996-11-01

    Ribozymes are a special class of polyribonucleotide (RNA) molecules which possess intrinsic catalytic activity, capable of cleaving nucleic acid substrates. RNA molecules were synthesized containing a hammerhead ribozyme moiety of 52 nucleotides linked to an inactive leader sequence, for total lengths of either 262 or 1226 nucleotides. These RNAs were frozen and irradiated with high energy electrons. Surviving ribozyme activity was determined, using the ability of the irradiated ribozymes to cleave a labeled substrate. From the same irradiated samples, the amount of intact RNA remaining was determined following denaturing gel electrophoresis. Radiation target analyses of these data revealed a structural target size of 80 kDa and a ribozyme activity target size of 15 kDa for the smaller ribozyme, and 319 and 16 kDa, respectively, for the larger ribozyme. The disparity in target size for activity vs structure indicates that, in contrast to proteins, there is no spread of radiation damage far from the primary site of ionization in RNA molecules. The smaller target size for activity indicates that only primary ionizations occurring in the specific active region are effective. This is similar to the case for oligosaccharides. It is concluded that the presence of the ribose sugar in the polymer chain restricts radiation damage to a small region and prevents major energy transfer throughout the molecule.

  7. Radiative energy transfer in molecular gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1992-01-01

    Basic formulations, analyses, and numerical procedures are presented to study radiative interactions in gray as well as nongray gases under different physical and flow conditions. After preliminary fluid-dynamical considerations, essential governing equations for radiative transport are presented that are applicable under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Auxiliary relations for relaxation times and spectral absorption models are also provided. For specific applications, several simple gaseous systems are analyzed. The first system considered consists of a gas bounded by two parallel plates having the same temperature. Within the gas there is a uniform heat source per unit volume. For this system, both vibrational nonequilibrium effects and radiation conduction interactions are studied. The second system consists of fully developed laminar flow and heat transfer in a parallel plate duct under the boundary condition of a uniform surface heat flux. For this system, effects of gray surface emittance are studied. With the single exception of a circular geometry, the third system is considered identical to the second system. Here, the influence of nongray walls is also studied.

  8. Flare loop radiative hydrodynamics. III - Nonlocal radiative transfer effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, R. C.; Fisher, G. H.; Mcclymont, A. N.

    1983-01-01

    The study has three goals. The first is to demonstrate that processes exist whose intrinsic nonlocal nature cannot be represented by local approximations. The second is to elucidate the physical nature and origins of these nonlocal processes. The third is to suggest that the methods and results described here may prove useful in constructing semiempirical models of the chromosphere by means more efficient than trial and error. Matrices are computed that describe the effect of a temperature perturbation at an arbitrary point in the loop on density, hydrogen ionized fraction, total radiative loss rate, and radiative loss rate of selected hydrogen lines and continua at all other points. It is found that the dominant nonlocal radiative transfer effects can be separated into flux divergence coefficient effects and upper level population effects. The former are most important when the perturbation takes place in a region of significant opacity. Upper level population effects arise in both optically thick and thin regions in response to nonlocal density, ionization, and interlocking effects.

  9. Comparison of the 3D VERB Code Simulations of the Dynamic Evolution of the Outer and Inner Radiation Belts With the Reanalysis Obtained from Observations on Multiple Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shprits, Y.; Subbotin, D.; Ni, B.; Daae, M.; Kondrashov, D. A.; Hartinger, M.; Kim, K.; Orlova, K.; Nagai, T.; Friedel, R. H.; Chen, Y.

    2010-12-01

    In this study we present simulations of the inner and outer radiation belts using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) accounting for radial, pitch-angle, energy, and mixed diffusion. Qusi-linear diffusion coefficients are computed using the Full Diffusion Code (FDC) due to day-side and night-side chorus waves, magneto-sonic waves, phasmaspheric hiss waves, EMIC and hiss waves in the regions of plumes, lightning generated whistlers and anthropogenic whistlers. Sensitivity simulations show that the knowledge of wave spectral properties and spacial distribution of waves is crucially important for reproducing long term observations. The 3D VERB code simulations are compared to 3D reanalysis of the radiation belt fluxes obtained by blending the predictive model with observations from LANL GEO, CRRES, Akebono, and GPS. We also discuss the initial results of coupled RCM-VERB simulations. Finally, we present a statistical analysis of radiation belt phase space density obtained from reanalysis to explore sudden drop outs of the radiation belt fluxes and location of peaks in phase space density. The application of the developed tools to future measurements on board RBSP is discussed.

  10. Using 1D theory to understand 3D stagnation of a wire-array Z pinch in the absence of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Edmund

    2015-11-01

    Many high-energy-density systems implode towards the axis of symmetry, where it collides on itself, forming a hot plasma. However, experiments show these imploding plasmas develop three-dimensional (3D) structures. As a result, the plasma cannot completely dissipate its kinetic energy at stagnation, instead retaining significant 3D flow. A useful tool for understanding the effects of this residual flow is 3D simulation, but the amount and complexity of information can be daunting. To address this problem, we explore the connection between 3D simulation and one-dimensional (1D) theory. Such a connection, if it exists, is mutually beneficial: 1D theory can provide a clear picture of the underlying dynamics of 3D stagnation. On the other hand, deviations between theory and simulation suggest how 1D theory must be modified to account for 3D effects. In this work, we focus on a 3D, magnetohydrodynamic simulation of a compact wire-array Z pinch. To provide a simpler background against which to test our ideas, we artificially turn off radiation during the stagnation phase. Examination of the initial accumulation of mass on axis reveals oblique collision between jets, shock accretion, and vortex formation. Despite evidence for shock-dominated stagnation, a 1D shockless stagnation solution is more appropriate for describing the global dynamics, in that it reproduces the increase of on-axis density with time. However, the 1D solution must be modified to account for 3D effects: the flows suggest enhanced thermal transport as well as centrifugal force. Upon reaching peak compression, the stagnation transitions to a second phase, in which the high-pressure core on axis expands outward into the remaining imploding plasma. During this phase, a 1D shock solution describes the growth of the shock accretion region, as well as the decrease of on-axis density with time. However, the effect of 3D flows is still present: the on-axis temperature does not cool during expansion, which

  11. A stochastic formation of radiative transfer in clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, G.L.; Gabriel, P.M.

    1993-03-01

    The research carried out under this award dealt with issues involving deterministic radiative transfer, remote sensing, Stochastic radiative transfer, and parameterization of cloud optical properties. A number of different forms of radiative transfer models in one, two, and three dimensions were developed in an attempt to build an understanding of the radiative transfer in clouds with realistic spatial structure and to determine the key geometrical parameter that influence this transfer. The research conducted also seeks to assess the relative importance of these geometrical effects in contrast to microphysical effects of clouds. The main conclusion of the work is that geometry has a profound influence on all aspects of radiative transfer and the interpretation of this transfer. We demonstrate how this geometry can influence estimate of particle effective radius to the 30-50% level and also how geometry can significantly bias the remote sensing of cloud optical depth.

  12. High-resolution 3D numerical modeling of thrust wedges: Influence of décollement strength on transfer zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruh, Jonas B.; Gerya, Taras; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2013-04-01

    mechanics and dynamics of thin-skinned compressible thrust wedges with prescribed offsets in the backstop, i.e., transfer zones, are investigated using a three-dimensional finite difference numerical model with a visco-brittle/plastic rheology. The main questions addressed are as follows: (i) What is the influence of the initial length of the backstop offset and (ii) what is the effect of the frictional strength of the main décollement on the structural evolution of the brittle wedges along such transfer zones? Results show that the shorter the backstop offset, the earlier these two thrust planes connect, forming a curved frontal thrust along the entire width of the model. Younger, in-sequence thrusts are formed parallel to this curved shape. Long backstop offsets produce strongly curved thrust faults around the indenting corner. Simulations with a weak basal friction evolve toward almost linear frontal thrusts orthogonal to the bulk shortening direction. Increased basal drag in models with a strong décollement favors propagation of the backstop offset into a transfer zone up to the frontal thrust. These simulations revealed that surface tapers of the wedge in front of the backstop promontory are larger than what the critical wedge theory predicts, whereas the tapers on the other side of the transfer zone are smaller than analytical values. This difference is amplified with increasing length of the backstop offset and/or strength of the décollement. Modeled surface elevation schemes reproduce well the topographic patterns of natural orogenic systems such as the topographic low along the Minab-Zendan transform/transfer fault between the Zagros and Makran.

  13. PAKAL: A THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODEL TO SOLVE THE RADIATIVE TRANSFER EQUATION

    SciTech Connect

    De la Luz, Victor; Lara, Alejandro; Mendoza-Torres, J. E.; Selhorst, Caius L.

    2010-06-15

    We present a new numerical model called 'Pakal' intended to solve the radiative transfer equation in a three-dimensional (3D) geometry, using the approximation for a locally plane-parallel atmosphere. Pakal uses pre-calculated radial profiles of density and temperature (based on hydrostatic, hydrodynamic, or MHD models) to compute the emission from 3D source structures with high spatial resolution. Then, Pakal solves the radiative transfer equation in a set of (3D) ray paths, going from the source to the observer. Pakal uses a new algorithm to compute the radiative transfer equation by using an intelligent system consisting of three structures: a cellular automaton; an expert system; and a program coordinator. The code outputs can be either two-dimensional maps or one-dimensional profiles, which reproduce the observations with high accuracy, giving detailed physical information about the environment where the radiation was generated and/or transmitted. We present the model applied to a 3D solar radial geometry, assuming a locally plane-parallel atmosphere, and thermal free-free radio emission from hydrogen-helium gas in thermodynamic equilibrium. We also present the convergence test of the code. We computed the synthetic spectrum of the centimetric-millimetric solar emission and found better agreement with observations (up to 10{sup 4} K at 20 GHz) than previous models reported in the literature. The stability and convergence test show the high accuracy of the code. Finally, Pakal can improve the integration time by up to an order of magnitude compared against linear integration codes.

  14. Can we afford three-dimensional radiative transfer in NWP and LES models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakub, Fabian; Mayer, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Next generation NWP models shift from statistical cloud parametrizations to physics based convection, by increasing the spatial resolution to considerably less than 1km. The calculation of atmospheric heating rates still relies heavily on one dimensional schemes (independent column approximation, ICA), although recent studies showed that three dimensional radiative heating rates may have considerable impact on clouds and precipitation. Simple approximations such as the ICA are needed because of the extraordinary computational burden of known 3D radiative transfer operators (Monte Carlo based or SHDOM) which makes the assessment of 3D RT-effects on cloud dynamics cumbersome. Thus, to date NWP/LES simulations which include 3D RT effects are only performed for limited time periods and domain sizes. In order to study the full extent of 3D RT effects a fresh approach is needed: We present a new RT-scheme which compares well in computational speed to currently employed 1D-schemes whilst incorporating principal 3D-effects. Special emphasis in the development of such a RT-scheme has to be laid on the calculation of atmospheric heating rates. Furthermore the scalability on massively parallel computers is mandatory.

  15. Assessment of a 3-D boundary layer analysis to predict heat transfer and flow field in a turbine passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, O. L.

    1985-01-01

    An assessment was made of the applicability of a three dimensional boundary layer analysis of heat transfer, total pressure losses, and streamline flow patterns on the surfaces of both stationary and rotating turbine passages. In support of this effort, an analysis was developed to calculate a general nonorthogonal surface coordinate system for arbitrary three dimensional surfaces and also to calculate the boundary layer edge conditions for compressible flow using the surface Euler equations and experimental pressure distributions. Calculations are presented for the pressure, endwall, and suction surfaces of a stationary cascade and for the pressure surface of a rotating turbine blade. The results strongly indicate that the three dimensional boundary layer analysis can give good predictions of the flow field, loss, and heat transfer on the pressure, suction, and endwall surface of a gas turbine passage.

  16. Assessment of a 3-D boundary layer analysis to predict heat transfer and flow field in a turbine passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, O. L.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment was made of the applicability of a three dimensional boundary layer analysis of heat transfer, total pressure losses, and streamline flow patterns on the surfaces of both stationary and rotating turbine passages. In support of this effort, an analysis was developed to calculate a general nonorthogonal surface coordinate system for arbitrary three dimensional surfaces and also to calculate the boundary layer edge conditions for compressible flow using the surface Euler equations and experimental pressure distributions. Calculations are presented for the pressure, endwall, and suction surfaces of a stationary cascade and for the pressure surface of a rotating turbine blade. The results strongly indicate that the three dimensional boundary layer analysis can give good predictions of the flow field, loss, and heat transfer on the pressure, suction, and endwall surface of a gas turbine passage.

  17. Multilevel Radiative Transfer with Partial Frequency Redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uitenbroek, H.

    2001-08-01

    A multilevel accelerated lambda iteration (MALI) method for radiative transfer calculations with partial frequency redistribution (PRD) is presented. The method, which is based on Rybicki & Hummer's complete frequency redistribution (CRD) formalism with full preconditioning, consistently accounts for overlapping radiative transitions. Its extension to PRD is implemented in a very natural way through the use of the Ψ operator operating on the emissivity rather than the commonly used Λ operator, which operates on the source function. Apart from requiring an additional inner computational loop to evaluate the PRD emission-line profiles with fixed population numbers, implementation of the presented method requires only a trivial addition of computer code. Since the presented method employs a diagonal operator, it is easily extended to different geometries. Currently, it has been implemented for one-, two-, and three-dimensional Cartesian grids and spherical symmetry. In all cases, the speed of convergence with PRD is very similar to that in CRD, with the former sometimes even surpassing the latter. Sample calculations exhibiting the favorable convergence behavior of the PRD code are presented in the case of the Ca II H and K lines, the Mg II h and k lines, and the hydrogen Lyα and Lyβ lines in a one-dimensional solar model and the Ca II resonance lines in a two-dimensional flux-sheet model.

  18. Radiative Transfer in a Scattering Spherical Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, S. S.; Park, Y.-S.; Kwon, S. M.; Park, C.; Weinberg, J. L.

    2002-03-01

    We have written a code called QDM_sca, which numerically solves the problem of radiative transfer in an anisotropically scattering, spherical atmosphere. First we formulate the problem as a second order differential equation of a quasi-diffusion type. We then apply a three-point finite differencing to the resulting differential equation and transform it to a tri-diagonal system of simultaneous linear equations. After boundary conditions are implemented in the tri-diagonal system, the QDM_sca radiative code fixes the field of specific intensity at every point in the atmosphere. As an application example, we used the code to calculate the brightness of atmospheric diffuse light(ADL) as a function of zenith distance, which plays a pivotal role in reducing the zodiacal light brightness from night sky observations. On the basis of this ADL calculation, frequent uses of effective extinction optical depth have been fully justified in correcting the atmospheric extinction for such extended sources as zodiacal light, integrated starlight and diffuse galactic light. The code will be available on request.

  19. Optical CT scanner for in-air readout of gels for external radiation beam 3D dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Ramm, Daniel; Rutten, Thomas P; Shepherd, Justin; Bezak, Eva

    2012-06-21

    Optical CT scanners for a 3D readout of externally irradiated radiosensitive hydrogels currently require the use of a refractive index (RI) matching liquid bath to obtain suitable optical ray paths through the gel sample to the detector. The requirement for a RI matching liquid bath has been negated by the design of a plastic cylindrical gel container that provides parallel beam geometry through the gel sample for the majority of the projection. The design method can be used for various hydrogels. Preliminary test results for the prototype laser beam scanner with ferrous xylenol-orange gel show geometric distortion of 0.2 mm maximum, spatial resolution limited to beam spot size of about 0.4 mm and 0.8% noise (1 SD) for a uniform irradiation. Reconstruction of a star pattern irradiated through the cylinder walls demonstrates the suitability for external beam applications. The extremely simple and cost-effective construction of this optical CT scanner, together with the simplicity of scanning gel samples without RI matching fluid increases the feasibility of using 3D gel dosimetry for clinical external beam dose verifications.

  20. Comparison of 1D stagnation solutions to 3D wire-array Z pinch simulations in absence of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Edmund; Velikovich, Alexander; Maron, Yitzhak

    2013-10-01

    In the idealized picture of a Z pinch, a cylindrically symmetric plasma shell implodes towards axis. In this 1D (radial) picture, the resulting stagnation is very efficient: all the kinetic energy of the shell converts to internal energy, as for instance in the Noh shock solution or the homogeneous stagnation flow. If we generalize the problem to 2D by deforming the shell from perfectly circular to oblate, the resulting stagnation will not be as efficient. As in the Hiemenz flow, in which a jet of fluid strikes a rigid flat boundary and squirts out to the sides, the more complicated flows allowed in 2D allow flow kinetic energy to redirect rather than stagnate. With this picture in mind, we might expect the stagnation of a wire-array Z pinch, which in actuality forms a highly distorted 3D imploding plasma, to dissipate its kinetic energy inefficiently due to the lack of symmetry, and be indescribable by means of the idealized 1D stagnation solutions. On the other hand, one might expect that if the imploding plasma is sufficiently messy, the non-uniformities might ``wash out,'' allowing a quasi-1D description of the averaged quantities of plasma. In this work we explore this idea, comparing predictions of 1D stagnation solutions with 3D simulation. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC0 4-94AL85000.

  1. 3-D electrical resistivity structure based on geomagnetic transfer functions exploring the features of arc magmatism beneath Kyushu, Southwest Japan Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, Maki; Uyeshima, Makoto; Handa, Shun; Shimoizumi, Masashi; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Kagiyama, Tsuneomi; Utada, Hisashi; Munekane, Hiroshi; Ichiki, Masahiro; Fuji-ta, Kiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Our 3-D electrical resistivity model clearly detects particular subsurface features for magmatism associated with subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) in three regions: a southern and a northern volcanic region, and a nonvolcanic region on the island of Kyushu. We apply 3-D inversion analyses for geomagnetic transfer function data of a short-period band, in combination with results of a previous 3-D model that was determined by using Network-Magnetotelluric response function data of a longer-period band as an initial model in the present inversion to improve resolution at shallow depths; specifically, a two-stage inversion is used instead of a joint inversion. In contrast to the previous model, the presented model clearly reveals a conductive block on the back-arc side of Kirishima volcano at shallow depths of 50 km; the block is associated with hydrothermal fluids and hydrothermal alteration zones related to the formation of epithermal gold deposits. A second feature revealed by the model is another conductive block regarded as upwelling fluids, extending from the upper surface of the PSP in the mantle under Kirishima volcano in the southern volcanic region. Third, a resistive crustal layer, which confines the conductive block in the mantle, is distributed beneath the nonvolcanic region. Fourth, our model reveals a significant resistive block, which extends below the continental Moho at the fore-arc side of the volcanic front and extends into the nonvolcanic region in central Kyushu.

  2. SU-C-213-05: Evaluation of a Composite Copper-Plastic Material for a 3D Printed Radiation Therapy Bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Vitzthum, L; Ehler, E; Sterling, D; Reynolds, T; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a novel 3D printed bolus fabricated from a copper-plastic composite as a thin flexible, custom fitting device that can replicate doses achieved with conventional bolus techniques. Methods: Two models of bolus were created on a 3D printer using a composite copper-PLA/PHA. Firstly, boluses were constructed at thicknesses of 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 mm. Relative dose measurements were performed under the bolus with an Attix Chamber as well as with radiochromic film. Results were compared to superficial Attix Chamber measurements in a water equivalent material to determine the dosimetric water equivalence of the copper-PLA/PHA plastic. Secondly, CT images of a RANDO phantom were used to create a custom fitting bolus across the anterolateral scalp. Surface dose with the bolus placed on the RANDO phantom was measured with radiochromic film at tangential angles with 6, 10, 10 flattening filter free (FFF) and 18 MV photon beams. Results: Mean surface doses for 6, 10, 10FFF and 18 MV were measured as a percent of Dmax for the flat bolus devices of each thickness. The 0.4 mm thickness bolus was determined to be near equivalent to 2.5 mm depth in water for all four energies. Surface doses ranged from 59–63% without bolus and 85–90% with the custom 0.4 mm copper-plastic bolus relative to the prescribed dose for an oblique tangential beam arrangement on the RANDO phantom. Conclusion: Sub-millimeter thickness, 3D printed composite copper-PLA/PHA bolus can provide a build-up effect equivalent to conventional bolus. At this thickness, the 3D printed bolus allows a level of flexure that may provide more patient comfort than current 3D printing materials used in bolus fabrication while still retaining the CT based custom patient shape. Funding provided by an intra-department grant of the University of Minnesota Department of Radiation Oncology.

  3. Detecting Radiation-Induced Injury Using Rapid 3D Variogram Analysis of CT Images of Rat Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Richard E.; Murphy, Mark K.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Carson, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To investigate the ability of variogram analysis of octree-decomposed CT images and volume change maps to detect radiation-induced damage in rat lungs. Materials and Methods The lungs of female Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to one of five absorbed doses (0, 6, 9, 12, or 15 Gy) of gamma radiation from a Co-60 source. At 6 months post-exposure, pulmonary function tests were performed and 4DCT images were acquired using a respiratory-gated microCT scanner. Volume change maps were then calculated from the 4DCT images. Octree decomposition was performed on CT images and volume change maps, and variogram analysis was applied to the decomposed images. Correlations of measured parameters with dose were evaluated. Results The effects of irradiation were not detectable from measured parameters, indicating only mild lung damage. Additionally, there were no significant correlations of pulmonary function results or CT densitometry with radiation dose. However, the variogram analysis did detect a significant correlation with dose in both the CT images (r=−0.57, p=0.003) and the volume change maps (r=−0.53, p=0.008). Conclusion This is the first study to utilize variogram analysis of lung images to assess pulmonary damage in a model of radiation injury. Results show that this approach is more sensitive to detecting radiation damage than conventional measures such as pulmonary function tests or CT densitometry. PMID:24029058

  4. 3D dosimetry estimation for selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) using SPECT/CT images: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debebe, Senait A.; Franquiz, Juan; McGoron, Anthony J.

    2015-03-01

    Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) is a common way to treat liver cancer that cannot be treated surgically. SIRT involves administration of Yttrium - 90 (90Y) microspheres via the hepatic artery after a diagnostic procedure using 99mTechnetium (Tc)-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) to detect extrahepatic shunting to the lung or the gastrointestinal tract. Accurate quantification of radionuclide administered to patients and radiation dose absorbed by different organs is of importance in SIRT. Accurate dosimetry for SIRT allows optimization of dose delivery to the target tumor and may allow for the ability to assess the efficacy of the treatment. In this study, we proposed a method that can efficiently estimate radiation absorbed dose from 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT images of liver and the surrounding organs. Bremsstrahlung radiation from 90Y was simulated using the Compton window of 99mTc (78keV at 57%). 99mTc images acquired at the photopeak energy window were used as a standard to examine the accuracy of dosimetry prediction by the simulated bremsstrahlung images. A Liqui-Phil abdominal phantom with liver, stomach and two tumor inserts was imaged using a Philips SPECT/CT scanner. The Dose Point Kernel convolution method was used to find the radiation absorbed dose at a voxel level for a three dimensional dose distribution. This method will allow for a complete estimate of the distribution of radiation absorbed dose by tumors, liver, stomach and other surrounding organs at the voxel level. The method provides a quantitative predictive method for SIRT treatment outcome and administered dose response for patients who undergo the treatment.

  5. Measuring the effects of fractionated radiation therapy in a 3D prostate cancer model system using SERS nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Camus, Victoria L; Stewart, Grant; Nailon, William H; McLaren, Duncan B; Campbell, Colin J

    2016-08-15

    Multicellular tumour spheroids (MTS) are three-dimensional cell cultures that possess their own microenvironments and provide a more meaningful model of tumour biology than monolayer cultures. As a result, MTS are becoming increasingly used as tumor models when measuring the efficiency of therapies. Monitoring the viability of live MTS is complicated by their 3D nature and conventional approaches such as fluorescence often require fixation and sectioning. In this paper we detail the use of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) to measure the viability of MTS grown from prostate cancer (PC3) cells. Our results show that we can monitor loss of viability by measuring pH and redox potential in MTS and furthermore we demonstrate that SERS can be used to measure the effects of fractionation of a dose of radiotherapy in a way that has potential to inform treatment planning.

  6. Synergetic effect of efficient energy transfer and 3D pi-pi stack for white emission based on the block copolymers containing nonconjugated spacer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junjian; Li, Hui; Yao, Bing; Zhao, Bin; Weng, Chao; Lei, Gangtie; Shen, Ping; Xie, Zhiyuan; Tan, Songting

    2009-04-02

    A series of block copolymers containing nonconjugated spacer and 3D pi-pi stacking structure with simultaneous blue-, green-, and yellow-emitting units has been synthesized and characterized. The dependence of the energy transfer and electroluminescence (EL) properties of these block copolymers on the contents of oligo(phenylenevinylene)s has been investigated. The block copolymer (GEO8-BEO-YEO4) with 98.8% blue-emitting oligomer (BEO), 0.8% green-emitting oligomer (GEO), and 0.4% yellow-emitting oligomer (YEO) showed the best electroluminescent performance, exhibiting a maximum luminance of 2309 cd/m(2) and efficiency of 0.34 cd/A. The single-layer-polymer light-emitting diodes device based on GEO2-BEO-YEO4 emitted greenish white light with the CIE coordinates of (0.26, 0.37) at 10 V. The synergetic effect of the efficient energy transfer and 3D pi-pi stack of these block copolymers on the photoluminescent and electroluminescent properties are investigated.

  7. Scaling and performance of a 3-D radiation hydrodynamics code on message-passing parallel computers: final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, J C; Norman, M

    1999-10-28

    This report details an investigation into the efficacy of two approaches to solving the radiation diffusion equation within a radiation hydrodynamic simulation. Because leading-edge scientific computing platforms have evolved from large single-node vector processors to parallel aggregates containing tens to thousands of individual CPU's, the ability of an algorithm to maintain high compute efficiency when distributed over a large array of nodes is critically important. The viability of an algorithm thus hinges upon the tripartite question of numerical accuracy, total time to solution, and parallel efficiency.

  8. Radiative Transfer Modeling and Retrievals for Advanced Hyperspectral Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Smith, William L., Sr.; Mango, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    A novel radiative transfer model and a physical inversion algorithm based on principal component analysis will be presented. Instead of dealing with channel radiances, the new approach fits principal component scores of these quantities. Compared to channel-based radiative transfer models, the new approach compresses radiances into a much smaller dimension making both forward modeling and inversion algorithm more efficient.

  9. Determination of time of death in forensic science via a 3-D whole body heat transfer model.

    PubMed

    Bartgis, Catherine; LeBrun, Alexander M; Ma, Ronghui; Zhu, Liang

    2016-12-01

    This study is focused on developing a whole body heat transfer model to accurately simulate temperature decay in a body postmortem. The initial steady state temperature field is simulated first and the calculated weighted average body temperature is used to determine the overall heat transfer coefficient at the skin surface, based on thermal equilibrium before death. The transient temperature field postmortem is then simulated using the same boundary condition and the temperature decay curves at several body locations are generated for a time frame of 24h. For practical purposes, curve fitting techniques are used to replace the simulations with a proposed exponential formula with an initial time delay. It is shown that the obtained temperature field in the human body agrees very well with that in the literature. The proposed exponential formula provides an excellent fit with an R(2) value larger than 0.998. For the brain and internal organ sites, the initial time delay varies from 1.6 to 2.9h, when the temperature at the measuring site does not change significantly from its original value. The curve-fitted time constant provides the measurement window after death to be between 8h and 31h if the brain site is used, while it increases 60-95% at the internal organ site. The time constant is larger when the body is exposed to colder air, since a person usually wears more clothing when it is cold outside to keep the body warm and comfortable. We conclude that a one-size-fits-all approach would lead to incorrect estimation of time of death and it is crucial to generate a database of cooling curves taking into consideration all the important factors such as body size and shape, environmental conditions, etc., therefore, leading to accurate determination of time of death.

  10. Polar firn layering in radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linow, Stefanie; Hoerhold, Maria

    2016-04-01

    For many applications in the geosciences, remote sensing is the only feasible method of obtaining data from large areas with limited accessibility. This is especially true for the cryosphere, where light conditions and cloud coverage additionally limit the use of optical sensors. Here, instruments operating at microwave frequencies become important, for instance in polar snow parameters / SWE (snow water equivalent) mapping. However, the interaction between snow and microwave radiation is a complex process and still not fully understood. RT (radiative transfer) models to simulate snow-microwave interaction are available, but they require a number of input parameters such as microstructure and density, which are partly ill-constrained. The layering of snow and firn introduces an additional degree of complexity, as all snow parameters show a strong variability with depth. Many studies on RT modeling of polar firn deal with layer variability by using statistical properties derived from previous measurements, such as the standard deviations of density and microstructure, to configure model input. Here, the variability of microstructure parameters, such as density and particle size, are usually assumed to be independent of each other. However, in the case of the firn pack of the polar ice sheets, we observe that microstructure evolution depends on environmental parameters, such as temperature and snow deposition. Accordingly, density and microstructure evolve together within the snow and firn. Based on CT (computer tomography) microstructure measurements of antarctic firn, we can show that: first, the variability of density and effective grain size are linked and can thus be implemented in the RT models as a coupled set of parameters. Second, the magnitude of layering is captured by the measured standard deviation. Based on high-resolution density measurements of an Antarctic firn core, we study the effect of firn layering at different microwave wavelengths. By means of

  11. Radiative Transfer in Primordial Atmosphere of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, E.; Atreya, S.; Kuhn, W.

    2005-05-01

    In light of Huygens measurements, we present our improved model of thermal and photochemical evolution of Titan's atmosphere. Atreya et. al (1978) demonstrated that photolysis of ammonia on primordial Titan is capable of producing a nitrogen atmosphere substantially thicker than that measured by Voyager. E. Wilson (2001) carried this calculation one step further by including methane and water vapor explicitly in the ammonia photochemistry model, and arrived at a preliminary estimate of time required to accumulate different amounts of nitrogen. However, both models assumed an isothermal atmosphere. Since chemistry leading up to nitrogen occurs in the stratosphere, both the thermal structure and saturation effects are important for determining the time constants and amounts of nitrogen production. In this presentation, we discuss preliminary results of a radiative equilibrium model for the primordial middle and lower atmosphere of Titan. It includes CH4, NH3 and H2O in solar proportions for its initial composition, and CH4-CH4 pressure induced absorption, which presently controls the thermal structure in the troposphere. The temperature in the stratosphere is controlled by the haze, and we explore the effects of a haze layer at various altitudes for accelerating conversion of ammonia to nitrogen. Furthermore, we include the effects of enhanced solar flux during the T-Tauri phase, which could speed up both the loss of nitrogen and conversion of ammonia to nitrogen. We are in the process of coupling the radiative transfer model to a comprehensive photochemical model (Wilson and Atreya, 2004) to access the roles of trace species other than those included in this calculation.

  12. HIGH-TEMPERATURE PROCESSING OF SOLIDS THROUGH SOLAR NEBULAR BOW SHOCKS: 3D RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATIONS WITH PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, A. C.; Morris, M. A.; Desch, S. J.

    2013-10-20

    A fundamental, unsolved problem in solar system formation is explaining the melting and crystallization of chondrules found in chondritic meteorites. Theoretical models of chondrule melting in nebular shocks have been shown to be consistent with many aspects of thermal histories inferred for chondrules from laboratory experiments; but, the mechanism driving these shocks is unknown. Planetesimals and planetary embryos on eccentric orbits can produce bow shocks as they move supersonically through the disk gas, and are one possible source of chondrule-melting shocks. We investigate chondrule formation in bow shocks around planetoids through three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. A new radiation transport algorithm that combines elements of flux-limited diffusion and Monte Carlo methods is used to capture the complexity of radiative transport around bow shocks. An equation of state that includes the rotational, vibrational, and dissociation modes of H{sub 2} is also used. Solids are followed directly in the simulations and their thermal histories are recorded. Adiabatic expansion creates rapid cooling of the gas, and tail shocks behind the embryo can cause secondary heating events. Radiative transport is efficient, and bow shocks around planetoids can have luminosities ∼few× 10{sup –8} L{sub ☉}. While barred and radial chondrule textures could be produced in the radiative shocks explored here, porphyritic chondrules may only be possible in the adiabatic limit. We present a series of predicted cooling curves that merit investigation in laboratory experiments to determine whether the solids produced by bow shocks are represented in the meteoritic record by chondrules or other solids.

  13. SU-C-BRE-04: Microbeam-Radiation-Therapy (MRT): Characterizing a Novel MRT Device Using High Resolution 3D Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q; Juang, T; Bache, S; Chang, S; Oldham, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The feasibility of MRT has recently been demonstrated utilizing a new technology of Carbon-Nano-Tube(CNT) field emission x-ray sources.This approach can deliver very high dose(10's of Gy) in narrow stripes(sub-mm) of radiation which enables the study of novel radiation treatment approaches. Here we investigate the application of highresolution (50um isotropic) PRESAGE/Optical-CT 3D dosimetry techniques to characterize the radiation delivered in this extremely dosimetrically challenging scenario. Methods: The CNT field emission x-ray source irradiator comprises of a linear cathode array and a novel collimator alignment system. This allows a precise delivery of high-energy small beams up to 160 kVp. A cylindrical dosimeter (∼2.2cm in height ∼2.5cm in diameter) was irradiated by CNT MRT delivering 3 strips of radiation with a nominal entrance dose of 32 Gy.A second dosimeter was irradiated with similar entrance dose, with a regular x-ray irradiator collimated to microscopical strip-beams. 50um (isotropic) 3D dosimetry was performed using an in-house optical-CT system designed and optimized for high resolution imaging (including a stray light deconvolution correction).The percentage depth dose (PDD), peak-to-valley ratio (PVR) and beam width (FWHM) data were obtained and analyzed in both cases. Results: High resolution 3D images were successfully achieved with the prototype system, enabling extraction of PDD and dose profiles. The PDDs for the CNT irradiation showed pronounced attenuation, but less build-up effect than that from the multibeam irradiation. The beam spacing between the three strips has an average value of 0.9mm while that for the 13 strips is 1.5 mm at a depth of 16.5 mm. The stray light corrected image shows line profiles with reduced noise and consistent PVR values. Conclusion: MRT dosimetry is extremely challenging due to the ultra small fields involved.This preliminary application of a novel, ultra-high resolution, optical-CT 3D

  14. Nitrogen transfers off Walvis Bay: a 3-D coupled physical/biogeochemical modeling approach in the Namibian upwelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutknecht, E.; Dadou, I.; Marchesiello, P.; Cambon, G.; Le Vu, B.; Sudre, J.; Garçon, V.; Machu, E.; Rixen, T.; Kock, A.; Flohr, A.; Paulmier, A.; Lavik, G.

    2013-06-01

    Eastern boundary upwelling systems (EBUS) are regions of high primary production often associated with oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). They represent key regions for the oceanic nitrogen (N) cycle. By exporting organic matter (OM) and nutrients produced in the coastal region to the open ocean, EBUS can play an important role in sustaining primary production in subtropical gyres. However, losses of fixed inorganic N through denitrification and anammox processes take place in oxygen depleted environments such as EBUS, and can potentially mitigate the role of these regions as a source of N to the open ocean. EBUS can also represent a considerable source of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere, affecting the atmospheric budget of N2O. In this paper a 3-D coupled physical/biogeochemical model (ROMS/BioEBUS) is used to investigate the N budget in the Namibian upwelling system. The main processes linked to EBUS and associated OMZs are taken into account. The study focuses on the northern part of the Benguela upwelling system (BUS), especially the Walvis Bay area (between 22° S and 24° S) where the OMZ is well developed. Fluxes of N off the Walvis Bay area are estimated in order to understand and quantify (1) the total N offshore export from the upwelling area, representing a possible N source that sustains primary production in the South Atlantic subtropical gyre; (2) export production and subsequent losses of fixed N via denitrification and anammox under suboxic conditions (O2 < 25 mmol O2 m-3); and (3) the N2O emission to the atmosphere in the upwelling area. In the mixed layer, the total N offshore export is estimated as 8.5 ± 3.9 × 1010 mol N yr-1 at 10° E off the Walvis Bay area, with a mesoscale contribution of 20%. Extrapolated to the whole BUS, the coastal N source for the subtropical gyre corresponds to 0.1 ± 0.04 mol N m-2 yr-1. This N flux represents a major source of N for the gyre compared with other N sources, and contributes 28% of the new primary

  15. Application of ray tracing in radiation heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Joseph F.

    1993-01-01

    This collection of presentation figures displays the capabilities of ray tracing for radiation propagation calculations as compared to an analytical approach. The goal is to introduce the terminology and solution process used in ray tracing, and provide insight into radiation heat transfer principles and analysis tools. A thermal analysis working environment is introduced that solves demanding radiation heat transfer problems based on ray tracing. This information may serve as a reference for designing and building ones own analysis environment.

  16. Determination of the 5d6s3D1 State Lifetime and Blackbody Radiation Clock Shift in Yb

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-03

    transition due to room temperature blackbody radiation is dominated by a static Stark effect , which was recently measured to high accuracy [J. A. Shennan et...Stark effect , which was recently measured to high accuracy [J. A. Sherman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 153002 (2012)]. However, room temperature... effect , which was recently measured to high accuracy [J. A. Sherman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 153002 (2012)]. However, room temperature

  17. [A new 2D and 3D imaging approach to musculoskeletal physiology and pathology with low-dose radiation and the standing position: the EOS system].

    PubMed

    Dubousset, Jean; Charpak, Georges; Dorion, Irène; Skalli, Wafa; Lavaste, François; Deguise, Jacques; Kalifa, Gabriel; Ferey, Solène

    2005-02-01

    Close collaboration between multidisciplinary specialists (physicists, biomecanical engineers, medical radiologists and pediatric orthopedic surgeons) has led to the development of a new low-dose radiation device named EOS. EOS has three main advantages: The use of a gaseous X-ray detector, invented by Georges Charpak (Nobel Prizewinner 1992), the dose necessary to obtain a 2D image of the skeletal system has been reduced by 8 to 10 times, while that required to obtain a 3D reconstruction from CT slices has fallen by a factor of 800 to 1000. The accuracy of the 3D reconstruction obtained with EOS is as good as that obtained with CT. The patient is examined in the standing (or seated) position, and is scanned simultaneously from head to feet, both frontally and laterally. This is a major advantage over conventional CT which requires the patient to be placed horizontally. -The 3D reconstructions of each element of the osteo-articular system are as precise as those obtained by conventional CT. EOS is also rapid, taking only 15 to 30 minutes to image the entire spine.

  18. Scrape-off layer modeling of radiative divertor and high heat flux experiments on D3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, R. B.; Petrie, T. W.; Hill, D. N.

    1992-03-01

    We use a new multispecies 1-D fluid code, NEWT-1D, to model DIII-D scrape-off layer (SOL) behavior during radiative divertor and high heat flux experiments. The separatrix location and the width of the SOL are uncertain, and affect the comparison of the data in important ways. The model agrees with many of the experimental measurements for a particular prescription for the separatrix location. The model cannot explain the recent data on the separatrix T(sub i) with a conventional picture of ion and electron power flows across the separatrix. Radial transport of particles and heat in some form is required to explain the peak heat flux data before and after gas puffing. For argon puffing in the private flux region, entrainment is poor in the steady state. The calculations suggest that strike point argon puffing in a slot divertor geometry results in substantially better entrainment. Self-consistent, steady-state solutions with radiated powers up to 80 percent of the SOL power input are obtained in 1-D. We discuss significant radial effects which warrant the development of a code which can treat strongly radiating impurities in 2-D geometries.

  19. Studies of radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.

    1986-01-01

    Schloerb and Claussen continued their analysis of the very high quality data set obtained on the 18 centimeter OH line from the Comet P/Halley with the NRAO 43 meter antenna. The high spectral resolution (0.22 km/sec) and high signal-to-noise of the OH spectra make them ideal for the study of kinematics in the coma. Synthetic profiles were initiated for comparison with the data. A vectorial model was developed using the Monte Carlo techniques originated by Combi and Delsemme. Analysis of the millimeter wavelength observations of HCN emission from P/Halley obtained throughout much of the recent apparition were continued using the University of Massachusetts 14 millimeter-wavelength (FCRAO) antenna. A detailed analysis of the HCN lineshpaes was performed over the last six months. The excitation of HCN in the coma was studied to obtain a detailed match to the observed spectra. The passive millimeter wave radiometer was used to probe the physical and chemical nature of comets from spacecraft. Work was continued on an improved theory of radiative transfer for rough and porous surfaces, such as the regoliths of satellites, asteroids, and comets.

  20. 3D discrete angiogenesis dynamic model and stochastic simulation for the assessment of blood perfusion coefficient and impact on heat transfer between nanoparticles and malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Yifat, Jonathan; Gannot, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Early detection of malignant tumors plays a crucial role in the survivability chances of the patient. Therefore, new and innovative tumor detection methods are constantly searched for. Tumor-specific magnetic-core nano-particles can be used with an alternating magnetic field to detect and treat tumors by hyperthermia. For the analysis of the method effectiveness, the bio-heat transfer between the nanoparticles and the tissue must be carefully studied. Heat diffusion in biological tissue is usually analyzed using the Pennes Bio-Heat Equation, where blood perfusion plays an important role. Malignant tumors are known to initiate an angiogenesis process, where endothelial cell migration from neighboring vasculature eventually leads to the formation of a thick blood capillary network around them. This process allows the tumor to receive its extensive nutrition demands and evolve into a more progressive and potentially fatal tumor. In order to assess the effect of angiogenesis on the bio-heat transfer problem, we have developed a discrete stochastic 3D model & simulation of tumor-induced angiogenesis. The model elaborates other angiogenesis models by providing high resolution 3D stochastic simulation, capturing of fine angiogenesis morphological features, effects of dynamic sprout thickness functions, and stochastic parent vessel generator. We show that the angiogenesis realizations produced are well suited for numerical bio-heat transfer analysis. Statistical study on the angiogenesis characteristics was derived using Monte Carlo simulations. According to the statistical analysis, we provide analytical expression for the blood perfusion coefficient in the Pennes equation, as a function of several parameters. This updated form of the Pennes equation could be used for numerical and analytical analyses of the proposed detection and treatment method.

  1. Treatment techniques for 3D conformal radiation to breast and chest wall including the internal mammary chain.

    PubMed

    Sonnik, Deborah; Selvaraj, Raj N; Faul, Clare; Gerszten, Kristina; Heron, Dwight E; King, Gwendolyn C

    2007-01-01

    Breast, chest wall, and regional nodal irradiation have been associated with an improved outcome in high-risk breast cancer patients. Complex treatment planning is often utilized to ensure complete coverage of the target volume while minimizing the dose to surrounding normal tissues. The 2 techniques evaluated in this report are the partially wide tangent fields (PWTFs) and the 4-field photon/electron combination (the modified "Kuske Technique"). These 2 techniques were evaluated in 10 consecutive breast cancer patients. All patients had computerized tomographic (CT) scans for 3D planning supine on a breast board. The breast was defined clinically by the physician and confirmed radiographically with radiopaque bebes. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of normal and target tissues were then compared. The deep tangent field with blocks resulted in optimal coverage of the target and the upper internal mammary chain (IMC) while sparing of critical and nontarget tissues. The wide tangent technique required less treatment planning and delivery time. We compared the 2 techniques and their resultant DVHs and feasibility in a busy clinic.

  2. Treatment techniques for 3D conformal radiation to breast and chest wall including the internal mammary chain

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnik, Deborah; Selvaraj, Raj N. . E-mail: selvarajrn@upmc.edu; Faul, Clare; Gerszten, Kristina; Heron, Dwight E.; King, Gwendolyn C.

    2007-04-01

    Breast, chest wall, and regional nodal irradiation have been associated with an improved outcome in high-risk breast cancer patients. Complex treatment planning is often utilized to ensure complete coverage of the target volume while minimizing the dose to surrounding normal tissues. The 2 techniques evaluated in this report are the partially wide tangent fields (PWTFs) and the 4-field photon/electron combination (the modified 'Kuske Technique'). These 2 techniques were evaluated in 10 consecutive breast cancer patients. All patients had computerized tomographic (CT) scans for 3D planning supine on a breast board. The breast was defined clinically by the physician and confirmed radiographically with radiopaque bebes. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of normal and target tissues were then compared. The deep tangent field with blocks resulted in optimal coverage of the target and the upper internal mammary chain (IMC) while sparing of critical and nontarget tissues. The wide tangent technique required less treatment planning and delivery time. We compared the 2 techniques and their resultant DVHs and feasibility in a busy clinic.

  3. Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Marshak; Warren Wiscombe; Yuri Knyazikhin; Christine Chiu

    2011-05-24

    We proposed a variety of tasks centered on the following question: what can we learn about 3D cloud-radiation processes and aerosol-cloud interaction from rapid-sampling ARM measurements of spectral zenith radiance? These ARM measurements offer spectacular new and largely unexploited capabilities in both the temporal and spectral domains. Unlike most other ARM instruments, which average over many seconds or take samples many seconds apart, the new spectral zenith radiance measurements are fast enough to resolve natural time scales of cloud change and cloud boundaries as well as the transition zone between cloudy and clear areas. In the case of the shortwave spectrometer, the measurements offer high time resolution and high spectral resolution, allowing new discovery-oriented science which we intend to pursue vigorously. Research objectives are, for convenience, grouped under three themes: • Understand radiative signature of the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy areas using data from ARM shortwave radiometers, which has major climatic consequences in both aerosol direct and indirect effect studies. • Provide cloud property retrievals from the ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility for studies of aerosol-cloud interactions. • Assess impact of 3D cloud structures on aerosol properties using passive and active remote sensing techniques from both ARM and satellite measurements.

  4. Evaluation of a prototype 3D ultrasound system for multimodality imaging of cervical nodes for adaptive radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Danielle; Fava, Palma; Cury, Fabio; Vuong, Te; Falco, Tony; Verhaegen, Frank

    2007-03-01

    Sonography has good topographic accuracy for superficial lymph node assessment in patients with head and neck cancers. It is therefore an ideal non-invasive tool for precise inter-fraction volumetric analysis of enlarged cervical nodes. In addition, when registered with computed tomography (CT) images, ultrasound information may improve target volume delineation and facilitate image-guided adaptive radiation therapy. A feasibility study was developed to evaluate the use of a prototype ultrasound system capable of three dimensional visualization and multi-modality image fusion for cervical node geometry. A ceiling-mounted optical tracking camera recorded the position and orientation of a transducer in order to synchronize the transducer's position with respect to the room's coordinate system. Tracking systems were installed in both the CT-simulator and radiation therapy treatment rooms. Serial images were collected at the time of treatment planning and at subsequent treatment fractions. Volume reconstruction was performed by generating surfaces around contours. The quality of the spatial reconstruction and semi-automatic segmentation was highly dependent on the system's ability to track the transducer throughout each scan procedure. The ultrasound information provided enhanced soft tissue contrast and facilitated node delineation. Manual segmentation was the preferred method to contour structures due to their sonographic topography.

  5. New insights in the velocity dependency of the external mass transfer coefficient in 2D and 3D porous media for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Deridder, Sander; Desmet, Gert

    2012-03-02

    Numerical calculations of the mobile zone mass transfer rate in a variety of ordered 2D and 3D structures are presented. These calculations are in line with earlier theoretical and experimental findings made in the field of chemical engineering and suggest that the Sherwood-number (Sh(m)) appearing in the mobile phase mass transfer term of the general plate height expression of liquid chromatography is not correctly predicted by the Wilson-Geankoplis--or the Kataoka--or the penetration model expression that have been used up to now to in the field of LC, and that at least more research is needed before these expressions can be continued to be used with confidence. The aforementioned expressions were obtained by neglecting the effect of axial dispersion on the mass transfer process, and it seems that they therefore underestimate the true Sh(m)-number by a factor of 2-5 around the minimum of the van Deemter-curve. New correlations describing the variation of the Sh(m)-coefficient as a function of the reduced velocity for a number of other packing geometries (tetrahedral monolith, 2D pillar array) are proposed. These correlations are in agreement with earlier theoretical and experimental studies showing that at low velocities the local-driving force-based Sh(m)-value is of the order of 10-20 in a packed bed column with an external porosity on the order of 35-40%.

  6. An innovative stand-alone bioreactor for the highly reproducible transfer of cyclic mechanical stretch to stem cells cultured in a 3D scaffold.

    PubMed

    Govoni, Marco; Lotti, Fabrizio; Biagiotti, Luigi; Lannocca, Maurizio; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Valente, Sabrina; Muscari, Claudio; Bonafè, Francesca; Caldarera, Claudio M; Guarnieri, Carlo; Cavalcanti, Silvio; Giordano, Emanuele

    2014-10-01

    Much evidence in the literature demonstrates the effect of cyclic mechanical stretch in maintaining, or addressing, a muscle phenotype. Such results were obtained using several technical approaches, useful for the experimental collection of proofs of principle but probably unsuitable for application in clinical regenerative medicine. Here we aimed to design a reliable innovative bioreactor, acting as a stand-alone cell culture incubator, easy to operate and effective in addressing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded onto a 3D bioreabsorbable scaffold, towards a muscle phenotype via the transfer of a controlled and highly-reproducible cyclic deformation. Electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry and biochemical analysis of the obtained pseudotissue constructs showed that cells 'trained' over 1 week: (a) displayed multilayer organization and invaded the 3D mesh of the scaffold; and (b) expressed typical markers of muscle cells. This effect was due only to physical stimulation of the cells, without the need of any other chemical or genetic manipulation. This device is thus proposed as a prototypal instrument to obtain pseudotissue constructs to test in cardiovascular regenerative medicine, using good manufacturing procedures.

  7. Radiative transfer in atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Z.; Stamnes, K.; Weeks, W.F.; Tsay, S.C.

    1996-04-01

    Radiative energy is critical in controlling the heat and mass balance of sea ice, which significantly affects the polar climate. In the polar oceans, light transmission through the atmosphere and sea ice is essential to the growth of plankton and algae and, consequently, to the microbial community both in the ice and in the ocean. Therefore, the study of radiative transfer in the polar atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean system is of particular importance. Lacking a properly coupled radiative transfer model for the atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system, a consistent study of the radiative transfer in the polar atmosphere, snow, sea ice, and ocean system has not been undertaken before. The radiative transfer processes in the atmosphere and in the ice and ocean have been treated separately. Because the radiation processes in the atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean depend on each other, this separate treatment is inconsistent. To study the radiative interaction between the atmosphere, clouds, snow, sea ice, and ocean, a radiative transfer model with consistent treatment of radiation in the coupled system is needed and is under development.

  8. Subgrid-scale model for radiative transfer in turbulent participating media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucasse, L.; Rivière, Ph.; Soufiani, A.

    2014-01-01

    The simulation of turbulent flows of radiating gases, taking into account all turbulence length scales with an accurate radiation transport solver, is computationally prohibitive for high Reynolds or Rayleigh numbers. This is particularly the case when the small structures are not optically thin. We develop in this paper a radiative transfer subgrid model suitable for the coupling with direct numerical simulations of turbulent radiating fluid flows. Owing to the linearity of the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE), the emission source term is spatially filtered to define large-scale and subgrid-scale radiation intensities. The large-scale or filtered intensity is computed with a standard ray tracing method on a coarse grid, and the subgrid intensity is obtained analytically (in Fourier space) from the Fourier transform of the subgrid emission source term. A huge saving of computational time is obtained in comparison with direct ray tracing applied on the fine mesh. Model accuracy is checked for three 3D fluctuating temperature fields. The first field is stochastically generated and allows us to discuss the effects of the filtering level and of the optical thicknesses of the whole medium, of the integral length scale, and of the cutoff wave length. The second and third cases correspond respectively to turbulent natural convection of humid air in a cubical box, and to the flow of hot combustion products inside a channel. In all cases, the achieved accuracy on radiative powers and wall fluxes is about a few percents.

  9. Comparison of Radiation Treatment Plans for Breast Cancer between 3D Conformal in Prone and Supine Positions in Contrast to VMAT and IMRT Supine Positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejarano Buele, Ana Isabel

    The treatment regimen for breast cancer patients typically involves Whole Breast Irradiation (WBI). The coverage and extent of the radiation treatment is dictated by location of tumor mass, breast tissue distribution, involvement of lymph nodes, and other factors. The current standard treatment approach used at our institution is a 3D tangential beam geometry, which involves two fields irradiating the breast, or a four field beam arrangement covering the whole breast and involved nodes, while decreasing the dose to organs as risk (OARs) such as the lung and heart. The coverage of these targets can be difficult to achieve in patients with unfavorable thoracic geometries, especially in those cases in which the planning target volume (PTV) is extended to the chest wall. It is a well-known fact that exposure of the heart to ionizing radiation has been proved to increase the subsequent rate of ischemic heart disease. In these cases, inverse planned treatments have become a proven alternative to the 3D approach. The goal of this research project is to evaluate the factors that affect our current techniques as well as to adapt the development of inverse modulated techniques for our clinic, in which breast cancer patients are one of the largest populations treated. For this purpose, a dosimetric comparison along with the evaluation of immobilization devices was necessary. Radiation treatment plans were designed and dosimetrically compared for 5 patients in both, supine and prone positions. For 8 patients, VMAT and IMRT plans were created and evaluated in the supine position. Skin flash incorporation for inverse modulated plans required measurement of the surface dose as well as an evaluation of breast volume changes during a treatment course. It was found that prone 3D conformal plans as well as the VMAT and IMRT plans are generally superior in sparing OARs to supine plans with comparable PTV coverage. Prone setup leads to larger shifts in breast volume as well as in

  10. Evaluating radiative transfer schemes treatment of vegetation canopy architecture in land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braghiere, Renato; Quaife, Tristan; Black, Emily

    2016-04-01

    Incoming shortwave radiation is the primary source of energy driving the majority of the Earth's climate system. The partitioning of shortwave radiation by vegetation into absorbed, reflected, and transmitted terms is important for most of biogeophysical processes, including leaf temperature changes and photosynthesis, and it is currently calculated by most of land surface schemes (LSS) of climate and/or numerical weather prediction models. The most commonly used radiative transfer scheme in LSS is the two-stream approximation, however it does not explicitly account for vegetation architectural effects on shortwave radiation partitioning. Detailed three-dimensional (3D) canopy radiative transfer schemes have been developed, but they are too computationally expensive to address large-scale related studies over long time periods. Using a straightforward one-dimensional (1D) parameterisation proposed by Pinty et al. (2006), we modified a two-stream radiative transfer scheme by including a simple function of Sun zenith angle, so-called "structure factor", which does not require an explicit description and understanding of the complex phenomena arising from the presence of vegetation heterogeneous architecture, and it guarantees accurate simulations of the radiative balance consistently with 3D representations. In order to evaluate the ability of the proposed parameterisation in accurately represent the radiative balance of more complex 3D schemes, a comparison between the modified two-stream approximation with the "structure factor" parameterisation and state-of-art 3D radiative transfer schemes was conducted, following a set of virtual scenarios described in the RAMI4PILPS experiment. These experiments have been evaluating the radiative balance of several models under perfectly controlled conditions in order to eliminate uncertainties arising from an incomplete or erroneous knowledge of the structural, spectral and illumination related canopy characteristics typical

  11. 3D Micro-topography of Transferred Laboratory and Natural Ice Crystal Surfaces Imaged by Cryo and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, N. B.; Boaggio, K.; Bancroft, L.; Bandamede, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work has highlighted micro-scale roughness on the surfaces of ice crystals grown and imaged in-situ within the chambers of environmental scanning electron microscopes (ESEM). These observations appear to align with theoretical and satellite observations that suggest a prevalence of rough ice in cirrus clouds. However, the atmospheric application of the lab observations are indeterminate because the observations have been based only on crystals grown on substrates and in pure-water vapor environments. In this work, we present details and results from the development of a transfer technique which allows natural and lab-grown ice and snow crystals to be captured, preserved, and transferred into the ESEM for 3D imaging. Ice crystals were gathered from 1) natural snow, 2) a balloon-borne cirrus particle capture device, and 3) lab-grown ice crystals from a diffusion chamber. Ice crystals were captured in a pre-conditioned small-volume (~1 cm3) cryo-containment cell. The cell was then sealed closed and transferred to a specially-designed cryogenic dewer (filled with liquid nitrogen or crushed dry ice) for transport to a new Hitachi Field Emission, Variable Pressure SEM (SU-5000). The cryo-cell was then removed from the dewer and quickly placed onto the pre-conditioned cryo transfer stage attached to the ESEM (Quorum 3010T). Quantitative 3D topographical digital elevation models of ice surfaces are reported from SEM for the first time, including a variety of objective measures of statistical surface roughness. The surfaces of the transported crystals clearly exhibit signatures of mesoscopic roughening that are similar to examples of roughness seen in ESEM-grown crystals. For most transported crystals, the habits and crystal edges are more intricate that those observed for ice grown directly on substrates within the ESEM chamber. Portions of some crystals do appear smooth even at magnification greater than 1000x, a rare observation in our ESEM-grown crystals. The

  12. Advances in studies of cloud overlap and its radiative transfer in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Jing, Xianwen

    2016-04-01

    The latest advances in studies on the treatment of cloud overlap and its radiative transfer in global climate models are summarized. Developments with respect to this internationally challenging problem are described from aspects such as the design of cloud overlap assumptions, the realization of cloud overlap assumptions within climate models, and the data and methods used to obtain consistent observations of cloud overlap structure and radiative transfer in overlapping clouds. To date, there has been an appreciable level of achievement in studies on cloud overlap in climate models, demonstrated by the development of scientific assumptions (e.g., e-folding overlap) to describe cloud overlap, the invention and broad application of the fast radiative transfer method for overlapped clouds (Monte Carlo Independent Column Approximation), and the emergence of continuous 3D cloud satellite observation (e.g., CloudSat/CALIPSO) and cloud-resolving models, which provide numerous data valuable for the exact description of cloud overlap structure in climate models. However, present treatments of cloud overlap and its radiative transfer process are far from complete, and there remain many unsettled problems that need to be explored in the future.

  13. Exceptionally Preserved Cambrian Trilobite Digestive System Revealed in 3D by Synchrotron-Radiation X-Ray Tomographic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Mats E.; Terfelt, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    The Cambrian ‘Orsten’ fauna comprises exceptionally preserved and phosphatised microscopic arthropods. The external morphology of these fossils is well known, but their internal soft-tissue anatomy has remained virtually unknown. Here, we report the first non-biomineralised tissues from a juvenile polymerid trilobite, represented by digestive structures, glands, and connective strands harboured in a hypostome from the Swedish ‘Orsten’ fauna. Synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy enabled three-dimensional internal recordings at sub-micrometre resolution. The specimen provides the first unambiguous evidence for a J-shaped anterior gut and the presence of a crop with a constricted alimentary tract in the Trilobita. Moreover, the gut is Y-shaped in cross section, probably due to a collapsed lumen of that shape, another feature which has not previously been observed in trilobites. The combination of anatomical features suggests that the trilobite hypostome is functionally analogous to the labrum of euarthropods and that it was a sophisticated element closely integrated with the digestive system. This study also briefly addresses the preservational bias of the ‘Orsten’ fauna, particularly the near-absence of polymerid trilobites, and the taphonomy of the soft-tissue-harbouring hypostome. PMID:22558180

  14. Exceptionally preserved Cambrian trilobite digestive system revealed in 3D by synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Mats E; Terfelt, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    The Cambrian 'Orsten' fauna comprises exceptionally preserved and phosphatised microscopic arthropods. The external morphology of these fossils is well known, but their internal soft-tissue anatomy has remained virtually unknown. Here, we report the first non-biomineralised tissues from a juvenile polymerid trilobite, represented by digestive structures, glands, and connective strands harboured in a hypostome from the Swedish 'Orsten' fauna. Synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy enabled three-dimensional internal recordings at sub-micrometre resolution. The specimen provides the first unambiguous evidence for a J-shaped anterior gut and the presence of a crop with a constricted alimentary tract in the Trilobita. Moreover, the gut is Y-shaped in cross section, probably due to a collapsed lumen of that shape, another feature which has not previously been observed in trilobites. The combination of anatomical features suggests that the trilobite hypostome is functionally analogous to the labrum of euarthropods and that it was a sophisticated element closely integrated with the digestive system. This study also briefly addresses the preservational bias of the 'Orsten' fauna, particularly the near-absence of polymerid trilobites, and the taphonomy of the soft-tissue-harbouring hypostome.

  15. Synchrotron radiation CT methods for 3D quantitative assessment of mechanically relevant ultrastructural properties in murine bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Philipp; Voide, Romain; Stampanoni, Marco; Müller, Ralph

    2008-03-01

    Recent data have shown that predicting bone strength can be greatly improved by including microarchitectural parameters in the analysis. Moreover, bone ultrastructure has been implicated as an important contributor to bone strength. We therefore hypothesized that a better understanding of phenotypes linked to bone ultrastructure will provide new insight in the assessment of bone quality and its contribution to bone strength and fracture risk. Therefore, we first developed an experimental design to assess quantitatively ultrastructural murine bone tissue properties non-invasively in three dimensions by using synchrotron radiation-based (SR) computed tomography (CT) methods with resolutions on the order of one micrometer and below. New morphometric indices were introduced to quantify ultrastructural phenotypes of murine cortical bone assessed by our SR CT-based setup, namely the canal network and the osteocyte lacunar system. These ultrastructural phenotypes were then successfully studied in two genetically distinct mouse strains. Finally, we provided strong evidence for a significant influence of the canal network on murine bone mechanics. In the long run, we believe that the morphometric analysis of the ultrastructural phenotypes and the study of bone phenotypes at different hierarchy levels, in conjunction with bone mechanics, will provide new insights in the assessment of bone quality.

  16. Polarization : Proving ground for methods in radiative transfer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagendra, K. N.; Anusha, L. S.; Sampoorna, M.

    Polarization of solar lines arises due to illumination of radiating atom by anisotropic (limb darkened/brightened) radiation. Modelling the polarized spectra of the Sun and stars requires solution of the line radiative transfer problem in which the relevant polarizing physical mechanisms are incorporated. The purpose of this paper is to describe in what different ways the polarization state of the radiation `complicates' the numerical methods originally designed for scalar radiative transfer. We present several interesting situations involving the solution of polarized line transfer to prove our point. They are (i) Comparison of the polarized approximate lambda iteration (PALI) methods with new approaches like Bi-conjugate gradient method that is faster, (ii) Polarized Hanle scattering line radiative transfer in random magnetic fields, (iii) Difficulties encountered in incorporating polarized partial frequency redistribution (PRD) matrices in line radiative transfer codes, (iv) Technical difficulties encountered in handling polarized specific intensity vector, some components of which are sign changing, (v) Proving that scattering polarization is indeed a boundary layer phenomenon. We provide credible benchmarks in each of the above studies. We show that any new numerical methods can be tested in the best possible way, when it is extended to include polarization state of the radiation field in line scattering.

  17. Natural element method for solving radiative transfer with or without conduction in three-dimensional complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Ma, Yu; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2013-11-01

    A meshless method called as the natural element method (NEM) is developed for solving radiative heat transfer problem in 3D complex enclosures filled with an absorbing, emitting and scattering medium. The boundary surfaces are supposed to be opaque, diffuse as well as gray. The shape functions used in NEM are constructed by the natural neighbor interpolations, which are strictly interpolant and the essential boundary conditions can be imposed directly. The NEM solutions dealing with the radiative heat transfer with or without conduction are validated by comparison with some cases reported by the literature. Furthermore, the radiative heat transfer in cubic enclosures with or without an inner hollow sphere, cylinder and elliptical cylinder is also examined to demonstrate the applicability of the present method towards various three-dimensional geometries. For pure radiative transfer, both the cases of radiative non-equilibrium and radiative equilibrium are investigated. For combined conduction and radiation heat transfer, effects of various parameters such as the conduction-radiation parameter, the scattering albedo, the extinction coefficient, and the boundary emissivity are analyzed on the temperature distributions.

  18. Radiative Transfer Model for Translucent Slab Ice on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrieu, F.; Schmidt, F.; Douté, S.; Schmitt, B.; Brissaud, O.

    2016-09-01

    We developed a radiative transfer model that simulates in VIS/NIR the bidirectional reflectance of a contaminated slab layer of ice overlaying a granular medium, under geometrical optics conditions to study martian ices.

  19. High density resolution synchrotron radiation based x-ray microtomography (SR μCT) for quantitative 3D-morphometrics in zoological sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickel, Michael; Hammel, Jörg U.; Herzen, Julia; Bullinger, Eric; Beckmann, Felix

    2008-08-01

    Zoological sciences widely rely on morphological data to reconstruct and understand body structures of animals. The best suitable methods like tomography allow for a direct representation of 3D-structures. In recent years, synchrotron radiation based x-ray microtomography (SR μCT) placed high resolutions to the disposal of morphologists. With the development of highly brilliant and collimated third generation synchrotron sources, phase contrast SR μCT became widely available. A number of scientific contributions stressed the superiority of phase contrast over absorption contrast. However, here we demonstrate the power of high density resolution methods based on absorption-contrast SRμCT for quantitative 3D-measurements of tissues and other delicate bio-structures in zoological sciences. We used beamline BW2 at DORIS III (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) to perform microtomography on tissue and mineral skeletons of marine sponges (Porifera) which were shock frozen and/or fixed in a glutamate osmium tetroxide solution, followed by critical point drying. High density resolution tomographic reconstructions allowed running quantitative 3D-image analyses in Matlab and ImageJ. By applying contrast and shape rule based algorithms we semi-automatically extracted and measured sponge body structures like mineral spicules, elements of the canal system or tissue structures. This lead to a better understanding of sponge biology: from skeleton functional morphology and internal water flow regimes to body contractility. Our high density resolution based quantitative approach can be applied to a wide variety of biological structures. However, two prerequisites apply: (1) maximum density resolution is necessary; (2) edge effects as seen for example in phase outline contrast SR μCT must not be present. As a consequence, to allow biological sciences to fully exploit the power of SR μCT further increase of density resolution in absorption contrast methods is desirable.

  20. Preparation and photo-induced charge transfer of the composites based on 3D structural CdS nanocrystals and MEH-PPV

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Dan; Shi, Minmin; Chen, Fei; Chen, Lin; Jiang, Xiaoxia; Chen, Hongzheng

    2010-05-15

    We report the synthesis of 3D structural CdS nanocrystals by a simple biomolecule-assisted hydrothermal process. The CdS nanocrystals are composed of many branched nanorods with the diameter of about 50 nm, and the length of about 250 nm. The phase and crystallographic properties are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The composites based on CdS nanocrystals and poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy-p-phenylenevinylene)] (MEH-PPV) have been prepared by spin-coating of the mixture in the common solvent. The optical properties of the composites are investigated using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopies. A significant fluorescence quenching of MEH-PPV in the composites is observed at high CdS nanocrystals/MEH-PPV ratios, indicating that the photo-induced charge transfer occurred due to the energy level offset between the donor MEH-PPV and the acceptor CdS nanocrystals. The obvious photovoltaic behavior of the solar cell made from this composite further demonstrates the mentioned photo-induced charge transfer process. (author)

  1. High-Precision Direct Method for the Radiative Transfer Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Hou, Su-Qing; Yang, Ping; Wu, Kai-Su

    2013-06-01

    It is the main aim of this paper to investigate the numerical methods of the radiative transfer equation. Using the five-point formula to approximate the differential part and the Simpson formula to substitute for integral part respectively, a new high-precision numerical scheme, which has 4-order local truncation error, is obtained. Subsequently, a numerical example for radiative transfer equation is carried out, and the calculation results show that the new numerical scheme is more accurate.

  2. Heat transfer augmentation of a car radiator using nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Adnan M.; Bakar, R. A.; Kadirgama, K.; Sharma, K. V.

    2014-05-01

    The car radiator heat transfer enhancement by using TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles dispersed in water as a base fluid was studied experimentally. The test rig is setup as a car radiator with tubes and container. The range of Reynolds number and volume fraction are (250-1,750) and (1.0-2.5 %) respectively. Results showed that the heat transfer increases with increasing of nanofluid volume fraction. The experimental data is agreed with other investigator.

  3. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffrey D; Kelly, Thompson G; Urbatish, Todd J

    2010-11-17

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

  4. Third Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) exercise: Documenting progress in canopy reflectance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widlowski, J.-L.; Taberner, M.; Pinty, B.; Bruniquel-Pinel, V.; Disney, M.; Fernandes, R.; Gastellu-Etchegorry, J.-P.; Gobron, N.; Kuusk, A.; Lavergne, T.; Leblanc, S.; Lewis, P. E.; Martin, E.; Mõttus, M.; North, P. R. J.; Qin, W.; Robustelli, M.; Rochdi, N.; Ruiloba, R.; Soler, C.; Thompson, R.; Verhoef, W.; Verstraete, M. M.; Xie, D.

    2007-05-01

    The Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) initiative benchmarks canopy reflectance models under well-controlled experimental conditions. Launched for the first time in 1999, this triennial community exercise encourages the systematic evaluation of canopy reflectance models on a voluntary basis. The first phase of RAMI focused on documenting the spread among radiative transfer (RT) simulations over a small set of primarily 1-D canopies. The second phase expanded the scope to include structurally complex 3-D plant architectures with and without background topography. Here sometimes significant discrepancies were noted which effectively prevented the definition of a reliable "surrogate truth," over heterogeneous vegetation canopies, against which other RT models could then be compared. The present paper documents the outcome of the third phase of RAMI, highlighting both the significant progress that has been made in terms of model agreement since RAMI-2 and the capability of/need for RT models to accurately reproduce local estimates of radiative quantities under conditions that are reminiscent of in situ measurements. Our assessment of the self-consistency and the relative and absolute performance of 3-D Monte Carlo models in RAMI-3 supports their usage in the generation of a "surrogate truth" for all RAMI test cases. This development then leads (1) to the presentation of the "RAMI Online Model Checker" (ROMC), an open-access web-based interface to evaluate RT models automatically, and (2) to a reassessment of the role, scope, and opportunities of the RAMI project in the future.

  5. An in vivo validation of the application of acoustic radiation force to enhance the diagnostic utility of molecular imaging using 3-d ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Gessner, Ryan C; Streeter, Jason E; Kothadia, Roshni; Feingold, Steven; Dayton, Paul A

    2012-04-01

    For more than a decade, the application of acoustic radiation force (ARF) has been proposed as a mechanism to increase ultrasonic molecular imaging (MI) sensitivity in vivo. Presented herein is the first noninvasive in vivo validation of ARF-enhanced MI with an unmodified clinical system. First, an in vitro optical-acoustical setup was used to optimize system parameters and ensure sufficient microbubble translation when exposed to ARF. 3-D ARF-enhanced MI was then performed on 7 rat fibrosarcoma tumors using microbubbles targeted to α(v)β₃ and nontargeted microbubbles. Low-amplitude (<25 kPa) 3-D ARF pulse sequences were tested and compared with passive targeting studies in the same animal. Our results demonstrate that a 78% increase in image intensity from targeted microbubbles can be achieved when using ARF relative to the passive targeting studies. Furthermore, ARF did not significantly increase image contrast when applied to nontargeted agents, suggesting that ARF did not increase nonspecific adhesion.

  6. A study of Monte Carlo radiative transfer through fractal clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, C.; Lavallec, D.; O`Hirok, W.; Ricchiazzi, P.

    1996-04-01

    An understanding of radiation transport (RT) through clouds is fundamental to studies of the earth`s radiation budget and climate dynamics. The transmission through horizontally homogeneous clouds has been studied thoroughly using accurate, discreet ordinates radiative transfer models. However, the applicability of these results to general problems of global radiation budget is limited by the plane parallel assumption and the fact that real clouds fields show variability, both vertically and horizontally, on all size scales. To understand how radiation interacts with realistic clouds, we have used a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model to compute the details of the photon-cloud interaction on synthetic cloud fields. Synthetic cloud fields, generated by a cascade model, reproduce the scaling behavior, as well as the cloud variability observed and estimated from cloud satellite data.

  7. Radiative Transfer Effects on the Colors of RR Lyrae Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. G.

    The methods of Davis and Cox (1980), are applied to a series of models described by Bono and Stellingwerf(1994) to determine the colors of RR Lyrae stars. Convection is ignored and the radiation flow is treated by a complete variable Eddington, multi-frequency dependent radiative transfer approximation.

  8. Radiative Transfer Effects on the Colors of RR Lyrae Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. G.

    The methods of Davis & Cox (1980), are applied to a series of models described by Bono & Stellingwerf(1994), to determine the colors of RR Lyrae stars. Convection is ignored and the radiative flow is treated by a complete variable Eddington multi-frequency group radiative transfer approximation.

  9. Radiation Transfer in the Atmosphere: Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, M.; Travis, L.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Sunlight illuminating the Earth's atmosphere is scattered by gas molecules and suspended particles, giving rise to blue skies, white clouds, and optical displays such as rainbows and halos. By scattering and absorbing the shortwave solar radiation and the longwave radiation emitted by the underlying surface, cloud and aerosol particles strongly affect the radiation budget of the terrestrial climate system. As a consequence of the dependence of scattering characteristics on particle size, morphology, and composition, scattered light can be remarkably rich in information on particle properties and thus provides a sensitive tool for remote retrievals of macro- and microphysical parameters of clouds and aerosols.

  10. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer: Applications to Black-Hole Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Kinwah; Fuerst, Steven V.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Lee, Khee-Gan

    2007-01-01

    We present general relativistic radiation transfer formulations which include opacity effects due to absorption, emission and scattering explicitly. We consider a moment expansions for the transfer in the presence of scattering. The formulation is applied to calculation emissions from accretion and outflows in black-hole systems. Cases with thin accretion disks and accretion tori are considered. Effects, such as emission anisotropy, non-stationary flows and geometrical self-occultation are investigated. Polarisation transfer in curved space-time is discussed qualitatively.

  11. CRETE: Comet RadiativE Transfer and Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Wilson, Thomas G.

    2016-12-01

    CRETE (Comet RadiativE Transfer and Excitation) is a one-dimensional water excitation and radiation transfer code for sub-millimeter wavelengths based on the RATRAN code (ascl:0008.002). The code considers rotational transitions of water molecules given a Haser spherically symmetric distribution for the cometary coma and produces FITS image cubes that can be analyzed with tools like MIRIAD (ascl:1106.007). In addition to collisional processes to excite water molecules, the effect of infrared radiation from the Sun is approximated by effective pumping rates for the rotational levels in the ground vibrational state.

  12. Spectrally-Invariant Approximation Within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    Certain algebraic combinations of single scattering albedo and solar radiation reflected from, or transmitted through, vegetation canopies do not vary with wavelength. These "spectrally invariant relationships" are the consequence of wavelength independence of the extinction coefficient and scattering phase function in vegetation. In general, this wavelength independence does not hold in the atmosphere, but in clouddominated atmospheres the total extinction and total scattering phase function vary only weakly with wavelength. This paper identifies the atmospheric conditions under which the spectrally invariant approximation can accurately describe the extinction. and scattering properties of cloudy atmospheres. The validity of the assumptions and the accuracy of the approximation are tested with ID radiative transfer calculations using publicly available radiative transfer models: Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) and Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART). It is shown for cloudy atmospheres with cloud optical depth above 3, and for spectral intervals that exclude strong water vapor absorption, that the spectrally invariant relationships found in vegetation canopy radiative transfer are valid to better than 5%. The physics behind this phenomenon, its mathematical basis, and possible applications to remote sensing and climate are discussed.

  13. Discontinuous finite element method for vector radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cun-Hai; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2017-03-01

    The discontinuous finite element method (DFEM) is applied to solve the vector radiative transfer in participating media. The derivation in a discrete form of the vector radiation governing equations is presented, in which the angular space is discretized by the discrete-ordinates approach with a local refined modification, and the spatial domain is discretized into finite non-overlapped discontinuous elements. The elements in the whole solution domain are connected by modelling the boundary numerical flux between adjacent elements, which makes the DFEM numerically stable for solving radiative transfer equations. Several various problems of vector radiative transfer are tested to verify the performance of the developed DFEM, including vector radiative transfer in a one-dimensional parallel slab containing a Mie/Rayleigh/strong forward scattering medium and a two-dimensional square medium. The fact that DFEM results agree very well with the benchmark solutions in published references shows that the developed DFEM in this paper is accurate and effective for solving vector radiative transfer problems.

  14. Radiative heat transfer estimation in pipes with various wall emissivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Langebach; Christoph, Haberstroh

    2017-02-01

    Radiative heat transfer is usually of substantial importance in cryogenics when systems are designed and thermal budgeting is carried out. However, the contribution of pipes is commonly assumed to be comparably low since the warm and cold ends as well as their cross section are fairly small. Nevertheless, for a first assessment of each pipe rough estimates are always appreciated. In order to estimate the radiative heat transfer with traditional “paper and pencil“ methods there is only one analytical case available in literature – the case of plane-parallel plates. This case can only be used to calculate the theoretical lower and the upper asymptotic values of the radiative heat transfer, since pipe wall radiation properties are not taken into account. For this paper we investigated the radiative heat transfer estimation in pipes with various wall emissivities with the help of numerical simulations. Out of a number of calculation series we could gain an empirical extension for the used approach of plane-parallel plates. The model equation can be used to carry out enhanced paper and pencil estimations for the radiative heat transfer through pipes without demanding numerical simulations.

  15. Radiative transfer in finite participating atmospheric aerosol media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degheidy, A. R.; Elgarayhi, A.; Sallah, M.; Shaaban, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The properties of radiation transfer through a plane-parallel atmospheric aerosol medium has been studied. It has been done by employing Mie theory to calculate the radiation transfer scattering parameters of the medium in the form of extinction, scattering, and absorption efficiencies. Then, the equation of radiative transfer through a plane-parallel atmosphere of aerosol has been solved for partial heat fluxes using two different analytical techniques, namely, the Variational Pomraning -Eddington approximation and Galerkin technique. Average efficiencies over log-normal and modified gamma size distributions are calculated. Therefore, the radiative properties of Carbon, Anthracite, Bituminous, Lignite, and Fly ash have been calculated. The obtained numerical results show very good agreement with each other in addition to the previous published work.

  16. Radiative heat transfer in low-dimensional systems -- microscopic mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Lilia; Phan, Anh; Drosdoff, David

    2013-03-01

    Radiative heat transfer between objects can increase dramatically at sub-wavelength scales. Exploring ways to modulate such transport between nano-systems is a key issue from fundamental and applied points of view. We advance the theoretical understanding of radiative heat transfer between nano-objects by introducing a microscopic model, which takes into account the individual atoms and their atomic polarizabilities. This approach is especially useful to investigate nano-objects with various geometries and give a detailed description of the heat transfer distribution. We employ this model to study the heat exchange in graphene nanoribbon/substrate systems. Our results for the distance separations, substrates, and presence of extended or localized defects enable making predictions for tailoring the radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale. Financial support from the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-06ER46297 is acknowledged.

  17. Planetary Torque in 3D Isentropic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Masset, Frédéric; Lega, Elena; Velasco, David

    2017-03-01

    Planetary migration is inherently a three-dimensional (3D) problem, because Earth-size planetary cores are deeply embedded in protoplanetary disks. Simulations of these 3D disks remain challenging due to the steep resolution requirements. Using two different hydrodynamics codes, FARGO3D and PEnGUIn, we simulate disk–planet interaction for a one to five Earth-mass planet embedded in an isentropic disk. We measure the torque on the planet and ensure that the measurements are converged both in resolution and between the two codes. We find that the torque is independent of the smoothing length of the planet’s potential (r s), and that it has a weak dependence on the adiabatic index of the gaseous disk (γ). The torque values correspond to an inward migration rate qualitatively similar to previous linear calculations. We perform additional simulations with explicit radiative transfer using FARGOCA, and again find agreement between 3D simulations and existing torque formulae. We also present the flow pattern around the planets that show active flow is present within the planet’s Hill sphere, and meridional vortices are shed downstream. The vertical flow speed near the planet is faster for a smaller r s or γ, up to supersonic speeds for the smallest r s and γ in our study.

  18. 3D micro-scale deformations of wood in bending: synchrotron radiation muCT data analyzed with digital volume correlation.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, F; Mooser, R; Arnold, M; Hack, E; Wyss, P

    2008-12-01

    A micro-scale three-point-bending experiment with a wood specimen was carried out and monitored by synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography. The full three-dimensional wood structure of the 1.57x3.42x0.75mm(3) specimen was reconstructed at cellular level in different loading states. Furthermore, the full three-dimensional deformation field of the loaded wood specimen was determined by digital volume correlation, applied to the reconstructed data at successive loading states. Results from two selected regions within the wood specimen are presented as continuous displacement and strain fields in both 2D and 3D. The applied combination of synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography and digital volume correlation for the deformation analysis of wood under bending stress is a novel application in wood material science. The method offers the potential for the simultaneous observation of structural changes and quantified deformations during in situ micro-mechanical experiments. Moreover, the high spatial resolution allows studying the influence of anatomical features on the fracture behaviour of wood. Possible applications of this method range from bio-mechanical observations in fresh plant tissue to fracture mechanics aspects in structural timber.

  19. Non Grey Radiative Transfer in the Photospheric Convection: Validity of the Eddington Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Kiehunn

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the physical processes taking place in the solar photosphere. Based on 3D hydrodynamic simulations including a detailed radiation transfer scheme, we investigate thermodynamic structures and radiation fields in solar surface convection. As a starting model, the initial stratification in the outer envelope calculated using the solar calibrations in the context of the standard stellar theory. When the numerical fluid becomes thermally relaxed, the thermodynamic structure of the steady-state turbulent flow was explicitly collected. Particularly, a non-grey radiative transfer incorporating the opacity distribution function was considered in our calculations. In addition, we evaluate the classical approximations that are usually adopted in the one-dimensional stellar structure models. We numerically reconfirm that radiation fields are well represented by the asymptotic characteristics of the Eddington approximation (the diffusion limit and the streaming limit). However, this classical approximation underestimates radiation energy in the shallow layers near the surface, which implies that a reliable treatment of the non-grey line opacities is crucial for the accurate description of the photospheric convection phenomenon.

  20. User's Manual: Routines for Radiative Heat Transfer and Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risch, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the intensity and spectral distribution of radiation emanating from a heated surface has applications in many areas of science and engineering. Areas of research in which the quantification of spectral radiation is used routinely include thermal radiation heat transfer, infrared signature analysis, and radiation thermometry. In the analysis of radiation, it is helpful to be able to predict the radiative intensity and the spectral distribution of the emitted energy. Presented in this report is a set of routines written in Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) and incorporating functions specific to Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) that are useful for predicting the radiative behavior of heated surfaces. These routines include functions for calculating quantities of primary importance to engineers and scientists. In addition, the routines also provide the capability to use such information to determine surface temperatures from spectral intensities and for calculating the sensitivity of the surface temperature measurements to unknowns in the input parameters.

  1. Identification of source velocities on 3D structures in non-anechoic environments: Theoretical background and experimental validation of the inverse patch transfer functions method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aucejo, M.; Totaro, N.; Guyader, J.-L.

    2010-08-01

    In noise control, identification of the source velocity field remains a major problem open to investigation. Consequently, methods such as nearfield acoustical holography (NAH), principal source projection, the inverse frequency response function and hybrid NAH have been developed. However, these methods require free field conditions that are often difficult to achieve in practice. This article presents an alternative method known as inverse patch transfer functions, designed to identify source velocities and developed in the framework of the European SILENCE project. This method is based on the definition of a virtual cavity, the double measurement of the pressure and particle velocity fields on the aperture surfaces of this volume, divided into elementary areas called patches and the inversion of impedances matrices, numerically computed from a modal basis obtained by FEM. Theoretically, the method is applicable to sources with complex 3D geometries and measurements can be carried out in a non-anechoic environment even in the presence of other stationary sources outside the virtual cavity. In the present paper, the theoretical background of the iPTF method is described and the results (numerical and experimental) for a source with simple geometry (two baffled pistons driven in antiphase) are presented and discussed.

  2. Image guided radiation therapy applications for head and neck, prostate, and breast cancers using 3D ultrasound imaging and Monte Carlo dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Danielle

    In radiation therapy an uncertainty in the delivered dose always exists because anatomic changes are unpredictable and patient specific. Image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) relies on imaging in the treatment room to monitor the tumour and surrounding tissue to ensure their prescribed position in the radiation beam. The goal of this thesis was to determine the dosimetric impact on the misaligned radiation therapy target for three cancer sites due to common setup errors; organ motion, tumour tissue deformation, changes in body habitus, and treatment planning errors. For this purpose, a novel 3D ultrasound system (Restitu, Resonant Medical, Inc.) was used to acquire a reference image of the target in the computed tomography simulation room at the time of treatment planning, to acquire daily images in the treatment room at the time of treatment delivery, and to compare the daily images to the reference image. The measured differences in position and volume between daily and reference geometries were incorporated into Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. The EGSnrc (National Research Council, Canada) family of codes was used to model Varian linear accelerators and patient specific beam parameters, as well as to estimate the dose to the target and organs at risk under several different scenarios. After validating the necessity of MC dose calculations in the pelvic region, the impact of interfraction prostate motion, and subsequent patient realignment under the treatment beams, on the delivered dose was investigated. For 32 patients it is demonstrated that using 3D conformal radiation therapy techniques and a 7 mm margin, the prescribed dose to the prostate, rectum, and bladder is recovered within 0.5% of that planned when patient setup is corrected for prostate motion, despite the beams interacting with a new external surface and internal tissue boundaries. In collaboration with the manufacturer, the ultrasound system was adapted from transabdominal imaging to neck

  3. Heat Transfer Analysis of a Closed Brayton Cycle Space Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical analysis of the heat transfer processes taking place in a radiator for a closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT), also referred to as a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) space power system. The resulting equations and relationships have been incorporated into a radiator sub-routine of a numerical triple objective CCGT optimization program to determine operating conditions yielding maximum cycle efficiency, minimum radiator area and minimum overall systems mass. Study results should be of interest to numerical modeling of closed cycle Brayton space power systems and to the design of fluid cooled radiators in general.

  4. Radiative interactions in transient energy transfer in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the radiative interactions in transient energy transfer processes in gaseous systems. The nongray radiative formulations are based on the wide-band model correlations for molecular absorption. Various relations for the radiative flux are developed; these are useful for different flow conditions and physical problems. Specific plans for obtaining extensive results for different cases are presented. The methods presented in this study can be extended easily to investigate the radiative interactions in realistic flows of hydrogen-air species in the scramjet engine.

  5. A computerized framework for monitoring four-dimensional dose distributions during stereotactic body radiation therapy using a portal dose image-based 2D/3D registration approach.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takahiro; Arimura, Hidetaka; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Asumi; Hirose, Taka-Aki; Honda, Hiroshi; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Hirata, Hideki

    2015-03-01

    A computerized framework for monitoring four-dimensional (4D) dose distributions during stereotactic body radiation therapy based on a portal dose image (PDI)-based 2D/3D registration approach has been proposed in this study. Using the PDI-based registration approach, simulated 4D "treatment" CT images were derived from the deformation of 3D planning CT images so that a 2D planning PDI could be similar to a 2D dynamic clinical PDI at a breathing phase. The planning PDI was calculated by applying a dose calculation algorithm (a pencil beam convolution algorithm) to the geometry of the planning CT image and a virtual water equivalent phantom. The dynamic clinical PDIs were estimated from electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dynamic images including breathing phase data obtained during a treatment. The parameters of the affine transformation matrix were optimized based on an objective function and a gamma pass rate using a Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm. The proposed framework was applied to the EPID dynamic images of ten lung cancer patients, which included 183 frames (mean: 18.3 per patient). The 4D dose distributions during the treatment time were successfully obtained by applying the dose calculation algorithm to the simulated 4D "treatment" CT images. The mean±standard deviation (SD) of the percentage errors between the prescribed dose and the estimated dose at an isocenter for all cases was 3.25±4.43%. The maximum error for the ten cases was 14.67% (prescribed dose: 1.50Gy, estimated dose: 1.72Gy), and the minimum error was 0.00%. The proposed framework could be feasible for monitoring the 4D dose distribution and dose errors within a patient's body during treatment.

  6. 3D Surgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, Lucia; Tucker, Scott; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Chapuis, Jonas; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy; Jaskolka, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of methods for computer-aided jaw surgery. Computer-aided jaw surgery allows us to incorporate the high level of precision necessary for transferring virtual plans into the operating room. We also present a complete computer-aided surgery (CAS) system developed in close collaboration with surgeons. Surgery planning and simulation include construction of 3D surface models from Cone-beam CT (CBCT), dynamic cephalometry, semi-automatic mirroring, interactive cutting of bone and bony segment repositioning. A virtual setup can be used to manufacture positioning splints for intra-operative guidance. The system provides further intra-operative assistance with the help of a computer display showing jaw positions and 3D positioning guides updated in real-time during the surgical procedure. The CAS system aids in dealing with complex cases with benefits for the patient, with surgical practice, and for orthodontic finishing. Advanced software tools for diagnosis and treatment planning allow preparation of detailed operative plans, osteotomy repositioning, bone reconstructions, surgical resident training and assessing the difficulties of the surgical procedures prior to the surgery. CAS has the potential to make the elaboration of the surgical plan a more flexible process, increase the level of detail and accuracy of the plan, yield higher operative precision and control, and enhance documentation of cases. Supported by NIDCR DE017727, and DE018962 PMID:20816308

  7. A Non-Radiative Transfer Approach to Radiometric Vicarious Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara; Pagnutti, Mary; Stanley, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    TOA (top-of-atmosphere) radiance from high-spatial-resolution satellite imagery systems is important for a wide variety of research and applications. Many research initiatives require data with absolute radiometric accuracy better than a few percent. The conversion of satellite digital numbers to radiance depends on accurate radiometric calibration. A common method for determining and validating radiometric calibrations is to rely upon vicarious calibration approaches. Historically, vicarious calibration methods use radiative transfer codes with ground-based atmosphere and surface reflectance or radiance inputs for estimating TOA radiance values. These TOA radiance values are compared against the satellite digital numbers to determine the radiometric calibration. However, the radiative transfer codes used depend on many assumptions about the aerosol properties and the atmospheric point spread function. A measurement-based atmospheric radiance estimation approach for high-spatial-resolution, multispectral, visible/near-infrared sensors is presented that eliminates the use of radiative transfer codes and many of the underlying assumptions. A comparison between the radiative transfer and non-radiative transfer approaches is made.

  8. Synthesis and Exploratory Catalysis of 3d Metals: Group-Transfer Reactions, and the Activation and Functionalization of Small Molecules Including Greenhouse Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Mindiola, Daniel J.

    2014-05-07

    Our work over the past three years has resulted in the development of electron rich and low-coordinate vanadium fragments, molecular nitrides of vanadium and parent imide systems of titanium, and the synthesis of phosphorus containing molecules of the 3d transition metal series. Likewise, with financial support from BES Division in DOE (DE-FG02-07ER15893), we now completed the full characterization of the first single molecular magnet (SMM) of Fe(III). We demonstrated that this monomeric form of Fe(III) has an unusual slow relaxation of the magnetization under zero applied field. To make matters more interesting, this system also undergoes a rare example of an intermediate to high-spin transition (an S = 3/2 to S = 5/2 transition). In 2010 we reported the synthesis of the first neutral and low-coordinate vanadium complexes having the terminal nitride functionality. We have now completed a full study to understand formation of the nitride ligand from the metastable azide precursor, and have also explored the reactivity of the nitride ligand in the context of incomplete and complete N-atom transfer. During the 2010-2013 period we also discovered a facile approach to assemble low-coordinate and low-valent vanadium(II) complexes and exploit their multielectron chemistry ranging from 1-3 electrons. Consequently, we can now access 3d ligand frameworks such as cyclo-P3 (and its corresponding radical anion), nitride radical anions and cations, low-coordinate vanadium oxo’s, and the first example of a vanadium thionitrosyl complex. A cis-divacant iron(IV) imido having some ligand centered radical has been also discovered, and we are in the process of elucidating its electronic structure (in particular the sign of zero field splitting and the origin of its magnitude), bonding and reactivity. We have also revisited some paramagnetic and classic metallocene compounds with S >1/2 ground states in order to understand their reactivity patterns and electronic structure. Lastly

  9. Neutron detection and characterization for non-proliferation applications using 3D computer optical memories [Use of 3D optical computer memory for radiation detectors/dosimeters. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gary W. Phillips

    2000-12-20

    We have investigated 3-dimensional optical random access memory (3D-ORAM) materials for detection and characterization of charged particles of neutrons by detecting tracks left by the recoil charged particles produced by the neutrons. We have characterized the response of these materials to protons, alpha particles and carbon-12 nuclei as a functions of dose and energy. We have observed individual tracks using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. We are investigating the use of neural net analysis to characterize energetic neutron fields from their track structure in these materials.

  10. Test problems in radiative transfer calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shestakov, A. I.; Kershaw, D. S.; Zimmerman, G. B.

    1989-01-12

    Several test problems are presented for evaluating the radiation diffusion equations. For spatial transport schemes, 1-D problems with known analytic solutions are tested on 2-D domains with non-orthogonal meshes. It is shown that a scheme based on the Finite Element Method is insensitive to grid distortions when the diffusion term is dominant. Other test problems deal with Compton scattering, specifically the 1-D Fokker-Planck equation coupled to an equation describing the change in electron temperature. The test problems model the evolution of a Planckian radiation field as it equilibrates with the electrons. In all cases, the numerical results are compared with the analytic ones. 15 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Radiation Heat Transfer Procedures for Space-Related Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, John C.

    2000-01-01

    Over the last contract year, a numerical procedure for combined conduction-radiation heat transfer using unstructured grids has been developed. As a result of this research, one paper has been published in the Numerical Heat Transfer Journal. One paper has been accepted for presentation at the International Center for Heat and Mass Transfer's International Symposium on Computational Heat Transfer to be held in Australia next year. A journal paper is under review by my NASA's contact. A conference paper for the ASME National Heat Transfer conference is under preparation. In summary, a total of four (4) papers (two journal and two conference) have been published, accepted or are under preparation. There are two (2) to three (3) more papers to be written for the project. In addition to the above publications, one book chapter, one journal paper and six conference papers have been published as a result of this project. Over the last contract year, the research project resulted in one Ph.D. thesis and partially supported another Ph.D. student. My NASA contact and myself have formulated radiation heat transfer procedures for materials with different indices of refraction and for combined conduction-radiation heat transfer. We are trying to find other applications for the procedures developed under this grant.

  12. Radiative Transfer Model for Contaminated Rough Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    transfer, reflectance, rough surface, BRDF, Kramers- Kronig , penetration depth, fill factor, infrared, LWIR, MWIR, absorption coefficient, scattering...can be obtained from the absorption coefficient via Equation 6 (below) and the real part may be obtained via Kramers- Kronig (KK) analysis,18 n = KK(k...expanded reference library with more than one reference spectrum per material. Kramers- Kronig Relations: The Kramers- Kronig relationship is a

  13. Radiative Transfer in Submerged Macrophyte Canopies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    the canopy in Monterey Bay , California and Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas. Years 3 and 4 continued to evaluate inherent optical properties of individual...both the clear waters of Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas and the much more turbid environment of Elkhorn Slough, in Monterey Bay (Fig. 1A, C). Since...data sets consisting of water column optical property observations of nearshore waters in Monterey Bay were transferred to J. Smart (APL, Johns

  14. A modified Henyey method for computing radiative transfer hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The implicit hydrodynamic code of Kutter and Sparks (1972), which is limited to optically thick regions and employs the diffusion approximation for radiative transfer, is modified to include radiative transfer effects in the optically thin regions of a model star. A modified Henyey method is used to include the solution of the radiative transfer equation in this implicit code, and the convergence properties of this method are proven. A comparison is made between two hydrodynamic models of a classical Cepheid with a 12-day period, one of which was computed with the diffusion approximation and the other with the modified Henyey method. It is found that the two models produce nearly identical light and velocity curves, but differ in the fact that the former never has temperature inversions in the atmosphere while the latter does when sufficiently strong shocks are present.

  15. Radiative transfer theory for polarimetric remote sensing of pine forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C. C.; Han, H. C.; Shin, Robert T.; Kong, Jin AU; Beaudoin, A.; Letoan, T.

    1992-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied to interpret polarimetric radar backscatter from pine forest with clustered vegetation structures. To take into account the clustered structures with the radiative transfer theory, the scattering function of each cluster is calculated by incorporating the phase interference of scattered fields from each component. Subsequently, the resulting phase matrix is used in the radiative transfer equations to evaluate the polarimetric backscattering coefficients from random medium layers embedded with vegetation clusters. Upon including the multi-scale structures, namely, trunks, primary and secondary branches, as well as needles, we interpret and simulate the polarimetric radar responses from pine forest for different frequencies and looking angles. The preliminary results are shown to be in good agreement with the measured backscattering coefficients at the Landes maritime pine forest during the MAESTRO-1 experiment.

  16. Partial moment entropy approximation to radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Martin . E-mail: frank@mathematik.uni-kl.de; Dubroca, Bruno . E-mail: Bruno.Dubroca@math.u-bordeaux.fr; Klar, Axel . E-mail: klar@mathematik.uni-kl.de

    2006-10-10

    We extend the half moment entropy closure for the radiative heat transfer equations presented in Dubroca and Klar [B. Dubroca, A. Klar, Half moment closure for radiative transfer equations, J. Comput. Phys. 180 (2002) 584-596] and Turpault et al. [R. Turpault, M. Frank, B. Dubroca, A. Klar, Multigroup half space moment approximations to the radiative heat transfer equations, J. Comput. Phys. 198 (2004) 363-371] to multi-D. To that end, we consider a partial moment system with general partitions of the unit sphere closed by an entropy minimization principle. We give physical and mathematical reasons for this choice of model and study its properties. Several numerical examples in different physical regimes are presented.

  17. Introduction of Parallel GPGPU Acceleration Algorithms for the Solution of Radiative Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godoy, William F.; Liu, Xu

    2011-01-01

    General-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) is a recent technique that allows the parallel graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate calculations performed sequentially by the central processing unit (CPU). To introduce GPGPU to radiative transfer, the Gauss-Seidel solution of the well-known expressions for 1-D and 3-D homogeneous, isotropic media is selected as a test case. Different algorithms are introduced to balance memory and GPU-CPU communication, critical aspects of GPGPU. Results show that speed-ups of one to two orders of magnitude are obtained when compared to sequential solutions. The underlying value of GPGPU is its potential extension in radiative solvers (e.g., Monte Carlo, discrete ordinates) at a minimal learning curve.

  18. PORTA: A three-dimensional multilevel radiative transfer code for modeling the intensity and polarization of spectral lines with massively parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štěpán, Jiří; Trujillo Bueno, Javier

    2013-09-01

    The interpretation of the intensity and polarization of the spectral line radiation produced in the atmosphere of the Sun and of other stars requires solving a radiative transfer problem that can be very complex, especially when the main interest lies in modeling the spectral line polarization produced by scattering processes and the Hanle and Zeeman effects. One of the difficulties is that the plasma of a stellar atmosphere can be highly inhomogeneous and dynamic, which implies the need to solve the non-equilibrium problem of the generation and transfer of polarized radiation in realistic three-dimensional (3D) stellar atmospheric models. Here we present PORTA, an efficient multilevel radiative transfer code we have developed for the simulation of the spectral line polarization caused by scattering processes and the Hanle and Zeeman effects in 3D models of stellar atmospheres. The numerical method of solution is based on the non-linear multigrid iterative method and on a novel short-characteristics formal solver of the Stokes-vector transfer equation which uses monotonic Bézier interpolation. Therefore, with PORTA the computing time needed to obtain at each spatial grid point the self-consistent values of the atomic density matrix (which quantifies the excitation state of the atomic system) scales linearly with the total number of grid points. Another crucial feature of PORTA is its parallelization strategy, which allows us to speed up the numerical solution of complicated 3D problems by several orders of magnitude with respect to sequential radiative transfer approaches, given its excellent linear scaling with the number of available processors. The PORTA code can also be conveniently applied to solve the simpler 3D radiative transfer problem of unpolarized radiation in multilevel systems.

  19. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  20. A simplified scheme for computing radiation transfer in the troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katayama, A.

    1973-01-01

    A scheme is presented, for the heating of clear and cloudy air by solar and infrared radiation transfer, designed for use in tropospheric general circulation models with coarse vertical resolution. A bulk transmission function is defined for the infrared transfer. The interpolation factors, required for computing the bulk transmission function, are parameterized as functions of such physical parameters as the thickness of the layer, the pressure, and the mixing ratio at a reference level. The computation procedure for solar radiation is significantly simplified by the introduction of two basic concepts. The first is that the solar radiation spectrum can be divided into a scattered part, for which Rayleigh scattering is significant but absorption by water vapor is negligible, and an absorbed part for which absorption by water vapor is significant but Rayleigh scattering is negligible. The second concept is that of an equivalent cloud water vapor amount which absorbs the same amount of radiation as the cloud.

  1. Generalized source Finite Volume Method for radiative transfer equation in participating media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Biao; Xu, Chuan-Long; Wang, Shi-Min

    2017-03-01

    Temperature monitoring is very important in a combustion system. In recent years, non-intrusive temperature reconstruction has been explored intensively on the basis of calculating arbitrary directional radiative intensities. In this paper, a new method named Generalized Source Finite Volume Method (GSFVM) was proposed. It was based on radiative transfer equation and Finite Volume Method (FVM). This method can be used to calculate arbitrary directional radiative intensities and is proven to be accurate and efficient. To verify the performance of this method, six test cases of 1D, 2D, and 3D radiative transfer problems were investigated. The numerical results show that the efficiency of this method is close to the radial basis function interpolation method, but the accuracy and stability is higher than that of the interpolation method. The accuracy of the GSFVM is similar to that of the Backward Monte Carlo (BMC) algorithm, while the time required by the GSFVM is much shorter than that of the BMC algorithm. Therefore, the GSFVM can be used in temperature reconstruction and improvement on the accuracy of the FVM.

  2. Radiative heat transfer as a Landauer-Büttiker problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Han Hoe; Wang, Jian-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    We study the radiative heat transfer between two semi-infinite half-spaces, bounded by conductive surfaces in contact with vacuum. This setup is interpreted as a four-terminal mesoscopic transport problem. The slabs and interfaces are viewed as bosonic reservoirs, coupled perfectly to a scattering center consisting of the two planes and vacuum. Using Rytov's fluctuational electrodynamics and assuming Kirchhoff's circuital law, we calculate the heat flow in each bath. This allows for explicit evaluation of a conductance matrix, from which one readily verifies Büttiker symmetry. Thus, radiative heat transfer in layered media with conductive interfaces becomes a Landauer-Büttiker transport problem.

  3. Radiative heat transfer in coal furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    A hybrid technique has been developed to solve three-dimensional spectral radiation transport equations for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. An optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy is obtained by combining the discrete ordinate method (S{sub 4}), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P{sub 1} approximation for use in different range of optical thicknesses. The technique is used in conjunction with a char burnout model and spectroscopic data for H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, CO, char, soot and ash to determine the influence of ash composition, ash content and coal preparation on furnace heat absorption.

  4. Radiative heat transfer in coal furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1992-09-01

    A hybrid technique has been developed to solve three-dimensional spectral radiation transport equations for absorbing, emitting and anisotropically scattering media. An optimal mix of computational speed and accuracy is obtained by combining the discrete ordinate method (S{sub 4}), modified differential approximation (MDA) and P{sub 1} approximation for use in different range of optical thicknesses. The technique is used in conjunction with a char burnout model and spectroscopic data for H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, CO, char, soot and ash to determine the influence of ash composition, ash content and coal preparation on furnace heat absorption.

  5. Theory of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance of oil radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariamov, N B

    1942-01-01

    In the present report the coefficients of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance are theoretically obtained for the case of laminar flow of a heated viscous liquid in a narrow rectangular channel. The results obtained are applied to the computation of oil radiators, which to a first approximation may be considered as made up of a system of such channels. In conclusion, a comparison is given of the theoretical with the experimental results obtained from tests on airplane oil radiators.

  6. Identifying Clinically Significant Prostate Cancers using 3-D In Vivo Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging with Whole-Mount Histology Validation.

    PubMed

    Palmeri, Mark L; Glass, Tyler J; Miller, Zachary A; Rosenzweig, Stephen J; Buck, Andrew; Polascik, Thomas J; Gupta, Rajan T; Brown, Alison F; Madden, John; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2016-06-01

    Overly aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) treatment adversely affects patients and places an unnecessary burden on our health care system. The inability to identify and grade clinically significant PCa lesions is a factor contributing to excessively aggressive PCa treatment, such as radical prostatectomy, instead of more focal, prostate-sparing procedures such as cryotherapy and high-dose radiation therapy. We have performed 3-D in vivo B-mode and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using a mechanically rotated, side-fire endorectal imaging array to identify regions suspicious for PCa in 29 patients being treated with radical prostatectomies for biopsy-confirmed PCa. Whole-mount histopathology analyses were performed to identify regions of clinically significant/insignificant PCa lesions, atrophy and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Regions of suspicion for PCa were reader-identified in ARFI images based on boundary delineation, contrast, texture and location. These regions of suspicion were compared with histopathology identified lesions using a nearest-neighbor regional localization approach. Of all clinically significant lesions identified on histopathology, 71.4% were also identified using ARFI imaging, including 79.3% of posterior and 33.3% of anterior lesions. Among the ARFI-identified lesions, 79.3% corresponded to clinically significant PCa lesions, with these lesions having higher indices of suspicion than clinically insignificant PCa. ARFI imaging had greater sensitivity for posterior versus anterior lesions because of greater displacement signal-to-noise ratio and finer spatial sampling. Atrophy and benign prostatic hyperplasia can cause appreciable prostate anatomy distortion and heterogeneity that confounds ARFI PCa lesion identification; however, in general, ARFI regions of suspicion did not coincide with these benign pathologies.

  7. Application of stochastic radiative transfer to remote sensing of vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabanov, Nikolay V.

    2002-01-01

    The availability of high quality remote sensing data during the past decade provides an impetus for the development of methods that facilitate accurate retrieval of structural and optical properties of vegetation required for the study of global vegetation dynamics. Empirical and statistical methods have proven to be quite useful in many applications, but they often do not shed light on the underlying physical processes. Approaches based on radiative transfer and the physics of matter-energy interaction are therefore required to gain insight into the mechanisms responsible for signal generation. The goal of this dissertation is the development of advanced methods based on radiative transfer for the retrieval of biophysical information from satellite data. Classical radiative transfer theory is applicable to homogeneous vegetation and is generally inaccurate in characterizing the radiation regime in natural vegetation communities, such as forests or woodlands. A stochastic approach to radiative transfer was introduced in this dissertation to describe the radiation regime in discontinuous vegetation canopies. The resulting stochastic model was implemented and tested with field data and Monte Carlo simulations. The effect of gaps on radiation fluxes in vegetation canopies was quantified analytically and compared to classical representations. Next, the stochastic theory was applied to vegetation remote sensing in two case studies. First, the radiative transfer principles underlying an algorithm for leaf area index (LAI) retrieval were studied with data from Harvard Forest. The classical expression for uncollided radiation was modified according to stochastic principles to explain radiometric measurements and vegetation structure. In the second case study, vegetation dynamics in the northern latitudes inferred from the Pathfinder Advanced Very High-Resolution Radiometer Land data were investigated. The signatures of interannual and seasonal variation recorded in the

  8. Radiative heat transfer between nanoparticles enhanced by intermediate particle

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanhong; Wu, Jingzhi

    2016-02-15

    Radiative heat transfer between two polar nanostructures at different temperatures can be enhanced by resonant tunneling of surface polaritons. Here we show that the heat transfer between two nanoparticles is strongly varied by the interactions with a third nanoparticle. By controlling the size of the third particle, the time scale of thermalization toward the thermal bath temperature can be modified over 5 orders of magnitude. This effect provides control of temperature distribution in nanoparticle aggregation and facilitates thermal management at nanoscale.

  9. In situ 3D topographic and shape analysis by synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography for crystal form identification in polymorphic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xian-Zhen; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; Nangia, Ashwini; Yang, Shuo; Lu, Xiao-Long; Li, Hai-Yan; Shao, Qun; He, You; York, Peter; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2016-04-01

    Polymorphism denotes the existence of more than one crystal structure of a substance, and great practical and theoretical interest for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In many cases, it is challenging to produce a pure crystal form and establish a sensitive detection method for the identification of crystal form in a mixture of polymorphs. In this study, an accurate and sensitive method based on synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography (SR-μCT) was devised to identify the polymorphs of clopidogrel bisulphate (CLP). After 3D reconstruction, crystal particles were extracted and dozens of structural parameters were calculated. Whilst, the particle shapes of the two crystal forms were all irregular, the surface of CLP II was found to be rougher than CLP I. In order to classify the crystal form based on the quantitative morphological property of particles, Volume Bias Percentage based on Surface Smoothing (VBP) was defined and a new method based on VBP was successfully developed, with a total matching rate of 99.91% for 4544 particles and a lowest detectable limit of 1%. More important for the mixtures in solid pharmaceutical formulations, the interference of excipients can be avoided, a feature cannot achieved by other available analytical methods.

  10. Use of the ARM Measurement of Spectral Zenith Radiance For Better Understanding Of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan

    2010-10-19

    Our proposal focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general 3D cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. We also focus on zenith radiance measurements, both active and passive. The proposal has three main parts. Part One exploits the "solar-background" mode of ARM lidars to allow them to retrieve cloud optical depth not just for thin clouds but for all clouds. This also enables the study of aerosol cloud interactions with a single instrument. Part Two exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by ARM's zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), especially during CLASIC, to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also propose to take advantage of the SWS's 1 Hz sampling to study the "twilight zone" around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part Three involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM's 2NFOV instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the AMF-COPS/CLOWD deployment, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM's operational data processing.

  11. Super-Eddington radiation transfer in soft gamma repeaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    Bursts from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) have been shown to be super-Eddington by a factor of 1000 and have been persuasively associated with compact objects. Super-Eddington radiation transfer on the surface of a strongly magnetic (greater than or equal to 10(exp 13) G) neutron star is studied and related to the observational constraints on SGRs. In strong magnetic fields, Thompson scattering is suppressed in one polarization state, so super-Eddington fluxes can be radiated while the plasma remains in hydrostatic equilibrium. We discuss a model which offers a somewhat natural explanation for the observation that the energy spectra of bursts with varying intensity are similar. The radiation produced is found to be linearly polarized to one part in 1000 in a direction determined by the local magnetic field, and intensity variations between bursts are understood as a change in the radiating area on the source. The net polarization is inversely correlated with burst intensity. Further, it is shown that for radiation transfer calculations in limit of superstrong magnetic fields, it is sufficient to solve the radiation transfer for the low opacity state rather than the coupled equations for both. With this approximation, standard stellar atmosphere techniques are utilized to calculate the model energy spectrum.

  12. Nonlocality of radiative transfer in continuous spectra and Bremsstrahlung radiation transport in hot dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V. V.; Kukushkin, A. B.

    1997-05-05

    The importance of nonlocal effects in radiative transfer in continuous spectra is shown in numerical modelling of space profiles of plasma temperature and Bremsstrahlung total power losses in a layer of adiabatically compressed hot dense plasma, via comparing the results of the exact, integral equation formalism and widely used approach of radiation temperature diffusion with Rosseland mean diffusion coefficient.

  13. 3D GRMHD and GRPIC Simulations of Disk-Jet Coupling and Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Mizuno, Y.; Watson, M.; Hardee, P.; Fuerst, S.; Wu, K.; Fishman, G.J.; /NASA, Marshall

    2006-12-19

    We investigate jet formation in black-hole systems using 3-D General Relativistic Particle-In-Cell (GRPIC) and 3-D GRMHD simulations. GRPIC simulations, which allow charge separations in a collisionless plasma, do not need to invoke the frozen condition as in GRMHD simulations. 3-D GRPIC simulations show that jets are launched from Kerr black holes as in 3-D GRMHD simulations, but jet formation in the two cases may not be identical. Comparative study of black hole systems with GRPIC and GRMHD simulations with the inclusion of radiate transfer will further clarify the mechanisms that drive the evolution of disk-jet systems.

  14. Monte Carlo method based radiative transfer simulation of stochastic open forest generated by circle packing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shengye; Tamura, Masayuki

    2013-10-01

    Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) method is a versatile application for simulating radiative transfer regime of the Solar - Atmosphere - Landscape system. Moreover, it can be used to compute the radiation distribution over a complex landscape configuration, as an example like a forest area. Due to its robustness to the complexity of the 3-D scene altering, MCRT method is also employed for simulating canopy radiative transfer regime as the validation source of other radiative transfer models. In MCRT modeling within vegetation, one basic step is the canopy scene set up. 3-D scanning application was used for representing canopy structure as accurately as possible, but it is time consuming. Botanical growth function can be used to model the single tree growth, but cannot be used to express the impaction among trees. L-System is also a functional controlled tree growth simulation model, but it costs large computing memory. Additionally, it only models the current tree patterns rather than tree growth during we simulate the radiative transfer regime. Therefore, it is much more constructive to use regular solid pattern like ellipsoidal, cone, cylinder etc. to indicate single canopy. Considering the allelopathy phenomenon in some open forest optical images, each tree in its own `domain' repels other trees. According to this assumption a stochastic circle packing algorithm is developed to generate the 3-D canopy scene in this study. The canopy coverage (%) and the tree amount (N) of the 3-D scene are declared at first, similar to the random open forest image. Accordingly, we randomly generate each canopy radius (rc). Then we set the circle central coordinate on XY-plane as well as to keep circles separate from each other by the circle packing algorithm. To model the individual tree, we employ the Ishikawa's tree growth regressive model to set the tree parameters including DBH (dt), tree height (H). However, the relationship between canopy height (Hc) and trunk height (Ht) is

  15. Fractional integration and radiative transfer in a multifractal atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Naud, C.; Schertzer, D.; Lovejoy, S.

    1996-04-01

    Recently, Cess et al. (1995) and Ramathan et al. (1995) cited observations which exhibit an anomalous absorption of cloudy skies in comparison with the value predicted by usual models and which thus introduce large uncertainties for climatic change assessments. These observation raise questions concerning the way general circulation models have been tuned for decades, relying on classical methods, of both radiative transfer and dynamical modeling. The observations also tend to demonstrate that homogeneous models are simply not relevant in relating the highly variable properties of clouds and radiation fields. However smoothed, the intensity of cloud`s multi-scattered radiation fields reflect this extreme variability.

  16. A modular radiative transfer program for gas filter correlation radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casas, J. C.; Campbell, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    The fundamentals of a computer program, simulated monochromatic atmospheric radiative transfer (SMART), which calculates atmospheric path transmission, solar radiation, and thermal radiation in the 4.6 micrometer spectral region, are described. A brief outline of atmospheric absorption properties and line by line transmission calculations is explained in conjunction with an outline of the SMART computational procedures. Program flexibility is demonstrated by simulating the response of a gas filter correlation radiometer as one example of an atmospheric infrared sensor. Program limitations, input data requirements, program listing, and comparison of SMART transmission calculations are presented.

  17. Validation of the Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhuravleva, Tatiana; Marshak, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    A new approach to validation of the Poisson stochastic radiative transfer method is proposed. In contrast to other validations of stochastic models, the main parameter of the Poisson model responsible for cloud geometrical structure - cloud aspect ratio - is determined entirely by matching measurements and calculations of the direct solar radiation. If the measurements of the direct solar radiation is unavailable, it was shown that there is a range of the aspect ratios that allows the stochastic model to accurately approximate the average measurements of surface downward and cloud top upward fluxes. Realizations of the fractionally integrated cascade model are taken as a prototype of real measurements.

  18. Stochastic Radiative Transfer in Polar Mixed Phase Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, J.; Veron, D. E.

    2004-12-01

    According to recent research, mixed phase clouds comprise one third of the overall annual cloud cover in the Arctic region. These clouds contain distinct regions of liquid water and ice, which have a different impact on radiation than single-phase clouds. Despite the prevalence of mixed phase clouds in the polar regions, many modern atmospheric general circulation models use single-phase clouds in their radiation routines. A stochastic approach to representating the transfer of shortwave radiation through a cloud layer where the distribution of the ice and liquid is governed by observed statistics is being assessed. Data from the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) program and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's North Slopes of Alaska Cloud and Radiation Testbed site will be used to determine the characteristic features of the cloud field and to evaluate the performance of this statistical model.

  19. Mesoscopic near-field radiative heat transfer at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maasilta, Ilari; Geng, Zhuoran; Chaudhuri, Saumyadip; Koppinen, Panu

    2015-03-01

    Near-field radiative heat transfer has mostly been discussed at room temperatures and/or macroscopic scale geometries. Here, we discuss our recent theoretical and experimental advances in understanding near-field transfer at ultra-low temperatures below 1K. As the thermal wavelengths increase with lowering temperature, we show that with sensitive tunnel junction bolometers it is possible to study near-field transfer up to distances ~ 10 μm currently, even though the power levels are low. In addition, these type of experiments correspond to the extreme near-field limit, as the near-field region starts at ~ mm distances at 0.1 K, and could have theoretical power enhancement factors of the order of 1010. Preliminary results on heat transfer between two parallel metallic wires are presented. We also comment on possible areas were such heat transfer might be relevant, such as densely packed arrays of low-temperature detectors.

  20. Efficient vector radiative transfer calculations in vertically inhomogeneous cloudy atmospheres.

    PubMed

    van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Hasekamp, Otto P; Landgraf, Jochen

    2006-08-10

    Accurate radiative transfer calculations in cloudy atmospheres are generally time consuming, limiting their practical use in satellite remote sensing applications. We present a model to efficiently calculate the radiative transfer of polarized light in atmospheres that contain homogeneous cloud layers. This model combines the Gauss-Seidel method, which is efficient for inhomogeneous cloudless atmospheres, with the doubling method, which is efficient for homogeneous cloud layers. Additionally to reduce the computational effort for radiative transfer calculations in absorption bands, the cloud reflection and transmission matrices are interpolated over the absorption and scattering optical thicknesses within the cloud layer. We demonstrate that the proposed radiative transfer model in combination with this interpolation technique is efficient for the simulation of satellite measurements for inhomogeneous atmospheres containing one homogeneous cloud layer. For example, the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY) measurements in the oxygen A band (758-773 nm) and the Hartley-Huggins ozone band (295-335 nm) with a spectral resolution of 0.4 nm can be simulated for these atmospheres within 1 min on a 2.8 GHz PC with an accuracy better than 0.1%.

  1. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; ...

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  2. Redshifted Cherenkov Radiation for in vivo Imaging: Coupling Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer to multiple Förster Resonance Energy Transfers

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, Yann; Collin, Bertrand; Decréau, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Cherenkov Radiation (CR), this blue glow seen in nuclear reactors, is an optical light originating from energetic β-emitter radionuclides. CR emitter 90Y triggers a cascade of energy transfers in the presence of a mixed population of fluorophores (which each other match their respective absorption and emission maxima): Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) first, followed by multiple Förster Resonance Energy transfers (FRET): CRET ratios were calculated to give a rough estimate of the transfer efficiency. While CR is blue-weighted (300–500 nm), such cascades of Energy Transfers allowed to get a) fluorescence emission up to 710 nm, which is beyond the main CR window and within the near-infrared (NIR) window where biological tissues are most transparent, b) to amplify this emission and boost the radiance on that window: EMT6-tumor bearing mice injected with both a radionuclide and a mixture of fluorophores having a good spectral overlap, were shown to have nearly a two-fold radiance boost (measured on a NIR window centered on the emission wavelength of the last fluorophore in the Energy Transfer cascade) compared to a tumor injected with the radionuclide only. Some CR embarked light source could be converted into a near-infrared radiation, where biological tissues are most transparent. PMID:28338043

  3. Redshifted Cherenkov Radiation for in vivo Imaging: Coupling Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer to multiple Förster Resonance Energy Transfers.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Yann; Collin, Bertrand; Decréau, Richard A

    2017-03-24

    Cherenkov Radiation (CR), this blue glow seen in nuclear reactors, is an optical light originating from energetic β-emitter radionuclides. CR emitter (90)Y triggers a cascade of energy transfers in the presence of a mixed population of fluorophores (which each other match their respective absorption and emission maxima): Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) first, followed by multiple Förster Resonance Energy transfers (FRET): CRET ratios were calculated to give a rough estimate of the transfer efficiency. While CR is blue-weighted (300-500 nm), such cascades of Energy Transfers allowed to get a) fluorescence emission up to 710 nm, which is beyond the main CR window and within the near-infrared (NIR) window where biological tissues are most transparent, b) to amplify this emission and boost the radiance on that window: EMT6-tumor bearing mice injected with both a radionuclide and a mixture of fluorophores having a good spectral overlap, were shown to have nearly a two-fold radiance boost (measured on a NIR window centered on the emission wavelength of the last fluorophore in the Energy Transfer cascade) compared to a tumor injected with the radionuclide only. Some CR embarked light source could be converted into a near-infrared radiation, where biological tissues are most transparent.

  4. Redshifted Cherenkov Radiation for in vivo Imaging: Coupling Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer to multiple Förster Resonance Energy Transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Yann; Collin, Bertrand; Decréau, Richard A.

    2017-03-01

    Cherenkov Radiation (CR), this blue glow seen in nuclear reactors, is an optical light originating from energetic β-emitter radionuclides. CR emitter 90Y triggers a cascade of energy transfers in the presence of a mixed population of fluorophores (which each other match their respective absorption and emission maxima): Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) first, followed by multiple Förster Resonance Energy transfers (FRET): CRET ratios were calculated to give a rough estimate of the transfer efficiency. While CR is blue-weighted (300–500 nm), such cascades of Energy Transfers allowed to get a) fluorescence emission up to 710 nm, which is beyond the main CR window and within the near-infrared (NIR) window where biological tissues are most transparent, b) to amplify this emission and boost the radiance on that window: EMT6-tumor bearing mice injected with both a radionuclide and a mixture of fluorophores having a good spectral overlap, were shown to have nearly a two-fold radiance boost (measured on a NIR window centered on the emission wavelength of the last fluorophore in the Energy Transfer cascade) compared to a tumor injected with the radionuclide only. Some CR embarked light source could be converted into a near-infrared radiation, where biological tissues are most transparent.

  5. Application of alternative synthetic kernel approximation to radiative transfer in regular and irregular two-dimensional media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altaç, Zekeriya; Sert, Zerrin

    2017-01-01

    Alternative synthetic kernel (ASKN) approximation, just as the standard SKN method, is derived from the radiative integral transfer equations in full 3D generality. The direct and diffuse terms of thermal radiation appear explicitly in the radiative integral transfer equations as surface and volume integrals, respectively. In standard SKN method, the approximation is employed to the diffuse terms while direct terms are evaluated analytically. The alternative formulation differs from the standard one in that the direct radiation wall contributions are also approximated with the same spirit of the synthetic kernel approximation. This alternative formulation also yields a set of coupled partial differential-the ASKN-equations which could be solved using finite volume methods. This approximation is applied to radiative transfer calculations in regular and irregular two-dimensional absorbing, emitting and isotropically scattering media. Four benchmark problems-one rectangular and three irregular media-are considered, and the net radiative flux and/or incident energy solutions along the boundaries are compared with available exact, standard discrete ordinates S4 and S12, modified discrete ordinates S4, Monte Carlo and collocation spectral method to assess the accuracy of the method. The ASKN approximation yields ray effect free incident energy and radiative flux distributions, and low order ASKN solutions are generally better than those of the high order standard discrete ordinates method.

  6. Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Veron, Dana E

    2009-03-12

    This project had two primary goals: 1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and 2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed below.

  7. Application of Stochastic Radiative Transfer Theory to the ARM Cloud-Radiative Parameterization Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Dana E. Veron

    2012-04-09

    This project had two primary goals: (1) development of stochastic radiative transfer as a parameterization that could be employed in an AGCM environment, and (2) exploration of the stochastic approach as a means for representing shortwave radiative transfer through mixed-phase layer clouds. To achieve these goals, climatology of cloud properties was developed at the ARM CART sites, an analysis of the performance of the stochastic approach was performed, a simple stochastic cloud-radiation parameterization for an AGCM was developed and tested, a statistical description of Arctic mixed phase clouds was developed and the appropriateness of stochastic approach for representing radiative transfer through mixed-phase clouds was assessed. Significant progress has been made in all of these areas and is detailed in the final report.

  8. Radiative transfer in a polluted urban planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viskanta, R.; Johnson, R. O.; Bergstrom, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Radiative transfer in a polluted urban atmosphere is studied using a dynamic model. The diurnal nature of radiative transfer for summer conditions is simulated for an urban area 40 km in extent and the effects of various parameters arising in the problem are investigated. The results of numerical computations show that air pollution has the potential of playing a major role in the radiative regime of the urban area. Absorption of solar energy by aerosols in realistic models of urban atmosphere are of the same order of magnitude as that due to water vapor. The predicted effect of the air pollution aerosol in the city is to warm the earth-atmosphere system, and the net effect of gaseous pollutant is to warm the surface and cool the planetary boundary layer, particularly near the top.

  9. Near-field radiative heat transfer between metamaterial thin films.

    PubMed

    Basu, Soumyadipta; Francoeur, Mathieu

    2014-03-01

    We investigate near-field radiative heat transfer between two thin films made of metamaterials. The impact of film thickness on magnetic and electric surface polaritons (ESPs) is analyzed. It is found that the strength as well as the location of magnetic resonance does not change with film thickness until the film behaves as semi-infinite for the dielectric function chosen in this study. When the film is thinner than vacuum gap, both electric and magnetic polaritons contribute evenly to near-field radiative heat transfer. At larger film thicknesses, ESPs dominate heat transfer due to excitation of a larger number of modes. Results obtained from this study will facilitate applications of metamaterials as thin-film coatings for energy systems.

  10. A Fast Infrared Radiative Transfer Model for Overlapping Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niu, Jianguo; Yang, Ping; Huang, Huang-Lung; Davies, James E.; Li, Jun; Baum, Bryan A.; Hu, Yong X.

    2006-01-01

    A fast infrared radiative transfer model (FIRTM2) appropriate for application to both single-layered and overlapping cloud situations is developed for simulating the outgoing infrared spectral radiance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In FIRTM2 a pre-computed library of cloud reflectance and transmittance values is employed to account for one or two cloud layers, whereas the background atmospheric optical thickness due to gaseous absorption can be computed from a clear-sky radiative transfer model. FIRTM2 is applicable to three atmospheric conditions: 1) clear-sky, 2) single-layered ice or water cloud, and 3) two simultaneous cloud layers in a column (e.g., ice cloud overlying water cloud). Moreover, FIRTM2 outputs the derivatives (i.e., Jacobians) of the TOA brightness temperature with respect to cloud optical thickness and effective particle size. Sensitivity analyses have been carried out to assess the performance of FIRTM2 for two spectral regions, namely the longwave (LW) band (587.3 - 1179.5/cm) and the short-to-medium wave (SMW) band (1180.1 - 2228.9/cm). The assessment is carried out in terms of brightness temperature differences (BTD) between FIRTM2 and the well-known discrete ordinates radiative transfer model (DISORT), henceforth referred to as BTD (F-D). The BTD (F-D) values for single-layered clouds are generally less than 0.8 K. For the case of two cloud layers (specifically ice cloud over water cloud), the BTD(F-D) values are also generally less than 0.8 K except for the SMW band for the case of a very high altitude (>15 km) cloud comprised of small ice particles. Note that for clear-sky atmospheres, FIRTM2 reduces to the clear-sky radiative transfer model that is incorporated into FIRTM2, and the errors in this case are essentially those of the clear-sky radiative transfer model.

  11. Polarized radiative transfer considering thermal emission in semitransparent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben, Xun; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2014-09-01

    The characteristics of the polarization must be considered for a complete and correct description of radiation transfer in a scattering medium. Observing and identifying the polarizition characteristics of the thermal emission of a hot semitransparent medium have a major significance to analyze the optical responses of the medium for different temperatures. In this paper, a Monte Carlo method is developed for polarzied radiative transfer in a semitransparent medium. There are mainly two kinds of mechanisms leading to polarization of light: specular reflection on the Fresnel boundary and scattering by particles. The determination of scattering direction is the key to solve polarized radiative transfer problem using the Monte Carlo method. An optimized rejection method is used to calculate the scattering angles. In the model, the treatment of specular reflection is also considered, and in the process of tracing photons, the normalization must be applied to the Stokes vector when scattering, reflection, or transmission occurs. The vector radiative transfer matrix (VRTM) is defined and solved using Monte Carlo strategy, by which all four Stokes elements can be determined. Our results for Rayleigh scattering and Mie scattering are compared well with published data. The accuracy of the developed Monte Carlo method is shown to be good enough for the solution to vector radiative transfer. Polarization characteristics of thermal emission in a hot semitransparent medium is investigated, and results show that the U and V parameters of Stokes vector are equal to zero, an obvious peak always appear in the Q curve instead of the I curve, and refractive index has a completely different effect on I from Q.

  12. Realistic three-dimensional radiative transfer simulations of observed precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, I. S.; Bettenhausen, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Remote sensing observations of precipitation typically utilize a number of instruments on various platforms. Ground validation campaigns incorporate ground-based and airborne measurements to characterize and study precipitating clouds, while the precipitation measurement constellation envisioned by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission includes measurements from differing space-borne instruments. In addition to disparities such as frequency channel selection and bandwidth, measurement geometry and resolution differences between observing platforms result in inherent inconsistencies between data products. In order to harmonize measurements from multiple passive radiometers, a framework is required that addresses these differences. To accomplish this, we have implemented a flexible three-dimensional radiative transfer model. As its core, the radiative transfer model uses the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) version 2 to solve the radiative transfer equation in three dimensions using Monte Carlo integration. Gaseous absorption is computed with MonoRTM and formatted into look-up tables for rapid processing. Likewise, scattering properties are pre-computed using a number of publicly available codes, such as T-Matrix and DDSCAT. If necessary, a melting layer model can be applied to the input profiles. Gaussian antenna beams estimate the spatial resolutions of the passive measurements, and realistic bandpass characteristics can be included to properly account for the spectral response of the simulated instrument. This work presents three-dimensional simulations of WindSat brightness temperatures for an oceanic rain event sampled by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The 2B-31 combined Precipitation Radar / TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) retrievals provide profiles that are the input to the radiative transfer model. TMI brightness temperatures are also simulated. Comparisons between monochromatic, pencil beam simulations and

  13. Structure Segmentation and Transfer Faults in the Marcellus Shale, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania: Implications for Gas Recovery Efficiency and Risk Assessment Using 3D Seismic Attribute Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Emily D.

    The Marcellus Shale has become an important unconventional gas reservoir in the oil and gas industry. Fractures within this organic-rich black shale serve as an important component of porosity and permeability useful in enhancing production. Horizontal drilling is the primary approach for extracting hydrocarbons in the Marcellus Shale. Typically, wells are drilled perpendicular to natural fractures in an attempt to intersect fractures for effective hydraulic stimulation. If the fractures are contained within the shale, then hydraulic fracturing can enhance permeability by further breaking the already weakened rock. However, natural fractures can affect hydraulic stimulations by absorbing and/or redirecting the energy away from the wellbore, causing a decreased efficiency in gas recovery, as has been the case for the Clearfield County, Pennsylvania study area. Estimating appropriate distances away from faults and fractures, which may limit hydrocarbon recovery, is essential to reducing the risk of injection fluid migration along these faults. In an attempt to mitigate the negative influences of natural fractures on hydrocarbon extraction within the Marcellus Shale, fractures were analyzed through the aid of both traditional and advanced seismic attributes including variance, curvature, ant tracking, and waveform model regression. Through the integration of well log interpretations and seismic data, a detailed assessment of structural discontinuities that may decrease the recovery efficiency of hydrocarbons was conducted. High-quality 3D seismic data in Central Pennsylvania show regional folds and thrusts above the major detachment interval of the Salina Salt. In addition to the regional detachment folds and thrusts, cross-regional, northwest-trending lineaments were mapped. These lineaments may pose a threat to hydrocarbon productivity and recovery efficiency due to faults and fractures acting as paths of least resistance for induced hydraulic stimulation fluids

  14. Tree crown structural characterization: A study using terrestrial laser scanning and three-dimensional radiative transfer modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorthy, Inian

    Spectroscopic observational data for vegetated environments, have been coupled with 3D physically-based radiative transfer models for retrievals of biochemical and biophysical indicators of vegetation health and condition. With the recent introduction of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) units, there now exists a means of rapidly measuring intricate structural details of vegetation canopies, which can also serve as input into 3D radiative transfer models. In this investigation, Intelligent Laser Ranging and Imaging System (ILRIS-3D) data was acquired of individual tree crowns in laboratory, and field-based experiments. The ILRIS-3D uses the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) principle to measure the distances of objects based on the time interval between laser pulse exitance and return, upon reflection from an object. At the laboratory-level, this exploratory study demonstrated and validated innovative approaches for retrieving crown-level estimates of Leaf Area Index (LAI) (r2 = 0.98, rmse = 0.26m2/m2), a critical biophysical parameter for vegetation monitoring and modeling. These methods were implemented and expanded in field experiments conducted in olive (Olea europaea L.) orchards in Cordoba, Spain, where ILRIS-3D observations for 24 structurally-variable trees were made. Robust methodologies were developed to characterize diagnostic architectural parameters, such as tree height (r2 = 0.97, rmse = 0.21m), crown width (r 2 = 0.98, rmse = 0.12m), crown height (r2 = 0.81, rmse = 0.11m), crown volume (r2 = 0.99, rmse = 2.6m3), and LAI (r2 = 0.76, rmse = 0.27m2/ m2). These parameters were subsequently used as direct inputs into the Forest LIGHT (FLIGHT) 3D ray tracing model for characterization of the spectral behavior of the olive crowns. Comparisons between FLIGHT-simulated spectra and measured data showed small differences in the visible (< 3%) and near infrared (< 10%) spectral ranges. These differences between model simulations and measurements were significantly correlated

  15. Characterization of 3D Cirrus Cloud and Radiation Fields Using ARS/AIRS/MODIS data and its Application to Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, Kuo-Nan; Ou, S. C.; Gu, Y.; Takano, Y.

    2016-02-22

    + b ln(IWC) + c ((ln(IWC))2, where a, b, and c are fitting coefficients and are functions of three regions. We demonstrated that this correlation can be effectively incorporated in GCMs and climate models that predict IWC - a significant advance in ice microphysics parameterization for interactive cloud-radiation analysis and feedback. Substantial July mean differences are shown in the OLR (W/m2) and precipitation (mm/day) patterns between UCLA GCM simulations based on Des determined from the De-IWC correlations and the control run using a fixed ice crystal size. Third, in order to improve the computation of spectral radiative transfer processes in the WRF model, we developed a consistent and efficient radiation scheme that can better resolve the spectral bands, determine the cloud optical properties, and provide more reliable and accurate radiative heating fields. In the newly developed radiation module, we have implemented in WRF a modified and improved version referred to as the Fu-Liou-Gu scheme, which includes a combination of delta-four-stream and delta-two-stream approximations for solar and IR flux calculations, respectively. This combination has been proven to be computationally efficient and at the same time to produce a high degree of accuracy. The incorporation of nongray gaseous absorption in multiple scattering atmospheres was based on the correlated k-distribution method. The solar and IR spectra are divided into 6 and 12 bands, respectively, according to the location of absorption bands of H2O, CO2, O3, CH4, N2O, and CFCs. We further included absorption by the water vapor continuum and a number of minor absorbers in the solar spectrum leading to an additional absorption of solar flux in a clear atmosphere on the order of 1-3 W/m2. Additionally, we incorporated the ice microphysics parameterization that includes an interactive mean effective ice crystal size in association with radiation parameterizations. The Fu-Liou-Gu scheme is an ideal tool for the

  16. 3D Time Dependent Stokes Vector Radiative Transfer in an Atmosphere-Ocean System Including a Stochastic Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    the detector and the surface. The simulated radiance I, Stokes parameters Q, U, and degree of linear polarization P , as well as the counterparts...from field measurements, are shown in Fig. 6. 8 Numerical Simulations Measurements I Q U 9 P Fig. 6. The angular distributions of the downward...radiance (I), Stokes parameters Q and U, and the degree of linear polarization ( P ), as given by a Monte Carlo simulation (left panel) and by

  17. 3D Time Dependent Stokes Vector Radiative Transfer in an Atmosphere-Ocean System Including a Stochastic Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    This study will serve as the genesis to the future evolution of an inversion algorithm whereby one could reconstruct images that have been... Evolution of Polarization of Light in the Ocean” which has been accepted for publication in Applied Optics. RESULTS a) Raman Scattering. The...input to our codes in our MURI study of cephalopods . REFERENCES 1. G. W. Kattawar and G. N. Plass, “Asymptotic Radiance and Po1arization in

  18. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  19. Radiative Transfer Modeling Within the Vegetation Based on Virtual Flux Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallel, A.

    2009-04-01

    the first collision of the solar irradiance (E+1) as well as the diffuse fluxes created by E+1 scattering. Finally, to solve the radiative transfer equations, E+1 is divided into virtual sub-fluxes having simple expressions, allowing the division of the radiative transfer problem into a finite number of sub-problems easily solved based on SAIL++ formalism. The simulation tests show that the proposed model conserves the energy with good accuracy, better than AddingSD (Kallel et al., 2008). Compared to 3-D models considered on RAMI database, our model shows similar performances. Finally, compared to AddingSD, the running time is drastically reduced from about 15 minutes to 0.05 seconds.

  20. Coupling radiative heat transfer in participating media with other heat transfer modes

    SciTech Connect

    Tencer, John; Howell, John R.

    2015-09-28

    The common methods for finding the local radiative flux divergence in participating media through solution of the radiative transfer equation are outlined. The pros and cons of each method are discussed in terms of their speed, ability to handle spectral properties and scattering phenomena, as well as their accuracy in different ranges of media transport properties. The suitability of each method for inclusion in the energy equation to efficiently solve multi-mode thermal transfer problems is discussed. Lastly, remaining topics needing research are outlined.

  1. Preliminary results of a three-dimensional radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hirok, W.

    1995-09-01

    Clouds act as the primary modulator of the Earth`s radiation at the top of the atmosphere, within the atmospheric column, and at the Earth`s surface. They interact with both shortwave and longwave radiation, but it is primarily in the case of shortwave where most of the uncertainty lies because of the difficulties in treating scattered solar radiation. To understand cloud-radiative interactions, radiative transfer models portray clouds as plane-parallel homogeneous entities to ease the computational physics. Unfortunately, clouds are far from being homogeneous, and large differences between measurement and theory point to a stronger need to understand and model cloud macrophysical properties. In an attempt to better comprehend the role of cloud morphology on the 3-dimensional radiation field, a Monte Carlo model has been developed. This model can simulate broadband shortwave radiation fluxes while incorporating all of the major atmospheric constituents. The model is used to investigate the cloud absorption anomaly where cloud absorption measurements exceed theoretical estimates and to examine the efficacy of ERBE measurements and cloud field experiments. 3 figs.

  2. Critical ingredients of Type Ia supernova radiative-transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Blondin, Stéphane; Khokhlov, Alexei

    2014-07-01

    We explore the physics of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves and spectra using the 1D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) time-dependent radiative-transfer code CMFGEN. Rather than adjusting ejecta properties to match observations, we select as input one `standard' 1D Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation hydrodynamical model, and then explore the sensitivity of radiation and gas properties of the ejecta on radiative-transfer modelling assumptions. The correct computation of SN Ia radiation is not exclusively a solution to an `opacity problem', characterized by the treatment of a large number of lines. We demonstrate that the key is to identify and treat important atomic processes consistently. This is not limited to treating line blanketing in non-LTE. We show that including forbidden-line transitions of metals, and in particular Co, is increasingly important for the temperature and ionization of the gas beyond maximum light. Non-thermal ionization and excitation are also critical since they affect the colour evolution and the ΔM15 decline rate of our model. While impacting little the bolometric luminosity, a more complete treatment of decay routes leads to enhanced line blanketing, e.g. associated with 48Ti in the U and B bands. Overall, we find that SN Ia radiation properties are influenced in a complicated way by the atomic data we employ, so that obtaining converged results is a real challenge. Nonetheless, with our fully fledged CMFGEN model, we obtain good agreement with the golden standard Type Ia SN 2005cf in the optical and near-IR, from 5 to 60 d after explosion, suggesting that assuming spherical symmetry is not detrimental to SN Ia radiative-transfer modelling at these times. Multi-D effects no doubt matter, but they are perhaps less important than accurately treating the non-LTE processes that are crucial to obtain reliable temperature and ionization structures.

  3. Implications of a quadratic stream definition in radiative transfer theory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, C.

    1972-01-01

    An explicit definition of the radiation-stream concept is stated and applied to approximate the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer with a set of twelve coupled differential equations. Computational efficiency is enhanced by distributing the corresponding streams in three-dimensional space in a totally symmetric way. Polarization is then incorporated in this model. A computer program based on the model is briefly compared with a Monte Carlo program for simulation of horizon scans of the earth's atmosphere. It is found to be considerably faster.

  4. An Improved Radiative Transfer Model for Climate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Sokolik, Irina N.; Clough, Shepard A.; Toon, Owen B.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a radiative transfer model that has been developed to accurately predict the atmospheric radiant flux in both the infrared and the solar spectrum with a minimum of computational effort. The model is designed to be included in numerical climate models To assess the accuracy of the model, the results are compared to other more detailed models for several standard cases in the solar and thermal spectrum. As the thermal spectrum has been treated in other publications, we focus here on the solar part of the spectrum. We perform several example calculations focussing on the question of absorption of solar radiation by gases and aerosols.

  5. Fire Intensity Data for Validation of the Radiative Transfer Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Jernigan, Dann A.

    2016-01-01

    A set of experiments and test data are outlined in this report that provides radiation intensity data for the validation of models for the radiative transfer equation. The experiments were performed with lightly-sooting liquid hydrocarbon fuels that yielded fully turbulent fires 2 m diameter). In addition, supplemental measurements of air flow and temperature, fuel temperature and burn rate, and flame surface emissive power, wall heat, and flame height and width provide a complete set of boundary condition data needed for validation of models used in fire simulations.

  6. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-López, Pablo; Tse, Wang-Kong; Dalvit, Diego A R

    2015-06-03

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. Finally, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

  7. Radiative heat transfer in 2D Dirac materials

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez-López, Pablo; Tse, Wang -Kong; Dalvit, Diego A. R.

    2015-05-12

    We compute the radiative heat transfer between two sheets of 2D Dirac materials, including topological Chern insulators and graphene, within the framework of the local approximation for the optical response of these materials. In this approximation, which neglects spatial dispersion, we derive both numerically and analytically the short-distance asymptotic of the near-field heat transfer in these systems, and show that it scales as the inverse of the distance between the two sheets. In conclusion, we discuss the limitations to the validity of this scaling law imposed by spatial dispersion in 2D Dirac materials.

  8. Advanced Computational Methods for Thermal Radiative Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Tencer, John; Carlberg, Kevin Thomas; Larsen, Marvin E.; Hogan, Roy E.

    2016-10-01

    Participating media radiation (PMR) in weapon safety calculations for abnormal thermal environments are too costly to do routinely. This cost may be s ubstantially reduced by applying reduced order modeling (ROM) techniques. The application of ROM to PMR is a new and unique approach for this class of problems. This approach was investigated by the authors and shown to provide significant reductions in the computational expense associated with typical PMR simulations. Once this technology is migrated into production heat transfer analysis codes this capability will enable the routine use of PMR heat transfer in higher - fidelity simulations of weapon resp onse in fire environments.

  9. A Radiation Transfer Solver for Athena Using Short Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.; Jiang, Yan-Fei

    2012-03-01

    We describe the implementation of a module for the Athena magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code that solves the time-independent, multi-frequency radiative transfer (RT) equation on multidimensional Cartesian simulation domains, including scattering and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) effects. The module is based on well known and well tested algorithms developed for modeling stellar atmospheres, including the method of short characteristics to solve the RT equation, accelerated Lambda iteration to handle scattering and non-LTE effects, and parallelization via domain decomposition. The module serves several purposes: it can be used to generate spectra and images, to compute a variable Eddington tensor (VET) for full radiation MHD simulations, and to calculate the heating and cooling source terms in the MHD equations in flows where