Science.gov

Sample records for 3d ray tracing

  1. 3D ultrasonic ray tracing in AutoCAD®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, D.; Leggat, P.; McNab, A.

    2001-04-01

    To assist with the design and validation of testing procedures for NDT, add-on modules have been developed for AutoCAD® 2000. One of the modules computes and displays ultrasonic 3D ray tracing. Another determines paths between two points, for instance a probe and a target or two probes. The third module displays phased array operational modes and calculates element delays for phased array operation. The modules can be applied to simple or complex solid model components.

  2. Microseismic network design assessment based on 3D ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näsholm, Sven Peter; Wuestefeld, Andreas; Lubrano-Lavadera, Paul; Lang, Dominik; Kaschwich, Tina; Oye, Volker

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing demand on the versatility of microseismic monitoring networks. In early projects, being able to locate any triggers was considered a success. These early successes led to a better understanding of how to extract value from microseismic results. Today operators, regulators, and service providers work closely together in order to find the optimum network design to meet various requirements. In the current study we demonstrate an integrated and streamlined network capability assessment approach. It is intended for use during the microseismic network design process prior to installation. The assessments are derived from 3D ray tracing between a grid of event points and the sensors. Three aspects are discussed: 1) Magnitude of completeness or detection limit; 2) Event location accuracy; and 3) Ground-motion hazard. The network capability parameters 1) and 2) are estimated at all hypothetic event locations and are presented in the form of maps given a seismic sensor coordinate scenario. In addition, the ray tracing traveltimes permit to estimate the point-spread-functions (PSFs) at the event grid points. PSFs are useful in assessing the resolution and focusing capability of the network for stacking-based event location and imaging methods. We estimate the performance for a hypothetical network case with 11 sensors. We consider the well-documented region around the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) located north of Parkfield, California. The ray tracing is done through a detailed velocity model which covers a 26.2 by 21.2 km wide area around the SAFOD drill site with a resolution of 200 m both for the P-and S-wave velocities. Systematic network capability assessment for different sensor site scenarios prior to installation facilitates finding a final design which meets the survey objectives.

  3. TRACE 3-D documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, K.R.

    1987-08-01

    TRACE 3-D is an interactive beam-dynamics program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined transport system. TRACE 3-D provides an immediate graphics display of the envelopes and the phase-space ellipses and allows nine types of beam-matching options. This report describes the beam-dynamics calculations and gives detailed instruction for using the code. Several examples are described in detail.

  4. Comparing TID simulations using 3-D ray tracing and mirror reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Reinisch, B. W.; Sales, G. S.; Paznukhov, V. V.; Galkin, I. A.

    2016-04-01

    Measuring the time variations of Doppler frequencies and angles of arrival (AoA) of ionospherically reflected HF waves has been proposed as a means of detecting the occurrence of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). Simulations are made using ray tracing through the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) electron density model in an effort to reproduce measured signatures. The TID is represented by a wavelike perturbation of the 3-D electron density traveling horizontally in the ionosphere with an amplitude that varies sinusoidally with time. By judiciously selecting the TID parameters the ray tracing simulation reproduces the observed Doppler frequencies and AoAs. Ray tracing in a 3-D realistic ionosphere is, however, excessively time consuming considering the involved homing procedures. It is shown that a carefully selected reflecting corrugated mirror can reproduce the time variations of the AoA and Doppler frequency. The results from the ray tracing through the IRI model ionosphere and the mirror model reflections are compared to assess the applicability of the mirror-reflection model.

  5. Mapping gray-scale image to 3D surface scanning data by ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Jones, Peter R. M.

    1997-03-01

    The extraction and location of feature points from range imaging is an important but difficult task in machine vision based measurement systems. There exist some feature points which are not able to be detected from pure geometric characteristics, particularly in those measurement tasks related to the human body. The Loughborough Anthropometric Shadow Scanner (LASS) is a whole body surface scanner based on structured light technique. Certain applications of LASS require accurate location of anthropometric landmarks from the scanned data. This is sometimes impossible from existing raw data because some landmarks do not appear in the scanned data. Identification of these landmarks has to resort to surface texture of the scanned object. Modifications to LASS were made to allow gray-scale images to be captured before or after the object was scanned. Two-dimensional gray-scale image must be mapped to the scanned data to acquire the 3D coordinates of a landmark. The method to map 2D images to the scanned data is based on the colinearity conditions and ray-tracing method. If the camera center and image coordinates are known, the corresponding object point must lie on a ray starting from the camera center and connecting to the image coordinate. By intersecting the ray with the scanned surface of the object, the 3D coordinates of a point can be solved. Experimentation has demonstrated the feasibility of the method.

  6. Sensitivity of power and RMS delay spread predictions of a 3D indoor ray tracing model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Yu; Guo, Li-Xin; Li, Chang-Long; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Zhen-Wei

    2016-06-13

    This study investigates the sensitivity of a three-dimensional (3D) indoor ray tracing (RT) model for the use of the uniform theory of diffraction and geometrical optics in radio channel characterizations of indoor environments. Under complex indoor environments, RT-based predictions require detailed and accurate databases of indoor object layouts and the electrical characteristics of such environments. The aim of this study is to assist in selecting the appropriate level of accuracy required in indoor databases to achieve good trade-offs between database costs and prediction accuracy. This study focuses on the effects of errors in indoor environments on prediction results. In studying the effects of inaccuracies in geometry information (indoor object layout) on power coverage prediction, two types of artificial erroneous indoor maps are used. Moreover, a systematic analysis is performed by comparing the predictions with erroneous indoor maps and those with the original indoor map. Subsequently, the influence of random errors on RMS delay spread results is investigated. Given the effect of electrical parameters on the accuracy of the predicted results of the 3D RT model, the relative permittivity and conductivity of different fractions of an indoor environment are set with different values. Five types of computer simulations are considered, and for each type, the received power and RMS delay spread under the same circumstances are simulated with the RT model. PMID:27410335

  7. Ray tracing technique for global 3-D modeling of ionospheric electron density using GNSS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Mohamad Mahdi; Schuh, Harald; Schmidt, Michael

    2015-06-01

    For space geodetic techniques, operating in microwave band, ionosphere is a dispersive medium; thus, signals traveling through this medium are in the first approximation, affected proportional to the inverse of the square of their frequencies. This effect allows gaining information about the parameters of the ionosphere in terms of total electron content (TEC) or the electron density (Ne). Making use of this phenomenon, space geodetic techniques have turned into a capable tool for studying the ionosphere in the last decades. Up to now, two-dimensional (2-D) models of Vertical TEC (VTEC) have been widely developed and used by different communities; however, due to the fact that these models provide information about the integral of the whole electron content along the vertical or slant raypath, these maps are not useful when information about the ionosphere at different altitude is required. This paper presents a recent study which aims at developing a global 3-D model of the electron density, using measurements from Global Navigation Satellite Systems and by applying the ray tracing technique to the upper atmosphere. The developed modeling approach represents the horizontal variations of the electron density, with two sets of spherical harmonic expansions of degree and order 15. The height dependency of the electron density is represented by a multilayered Chapman profile function for the bottomside and topside ionosphere, and an appropriate model for the plasmasphere. In addition to the geodetic applications of the developed models, within this study, the 3-D models of electron density can include geophysical parameters like maximum electron density and its corresponding height. High-resolution modeling of these parameters allows an improved geophysical interpretation, which is essential in all studies of the upper atmosphere, space weather, and for the solar-terrestrial environment.

  8. A new 3-D ray tracing method based on LTI using successive partitioning of cell interfaces and traveltime gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Yan; Hu, Ying; Qin, Qian-Qing

    2013-05-01

    We present a new method of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic ray tracing, based on an improvement to the linear traveltime interpolation (LTI) ray tracing algorithm. This new technique involves two separate steps. The first involves a forward calculation based on the LTI method and the dynamic successive partitioning scheme, which is applied to calculate traveltimes on cell boundaries and assumes a wavefront that expands from the source to all grid nodes in the computational domain. We locate several dynamic successive partition points on a cell's surface, the traveltimes of which can be calculated by linear interpolation between the vertices of the cell's boundary. The second is a backward step that uses Fermat's principle and the fact that the ray path is always perpendicular to the wavefront and follows the negative traveltime gradient. In this process, the first-arriving ray path can be traced from the receiver to the source along the negative traveltime gradient, which can be calculated by reconstructing the continuous traveltime field with cubic B-spline interpolation. This new 3-D ray tracing method is compared with the LTI method and the shortest path method (SPM) through a number of numerical experiments. These comparisons show obvious improvements to computed traveltimes and ray paths, both in precision and computational efficiency.

  9. 3-D TECATE/BREW: Thermal, stress, and birefringent ray-tracing codes for solid-state laser design

    SciTech Connect

    Gelinas, R.J.; Doss, S.K.; Nelson, R.G.

    1994-07-20

    This report describes the physics, code formulations, and numerics that are used in the TECATE (totally Eulerian code for anisotropic thermo-elasticity) and BREW (birefringent ray-tracing of electromagnetic waves) codes for laser design. These codes resolve thermal, stress, and birefringent optical effects in 3-D stationary solid-state systems. This suite of three constituent codes is a package referred to as LASRPAK.

  10. 3-D x-ray mirror metrology with a vertical scanning long trace profiler

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Li, H.; Li, X.; Grindel, M.W.

    1996-09-01

    The long trace profiler (LTP) was originally developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the specific purpose of measuring the surface figure of large cylindrical mirrors used at grazing incidence in synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines. In its original configuration, it could measure only along one line down the center of the cylinder. A single linear profile is often sufficient to gauge the quality of the optical surface on these kinds of mirrors. For some applications it is necessary to measure the topography of the entire surface, not just along one line but over a grid that covers the entire surface area. We have modified a standard LTP to enable measurement of the complete surface of Wolter telescope optics in a vertical configuration. The vertical scanning LTP (VSLTP) is capable of producing a complete 3-D map of the surface topography errors relative to the ideal desired surface on complete segments of paraboloids and hyperboloids. The instrument uses a penta prism assembly to scan the probe beam in the longitudinal direction parallel to the mirror symmetry axis and uses a precision rotary stage to provide scans in the azimuthal direction. A Risley prism pair and a dove prism are used to orient the probe beam in the proper direction for the azimuthal scans. The repeatability of the prototype instrument is better than 20 nm over trace lengths of 35 mm with a slope measurement accuracy of about 1 microradian. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Patellar segmentation from 3D magnetic resonance images using guided recursive ray-tracing for edge pattern detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ruida; Jackson, Jennifer N.; McCreedy, Evan S.; Gandler, William; Eijkenboom, J. J. F. A.; van Middelkoop, M.; McAuliffe, Matthew J.; Sheehan, Frances T.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents an automatic segmentation methodology for the patellar bone, based on 3D gradient recalled echo and gradient recalled echo with fat suppression magnetic resonance images. Constricted search space outlines are incorporated into recursive ray-tracing to segment the outer cortical bone. A statistical analysis based on the dependence of information in adjacent slices is used to limit the search in each image to between an outer and inner search region. A section based recursive ray-tracing mechanism is used to skip inner noise regions and detect the edge boundary. The proposed method achieves higher segmentation accuracy (0.23mm) than the current state-of-the-art methods with the average dice similarity coefficient of 96.0% (SD 1.3%) agreement between the auto-segmentation and ground truth surfaces.

  12. Comparison of a 3-D GPU-Assisted Maxwell Code and Ray Tracing for Reflectometry on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gady, Sarah; Kubota, Shigeyuki; Johnson, Irena

    2015-11-01

    Electromagnetic wave propagation and scattering in magnetized plasmas are important diagnostics for high temperature plasmas. 1-D and 2-D full-wave codes are standard tools for measurements of the electron density profile and fluctuations; however, ray tracing results have shown that beam propagation in tokamak plasmas is inherently a 3-D problem. The GPU-Assisted Maxwell Code utilizes the FDTD (Finite-Difference Time-Domain) method for solving the Maxwell equations with the cold plasma approximation in a 3-D geometry. Parallel processing with GPGPU (General-Purpose computing on Graphics Processing Units) is used to accelerate the computation. Previously, we reported on initial comparisons of the code results to 1-D numerical and analytical solutions, where the size of the computational grid was limited by the on-board memory of the GPU. In the current study, this limitation is overcome by using domain decomposition and an additional GPU. As a practical application, this code is used to study the current design of the ITER Low Field Side Reflectometer (LSFR) for the Equatorial Port Plug 11 (EPP11). A detailed examination of Gaussian beam propagation in the ITER edge plasma will be presented, as well as comparisons with ray tracing. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No.DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FG02-99-ER54527.

  13. Skeleton-based tracing of curved fibers from 3D X-ray microtomographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiang; Wen, Donghui; Zhao, Yanwei; Wang, Qinghui; Zhou, Wei; Deng, Daxiang

    A skeleton-based fiber tracing algorithm is described and applied on a specific fibrous material, porous metal fiber sintered sheet (PMFSS), featuring high porosity and curved fibers. The skeleton segments are firstly categorized according to the connectivity of the skeleton paths. Spurious segments like fiber bonds are detected making extensive use of the distance transform (DT) values. Single fibers are then traced and reconstructed by consecutively choosing the connecting skeleton segment pairs that show the most similar orientations and radius. Moreover, to reduce the misconnection due to the tracing orders, a multilevel tracing strategy is proposed. The fibrous network is finally reconstructed by dilating single fibers according to the DT values. Based on the traced single fibers, various morphology information regarding fiber length, radius, orientation, and tortuosity are quantitatively analyzed and compared with our previous results (Wang et al., 2013). Moreover, the number of bonds per fibers are firstly accessed. The methodology described in this paper can be expanded to other fibrous materials with adapted parameters.

  14. Development and application of a ray-tracing code integrating with 3D equilibrium mapping in LHD ECH experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimura, T., Ii; Kubo, S.; Takahashi, H.; Makino, R.; Seki, R.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Shimozuma, T.; Ida, K.; Suzuki, C.; Emoto, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Moon, C.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Kobayashi, S.; Ito, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Ejiri, A.; Mutoh, T.

    2015-11-01

    The central electron temperature has successfully reached up to 7.5 keV in large helical device (LHD) plasmas with a central high-ion temperature of 5 keV and a central electron density of 1.3× {{10}19} m-3. This result was obtained by heating with a newly-installed 154 GHz gyrotron and also the optimisation of injection geometry in electron cyclotron heating (ECH). The optimisation was carried out by using the ray-tracing code ‘LHDGauss’, which was upgraded to include the rapid post-processing three-dimensional (3D) equilibrium mapping obtained from experiments. For ray-tracing calculations, LHDGauss can automatically read the relevant data registered in the LHD database after a discharge, such as ECH injection settings (e.g. Gaussian beam parameters, target positions, polarisation and ECH power) and Thomson scattering diagnostic data along with the 3D equilibrium mapping data. The equilibrium map of the electron density and temperature profiles are then extrapolated into the region outside the last closed flux surface. Mode purity, or the ratio between the ordinary mode and the extraordinary mode, is obtained by calculating the 1D full-wave equation along the direction of the rays from the antenna to the absorption target point. Using the virtual magnetic flux surfaces, the effects of the modelled density profiles and the magnetic shear at the peripheral region with a given polarisation are taken into account. Power deposition profiles calculated for each Thomson scattering measurement timing are registered in the LHD database. The adjustment of the injection settings for the desired deposition profile from the feedback provided on a shot-by-shot basis resulted in an effective experimental procedure.

  15. Integrated ray tracing simulation of annual variation of spectral bio-signatures from cloud free 3D optical Earth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Dongok; Kim, Sug-Whan; Kim, Dae Wook; Lee, Jae-Min; Lee, Hanshin; Park, Won Hyun; Seong, Sehyun; Ham, Sun-Jeong

    2010-09-01

    Understanding the Earth spectral bio-signatures provides an important reference datum for accurate de-convolution of collapsed spectral signals from potential earth-like planets of other star systems. This study presents a new ray tracing computation method including an improved 3D optical earth model constructed with the coastal line and vegetation distribution data from the Global Ecological Zone (GEZ) map. Using non-Lambertian bidirectional scattering distribution function (BSDF) models, the input earth surface model is characterized with three different scattering properties and their annual variations depending on monthly changes in vegetation distribution, sea ice coverage and illumination angle. The input atmosphere model consists of one layer with Rayleigh scattering model from the sea level to 100 km in altitude and its radiative transfer characteristics is computed for four seasons using the SMART codes. The ocean scattering model is a combination of sun-glint scattering and Lambertian scattering models. The land surface scattering is defined with the semi empirical parametric kernel method used for MODIS and POLDER missions. These three component models were integrated into the final Earth model that was then incorporated into the in-house built integrated ray tracing (IRT) model capable of computing both spectral imaging and radiative transfer performance of a hypothetical space instrument as it observes the Earth from its designated orbit. The IRT model simulation inputs include variation in earth orientation, illuminated phases, and seasonal sea ice and vegetation distribution. The trial simulation runs result in the annual variations in phase dependent disk averaged spectra (DAS) and its associated bio-signatures such as NDVI. The full computational details are presented together with the resulting annual variation in DAS and its associated bio-signatures.

  16. Improved robustness study of a shock ignited target, with DUED code including non-local electron transport and 3D laser ray-tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atzeni, Stefano; Marocchino, Alberto; Schiavi, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    Accurate descriptions of laser power coupling to the plasma and electron energy transport are crucial for designing shock-ignition targets and assessing their robustness (in particular with regard to laser and positioning errors). To this purpose, the 2D DUED laser fusion code has been improved with the inclusion of a 3D laser ray-tracing scheme and a model for non-local electron transport. 2D simulations with the upgraded code are presented; the dependence of the fusion yield vs target displacement is studied. Two different irradiation configurations are considered.

  17. Ray tracing of multiple transmitted/reflected/converted waves in 2-D/3-D layered anisotropic TTI media and application to crosswell traveltime tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chao-Ying; Huang, Guo-Jiao; Li, Xiao-Ling; Zhou, Bing; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2013-11-01

    To overcome the deficiency of some current grid-/cell-based ray tracing algorithms, which are only able to handle first arrivals or primary reflections (or conversions) in anisotropic media, we have extended the functionality of the multistage irregular shortest-path method to 2-D/3-D tilted transversely isotropic (TTI) media. The new approach is able to track multiple transmitted/reflected/converted arrivals composed of any kind of combinations of transmissions, reflections and mode conversions. The basic principle is that the seven parameters (five elastic parameters plus two polar angles defining the tilt of the symmetry axis) of the TTI media are sampled at primary nodes, and the group velocity values at secondary nodes are obtained by tri-linear interpolation of the primary nodes across each cell, from which the group velocities of the three wave modes (qP, qSV and qSH) are calculated. Finally, we conduct grid-/cell-based wave front expansion to trace multiple transmitted/reflected/converted arrivals from one region to the next. The results of calculations in uniform anisotropic media indicate that the numerical results agree with the analytical solutions except in directions of SV-wave triplications, at which only the lowest velocity value is selected at the singularity points by the multistage irregular shortest-path anisotropic ray tracing method. This verifies the accuracy of the methodology. Several simulation results show that the new method is able to efficiently and accurately approximate situations involving continuous velocity variations and undulating discontinuities, and that it is suitable for any combination of multiple transmitted/reflected/converted arrival tracking in TTI media of arbitrary strength and tilt. Crosshole synthetic traveltime tomographic tests have been performed, which highlight the importance of using such code when the medium is distinctly anisotropic.

  18. Ray Tracing in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majewski, Mirek

    1997-01-01

    Ray tracing is a method that allows the creation of photo-realistic images on a computer. This article describes a shareware ray tracing program called PovRay and includes some ideas on how PovRay can be used in teaching and in 3-D geometry, physics, and other high school and university subjects. (Author/AIM)

  19. Anisotropic ray trace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Wai Sze Tiffany

    Optical components made of anisotropic materials, such as crystal polarizers and crystal waveplates, are widely used in many complex optical system, such as display systems, microlithography, biomedical imaging and many other optical systems, and induce more complex aberrations than optical components made of isotropic materials. The goal of this dissertation is to accurately simulate the performance of optical systems with anisotropic materials using polarization ray trace. This work extends the polarization ray tracing calculus to incorporate ray tracing through anisotropic materials, including uniaxial, biaxial and optically active materials. The 3D polarization ray tracing calculus is an invaluable tool for analyzing polarization properties of an optical system. The 3x3 polarization ray tracing P matrix developed for anisotropic ray trace assists tracking the 3D polarization transformations along a ray path with series of surfaces in an optical system. To better represent the anisotropic light-matter interactions, the definition of the P matrix is generalized to incorporate not only the polarization change at a refraction/reflection interface, but also the induced optical phase accumulation as light propagates through the anisotropic medium. This enables realistic modeling of crystalline polarization elements, such as crystal waveplates and crystal polarizers. The wavefront and polarization aberrations of these anisotropic components are more complex than those of isotropic optical components and can be evaluated from the resultant P matrix for each eigen-wavefront as well as for the overall image. One incident ray refracting or reflecting into an anisotropic medium produces two eigenpolarizations or eigenmodes propagating in different directions. The associated ray parameters of these modes necessary for the anisotropic ray trace are described in Chapter 2. The algorithms to calculate the P matrix from these ray parameters are described in Chapter 3 for

  20. Thin Lens Ray Tracing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatland, Ian R.

    2002-01-01

    Proposes a ray tracing approach to thin lens analysis based on a vector form of Snell's law for paraxial rays as an alternative to the usual approach in introductory physics courses. The ray tracing approach accommodates skew rays and thus provides a complete analysis. (Author/KHR)

  1. Computer ray tracing speeds.

    PubMed

    Robb, P; Pawlowski, B

    1990-05-01

    The results of measuring the ray trace speed and compilation speed of thirty-nine computers in fifty-seven configurations, ranging from personal computers to super computers, are described. A correlation of ray trace speed has been made with the LINPACK benchmark which allows the ray trace speed to be estimated using LINPACK performance data. The results indicate that the latest generation of workstations, using CPUs based on RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) technology, are as fast or faster than mainframe computers in compute-bound situations. PMID:20563112

  2. New 3D Bolton standards: coregistration of biplane x rays and 3D CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, David; Subramanyan, Krishna; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    1997-04-01

    The Bolton Standards 'normative' cohort (16 males, 16 females) have been invited back to the Bolton-Brush Growth Study Center for new biorthogonal plain film head x-rays and 3D (three dimensional) head CT-scans. A set of 29 3D landmarks were identified on both their biplane head film and 3D CT images. The current 3D CT image is then superimposed onto the landmarks collected from the current biplane head films. Three post-doctoral fellows have collected 37 3D landmarks from the Bolton Standards' 40 - 70 year old biplane head films. These films were captured annually during their growing period (ages 3 - 18). Using 29 of these landmarks the current 3D CT image is next warped (via thin plate spline) to landmarks taken from each participant's 18th year biplane head films, a process that is successively reiterated back to age 3. This process is demonstrated here for one of the Bolton Standards. The outer skull surfaces will be extracted from each warped 3D CT image and an average will be generated for each age/sex group. The resulting longitudinal series of average 'normative' boney skull surface images may be useful for craniofacial patient: diagnosis, treatment planning, stereotactic procedures, and outcomes assessment.

  3. Systematic error analysis for 3D nanoprofiler tracing normal vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Ryota; Tokuta, Yusuke; Nakano, Motohiro; Yamamura, Kazuya; Endo, Katsuyoshi

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, demand for an optical element having a high degree of freedom shape is increased. High-precision aspherical shape is required for the X-ray focusing mirror etc. For the head-mounted display etc., optical element of the free-form surface is used. For such an optical device fabrication, measurement technology is essential. We have developed a high- precision 3D nanoprofiler. By nanoprofiler, the normal vector information of the sample surface is obtained on the basis of the linearity of light. Normal vector information is differential value of the shape, it is possible to determine the shape by integrating. Repeatability of sub-nanometer has been achieved by nanoprofiler. To pursue the accuracy of shapes, systematic error is analyzed. The systematic errors are figure error of sample and assembly errors of the device. This method utilizes the information of the ideal shape of the sample, and the measurement point coordinates and normal vectors are calculated. However, measured figure is not the ideal shape by the effect of systematic errors. Therefore, the measurement point coordinate and the normal vector is calculated again by feeding back the measured figure. Correction of errors have been attempted by figure re-derivation. It was confirmed theoretically effectiveness by simulation. This approach also applies to the experiment, it was confirmed the possibility of about 4 nm PV figure correction in the employed sample.

  4. 3D positioning germanium detectors for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coburn, Wayne; Amrose, Susan; Boggs, Steven E.; Lin, Robert P.; Amman, Mark S.; Burks, Morgan T.; Hull, Ethan L.; Luke, Paul N.; Madden, Norman W.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed germanium detector technologies for use in the Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) - a balloon-borne soft γ-ray (0.2-10 MeV) telescope to study astrophysical sources of nuclear line emission and polarization. The heart of NCT is an array of twelve large volume cross strip germanium detectors, designed to provide 3-D positions for each photon interaction with ~1mm resolution while maintaining the high spectral resolution of germanium. Here we discuss the detailed performance of our prototype 19x19 strip detector, including laboratory tests, calibrations, and numerical simulations. In addition to the x and y positions provided by the orthogonal strips, the interaction depth (z-position) in the detector is measured using the relative timing of the anode and cathode charge collection signals. We describe laboratory calibrations of the depth discrimination using collimated sources with different characteristic energies, and compare the measurements to detailed Monte Carlo simulations and charge collection routines tracing electron-hole pairs from the interaction site to the electrodes. We have also investigated the effects of charge sharing and loss between electrodes, and present these in comparison to charge collection simulations. Detailed analysis of strip-to-strip uniformity in both efficiency and spectral resolution are also presented.

  5. Reverse ray tracing for transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chia-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2015-06-29

    Ray tracing is an important technique for predicting optical system performance. In the field of transformation optics, the Hamiltonian equations of motion for ray tracing are well known. The numerical solutions to the Hamiltonian equations of motion are affected by the complexities of the inhomogeneous and anisotropic indices of the optical device. Based on our knowledge, no previous work has been conducted on ray tracing for transformation optics with extreme inhomogeneity and anisotropicity. In this study, we present the use of 3D reverse ray tracing in transformation optics. The reverse ray tracing is derived from Fermat's principle based on a sweeping method instead of finding the full solution to ordinary differential equations. The sweeping method is employed to obtain the eikonal function. The wave vectors are then obtained from the gradient of that eikonal function map in the transformed space to acquire the illuminance. Because only the rays in the points of interest have to be traced, the reverse ray tracing provides an efficient approach to investigate the illuminance of a system. This approach is useful in any form of transformation optics where the material property tensor is a symmetric positive definite matrix. The performance and analysis of three transformation optics with inhomogeneous and anisotropic indices are explored. The ray trajectories and illuminances in these demonstration cases are successfully solved by the proposed reverse ray tracing method. PMID:26191770

  6. Ray Tracing with Virtual Objects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leinoff, Stuart

    1991-01-01

    Introduces the method of ray tracing to analyze the refraction or reflection of real or virtual images from multiple optical devices. Discusses ray-tracing techniques for locating images using convex and concave lenses or mirrors. (MDH)

  7. Nonlinear ray tracing for vessel enhanced visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Feng; Hong, Wei

    2012-02-01

    3D visualization of angiography data is an important preprocessing step in diagnosis of vascular disease. This paper describes an efficient volume rendering method to emphasize feature-rich region (or focus) in the 3D angiography data. The method takes the input 3D angiography data and computes the focus with user specification or certain feature extraction algorithms. Then, a distance map is constructed based on the description of the focused region(s). While rendering the 3D angiography data, the nonlinear ray tracing method is used and the gradient of the distance volume is applied to guide ray marching. In the result image, the focused region(s) appears larger than in the normal ray-casting image, while the context (other regions of the volume) can be still preserved in the image (maybe displayed in a shrink size). This method avoids deforming the original volume to magnify focus regions, which is expensive to compute, thus improves the performance.

  8. 3D synchrotron x-ray microtomography of paint samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Ester S. B.; Boon, Jaap J.; van der Horst, Jerre; Scherrer, Nadim C.; Marone, Federica; Stampanoni, Marco

    2009-07-01

    Synchrotron based X-ray microtomography is a novel way to examine paint samples. The three dimensional distribution of pigment particles, binding media and their deterioration products as well as other features such as voids, are made visible in their original context through a computing environment without the need of physical sectioning. This avoids manipulation related artefacts. Experiments on paint chips (approximately 500 micron wide) were done on the TOMCAT beam line (TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs) at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, CH, using an x-ray energy of up to 40 keV. The x-ray absorption images are obtained at a resolution of 350 nm. The 3D dataset was analysed using the commercial 3D imaging software Avizo 5.1. Through this process, virtual sections of the paint sample can be obtained in any orientation. One of the topics currently under research are the ground layers of paintings by Cuno Amiet (1868- 1961), one of the most important Swiss painters of classical modernism, whose early work is currently the focus of research at the Swiss Institute for Art Research (SIK-ISEA). This technique gives access to information such as sample surface morphology, porosity, particle size distribution and even particle identification. In the case of calcium carbonate grounds for example, features like microfossils present in natural chalks, can be reconstructed and their species identified, thus potentially providing information towards the mineral origin. One further elegant feature of this technique is that a target section can be selected within the 3D data set, before exposing it to obtain chemical data. Virtual sections can then be compared with cross sections of the same samples made in the traditional way.

  9. Towards magnetic 3D x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Peter; Streubel, R.; Im, M.-Y.; Parkinson, D.; Hong, J.-I.; Schmidt, O. G.; Makarov, D.

    2014-03-01

    Mesoscale phenomena in magnetism will add essential parameters to improve speed, size and energy efficiency of spin driven devices. Multidimensional visualization techniques will be crucial to achieve mesoscience goals. Magnetic tomography is of large interest to understand e.g. interfaces in magnetic multilayers, the inner structure of magnetic nanocrystals, nanowires or the functionality of artificial 3D magnetic nanostructures. We have developed tomographic capabilities with magnetic full-field soft X-ray microscopy combining X-MCD as element specific magnetic contrast mechanism, high spatial and temporal resolution due to the Fresnel zone plate optics. At beamline 6.1.2 at the ALS (Berkeley CA) a new rotation stage allows recording an angular series (up to 360 deg) of high precision 2D projection images. Applying state-of-the-art reconstruction algorithms it is possible to retrieve the full 3D structure. We will present results on prototypic rolled-up Ni and Co/Pt tubes and glass capillaries coated with magnetic films and compare to other 3D imaging approaches e.g. in electron microscopy. Supported by BES MSD DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05-CH11231 and ERC under the EU FP7 program (grant agreement No. 306277).

  10. A new method for automated discontinuity trace mapping on rock mass 3D surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojun; Chen, Jianqin; Zhu, Hehua

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an automated discontinuity trace mapping method on a 3D surface model of rock mass. Feature points of discontinuity traces are first detected using the Normal Tensor Voting Theory, which is robust to noisy point cloud data. Discontinuity traces are then extracted from feature points in four steps: (1) trace feature point grouping, (2) trace segment growth, (3) trace segment connection, and (4) redundant trace segment removal. A sensitivity analysis is conducted to identify optimal values for the parameters used in the proposed method. The optimal triangular mesh element size is between 5 cm and 6 cm; the angle threshold in the trace segment growth step is between 70° and 90°; the angle threshold in the trace segment connection step is between 50° and 70°, and the distance threshold should be at least 15 times the mean triangular mesh element size. The method is applied to the excavation face trace mapping of a drill-and-blast tunnel. The results show that the proposed discontinuity trace mapping method is fast and effective and could be used as a supplement to traditional direct measurement of discontinuity traces.

  11. 3D X-Ray Luggage-Screening System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) x-ray luggage- screening system has been proposed to reduce the fatigue experienced by human inspectors and increase their ability to detect weapons and other contraband. The system and variants thereof could supplant thousands of xray scanners now in use at hundreds of airports in the United States and other countries. The device would be applicable to any security checkpoint application where current two-dimensional scanners are in use. A conventional x-ray luggage scanner generates a single two-dimensional (2D) image that conveys no depth information. Therefore, a human inspector must scrutinize the image in an effort to understand ambiguous-appearing objects as they pass by at high speed on a conveyor belt. Such a high level of concentration can induce fatigue, causing the inspector to reduce concentration and vigilance. In addition, because of the lack of depth information, contraband objects could be made more difficult to detect by positioning them near other objects so as to create x-ray images that confuse inspectors. The proposed system would make it unnecessary for a human inspector to interpret 2D images, which show objects at different depths as superimposed. Instead, the system would take advantage of the natural human ability to infer 3D information from stereographic or stereoscopic images. The inspector would be able to perceive two objects at different depths, in a more nearly natural manner, as distinct 3D objects lying at different depths. Hence, the inspector could recognize objects with greater accuracy and less effort. The major components of the proposed system would be similar to those of x-ray luggage scanners now in use. As in a conventional x-ray scanner, there would be an x-ray source. Unlike in a conventional scanner, there would be two x-ray image sensors, denoted the left and right sensors, located at positions along the conveyor that are upstream and downstream, respectively (see figure). X-ray illumination

  12. A three-dimensional ray-tracing code dedicated to x-ray laser amplification simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temporal, M.; Jacquemot, S.; Bonnet, L.; Decoster, A.

    2001-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) ray-tracing code has been developed to simulate the x-ray intensity produced in recent experiments where a silver target was driven by two laser beams. The code is used as a postprocessor of a detailed atomic physics code, which provides emissivities and opacities for inverted transitions. The hydrodynamics of the plasma is calculated with a 1D1/2 hydrocode where transverse profiles of temperature and density follow a self-similar solution. The 3D ray-tracing code accounts for progressive target illumination and calculates the x-ray laser output by solving the eikonal equation. Once 3D paths are determined, a steady-state transport solution is used to calculate the output intensity. The ray-tracing package is discussed first, then the present 3D results are compared with 2D calculations, as well as with collected experimental data.

  13. X-ray stereo imaging for micro 3D motions within non-transparent objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salih, Wasil H. M.; Buytaert, Jan A. N.; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2012-03-01

    We propose a new technique to measure the 3D motion of marker points along a straight path within an object using x-ray stereo projections. From recordings of two x-ray projections with 90° separation angle, the 3D coordinates of marker points can be determined. By synchronizing the x-ray exposure time to the motion event, a moving marker leaves a trace in the image of which the gray scale is linearly proportional to the marker velocity. From the gray scale along the motion path, the 3D motion (velocity) is obtained. The path of motion was reconstructed and compared with the applied waveform. The results showed that the accuracy is in order of 5%. The difference of displacement amplitude between the new method and laser vibrometry was less than 5μm. We demonstrated the method on the malleus ossicle motion in the gerbil middle ear as a function of pressure applied on the eardrum. The new method has the advantage over existing methods such as laser vibrometry that the structures under study do not need to be visually exposed. Due to the short measurement time and the high resolution, the method can be useful in the field of biomechanics for a variety of applications.

  14. Linearized ray-trace analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, David C.; Breckenridge, William G.

    1990-01-01

    A new, coordinate-free version of the exact ray-trace equations for optical systems consisting of conic reflecting, refracting and reference surfaces is presented. These equations are differentiated to obtain closed-form optical sensitivity dyadics. For computation, the sensitivities are evaluated in a single global coordinate frame and combined in linearized ray-trace matrix difference equations that propagate the rays and the sensitivities from element to element. One purpose of this analysis is to create optical models that can be directly integrated with models of the instrument structure and control systems for dynamic simulation.

  15. A Self-Consistent Beam Loaded Travelling Wave Accelerator Model for use in TRACE-3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampel, M. C.

    1997-05-01

    An optics model of a constant gradient traveling wave (CGTW) accelerator structure has been implemented for TRACE-3D. TRACE-3D is an envelope code including space charge that is used to model bunched beams in magnetic transport systems and radio frequency (rf) accelerators when the effects of beam current might be significant. The new matrix model has been developed to allow incorporation of particle beam loading (current) effects on the accelerator gradient and the accelerator structure's beam focusing properties in a self-consistent manner. The beam loaded electric field for a CGTW accelerator structure is constant for only a particular design current (e.g., 0 current), otherwise it can be written as a function of accelerator attenuation and axial position along the structure. The variation of the electric field through the structure has been taken into account in the new model. CGTW structures differ substantially in focusing properties and beam loading properties from standing wave structures. Examples will be presented using the new TW model, propagating electron beams with different currents through the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's 3 m structure. The results will be compared to the zero current TW structure model in TRANSPORT and the Tank model (a standing wave structure model) in TRACE-3D. A computer demonstration of the code with the new element will also be presented.

  16. TReMAP: Automatic 3D Neuron Reconstruction Based on Tracing, Reverse Mapping and Assembling of 2D Projections.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Long, Brian; Peng, Hanchuan

    2016-01-01

    Efficient and accurate digital reconstruction of neurons from large-scale 3D microscopic images remains a challenge in neuroscience. We propose a new automatic 3D neuron reconstruction algorithm, TReMAP, which utilizes 3D Virtual Finger (a reverse-mapping technique) to detect 3D neuron structures based on tracing results on 2D projection planes. Our fully automatic tracing strategy achieves close performance with the state-of-the-art neuron tracing algorithms, with the crucial advantage of efficient computation (much less memory consumption and parallel computation) for large-scale images. PMID:26306866

  17. Photon counting x-ray CT with 3D holograms by CdTe line sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, A.; Yomori, M.; Morii, H.; Neo, Y.; Aoki, T.; Mimura, H.

    2008-08-01

    The novel 3-D display system is required in the medical treatment field and non-destructive testing field. In these field, the X-ray CT system is used for obtaining 3-D information. However, there are no meaningful 3-D information in X-ray CT data, and there are also no practical 3-D display system. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an X-ray 3-D CT display system by combining a photon-counting X-ray CT system and a holographic image display system. The advantage of this system was demonstrated by comparing the holographic calculation time and recognizability of a reconstructed image.

  18. 3D X-ray tomography to evaluate volumetric objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Luís. F.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; de Jesus, Edgar F. O.; Braz, Delson

    2003-06-01

    The 3D-CT and stereological techniques are used concomitantly. The quantitative stereology yields measurements that reflects areas, volumes, lengths, rates and frequencies of the test body. Two others quantification, connectivity and anisotropy, can be used as well to complete the analysis. In this paper, it is presented the application of 3D-CT and the stereological quantification to analyze a special kind of test body: ceramic filters which have an internal structure similar to cancellous bone. The stereology is adapted to work with the 3D nature of the tomographic data. It is presented too the results of connectivity and anisotropy.

  19. Special relativistic visualization by local ray tracing.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas; Grottel, Sebastian; Weiskopf, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Special relativistic visualization offers the possibility of experiencing the optical effects of traveling near the speed of light, including apparent geometric distortions as well as Doppler and searchlight effects. Early high-quality computer graphics images of relativistic scenes were created using offline, computationally expensive CPU-side 4D ray tracing. Alternate approaches such as image-based rendering and polygon-distortion methods are able to achieve interactivity, but exhibit inferior visual quality due to sampling artifacts. In this paper, we introduce a hybrid rendering technique based on polygon distortion and local ray tracing that facilitates interactive high-quality visualization of multiple objects moving at relativistic speeds in arbitrary directions. The method starts by calculating tight image-space footprints for the apparent triangles of the 3D scene objects. The final image is generated using a single image-space ray tracing step incorporating Doppler and searchlight effects. Our implementation uses GPU shader programming and hardware texture filtering to achieve high rendering speed. PMID:20975164

  20. Fully 3D-Printed Preconcentrator for Selective Extraction of Trace Elements in Seawater.

    PubMed

    Su, Cheng-Kuan; Peng, Pei-Jin; Sun, Yuh-Chang

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we used a stereolithographic 3D printing technique and polyacrylate polymers to manufacture a solid phase extraction preconcentrator for the selective extraction of trace elements and the removal of unwanted salt matrices, enabling accurate and rapid analyses of trace elements in seawater samples when combined with a quadrupole-based inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. To maximize the extraction efficiency, we evaluated the effect of filling the extraction channel with ordered cuboids to improve liquid mixing. Upon automation of the system and optimization of the method, the device allowed highly sensitive and interference-free determination of Mn, Ni, Zn, Cu, Cd, and Pb, with detection limits comparable with those of most conventional methods. The system's analytical reliability was further confirmed through analyses of reference materials and spike analyses of real seawater samples. This study suggests that 3D printing can be a powerful tool for building multilayer fluidic manipulation devices, simplifying the construction of complex experimental components, and facilitating the operation of sophisticated analytical procedures for most sample pretreatment applications. PMID:26101898

  1. 3D registration through pseudo x-ray image generation.

    PubMed

    Domergue, G; Viant, W J

    2000-01-01

    One of the less effective processes within current Computer Assisted Surgery systems, utilizing pre-operative planning, is the registration of the plan with the intra-operative position of the patient. The technique described in this paper requires no digitisation of anatomical features or fiducial markers but instead relies on image matching between pseudo and real x-ray images generated by a virtual and a real image intensifier respectively. The technique is an extension to the work undertaken by Weese [1]. PMID:10977585

  2. 3D registration through pseudo x-ray image generation.

    PubMed

    Viant, W J; Barnel, F

    2001-01-01

    Registration of a pre operative plan with the intra operative position of the patient is still a largely unsolved problem. Current techniques generally require fiducials, either artificial or anatomic, to achieve the registration solution. Invariably these fiducials require implantation and/or direct digitisation. The technique described in this paper requires no digitisation or implantation of fiducials, but instead relies on the shape and form of the anatomy through a fully automated image comparison process. A pseudo image, generated from a virtual image intensifier's view of a CT dataset, is intra operatively compared with a real x-ray image. The principle is to align the virtual with the real image intensifier. The technique is an extension to the work undertaken by Domergue [1] and based on original ideas by Weese [4]. PMID:11317805

  3. Evaluation of a new method for stenosis quantification from 3D x-ray angiography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betting, Fabienne; Moris, Gilles; Knoplioch, Jerome; Trousset, Yves L.; Sureda, Francisco; Launay, Laurent

    2001-05-01

    A new method for stenosis quantification from 3D X-ray angiography images has been evaluated on both phantom and clinical data. On phantoms, for the parts larger or equal to 3 mm, the standard deviation of the measurement error has always found to be less or equal to 0.4 mm, and the maximum measurement error less than 0.17 mm. No clear relationship has been observed between the performances of the quantification method and the acquisition FoV. On clinical data, the 3D quantification method proved to be more robust to vessel bifurcations than its 3D equivalent. On a total of 15 clinical cases, the differences between 2D and 3D quantification were always less than 0.7 mm. The conclusion is that stenosis quantification from 3D X-4ay angiography images is an attractive alternative to quantification from 2D X-ray images.

  4. 3D Reconstruction from X-ray Fluoroscopy for Clinical Veterinary Medicine using Differential Volume Rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khongsomboon, Khamphong; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Shozo

    3D reconstruction from ordinary X-ray equipment which is not CT or MRI is required in clinical veterinary medicine. Authors have already proposed a 3D reconstruction technique from X-ray photograph to present bone structure. Although the reconstruction is useful for veterinary medicine, the thechnique has two problems. One is about exposure of X-ray and the other is about data acquisition process. An x-ray equipment which is not special one but can solve the problems is X-ray fluoroscopy. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a method for 3D-reconstruction from X-ray fluoroscopy for clinical veterinary medicine. Fluoroscopy is usually used to observe a movement of organ or to identify a position of organ for surgery by weak X-ray intensity. Since fluoroscopy can output a observed result as movie, the previous two problems which are caused by use of X-ray photograph can be solved. However, a new problem arises due to weak X-ray intensity. Although fluoroscopy can present information of not only bone structure but soft tissues, the contrast is very low and it is very difficult to recognize some soft tissues. It is very useful to be able to observe not only bone structure but soft tissues clearly by ordinary X-ray equipment in the field of clinical veterinary medicine. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a new method to determine opacity in volume rendering process. The opacity is determined according to 3D differential coefficient of 3D reconstruction. This differential volume rendering can present a 3D structure image of multiple organs volumetrically and clearly for clinical veterinary medicine. This paper shows results of simulation and experimental investigation of small dog and evaluation by veterinarians.

  5. Real ray tracing in anisotropic viscoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavryčuk, Václav

    2008-11-01

    Ray tracing equations applicable to smoothly inhomogeneous anisotropic viscoelastic media are derived. The equations produce real rays, in contrast to previous ray-theoretical approaches, which deal with complex rays. The real rays are defined as the solutions of the Hamilton equations, with the Hamiltonian modified for viscoelastic media, and physically correspond to trajectories of high-frequency waves characterized by a real stationary phase. As a consequence, the complex eikonal equation is satisfied only approximately. The ray tracing equations are valid for weakly and moderately attenuating media. The rays are frequency-dependent and must be calculated for each frequency, separately. Solving the ray tracing equations in viscoelastic anisotropy is more time consuming than in elastic anisotropy. The main difficulty is with determining the stationary slowness vector, which is generally complex-valued and inhomogeneous and must be computed at each time step of the ray tracing procedure. In viscoelastic isotropy, the ray tracing equations considerably simplify, because the stationary slowness vector is homogeneous. The computational time for tracing rays in isotropic elastic and viscoelastic media is the same. Using numerical examples, it is shown that ray fields in weakly attenuating media (Q higher than about 30) are almost indistinguishable from those in elastic media. For moderately attenuating anisotropic media (Q between 5-20), the differences in ray fields can be visible and significant.

  6. 3D ablation catheter localisation using individual C-arm x-ray projections.

    PubMed

    Haase, C; Schäfer, D; Dössel, O; Grass, M

    2014-11-21

    Cardiac ablation procedures during electrophysiology interventions are performed under x-ray guidance with a C-arm imaging system. Some procedures require catheter navigation in complex anatomies like the left atrium. Navigation aids like 3D road maps and external tracking systems may be used to facilitate catheter navigation. As an alternative to external tracking a fully automatic method is presented here that enables the calculation of the 3D location of the ablation catheter from individual 2D x-ray projections. The method registers a high resolution, deformable 3D attenuation model of the catheter to a 2D x-ray projection. The 3D localization is based on the divergent beam projection of the catheter. On an individual projection, the catheter tip is detected in 2D by image filtering and a template matching method. The deformable 3D catheter model is adapted using the projection geometry provided by the C-arm system and 2D similarity measures for an accurate 2D/3D registration. Prior to the tracking and registration procedure, the deformable 3D attenuation model is automatically extracted from a separate 3D cone beam CT reconstruction of the device. The method can hence be applied to various cardiac ablation catheters. In a simulation study of a virtual ablation procedure with realistic background, noise, scatter and motion blur an average 3D registration accuracy of 3.8 mm is reached for the catheter tip. In this study four different types of ablation catheters were used. Experiments using measured C-arm fluoroscopy projections of a catheter in a RSD phantom deliver an average 3D accuracy of 4.5 mm. PMID:25350552

  7. 3D ablation catheter localisation using individual C-arm x-ray projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, C.; Schäfer, D.; Dössel, O.; Grass, M.

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac ablation procedures during electrophysiology interventions are performed under x-ray guidance with a C-arm imaging system. Some procedures require catheter navigation in complex anatomies like the left atrium. Navigation aids like 3D road maps and external tracking systems may be used to facilitate catheter navigation. As an alternative to external tracking a fully automatic method is presented here that enables the calculation of the 3D location of the ablation catheter from individual 2D x-ray projections. The method registers a high resolution, deformable 3D attenuation model of the catheter to a 2D x-ray projection. The 3D localization is based on the divergent beam projection of the catheter. On an individual projection, the catheter tip is detected in 2D by image filtering and a template matching method. The deformable 3D catheter model is adapted using the projection geometry provided by the C-arm system and 2D similarity measures for an accurate 2D/3D registration. Prior to the tracking and registration procedure, the deformable 3D attenuation model is automatically extracted from a separate 3D cone beam CT reconstruction of the device. The method can hence be applied to various cardiac ablation catheters. In a simulation study of a virtual ablation procedure with realistic background, noise, scatter and motion blur an average 3D registration accuracy of 3.8 mm is reached for the catheter tip. In this study four different types of ablation catheters were used. Experiments using measured C-arm fluoroscopy projections of a catheter in a RSD phantom deliver an average 3D accuracy of 4.5 mm.

  8. Gamma/x-ray linear pushbroom stereo for 3D cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhigang; Hu, Yu-Chi

    2006-05-01

    For evaluating the contents of trucks, containers, cargo, and passenger vehicles by a non-intrusive gamma-ray or X-ray imaging system to determine the possible presence of contraband, three-dimensional (3D) measurements could provide more information than 2D measurements. In this paper, a linear pushbroom scanning model is built for such a commonly used gamma-ray or x-ray cargo inspection system. Accurate 3D measurements of the objects inside a cargo can be obtained by using two such scanning systems with different scanning angles to construct a pushbroom stereo system. A simple but robust calibration method is proposed to find the important parameters of the linear pushbroom sensors. Then, a fast and automated stereo matching algorithm based on free-form deformable registration is developed to obtain 3D measurements of the objects under inspection. A user interface is designed for 3D visualization of the objects in interests. Experimental results of sensor calibration, stereo matching, 3D measurements and visualization of a 3D cargo container and the objects inside, are presented.

  9. Validation of Ray Tracing Code Refraction Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Stephanie L.; McAninch, Gerry L.; Smith, Charles D.; Conner, David A.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's current predictive capabilities using the ray tracing program (RTP) are validated using helicopter noise data taken at Eglin Air Force Base in 2007. By including refractive propagation effects due to wind and temperature, the ray tracing code is able to explain large variations in the data observed during the flight test.

  10. 2D and 3D X-Ray Structural Microscopy Using Submicron-Resolution Laue Microdiffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Budai, John D.; Yang, Wenge; Larson, Bennett C.; Tischler, Jonathan Z.; Liu, Wenjun; Ice, Gene E.

    2010-11-10

    We have developed a scanning, polychromatic x-ray microscopy technique with submicron spatial resolution at the Advanced Photon Source. In this technique, white undulator radiation is focused to submicron diameter using elliptical mirrors. Laue diffraction patterns scattered from the sample are collected with an area detector and then analyzed to obtain the local crystal structure, lattice orientation, and strain tensor. These new microdiffraction capabilities have enabled both 2D and 3D structural studies of materials on mesoscopic length-scales of tenths-to-hundreds of microns. For thin samples such as deposited films, 2D structural maps are obtained by step-scanning the area of interest. For example, 2D x-ray microscopy has been applied in studies of the epitaxial growth of oxide films. For bulk samples, a 3D differential-aperture x-ray microscopy technique has been developed that yields the full diffraction information from each submicron volume element. The capabilities of 3D x-ray microscopy are demonstrated here with measurements of grain orientations and grain boundary motion in polycrystalline aluminum during 3D thermal grain growth. X-ray microscopy provides the needed, direct link between the experimentally measured 3D microstructural evolution and the results of theory and modeling of materials processes on mesoscopic length scales.

  11. Symplectic ray-tracing: a new approach for nonlinear ray tracings by Hamiltonian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Tetsu R.

    2003-05-01

    This paper describes a method of symplectic ray tracing for calculating the flows of non-linear dynamical systems. Symplectic ray tracing method traces the path of photons moving along the orbit calculated by using Hamilton's canonical equation. Using this method, we can simulate non-linear dynamical systems with various dimensions, accurate calculation, and quick implementation of scientif visualization system. This paper also demonstrates some visualization results of non-linear dynamical systems computed by using symplectic ray tracing method.

  12. Digitized crime scene forensics: automated trace separation of toolmarks on high-resolution 2D/3D CLSM surface data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausing, Eric; Vielhauer, Claus

    2015-03-01

    Locksmith forensics is an important and very challenging part of classic crime scene forensics. In prior work, we propose a partial transfer to the digital domain, to effectively support forensic experts and present approaches for a full process chain consisting of five steps: Trace positioning, 2D/3D acquisition with a confocal 3D laser scanning microscope, detection by segmentation, trace type determination, and determination of the opening method. In particular the step of trace segmentation on high-resolution 3D surfaces thereby turned out to be the part most difficult to implement. The reason for that is the highly structured and complex surfaces to be analyzed. These surfaces are cluttered with a high number of toolmarks, which overlap and distort each other. In Clausing et al., we present an improved approach for a reliable segmentation of relevant trace regions but without the possibility of separating single traces out of segmented trace regions. However, in our past research, especially features based on shape and dimension turned out to be highly relevant for a fully automated analysis and interpretation. In this paper, we consequently propose an approach for this separation. To achieve this goal, we use our segmentation approach and expand it with a combination of the watershed algorithm with a graph-based analysis. Found sub-regions are compared based on their surface character and are connected or divided depending on their similarity. We evaluate our approach with a test set of about 1,300 single traces on the exemplary locking cylinder component 'key pin' and thereby are able of showing the high suitability of our approach.

  13. GammaModeler TM 3-D gamma-ray imaging technology

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-01

    The 3-D GammaModeler{trademark} system was used to survey a portion of the facility and provide 3-D visual and radiation representation of contaminated equipment located within the facility. The 3-D GammaModeler{trademark} system software was used to deconvolve extended sources into a series of point sources, locate the positions of these sources in space and calculate the 30 cm. dose rates for each of these sources. Localization of the sources in three dimensions provides information on source locations interior to the visual objects and provides a better estimate of the source intensities. The three dimensional representation of the objects can be made transparent in order to visualize sources located within the objects. Positional knowledge of all the sources can be used to calculate a map of the radiation in the canyon. The use of 3-D visual and gamma ray information supports improved planning decision-making, and aids in communications with regulators and stakeholders.

  14. Modeling of micro cat's eye retroreflectors using a matrix-based three-dimensional ray tracing technique.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing-jun; Chao, Keng-hsing; Tsai, Jui-che

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we develop a three-dimensional (3D) ray tracing tool based on the ABCD ray transfer matrices. With symmetric optical components and under paraxial approximation, two sets of 2×2 ABCD matrices, each for a two-dimensional subspace, can be used to describe the 3D ray propagation completely. Compared to commercial ray-tracing software packages, our tool requires no tedious drawing, and the results for various conditions, such as different device dimensions and incident angles, can be easily obtained by simply changing the parameter values used for the calculation. We have employed this matrix-based 3D ray tracing tool to model cat's eye retroreflectors. The cat's eye performance, including the retroreflection efficiency, acceptance angle (i.e., field of view), and beam divergence and deviation, is fully studied. The application of this 3D ray tracing technique can be further extended to other optical components. PMID:22945148

  15. Element-specific X-ray phase tomography of 3D structures at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Claire; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Scagnoli, Valerio; Holler, Mirko; Huthwelker, Thomas; Menzel, Andreas; Vartiainen, Ismo; Müller, Elisabeth; Kirk, Eugenie; Gliga, Sebastian; Raabe, Jörg; Heyderman, Laura J

    2015-03-20

    Recent advances in fabrication techniques to create mesoscopic 3D structures have led to significant developments in a variety of fields including biology, photonics, and magnetism. Further progress in these areas benefits from their full quantitative and structural characterization. We present resonant ptychographic tomography, combining quantitative hard x-ray phase imaging and resonant elastic scattering to achieve ab initio element-specific 3D characterization of a cobalt-coated artificial buckyball polymer scaffold at the nanoscale. By performing ptychographic x-ray tomography at and far from the Co K edge, we are able to locate and quantify the Co layer in our sample to a 3D spatial resolution of 25 nm. With a quantitative determination of the electron density we can determine that the Co layer is oxidized, which is confirmed with microfluorescence experiments. PMID:25839287

  16. 3-D Multiphase Segmentation of X-Ray Micro Computed Tomography Data of Geologic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuller, M.; Kulkarni, R.; Fink, W.

    2011-12-01

    Advancements of noninvasive imaging methods such as X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) led to a recent surge of applications in Geoscience. While substantial efforts and resources have been devoted to advance CT technology and micro-scale analysis, the development of a stable 3-D multiphase image segmentation method applicable to large datasets is lacking. To eliminate the need for wet/dry or dual energy scans, image alignment, and subtraction analysis, commonly applied in synchrotron X-Ray micro CT, a segmentation method based on a Bayesian Markov Random Field (MRF) framework amenable to true 3-D multiphase processing was developed and evaluated. Furthermore, several heuristic and deterministic combinatorial optimization schemes required to solve the labeling problem of the MRF image model were implemented and tested for computational efficiency and their impact on segmentation results. Test results for natural and artificial porous media datasets demonstrate great potential of the MRF image model for 3-D multiphase segmentation.

  17. A Fast Ray-Tracing Using Bounding Spheres and Frustum Rays for Dynamic Scene Rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ken-Ichi; Kaeriyama, Yoshiyuki; Komatsu, Kazuhiko; Egawa, Ryusuke; Ohba, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Hiroaki

    Ray tracing is one of the most popular techniques for generating photo-realistic images. Extensive research and development work has made interactive static scene rendering realistic. This paper deals with interactive dynamic scene rendering in which not only the eye point but also the objects in the scene change their 3D locations every frame. In order to realize interactive dynamic scene rendering, RTRPS (Ray Tracing based on Ray Plane and Bounding Sphere), which utilizes the coherency in rays, objects, and grouped-rays, is introduced. RTRPS uses bounding spheres as the spatial data structure which utilizes the coherency in objects. By using bounding spheres, RTRPS can ignore the rotation of moving objects within a sphere, and shorten the update time between frames. RTRPS utilizes the coherency in rays by merging rays into a ray-plane, assuming that the secondary rays and shadow rays are shot through an aligned grid. Since a pair of ray-planes shares an original ray, the intersection for the ray can be completed using the coherency in the ray-planes. Because of the three kinds of coherency, RTRPS can significantly reduce the number of intersection tests for ray tracing. Further acceleration techniques for ray-plane-sphere and ray-triangle intersection are also presented. A parallel projection technique converts a 3D vector inner product operation into a 2D operation and reduces the number of floating point operations. Techniques based on frustum culling and binary-tree structured ray-planes optimize the order of intersection tests between ray-planes and a sphere, resulting in 50% to 90% reduction of intersection tests. Two ray-triangle intersection techniques are also introduced, which are effective when a large number of rays are packed into a ray-plane. Our performance evaluations indicate that RTRPS gives 13 to 392 times speed up in comparison with a ray tracing algorithm without organized rays and spheres. We found out that RTRPS also provides competitive

  18. Improved backward ray tracing with stochastic sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Seung Taek; Yoon, Kyung-Hyun

    1999-03-01

    This paper presents a new technique that enhances the diffuse interreflection with the concepts of backward ray tracing. In this research, we have modeled the diffuse rays with the following conditions. First, as the reflection from the diffuse surfaces occurs in all directions, it is impossible to trace all of the reflected rays. We confined the diffuse rays by sampling the spherical angle out of the reflected rays around the normal vector. Second, the traveled distance of reflected energy from the diffuse surface differs according to the object's property, and has a comparatively short reflection distance. Considering the fact that the rays created on the diffuse surfaces affect relatively small area, it is very inefficient to trace all of the sampled diffused rays. Therefore, we set a fixed distance as the critical distance and all the rays beyond this distance are ignored. The result of this research is that as the improved backward ray tracing can model the illumination effects such as the color bleeding effects, we can replace the radiosity algorithm under the limited environment.

  19. 3D X-ray ultra-microscopy of bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Langer, M; Peyrin, F

    2016-02-01

    We review the current X-ray techniques with 3D imaging capability at the nano-scale: transmission X-ray microscopy, ptychography and in-line phase nano-tomography. We further review the different ultra-structural features that have so far been resolved: the lacuno-canalicular network, collagen orientation, nano-scale mineralization and their use as basis for mechanical simulations. X-ray computed tomography at the micro-metric scale is increasingly considered as the reference technique in imaging of bone micro-structure. The trend has been to push towards increasingly higher resolution. Due to the difficulty of realizing optics in the hard X-ray regime, the magnification has mainly been due to the use of visible light optics and indirect detection of the X-rays, which limits the attainable resolution with respect to the wavelength of the visible light used in detection. Recent developments in X-ray optics and instrumentation have allowed to implement several types of methods that achieve imaging that is limited in resolution by the X-ray wavelength, thus enabling computed tomography at the nano-scale. We review here the X-ray techniques with 3D imaging capability at the nano-scale: transmission X-ray microscopy, ptychography and in-line phase nano-tomography. Further, we review the different ultra-structural features that have so far been resolved and the applications that have been reported: imaging of the lacuno-canalicular network, direct analysis of collagen orientation, analysis of mineralization on the nano-scale and use of 3D images at the nano-scale to drive mechanical simulations. Finally, we discuss the issue of going beyond qualitative description to quantification of ultra-structural features. PMID:26370826

  20. X-Ray Phase Nanotomography Resolves the 3D Human Bone Ultrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Suhonen, Heikki; Grimal, Quentin; Cloetens, Peter; Peyrin, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    Bone strength and failure are increasingly thought to be due to ultrastructural properties, such as the morphology of the lacuno-canalicular network, the collagen fiber orientation and the mineralization on the nanoscale. However, these properties have not been studied in 3D so far. Here we report the investigation of the human bone ultrastructure with X-ray phase nanotomography, which now provides the required sensitivity, spatial resolution and field of view. The 3D organization of the lacuno-canalicular network is studied in detail over several cells in osteonal and interstitial tissue. Nanoscale density variations are revealed and show that the cement line separating these tissues is hypermineralized. Finally, we show that the collagen fibers are organized as a twisted plywood structure in 3D. PMID:22952569

  1. Application of 3D X-ray CT data sets to finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, P.L.; Martz, H.E.; Brand, H.R.; Hollerbach, K.

    1995-08-31

    Finite Element Modeling (FEM) is becoming more important as industry drives toward concurrent engineering. A fundamental hindrance to fully exploiting the power of FEM is the human effort required to acquire complex part geometry, particularly as-built geometry, as a FEM mesh. Many Quantitative Non Destructive Evaluation (QNDE) techniques that produce three-dimensional (3D) data sets provide a substantial reduction in the effort required to apply FEM to as-built parts. This paper describes progress at LLNL on the application of 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) data sets to more rapidly produce high-quality FEM meshes of complex, as-built geometries. Issues related to the volume segmentation of the 3D CT data as well as the use of this segmented data to tailor generic hexahedral FEM meshes to part specific geometries are discussed. The application of these techniques to FEM analysis in the medical field is reported here.

  2. X-ray phase nanotomography resolves the 3D human bone ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Langer, Max; Pacureanu, Alexandra; Suhonen, Heikki; Grimal, Quentin; Cloetens, Peter; Peyrin, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    Bone strength and failure are increasingly thought to be due to ultrastructural properties, such as the morphology of the lacuno-canalicular network, the collagen fiber orientation and the mineralization on the nanoscale. However, these properties have not been studied in 3D so far. Here we report the investigation of the human bone ultrastructure with X-ray phase nanotomography, which now provides the required sensitivity, spatial resolution and field of view. The 3D organization of the lacuno-canalicular network is studied in detail over several cells in osteonal and interstitial tissue. Nanoscale density variations are revealed and show that the cement line separating these tissues is hypermineralized. Finally, we show that the collagen fibers are organized as a twisted plywood structure in 3D. PMID:22952569

  3. Auroral kilometric radiation source characteristics using ray tracing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, R.; Santolik, O.; Parrot, M.; Lefeuvre, F.; Hanasz, J.; Brittnacher, M.; Parks, G.

    2002-11-01

    3-D ray tracing to the presumed auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) source region has been performed using the input data from wave distribution function (WDF) based on the AKR waveforms recorded on board the Interball 2 satellite by the French wave experiment MEMO. Both the direction of the WDF maximum and the WDF form and angular size have been taken into account. Two instances of AKR emissions were observed on 28 January 1997 at 2037 and 2107 UT. Rays traced in R-X mode out of the s/c point toward two different active regions on the auroral oval (as seen with Polar UV imager after projection of the source region along the magnetic field lines down to the ionosphere level). Source region apparent angular sizes based on WDF are compatible with sizes estimated from signal modulation produced by electric antenna system rotation.

  4. Ray Tracing for Complex Astrophysical High-opacity Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinacker, J.; Bacmann, A.; Henning, T.

    2006-07-01

    We present a ray-tracing technique for radiative transfer modeling of complex three-dimensional (3D) structures that include dense regions of high optical depth, such as that in dense molecular clouds, circumstellar disks, envelopes of evolved stars, and dust tori around active galactic nuclei. The corresponding continuum radiative transfer problem is described, and the numerical requirements for inverse 3D density and temperature modeling are defined. We introduce a relative intensity and transform the radiative transfer equation along the rays to solve machine precision problems and to relax strong gradients in the source term. For the optically thick regions where common ray tracers are forced to perform small trace steps, we give two criteria for making use of a simple approximative solver crossing the optically thick region quickly. Using an example of a density structure with optical depth changes of 6 orders of magnitude and sharp temperature variations, we demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed scheme using a common fifth-order Runge-Kutta ray tracer with adaptive step-size control. In our test case, the gain in computational speed is about a factor of 870. The method is applied in order to calculate the temperature distribution within a massive molecular cloud core for different boundary conditions for the radiation field.

  5. Finding and tracing human MSC in 3D microenvironments with the photoconvertible protein Dendra2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caires, Hugo R.; Gomez-Lazaro, Maria; Oliveira, Carla M.; Gomes, David; Mateus, Denisa D.; Oliveira, Carla; Barrias, Cristina C.; Barbosa, Mário A.; Almeida, Catarina R.

    2015-05-01

    Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells (MSC) are a promising cell type for cell-based therapies - from tissue regeneration to treatment of autoimmune diseases - due to their capacity to migrate to damaged tissues, to differentiate in different lineages and to their immunomodulatory and paracrine properties. Here, a simple and reliable imaging technique was developed to study MSC dynamical behavior in natural and bioengineered 3D matrices. Human MSC were transfected to express a fluorescent photoswitchable protein, Dendra2, which was used to highlight and follow the same group of cells for more than seven days, even if removed from the microscope to the incubator. This strategy provided reliable tracking in 3D microenvironments with different properties, including the hydrogels Matrigel and alginate as well as chitosan porous scaffolds. Comparison of cells mobility within matrices with tuned physicochemical properties revealed that MSC embedded in Matrigel migrated 64% more with 5.2 mg protein/mL than with 9.6 mg/mL and that MSC embedded in RGD-alginate migrated 51% faster with 1% polymer concentration than in 2% RGD-alginate. This platform thus provides a straightforward approach to characterize MSC dynamics in 3D and has applications in the field of stem cell biology and for the development of biomaterials for tissue regeneration.

  6. Quantitative 3D Tracing of Gene-delivery Viral Vectors in Human Cells and Animal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ping-Jie; Li, Chengwen; Neumann, Aaron; Samulski, R Jude

    2012-01-01

    Trafficking through a variety of cellular structures and organelles is essential for the interaction between gene-delivery vectors (i.e., adeno-associated virus (AAV) and liposomes) and host cells/tissues. Here, we present a method of computer-assisted quantitative 3D biodistribution microscopy that samples the whole population of fluorescently-labeled vectors and document their trafficking routes. Using AAV as a working model, we first experimentally defined numerical parameters for the singularity of Cy5-labeled particles by combining confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We then developed a robust approach that integrates single-particle fluorescence imaging with 3D deconvolution and isosurface rendering to quantitate viral distribution and trafficking in human cells as well as animal tissues at the single-particle level. Using this quantitative method, we uncovered an as yet uncharacterized rate-limiting step during viral cell entry, while delineating nuclear accumulation of virions during the first 8 hours postinfection. Further, our studies revealed for the first time that following intramuscular injection, AAV spread progressively across muscle tissues through endomysium between myofibers instead of traversing through target cells. Such 3D resolution and quantitative dissection of vector–host interactions at the subcellular level should significantly improve our ability to resolve trafficking mechanisms of gene-delivery particles and facilitate the development of enhanced viral vectors. PMID:22108857

  7. Tracing the X-Ray Trail

    MedlinePlus

    What you need to know about… Tracing the X-ray Trail If you’ve just completed an x-ray, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) Start here! or other diagnostic imaging procedure, you probably want to know when you will ... los rayos X Si acaba de hacerse una radiografía, tomografía ¡Empezar ...

  8. Approximation of a foreign object using x-rays, reference photographs and 3D reconstruction techniques.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Matt; Shanmugam, Mohan

    2013-12-01

    This case study describes how a 3D animation was created to approximate the depth and angle of a foreign object (metal bar) that had become embedded into a patient's head. A pre-operative CT scan was not available as the patient could not fit though the CT scanner, therefore a post surgical CT scan, x-ray and photographic images were used. A surface render was made of the skull and imported into Blender (a 3D animation application). The metal bar was not available, however images of a similar object that was retrieved from the scene by the ambulance crew were used to recreate a 3D model. The x-ray images were then imported into Blender and used as background images in order to align the skull reconstruction and metal bar at the correct depth/angle. A 3D animation was then created to fully illustrate the angle and depth of the iron bar in the skull. PMID:24206011

  9. Birefringent Polarization Ray Tracing: Theory and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClain, Stephen Charles

    Birefringent polarization ray tracing is an extension of geometric ray tracing. In addition to calculating ray paths and phases, it also analyzes the state of polarization through birefringent devices. Some systems containing birefringent elements include optical computers, radiometers, optical isolators, bar code scanners, and optical data storage systems. This dissertation derives explicit algorithms for polarization ray tracing through anisotropic media, optically active media, and anisotropic optically active media, such as quartz. The objective was to go beyond the electromagnetic relations to establish algorithms in standard ray tracing format, ready for direct inclusion into lens design software. The algorithms, derived from Maxwell's equations, constitutive relations, and boundary conditions, calculate the wavevector, ray vector, optical path length, refractive index, and polarization state of a ray. Generalized Fresnel relations govern the division of energy at each interface into two transmitted and two reflected modes. The algorithms are applied to calculate the polarization aberrations of a variety of birefringent devices. In particular, it is established that the polarization properties of quartz vary significantly (>20%) over angles of only 5 degrees. This limits the useful field of view of quartz devices. Field of view aberrations of birefringent elements can critically affect the performance of optical systems. Also, design guidelines are presented for pseudodepolarizers. These devices spatially scramble the polarization. Inserted into an instrument, a depolarizer negates the polarization sensitivity of the elements which follow it. Presented in detail is the design and analysis of a depolarizer for use in a spectrometer on NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS).

  10. Birefringent polarization ray tracing: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClain, Stephen Charles

    1992-06-01

    Birefringent polarization ray tracing is an extension of geometric ray tracing. In addition to calculating ray paths and phases, it also analyzes the state of polarization through birefringent devices. Some systems containing birefringent elements include optical computers, radiometers, optical isolators, bar code scanners, and optical data storage systems. This dissertation derives explicit algorithms for polarization ray tracing through anisotropic media, optically active media, and anisotropic optically active media, such as quartz. The objective was to go beyond the electromagnetic relations to establish algorithms in standard ray tracing format, ready for direct inclusion into lens design software. The algorithms, derived from Maxwell's equations, constitutive relations, and boundary conditions, calculate the wavevector, ray vector, optical path length, refractive index, and polarization state of a ray. Generalized Fresnel relations govern the division of energy at each interface into two transmitted and two reflected modes. The algorithms are applied to calculate the polarization aberrations of a variety of birefringent devices. In particular, it is established that the polarization properties of quartz vary significantly (greater than 20 percent) over angles of only 5 degrees. This limits the useful field of view of quartz devices. Field of view aberrations of birefringent elements can critically affect the performance of optical systems. Also, design guidelines are presented for pseudodepolarizers. These devices spatially scramble the polarization. Inserted into an instrument, a depolarizer negates the polarization sensitivity of the elements which follow it. Presented in detail is the design and analysis of a depolarizer for use in a spectrometer on NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS).

  11. X-ray ptychographic computed tomography at 16 nm isotropic 3D resolution

    PubMed Central

    Holler, M.; Diaz, A.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Karvinen, P.; Färm, Elina; Härkönen, Emma; Ritala, Mikko; Menzel, A.; Raabe, J.; Bunk, O.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray ptychography is a scanning variant of coherent diffractive imaging with the ability to image large fields of view at high resolution. It further allows imaging of non-isolated specimens and can produce quantitative mapping of the electron density distribution in 3D when combined with computed tomography. The method does not require imaging lenses, which makes it dose efficient and suitable to multi-keV X-rays, where efficient photon counting, pixelated detectors are available. Here we present the first highly resolved quantitative X-ray ptychographic tomography of an extended object yielding 16 nm isotropic 3D resolution recorded at 2 Å wavelength. This first-of-its-kind demonstration paves the way for ptychographic X-ray tomography to become a promising method for X-ray imaging of representative sample volumes at unmatched resolution, opening tremendous potential for characterizing samples in materials science and biology by filling the resolution gap between electron microscopy and other X-ray imaging techniques. PMID:24457289

  12. NDE of spacecraft materials using 3D Compton backscatter x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, E. R.; Grubsky, V.; Romanov, V.; Shoemaker, K.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of testing of the NDE performance of a Compton Imaging Tomography (CIT) system for single-sided, penetrating 3D inspection. The system was recently developed by Physical Optics Corporation (POC) and delivered to NASA for testing and evaluation. The CIT technology is based on 3D structure mapping by collecting the information on density profiles in multiple object cross sections through hard x-ray Compton backscatter imaging. The individual cross sections are processed and fused together in software, generating a 3D map of the density profile of the object which can then be analyzed slice-by-slice in x, y, or z directions. The developed CIT scanner is based on a 200-kV x-ray source, flat-panel x-ray detector (FPD), and apodized x-ray imaging optics. The CIT technology is particularly well suited to the NDE of lightweight aerospace materials, such as the thermal protection system (TPS) ceramic and composite materials, micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shielding, spacecraft pressure walls, inflatable habitat structures, composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), and aluminum honeycomb materials. The current system provides 3D localization of defects and features with field of view 20x12x8 cm3 and spatial resolution ˜2 mm. In this paper, we review several aerospace NDE applications of the CIT technology, with particular emphasis on TPS. Based on the analysis of the testing results, we provide recommendations for continued development on TPS applications that can benefit the most from the unique capabilities of this new NDE technology.

  13. Dislocation Density Tensor Characterization of Deformation Using 3D X-Ray Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Ben C; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; El-Azab, Anter; Liu, Wenjun

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) X-ray microscopy with submicron resolution has been used to make spatially resolved measurements of lattice curvature and elastic strain over two-dimensional slices in thin deformed Si plates. The techniques and capabilities associated with white-beam 3D X-ray microscopy are discussed, and both theoretical and experimental considerations associated with the measurement of Nye dislocation density tensors in deformed materials are presented. The ability to determine the local geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) density in the form of a dislocation density tensor, with micron spatial resolution over mesoscopic length scales, is demonstrated. Results are shown for the special case of an elastically bent (dislocation free) thin Si plate and for a similar thin Si plate that was bent plastically, above the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature, to introduce dislocations. Within the uncertainties of the measurements, the known result that GND density is zero for elastic bending is obtained, and well-defined GND distributions are observed in the plastically deformed Si plate. The direct and absolute connection between experimental measurements of GND density and multiscale modeling and computer simulations of deformation microstructures is discussed to highlight the importance of submicron-resolution 3D X-ray microscopy for mesoscale characterization of material defects and to achieve a fundamental understanding of deformation in ductile materials.

  14. Dislocation density tensor characterization of deformation using 3D x-ray microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, B. C.; Tischler, J. Z.; El-Azab, A.; Liu, W.; ORNL; Florida State Univ.

    2008-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) X-ray microscopy with submicron resolution has been used to make spatially resolved measurements of lattice curvature and elastic strain over two-dimensional slices in thin deformed Si plates. The techniques and capabilities associated with white-beam 3D X-ray microscopy are discussed, and both theoretical and experimental considerations associated with the measurement of Nye dislocation density tensors in deformed materials are presented. The ability to determine the local geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) density in the form of a dislocation density tensor, with micron spatial resolution over mesoscopic length scales, is demonstrated. Results are shown for the special case of an elastically bent (dislocation free) thin Si plate and for a similar thin Si plate that was bent plastically, above the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature, to introduce dislocations. Within the uncertainties of the measurements, the known result that GND density is zero for elastic bending is obtained, and well-defined GND distributions are observed in the plastically deformed Si plate. The direct and absolute connection between experimental measurements of GND density and multiscale modeling and computer simulations of deformation microstructures is discussed to highlight the importance of submicron-resolution 3D X-ray microscopy for mesoscale characterization of material defects and to achieve a fundamental understanding of deformation in ductile materials.

  15. Rigorous 3-D vectorial complex ray model applied to light scattering by an arbitrary spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bingqiang; Kattawar, George W.; Yang, Ping; Ren, Kuan Fang

    2016-08-01

    After a ray bundle passes a curved surface, the equal-phase wavefront associated with the refracted rays will be distorted. Consequently, the cross-section of a ray bundle with a curved wavefront during propagation in a homogeneous medium will vary with the ray-bundle propagation distance. Moreover, the phase of a ray bundle with convergent wavefront will undergo a phase shift of π/2 with each passage of a focal line. The contribution to the scattering amplitude by a ray bundle after passing a scatterer is determined by three elements: the cross-section variation of its wavefront, the total phase, and the refraction coefficients determined by Fresnel equations. In the geometric optics regime, the aforesaid three elements caused by a curved surface can be systematically quantified in terms of the vectorial complex ray-tracing technique. In this study, rigorous vectorial complex ray-tracing calculations are conducted for light scattering by a general spheroid and the results are validated in comparison with the benchmarks provided by the rigorous T-matrix method.

  16. A Segmentation Algorithm for X-ray 3D Angiography and Vessel Catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Franchi, Danilo; Rosa, Luigi; Placidi, Giuseppe

    2008-11-06

    Vessel Catheterization is a clinical procedure usually performed by a specialist by means of X-ray fluoroscopic guide with contrast-media. In the present paper, we present a simple and efficient algorithm for vessel segmentation which allows vessel separation and extraction from the background (noise and signal coming from other organs). This would reduce the number of projections (X-ray scans) to reconstruct a complete and accurate 3D vascular model and the radiological risk, in particular for the patient. In what follows, the algorithm is described and some preliminary experimental results are reported illustrating the behaviour of the proposed method.

  17. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  18. AXAF FITS standard for ray trace interchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Paul F.

    1993-07-01

    A standard data format for the archival and transport of x-ray events generated by ray trace models is described. Upon review and acceptance by the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) Software Systems Working Group (SSWG), this standard shall become the official AXAF data format for ray trace events. The Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) is well suited for the purposes of the standard and was selected to be the basis of the standard. FITS is both flexible and efficient and is also widely used within the astronomical community for storage and transfer of data. In addition, software to read and write FITS format files are widely available. In selecting quantities to be included within the ray trace standard, the AXAF Mission Support team, Science Instruments team, and the other contractor teams were surveyed. From the results of this survey, the following requirements were established: (1) for the scientific needs, each photon should have associated with it: position, direction, energy, and statistical weight; the standard must also accommodate path length (relative phase), and polarization. (2) a unique photon identifier is necessary for bookkeeping purposes; (3) a log of individuals, organizations, and software packages that have modified the data must be maintained in order to create an audit trail; (4) a mechanism for extensions to the basic kernel should be provided; and (5) the ray trace standard should integrate with future AXAF data product standards.

  19. AXAF FITS standard for ray trace interchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Paul F.

    1993-01-01

    A standard data format for the archival and transport of x-ray events generated by ray trace models is described. Upon review and acceptance by the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) Software Systems Working Group (SSWG), this standard shall become the official AXAF data format for ray trace events. The Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) is well suited for the purposes of the standard and was selected to be the basis of the standard. FITS is both flexible and efficient and is also widely used within the astronomical community for storage and transfer of data. In addition, software to read and write FITS format files are widely available. In selecting quantities to be included within the ray trace standard, the AXAF Mission Support team, Science Instruments team, and the other contractor teams were surveyed. From the results of this survey, the following requirements were established: (1) for the scientific needs, each photon should have associated with it: position, direction, energy, and statistical weight; the standard must also accommodate path length (relative phase), and polarization. (2) a unique photon identifier is necessary for bookkeeping purposes; (3) a log of individuals, organizations, and software packages that have modified the data must be maintained in order to create an audit trail; (4) a mechanism for extensions to the basic kernel should be provided; and (5) the ray trace standard should integrate with future AXAF data product standards.

  20. 3D Arterial Trace Reconstruction From Biplane Multi-Valued Projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba, Joseph; Fenster, Paul; Suardiaz, Manuel

    1988-12-01

    An automatic algorithm for reconstructing arterial center lines in three dimensional (3D) space from two orthogonal angiographic views is presented. As a result of representing projected center lines by, cubic spline polynomials, corresponding points in both views are automatically determined. A previous paperl showed automatic positional reconstruction to be possible when the projected center line can be expressed as a single-valued function. This algorithm generalizes the method to include cases where the center lines are described by multi-valued functions. Three dimensional curves, representing arterial center lines, were sampled and projected onto two orthogonal planes to simulate the projected vessel center line in each view. Gaussian noise of different magnitudes was added to the projected coordinates in both views to simulate vessel center line estimation errors. Stenosed segments were simulated by deleting sections of the projected center lines. Positional reconstruction accuracy for various mean centering errors (MCE) and stenosis lengths are presented.

  1. Non-destructive investigations of a copper and argon doped sputtered beryllium capsule using x-rays in 3d

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Brian M; Defriend, Kimberly A; Havrilla, George J; Nikroo, Abbas

    2008-01-01

    The combination of 3D computed micro x-ray tomography (micro CT) and 3D confocal micro x-ray fluorescence (confocal MXRF) are very useful nondestructive metrology techniques for determining the unique compositional and morphological information of fusion targets and target materials.

  2. Ray tracing through progressive ophthalmic lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdoncle, Bernard; Chauveau, J. P.; Mercier, Jean-Louis M.

    1991-01-01

    Ray-tracing through Progressive Addition Lenses (PAL) has been performed. PAL is a deep non rotationally symmetric asp1ric lens used for the compensation of presbyopia. PAL and its mathematical model are presented. The special features of the ray-tracing program due to the model of the lens plus eye system are detailed. Typical results are presented showing in particular that computing conditions of contour-plots of power and astigmatism must be very strict and that coma must be taken into account for precise measurements of PAL. 1.

  3. Phase Tomography Reconstructed by 3D TIE in Hard X-ray Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, G.-C.; Chen, F.-R.; Pyun, Ahram; Je, Jung Ho; Hwu, Yeukuang; Liang, Keng S.

    2007-01-19

    X-ray phase tomography and phase imaging are promising ways of investigation on low Z material. A polymer blend of PE/PS sample was used to test the 3D phase retrieval method in the parallel beam illuminated microscope. Because the polymer sample is thick, the phase retardation is quite mixed and the image can not be distinguished when the 2D transport intensity equation (TIE) is applied. In this study, we have provided a different approach for solving the phase in three dimensions for thick sample. Our method involves integration of 3D TIE/Fourier slice theorem for solving thick phase sample. In our experiment, eight sets of de-focal series image data sets were recorded covering the angular range of 0 to 180 degree. Only three set of image cubes were used in 3D TIE equation for solving the phase tomography. The phase contrast of the polymer blend in 3D is obviously enhanced, and the two different groups of polymer blend can be distinguished in the phase tomography.

  4. X-ray microscopy for in situ characterization of 3D nanostructural evolution in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornberger, Benjamin; Bale, Hrishikesh; Merkle, Arno; Feser, Michael; Harris, William; Etchin, Sergey; Leibowitz, Marty; Qiu, Wei; Tkachuk, Andrei; Gu, Allen; Bradley, Robert S.; Lu, Xuekun; Withers, Philip J.; Clarke, Amy; Henderson, Kevin; Cordes, Nikolaus; Patterson, Brian M.

    2015-09-01

    X-ray microscopy (XRM) has emerged as a powerful technique that reveals 3D images and quantitative information of interior structures. XRM executed both in the laboratory and at the synchrotron have demonstrated critical analysis and materials characterization on meso-, micro-, and nanoscales, with spatial resolution down to 50 nm in laboratory systems. The non-destructive nature of X-rays has made the technique widely appealing, with potential for "4D" characterization, delivering 3D micro- and nanostructural information on the same sample as a function of sequential processing or experimental conditions. Understanding volumetric and nanostructural changes, such as solid deformation, pore evolution, and crack propagation are fundamental to understanding how materials form, deform, and perform. We will present recent instrumentation developments in laboratory based XRM including a novel in situ nanomechanical testing stage. These developments bridge the gap between existing in situ stages for micro scale XRM, and SEM/TEM techniques that offer nanometer resolution but are limited to analysis of surfaces or extremely thin samples whose behavior is strongly influenced by surface effects. Several applications will be presented including 3D-characterization and in situ mechanical testing of polymers, metal alloys, composites and biomaterials. They span multiple length scales from the micro- to the nanoscale and different mechanical testing modes such as compression, indentation and tension.

  5. 3D global estimation and augmented reality visualization of intra-operative X-ray dose.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Nicolas Loy; Padoy, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The growing use of image-guided minimally-invasive surgical procedures is confronting clinicians and surgical staff with new radiation exposure risks from X-ray imaging devices. The accurate estimation of intra-operative radiation exposure can increase staff awareness of radiation exposure risks and enable the implementation of well-adapted safety measures. The current surgical practice of wearing a single dosimeter at chest level to measure radiation exposure does not provide a sufficiently accurate estimation of radiation absorption throughout the body. In this paper, we propose an approach that combines data from wireless dosimeters with the simulation of radiation propagation in order to provide a global radiation risk map in the area near the X-ray device. We use a multi-camera RGBD system to obtain a 3D point cloud reconstruction of the room. The positions of the table, C-arm and clinician are then used 1) to simulate the propagation of radiation in a real-world setup and 2) to overlay the resulting 3D risk-map onto the scene in an augmented reality manner. By using real-time wireless dosimeters in our system, we can both calibrate the simulation and validate its accuracy at specific locations in real-time. We demonstrate our system in an operating room equipped with a robotised X-ray imaging device and validate the radiation simulation on several X-ray acquisition setups. PMID:25333145

  6. Tracing terrestrial DOC in the Baltic Sea—A 3-D model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransner, Filippa; Nycander, Jonas; Mörth, Carl-Magnus; Humborg, Christoph; Markus Meier, H. E.; Hordoir, Robinson; Gustafsson, Erik; Deutsch, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    The fate of terrestrial organic matter brought to the coastal seas by rivers and its role in the global carbon cycle are still not very well known. Here the degradation rate of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOCter) is studied in the Baltic Sea, a subarctic semienclosed sea, by releasing it as a tracer in a 3-D circulation model and applying linear decay constants. A good agreement with available observational data is obtained by parameterizing the degradation in two rather different ways: one by applying a decay time on the order of 10 years to the whole pool of DOCter and one by dividing the DOCter into one refractory pool and one pool subject to a decay time on the order of 1 year. The choice of parameterization has a significant effect on where in the Baltic Sea the removal takes place, which can be of importance when modeling the full carbon cycle and the CO2 exchange with the atmosphere. In both cases the biogeochemical decay operates on time scales less than the water residence time. Therefore, only a minor fraction of the DOCter reaches the North Sea, whereas approximately 80% is removed by internal sinks within the Baltic Sea. This further implies that DOCter mineralization is an important link in land-sea-atmosphere cycling of carbon in coastal and shelf seas that are heavily influenced by riverine DOC.

  7. Using 3D dynamic models to reproduce X-ray properties of colliding wind binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Christopher Michael Post

    Colliding wind binaries (CWBs) are unique laboratories for X-ray astrophysics. The two massive stars contained in these systems have powerful radiatively driven stellar winds, and the conversion of their kinetic energy to heat (up to 108 K) at the wind-wind collision region generates hard thermal X-rays (up to 10 keV). Rich data sets exist of several multi-year-period systems, as well as key observations of shorter period systems, and detailed models are required to disentangle the phase-locked emission and absorption processes in these systems. To interpret these X-ray light curves and spectra, this dissertation models the wind-wind interaction of CWBs using 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), and solves the 3D formal solution of radiative transfer to synthesize the model X-ray properties, allowing direct comparison with the colliding-wind X-ray spectra observed by, e.g., RXTE and XMM. The multi-year-period, highly eccentric CWBs we examine are eta Carinae and WR140. For the commonly inferred primary mass loss rate of ˜10 -3 Msun/yr, eta Carinae's 3D model reproduces quite well the 2-10 keV RXTE light curve, hardness ratio, and dynamic spectra in absolute units. This agreement includes the ˜3 month X-ray minimum associated with the 1998.0 and 2003.5 periastron passages, which we find to occur as the primary wind encroaches into the secondary wind's acceleration region. This modeling provides further evidence that the observer is mainly viewing the system through the secondary's shock cone, and suggests that periastron occurs ~1 month after the onset of the X-ray minimum. The model RXTE observables of WR140 match the data well in absolute units, although the decrease in model X-rays around periastron is less than observed. There is very good agreement between the observed XMM spectrum taken on the rise before periastron and the model. We also model two short-period CWBs, HD150136, which has a wind-star collision, and delta Orionis A, the closest eclipsing

  8. 3D-printing of undisturbed soil imaged by X-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacher, Matthias; Koestel, John; Schwen, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The unique pore structures in Soils are altered easily by water flow. Each sample has a different morphology and the results of repetitions vary as well. Soil macropores in 3D-printed durable material avoid erosion and have a known morphology. Therefore potential and limitations of reproducing an undisturbed soil sample by 3D-printing was evaluated. We scanned an undisturbed soil column of Ultuna clay soil with a diameter of 7 cm by micro X-ray computer tomography at a resolution of 51 micron. A subsample cube of 2.03 cm length with connected macropores was cut out from this 3D-image and printed in five different materials by a 3D-printing service provider. The materials were ABS, Alumide, High Detail Resin, Polyamide and Prime Grey. The five print-outs of the subsample were tested on their hydraulic conductivity by using the falling head method. The hydrophobicity was tested by an adapted sessile drop method. To determine the morphology of the print-outs and compare it to the real soil also the print-outs were scanned by X-ray. The images were analysed with the open source program ImageJ. The five 3D-image print-outs copied from the subsample of the soil column were compared by means of their macropore network connectivity, porosity, surface volume, tortuosity and skeleton. The comparison of pore morphology between the real soil and the print-outs showed that Polyamide reproduced the soil macropore structure best while Alumide print-out was the least detailed. Only the largest macropore was represented in all five print-outs. Printing residual material or printing aid material remained in and clogged the pores of all print-out materials apart from Prime Grey. Therefore infiltration was blocked in these print-outs and the materials are not suitable even though the 3D-printed pore shapes were well reproduced. All of the investigated materials were insoluble. The sessile drop method showed angles between 53 and 85 degrees. Prime Grey had the fastest flow rate; the

  9. 3D elemental sensitive imaging using transmission X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yijin; Meirer, Florian; Wang, Junyue; Requena, Guillermo; Williams, Phillip; Nelson, Johanna; Mehta, Apurva; Andrews, Joy C; Pianetta, Piero

    2012-09-01

    Determination of the heterogeneous distribution of metals in alloy/battery/catalyst and biological materials is critical to fully characterize and/or evaluate the functionality of the materials. Using synchrotron-based transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM), it is now feasible to perform nanoscale-resolution imaging over a wide X-ray energy range covering the absorption edges of many elements; combining elemental sensitive imaging with determination of sample morphology. We present an efficient and reliable methodology to perform 3D elemental sensitive imaging with excellent sample penetration (tens of microns) using hard X-ray TXM. A sample of an Al-Si piston alloy is used to demonstrate the capability of the proposed method. PMID:22349401

  10. STEMS3D: An X-ray spectral model for magnetar persistent radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogus, Ersin; Weng, Shan-Shan

    2016-07-01

    Anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma-ray repeaters are recognized as the most promising magnetar candidates, as indicated by their energetic bursts and rapid spin-downs. It is expected that the strong magnetic field leaves distinctive imprints on the emergent radiation both by affecting the radiative processes in atmospheres of magnetars and by scattering in the upper magnetospheres. We construct a self-consistent physical model that incorporates emission from the magnetar surface and its reprocessing in the three-dimensional twisted magnetosphere using a Monte Carlo technique. The synthetic spectra are characterized by four parameters: surface temperature kT, surface magnetic field strength B, magnetospheric twist angle Δφ, and the normalized electron velocity β. We also create a tabular model (STEMS3D) and apply it to X-ray spectra of magnetars.

  11. Ray tracing on a networked processor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jungsook; Lee, Seung Eun; Chen, Chunyi; Bagherzadeh, Nader

    2010-10-01

    As computation costs increase to meet design requirements for computation-intensive graphics applications on today's embedded systems, the pressure to develop high-performance parallel processors on a chip will increase. Acceleration of the ray tracing computation has become a major issue as the computer graphics industry demands for rendering realistic images. Network-on-chip (NoC) techniques that interconnect multiple processing elements with routers are the solution for reducing computation time and power consumption by parallel processing on a chip. It is also essential to meet the scalability and complexity challenges for system-on-chip (SoC). In this article, we describe a parallel ray tracing application mapping on a mesh-based multicore NoC architecture. We describe an optimised ray tracing kernel and parallelisation strategies, varying the workload distribution statically and dynamically. In this work, we present results and timing performance of our parallel ray tracing application on a NoC, which are obtained through our cycle accurate multicore NoC simulator. Using a dynamic scheduling load balancing technique, we achieved a maximum speedup multiplier of 35.97 on an 8 × 8 networked processor array using a NoC as the interconnect.

  12. Tracing Rays In Laser-Fringe Anemometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Karl

    1989-01-01

    "OPTMAIN" is simple ray-tracing computer code developed to quantify refractive effects that result when laser-fringe anemometer used to observe flows through window. Code calculates changes for four different types of windows: flat-plate windows, simple cylindrical windows, "general" axisymmetric windows, and smooth general-surface windows. Written in FORTRAN IV.

  13. Automated tracing of filaments in 3D electron tomography reconstructions using Sculptor and Situs.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mirabela; Starosolski, Zbigniew; Wahle, Manuel; Rigort, Alexander; Wriggers, Willy

    2012-05-01

    The molecular graphics program Sculptor and the command-line suite Situs are software packages for the integration of biophysical data across spatial resolution scales. Herein, we provide an overview of recently developed tools relevant to cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET), with an emphasis on functionality supported by Situs 2.7.1 and Sculptor 2.1.1. We describe a work flow for automatically segmenting filaments in cryo-ET maps including denoising, local normalization, feature detection, and tracing. Tomograms of cellular actin networks exhibit both cross-linked and bundled filament densities. Such filamentous regions in cryo-ET data sets can then be segmented using a stochastic template-based search, VolTrac. The approach combines a genetic algorithm and a bidirectional expansion with a tabu search strategy to localize and characterize filamentous regions. The automated filament segmentation by VolTrac compares well to a manual one performed by expert users, and it allows an efficient and reproducible analysis of large data sets. The software is free, open source, and can be used on Linux, Macintosh or Windows computers. PMID:22433493

  14. Non-destructive mapping of grain orientations in 3D by laboratory X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, S. A.; Reischig, P.; Holzner, C.; Lauridsen, E. M.; Withers, P. J.; Merkle, A. P.; Feser, M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to characterise crystallographic microstructure, non-destructively and in three-dimensions, is a powerful tool for understanding many aspects related to damage and deformation mechanisms in polycrystalline materials. To this end, the technique of X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) using monochromatic synchrotron and polychromatic laboratory X-ray sources has been shown to be capable of mapping crystal grains and their orientations non-destructively in 3D. Here we describe a novel laboratory-based X-ray DCT modality (LabDCT), enabling the wider accessibility of the DCT technique for routine use and in-depth studies of, for example, temporal changes in crystallographic grain structure non-destructively over time through ‘4D’ in situ time-lapse studies. The capability of the technique is demonstrated by studying a titanium alloy (Ti-β21S) sample. In the current implementation the smallest grains that can be reliably detected are around 40 μm. The individual grain locations and orientations are reconstructed using the LabDCT method and the results are validated against independent measurements from phase contrast tomography and electron backscatter diffraction respectively. Application of the technique promises to provide important insights related to the roles of recrystallization and grain growth on materials properties as well as supporting 3D polycrystalline modelling of materials performance. PMID:26494523

  15. 3D Forward and Back-Projection for X-Ray CT Using Separable Footprints

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yong; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Balter, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Iterative methods for 3D image reconstruction have the potential to improve image quality over conventional filtered back projection (FBP) in X-ray computed tomography (CT). However, the computation burden of 3D cone-beam forward and back-projectors is one of the greatest challenges facing practical adoption of iterative methods for X-ray CT. Moreover, projector accuracy is also important for iterative methods. This paper describes two new separable footprint (SF) projector methods that approximate the voxel footprint functions as 2D separable functions. Because of the separability of these footprint functions, calculating their integrals over a detector cell is greatly simplified and can be implemented efficiently. The SF-TR projector uses trapezoid functions in the transaxial direction and rectangular functions in the axial direction, whereas the SF-TT projector uses trapezoid functions in both directions. Simulations and experiments showed that both SF projector methods are more accurate than the distance-driven (DD) projector, which is a current state-of-the-art method in the field. The SF-TT projector is more accurate than the SF-TR projector for rays associated with large cone angles. The SF-TR projector has similar computation speed with the DD projector and the SF-TT projector is about two times slower. PMID:20529732

  16. Overview of 3D-TRACE, a NASA Initiative in Three-Dimensional Tomography of the Aerosol-Cloud Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Anthony; Diner, David; Yanovsky, Igor; Garay, Michael; Xu, Feng; Bal, Guillaume; Schechner, Yoav; Aides, Amit; Qu, Zheng; Emde, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    microphysical properties, can be reconstructed from multi-angle/multi-spectral imaging radiometry and, more and more, polarimetry. Specific technologies of interest are computed tomography (reconstruction from projections), optical tomography (using cross-pixel radiation transport in the diffusion limit), stereoscopy (depth/height retrievals), blind source and scale separation (signal unmixing), and disocclusion (information recovery in the presence of obstructions). Later on, these potentially powerful inverse problem solutions will be fully integrated in a versatile satellite data analysis toolbox. At present, we can report substantial progress at the component level. Specifically, we will focus on the most elementary problems in atmospheric tomography with an emphasis on the vastly under-exploited class of multi-pixel techniques. One basic problem is to infer the outer shape and mean opacity of 3D clouds, along with a bulk measure of cloud particle size. Another is to separate high and low cloud layers based on their characteristically different spatial textures. Yet another is to reconstruct the 3D spatial distribution of aerosol density based on passive imaging. This suite of independent feasibility studies amounts to a compelling proofof- concept for the ambitious 3D-Tomographic Reconstruction of the Aerosol-Cloud Environment (3D-TRACE) project as a whole.

  17. Probing Local Mineralogy in 3D with Dual Energy X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelb, J.; Yun, S.; Doerr, D.; Hunter, L.; Johnson, B.; Merkle, A.; Fahey, K.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, 3D imaging of rock microstructures has become routine practice for determining pore-scale properties in the geosciences. X-Ray imaging techniques, such as X-Ray Microscopy (XRM), have demonstrated several unique capabilities: namely, the ability to characterize the same sample across a range of length scales and REVs (from millimeters to nanometers), and to perform these characterizations on the same sample over a range of times/treatments (e.g., to observe fluid transporting through the pore networks in a flow cell). While the XRM technique is a popular choice for structural (i.e., pore) characterization, historically it has provided little mineralogical information. This means that resulting simulations are either based on pore structure alone, or rely on correlative chemical mapping techniques for compositionally-sensitive models. Recent advancements in XRM techniques are now enabling compositional sensitivity for a variety of geological sample types. By collecting high-resolution 3D tomography data sets at two different source settings (energies), results may be mixed together to enhance the appearance (contrast) of specific materials. This approach is proving beneficial, for example, to mining applications to locate and identify precious metals, as well as for oil & gas applications to map local hydrophobicity. Here, we will introduce the technique of dual energy X-Ray microscopy, showing how it extends the capabilities of traditional XRM techniques, affording the same high resolution structural information while adding 3D compositional data. Application examples will be shown to illustrate its effectiveness at both the single to sub-micron length scale for mining applications as well as at the 150 nm length scale for shale rock analysis.

  18. 3D investigation of inclusions in diamonds using X-ray micro-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisatto, M.; Nestola, F.; Artioli, G.; Nimis, P.; Harris, J. W.; Kopylova, M.; Pearson, G. D.

    2012-04-01

    The study of mineral inclusions in diamonds is providing invaluable insights into the geochemistry, geodynamics and geophysics of the Earth's mantle. Over the last two decades, the identification of different inclusion assemblages allowed to recognize diamonds deriving from the deep upper mantle, the transition zone and even the lower mantle. In such research field the in-situ investigation of inclusions using non-destructive techniques is often essential but still remains a challenging task. In particular, conventional 2D imaging techniques (e.g. SEM) are limited to the investigation of surfaces and the lack of access to the third dimension represents a major limitation when trying to extract quantitative information. Another critical aspect is related to sample preparation (cutting, polishing) which is typically very invasive. Nowadays, X-ray computed micro-tomography (X-μCT) allows to overcome such limitations, enabling the internal microstructure of totally undisturbed samples to be visualized in a three-dimensional (3D) manner at the sub-micrometric scale. The final output of a micro-tomography experiment is a greyvalue 3D map of the variations of the X-ray attenuation coefficient (µ) within the studied object. The high X-ray absorption contrast between diamond (almost transparent to X-rays) and the typical inclusion-forming minerals (olivines, garnets, pyroxenes, oxides and sulphides) makes X-μCT a straightforward method for the 3D visualization of inclusions and for the study of their spatial relationships with the diamond host. In this work we applied microfocus X-μCT to investigate silicate inclusions still trapped in diamonds, in order to obtain in-situ information on their exact position, crystal size, shape and X-ray absorption coefficient (which is related to their composition). We selected diamond samples from different deposits containing mainly olivine and garnet inclusions. The investigated samples derived from the Udachnaya pipe (Siberia

  19. Mapping the holes: 3D ISM maps and diffuse X-ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallement, R.; Vergely, J.-L.; Puspitarini, L.; Snowden, S.; Galeazzi, M.; Koutroumpa, D.

    3D maps of Galactic interstellar dust and gas reveal empty regions, including cavities carved by stellar winds and supernovae. Such cavities are often filled with hot gas and are sources of soft X-ray background emission. We discuss the combined analysis of the diffuse soft (0.25 keV) X-ray background and the 3D distribution of nearby (<1 kpc) dust, including studies of shadows cast by nearby clouds in the background. This analysis benefits from recent progress in the estimate of the foreground X-ray emission from the heliosphere. New and past X-ray data are found to be consistent with the maps if the ≃ 100-150 pc wide Local Bubble surrounding the Sun is filled with 106K gas with a pressure 2nT ≃ 10,000 K cm-3. On the other hand, the giant cavity found in the 3rd Galactic quadrant has a weaker volume emission than the LB and is very likely filled to a large extent with warm ionized gas. Its geometry suggests a link with the tilted Gould belt, and a potential mechanism for the formation of the whole structure has been recently proposed. According to it, the local inclination of gas and stars, the velocity pattern and enhanced star formation could have been initiated 60-70 Myr ago when a massive globular cluster crossed the Galactic Plane in the vicinity of the Sun. The destabilization of stellar orbits around the Sun may have generated enhanced asteroid falls of the Cretaceous-Tertiary (KT) extinction events. Additionally, a short gamma ray burst may have occurred in the cluster during the crossing, producing intense ionization and subsequent shock waves leading to the star formations seen today in the form of the giant ionized region and OB associations at its periphery. Gaia measurements of nearby stars and clusters should help shedding light on the local history.

  20. A study of Forbush Decreases with a full 3-D cosmic ray modulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xi; Zhang, Ming; Potgieter, Marius

    2016-07-01

    We have constructed a 3-D numerical model for studying Forbush Decreases (FDs) in the global heliosphere. It incorporates 3-D propagation barriers, with enhanced cooling inside, into a time-dependent Parker type modulation model using a Stochastic Differential Equation (SDE) approach. This numerical model simultaneously takes into account the effect of solar wind convection with associated adiabatic energy changes; gradient, curvature and current sheet drifts; as well as parallel and perpendicular diffusion. This state-of-the-art numerical model enables us to find and study some new 3-D features for FD type events: 1. The cosmic ray intensity at Earth varies depending on the relative location of the Earth to the current sheet, and is reflected also in the amplitude of the FDs. The local modulation conditions, at a given observational point, determine the total amplitude. 2. The radial, latitudinal and longitudinal extent of a diffusion barrier significantly affects the amplitude of a FD. 3. The recovery time of a FD, at a given observational location, is determined by the modulation conditions which the corresponding propagation barrier encounters as it moves outwards in the heliosphere.

  1. 3D, high-resolution deep x-ray absorber mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbravescu, Niculae; Grigore, Luminita

    2000-08-01

    Although, by using gray-tone lithography and common technologies in standard IC fabrication it's easy to obtain an arbitrarily 3-D shaping of positive thick resists, there are some limitations too. E-beam writing implies a maximum of only 200 gray-levels on the project retilce, and the limited focus depth of the projection objective gives a poor lateral resolution. That's why we applied a new approach to enhance the 3-D resolution of gray-tone lithography. By combining gray-tone lithography with binary masking technique, it was possible to obtain a high resolution (vertical and horizontal directions) into thick resist. Considering it as a primary mold, a metallic variable absorber mask for deep X-ray lithography may be processed. Previously, it's necessary to transform the resist surface into a conductive layer as follows: conditioning, nucleation and electroless plating, respectively. After that, a metallic deposit is obtained by electroplating at a desired thickness, resulting in a complementary shape of the mold resist. The original design and fabrication method for the gray-tone test reticle were supported by preliminary experiments showing the main advantage of this new technology: the 3-D structuring of thick resists in a single exposure step and also a very promising aspect ratio obtained of over 9:1.

  2. First direct 3D visualisation of microstructural evolutions during sintering through X-ray computed microtomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Dominique . E-mail: bernard@icmcb.u-bordeaux.fr; Gendron, Damien; Heintz, Jean-Marc; Bordere, Sylvie; Etourneau, Jean

    2005-01-03

    X-ray computed microtomography (XCMT) has been applied to ceramic samples of different materials to visualise, for the first time at this scale, real 3D microstructural evolutions during sintering. Using this technique, it has been possible to follow the whole sintering process of the same grains set. Two materials have been studied; a glass powder heat treated at 700 deg. C and a crystallised lithium borate (Li{sub 6}Gd(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}) powder heat treated at 720 deg. C. XCMT measurements have been done after different sintering times. For each material, a sub-volume was individualised and localised on the successive recordings and its 3D images numerically reconstructed. Description of the three-dimensional microstructures evolution is proposed. From the 3D experimental data, quantitative evolutions of parameters such as porosity and neck size are presented for the glass sample. Possibilities offered by this technique to study complex sintering processes, as for lithium borate, are illustrated.

  3. Automatic generation of 3D coronary artery centerlines using rotational X-ray angiography.

    PubMed

    Jandt, Uwe; Schäfer, Dirk; Grass, Michael; Rasche, Volker

    2009-12-01

    A fully automated 3D centerline modeling algorithm for coronary arteries is presented. It utilizes a subset of standard rotational X-ray angiography projections that correspond to one single cardiac phase. The algorithm is based on a fast marching approach, which selects voxels in 3D space that belong to the vascular structure and introduces a hierarchical order. The local 3D propagation speed is determined by a combination of corresponding 2D projections filtered with a vessel enhancing kernel. The best achievable accuracy of the algorithm is evaluated on simulated projections of a virtual heart phantom, showing that it is capable of extracting coronary centerlines with an accuracy that is mainly limited by projection and volume quantization (0.25 mm). The algorithm is reasonably insensitive to residual motion, which means that it is able to cope with inconsistencies within the projection data set caused by limited gating accuracy and respiration. Its accuracy on clinical data is evaluated based on expert ratings of extracted models of 17 consecutive clinical cases (10 LCA, 7 RCA). A success rate of 93.5% (i.e. with no or slight deviations) is achieved compared to 58.8% success rate of semi-automatically extracted models. PMID:19713148

  4. 3D localization of electrophysiology catheters from a single x-ray cone-beam projection

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, Normand Polack, George G.; Sethi, Benu; Rowlands, John A.; Crystal, Eugene

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: X-ray images allow the visualization of percutaneous devices such as catheters in real time but inherently lack depth information. The provision of 3D localization of these devices from cone beam x-ray projections would be advantageous for interventions such as electrophysiology (EP), whereby the operator needs to return a device to the same anatomical locations during the procedure. A method to achieve real-time 3D single view localization (SVL) of an object of known geometry from a single x-ray image is presented. SVL exploits the change in the magnification of an object as its distance from the x-ray source is varied. The x-ray projection of an object of interest is compared to a synthetic x-ray projection of a model of said object as its pose is varied. Methods: SVL was tested with a 3 mm spherical marker and an electrophysiology catheter. The effect of x-ray acquisition parameters on SVL was investigated. An independent reference localization method was developed to compare results when imaging a catheter translated via a computer controlled three-axes stage. SVL was also performed on clinical fluoroscopy image sequences. A commercial navigation system was used in some clinical image sequences for comparison. Results: SVL estimates exhibited little change as x-ray acquisition parameters were varied. The reproducibility of catheter position estimates in phantoms denoted by the standard deviations, (σ{sub x}, σ{sub y}, σ{sub z}) = (0.099 mm,  0.093 mm,  2.2 mm), where x and y are parallel to the detector plane and z is the distance from the x-ray source. Position estimates (x, y, z) exhibited a 4% systematic error (underestimation) when compared to the reference method. The authors demonstrated that EP catheters can be tracked in clinical fluoroscopic images. Conclusions: It has been shown that EP catheters can be localized in real time in phantoms and clinical images at fluoroscopic exposure rates. Further work is required to characterize

  5. Optimizing illumination in the greenhouse using a 3D model of tomato and a ray tracer.

    PubMed

    de Visser, Pieter H B; Buck-Sorlin, Gerhard H; van der Heijden, Gerie W A M

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of energy use for assimilation lighting is one of the most urgent goals of current greenhouse horticulture in the Netherlands. In recent years numerous lighting systems have been tested in greenhouses, yet their efficiency has been very difficult to measure in practice. This simulation study evaluated a number of lighting strategies using a 3D light model for natural and artificial light in combination with a 3D model of tomato. The modeling platform GroIMP was used for the simulation study. The crop was represented by 3D virtual plants of tomato with fixed architecture. Detailed data on greenhouse architecture and lamp emission patterns of different light sources were incorporated in the model. A number of illumination strategies were modeled with the calibrated model. Results were compared to the standard configuration. Moreover, adaptation of leaf angles was incorporated for testing their effect on light use efficiency (LUE). A Farquhar photosynthesis model was used to translate the absorbed light for each leaf into a produced amount of carbohydrates. The carbohydrates produced by the crop per unit emitted light from sun or high pressure sodium lamps was the highest for horizontal leaf angles or slightly downward pointing leaves, and was less for more upward leaf orientations. The simulated leaf angles did not affect light absorption from inter-lighting LED modules, but the scenario with LEDs shining slightly upward (20(°)) increased light absorption and LUE relative to default horizontal beaming LEDs. Furthermore, the model showed that leaf orientation more perpendicular to the string of LEDs increased LED light interception. The combination of a ray tracer and a 3D crop model could compute optimal lighting of leaves by quantification of light fluxes and illustration by rendered lighting patterns. Results indicate that illumination efficiency increases when the lamp light is directed at most to leaves that have a high photosynthetic potential. PMID

  6. Optimizing illumination in the greenhouse using a 3D model of tomato and a ray tracer

    PubMed Central

    de Visser, Pieter H. B.; Buck-Sorlin, Gerhard H.; van der Heijden, Gerie W. A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of energy use for assimilation lighting is one of the most urgent goals of current greenhouse horticulture in the Netherlands. In recent years numerous lighting systems have been tested in greenhouses, yet their efficiency has been very difficult to measure in practice. This simulation study evaluated a number of lighting strategies using a 3D light model for natural and artificial light in combination with a 3D model of tomato. The modeling platform GroIMP was used for the simulation study. The crop was represented by 3D virtual plants of tomato with fixed architecture. Detailed data on greenhouse architecture and lamp emission patterns of different light sources were incorporated in the model. A number of illumination strategies were modeled with the calibrated model. Results were compared to the standard configuration. Moreover, adaptation of leaf angles was incorporated for testing their effect on light use efficiency (LUE). A Farquhar photosynthesis model was used to translate the absorbed light for each leaf into a produced amount of carbohydrates. The carbohydrates produced by the crop per unit emitted light from sun or high pressure sodium lamps was the highest for horizontal leaf angles or slightly downward pointing leaves, and was less for more upward leaf orientations. The simulated leaf angles did not affect light absorption from inter-lighting LED modules, but the scenario with LEDs shining slightly upward (20°) increased light absorption and LUE relative to default horizontal beaming LEDs. Furthermore, the model showed that leaf orientation more perpendicular to the string of LEDs increased LED light interception. The combination of a ray tracer and a 3D crop model could compute optimal lighting of leaves by quantification of light fluxes and illustration by rendered lighting patterns. Results indicate that illumination efficiency increases when the lamp light is directed at most to leaves that have a high photosynthetic potential. PMID

  7. Multi-ray-based system matrix generation for 3D PET reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Moehrs, Sascha; Defrise, Michel; Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, Alberto Del; Bartoli, Antonietta; Fabbri, Serena; Zanetti, Gianluigi

    2008-12-01

    Iterative image reconstruction algorithms for positron emission tomography (PET) require a sophisticated system matrix (model) of the scanner. Our aim is to set up such a model offline for the YAP-(S)PET II small animal imaging tomograph in order to use it subsequently with standard ML-EM (maximum-likelihood expectation maximization) and OSEM (ordered subset expectation maximization) for fully three-dimensional image reconstruction. In general, the system model can be obtained analytically, via measurements or via Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we present the multi-ray method, which can be considered as a hybrid method to set up the system model offline. It incorporates accurate analytical (geometric) considerations as well as crystal depth and crystal scatter effects. At the same time, it has the potential to model seamlessly other physical aspects such as the positron range. The proposed method is based on multiple rays which are traced from/to the detector crystals through the image volume. Such a ray-tracing approach itself is not new; however, we derive a novel mathematical formulation of the approach and investigate the positioning of the integration (ray-end) points. First, we study single system matrix entries and show that the positioning and weighting of the ray-end points according to Gaussian integration give better results compared to equally spaced integration points (trapezoidal integration), especially if only a small number of integration points (rays) are used. Additionally, we show that, for a given variance of the single matrix entries, the number of rays (events) required to calculate the whole matrix is a factor of 20 larger when using a pure Monte-Carlo-based method. Finally, we analyse the quality of the model by reconstructing phantom data from the YAP-(S)PET II scanner. PMID:19001696

  8. Ray Tracing Study of Magnetospheric ULF Wave Propagation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinbo

    1993-01-01

    A semi-empirical plasma density model and Mead -Fairfield magnetic field model are incorporated into a 3-D ray tracing code to study magnetospheric ULF wave propagation from the subsolar magnetopause. The ray-tracing of Pc3 compressional waves from the magnetosheath reveals that the magnetosphere can present a major propagation barrier to the penetration of these waves to the plasmasphere. This barrier is the ion-ion cutoff between the He^+ and O ^+ gyroresonances. As a result of the frequency -dependent location of this cutoff, the magnetosphere behaves like a filter for Pc3 compressional waves, and only the low frequency components can penetrate to the inner magnetosphere. These results are in agreement with previous satellite observations. This 'filter action' strongly depends on the relative concentration of He^+ and O^+ and is, therefore, sensitive to solar and magnetic activity. The study of the propagation characteristics of Pc3 transverse Alfven waves shows that these waves cannot penetrate to low Earth altitudes for wave frequencies above about approximately 0.03 hz. The configuration of the refractive index reveals an O^+-He^+ associated cutoff located between the assumed wave source in the equatorial magnetopause and the Earth. When the O^+ concentration is removed from the plasma composition, the barrier no longer exists, and waves with much higher frequencies than 0.03 Hz can penetrate to low altitudes. The result that the 0.03 Hz or lower frequency Alfven waves can be guided to the low altitudes agrees with ground-based power spectrum observations at high latitudes. The ray tracing study of Pc 1-2 waves reproduces earlier results (Rauch and Roux, 1982) for an H ^+-He^+ two-ion-species plasma, i.e. Pc 1-2 left hand polarized Alfven mode waves originating at equatorial geostationary orbit, below He ^+ gyrofrequency, are guided to the ground. However, our ray tracing study shows that previous Pc 1-2 ray tracing results are only valid in the absence of O

  9. The 3D Space and Spin Velocities of a Gamma-ray Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2016-04-01

    PSR J2030+4415 is a LAT-discovered 0.5My-old gamma-ray pulsar with an X-ray synchrotron trail and a rare Halpha bowshock. We have obtained GMOS IFU spectroscopic imaging of this shell, and show a sweep through the remarkable Halpha structure, comparing with the high energy emission. These data provide a unique 3D map of the momentum distribution of the relativistic pulsar wind. This shows that the pulsar is moving nearly in the plane of the sky and that the pulsar wind has a polar component misaligned with the space velocity. The spin axis is shown to be inclined some 95degrees to the Earth line of sight, explaining why this is a radio-quiet, gamma-only pulsar. Intriguingly, the shell also shows multiple bubbles that suggest that the pulsar wind power has varied substantially over the past 500 years.

  10. Use of x-ray microtomography for 3D imaging of internal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hain, Miroslav; Bartl, Jan; Ševčík, Robert; Jacko, Vlado

    2012-01-01

    The article describes the basic principles and the use of X-ray microtomography which has emerged as a new promising method of measurement and non-destructive testing. X-ray microtomography (μCT) combines the principles of X-ray shadow microscopy together with the computed tomography CT. The current technical possibilities allow achieving submicron resolution by the use of experimental as well as commercial μCT facilities. Use of this method can be found particularly in materials research, precision engineering, and electronics industry. In all these areas there is a need for a non-destructive, high resolution visualization of internal microstructures, measurement of interior dimensions of 3D objects, materials testing for the presence of internal defects. Unlike the nondestructive μCT, the conventional testing methods require for the observation of internal structures mechanical cutting of the object and thus its destruction. Such damage of the object under study is often unacceptable, especially when it concerns an object of research, which should be preserved in integrity for its uniqueness or need to take further measurements and tests. Besides the materials research, there are also many other important areas of application of X-ray microtomography measuring method: electronics and precision mechanical engineering industry, mineralogy, geology, biology and archeology. In the experimental part of this article the results achieved in the microtomography laboratory of Slovak Academy of Sciences, equipped with the GE phoenix|x-ray nanotom 180 facility, will be presented.

  11. Dual anode contact geometries for x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy and 3D localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. W.; Garson, A. B., III; Li, Q.; Lee, K.; Groza, M.; Buliga, V.; Burger, A.; Krawczynski, H.

    2009-08-01

    We report on the continued development and testing of unique types of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors. Using large volume (10×20×20 mm3) CZT crystals, we contact various "dual anode" detector designs. We incorporate a segmented cathode with five regions so that the charge on all seven contacts can be used to determine the energy and the 3-D interaction location of detected X-ray and gamma-ray photons. We describe the status of the detector development program, emphasize strengths and weaknesses of the different contact configurations, and discuss possible applications of Dual Anode Detectors in radiation detection applications.

  12. 3D X-rays application for precision measurement of the cell structure of extruded polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J. Y.; Kim, K. Y.; Shin, H. S.; Yeom, S.; Lee, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    While the thermal performance of existing insulation materials have been determined by blister gases, the thermal performance of future insulation materials will be dependent on the cell size and independent foam content as we use eco-friendly blister gases with a higher thermal conductivity. However, with the current technology we are only able to guess the whole cell size and independent foam content through SEM applied 2D fragmentary scanning but are still far from the level of accurate cell structure data extraction. Under this situation, we utilized X-ray CT scanned 3D images to identify and shape the cell structure and proposed a method of inferring the whole distribution and independent foam content as accurately as possible. According to X-ray CT scanning images and SEM images, the shape was similar but according to tracer applied CT scanning images, the cell size distribution was 380∼400 pm within the range of the general insulation diameter distribution which had the highest reliability. As for extrusion foaming polystyrene, we need additional image processing to identify the independent foam content as its density is too low. So, it is recommended to raise the 3D cell structure completeness of XPS by improving the scanning accuracy.

  13. 3D Imaging of Transition Metals in the Zebrafish Embryo by X-ray Fluorescence Microtomography

    PubMed Central

    Bourassa, Daisy; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Vogt, Stefan; Yi, Hong; Will, Fabian; Richter, Heiko; Shin, Chong Hyun; Fahrni, Christoph J.

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microtomography has emerged as a powerful technique for the 3D visualization of the elemental distribution in biological samples. The mechanical stability, both of the instrument and the specimen, is paramount when acquiring tomographic projection series. By combining the progressive lowering of temperature method (PLT) with femtosecond laser sectioning, we were able to embed, excise, and preserve a zebrafish embryo at 24 hours post fertilization in an X-ray compatible, transparent resin for tomographic elemental imaging. Based on a data set comprised of 60 projections, acquired with a step size of 2 μm during 100 hours of beam time, we reconstructed the 3D distribution of zinc, iron, and copper using the iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstruction algorithm. The volumetric elemental maps, which entail over 124 million individual voxels for each transition metal, revealed distinct elemental distributions that could be correlated with characteristic anatomical features at this stage of embryonic development. PMID:24992831

  14. Ray Traces Through Unsteady Jet Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, J. B.; Fleischman, T. G.

    2002-01-01

    Results of an ongoing effort to quantify the role turbulence in scattering sound in jets are reported. Using a direct numerical simulation database to provide the flow data, ray paths traced through the mean flow are compared with those traced through the actual time evolving turbulent flow. Significant scattering by the turbulence is observed. The most notable effect is that upstream traveling waves that are trapped in the potential core by the mean flow, which acts as a wave guide, easily escape in the turbulent flow. A crude statistical estimate based on ray number density suggests that directivity is modified by the turbulence, but no rigorous treatment of non-uniformities in the high-frequency approximation is attempted.

  15. X-Ray Nanofocus CT: Visualising Of Internal 3D-Structures With Submicrometer Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinekoetter, Christian

    2008-09-01

    High-resolution X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) allows the visualization and failure analysis of the internal micro structure of objects—even if they have complicated 3D-structures where 2D X-ray microscopy would give unclear information. During the past several years, computed tomography has progressed to higher resolution and quicker reconstruction of the 3D-volume. Most recently it even allows a three-dimensional look into the inside of materials with submicron resolution. With the use of nanofocus® tube technology, nanoCT®-systems are pushing forward into application fields that were exclusive to high cost and rare available synchrotron techniques. The study was performed with the new nanotom, a very compact laboratory system which allows the analysis of samples up to 120 mm in diameter and weighing up to 1 kg with exceptional voxel-resolution down to <500 nm (<0.5 microns). It is the first 180 kV nanofocus® computed tomography system in the world which is tailored specifically to the highest-resolution applications in the fields of material science, micro electronics, geology and biology. Therefore it is particularly suitable for nanoCT-examinations e.g. of synthetic materials, metals, ceramics, composite materials, mineral and organic samples. There are a few physical effects influencing the CT quality, such as beam-hardening within the sample or ring-artefacts, which can not be completely avoided. To optimize the quality of high resolution 3D volumes, the nanotom® includes a variety of effective software tools to reduce ring-artefacts and correct beam hardenings or drift effects which occurred during data acquisition. The resulting CT volume data set can be displayed in various ways, for example by virtual slicing and sectional views in any direction of the volume. By the fact that this requires only a mouse click, this technique will substitute destructive mechanical slicing and cutting in many applications. The initial CT results obtained with the

  16. Testing the ray-tracing code GYOTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grould, M.; Paumard, T.; Perrin, G.

    2015-12-01

    In the next few years, the near-infrared interferometer GRAVITY will observe the Galactic Center. Astrometric data will be obtained with an expected accuracy of 10 μas. In order to analyze those future data, we have developed a code named GYOTO to compute orbits and ray-trace images. We want to assess the validity and accuracy of GYOTO in a variety of contexts, in particular for stellar astrometry in the Galactic Center.

  17. The Derivation of Fault Volumetric Properties from 3D Trace Maps Using Outcrop Constrained Discrete Fracture Network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgetts, David; Seers, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Fault systems are important structural elements within many petroleum reservoirs, acting as potential conduits, baffles or barriers to hydrocarbon migration. Large, seismic-scale faults often serve as reservoir bounding seals, forming structural traps which have proved to be prolific plays in many petroleum provinces. Though inconspicuous within most seismic datasets, smaller subsidiary faults, commonly within the damage zones of parent structures, may also play an important role. These smaller faults typically form narrow, tabular low permeability zones which serve to compartmentalize the reservoir, negatively impacting upon hydrocarbon recovery. Though considerable improvements have been made in the visualization field to reservoir-scale fault systems with the advent of 3D seismic surveys, the occlusion of smaller scale faults in such datasets is a source of significant uncertainty during prospect evaluation. The limited capacity of conventional subsurface datasets to probe the spatial distribution of these smaller scale faults has given rise to a large number of outcrop based studies, allowing their intensity, connectivity and size distributions to be explored in detail. Whilst these studies have yielded an improved theoretical understanding of the style and distribution of sub-seismic scale faults, the ability to transform observations from outcrop to quantities that are relatable to reservoir volumes remains elusive. These issues arise from the fact that outcrops essentially offer a pseudo-3D window into the rock volume, making the extrapolation of surficial fault properties such as areal density (fracture length per unit area: P21), to equivalent volumetric measures (i.e. fracture area per unit volume: P32) applicable to fracture modelling extremely challenging. Here, we demonstrate an approach which harnesses advances in the extraction of 3D trace maps from surface reconstructions using calibrated image sequences, in combination with a novel semi

  18. Wavefront construction in 3-D

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcoat, S.R. Hildebrand, S.T.

    1995-12-31

    Travel time computation in inhomogeneous media is essential for pre-stack Kirchhoff imaging in areas such as the sub-salt province in the Gulf of Mexico. The 2D algorithm published by Vinje, et al, has been extended to 3D to compute wavefronts in complicated inhomogeneous media. The 3D wavefront construction algorithm provides many advantages over conventional ray tracing and other methods of computing travel times in 3D. The algorithm dynamically maintains a reasonably consistent ray density without making a priori guesses at the number of rays to shoot. The determination of caustics in 3D is a straight forward geometric procedure. The wavefront algorithm also enables the computation of multi-valued travel time surfaces.

  19. Real-time 3-D X-ray and gamma-ray viewer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A multi-pinhole aperture lead screen forms an equal plurality of invisible mini-images having dissimilar perspectives of an X-ray and gamma-ray emitting object (ABC) onto a near-earth phosphor layer. This layer provides visible light mini-images directly into a visible light image intensifier. A viewing screen having an equal number of dissimilar perspective apertures distributed across its face in a geometric pattern identical to the lead screen, provides a viewer with a real, pseudoscopic image (A'B'C') of the object with full horizontal and vertical parallax. Alternatively, a third screen identical to viewing screen and spaced apart from a second visible light image intensifier, may be positioned between the first image intensifier and the viewing screen, thereby providing the viewer with a virtual, orthoscopic image (A"B"C") of the object (ABC) with full horizontal and vertical parallax.

  20. Local ISM 3D Distribution and Soft X-ray Background Inferences for Nearby Hot Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puspitarini, L.; Lallement, R.; Snowden, Steven L.; Vergely, J.-L.; Snowden, S.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interstellar medium (ISM) maps can be used to locate not only interstellar (IS) clouds, but also IS bubbles between the clouds that are blown by stellar winds and supernovae, and are filled by hot gas. To demonstrate this, and to derive a clearer picture of the local ISM, we compare our recent 3D IS dust distribution maps to the ROSAT diffuse Xray background maps after removal of heliospheric emission. In the Galactic plane, there is a good correspondence between the locations and extents of the mapped nearby cavities and the soft (0.25 keV) background emission distribution, showing that most of these nearby cavities contribute to this soft X-ray emission. Assuming a constant dust to gas ratio and homogeneous 106 K hot gas filling the cavities, we modeled in a simple way the 0.25 keV surface brightness along the Galactic plane as seen from the Sun, taking into account the absorption by the mapped clouds. The data-model comparison favors the existence of hot gas in the solar neighborhood, the so-called Local Bubble (LB). The inferred mean pressure in the local cavities is found to be approx.9,400/cu cm K, in agreement with previous studies, providing a validation test for the method. On the other hand, the model overestimates the emission from the huge cavities located in the third quadrant. Using CaII absorption data, we show that the dust to CaII ratio is very small in those regions, implying the presence of a large quantity of lower temperature (non-X-ray emitting) ionized gas and as a consequence a reduction of the volume filled by hot gas, explaining at least part of the discrepancy. In the meridian plane, the two main brightness enhancements coincide well with the LB's most elongated parts and chimneys connecting the LB to the halo, but no particular nearby cavity is found towards the enhancement in the direction of the bright North Polar Spur (NPS) at high latitude. We searched in the 3D maps for the source regions of the higher energy

  1. CFSpro: ray tracing for design and optimization of complex fenestration systems using mixed dimensionality approach.

    PubMed

    Kostro, André; Geiger, Mario; Scartezzini, Jean-Louis; Schüler, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Advanced optical ray tracing software, CFSpro, was developed for the study and optimization of complex fenestration systems (CFSs). Using an algorithm mixing 2D and 3D approaches, accurate computation of large numbers of rays in extruded geometries can be performed and visualized in real time. A thin film model was included to assess the spectral control provided by coatings. In this paper, the ray tracing model is described and validated. A novel glazing, engineered with this simulation tool, is presented. It combines the functions of daylight provision, glare protection, and seasonal thermal control while conserving a view to the outside at near normal incidence. PMID:27409200

  2. Noninvasive MR to 3D Rotational x-ray registration of vetebral bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Kraats, Everine B.; van Walsum, Theo; Verlaan, Jorrit-Jan; Niessen, Wiro J.

    2003-05-01

    3D Rotational X-ray (3DRX) imaging can be used to intraoperatively acquire 3D volumes depicting bone structures in the patient. Registration of 3DRX to MR images, containing soft tissue information, facilitates image guided surgery on both soft tissue and bone tissue information simultaneously. In this paper, automated noninvasive registration using maximization of mutual information is compared to conventional interactive and invasive point-based registration using the least squares fit of corresponding point sets. Both methods were evaluated on 3DRX images (with a resolution of 0.62x0.62x0.62 mm3) and MRI images (with resolutions of 2x2x2 mm3, 1.5x1.5x1.5 mm3 and 1x1x1 mm3) of seven defrosted spinal segments implanted with six or seven markers. The markers were used for the evaluation of the registration transformations found by both point- and maximization of mutual information based registration. The root-mean-squared-error on markers that were left out during registration was calculated after transforming the marker set with the computed registration transformation. The results show that the noninvasive registration method performs significantly better (p<=0.01) for all MRI resolutions than point-based registration using four or five markers, which is the number of markers conventionally used in image guided surgery systems.

  3. A dispersion minimizing scheme for the 3-D Helmholtz equation based on ray theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolk, Christiaan C.

    2016-06-01

    We develop a new dispersion minimizing compact finite difference scheme for the Helmholtz equation in 2 and 3 dimensions. The scheme is based on a newly developed ray theory for difference equations. A discrete Helmholtz operator and a discrete operator to be applied to the source and the wavefields are constructed. Their coefficients are piecewise polynomial functions of hk, chosen such that phase and amplitude errors are minimal. The phase errors of the scheme are very small, approximately as small as those of the 2-D quasi-stabilized FEM method and substantially smaller than those of alternatives in 3-D, assuming the same number of gridpoints per wavelength is used. In numerical experiments, accurate solutions are obtained in constant and smoothly varying media using meshes with only five to six points per wavelength and wave propagation over hundreds of wavelengths. When used as a coarse level discretization in a multigrid method the scheme can even be used with down to three points per wavelength. Tests on 3-D examples with up to 108 degrees of freedom show that with a recently developed hybrid solver, the use of coarser meshes can lead to corresponding savings in computation time, resulting in good simulation times compared to the literature.

  4. Automatic urban 3D building reconstruction from multi-ray photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClune, A. P.; Miller, P. E.; Mills, J. P.; Holland, D.

    2014-08-01

    Over the last 20 years the use of, and demand for, three dimensional (3D) building models has meant there has been a vast amount of research conducted in automating the extraction and reconstruction of these models from airborne sensors. Whilst many different approaches have been suggested, full automation is yet to be achieved and research has suggested that the combination of data from multiple sources is required in order to achieve this. Developments in digital photogrammetry have delivered improvements in spatial resolution whilst higher image overlap to increase the number of pixel correspondents between images, giving the name multi-ray photogrammetry, has improved the resolution and quality of its by-products. In this paper the extraction of roof geometry from multiray photogrammetry will be covered, which underpins 3D building reconstruction. Using orthophotos, roof vertices are extracted using the Canny edge detector. Roof planes are detected from digital surface models (DSM) by extracting information from 2D cross sections and measuring height differences. To eliminate overhanging vegetation, the segmentation of trees is investigated by calculating the characteristics of a point within a local neighbourhood of the photogrammetric point cloud. The results highlight the complementary nature of these information sources, and a methodology for integration and reconstruction of roof geometry is proposed.

  5. Photoemission spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis of 3D topological and Kondo insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibayev, Pavel

    2015-03-01

    The advantage of studying 3D topological insulators (TIs), compounds that have attracted the attention of many in the condensed matter field, is the ability for their existence at room temperature and no magnetic fields, allowing both for resolving their band structure via angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and understanding electrical transport and other properties via X-ray diffraction (XRD) and point-contact spectroscopy (PCS). A comprehensive quantitative analysis of Bi2Se3, a 3D TI, was carried out using these methods. The Bi2Se3\\ crystals were synthesized in-house at Princeton University. A first-principles calculation based on density functional theory, DFT, was performed using the Abinit software. The band structure of the crystal was then resolved via ARPES at the Advanced Light Source in LBNL, resulting in a surprisingly stark and clear single Dirac cone. A large band gap was confirmed, suggesting an increased potential for applications. In contrast, Kondo insulators are found in rare-earth based materials with f-electron degrees of freedom. Photon energy dependent dispersion relationships and temperature dependence studies were performed on a Kondo candidate CeB6 via ARPES, showing an even number of Dirac cones and a non-TI behavior. Analysis of I-V characteristics through PCS will follow, in addition to characterization via Bruker XRD for both compounds. Research group led by Professor M. Zahid Hasan (Princeton University).

  6. Computing elastic moduli on 3-D X-ray computed tomography image stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garboczi, E. J.; Kushch, V. I.

    2015-03-01

    A numerical task of current interest is to compute the effective elastic properties of a random composite material by operating on a 3D digital image of its microstructure obtained via X-ray computed tomography (CT). The 3-D image is usually sub-sampled since an X-ray CT image is typically of order 10003 voxels or larger, which is considered to be a very large finite element problem. Two main questions for the validity of any such study are then: can the sub-sample size be made sufficiently large to capture enough of the important details of the random microstructure so that the computed moduli can be thought of as accurate, and what boundary conditions should be chosen for these sub-samples? This paper contributes to the answer of both questions by studying a simulated X-ray CT cylindrical microstructure with three phases, cut from a random model system with known elastic properties. A new hybrid numerical method is introduced, which makes use of finite element solutions coupled with exact solutions for elastic moduli of square arrays of parallel cylindrical fibers. The new method allows, in principle, all of the microstructural data to be used when the X-ray CT image is in the form of a cylinder, which is often the case. Appendix A describes a similar algorithm for spherical sub-samples, which may be of use when examining the mechanical properties of particles. Cubic sub-samples are also taken from this simulated X-ray CT structure to investigate the effect of two different kinds of boundary conditions: forced periodic and fixed displacements. It is found that using forced periodic displacements on the non-geometrically periodic cubic sub-samples always gave more accurate results than using fixed displacements, although with about the same precision. The larger the cubic sub-sample, the more accurate and precise was the elastic computation, and using the complete cylindrical sample with the new method gave still more accurate and precise results. Fortran 90

  7. The 3D inversion of airborne gamma-ray spectrometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minty, Brian; Brodie, Ross

    2016-07-01

    We present a new method for the inversion of airborne gamma-ray spectrometric line data to a regular grid of radioelement concentration estimates on the ground. The method incorporates the height of the aircraft, the 3D terrain within the field of view of the spectrometer, the directional sensitivity of rectangular detectors, and a source model comprising vertical rectangular prisms with the same horizontal dimensions as the required grid cell size. The top of each prism is a plane surface derived from a best-fit plane to the digital elevation model of the earth's surface within each grid cell area. The method is a significant improvement on current methods, and gives superior interpolation between flight lines. It also eliminates terrain effects that would normally remain in the data after the conventional processing of these data assuming a flat-earth model.

  8. Visualising, segmenting and analysing heterogenous glacigenic sediments using 3D x-ray CT.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Simon; Diggens, Lucy; Groves, John; O'Sullivan, Catherine; Marsland, Rhona

    2015-04-01

    Whilst there has been significant application of 3D x-ray CT to geological contexts, much of this work has focused on examining properties such as porosity, which are important in reservoir assessment and hydrological evaluations. There has been considerably less attention given to the analysis of the properties of sediments themselves. One particular challenge in CT analysis is to effectively observe and discriminate the relationships between the skeleton and matrix of a sediment. This is particularly challenging in glacial sediments, which comprise an admixture of particles of a wide range of size, morphology and composition within a variably-consolidated sediment body. A key sedimentological component of glacial sediments is their fabric properties. Till fabric data has long been applied to the analysis of the coupling between glaciers and their deformable substrates. This work has typically focused on identifying former ice-flow directions, processes of till deformation and emplacement, and such data is often used to reconcile the sedimentary evidence of former glaciation with the predicted glacier and ice-sheet dynamics derived from numerical models. The collection and interpretation of till fabric data has received significant criticism in recent years, with issues such as low sample populations (typically ~50 grains per sample), small-scale spatial variation in till fabric and operator bias during data collection, all of which compromise the reliability of macro-scale till fabric analysis. Recent studies of micro-scale till fabrics have substantially added to our understanding, and suggest there is systematic variation in particle fabric as a function of particle size. However, these findings are compromised by the 2D nature of the samples (derived from thin sections) capturing only apparent orientations of particles, and are again limited to relatively small datasets. As such, there are fundamental limitations in the quality and application of till fabric

  9. Relativistic 3D precessing jet simulations for the X-ray binary SS433

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monceau-Baroux, Rémi; Porth, Oliver; Meliani, Zakaria; Keppens, Rony

    2014-01-01

    Context. Modern high-resolution radio observations allow us a closer look into the objects that power relativistic jets. This is especially the case for SS433, an X-ray binary that emits a precessing jet that is observed down to the subparsec scale. Aims: We aim to study full 3D dynamics of relativistic jets associated with active galactic nuclei or X-ray binaries (XRB). In particular, we incorporate the precessing motion of a jet into a model for the jet associated with the XRB SS433. Our study of the jet dynamics in this system focuses on the subparsec scales. We investigate the impact of jet precession and the variation of the Lorentz factor of the injected matter on the general 3D jet dynamics and its energy transfer to the surrounding medium. After visualizing and quantifying jet dynamics, we aim to realize synthetic radio mapping of the data, to compare our results with observations. Methods: For our study we used a block-tree adaptive mesh refinement scheme and an inner time-dependent boundary prescription to inject precessing bipolar supersonic jets. Parameters extracted from observations were used. Different 3D jet realizations that match the kinetic flux of the SS433 jet were intercompared, which vary in density contrast and jet beam velocity. We tracked the energy content deposited in different regions of the domain affected by the jet. Our code allows us to follow the adiabatic cooling of a population of relativistic particles injected by the jet. This evolving energy spectrum of accelerated electrons, using a pressure-based proxy for the magnetic field, allowed us to obtain the radio emission from our simulation. Results: We find a higher energy transfer for a precessing jet than for standing jets with otherwise identical parameters as a result of the effectively increased interaction area. We obtain synthetic radio maps for all jets, from which one can see that dynamical flow features are clearly linked with enhanced emission sites. Conclusions: The

  10. 3D evolution of barred galaxies based on the cosmic-ray driven dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Natalia; Otmianowska-Mazur, Katarzyna; Hanasz, Michal

    2015-08-01

    Our MHD numerical calculations provide results for a three-dimensional model of barred galaxies involving a cosmic-ray driven dynamo process that depends on star formation rates. We applied global 3D numerical calculations of a cosmic-ray driven dynamo in barred galaxies with different physical input parameters such as the supernova (SN) rate.Furthermore, we argue that the cosmic-ray driven dynamo can account for a number of magnetic features in barred galaxies, such as magnetic arms observed along the gaseous arms, magnetic arms in the inter-arm regions, polarized emission that is at the strongest in the central part of the galaxy, where the bar is situated, polarized emission that forms ridges coinciding with the dust lanes along the leading edges of the bar, as well as their very strong total radio intensity. Our results give the modelled magnetic field topology similar to the observational maps of polarized intensity in barred galaxies. Moreover, they cast a new light on a number of polarization properties observed in barred or even spiral galaxies, like fast exponential growth of the total magnetic energy to the present values, stochastic nature of magnetic field reversals (for instance: in the Milky Way).We concluded that a cosmic-ray driven dynamo process in barred galaxies could boost magnetic fields efficiently. The fastest rate of magnetic field increase is 195 yr for SN frequency 1/50 yr-1.The obtained intensity of magnetic field corresponds to the observational values (few μG in spiral arms). We also found the effect of shifting magnetic arms.

  11. 3D printing of preclinical X-ray computed tomographic data sets.

    PubMed

    Doney, Evan; Krumdick, Lauren A; Diener, Justin M; Wathen, Connor A; Chapman, Sarah E; Stamile, Brian; Scott, Jeremiah E; Ravosa, Matthew J; Van Avermaete, Tony; Leevy, W Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing allows for the production of highly detailed objects through a process known as additive manufacturing. Traditional, mold-injection methods to create models or parts have several limitations, the most important of which is a difficulty in making highly complex products in a timely, cost-effective manner.(1) However, gradual improvements in three-dimensional printing technology have resulted in both high-end and economy instruments that are now available for the facile production of customized models.(2) These printers have the ability to extrude high-resolution objects with enough detail to accurately represent in vivo images generated from a preclinical X-ray CT scanner. With proper data collection, surface rendering, and stereolithographic editing, it is now possible and inexpensive to rapidly produce detailed skeletal and soft tissue structures from X-ray CT data. Even in the early stages of development, the anatomical models produced by three-dimensional printing appeal to both educators and researchers who can utilize the technology to improve visualization proficiency. (3, 4) The real benefits of this method result from the tangible experience a researcher can have with data that cannot be adequately conveyed through a computer screen. The translation of pre-clinical 3D data to a physical object that is an exact copy of the test subject is a powerful tool for visualization and communication, especially for relating imaging research to students, or those in other fields. Here, we provide a detailed method for printing plastic models of bone and organ structures derived from X-ray CT scans utilizing an Albira X-ray CT system in conjunction with PMOD, ImageJ, Meshlab, Netfabb, and ReplicatorG software packages. PMID:23542702

  12. Multi-contrast 3D X-ray imaging of porous and composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sarapata, Adrian; Herzen, Julia; Ruiz-Yaniz, Maite; Zanette, Irene; Rack, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-04-13

    Grating-based X-ray computed tomography allows for simultaneous and nondestructive determination of the full X-ray complex index of refraction and the scattering coefficient distribution inside an object in three dimensions. Its multi-contrast capabilities combined with a high resolution of a few micrometers make it a suitable tool for assessing multiple phases inside porous and composite materials such as concrete. Here, we present quantitative results of a proof-of-principle experiment performed on a concrete sample. Thanks to the complementarity of the contrast channels, more concrete phases could be distinguished than in conventional attenuation-based imaging. The phase-contrast reconstruction shows high contrast between the hardened cement paste and the aggregates and thus allows easy 3D segmentation. Thanks to the dark-field image, micro-cracks inside the coarse aggregates are visible. We believe that these results are extremely interesting in the field of porous and composite materials studies because of unique information provided by grating interferometry in a non-destructive way.

  13. Resonant x-ray scattering in 3d-transition-metal oxides: Anisotropy and charge orderings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subías, G.; García, J.; Blasco, J.; Herrero-Martín, J.; Sánchez, M. C.

    2009-11-01

    The structural, magnetic and electronic properties of transition metal oxides reflect in atomic charge, spin and orbital degrees of freedom. Resonant x-ray scattering (RXS) allows us to perform an accurate investigation of all these electronic degrees. RXS combines high-Q resolution x-ray diffraction with the properties of the resonance providing information similar to that obtained by atomic spectroscopy (element selectivity and a large enhancement of scattering amplitude for this particular element and sensitivity to the symmetry of the electronic levels through the multipole electric transitions). Since electronic states are coupled to the local symmetry, RXS reveals the occurrence of symmetry breaking effects such as lattice distortions, onset of electronic orbital ordering or ordering of electronic charge distributions. We shall discuss the strength of RXS at the K absorption edge of 3d transition-metal oxides by describing various applications in the observation of local anisotropy and charge disproportionation. Examples of these resonant effects are (I) charge ordering transitions in manganites, Fe3O4 and ferrites and (II) forbidden reflections and anisotropy in Mn3+ perovskites, spinel ferrites and cobalt oxides. In all the studied cases, the electronic (charge and/or anisotropy) orderings are determined by the structural distortions.

  14. X-ray imaging and 3D reconstruction of in-flight exploding foil initiator flyers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willey, T. M.; Champley, K.; Hodgin, R.; Lauderbach, L.; Bagge-Hansen, M.; May, C.; Sanchez, N.; Jensen, B. J.; Iverson, A.; van Buuren, T.

    2016-06-01

    Exploding foil initiators (EFIs), also known as slapper initiators or detonators, offer clear safety and timing advantages over other means of initiating detonation in high explosives. This work outlines a new capability for imaging and reconstructing three-dimensional images of operating EFIs. Flyer size and intended velocity were chosen based on parameters of the imaging system. The EFI metal plasma and plastic flyer traveling at 2.5 km/s were imaged with short ˜80 ps pulses spaced 153.4 ns apart. A four-camera system acquired 4 images from successive x-ray pulses from each shot. The first frame was prior to bridge burst, the 2nd images the flyer about 0.16 mm above the surface but edges of the foil and/or flyer are still attached to the substrate. The 3rd frame captures the flyer in flight, while the 4th shows a completely detached flyer in a position that is typically beyond where slappers strike initiating explosives. Multiple acquisitions at different incident angles and advanced computed tomography reconstruction algorithms were used to produce a 3-dimensional image of the flyer at 0.16 and 0.53 mm above the surface. Both the x-ray images and the 3D reconstruction show a strong anisotropy in the shape of the flyer and underlying foil parallel vs. perpendicular to the initiating current and electrical contacts. These results provide detailed flyer morphology during the operation of the EFI.

  15. Projection-based metal-artifact reduction for industrial 3D X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Amirkhanov, Artem; Heinzl, Christoph; Reiter, Michael; Kastner, Johann; Gröller, M Eduard

    2011-12-01

    Multi-material components, which contain metal parts surrounded by plastic materials, are highly interesting for inspection using industrial 3D X-ray computed tomography (3DXCT). Examples of this application scenario are connectors or housings with metal inlays in the electronic or automotive industry. A major problem of this type of components is the presence of metal, which causes streaking artifacts and distorts the surrounding media in the reconstructed volume. Streaking artifacts and dark-band artifacts around metal components significantly influence the material characterization (especially for the plastic components). In specific cases these artifacts even prevent a further analysis. Due to the nature and the different characteristics of artifacts, the development of an efficient artifact-reduction technique in reconstruction-space is rather complicated. In this paper we present a projection-space pipeline for metal-artifacts reduction. The proposed technique first segments the metal in the spatial domain of the reconstructed volume in order to separate it from the other materials. Then metal parts are forward-projected on the set of projections in a way that metal-projection regions are treated as voids. Subsequently the voids, which are left by the removed metal, are interpolated in the 2D projections. Finally, the metal is inserted back into the reconstructed 3D volume during the fusion stage. We present a visual analysis tool, allowing for interactive parameter estimation of the metal segmentation. The results of the proposed artifact-reduction technique are demonstrated on a test part as well as on real world components. For these specimens we achieve a significant reduction of metal artifacts, allowing an enhanced material characterization. PMID:22034338

  16. A 3D CZT high resolution detector for x- and gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvvetli, I.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Zappettini, A.; Zambelli, N.; Benassi, G.; Kalemci, E.; Caroli, E.; Stephen, J. B.; Auricchio, N.

    2014-07-01

    At DTU Space we have developed a high resolution three dimensional (3D) position sensitive CZT detector for high energy astronomy. The design of the 3D CZT detector is based on the CZT Drift Strip detector principle. The position determination perpendicular to the anode strips is performed using a novel interpolating technique based on the drift strip signals. The position determination in the detector depth direction, is made using the DOI technique based the detector cathode and anode signals. The position determination along the anode strips is made with the help of 10 cathode strips orthogonal to the anode strips. The position resolutions are at low energies dominated by the electronic noise and improve therefore with increased signal to noise ratio as the energy increases. The achievable position resolution at higher energies will however be dominated by the extended spatial distribution of the photon produced ionization charge. The main sources of noise contribution of the drift signals are the leakage current between the strips and the strip capacitance. For the leakage current, we used a metallization process that reduces the leakage current by means of a high resistive thin layer between the drift strip electrodes and CZT detector material. This method was applied to all the proto type detectors and was a very effective method to reduce the surface leakage current between the strips. The proto type detector was recently investigated at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble which provided a fine 50 × 50 μm2 collimated X-ray beam covering an energy band up to 600 keV. The Beam positions are resolved very well with a ~ 0.2 mm position resolution (FWHM ) at 400 keV in all directions.

  17. Modeling and Measurement of 3D Deformation of Scoliotic Spine Using 2D X-ray Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Leow, Wee Kheng; Huang, Chao-Hui; Howe, Tet Sen

    Scoliosis causes deformations such as twisting and lateral bending of the spine. To correct scoliotic deformation, the extents of 3D spinal deformation need to be measured. This paper studies the modeling and measurement of scoliotic spine based on 3D curve model. Through modeling the spine as a 3D Cosserat rod, the 3D structure of a scoliotic spine can be recovered by obtaining the minimum potential energy registration of the rod to the scoliotic spine in the x-ray image. Test results show that it is possible to obtain accurate 3D reconstruction using only the landmarks in a single view, provided that appropriate boundary conditions and elastic properties are included as constraints.

  18. Magnetospheric ray tracing studies. [Jupiter's decametric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Six, N. F.

    1982-01-01

    Using a model of Jupiter's magnetized plasma environment, radiation raypaths were calculated with a three-dimension ray tracing program. It is assumed that energetic particles produce the emission in the planet's auroral zone at frequencies just above the electron gyrofrequencies. This radiation is generated in narrow sheets defined by the angle of a ray with respect to the magnetic field line. By specifying the source position: latitude, longitude, and radial distance from the planet, signatures in the spectrum of frequency versus time seen by Voyager 1 and 2 were duplicated. The frequency range and the curvature of the decametric arcs in these dynamic spectra are the result of the geometry of the radiation sheets (imposed by the plasma and by the B-field) and illumination of Voyager 1 and 2 as the rotating magnetosphere mimics a pulsar.

  19. Empirical assessment of the validity limits of the surface wave full ray theory using realistic 3-D Earth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, Laura; Ferreira, Ana M. G.

    2016-04-01

    The surface wave full ray theory (FRT) is an efficient tool to calculate synthetic waveforms of surface waves. It combines the concept of local modes with exact ray tracing as a function of frequency, providing a more complete description of surface wave propagation than the widely used great circle approximation (GCA). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of the FRT approach to model teleseismic long-period surface waveforms (T ˜ 45-150 s) in the context of current 3-D Earth models to empirically assess its validity domain and its scope for future studies in seismic tomography. To achieve this goal, we compute vertical and horizontal component fundamental mode synthetic Rayleigh waveforms using the FRT, which are compared with calculations using the highly accurate spectral element method. We use 13 global earth models including 3-D crustal and mantle structure, which are derived by successively varying the strength and lengthscale of heterogeneity in current tomographic models. For completeness, GCA waveforms are also compared with the spectral element method. We find that the FRT accurately predicts the phase and amplitude of long-period Rayleigh waves (T ˜ 45-150 s) for almost all the models considered, with errors in the modelling of the phase (amplitude) of Rayleigh waves being smaller than 5 per cent (10 per cent) in most cases. The largest errors in phase and amplitude are observed for T ˜ 45 s and for the three roughest earth models considered that exhibit shear wave anomalies of up to ˜20 per cent, which is much larger than in current global tomographic models. In addition, we find that overall the GCA does not predict Rayleigh wave amplitudes well, except for the longest wave periods (T ˜ 150 s) and the smoothest models considered. Although the GCA accurately predicts Rayleigh wave phase for current earth models such as S20RTS and S40RTS, FRT's phase errors are smaller, notably for the shortest wave periods considered (T ˜ 45 s and

  20. 3-D X-ray tomography of diamondiferous mantle eclogite xenoliths, Siberia: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Sobolev, Nikolay V.; Pernet-Fisher, John F.; Ketcham, Richard A.; Maisano, Jessica A.; Pokhilenko, Lyudmila N.; Taylor, Dawn; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2015-04-01

    -systems'. Diamonds observed completely enclosed in garnets suggest an early diamond-forming event prior to major re-crystallization and eclogite formation during subduction. The occurrence of diamond in association with embayed garnets suggests that diamond grew at the expense of the hosting silicate protolith. In addition, the spatial relationships of diamonds with metasomatic pathways, which are generally interpreted to result from late-stage proto-kimberlitic fluid percolation, indicate a period of diamond growth occurring close to, but prior to, the time of kimberlite emplacement. Furthermore, the paragenesis of sulfides within eclogite xenoliths are described using 3-D models for entire xenoliths volumes, providing important constraints of the timing of sulfide mobilization within the mantle. Three-D animations created using X-ray tomography data for ten of the xenoliths can be viewed at the following link: http://eps.utk.edu/faculty/taylor/tomography.php

  1. Sloped irradiation techniques in deep x-ray lithography for 3D shaping of microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiertag, Gregor; Ehrfeld, Wolfgang; Lehr, Heinz; Schmidt, Martin

    1997-07-01

    Deep x-ray lithography (DXRL) makes use of synchrotron radiation (SR) to transfer an absorber pattern from a mask into a thick resist layer. For most applications the direction of the SR beam is perpendicular to the mask and the resist plane. Subsequent replication techniques, e.g. electroforming, moulding or hot embossing, convert the resist relief obtained after development into micromechanical, microfluidic or micro- optical elements made from metals, polymers or ceramic materials. This process sequence is well known as the LIGA technique. The normal shadow printing process is complemented and enhanced by advanced techniques, e.g. by tilting the mask and the resist with respect to the SR beam or aligned multiple exposures to produce step-like structures. In this paper a technology for the fabrication of multidirectional inclined microstructures applying multiple tilted DXRL will be presented. Instead of one exposure with the mask/substrate assembly perpendicular to the SR beam, irradiation is performed several times applying tilt and rotational angles of the mask/substrate assembly relative to the SR beam. A huge variety of 3-D structures can be obtained using this technique. Some possible applications will be discussed.

  2. 3-D localization of gamma ray sources with coded apertures for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaissas, I.; Papadimitropoulos, C.; Karafasoulis, K.; Potiriadis, C.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Several small gamma cameras for radioguided surgery using CdTe or CdZnTe have parallel or pinhole collimators. Coded aperture imaging is a well-known method for gamma ray source directional identification, applied in astrophysics mainly. The increase in efficiency due to the substitution of the collimators by the coded masks renders the method attractive for gamma probes used in radioguided surgery. We have constructed and operationally verified a setup consisting of two CdTe gamma cameras with Modified Uniform Redundant Array (MURA) coded aperture masks of rank 7 and 19 and a video camera. The 3-D position of point-like radioactive sources is estimated via triangulation using decoded images acquired by the gamma cameras. We have also developed code for both fast and detailed simulations and we have verified the agreement between experimental results and simulations. In this paper we present a simulation study for the spatial localization of two point sources using coded aperture masks with rank 7 and 19.

  3. X-ray imaging and 3D reconstruction of in-flight exploding foil initiator flyers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Willey, T. M.; Champley, K.; Hodgin, R.; Lauderbach, L.; Bagge-Hansen, M.; May, C.; Sanchez, N.; Jensen, B. J.; Iverson, A.; van Buuren, T.

    2016-06-17

    Exploding foil initiators (EFIs), also known as slapper initiators or detonators, offer clear safety and timing advantages over other means of initiating detonation in high explosives. The work described here outlines a new capability for imaging and reconstructing three-dimensional images of operating EFIs. Flyer size and intended velocity were chosen based on parameters of the imaging system. The EFI metal plasma and plastic flyer traveling at 2.5 km/s were imaged with short ~80 ps pulses spaced 153.4 ns apart. A four-camera system acquired 4 images from successive x-ray pulses from each shot. The first frame was prior to bridge burst,more » the 2nd images the flyer about 0.16 mm above the surface but edges of the foil and/or flyer are still attached to the substrate. The 3rd frame captures the flyer in flight, while the 4th shows a completely detached flyer in a position that is typically beyond where slappers strike initiating explosives. Multiple acquisitions at different incident angles and advanced computed tomography reconstruction algorithms were used to produce a 3-dimensional image of the flyer at 0.16 and 0.53 mm above the surface. Both the x-ray images and the 3D reconstruction show a strong anisotropy in the shape of the flyer and underlying foil parallel vs. perpendicular to the initiating current and electrical contacts. These results provide detailed flyer morphology during the operation of the EFI.« less

  4. 3-D surface profile measurements of large x-ray synchrotron radiation mirrors using stitching interferometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Assoufid, L.; Bray, M.; Qian, J.; Shu, D.

    2002-09-12

    Stitching interferometry, using small-aperture, high-resolution, phase-measuring interferometry, has been proposed for quite some time now as a metrology technique to obtain 3-dimensional profiles of surfaces of oversized optical components and substrates. The aim of this work is to apply this method to the specific case of long grazing-incidence x-ray mirrors, such as those used in beamlines at synchrotron radiation facilities around the world. Both fabrication and characterization of these mirrors would greatly benefit from this technique because it offers the potential for providing measurements with accuracy and resolution better than those obtained using existing noncontact laser profilers, such as the long trace profiler (LTP). Measurement data can be used as feedback for computer-controlled fabrication processes to correct for possible topography errors. The data can also be used for simulating and predicting mirror performance under realistic conditions. A semiautomated stitching system was built and tested at the X-ray Optics Metrology Laboratory of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The initial objective was to achieve a measurement sensitivity on the order of 1 {micro}rad rms. Preliminary tests on a 1 m-long x-ray mirror showed system repeatability of less than 0.6 {micro}rad rms. This value is comparable to that of a conventional LTP. The measurement accuracy was mostly affected by environmental perturbations and system calibration effects. With a fully automated and improved system (to be built in the near future), we expect to achieve measurement sensitivity on the order of 0.0 {micro}rad rms or better. In this paper, after a brief review of basic principles and general technical difficulties and challenges of the stitching technique, a detailed description of the measurement setup is given and preliminary results obtained with it are analyzed and discussed.

  5. High performance dosimetry calculations using adapted ray-tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrotte, Lancelot; Saupin, Guillaume

    2010-11-01

    When preparing interventions on nuclear sites, it is interesting to study different scenarios, to identify the most appropriate one for the operator(s). Using virtual reality tools is a good way to simulate the potential scenarios. Thus, taking advantage of very efficient computation times can help the user studying different complex scenarios, by immediately evaluating the impact of any changes. In the field of radiation protection, people often use computation codes based on the straight line attenuation method with build-up factors. As for other approaches, geometrical computations (finding all the interactions between radiation rays and the scene objects) remain the bottleneck of the simulation. We present in this paper several optimizations used to speed up these geometrical computations, using innovative GPU ray-tracing algorithms. For instance, we manage to compute every intersectionbetween 600 000 rays and a huge 3D industrial scene in a fraction of second. Moreover, our algorithm works the same way for both static and dynamic scenes, allowing easier study of complex intervention scenarios (where everything moves: the operator(s), the shielding objects, the radiation sources).

  6. Analytic 3D Imaging of Mammalian Nucleus at Nanoscale Using Coherent X-Rays and Optical Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Changyong; Takagi, Masatoshi; Park, Jaehyun; Xu, Rui; Gallagher-Jones, Marcus; Imamoto, Naoko; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Despite the notable progress that has been made with nano-bio imaging probes, quantitative nanoscale imaging of multistructured specimens such as mammalian cells remains challenging due to their inherent structural complexity. Here, we successfully performed three-dimensional (3D) imaging of mammalian nuclei by combining coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy, explicitly visualizing nuclear substructures at several tens of nanometer resolution, and optical fluorescence microscopy, cross confirming the substructures with immunostaining. This demonstrates the successful application of coherent x-rays to obtain the 3D ultrastructure of mammalian nuclei and establishes a solid route to nanoscale imaging of complex specimens. PMID:25185543

  7. Data-fusion of high resolution X-ray CT, SEM and EDS for 3D and pseudo-3D chemical and structural characterization of sandstone.

    PubMed

    De Boever, Wesley; Derluyn, Hannelore; Van Loo, Denis; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2015-07-01

    When dealing with the characterization of the structure and composition of natural stones, problems of representativeness and choice of analysis technique almost always occur. Since feature-sizes are typically spread over the nanometer to centimeter range, there is never one single technique that allows a rapid and complete characterization. Over the last few decades, high resolution X-ray CT (μ-CT) has become an invaluable tool for the 3D characterization of many materials, including natural stones. This technique has many important advantages, but there are also some limitations, including a tradeoff between resolution and sample size and a lack of chemical information. For geologists, this chemical information is of importance for the determination of minerals inside samples. We suggest a workflow for the complete chemical and structural characterization of a representative volume of a heterogeneous geological material. This workflow consists of combining information derived from CT scans at different spatial resolutions with information from scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. PMID:25939085

  8. Application of ray tracing in radiation heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Joseph F.

    1993-01-01

    This collection of presentation figures displays the capabilities of ray tracing for radiation propagation calculations as compared to an analytical approach. The goal is to introduce the terminology and solution process used in ray tracing, and provide insight into radiation heat transfer principles and analysis tools. A thermal analysis working environment is introduced that solves demanding radiation heat transfer problems based on ray tracing. This information may serve as a reference for designing and building ones own analysis environment.

  9. New X-Ray Tomography Method Based on the 3D Radon Transform Compatible with Anisotropic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassholz, M.; Koberstein-Schwarz, B.; Ruhlandt, A.; Krenkel, M.; Salditt, T.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we propose a novel computed tomography (CT) approach for three-dimensional (3D) object reconstruction, based on a generalized tomographic geometry with two-dimensional angular sampling (two angular degrees of freedom). The reconstruction is based on the 3D radon transform and is compatible with anisotropic beam conditions. This allows isotropic 3D imaging with a source, which can be extended along one direction for increased flux, while high resolution is achieved by a small source size only in the orthogonal direction. This novel scheme for analytical CT is demonstrated by numerical simulations and proof-of-concept experiments. In this way high resolution and coherence along a single direction determines the reconstruction quality of the entire 3D data set, opening up, for example, new opportunities to achieve nanoscale resolution and/or phase contrast with low brilliance sources such as laboratory x-ray or neutron sources.

  10. New X-Ray Tomography Method Based on the 3D Radon Transform Compatible with Anisotropic Sources.

    PubMed

    Vassholz, M; Koberstein-Schwarz, B; Ruhlandt, A; Krenkel, M; Salditt, T

    2016-02-26

    In this work, we propose a novel computed tomography (CT) approach for three-dimensional (3D) object reconstruction, based on a generalized tomographic geometry with two-dimensional angular sampling (two angular degrees of freedom). The reconstruction is based on the 3D Radon transform and is compatible with anisotropic beam conditions. This allows isotropic 3D imaging with a source, which can be extended along one direction for increased flux, while high resolution is achieved by a small source size only in the orthogonal direction. This novel scheme for analytical CT is demonstrated by numerical simulations and proof-of-concept experiments. In this way high resolution and coherence along a single direction determines the reconstruction quality of the entire 3D data set, opening up, for example, new opportunities to achieve nanoscale resolution and/or phase contrast with low brilliance sources such as laboratory x-ray or neutron sources. PMID:26967444

  11. Powerful scriptable ray tracing package xrt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klementiev, Konstantin; Chernikov, Roman

    2014-09-01

    We present an open source python based ray tracing tool that offers several useful features in graphical presentation, material properties, advanced calculations of synchrotron sources, implementation of diffractive and refractive elements, complex (also closed) surfaces and multiprocessing. The package has many usage examples which are supplied together with the code and visualized on its web page. We exemplify the present version by modeling (i) a curved crystal analyzer, (ii) a quarter wave plate, (iii) Bragg-Fresnel optics and (iv) multiple reflective and non-sequential optics (polycapillary). The present version implements the use of OpenCL framework that executes calculations on both CPUs and GPUs. Currently, the calculations of an undulator source on a GPU show a gain of about two orders of magnitude in computing time. The development version is successful in modelling the wavefront propagation. Two examples of diffraction on a plane mirror and a plane blazed grating are given for a beam with a finite energy band.

  12. Fully 3D-Integrated Pixel Detectors for X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Gabriella, Carini; Enquist, Paul; Grybos, Pawel; Holm, Scott; Lipton, Ronald; Maj, Piotr; Patti, Robert; Siddons, David Peter; Szczygiel, Robert; Yarema, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The vertically integrated photon imaging chip (VIPIC1) pixel detector is a stack consisting of a 500-μm-thick silicon sensor, a two-tier 34-μm-thick integrated circuit, and a host printed circuit board (PCB). The integrated circuit tiers were bonded using the direct bonding technology with copper, and each tier features 1-μm-diameter through-silicon vias that were used for connections to the sensor on one side, and to the host PCB on the other side. The 80-μm-pixel-pitch sensor was the direct bonding technology with nickel bonded to the integrated circuit. The stack was mounted on the board using Sn–Pb balls placed on a 320-μm pitch, yielding an entirely wire-bond-less structure. The analog front-end features a pulse response peaking at below 250 ns, and the power consumption per pixel is 25 μW. We successful completed the 3-D integration and have reported here. Additionally, all pixels in the matrix of 64 × 64 pixels were responding on well-bonded devices. Correct operation of the sparsified readout, allowing a single 153-ns bunch timing resolution, was confirmed in the tests on a synchrotron beam of 10-keV X-rays. An equivalent noise charge of 36.2 e- rms and a conversion gain of 69.5 μV/e- with 2.6 e- rms and 2.7 μV/e- rms pixel-to-pixel variations, respectively, were measured.

  13. 3D printing in X-ray and Gamma-Ray Imaging: A novel method for fabricating high-density imaging apertures☆

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian W.; Moore, Jared W.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Fryé, Teresa; Adler, Steven; Sery, Joe; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in 3D rapid-prototyping printers, 3D modeling software, and casting techniques allow for cost-effective fabrication of custom components in gamma-ray and X-ray imaging systems. Applications extend to new fabrication methods for custom collimators, pinholes, calibration and resolution phantoms, mounting and shielding components, and imaging apertures. Details of the fabrication process for these components, specifically the 3D printing process, cold casting with a tungsten epoxy, and lost-wax casting in platinum are presented. PMID:22199414

  14. Enhanced quantification for 3D SEM–EDS: Using the full set of available X-ray lines

    PubMed Central

    Burdet, Pierre; Croxall, S.A.; Midgley, P.A.

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced method to quantify energy dispersive spectra recorded in 3D with a scanning electron microscope (3D SEM–EDS) has been previously demonstrated. This paper presents an extension of this method using all the available X-ray lines generated by the beam. The extended method benefits from using high energy lines, that are more accurately quantified, and from using soft X-rays that are highly absorbed and thus more surface sensitive. The data used to assess the method are acquired with a dual beam FIB/SEM investigating a multi-element Ni-based superalloy. A high accelerating voltage, needed to excite the highest energy X-ray line, results in two available X-ray lines for several elements. The method shows an improved compositional quantification as well as an improved spatial resolution. PMID:25461593

  15. Enhanced quantification for 3D SEM-EDS: using the full set of available X-ray lines.

    PubMed

    Burdet, Pierre; Croxall, S A; Midgley, P A

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced method to quantify energy dispersive spectra recorded in 3D with a scanning electron microscope (3D SEM-EDS) has been previously demonstrated. This paper presents an extension of this method using all the available X-ray lines generated by the beam. The extended method benefits from using high energy lines, that are more accurately quantified, and from using soft X-rays that are highly absorbed and thus more surface sensitive. The data used to assess the method are acquired with a dual beam FIB/SEM investigating a multi-element Ni-based superalloy. A high accelerating voltage, needed to excite the highest energy X-ray line, results in two available X-ray lines for several elements. The method shows an improved compositional quantification as well as an improved spatial resolution. PMID:25461593

  16. Ray-tracing code TRAVIS for ECR heating, EC current drive and ECE diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marushchenko, N. B.; Turkin, Y.; Maassberg, H.

    2014-01-01

    A description of the recently developed ray-tracing code TRAVIS is given together with the theoretical background, results of benchmarking and examples of application. The code is written for electron cyclotron studies with emphasis on heating, current drive and ECE diagnostic. The code works with an arbitrary 3D magnetic equilibrium being applicable for both stellarators and tokamaks. The equations for ray tracing are taken in the weakly relativistic approach, i.e. with thermal effects taken into account, while the absorption, current drive and emissivity are calculated in the fully relativistic approach. For the calculation of ECCD, an adjoint technique with parallel momentum conservation is applied. The code is controlled through a specially designed graphical user interface, which allows the preparation of the input parameters and viewing the results in convenient (2D and 3D) form.

  17. Ray tracing in nuclear-pumped flowing gas lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mat'ev, V Yu

    2003-06-30

    The ray tracing in the resonators of a nuclear-pumped flowing gas lasers is considered. The refractive index profile of the medium in a direction perpendicular to the optical axis in such lasers can be considered parabolic, but the steepness of the parabola is quite nonuniform along the ray trace, and the resonator stability condition (the absolute value of the ray matrix trace for a single trip of the ray in the resonator is smaller than two) is not sufficient to confine the ray within the resonator after a large number of trips. (lasers)

  18. 3D rendering of SAR distributions from Thermotron RF-8 using a ray casting technique.

    PubMed

    Paliwal, B R; Gehring, M A; Sanders, C; Mackie, T R; Raffety, H M; Song, C W

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive 3D visualization package developed for CT-based 3D radiation treatment planning has been modified to volume-render SAR data. The program accepts data from sequential thermographic thermometry measurements as well as calculated data from thermal models. In this presentation sample data obtained from a capacitive heating system 'Thermotron-RF8' is presented. This capability allows the generation of accurate standardized volumetric images of SAR and provides a valuable tool to better preplan hyperthermia treatments. PMID:1919152

  19. A Bayesian approach to real-time 3D tumor localization via monoscopic x-ray imaging during treatment delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruijiang; Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Xing, Lei

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Monoscopic x-ray imaging with on-board kV devices is an attractive approach for real-time image guidance in modern radiation therapy such as VMAT or IMRT, but it falls short in providing reliable information along the direction of imaging x-ray. By effectively taking consideration of projection data at prior times and/or angles through a Bayesian formalism, the authors develop an algorithm for real-time and full 3D tumor localization with a single x-ray imager during treatment delivery. Methods: First, a prior probability density function is constructed using the 2D tumor locations on the projection images acquired during patient setup. Whenever an x-ray image is acquired during the treatment delivery, the corresponding 2D tumor location on the imager is used to update the likelihood function. The unresolved third dimension is obtained by maximizing the posterior probability distribution. The algorithm can also be used in a retrospective fashion when all the projection images during the treatment delivery are used for 3D localization purposes. The algorithm does not involve complex optimization of any model parameter and therefore can be used in a ''plug-and-play'' fashion. The authors validated the algorithm using (1) simulated 3D linear and elliptic motion and (2) 3D tumor motion trajectories of a lung and a pancreas patient reproduced by a physical phantom. Continuous kV images were acquired over a full gantry rotation with the Varian TrueBeam on-board imaging system. Three scenarios were considered: fluoroscopic setup, cone beam CT setup, and retrospective analysis. Results: For the simulation study, the RMS 3D localization error is 1.2 and 2.4 mm for the linear and elliptic motions, respectively. For the phantom experiments, the 3D localization error is < 1 mm on average and < 1.5 mm at 95th percentile in the lung and pancreas cases for all three scenarios. The difference in 3D localization error for different scenarios is small and is not

  20. Registration of 2D x-ray images to 3D MRI by generating pseudo-CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bom, M. J.; Pluim, J. P. W.; Gounis, M. J.; van de Kraats, E. B.; Sprinkhuizen, S. M.; Timmer, J.; Homan, R.; Bartels, L. W.

    2011-02-01

    Spatial and soft tissue information provided by magnetic resonance imaging can be very valuable during image-guided procedures, where usually only real-time two-dimensional (2D) x-ray images are available. Registration of 2D x-ray images to three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, acquired prior to the procedure, can provide optimal information to guide the procedure. However, registering x-ray images to MRI data is not a trivial task because of their fundamental difference in tissue contrast. This paper presents a technique that generates pseudo-computed tomography (CT) data from multi-spectral MRI acquisitions which is sufficiently similar to real CT data to enable registration of x-ray to MRI with comparable accuracy as registration of x-ray to CT. The method is based on a k-nearest-neighbors (kNN)-regression strategy which labels voxels of MRI data with CT Hounsfield Units. The regression method uses multi-spectral MRI intensities and intensity gradients as features to discriminate between various tissue types. The efficacy of using pseudo-CT data for registration of x-ray to MRI was tested on ex vivo animal data. 2D-3D registration experiments using CT and pseudo-CT data of multiple subjects were performed with a commonly used 2D-3D registration algorithm. On average, the median target registration error for registration of two x-ray images to MRI data was approximately 1 mm larger than for x-ray to CT registration. The authors have shown that pseudo-CT data generated from multi-spectral MRI facilitate registration of MRI to x-ray images. From the experiments it could be concluded that the accuracy achieved was comparable to that of registering x-ray images to CT data.

  1. Seismic ray tracing using linear traveltime interpolation

    SciTech Connect

    Asakawa, Eiichi; Kawanaka, Taku )

    1993-01-01

    A new ray-tracing method called linear traveltime interpolation (LTI) is proposed. This method computes traveltimes and raypaths in a 2D velocity structure more rapidly and accurately than other conventional methods. The LTI method is formulated for a 2D cell model, and calculations of traveltimes and raypaths are carried out only on cell boundaries. Therefore a raypath is considered to be always straight in a cell with uniform velocity. This approach is suitable to tomography analysis. The algorithm of LTI consists of two separate steps: step 1 calculates traveltimes on all cell boundaries; step 2 traces raypaths for all pairs of receivers and the shot. A traveltime at an arbitrary point on a cell boundary is assumed to be linearly interpolated between traveltimes at the adjacent discrete points at which traveltimes were calculated. Fermat's principle is used as the criterion for choosing the correct traveltimes and raypaths from several candidates routinely. The LTI method has been compared numerically with the shooting method and the finite-difference method (FDM) of the eikonal equation. The results show that the LTI method has great advantages of high speed and high accuracy in the calculation of both traveltimes and raypaths. The LTI method can be regarded as an advanced version of the conventional FDM of the eikonal equation because the formulae of FDM are independently derived from LTI. In the process of derivation, it is shown theoretically that LTI is more accurate than FDM. Moreover in the LTI method, they can avoid the numerical instability that occurs in Vidale's method where the velocity changes abruptly.

  2. Twin robotic x-ray system for 2D radiographic and 3D cone-beam CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Steinbrener, Jan; Jerebko, Anna K.; Voigt, Johannes M.; Scholz, Rosemarie; Ritschl, Ludwig; Mertelmeier, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we provide an initial characterization of a novel twin robotic X-ray system. This system is equipped with two motor-driven telescopic arms carrying X-ray tube and flat-panel detector, respectively. 2D radiographs and fluoroscopic image sequences can be obtained from different viewing angles. Projection data for 3D cone-beam CT reconstruction can be acquired during simultaneous movement of the arms along dedicated scanning trajectories. We provide an initial evaluation of the 3D image quality based on phantom scans and clinical images. Furthermore, initial evaluation of patient dose is conducted. The results show that the system delivers high image quality for a range of medical applications. In particular, high spatial resolution enables adequate visualization of bone structures. This system allows 3D X-ray scanning of patients in standing and weight-bearing position. It could enable new 2D/3D imaging workflows in musculoskeletal imaging and improve diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders.

  3. General fusion approaches for the age determination of latent fingerprint traces: results for 2D and 3D binary pixel feature fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Ronny; Gruhn, Stefan; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus; Bräutigam, Anja

    2012-03-01

    Determining the age of latent fingerprint traces found at crime scenes is an unresolved research issue since decades. Solving this issue could provide criminal investigators with the specific time a fingerprint trace was left on a surface, and therefore would enable them to link potential suspects to the time a crime took place as well as to reconstruct the sequence of events or eliminate irrelevant fingerprints to ensure privacy constraints. Transferring imaging techniques from different application areas, such as 3D image acquisition, surface measurement and chemical analysis to the domain of lifting latent biometric fingerprint traces is an upcoming trend in forensics. Such non-destructive sensor devices might help to solve the challenge of determining the age of a latent fingerprint trace, since it provides the opportunity to create time series and process them using pattern recognition techniques and statistical methods on digitized 2D, 3D and chemical data, rather than classical, contact-based capturing techniques, which alter the fingerprint trace and therefore make continuous scans impossible. In prior work, we have suggested to use a feature called binary pixel, which is a novel approach in the working field of fingerprint age determination. The feature uses a Chromatic White Light (CWL) image sensor to continuously scan a fingerprint trace over time and retrieves a characteristic logarithmic aging tendency for 2D-intensity as well as 3D-topographic images from the sensor. In this paper, we propose to combine such two characteristic aging features with other 2D and 3D features from the domains of surface measurement, microscopy, photography and spectroscopy, to achieve an increase in accuracy and reliability of a potential future age determination scheme. Discussing the feasibility of such variety of sensor devices and possible aging features, we propose a general fusion approach, which might combine promising features to a joint age determination scheme

  4. Strain in a silicon-on-insulator nanostructure revealed by 3D x-ray Bragg ptychography

    PubMed Central

    Chamard, V.; Allain, M.; Godard, P.; Talneau, A.; Patriarche, G.; Burghammer, M.

    2015-01-01

    Progresses in the design of well-defined electronic band structure and dedicated functionalities rely on the high control of complex architectural device nano-scaled structures. This includes the challenging accurate description of strain fields in crystalline structures, which requires non invasive and three-dimensional (3D) imaging methods. Here, we demonstrate in details how x-ray Bragg ptychography can be used to quantify in 3D a displacement field in a lithographically patterned silicon-on-insulator structure. The image of the crystalline properties, which results from the phase retrieval of a coherent intensity data set, is obtained from a well-controlled optimized process, for which all steps are detailed. These results confirm the promising perspectives of 3D Bragg ptychography for the investigation of complex nano-structured crystals in material science. PMID:25984829

  5. Strain in a silicon-on-insulator nanostructure revealed by 3D x-ray Bragg ptychography.

    PubMed

    Chamard, V; Allain, M; Godard, P; Talneau, A; Patriarche, G; Burghammer, M

    2015-01-01

    Progresses in the design of well-defined electronic band structure and dedicated functionalities rely on the high control of complex architectural device nano-scaled structures. This includes the challenging accurate description of strain fields in crystalline structures, which requires non invasive and three-dimensional (3D) imaging methods. Here, we demonstrate in details how x-ray Bragg ptychography can be used to quantify in 3D a displacement field in a lithographically patterned silicon-on-insulator structure. The image of the crystalline properties, which results from the phase retrieval of a coherent intensity data set, is obtained from a well-controlled optimized process, for which all steps are detailed. These results confirm the promising perspectives of 3D Bragg ptychography for the investigation of complex nano-structured crystals in material science. PMID:25984829

  6. 2D/3D cryo x-ray fluorescence imaging at the bionanoprobe at the advanced photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Paunesku, T.; Yuan, Y.; Deng, J.; Jin, Q.; Hong, Y. P.; Vine, D. J.; Lai, B.; Flachenecker, C.; Hornberger, B.; Brister, K.; Jacobsen, C.; Woloschak, G. E.; Vogt, S.

    2016-01-01

    Trace elements, particularly metals, play very important roles in biological systems. Synchrotron-based hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy offers the most suitable capabilities to quantitatively study trace metals in thick biological samples, such as whole cells and tissues. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated X-ray fluorescence imaging of frozen-hydrated whole cells using the recent developed Bionanoprobe (BNP). The BNP provides spatial resolution down to 30 nm and cryogenic capabilities. Frozen-hydrated biological cells have been directly examined on a sub-cellular level at liquid nitrogen temperatures with minimal sample preparation.

  7. Inversion of anisotropic inner core structure from three dimensional ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Song, X.

    2005-12-01

    Seismological studies have generally suggest that the Earth's inner core is anisotropic and the anisotropic structure change significantly both laterally and with depth. Previous body-wave studies of the inner core have relied on 1-D ray tracing or waveform modeling, which do not account fully the 3D anisotropic structure. Here we adopt a pseudo-bending ray tracing (PBR) method in spherical coordinates (Koketsu and Sekine, 1998) for seismic rays that traverse the inner core (PKP-DF phase). The method iteratively perturbs each discontinuity points and continuous segment of the ray through 3D (but isotropic) earth structure so that its travel time is minimum. Our implementation also includes a flexible scheme in calculating the velocity gradient needed to perturb the ray. A large volume is included in calculating the velocity gradient initially to find the global minimum, but a small volume surrounding the ray is used eventually to obtain the precise local velocity gradient that is sampled by the ray. Tests show that our implementation is very stable, reliable, and fast. We have traced the rays for over 3000 event-station pairs that we have differential PKP travel-time measurements using both the PBR method and a shooting method for a 1D model (AK135). The travel-time difference from the two methods is generally within 0.05 s with a few up to 0.07 s and the largest path difference is within 24 km; Even with a model of strong velocity gradient, the travel time difference is still less than 0.08s and the largest path difference is within 40km. Because the ray direction in the inner core does not change much (within 10 degrees even with a strong velocity gradient in the inner core), the 3D anisotropic structure of the inner core can be approximated to the first order as 3D heterogeneous (but isotropic) structure for a given ray, assuming the inner core anisotropy is axisymmetric. We are implementing the PBR method and B-spline interpolation to invert for 3D anisotropic

  8. 2D and 3D Refraction Based X-ray Imaging Suitable for Clinical and Pathological Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Masami; Bando, Hiroko; Ueno, Ei

    2007-01-19

    The first observation of micro papillary (MP) breast cancer by x-ray dark-field imaging (XDFI) and the first observation of the 3D x-ray internal structure of another breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS), are reported. The specimen size for the sheet-shaped MP was 26 mm x 22 mm x 2.8 mm, and that for the rod-shaped DCIS was 3.6 mm in diameter and 4.7 mm in height. The experiment was performed at the Photon Factory, KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. We achieved a high-contrast x-ray image by adopting a thickness-controlled transmission-type angular analyzer that allows only refraction components from the object for 2D imaging. This provides a high-contrast image of cancer-cell nests, cancer cells and stroma. For x-ray 3D imaging, a new algorithm due to the refraction for x-ray CT was created. The angular information was acquired by x-ray optics diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI). The number of data was 900 for each reconstruction. A reconstructed CT image may include ductus lactiferi, micro calcification and the breast gland. This modality has the possibility to open up a new clinical and pathological diagnosis using x-ray, offering more precise inspection and detection of early signs of breast cancer.

  9. 2D and 3D Refraction Based X-ray Imaging Suitable for Clinical and Pathological Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Masami; Bando, Hiroko; Chen, Zhihua; Chikaura, Yoshinori; Choi, Chang-Hyuk; Endo, Tokiko; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Gang, Li; Hashimoto, Eiko; Hirano, Keiichi; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Ichihara, Shu; Jheon, SangHoon; Kim, HongTae; Kim, JongKi; Kimura, Tatsuro; Lee, ChangHyun; Maksimenko, Anton; Ohbayashi, Chiho; Park, SungHwan; Shimao, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Tang, Jintian; Ueno, Ei; Yamasaki, Katsuhito; Yuasa, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    The first observation of micro papillary (MP) breast cancer by x-ray dark-field imaging (XDFI) and the first observation of the 3D x-ray internal structure of another breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS), are reported. The specimen size for the sheet-shaped MP was 26 mm × 22 mm × 2.8 mm, and that for the rod-shaped DCIS was 3.6 mm in diameter and 4.7 mm in height. The experiment was performed at the Photon Factory, KEK: High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. We achieved a high-contrast x-ray image by adopting a thickness-controlled transmission-type angular analyzer that allows only refraction components from the object for 2D imaging. This provides a high-contrast image of cancer-cell nests, cancer cells and stroma. For x-ray 3D imaging, a new algorithm due to the refraction for x-ray CT was created. The angular information was acquired by x-ray optics diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI). The number of data was 900 for each reconstruction. A reconstructed CT image may include ductus lactiferi, micro calcification and the breast gland. This modality has the possibility to open up a new clinical and pathological diagnosis using x-ray, offering more precise inspection and detection of early signs of breast cancer.

  10. 3D Ultrastructural Organization of Whole Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Cells Studied by Nanoscale Soft X-Ray Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Eric; Guttmann, Peter; Werner, Stephan; Tarek, Basel; Schneider, Gerd; Kunz, Michael; Frangakis, Achilleas S.; Westermann, Benedikt

    2012-01-01

    The complex architecture of their structural elements and compartments is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. The creation of high resolution models of whole cells has been limited by the relatively low resolution of conventional light microscopes and the requirement for ultrathin sections in transmission electron microscopy. We used soft x-ray tomography to study the 3D ultrastructural organization of whole cells of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at unprecedented spatial resolution. Intact frozen hydrated cells were imaged using the natural x-ray absorption contrast of the sample without any staining. We applied different fiducial-based and fiducial-less alignment procedures for the 3D reconstructions. The reconstructed 3D volumes of the cells show features down to 30 nm in size. The whole cell tomograms reveal ultrastructural details such as nuclear envelope membranes, thylakoids, basal apparatus, and flagellar microtubule doublets. In addition, the x-ray tomograms provide quantitative data from the cell architecture. Therefore, nanoscale soft x-ray tomography is a new valuable tool for numerous qualitative and quantitative applications in plant cell biology. PMID:23300909

  11. Some extensions of the Booker method of ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budden, K. G.

    1989-10-01

    The Booker method of ray tracing is useful for tracing the paths of radio rays in a plane stratified magneto-plasma, and a brief summary is given. In its simplest form it is used for tracing a single ray, without taking account of the configuration of neighboring rays. Two extensions of the method are discussed. The first is the effect on the signal amplitude of the divergence or convergence of neighboring rays in a thin ray pencil. The second is the technique of complex rays and complex space, which are especially useful when electron collisions introduce attenuation of the waves. Some typical results for both extensions are presented. This paper is mainly a tutorial paper, but some new results are given, including a method for dealing with a singularity in the equations for the ray divergence effect.

  12. Methodology toward 3D micro X-ray fluorescence imaging using an energy dispersive charge-coupled device detector.

    PubMed

    Garrevoet, Jan; Vekemans, Bart; Tack, Pieter; De Samber, Björn; Schmitz, Sylvia; Brenker, Frank E; Falkenberg, Gerald; Vincze, Laszlo

    2014-12-01

    A new three-dimensional (3D) micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) methodology based on a novel 2D energy dispersive CCD detector has been developed and evaluated at the P06 beamline of the Petra-III storage ring (DESY) in Hamburg, Germany. This method is based on the illumination of the investigated sample cross-section by a horizontally focused beam (vertical sheet beam) while fluorescent X-rays are detected perpendicularly to the sheet beam by a 2D energy dispersive (ED) CCD detector allowing the collection of 2D cross-sectional elemental images of a certain depth within the sample, limited only by signal self-absorption effects. 3D elemental information is obtained by a linear scan of the sample in the horizontal direction across the vertically oriented sheet beam and combining the detected cross-sectional images into a 3D elemental distribution data set. Results of the 3D μXRF analysis of mineral inclusions in natural deep Earth diamonds are presented to illustrate this new methodology. PMID:25346101

  13. Mineral crystal alignment in mineralized fracture callus determined by 3D small-angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yifei; Manjubala, Inderchand; Roschger, Paul; Schell, Hanna; Duda, Georg N.; Fratzl, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Callus tissue formed during bone fracture healing is a mixture of different tissue types as revealed by histological analysis. But the structural characteristics of mineral crystals within the healing callus are not well known. Since two-dimensional (2D) scanning small-angle X-ray scattering (sSAXS) patterns showed that the size and orientation of callus crystals vary both spatially and temporally [1] and 2D electron microscopic analysis implies an anisotropic property of the callus morphology, the mineral crystals within the callus are also expected to vary in size and orientation in 3D. Three-dimensional small-angle X-ray scattering (3D SAXS), which combines 2D SAXS patterns collected at different angles of sample tilting, has been previously applied to investigate bone minerals in horse radius [2] and oim/oim mouse femur/tibia [3]. We implement a similar 3D SAXS method but with a different way of data analysis to gather information on the mineral alignment in fracture callus. With the proposed accurate yet fast assessment of 3D SAXS information, it was shown that the plate shaped mineral particles in the healing callus were aligned in groups with their predominant orientations occurring as a fiber texture.

  14. Rigid 2D/3D registration of intraoperative digital x-ray images and preoperative CT and MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomazevic, Dejan; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2002-05-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to register 3D computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) images to a set of 2D X-ray images. Such a registration may be a valuable tool for intraoperative determination of the precise position and orientation of some anatomy of interest, defined in preoperative images. The registration is based solely on the information present in 2D and 3D images. It does not require fiducial markers, X-ray image segmentation, or construction of digitally reconstructed radiographs. The originality of the approach is in using normals to bone surfaces, preoperatively defined in 3D MR or CT data, and gradients of intraoperative X-ray images, which are back-projected towards the X-ray source. The registration is then concerned with finding that rigid transformation of a CT or MR volume, which provides the best match between surface normals and back projected gradients, considering their amplitudes and orientations. The method is tested on a lumbar spine phantom. Gold standard registration is obtained by fidicual markers attached to the phantom. Volumes of interest, containing single vertebrae, are registered to different pairs of X-ray images from different starting positions, chosen randomly and uniformly around the gold standard position. Target registration errors and rotation errors are in order of 0.3 mm and 0.35 degrees for the CT to X-ray registration and 1.3 mm and 1.5 degrees for MR to X-ray registration. The registration is shown to be fast and accurate.

  15. The vectorization of a ray tracing program for image generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plunkett, D. J.; Cychosz, J. M.; Bailey, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ray tracing is a widely used method for producing realistic computer generated images. Ray tracing involves firing an imaginary ray from a view point, through a point on an image plane, into a three dimensional scene. The intersections of the ray with the objects in the scene determines what is visible at the point on the image plane. This process must be repeated many times, once for each point (commonly called a pixel) in the image plane. A typical image contains more than a million pixels making this process computationally expensive. A traditional ray tracing program processes one ray at a time. In such a serial approach, as much as ninety percent of the execution time is spent computing the intersection of a ray with the surface in the scene. With the CYBER 205, many rays can be intersected with all the bodies im the scene with a single series of vector operations. Vectorization of this intersection process results in large decreases in computation time. The CADLAB's interest in ray tracing stems from the need to produce realistic images of mechanical parts. A high quality image of a part during the design process can increase the productivity of the designer by helping him visualize the results of his work. To be useful in the design process, these images must be produced in a reasonable amount of time. This discussion will explain how the ray tracing process was vectorized and gives examples of the images obtained.

  16. Moving-Article X-Ray Imaging System and Method for 3-D Image Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Kenneth R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An x-ray imaging system and method for a moving article are provided for an article moved along a linear direction of travel while the article is exposed to non-overlapping x-ray beams. A plurality of parallel linear sensor arrays are disposed in the x-ray beams after they pass through the article. More specifically, a first half of the plurality are disposed in a first of the x-ray beams while a second half of the plurality are disposed in a second of the x-ray beams. Each of the parallel linear sensor arrays is oriented perpendicular to the linear direction of travel. Each of the parallel linear sensor arrays in the first half is matched to a corresponding one of the parallel linear sensor arrays in the second half in terms of an angular position in the first of the x-ray beams and the second of the x-ray beams, respectively.

  17. ROBAST: ROOT-based ray-tracing library for cosmic-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Akira

    2016-03-01

    ROBAST (ROOT-based simulator for ray tracing) is a non-sequential ray-tracing simulation library developed for wide use in optical simulations of gamma-ray and cosmic-ray telescopes. The library is written in C++ and fully utilizes the geometry library of the ROOT analysis framework, and can build the complex optics geometries typically used in cosmic ray experiments and ground-based gamma-ray telescopes.

  18. Precision measurement of the 3 d → 2 p x-ray energy in kaonic 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, S.; Beer, G.; Bhang, H.; Cargnelli, M.; Chiba, J.; Choi, Seonho; Curceanu, C.; Fukuda, Y.; Hanaki, T.; Hayano, R. S.; Iio, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Ishimoto, S.; Ishiwatari, T.; Itahashi, K.; Iwai, M.; Iwasaki, M.; Juhász, B.; Kienle, P.; Marton, J.; Matsuda, Y.; Ohnishi, H.; Outa, H.; Sato, M.; Schmid, P.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, T.; Tatsuno, H.; Tomono, D.; Widmann, E.; Yamazaki, T.; Yim, H.; Zmeskal, J.

    2007-09-01

    We have measured the Balmer-series x-rays of kaonic 4He atoms using novel large-area silicon drift x-ray detectors in order to study the low-energy Kbar-nucleus strong interaction. The energy of the 3 d → 2 p transition was determined to be 6467 ± 3 (stat) ± 2 (syst) eV. The resulting strong-interaction energy-level shift is in agreement with theoretical calculations, thus eliminating a long-standing discrepancy between theory and experiment.

  19. Personalized x-ray reconstruction of the proximal femur via a non-rigid 2D-3D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Weimin; Zysset, Philippe; Zheng, Guoyan

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present a new approach for a personalized X-ray reconstruction of the proximal femur via a non-rigid registration of a 3D volumetric template to 2D calibrated C-arm images. The 2D-3D registration is done with a hierarchical two-stage strategy: the global scaled rigid registration stage followed by a regularized deformable b-spline registration stage. In both stages, a set of control points with uniform spacing are placed over the domain of the 3D volumetric template and the registrations are driven by computing updated positions of these control points, which then allows to accurately register the 3D volumetric template to the reference space of the C-arm images. Comprehensive experiments on simulated images, on images of cadaveric femurs and on clinical datasets are designed and conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation results are given, which demonstrate the efficacy of the present approach.

  20. Understanding Plasticity and Fracture in Aluminum Alloys and their Composites by 3D X-ray Synchrotron Tomography and Microdiffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruby, Peter

    Aluminum alloys and their composites are attractive materials for applications requiring high strength-to-weight ratios and reasonable cost. Many of these applications, such as those in the aerospace industry, undergo fatigue loading. An understanding of the microstructural damage that occurs in these materials is critical in assessing their fatigue resistance. Two distinct experimental studies were performed to further the understanding of fatigue damage mechanisms in aluminum alloys and their composites, specifically fracture and plasticity. Fatigue resistance of metal matrix composites (MMCs) depends on many aspects of composite microstructure. Fatigue crack growth behavior is particularly dependent on the reinforcement characteristics and matrix microstructure. The goal of this work was to obtain a fundamental understanding of fatigue crack growth behavior in SiC particle-reinforced 2080 Al alloy composites. In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was performed on two samples at low (R=0.1) and at high (R=0.6) R-ratios. The resulting reconstructed images were used to obtain three-dimensional (3D) rendering of the particles and fatigue crack. Behaviors of the particles and crack, as well as their interaction, were analyzed and quantified. Four-dimensional (4D) visual representations were constructed to aid in the overall understanding of damage evolution. During fatigue crack growth in ductile materials, a plastic zone is created in the region surrounding the crack tip. Knowledge of the plastic zone is important for the understanding of fatigue crack formation as well as subsequent growth behavior. The goal of this work was to quantify the 3D size and shape of the plastic zone in 7075 Al alloys. X-ray synchrotron tomography and Laue microdiffraction were used to non-destructively characterize the volume surrounding a fatigue crack tip. The precise 3D crack profile was segmented from the reconstructed tomography data. Depth-resolved Laue patterns were obtained using

  1. 3D polymer gel dosimetry and Geant4 Monte Carlo characterization of novel needle based X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Sozontov, E.; Safronov, V.; Gutman, G.; Strumban, E.; Jiang, Q.; Li, S.

    2010-11-01

    In the recent years, there have been a few attempts to develop a low energy x-ray radiation sources alternative to conventional radioisotopes used in brachytherapy. So far, all efforts have been centered around the intent to design an interstitial miniaturized x-ray tube. Though direct irradiation of tumors looks very promising, the known insertable miniature x-ray tubes have many limitations: (a) difficulties with focusing and steering the electron beam to the target; (b)necessity to cool the target to increase x-ray production efficiency; (c)impracticability to reduce the diameter of the miniaturized x-ray tube below 4mm (the requirement to decrease the diameter of the x-ray tube and the need to have a cooling system for the target have are mutually exclusive); (c) significant limitations in changing shape and energy of the emitted radiation. The specific aim of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept for an insertable low-energy needle x-ray device based on simulation with Geant4 Monte Carlo code and to measure the dose rate distribution for low energy (17.5 keV) x-ray radiation with the 3D polymer gel dosimetry.

  2. Light ray tracing through a leaf cross section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.; Silva, L. F.

    1973-01-01

    A light ray, incident at about 5 deg to the normal, is geometrically plotted through the drawing of the cross section of a soybean leaf using Fresnel's equations and Snell's law. The optical mediums of the leaf considered for ray tracing are: air, cell sap, chloroplast, and cell wall. The ray is also drawn through the same leaf cross section with cell wall and air as the only optical mediums. The values of the reflection and transmission found from the ray tracing tests agree closely with the experimental results obtained using a Beckman Dk-2A Spectroreflector.

  3. Light ray tracing through a leaf cross section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.; Silva, L.

    1973-01-01

    A light ray, incident at about 5 deg to the normal, is geometrically plotted through the drawing of the cross section of a soybean leaf using Fresnel's equations and Snell's law. The optical mediums of the leaf considered for ray tracing are air, cell sap, chloroplast, and cell wall. The above ray is also drawn through the same leaf cross section considering cell wall and air as the only optical mediums. The values of the reflection and transmission found from ray tracing agree closely with the experimental results obtained using a Beckman DK-2A spectroreflectometer.

  4. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  5. Quantitative analysis of nanoripple and nanoparticle patterns by grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering 3D mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babonneau, D.; Camelio, S.; Vandenhecke, E.; Rousselet, S.; Garel, M.; Pailloux, F.; Boesecke, P.

    2012-06-01

    3D reciprocal space mapping in the grazing incidence small-angle x-ray scattering geometry was used to obtain accurate morphological characteristics of nanoripple patterns prepared by broad beam-ion sputtering of Al2O3 and Si3N4 amorphous thin films as well as 2D arrays of Ag nanoparticles obtained by glancing angle deposition on Al2O3 nanorippled buffer layers. Experiments and theoretical simulations based on the distorted-wave Born approximation make it possible to determine the average 3D shape of the ripples and nanoparticles together with crucial information on their in-plane organization. In the case of nanoparticle arrays, the approach was also used to quantify the growth conformity of an additional capping layer, which proceeds by replication of the buried ripple pattern.

  6. Classification and quantification of pore shapes in sandstone reservoir rocks with 3-D X-ray micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Mayka; Halisch, Matthias; Müller, Cornelia; Peres Fernandes, Celso

    2016-02-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the characterization of the pore morphologies of reservoir rocks and how the spatial organization of pore traits affects the macro behavior of rock-fluid systems. With the availability of 3-D high-resolution imaging, such as x-ray micro-computed tomography (µ-CT), the detailed quantification of particle shapes has been facilitated by progress in computer science. Here, we show how the shapes of irregular rock particles (pores) can be classified and quantified based on binary 3-D images. The methodology requires the measurement of basic 3-D particle descriptors (length, width, and thickness) and a shape classification that involves the similarity of artificial objects, which is based on main pore network detachments and 3-D sample sizes. Two main pore components were identified from the analyzed volumes: pore networks and residual pore ganglia. A watershed algorithm was applied to preserve the pore morphology after separating the main pore networks, which is essential for the pore shape characterization. The results were validated for three sandstones (S1, S2, and S3) from distinct reservoirs, and most of the pore shapes were found to be plate- and cube-like, ranging from 39.49 to 50.94 % and from 58.80 to 45.18 % when the Feret caliper descriptor was investigated in a 10003 voxel volume. Furthermore, this study generalizes a practical way to correlate specific particle shapes, such as rods, blades, cuboids, plates, and cubes to characterize asymmetric particles of any material type with 3-D image analysis.

  7. 3D electron density imaging using single scattered x rays with application to breast CT and mammographic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Uytven, Eric Peter

    Screening mammography is the current standard in detecting breast cancer. However, its fundamental disadvantage is that it projects a 3D object into a 2D image. Small lesions are difficult to detect when superimposed over layers of normal tissue. Commercial Computed Tomography (CT) produces a true 3D image yet has a limited role in mammography due to relatively low resolution and contrast. With the intent of enhancing mammography and breast CT, we have developed an algorithm which can produce 3D electron density images using a single projection. Imaging an object with x rays produces a characteristic scattered photon spectrum at the detector plane. A known incident beam spectrum, beam shape, and arbitrary 3D matrix of electron density values enable a theoretical scattered photon distribution to be calculated. An iterative minimization algorithm is used to make changes to the electron density voxel matrix to reduce regular differences between the theoretical and the experimentally measured distributions. The object is characterized by the converged electron density image. This technique has been validated in simulation using data produced by the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system. At both mammographic and CT energies, a scanning polychromatic pencil beam was used to image breast tissue phantoms containing lesion-like inhomogeneities. The resulting Monte Carlo data is processed using a Nelder-Mead iterative algorithm (MATLAB) to produce the 3D matrix of electron density values. Resulting images have confirmed the ability of the algorithm to detect various 1x1x2.5 mm3 lesions with calcification content as low as 0.5% (p<0.005) at a dose comparable to mammography.

  8. Efficient feature-based 2D/3D registration of transesophageal echocardiography to x-ray fluoroscopy for cardiac interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatt, Charles R.; Speidel, Michael A.; Raval, Amish N.

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel 2D/ 3D registration algorithm for fusion between transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and X-ray fluoroscopy (XRF). The TEE probe is modeled as a subset of 3D gradient and intensity point features, which facilitates efficient 3D-to-2D perspective projection. A novel cost-function, based on a combination of intensity and edge features, evaluates the registration cost value without the need for time-consuming generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Validation experiments were performed with simulations and phantom data. For simulations, in silica XRF images of a TEE probe were generated in a number of different pose configurations using a previously acquired CT image. Random misregistrations were applied and our method was used to recover the TEE probe pose and compare the result to the ground truth. Phantom experiments were performed by attaching fiducial markers externally to a TEE probe, imaging the probe with an interventional cardiac angiographic x-ray system, and comparing the pose estimated from the external markers to that estimated from the TEE probe using our algorithm. Simulations found a 3D target registration error of 1.08(1.92) mm for biplane (monoplane) geometries, while the phantom experiment found a 2D target registration error of 0.69mm. For phantom experiments, we demonstrated a monoplane tracking frame-rate of 1.38 fps. The proposed feature-based registration method is computationally efficient, resulting in near real-time, accurate image based registration between TEE and XRF.

  9. TU-F-BRF-04: Registration of 3D Transesophageal Echocardiography and X-Ray Fluoroscopy Using An Inverse Geometry X-Ray System

    SciTech Connect

    Speidel, M; Hatt, C; Tomkowiak, M; Raval, A; Funk, T

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for the fusion of 3D echocardiography and Scanning-Beam Digital X-ray (SBDX) fluoroscopy to assist with catheter device and soft tissue visualization during interventional procedures. Methods: SBDX is a technology for low-dose inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy that performs digital tomosynthesis at multiple planes in real time. In this study, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) images were fused with SBDX images by estimating the 3D position and orientation (the “pose”) of the TEE probe within the x-ray coordinate system and then spatially transforming the TEE image data to match this pose. An initial pose estimate was obtained through tomosynthesis-based 3D localization of points along the probe perimeter. Position and angle estimates were then iteratively refined by comparing simulated projections of a 3D probe model against SBDX x-ray images. Algorithm performance was quantified by imaging a TEE probe in different known orientations and locations within the x-ray field (0-30 degree tilt angle, up to 50 mm translation). Fused 3D TEE/SBDX imaging was demonstrated by imaging a tissue-mimicking polyvinyl alcohol cylindrical cavity as a catheter was navigated along the cavity axis. Results: Detected changes in probe tilt angle agreed with the known changes to within 1.2 degrees. For a 50 mm translation along the source-detector axis, the detected translation was 50.3 mm. Errors for in-plane translations ranged from 0.1 to 0.9 mm. In a fused 3D TEE/SBDX display, the catheter device was well visualized and coincident with the device shadow in the TEE images. The TEE images portrayed phantom boundaries that were not evident under x-ray. Conclusion: Registration of soft tissue anatomy derived from TEE imaging and device imaging from SBDX x-ray fluoroscopy is feasible. The simultaneous 3D visualization of these two modalities may be useful in interventional procedures involving the navigation of devices to soft tissue anatomy.

  10. Construction and test of an X-ray CT setup for material resolved 3D imaging with Medipix based detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schioppa, Enrico, Jr.; Uher, Josef; Visser, Jan

    2012-10-01

    A prototype computerized tomography (CT) setup has been recently built at Nikhef in order to exploit the material resolved capabilities of Medipix based detectors in X-ray imaging. The CT scanner contains a Hamamatsu 90 kVp microfocus X-ray tube and an entirely remotely controllable sample alignment system. The complete setup is fully integrated with the detector operation software. Moreover the 120 frames/s RelaxD readout system [1] allows real time X-ray imaging of fast moving samples. In this work, the description of the setup is given and the first results obtained with Medipix2 [2] and Timepix [3] detectors are presented. They concern detector calibration with fluorescence lines, CT reconstruction of small biological and non-biological samples and material resolved 3D micro-imaging [4].

  11. 3D/4D analyses of damage and fracture behaviours in structural materials via synchrotron X-ray tomography.

    PubMed

    Toda, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-01

    X-ray microtomography has been utilized for the in-situ observation of various structural metals under external loading. Recent advances in X-ray microtomography provide remarkable tools to image the interior of materials. In-situ X-ray microtomography provides a unique possibility to access the 3D character of internal microstructure and its time evolution behaviours non-destructively, thereby enabling advanced techniques for measuring local strain distribution. Local strain mapping is readily enabled by processing such high-resolution tomographic images either by the particle tracking technique or the digital image correlation technique [1]. Procedures for tracking microstructural features which have been developed by the authors [2], have been applied to analyse localised deformation and damage evolution in a material [3]. Typically several tens of thousands of microstructural features, such as particles and pores, are tracked in a tomographic specimen (0.2 - 0.3 mm(3) in volume). When a sufficient number of microstructural features is dispersed in 3D space, the Delaunay tessellation algorithm is used to obtain local strain distribution. With these techniques, 3D strain fields can be measured with reasonable accuracy. Even local crack driving forces, such as local variations in the stress intensity factor, crack tip opening displacement and J integral along a crack front line, can be measured from discrete crack tip displacement fields [4]. In the present presentation, complicated crack initiation and growth behaviour and the extensive formation of micro cracks ahead of a crack tip are introduced as examples.A novel experimental method has recently been developed by amalgamating a pencil beam X-Ray diffraction (XRD) technique with the microstructural tracking technique [5]. The technique provides information about individual grain orientations and 1-micron-level grain morphologies in 3D together with high-density local strain mapping. The application of this

  12. GPU-based ray tracing algorithm for high-speed propagation prediction in typical indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lixin; Guan, Xiaowei; Liu, Zhongyu

    2015-10-01

    A fast 3-D ray tracing propagation prediction model based on virtual source tree is presented in this paper, whose theoretical foundations are geometrical optics(GO) and the uniform theory of diffraction(UTD). In terms of typical single room indoor scene, taking the geometrical and electromagnetic information into account, some acceleration techniques are adopted to raise the efficiency of the ray tracing algorithm. The simulation results indicate that the runtime of the ray tracing algorithm will sharply increase when the number of the objects in the single room is large enough. Therefore, GPU acceleration technology is used to solve that problem. As is known to all, GPU is good at calculation operation rather than logical judgment, so that tens of thousands of threads in CUDA programs are able to calculate at the same time, in order to achieve massively parallel acceleration. Finally, a typical single room with several objects is simulated by using the serial ray tracing algorithm and the parallel one respectively. It can be found easily from the results that compared with the serial algorithm, the GPU-based one can achieve greater efficiency.

  13. Energy Dispersive X-ray Tomography for 3D Elemental Mapping of Individual Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Slater, Thomas J A; Lewis, Edward A; Haigh, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy within the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) provides accurate elemental analysis with high spatial resolution, and is even capable of providing atomically resolved elemental maps. In this technique, a highly focused electron beam is incident upon a thin sample and the energy of emitted X-rays is measured in order to determine the atomic species of material within the beam path. This elementally sensitive spectroscopy technique can be extended to three dimensional tomographic imaging by acquiring multiple spectrum images with the sample tilted along an axis perpendicular to the electron beam direction. Elemental distributions within single nanoparticles are often important for determining their optical, catalytic and magnetic properties. Techniques such as X-ray tomography and slice and view energy dispersive X-ray mapping in the scanning electron microscope provide elementally sensitive three dimensional imaging but are typically limited to spatial resolutions of > 20 nm. Atom probe tomography provides near atomic resolution but preparing nanoparticle samples for atom probe analysis is often challenging. Thus, elementally sensitive techniques applied within the scanning transmission electron microscope are uniquely placed to study elemental distributions within nanoparticles of dimensions 10-100 nm. Here, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy within the STEM is applied to investigate the distribution of elements in single AgAu nanoparticles. The surface segregation of both Ag and Au, at different nanoparticle compositions, has been observed. PMID:27403838

  14. 3D-analysis of plant microstructures: advantages and limitations of synchrotron X-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, U.; Graf, W.; Zabler, S.; Manke, I.; Dawson, M.; Choinka, G.; Hilger, A.; Herppich, W. B.

    2013-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray computer microtomography was used to analyze the microstructure of rose peduncles. Samples from three rose cultivars, differing in anatomy, were scanned to study the relation between tissue structure and peduncles mechanical strength. Additionally, chlorophyll fluorescence imaging and conventional light microscopy was applied to quantify possible irradiation-induced damage to plant physiology and tissue structure. The spatial resolution of synchrotron X-ray computer microtomography was sufficiently high to investigate the complex tissues of intact rose peduncles without the necessity of any preparation. However, synchrotron X-radiation induces two different types of damage on irradiated tissues. First, within a few hours after first X-ray exposure, there is a direct physical destruction of cell walls. In addition, a slow and delayed destruction of chlorophyll and, consequently, of photosynthetic activity occurred within hours/ days after the exposure. The results indicate that synchrotron X-ray computer microtomography is well suited for three-dimensional visualization of the microstructure of rose peduncles. However, in its current technique, synchrotron X-ray computer microtomography is not really non-destructive but induce tissue damage. Hence, this technique needs further optimization before it can be applied for time-series investigations of living plant materials

  15. 3D chemical imaging in the laboratory by hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Egan, C. K.; Jacques, S. D. M.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.; Seller, P.; Beale, A. M.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Withers, P. J.; Cernik, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of laboratory based hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography which allows the internal elemental chemistry of an object to be reconstructed and visualised in three dimensions. The method employs a spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector with sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual elemental absorption edges. Elemental distributions can then be made by K-edge subtraction, or alternatively by voxel-wise spectral fitting to give relative atomic concentrations. We demonstrate its application to two material systems: studying the distribution of catalyst material on porous substrates for industrial scale chemical processing; and mapping of minerals and inclusion phases inside a mineralised ore sample. The method makes use of a standard laboratory X-ray source with measurement times similar to that required for conventional computed tomography. PMID:26514938

  16. 3D chemical imaging in the laboratory by hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Egan, C K; Jacques, S D M; Wilson, M D; Veale, M C; Seller, P; Beale, A M; Pattrick, R A D; Withers, P J; Cernik, R J

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of laboratory based hyperspectral X-ray computed tomography which allows the internal elemental chemistry of an object to be reconstructed and visualised in three dimensions. The method employs a spectroscopic X-ray imaging detector with sufficient energy resolution to distinguish individual elemental absorption edges. Elemental distributions can then be made by K-edge subtraction, or alternatively by voxel-wise spectral fitting to give relative atomic concentrations. We demonstrate its application to two material systems: studying the distribution of catalyst material on porous substrates for industrial scale chemical processing; and mapping of minerals and inclusion phases inside a mineralised ore sample. The method makes use of a standard laboratory X-ray source with measurement times similar to that required for conventional computed tomography. PMID:26514938

  17. High-resolution, low-dose phase contrast X-ray tomography for 3D diagnosis of human breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunzhe; Brun, Emmanuel; Coan, Paola; Huang, Zhifeng; Sztrókay, Aniko; Diemoz, Paul Claude; Liebhardt, Susanne; Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergei; Miao, Jianwei; Bravin, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Mammography is the primary imaging tool for screening and diagnosis of human breast cancers, but ~10-20% of palpable tumors are not detectable on mammograms and only about 40% of biopsied lesions are malignant. Here we report a high-resolution, low-dose phase contrast X-ray tomographic method for 3D diagnosis of human breast cancers. By combining phase contrast X-ray imaging with an image reconstruction method known as equally sloped tomography, we imaged a human breast in three dimensions and identified a malignant cancer with a pixel size of 92 μm and a radiation dose less than that of dual-view mammography. According to a blind evaluation by five independent radiologists, our method can reduce the radiation dose and acquisition time by ~74% relative to conventional phase contrast X-ray tomography, while maintaining high image resolution and image contrast. These results demonstrate that high-resolution 3D diagnostic imaging of human breast cancers can, in principle, be performed at clinical compatible doses. PMID:23091003

  18. Analytic free-form lens design in 3D: coupling three ray sets using two lens surfaces.

    PubMed

    Duerr, Fabian; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C; Meuret, Youri; Thienpont, Hugo

    2012-05-01

    The two-dimensional analytic optics design method presented in a previous paper [Opt. Express 20, 5576-5585 (2012)] is extended in this work to the three-dimensional case, enabling the coupling of three ray sets with two free-form lens surfaces. Fermat's principle is used to deduce additional sets of functional differential equations which make it possible to calculate the lens surfaces. Ray tracing simulations demonstrate the excellent imaging performance of the resulting free-form lenses described by more than 100 coefficients. PMID:22565708

  19. A framework for 3-D coherent diffraction imaging by focused beam x-ray Bragg ptychography.

    SciTech Connect

    Hruszkewycz, S. O.; Holt, M. V.; Tripathi, A.; Maser, J.; Fuoss, P. H.

    2011-06-15

    We present the framework for convergent beam Bragg ptychography, and, using simulations, we demonstrate that nanocrystals can be ptychographically reconstructed from highly convergent x-ray Bragg diffraction. The ptychographic iterative engine is extended to three dimensions and shown to successfully reconstruct a simulated nanocrystal using overlapping raster scans with a defocused curved beam, the diameter of which matches the crystal size. This object reconstruction strategy can serve as the basis for coherent diffraction imaging experiments at coherent scanning nanoprobe x-ray sources.

  20. 3D nanoscale imaging of biological samples with laboratory-based soft X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehlinger, Aurélie; Blechschmidt, Anne; Grötzsch, Daniel; Jung, Robert; Kanngießer, Birgit; Seim, Christian; Stiel, Holger

    2015-09-01

    In microscopy, where the theoretical resolution limit depends on the wavelength of the probing light, radiation in the soft X-ray regime can be used to analyze samples that cannot be resolved with visible light microscopes. In the case of soft X-ray microscopy in the water-window, the energy range of the radiation lies between the absorption edges of carbon (at 284 eV, 4.36 nm) and oxygen (543 eV, 2.34 nm). As a result, carbon-based structures, such as biological samples, posses a strong absorption, whereas e.g. water is more transparent to this radiation. Microscopy in the water-window, therefore, allows the structural investigation of aqueous samples with resolutions of a few tens of nanometers and a penetration depth of up to 10μm. The development of highly brilliant laser-produced plasma-sources has enabled the transfer of Xray microscopy, that was formerly bound to synchrotron sources, to the laboratory, which opens the access of this method to a broader scientific community. The Laboratory Transmission X-ray Microscope at the Berlin Laboratory for innovative X-ray technologies (BLiX) runs with a laser produced nitrogen plasma that emits radiation in the soft X-ray regime. The mentioned high penetration depth can be exploited to analyze biological samples in their natural state and with several projection angles. The obtained tomogram is the key to a more precise and global analysis of samples originating from various fields of life science.

  1. Acute effects of delayed reperfusion following myocardial infarction: a 3D x-ray imaging analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simari, Robert D.; Bell, M. R.; Pao, Y. C.; Gersh, B. J.; Ritman, Erik L.

    1996-04-01

    Clinical and experimental data suggest that delayed reperfusion of the infarct related artery may limit infarct expansion without increasing myocardial salvage. In order to assess the potential mechanisms involved, an acute closed chest canine model of myocardial infarction and delayed reperfusion was studied. Nineteen dogs underwent 3D computed tomography in the Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor (a fast, volume imaging, CT scanner) at baseline and three and four hours later to estimate left ventricular chamber volumes, global distensibility and regional myocardial stiffness. A control group was scanned without intervention. An occlusion group underwent four hours of coronary artery occlusion. A reperfusion group underwent three hours of coronary artery occlusion followed by one hour of reperfusion. Similar infarct sizes were seen in the occlusion and reperfusion groups. Globally reperfusion was associated with increased left ventricular end diastolic pressure and prolongation of global relaxation. Regionally reperfusion was associated with increased myocardial stiffness, intramyocardial blood volume and wall thickness within the infarct zone relative to the not reperfused myocardium.

  2. High-quality 3-D coronary artery imaging on an interventional C-arm x-ray system

    SciTech Connect

    Hansis, Eberhard; Carroll, John D.; Schaefer, Dirk; Doessel, Olaf; Grass, Michael

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of the coronary arteries during a cardiac catheter-based intervention can be performed from a C-arm based rotational x-ray angiography sequence. It can support the diagnosis of coronary artery disease, treatment planning, and intervention guidance. 3-D reconstruction also enables quantitative vessel analysis, including vessel dynamics from a time-series of reconstructions. Methods: The strong angular undersampling and motion effects present in gated cardiac reconstruction necessitate the development of special reconstruction methods. This contribution presents a fully automatic method for creating high-quality coronary artery reconstructions. It employs a sparseness-prior based iterative reconstruction technique in combination with projection-based motion compensation. Results: The method is tested on a dynamic software phantom, assessing reconstruction accuracy with respect to vessel radii and attenuation coefficients. Reconstructions from clinical cases are presented, displaying high contrast, sharpness, and level of detail. Conclusions: The presented method enables high-quality 3-D coronary artery imaging on an interventional C-arm system.

  3. Characterization of Pore Defects and Fatigue Cracks in Die Cast AM60 Using 3D X-ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhuofei; Kang, Jidong; Wilkinson, David S.

    2015-08-01

    AM60 high pressure die castings have been used in automobile applications to reduce the weight of vehicles. However, the pore defects that are inherent in die casting may negatively affect mechanical properties, especially the fatigue properties. Here we have studied damage ( e.g., pore defects, fatigue cracks) during strained-controlled fatigue using 3-dimensional X-ray computed tomography (XCT). The fatigue test was interrupted every 2000 cycles and the specimen was removed to be scanned using a desktop micro-CT system. XCT reveals pore defects, cracks, and fracture surfaces. The results show that pores can be accurately measured and modeled in 3D. Defect bands are found to be made of pores under 50 µm (based on volume-equivalent sphere diameter). Larger pores are randomly distributed in the region between the defect bands. Observation of fatigue cracks by XCT is performed in three ways such that the 3D model gives the best illustration of crack-porosity interaction while the other two methods, with the cracks being viewed on transverse or longitudinal cross sections, have better detectability on crack initiation and crack tip observation. XCT is also of value in failure analysis on fracture surfaces. By assessing XCT data during fatigue testing and observing fracture surfaces on a 3D model, a better understanding on the crack initiation, crack-porosity interaction, and the morphology of fracture surface is achieved.

  4. Polarization ray tracing in anisotropic optically active media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, Stephen C.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1992-01-01

    Procedures for performing polarization ray tracing through birefringent media are presented in a form compatible with the standard methods of geometric ray tracing. The birefringent materials treated include the following: anisotropic optically active materials such as quartz, non-optically active uniaxial materials such as calcite, and isotropic optically active materials such as mercury sulfide or organic liquids. Refraction and reflection algorithms are presented which compute both ray directions and wave directions. Methods for computing polarization modes, refractive indices, optical path lengths, and Fresnel transmission and reflection coefficients are also specified.

  5. Evaluation of optimization methods for intensity-based 2D-3D registration in x-ray guided interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bom, I. M. J.; Klein, S.; Staring, M.; Homan, R.; Bartels, L. W.; Pluim, J. P. W.

    2011-03-01

    The advantage of 2D-3D image registration methods versus direct image-to-patient registration, is that these methods generally do not require user interaction (such as manual annotations), additional machinery or additional acquisition of 3D data. A variety of intensity-based similarity measures has been proposed and evaluated for different applications. These studies showed that the registration accuracy and capture range are influenced by the choice of similarity measure. However, the influence of the optimization method on intensity-based 2D-3D image registration has not been investigated. We have compared the registration performance of seven optimization methods in combination with three similarity measures: gradient difference, gradient correlation, and pattern intensity. Optimization methods included in this study were: regular step gradient descent, Nelder-Mead, Powell-Brent, Quasi-Newton, nonlinear conjugate gradient, simultaneous perturbation stochastic approximation, and evolution strategy. Registration experiments were performed on multiple patient data sets that were obtained during cerebral interventions. Various component combinations were evaluated on registration accuracy, capture range, and registration time. The results showed that for the same similarity measure, different registration accuracies and capture ranges were obtained when different optimization methods were used. For gradient difference, largest capture ranges were obtained with Powell-Brent and simultaneous perturbation stochastic approximation. Gradient correlation and pattern intensity had the largest capture ranges in combination with Powell-Brent, Nelder-Mead, nonlinear conjugate gradient, and Quasi-Newton. Average registration time, expressed in the number of DRRs required for convergence, was the lowest for Powell-Brent. Based on these results, we conclude that Powell-Brent is a reliable optimization method for intensity-based 2D-3D registration of x-ray images to CBCT

  6. Hinode observations and 3D magnetic structure of an X-ray bright point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. E.; Del Zanna, G.; Maclean, R. C.

    2011-02-01

    Aims: We present complete Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT), X-Ray Telescope (XRT)and EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) observations of an X-ray bright point (XBP) observed on the 10, 11 of October 2007 over its entire lifetime (~12 h). We aim to show how the measured plasma parameters of the XBP change over time and also what kind of similarities the X-ray emission has to a potential magnetic field model. Methods: Information from all three instruments on-board Hinode was used to study its entire evolution. XRT data was used to investigate the structure of the bright point and to measure the X-ray emission. The EIS instrument was used to measure various plasma parameters over the entire lifetime of the XBP. Lastly, the SOT was used to measure the magnetic field strength and provide a basis for potential field extrapolations of the photospheric fields to be made. These were performed and then compared to the observed coronal features. Results: The XBP measured ~15´´ in size and was found to be formed directly above an area of merging and cancelling magnetic flux on the photosphere. A good correlation between the rate of X-ray emission and decrease in total magnetic flux was found. The magnetic fragments of the XBP were found to vary on very short timescales (minutes), however the global quasi-bipolar structure remained throughout the lifetime of the XBP. The potential field extrapolations were a good visual fit to the observed coronal loops in most cases, meaning that the magnetic field was not too far from a potential state. Electron density measurements were obtained using a line ratio of Fe XII and the average density was found to be 4.95 × 109 cm-3 with the volumetric plasma filling factor calculated to have an average value of 0.04. Emission measure loci plots were then used to infer a steady temperature of log Te [ K] ~ 6.1. The calculated Fe XII Doppler shifts show velocity changes in and around the bright point of ±15 km s-1 which are observed to change

  7. Cosmic Ray and Solar Energetic Particle Observations In The 3-d Heliosphere Near Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKibben, R. B.; Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.

    Observations from the COSPIN High Energy Telescope during Ulysses recent fast lat- itude scan have provided the first latitudinal survey of intensities of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles near solar maximum. During the previous fast latitude scan near solar minimum, no significant solar energetic particle events were observed, but the galactic and anomalous component cosmic ray intensities showed small positive latitudinal gradients organized around a southwardly displaced heliospheric current sheet. The small size of the gradients, together with observation near the poles of 26-day intensity variations impressed by near-equatorial CIR-structures, led to the conclusion that latitudinal transport across the mean Parker spiral magnetic fields was much easier than had been expected prior to Ulysses observations. During the recently completed fast latitude scan near solar maximum, galactic cosmic rays could be ob- served only occasionally in the quiet times between frequent solar energetic particle events. When cosmic ray intensities could be observed, no measurable latitude gradi- ents were found, implying that modulation became much more spherically symmetric near solar maximum. From observations of the solar energetic particle intensities, we found that almost all large gradual events produced intensity increases both at Ulysses and at IMP-8 near Earth, regardless of the latitude or longitude of the spacecrafts relative to the initiating event in the corona. Most often the intensities at Ulysses and IMP-8 became comparable a few days after the onset of the event and remained nearly equal for the rest of the decay, which in some cases lasted as much as a full solar rota- tion. Both the cosmic ray and the solar energetic particle observations imply efficient latitudinal and cross-field transport of energetic particles even in the complex inter- planetary magnetic fields of solar maximum. Recent observations suggest that the solar polar coronal holes have

  8. Laser-wakefield accelerators as hard x-ray sources for 3D medical imaging of human bone.

    PubMed

    Cole, J M; Wood, J C; Lopes, N C; Poder, K; Abel, R L; Alatabi, S; Bryant, J S J; Jin, A; Kneip, S; Mecseki, K; Symes, D R; Mangles, S P D; Najmudin, Z

    2015-01-01

    A bright μm-sized source of hard synchrotron x-rays (critical energy Ecrit > 30 keV) based on the betatron oscillations of laser wakefield accelerated electrons has been developed. The potential of this source for medical imaging was demonstrated by performing micro-computed tomography of a human femoral trabecular bone sample, allowing full 3D reconstruction to a resolution below 50 μm. The use of a 1 cm long wakefield accelerator means that the length of the beamline (excluding the laser) is dominated by the x-ray imaging distances rather than the electron acceleration distances. The source possesses high peak brightness, which allows each image to be recorded with a single exposure and reduces the time required for a full tomographic scan. These properties make this an interesting laboratory source for many tomographic imaging applications. PMID:26283308

  9. Laser-wakefield accelerators as hard x-ray sources for 3D medical imaging of human bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, J. M.; Wood, J. C.; Lopes, N. C.; Poder, K.; Abel, R. L.; Alatabi, S.; Bryant, J. S. J.; Jin, A.; Kneip, S.; Mecseki, K.; Symes, D. R.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.

    2015-08-01

    A bright μm-sized source of hard synchrotron x-rays (critical energy Ecrit > 30 keV) based on the betatron oscillations of laser wakefield accelerated electrons has been developed. The potential of this source for medical imaging was demonstrated by performing micro-computed tomography of a human femoral trabecular bone sample, allowing full 3D reconstruction to a resolution below 50 μm. The use of a 1 cm long wakefield accelerator means that the length of the beamline (excluding the laser) is dominated by the x-ray imaging distances rather than the electron acceleration distances. The source possesses high peak brightness, which allows each image to be recorded with a single exposure and reduces the time required for a full tomographic scan. These properties make this an interesting laboratory source for many tomographic imaging applications.

  10. The K x-ray line structures of the 3d-transition metals in warm dense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymańska, E.; Syrocki, Ł.; Słabkowska, K.; Polasik, M.; Rzadkiewicz, J.

    2016-09-01

    The shapes and positions of the Kα1 and Kα2 x-ray lines for 3d-transition metals can vary substantially as electrons are stripped from the outer-shells. This paper shows the detailed line shapes for nickel and zinc, obtained by calculations with a multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method that includes Breit interaction and quantum electrodynamics corrections. The line shapes can be useful in interpreting hot, dense plasmas with energetic electrons for which the K x-ray lines are optically thin, as may be produced by pulsed power machines such as the plasma-filled rod pinch diode or the plasma focus, or in short-pulsed high power laser plasmas.

  11. Precise Animated 3-D Displays Of The Heart Constructed From X-Ray Scatter Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, J. J.; Herr, M. D.; Copenhaver, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    A technique, based upon the interrogation of x-ray scatter, has been used to construct precise animated displays of the three-dimensional surface of the heart throughout the cardiac cycle. With the selection of motion amplification, viewing orientation, beat rate, and repetitive playbacks of isolated segments of the cardiac cycle, these displays are used to directly visualize epicardial surface velocity and displacement patterns, to construct regional maps of old or new myocardial infarction, and to visualize diastolic stiffening of the ventricle associated with acute ischemia. The procedure is non-invasive. Cut-downs or injections are not required.

  12. Regularization Designs for Uniform Spatial Resolution and Noise Properties in Statistical Image Reconstruction for 3D X-ray CT

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jang Hwan; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Statistical image reconstruction methods for X-ray computed tomography (CT) provide improved spatial resolution and noise properties over conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction, along with other potential advantages such as reduced patient dose and artifacts. Conventional regularized image reconstruction leads to spatially variant spatial resolution and noise characteristics because of interactions between the system models and the regularization. Previous regularization design methods aiming to solve such issues mostly rely on circulant approximations of the Fisher information matrix that are very inaccurate for undersampled geometries like short-scan cone-beam CT. This paper extends the regularization method proposed in [1] to 3D cone-beam CT by introducing a hypothetical scanning geometry that helps address the sampling properties. The proposed regularization designs were compared with the original method in [1] with both phantom simulation and clinical reconstruction in 3D axial X-ray CT. The proposed regularization methods yield improved spatial resolution or noise uniformity in statistical image reconstruction for short-scan axial cone-beam CT. PMID:25361500

  13. Precision spectroscopy of Kaonic helium-3 and helium-4 3d-->2p X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiwatari, T.; Bazzi, M.; Bhang, H.; Beer, G.; Bombelli, L.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Cargnelli, M.; Choi, S.; Corradi, G.; Curceanu, C.; d'Uffizi, A.; Enomoto, S.; Fiorini, C.; Frizzi, T.; Fujioka, H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Ghio, F.; Girolami, B.; Guaraldo, C.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayano, R. S.; Hiraiwa, T.; Iio, M.; Iliescu, M.; Ishimoto, S.; Itahashi, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Kienle, P.; Kou, H.; Levi Sandri, P.; Longoni, A.; Lucherini, V.; Marton, J.; Matsuda, Y.; Noumi, H.; Ohnishi, H.; Okada, S.; Outa, H.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Rizzo, A.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sakuma, F.; Sato, M.; Scordo, A.; Sekimoto, M.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Suzuki, T.; Tanida, K.; Tatsuno, H.; Tokuda, M.; Tomono, D.; Toyoda, A.; Tsukada, K.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Wünschek, B.; Yamazaki, T.; Zmeskal, J.

    2010-08-01

    Recently, the shift of the kaonic helium-4 2p state was precisely determined by the E570 and SIDDHARTA experiments. Prior to the experiment by E570, the average of three earlier experimental results showed -43±8 eV, while most of the theoretical calculations give ˜0 eV. This five-sigma discrepancy between theory and experiment was known as the "kaonic helium puzzle". A recent theoretical model showed a possible resonance-like shift of maximum 10 eV for a certain value of a deep antikaon-nucleon interaction potential, which is different in helium 3 and helium 4. The E570 experiment determined the shift of the kaonic helium-4 2p state as +2±2 (stat)±2 (sys) eV in 2007. The SIDDHARTA experiment determined the shift as 0±6(stat)±2(sys) eV in 2009. The results of these experiments resolved the long-standing puzzle. A new experiment of the kaonic helium-3 X-ray measurement is being prepared by the J-PARC E17 collaborators, and the kaonic helium-3 X-ray data taken very recently by the SIDDHARTA experiment are on the way to be analyzed. The results of the E570, E17 and SIDDHARTA experiments examine the strong interaction for light nuclei with different isospin, and test furthermore recent theoretical predictions.

  14. Differential ray tracing analysis of the Schwarzschild objective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto-Blanco, Xesús; Mouriz, Dolores; González Núñez, Héctor; Lopez Lago, Elena; de la Fuente, Raúl

    2011-05-01

    Differential Ray Tracing (DRT) is applied to optimize the design of a Schwarzschild objective with large aperture and for arbitrary object position. This optical system lacks of cylindrical symmetry about the non-paraxial base ray, causing astigmatism of a pencil of rays around this ray. The analysis determines the mirror radii ratio that makes the pencil anastigmatic, leading to an excellent image performance. In particular, the classical aplanatic Schwarzschild design is obtained in the limiting case where the base ray becomes paraxial. One example of a design, similar to a typical commercial objective for microscopy, is presented and the image quality is analyzed with an optical design program.

  15. Modeling and analysis of novel laser weld joint designs using optical ray tracing.

    SciTech Connect

    Milewski, J. O.

    2002-01-01

    Reflection of laser energy presents challenges in material processing that can lead to process inefficiency or process instability. Understanding the fundamentals of non-imaging optics and the reflective propagation of laser energy can allow process and weld joint designs to take advantage of these reflections to enhance process efficiency or mitigate detrimental effects. Optical ray tracing may be used within a 3D computer model to evaluate novel joint and fixture designs for laser welding that take advantage of the reflective propagation of laser energy. This modeling work extends that of previous studies by the author and provides comparison with experimental studies performed on highly reflective metals. Practical examples are discussed.

  16. Precision spectroscopy of Kaonic Helium 3d → 2p X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, S.; Beer, G.; Bhang, H.; Cargnelli, M.; Chiba, J.; Choi, S.; Curceanu, C.; Fukuda, Y.; Hanaki, T.; Hayano, R. S.; Iio, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Ishimoto, S.; Ishiwatari, T.; Itahashi, K.; Iwasaki, M.; Juhász, B.; Kienle, P.; Marton, J.; Matsuda, Y.; Ohnishi, H.; Outa, H.; Sato, M.; Schmid, P.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, T.; Tatsuno, H.; Tomono, D.; Widmann, E.; Yamazaki, T.; Yim, H.; Zmeskal, J.

    2007-06-01

    We have measured the strong-interaction shift of 2p states of kaonic helium-4 atoms with a precision of ˜2 eV using Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) which lead to much improved energy resolution and signal-to-noise ratio compared to the conventional Si(Li) x-ray detector used in the past experiments. The measurement will give an answer to the longstanding “kaonic helium puzzle” and provide crucial information to understand the basis of the Akaishi-Yamazaki prediction of deeply-bound kaonic nuclei, which is one of the interpretations of the strange multibaryon candidates recently reported at KEK, DAΦNE and BNL.

  17. Porous structure and fluid partitioning in polyethylene cores from 3D X-ray microtomographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Prodanović, M; Lindquist, W B; Seright, R S

    2006-06-01

    Using oil-wet polyethylene core models, we present the development of robust throat finding techniques for the extraction, from X-ray microtomographic images, of a pore network description of porous media having porosity up to 50%. Measurements of volume, surface area, shape factor, and principal diameters are extracted for pores and area, shape factor and principal diameters for throats. We also present results on the partitioning of wetting and non-wetting phases in the pore space at fixed volume increments of the injected fluid during a complete cycle of drainage and imbibition. We compare these results with fixed fractional flow injection, where wetting and non-wetting phase are simultaneously injected at fixed volume ratio. Finally we demonstrate the ability to differentiate three fluid phases (oil, water, air) in the pore space. PMID:16364351

  18. Mapping electronic ordering in chromium in 3D with x-ray microdiffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ruqing

    2015-03-01

    In the antiferromagnetic state of chromium, electrons form spin-density waves and charge-density waves with wave vector along one of the lattice cubic axes; the spontaneous ordering of the electrons breaks the lattice symmetry and creates domains within a single crystal. We report the first 3-dimentional mapping of charge-density wave domains in bulk polycrystalline chromium samples using differential-aperture x-ray microdiffraction at the Advanced Photon Source. This research used resources of the Advanced Photon Source, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility operated for the DOE Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357

  19. Numerical Ray-Tracing in Full Angle Spatial Compounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas; Koch, Ingo; Hansen, Christian; Lerch, Reinhard; Ermert, Helmut

    The assumption of straight-line wave propagation is common in medical ultrasound. While sufficient for unidirectional systems, it is the main cause for degenerated FASC (Full Angle Spatial Compounding) images, where B-mode data from different viewing angles around an object, e.g. the female breast, are superimposed. To overcome this, we have implemented an eikonal equation based algorithm to perform numerical ray-tracing in inhomogeneous speed of sound distributions. Results can be used to correct ray-paths prior to FASC. Our goal was to improve FASC image quality by using numerical ray-tracing. A tissue mimicking phantom with reservoirs filled with different concentrations of saline water and correspondingly different speeds of sound was imaged with a 2.5 MHz transducer. To evaluate the isotropy of the system's spatial resolution, seven fibers were included into the phantom and the reservoirs. We compared the full width at half maximum of line scatterer images in a FASC image corrected by ray-paths from the numerical ray-tracing with an uncorrected FASC image. Results show that numerical ray-tracing improves the image contrast, eliminates double line artifacts and improves the resolution and its isotropy in FASC.

  20. Studying the precision of ray tracing techniques with Szekeres models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koksbang, S. M.; Hannestad, S.

    2015-07-01

    The simplest standard ray tracing scheme employing the Born and Limber approximations and neglecting lens-lens coupling is used for computing the convergence along individual rays in mock N-body data based on Szekeres swiss cheese and onion models. The results are compared with the exact convergence computed using the exact Szekeres metric combined with the Sachs formalism. A comparison is also made with an extension of the simple ray tracing scheme which includes the Doppler convergence. The exact convergence is reproduced very precisely as the sum of the gravitational and Doppler convergences along rays in Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi swiss cheese and single void models. This is not the case when the swiss cheese models are based on nonsymmetric Szekeres models. For such models, there is a significant deviation between the exact and ray traced paths and hence also the corresponding convergences. There is also a clear deviation between the exact and ray tracing results obtained when studying both nonsymmetric and spherically symmetric Szekeres onion models.

  1. A 3D reconstruction method of the body envelope from biplanar X-rays: Evaluation of its accuracy and reliability.

    PubMed

    Nérot, Agathe; Choisne, Julie; Amabile, Célia; Travert, Christophe; Pillet, Hélène; Wang, Xuguang; Skalli, Wafa

    2015-12-16

    The aim of this study was to propose a novel method for reconstructing the external body envelope from the low dose biplanar X-rays of a person. The 3D body envelope was obtained by deforming a template to match the surface profiles in two X-rays images in three successive steps: global morphing to adopt the position of a person and scale the template׳s body segments, followed by a gross deformation and a fine deformation using two sets of pre-defined control points. To evaluate the method, a biplanar X-ray acquisition was obtained from head to foot for 12 volunteers in a standing posture. Up to 172 radio-opaque skin markers were attached to the body surface and used as reference positions. Each envelope was reconstructed three times by three operators. Results showed a bias lower than 7mm and a confidence interval (95%) of reproducibility lower than 6mm for all body parts, comparable to other existing methods matching a template onto stereographic photographs. The proposed method offers the possibility of reconstructing body shape in addition to the skeleton using a low dose biplanar X-rays system. PMID:26592437

  2. Ionospheric differential error determination using ray tracing for a short baseline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, M.; Strangeways, H. J.; Zulkifli, S. S. N.

    2010-11-01

    Since the United States government discontinued Selective Availability (SA) on 1 May 2000, ionospheric effects have been responsible for the largest errors in GPS systems. The standard Differential GPS (DGPS) method is incapable of completely eliminating the ionospheric error. This paper describes a new approach to determine the differential ionospheric error between geographically distributed receiver stations. The ray paths of GPS signals were simulated using a modified Jones 3D ray tracing programme that includes the effect of the geomagnetic field. A Nelder-Mead optimisation algorithm was embedded in the program to precisely determine the satellite-to-station path. A realistic ionospheric model is essential for accurate ray tracing results and for estimates of differential error that are accurate on sub-centimetre scales. Here, the ionospheric model used in the ray tracing programme was developed by fitting realistic ionosphere profiles with a number of exponential functions. Results were compared to the theoretical approach. Results show that the differential delay is about 1-5 cm at low elevation angles for a short baseline of 10 km, as reported in other literature. This delay is often neglected in DGPS application. The differential delay also shows a pattern similar to that predicted by the Klobuchar model. The method proposed here can be used to improve future GPS applications.

  3. Bi-planar 2D-to-3D registration in Fourier domain for stereoscopic x-ray motion tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zosso, Dominique; Le Callennec, Benoît; Bach Cuadra, Meritxell; Aminian, Kamiar; Jolles, Brigitte M.; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we present a new method to track bone movements in stereoscopic X-ray image series of the knee joint. The method is based on two different X-ray image sets: a rotational series of acquisitions of the still subject knee that allows the tomographic reconstruction of the three-dimensional volume (model), and a stereoscopic image series of orthogonal projections as the subject performs movements. Tracking the movements of bones throughout the stereoscopic image series means to determine, for each frame, the best pose of every moving element (bone) previously identified in the 3D reconstructed model. The quality of a pose is reflected in the similarity between its theoretical projections and the actual radiographs. We use direct Fourier reconstruction to approximate the three-dimensional volume of the knee joint. Then, to avoid the expensive computation of digitally rendered radiographs (DRR) for pose recovery, we develop a corollary to the 3-dimensional central-slice theorem and reformulate the tracking problem in the Fourier domain. Under the hypothesis of parallel X-ray beams, the heavy 2D-to-3D registration of projections in the signal domain is replaced by efficient slice-to-volume registration in the Fourier domain. Focusing on rotational movements, the translation-relevant phase information can be discarded and we only consider scalar Fourier amplitudes. The core of our motion tracking algorithm can be implemented as a classical frame-wise slice-to-volume registration task. Results on both synthetic and real images confirm the validity of our approach.

  4. The 3D-architecture of individual free silver nanoparticles captured by X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Barke, Ingo; Hartmann, Hannes; Rupp, Daniela; Flückiger, Leonie; Sauppe, Mario; Adolph, Marcus; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Treusch, Rolf; Peltz, Christian; Bartling, Stephan; Fennel, Thomas; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Möller, Thomas

    2015-02-04

    The diversity of nanoparticle shapes generated by condensation from gaseous matter reflects the fundamental competition between thermodynamic equilibration and the persistence of metastable configurations during growth. In the kinetically limited regime, intermediate geometries that are favoured only in early formation stages can be imprinted in the finally observed ensemble of differently structured specimens. Here we demonstrate that single-shot wide-angle scattering of femtosecond soft X-ray free-electron laser pulses allows three-dimensional characterization of the resulting metastable nanoparticle structures. For individual free silver particles, which can be considered frozen in space for the duration of photon exposure, both shape and orientation are uncovered from measured scattering images. We identify regular shapes, including species with fivefold symmetry and surprisingly large aspect ratio up to particle radii of the order of 100 nm. Our approach includes scattering effects beyond Born’s approximation and is remarkably efficient—opening up new routes in ultrafast nanophysics and free-electron laser science

  5. The 3D-architecture of individual free silver nanoparticles captured by X-ray scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barke, Ingo; Hartmann, Hannes; Rupp, Daniela; Flückiger, Leonie; Sauppe, Mario; Adolph, Marcus; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Treusch, Rolf; Peltz, Christian; et al

    2015-02-04

    The diversity of nanoparticle shapes generated by condensation from gaseous matter reflects the fundamental competition between thermodynamic equilibration and the persistence of metastable configurations during growth. In the kinetically limited regime, intermediate geometries that are favoured only in early formation stages can be imprinted in the finally observed ensemble of differently structured specimens. Here we demonstrate that single-shot wide-angle scattering of femtosecond soft X-ray free-electron laser pulses allows three-dimensional characterization of the resulting metastable nanoparticle structures. For individual free silver particles, which can be considered frozen in space for the duration of photon exposure, both shape and orientation are uncoveredmore » from measured scattering images. We identify regular shapes, including species with fivefold symmetry and surprisingly large aspect ratio up to particle radii of the order of 100 nm. Our approach includes scattering effects beyond Born’s approximation and is remarkably efficient—opening up new routes in ultrafast nanophysics and free-electron laser science« less

  6. The 3D-architecture of individual free silver nanoparticles captured by X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barke, Ingo; Hartmann, Hannes; Rupp, Daniela; Flückiger, Leonie; Sauppe, Mario; Adolph, Marcus; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Treusch, Rolf; Peltz, Christian; Bartling, Stephan; Fennel, Thomas; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Möller, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    The diversity of nanoparticle shapes generated by condensation from gaseous matter reflects the fundamental competition between thermodynamic equilibration and the persistence of metastable configurations during growth. In the kinetically limited regime, intermediate geometries that are favoured only in early formation stages can be imprinted in the finally observed ensemble of differently structured specimens. Here we demonstrate that single-shot wide-angle scattering of femtosecond soft X-ray free-electron laser pulses allows three-dimensional characterization of the resulting metastable nanoparticle structures. For individual free silver particles, which can be considered frozen in space for the duration of photon exposure, both shape and orientation are uncovered from measured scattering images. We identify regular shapes, including species with fivefold symmetry and surprisingly large aspect ratio up to particle radii of the order of 100 nm. Our approach includes scattering effects beyond Born’s approximation and is remarkably efficient—opening up new routes in ultrafast nanophysics and free-electron laser science.

  7. The 3D-architecture of individual free silver nanoparticles captured by X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Barke, Ingo; Hartmann, Hannes; Rupp, Daniela; Flückiger, Leonie; Sauppe, Mario; Adolph, Marcus; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Treusch, Rolf; Peltz, Christian; Bartling, Stephan; Fennel, Thomas; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Möller, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of nanoparticle shapes generated by condensation from gaseous matter reflects the fundamental competition between thermodynamic equilibration and the persistence of metastable configurations during growth. In the kinetically limited regime, intermediate geometries that are favoured only in early formation stages can be imprinted in the finally observed ensemble of differently structured specimens. Here we demonstrate that single-shot wide-angle scattering of femtosecond soft X-ray free-electron laser pulses allows three-dimensional characterization of the resulting metastable nanoparticle structures. For individual free silver particles, which can be considered frozen in space for the duration of photon exposure, both shape and orientation are uncovered from measured scattering images. We identify regular shapes, including species with fivefold symmetry and surprisingly large aspect ratio up to particle radii of the order of 100 nm. Our approach includes scattering effects beyond Born's approximation and is remarkably efficient-opening up new routes in ultrafast nanophysics and free-electron laser science. PMID:25650004

  8. The 3D-architecture of individual free silver nanoparticles captured by X-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Barke, Ingo; Hartmann, Hannes; Rupp, Daniela; Flückiger, Leonie; Sauppe, Mario; Adolph, Marcus; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Treusch, Rolf; Peltz, Christian; Bartling, Stephan; Fennel, Thomas; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Möller, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The diversity of nanoparticle shapes generated by condensation from gaseous matter reflects the fundamental competition between thermodynamic equilibration and the persistence of metastable configurations during growth. In the kinetically limited regime, intermediate geometries that are favoured only in early formation stages can be imprinted in the finally observed ensemble of differently structured specimens. Here we demonstrate that single-shot wide-angle scattering of femtosecond soft X-ray free-electron laser pulses allows three-dimensional characterization of the resulting metastable nanoparticle structures. For individual free silver particles, which can be considered frozen in space for the duration of photon exposure, both shape and orientation are uncovered from measured scattering images. We identify regular shapes, including species with fivefold symmetry and surprisingly large aspect ratio up to particle radii of the order of 100 nm. Our approach includes scattering effects beyond Born’s approximation and is remarkably efficient—opening up new routes in ultrafast nanophysics and free-electron laser science. PMID:25650004

  9. Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media: 3D Visualization Using Synchrotron X-Ray Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueck, C. L.; Meisenheimer, D.; Wildenschild, D.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms controlling colloid transport and deposition in the vadose zone is an important step in protecting our water resources. Not only may these particles themselves be undesirable contaminants, but they can also aid in the transport of smaller, molecular-scale contaminants by chemical attachment. In this research, we examined the influence that air-water interfaces (AWI) and air-water-solid contact lines (AWS) have on colloid deposition and mobilization in three-dimensional systems. We used x-ray microtomography to visualize the transport of hydrophobic colloids as they move through a partially saturated glass bead pack. Drainage and imbibition experiments were conducted using syringe pumps to control the flow of a colloid suspension through the porous media at 0.6 mL/hr. The high ionic strength fluid was adjusted to a pH of 9.5 and a concentration of 1.0 mol/L KI. During the drainage and imbibition, the flow was periodically halted and allowed to equilibrate before collecting the microtomography scans. Dopants were used to enhance the contrast between the four phases (water, air, beads, and colloids), including potassium iodide dissolved in the fluid, and an outer layer of silver coating the colloids. We hypothesized that AWIs and AWSs will scour and mobilize a significant percentage of colloids, and therefore reduce the concentration of colloids along the vertical profile of the column. The concentration of potassium iodide, and thus the ionic strength, necessary for adequate image segmentation was also explored in separate experiments so that the influence of ionic strength on colloid deposition and mobilization can be studied.

  10. Quantitative 3D petrography using X-ray tomography 2: Combining information at various resolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pamukcu, Ayla S.; Gualda, Guilherme A.R.

    2010-12-02

    X-ray tomography is a nondestructive technique that can be used to study rocks and other materials in three dimensions over a wide range of sizes. Samples that range from decimeters to micrometers in size can be analyzed, and micrometer- to centimeter-sized crystals, vesicles, and other particles can be identified and quantified. In many applications, quantification of a large spectrum of sizes is important, but this cannot be easily accomplished using a single tomogram due to a common trade-off between sample size and image resolution. This problem can be circumvented by combining tomograms acquired for a single sample at a variety of resolutions. We have successfully applied this method to obtain crystal size distributions (CSDs) for magnetite, pyroxene + biotite, and quartz + feldspar in Bishop Tuff pumice. Five cylinders of systematically varying size (1-10 mm diameter and height) were analyzed from each of five pumice clasts. Cylinder size is inversely proportional to image resolution, such that resolution ranges from 2.5 to 17 {micro}m/voxel with increasing sample size. This allows quantification of crystals 10-1000 {micro}m in size. We obtained CSDs for each phase in each sample by combining information from all resolutions, each size bin containing data from the resolution that best characterizes crystals of that size. CSDs for magnetite and pyroxene + biotite in late-erupted Bishop pumice obtained using this method are fractal, but do not seem to result from crystal fragmentation. CSDs for quartz + feldspar reveal a population of abundant crystals <35 {micro}m in size, and a population of crystals >50 {micro}m in size, which will be the focus of a separate publication.

  11. Ray-tracing-based reconstruction algorithms for digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weihua; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Chen, Ying

    2015-03-01

    As a breast-imaging technique, digital breast tomosynthesis has great potential to improve the diagnosis of early breast cancer over mammography. Ray-tracing-based reconstruction algorithms, such as ray-tracing back projection, maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM), ordered-subset MLEM (OS-MLEM), and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART), have been developed as reconstruction methods for different breast tomosynthesis systems. This paper provides a comparative study to investigate these algorithms by computer simulation and phantom study. Experimental results suggested that, among the four investigated reconstruction algorithms, OS-MLEM and SART performed better in interplane artifact removal with a fast speed convergence.

  12. 3-D Structure of Arcade Type Flares Deduced from Soft X-Ray Observations of a Homologous Flare Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, S.; Uchida, Y.; Hirose, S.

    2002-01-01

    In the solar flare problems, no ultimate model that matches observations has been established. One of the reasons for this is due to the restrictions in the observational data lacking information about the third dimension. Thus, many researchers have tried to get information about the three dimensional (3-D) coronal structures by using various techniques or ideas; like movie analysis, calculations using vector or line-of-sight components of photospheric magnetic data, and etc.. In the near future, a mission named STEREO which will obtain information about the 3-D coronal structures from two satellites, is planned. In the present paper, we noted the homology in a homologous flare series of February 1992. We derived a 3-D coronal structures by making use of the images obtained from the three different sight-lines at some common phases in them with Yohkoh SXT. The result of this analysis has made it clear that the so-called ``cusped arcade'' at the maximum phase in the well-known 1992 February 21 flare is, contrary to the general views, an ``elongated arch'' seen with a shallow oblique angle. It is not the ``flare arcade'' seen axis-on as widely conceived. This elongated arch coincides roughly with a diagonal of the main body of the "soft X-ray arcade" that came up later. The magnetic structure causing the flare as a whole turned out in this analysis to be a structure with quadruple magnetic sources. The relative locations of these four characteristic sources stayed almost the same throughout the period of this homologous flare series, determining the fundamental shape of this homologous series. We also examined the corresponding features for other similar events, also using information from other satellites, and will report the results.

  13. Calibration model of a dual gain flat panel detector for 2D and 3D x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidgunst, C.; Ritter, D.; Lang, E.

    2007-09-15

    The continuing research and further development in flat panel detector technology have led to its integration into more and more medical x-ray systems for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) imaging, such as fixed or mobile C arms. Besides the obvious advantages of flat panel detectors, like the slim design and the resulting optimum accessibility to the patient, their success is primarily a product of the image quality that can be achieved. The benefits in the physical and performance-related features as opposed to conventional image intensifier systems (e.g., distortion-free reproduction of imaging information or almost linear signal response over a large dynamic range) can be fully exploited, however, only if the raw detector images are correctly calibrated and postprocessed. Previous procedures for processing raw data contain idealizations that, in the real world, lead to artifacts or losses in image quality. Thus, for example, temperature dependencies or changes in beam geometry, as can occur with mobile C arm systems, have not been taken into account up to this time. Additionally, adverse characteristics such as image lag or aging effects have to be compensated to attain the best possible image quality. In this article a procedure is presented that takes into account the important dependencies of the individual pixel sensitivity of flat panel detectors used in 2D or 3D imaging and simultaneously minimizes the work required for an extensive recalibration. It is suitable for conventional detectors with only one gain mode as well as for the detectors specially developed for 3D imaging with dual gain read-out technology.

  14. Observations of the 3-D distribution of interplanetary electrons and ions from solar wind plasma to low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Ashford, S.; Carlson, C.; Curtis, D.; Ergun, R.; Larson, D.; McFadden, J.; McCarthy, M.; Parks, G. K.

    1995-01-01

    The 3-D Plasma and Energetic Particle instrument on the GGS Wind spacecraft (launched November 1, 1994) is designed to make measurements of the full three-dimensional distribution of suprathermal electrons and ions from solar wind plasma to low energy cosmic rays, with high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, good energy and angular resolution, and high time resolution. Three pairs of double-ended telescopes, each with two or three closely sandwiched passivated ion implanted silicon detectors measure electrons and ions from approximately 20 keV to greater than or equal to 300 keV. Four top-hat symmetrical spherical section electrostatic analyzers with microchannel plate detectors, a large and a small geometric factor analyzer for electrons and a similar pair for ions, cover from approximately 3 eV to 30 keV. We present preliminary observations of the electron and ion distributions in the absence of obvious solar impulsive events and upstream particles. The quiet time electron energy spectrum shows a smooth approximately power law fall-off extending from the halo population at a few hundred eV to well above approximately 100 keV The quiet time ion energy spectrum also shows significant fluxes over this energy range. Detailed 3-D distributions and their temporal variations will be presented.

  15. A Detailed Study of FDIRC Prototype with Waveform Digitizing Electronics in Cosmic Ray Telescope Using 3D Tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K.; Dey, B.; Aston, D.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Ratcliff, B.; Roberts, D.; Ruckman, L.; Shtol, D.; Varner, G.S.; Va'vra, J.; Vavra, Jerry; /SLAC

    2012-07-30

    We present a detailed study of a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC) with waveform digitizing electronics. In this test study, the FDIRC prototype has been instrumented with seven Hamamatsu H-8500 MaPMTs. Waveforms from {approx}450 pixels are digitized with waveform sampling electronics based on the BLAB2 ASIC, operating at a sampling speed of {approx}2.5 GSa/s. The FDIRC prototype was tested in a large cosmic ray telescope (CRT) providing 3D muon tracks with {approx}1.5 mrad angular resolution and muon energy of E{sub muon} > 1.6 GeV. In this study we provide a detailed analysis of the tails in the Cherenkov angle distribution as a function of various variables, compare experimental results with simulation, and identify the major contributions to the tails. We demonstrate that to see the full impact of these tails on the Cherenkov angle resolution, it is crucial to use 3D tracks, and have a full understanding of the role of ambiguities. These issues could not be fully explored in previous FDIRC studies where the beam was perpendicular to the quartz radiator bars. This work is relevant for the final FDIRC prototype of the PID detector at SuperB, which will be tested this year in the CRT setup.

  16. A Detailed Study of FDIRC Prototype with Waveform Digitizing Electronics in Cosmic Ray Telescope Using 3D Tracks.

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K

    2012-07-01

    We present a detailed study of a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC) with waveform digitizing electronics. In this test study, the FDIRC prototype has been instrumented with seven Hamamatsu H-8500 MaPMTs. Waveforms from ~450 pixels are digitized with waveform sampling electronics based on the BLAB2 ASIC, operating at a sampling speed of ~2.5 GSa/s. The FDIRC prototype was tested in a large cosmic ray telescope (CRT) providing 3D muon tracks with ~1.5 mrad angular resolution and muon energy of Emuon greater than 1.6 GeV. In this study we provide a detailed analysis of the tails in the Cherenkov angle distribution as a function of various variables, compare experimental results with simulation, and identify the major contributions to the tails. We demonstrate that to see the full impact of these tails on the Cherenkov angle resolution, it is crucial to use 3D tracks, and have a full understanding of the role of ambiguities. These issues could not be fully explored in previous FDIRC studies where the beam was perpendicular to the quartz radiator bars. This work is relevant for the final FDIRC prototype of the PID detector at SuperB, which will be tested this year in the CRT setup.

  17. Utilization of 3-D elastic transformation in the registration of chest x-ray CT and whole body PET

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Yuan-Chuan; Hoh, C.K.; Hoffman, E.J.

    1996-12-31

    X-ray CT is widely used for detection and localization of lesions in the thorax. Whole Body PET with 18-FDG is becoming accepted for staging of cancer because of its ability to detect malignancy. Combining information from these two modalities has a significant value to improve lung cancer staging and treatment planning. Due to the non-rigid nature of the thorax and the differences in the acquisition conventions, the subject is stretched non-uniformly and the images of these two modalities requires non-rigid transformation for proper registration. Techniques to register chest x-ray CT and Whole Body PET images were developed and evaluated. Accuracy of 3-D elastic transformation was tested by phantom study. Studies on patients with lung carcinoma were used to validate the technique in localizing the 18-FDG uptake and in correlating PET to x-ray CT images. The fused images showed an accurate alignment and provided confident identification of the detailed anatomy of the CT with the functional information of the PET images.

  18. 3D simulation of interdendritic flow through a Al-18wt.%Cu structure captured with X-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domitner, J.; Hölzl, C.; Kharicha, A.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.; Köhler, M.; Ratke, L.

    2012-01-01

    A central parameter to describe the formation of porosity and macrosegregation during casting processes is the permeability of the dendritic mushy zone. To determine this specific feature for a binary Al-18wt.%Cu alloy, flow simulations based on the Lattice Boltz-mann (LB) method were performed. The LB method allows an efficient solving of fluid flow problems dealing with complex shapes within an acceptable period of time. The 3D structure required as input for the simulations was captured with X-ray microtomography, which enables the generation of representative geometries for permeability investigations. Removing the eutectic phase from the measured dataset generated a remaining network of solid primary dendrites. In the simulations, a pressure gradient was applied to force the liquid through the free interdendritic channels. The permeability of the structure was then calculated from the resulting flow velocity pattern using Darcy's law. To examine the influence of different boundary conditions on the results obtained, several simulations were conducted.

  19. Ray tracing a three dimensional scene using a grid

    DOEpatents

    Wald, Ingo; Ize, Santiago; Parker, Steven G; Knoll, Aaron

    2013-02-26

    Ray tracing a three-dimensional scene using a grid. One example embodiment is a method for ray tracing a three-dimensional scene using a grid. In this example method, the three-dimensional scene is made up of objects that are spatially partitioned into a plurality of cells that make up the grid. The method includes a first act of computing a bounding frustum of a packet of rays, and a second act of traversing the grid slice by slice along a major traversal axis. Each slice traversal includes a first act of determining one or more cells in the slice that are overlapped by the frustum and a second act of testing the rays in the packet for intersection with any objects at least partially bounded by the one or more cells overlapped by the frustum.

  20. Combining ray tracing and CFD in the thermal analysis of a parabolic dish tubular cavity receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Ken J.; Marsberg, Justin; Meyer, Josua P.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the numerical evaluation of a tubular receiver used in a dish Brayton cycle. In previous work considering the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to perform the calculation of the absorbed radiation from the parabolic dish into the cavity as well as the resulting conjugate heat transfer, it was shown that an axi-symmetric model of the dish and receiver absorbing surfaces was useful in reducing the computational cost required for a full 3-D discrete ordinates solution, but concerns remained about its accuracy. To increase the accuracy, the Monte Carlo ray tracer SolTrace is used to perform the calculation of the absorbed radiation profile to be used in the conjugate heat transfer CFD simulation. The paper describes an approach for incorporating a complex geometry like a tubular receiver generated using CFD software into SolTrace. The results illustrate the variation of CFD mesh density that translates into the number of elements in SolTrace as well as the number of rays used in the Monte Carlo approach and their effect on obtaining a resolution-independent solution. The conjugate heat transfer CFD simulation illustrates the effect of applying the SolTrace surface heat flux profile solution as a volumetric heat source to heat up the air inside the tube. Heat losses due to convection and thermal re-radiation are also determined as a function of different tube absorptivities.

  1. Critical dimension small angle X-ray scattering measurements of FinFET and 3D memory structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Settens, Charles; Bunday, Benjamin; Thiel, Brad; Kline, R. Joseph; Sunday, Daniel; Wang, Chengqing; Wu, Wen-li; Matyi, Richard

    2013-04-01

    We have demonstrated that transmission critical dimension small angle X-ray scattering (CD-SAXS) provides high accuracy and precision CD measurements on advanced 3D microelectronic architectures. The competitive advantage of CD-SAXS over current 3D metrology methods such as optical scatterometry is that CD-SAXS is able to decouple and fit cross-section parameters without any significant parameter cross-correlations. As the industry aggressively scales beyond the 22 nm node, CD-SAXS can be used to quantitatively measure nanoscale deviations in the average crosssections of FinFETs and high-aspect ratio (HAR) memory devices. Fitting the average cross-section of 18:1 isolated HAR contact holes with an effective trapezoid model yielded an average pitch of 796.9 +/- 0.4 nm, top diameter of 70.3 +/- 0.9 nm, height of 1088 +/- 4 nm, and sidewall angle below 0.1°. Simulations of dense 40:1 HAR contact holes and FinFET fin-gate crossbar structures have been analyzed using CD-SAXS to inquire the theoretical precision of the technique to measure important process parameters such as fin CD, height, and sidewall angle; BOX etch recess, thickness of hafnium oxide and titanium nitride layers; gate CD, height, and sidewall angle; and hafnium oxide and titanium nitride etch recess. The simulations of HAR and FinFET structures mimic the characteristics of experimental data collected at a synchrotron x-ray source. Using the CD-SAXS simulator, we estimate the measurement capabilities for smaller similar structures expected at future nodes to predict the applicability of this technique to fulfill important CD metrology needs.

  2. Development status of a CZT spectrometer prototype with 3D spatial resolution for hard x-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auricchio, N.; Caroli, E.; Basili, A.; Benassi, G.; Budtz Jørgensen, C.; Curado da Silva, R. M.; Del Sordo, S.; Kuvvetli, I.; Milano, L.; Moscatelli, F.; Stephen, J. B.; Zanichelli, M.; Zappettini, A.

    2012-07-01

    The development of new focusing optics based on wide band Laue lenses operating from ~60 keV up to several hundred keV is particularly challenging. This type of hard X-ray or gamma ray optics requires a high performance focal plane detector in order to exploit to the best their intrinsic capabilities. We describe a three dimensional (3D) position sensitive detector prototype suitable as the basic module for a high efficiency Laue lens focal plane detector. This detector configuration is currently under study for use in a balloon payload dedicated to performing a high significance measurement of the polarization status of the Crab between 100 and 500 keV. The prototype is made by packing 8 linear modules, each composed of one basic sensitive unit bonded onto a thin supporting ceramic layer. Each unit is a drift strip detector based on a CZT crystal, irradiated transversally to the electric field direction. The anode is segmented into 8 detection cells, each comprising one collecting strip and 8 surrounding drift strips. The drift strips are biased by a voltage divider. The cathode is divided into 4 horizontal strips for the reconstruction of the Z interaction position. The detector readout electronics is based on RENA-3 ASIC and the data handling system uses a custom electronics based on FPGA to provide the ASIC setting, the event handling logic, and the data acquisition. This paper mainly describes the components and the status of the undergoing activities for the construction of the proposed 3D CZT prototype and shows the results of the electronics tests.

  3. TIM, a ray-tracing program for METATOY research and its dissemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Dean; Hamilton, Alasdair C.; Constable, George; Snehanshu, Harsh; Talati, Sharvil; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-03-01

    TIM (The Interactive METATOY) is a ray-tracing program specifically tailored towards our research in METATOYs, which are optical components that appear to be able to create wave-optically forbidden light-ray fields. For this reason, TIM possesses features not found in other ray-tracing programs. TIM can either be used interactively or by modifying the openly available source code; in both cases, it can easily be run as an applet embedded in a web page. Here we describe the basic structure of TIM's source code and how to extend it, and we give examples of how we have used TIM in our own research. Program summaryProgram title: TIM Catalogue identifier: AEKY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKY_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 124 478 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4 120 052 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Java Computer: Any computer capable of running the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) 1.6 Operating system: Any; developed under Mac OS X Version 10.6 RAM: Typically 145 MB (interactive version running under Mac OS X Version 10.6) Classification: 14, 18 External routines: JAMA [1] (source code included) Nature of problem: Visualisation of scenes that include scene objects that create wave-optically forbidden light-ray fields. Solution method: Ray tracing. Unusual features: Specifically designed to visualise wave-optically forbidden light-ray fields; can visualise ray trajectories; can visualise geometric optic transformations; can create anaglyphs (for viewing with coloured "3D glasses") and random-dot autostereograms of the scene; integrable into web pages. Running time: Problem-dependent; typically seconds for a simple scene.

  4. Quantitative 3D elemental analysis inside plant roots by means of synchrotron confocal micro X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzano, R.; Vekemans, B.; Tomasi, N.; Spagnuolo, M.; Schoonjans, T.; Vincze, L.; Pinton, R.; Cesco, S.; Ruggiero, P.

    2009-04-01

    The knowledge of the distribution and concentration of elements within plants is a fundamental step to better understand how these plants uptake specific elements from the medium of growth and how they manage acquisition and compartmentalisation of nutrients as well as toxic metals. For some elements, either nutrients or toxicants, it can be of relevance to know their concentration level within microscopic volumes in plant organs, where they are stored or accumulated. Usually, this type of microscopic analysis requires complex cutting procedures and extensive sample manipulations. In this research, the technique of synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence in the confocal mode was applied to image the distribution of elements in selected key-planes of tomato roots without the need of any sample preparation, except washing and freeze-drying. Using this method, a first polycapillary lens focussed the X-ray beam with an energy of 12.4 keV down to a 20 µm beam that is penetrating the sample, and a second polycapillary half-lens, that was positioned at the detection side at 90 degrees to the first polycapillary, could then restrict further the view on this irradiated volume to a defined microscopic volume (typically 20x20x20 µm3) from which the induced fluorescent radiation is finally collected by the energy dispersive detector. In this way, it was possible to investigate the concentration levels of some elements such as K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn within the roots of tomato plants. The quantification was performed by means of a dedicated XRF Fundamental Parameter (FP) method in order to calculate the concentrations of trace elements within the analysed plants. Utilizing fundamental atomic parameters, the applied FP method is taking into account the influence of sample self-absorption and especially the specific detection processes by the polycapillary lens. Quantification was assessed and validated by using different standards: NIST SRM 1573a (trace elements in tomato leaves

  5. Characterization of 3D Trench PZT Capacitors for High Density FRAM Devices by Synchrotron X-ray Micro-diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sangmin; Han, Hee; Park, Yong Jun; Choi, Jae-Young; Park, Youngsoo; Baik, Sunggi

    2007-01-01

    3D trench PbZrxTi1-xO3 (PZT) capacitors for 256 Mbit 1T-1C FRAM devices were characterized by synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction at Pohang Light Source. Three layes, Ir/PZT/Ir were deposited on SiO2 trench holes with different widths ranging from 180 nm to 810 nm and 400 nm in depth by ALD and MOCVD. Each hole is separated from neighboring holes by 200 nm. The cross sectional TEM analysis for the trenches revealed that the PZT layers were consisted of columnar grains at the trench entrance and changes to polycrystalline granular grains at the lower part of the trench. The transition from columnar to granular grains was dependent on the trench size. The smaller trenches were favorable to granular grain formation. High resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis was performed to determine the crystal structure of each region. The beam was focused to about 500 μm and the diffraction patterns were obtained from a single trench. Only the peaks corresponding to ferroelectric tetragonal phases are observed for the trenches larger than 670 nm, which consist of fully columnar grains. However, the trenches smaller than 670 nm showed the peaks corresponding the pyrochlore phases, which suggested that the granular grains are of pyrochlore phases and non-ferroelectric.

  6. High-resolution non-invasive 3D imaging of paint microstructure by synchrotron-based X-ray laminography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischig, Péter; Helfen, Lukas; Wallert, Arie; Baumbach, Tilo; Dik, Joris

    2013-06-01

    The characterisation of the microstructure and micromechanical behaviour of paint is key to a range of problems related to the conservation or technical art history of paintings. Synchrotron-based X-ray laminography is demonstrated in this paper to image the local sub-surface microstructure in paintings in a non-invasive and non-destructive way. Based on absorption and phase contrast, the method can provide high-resolution 3D maps of the paint stratigraphy, including the substrate, and visualise small features, such as pigment particles, voids, cracks, wood cells, canvas fibres etc. Reconstructions may be indicative of local density or chemical composition due to increased attenuation of X-rays by elements of higher atomic number. The paint layers and their interfaces can be distinguished via variations in morphology or composition. Results of feasibility tests on a painting mockup (oak panel, chalk ground, vermilion and lead white paint) are shown, where lateral and depth resolution of up to a few micrometres is demonstrated. The method is well adapted to study the temporal evolution of the stratigraphy in test specimens and offers an alternative to destructive sampling of original works of art.

  7. Automatic lung lobe segmentation in x-ray CT images by 3D watershed transform using anatomic information from the segmented airway tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukil, Soumik; Hoffman, Eric A.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2005-04-01

    The human lungs are divided into five distinct anatomic compartments called lobes. The physical boundaries between the lobes are called the lobar fissures. Detection of lobar fissure positions in pulmonary X-ray CT images is of increasing interest for the diagnosis of lung disease. We have developed an automatic method for segmentation of all five lung lobes simultaneously using a 3D watershed transform on the distance transform of a previously generated vessel mask, linearly combined with the original data. Due to the anatomically separate airway sub-trees for individual lobes, we can accurately and automatically place seed points for the watershed segmentation based on the airway tree anatomical description, due to the fact that lower generation airway and vascular tree segments are located near each other. This, along with seed point placement using information on the spatial location of the lobes, can give a close approximation to the actual lobar fissures. The accuracy of the lobar borders is assessed by comparing the automatic segmentation to manually traced lobar boundaries. Averaged over all volumes, the RMS distance errors for the left oblique fissure, right oblique fissure and right horizontal fissure are 3.720 mm, 0.713 mm and 1.109 mm respectively.

  8. Ray tracing package through a lens system and a spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Zurro, B.; King, P.W.; Lazarus, E.A.

    1980-03-01

    To study the light collection optics of the ISX-B two-dimensional (2-D) Thomson scattering system, we have implemented in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fusion Energy Division (FED) PDP-10 two computer programs, LENS and SPECT, that trace rays through a lens system and a spectrometer, respectively. The lens package follows the path of any kind of ray (meridional or skew) through a centered optical system formed by an arbitrary number of spherical surfaces. The spectrometer package performs geometrical ray tracing through a Czerney-Turner spectrometer and can be easily modified for studying any other configuration. Contained herein is a description of the procedures followed and a listing of the computer programs.

  9. Ray tracing in discontinuous velocity model with implicit Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianxing; Yang, Qin; Meng, Xianhai; Li, Jigang

    2016-07-01

    Ray tracing in the velocity model containing complex discontinuities is still facing many challenges. The main difficulty arises from the detection of the spatial relationship between the rays and the interfaces that are usually described in non-linear parametric forms. We propose a novel model representation method that can facilitate the implementation of classical shooting-ray methods. In the representation scheme, each interface is expressed as the zero contour of a signed distance field. A multi-copy strategy is adopted to describe the volumetric properties within blocks. The implicit description of the interface makes it easier to detect the ray-interface intersection. The direct calculation of the intersection point is converted into the problem of judging the signs of a ray segment's endpoints. More importantly, the normal to the interface at the intersection point can be easily acquired according to the signed distance field of the interface. The multiple storage of the velocity property in the proximity of the interface can provide accurate and unambiguous velocity information of the intersection point. Thus, the departing ray path can be determined easily and robustly. In addition, the new representation method can describe velocity models containing very complex geological structures, such as faults, salt domes, intrusions, and pinches, without any simplification. The examples on synthetic and real models validate the robustness and accuracy of the ray tracing based on the proposed model representation scheme.

  10. 3D reconstruction of a patient-specific surface model of the proximal femur from calibrated x-ray radiographs: A validation study

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Guoyan; Schumann, Steffen

    2009-04-15

    Twenty-three femurs (one plastic bone and twenty-two cadaver bones) with both nonpathologic and pathologic cases were considered to validate a statistical shape model based technique for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of a patient-specific surface model from calibrated x-ray radiographs. The 3D reconstruction technique is based on an iterative nonrigid registration of the features extracted from a statistically instantiated 3D surface model to those interactively identified from the radiographs. The surface models reconstructed from the radiographs were compared to the associated ground truths derived either from a 3D CT-scan reconstruction method or from a 3D laser-scan reconstruction method and an average error distance of 0.95 mm were found. Compared to the existing works, our approach has the advantage of seamlessly handling both nonpathologic and pathologic cases even when the statistical shape model that we used was constructed from surface models of nonpathologic bones.

  11. High resolution cone beam X-ray computed tomography of 3D-microstructures of cast Al-alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, Johann; Harrer, Bernhard; Degischer, H. Peter

    2011-01-15

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) has become a very important method for non-destructive 3D-characterisation of materials. XCT systems with cone beam geometry, micro- or nano-focus tubes and matrix detectors are increasingly used in research and non-destructive testing. Spatial resolutions down to 1 {mu}m can be reached with such XCT-systems for heterogeneities in metals with high absorption contrast. High resolution cone beam XCT is applied to five different Al-alloys: AlMg5Si7, AlCu4Mg1, AlZn6Mg2Cu2, AlZn8Mg2Cu2 and AlSi12Ni1. Up to four different types of inhomogeneities are segmented in one alloy using voxel sizes between (0.4 {mu}m){sup 3} and (2.3 {mu}m){sup 3}. Target metallography and elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray analysis are used to identify the inhomogeneities. The possibilities and restrictions of XCT applied to Al-alloys are discussed. AlMg5Si7 XCT-data with a voxel size of (0.4 {mu}m){sup 3} show inhomogeneities with brighter grey-values than the Al-matrix identified as elongated Fe-aluminides, and those with lower grey-values identified as pores and Mg{sub 2}Si-particles with a 'Chinese script-like' structure. Higher-absorbing interdendritic Al-Al{sub 2}Cu-eutectic regions appear brighter than the Al-dendrites in the CT-data of AlCu4Mg1 with (1.1 {mu}m){sup 3}/voxel, whereas pores > 4 {mu}m appear darker than the Al-matrix. The size and the 3D-structure of the {alpha}-Al dendrite arms with a diameter of 50-100 {mu}m are determined in samples from chill cast billets of AlCu4Mg1 and AlZn6Mg2Cu2 alloys. The irregular interdendritic regions containing eutectic segregations with Cu- and Zn-rich phases are > 5 {mu}m wide. Equally absorbing primary equi-axed Al{sub 3}(Sc, Zr) particles > 5 {mu}m are distinguished in the centres of the dendrites by the level of sphericity values. The distribution of Ni- and Fe-aluminides in a squeeze cast AlSi12Ni1-alloy is imaged with (0.4 {mu}m){sup 3}/voxel, but the Si-phase cannot be segmented.

  12. Ray tracing reconstruction investigation for C-arm tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malalla, Nuhad A. Y.; Chen, Ying

    2016-04-01

    C-arm tomosynthesis is a three dimensional imaging technique. Both x-ray source and the detector are mounted on a C-arm wheeled structure to provide wide variety of movement around the object. In this paper, C-arm tomosynthesis was introduced to provide three dimensional information over a limited view angle (less than 180o) to reduce radiation exposure and examination time. Reconstruction algorithms based on ray tracing method such as ray tracing back projection (BP), simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) and maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) were developed for C-arm tomosynthesis. C-arm tomosynthesis projection images of simulated spherical object were simulated with a virtual geometric configuration with a total view angle of 40 degrees. This study demonstrated the sharpness of in-plane reconstructed structure and effectiveness of removing out-of-plane blur for each reconstruction algorithms. Results showed the ability of ray tracing based reconstruction algorithms to provide three dimensional information with limited angle C-arm tomosynthesis.

  13. Significant acceleration of 2D-3D registration-based fusion of ultrasound and x-ray images by mesh-based DRR rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Markus; John, Matthias; Borsdorf, Anja; Mountney, Peter; Ionasec, Razvan; Nöttling, Alois; Kiefer, Philipp; Seeburger, Jörg; Neumuth, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    For transcatheter-based minimally invasive procedures in structural heart disease ultrasound and X-ray are the two enabling imaging modalities. A live fusion of both real-time modalities can potentially improve the workflow and the catheter navigation by combining the excellent instrument imaging of X-ray with the high-quality soft tissue imaging of ultrasound. A recently published approach to fuse X-ray fluoroscopy with trans-esophageal echo (TEE) registers the ultrasound probe to X-ray images by a 2D-3D registration method which inherently provides a registration of ultrasound images to X-ray images. In this paper, we significantly accelerate the 2D-3D registration method in this context. The main novelty is to generate the projection images (DRR) of the 3D object not via volume ray-casting but instead via a fast rendering of triangular meshes. This is possible, because in the setting for TEE/X-ray fusion the 3D geometry of the ultrasound probe is known in advance and their main components can be described by triangular meshes. We show that the new approach can achieve a speedup factor up to 65 and does not affect the registration accuracy when used in conjunction with the gradient correlation similarity measure. The improvement is independent of the underlying registration optimizer. Based on the results, a TEE/X-ray fusion could be performed with a higher frame rate and a shorter time lag towards real-time registration performance. The approach could potentially accelerate other applications of 2D-3D registrations, e.g. the registration of implant models with X-ray images.

  14. The 3D microscopic 'signature' of strain within glacial sediments revealed using X-ray computed microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarplee, Mark F. V.; van der Meer, Jaap J. M.; Davis, Graham R.

    2011-11-01

    X-ray computed microtomography (μCT), a non-destructive analytical technique, was used to create volumetric three-dimensional (3D) models representing the internal composition and structure of undisturbed pro- and subglacial soft sediment sample plugs for the purposes of identifying and analysing kinematic indicators. The technique is introduced and a methodology is presented addressing specific issues relating to the investigation of unlithified, polymineralic sediments. Six samples were selected based on their proximity to 'type' brittle and ductile deformation structures, or because of their perceived suitability for successful application of the technique. Analysis of a proglacial 'ideal' specimen permitted the 3D geometry of a suite of micro-faults and folds to be investigated and the strain history of the sample reconstructed. The poor contrast achieved in scanning a diamicton of glaciomarine origin is attributable to overconsolidation under normal loading, the sediment demonstrated to have undergone subsequent subglacial deformation. Another overconsolidated diamicton contains an extensive, small scale (<20 μm) network of fractures delineating a 'marble-bed' structure, hitherto unknown at this scale. A volcanic lithic clast contrasts well with the surrounding matrix in a 'lodgement' till sample containing μCT (void) and thin-section evidence of clast ploughing. Initial ductile deformation was followed by dewatering of the matrix, which led to brittle failure and subsequent emplacement. Compelling evidence of clast rotation is located in the top of another sample, μCT analysis revealing that the grain has a proximal décollement surface orientated parallel to the plane of shear. The lenticular morphology of the rotational structure defined suggests an unequal distribution of forces along two of the principal stress axes. The excellent contrast between erratics contained within a sample and the enclosing till highlight the considerable potential of the

  15. Upgrading and testing the 3D reconstruction of gamma-ray air showers as observed with an array of Cherenkov telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Naumann-Godo, Melitta; Degrange, Bernard

    2008-12-24

    Stereoscopic arrays of Imaging Cherenkov Telescopes allow to reconstruct gamma-ray-induced showers in 3 dimensions. An analysis method based on a simple 3D-model of electromagnetic showers and implemented in the framework of the H.E.S.S. experiment was recently improved by an additional quality criterion which reduces the background contamination by a factor of about 2 in the case of extended sources, while hardly affecting gamma-ray selection efficiency. Moreover, the dramatic flares of PKS 2155-304 in July 2006, which provided H.E.S.S. data with an almost pure gamma-ray sample, offered the unique opportunity of a precision test of the 3D-reconstruction method as well as of the H.E.S.S. simulations used in its calibration. An agreement at a few percent level is found between data and simulations for the distributions of all 3D shower parameters.

  16. A study of internal structure in components made by additive manufacturing process using 3 D X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raguvarun, K.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Palanisamy, Suresh; Nagarajah, Romesh; Hoye, Nicholas; Curiri, Dominic; Kapoor, Ajay

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing methods are gaining increasing popularity for rapidly and efficiently manufacturing parts and components in the industrial context, as well as for domestic applications. However, except when used for prototyping or rapid visualization of components, industries are concerned with the load carrying capacity and strength achievable by additive manufactured parts. In this paper, the wire-arc additive manufacturing (AM) process based on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been examined for the internal structure and constitution of components generated by the process. High-resolution 3D X-ray tomography is used to gain cut-views through wedge-shaped parts created using this GTAW additive manufacturing process with titanium alloy materials. In this work, two different control conditions for the GTAW process are considered. The studies reveal clusters of porosities, located in periodic spatial intervals along the sample cross-section. Such internal defects can have a detrimental effect on the strength of the resulting AM components, as shown in destructive testing studies. Closer examination of this phenomenon shows that defect clusters are preferentially located at GTAW traversal path intervals. These results highlight the strong need for enhanced control of process parameters in ensuring components with minimal defects and higher strength.

  17. 3D visualization of XFEL beam focusing properties using LiF crystal X-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, Tatiana; Faenov, Anatoly; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ozaki, Norimasa; Albertazzi, Bruno; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Sato, Yuya; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Pikuz, Sergei; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N.; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2015-12-01

    Here, we report, that by means of direct irradiation of lithium fluoride a (LiF) crystal, in situ 3D visualization of the SACLA XFEL focused beam profile along the propagation direction is realized, including propagation inside photoluminescence solid matter. High sensitivity and large dynamic range of the LiF crystal detector allowed measurements of the intensity distribution of the beam at distances far from the best focus as well as near the best focus and evaluation of XFEL source size and beam quality factor M2. Our measurements also support the theoretical prediction that for X-ray photons with energies ~10 keV the radius of the generated photoelectron cloud within the LiF crystal reaches about 600 nm before thermalization. The proposed method has a spatial resolution ~ 0.4-2.0 μm for photons with energies 6-14 keV and potentially could be used in a single shot mode for optimization of different focusing systems developed at XFEL and synchrotron facilities.

  18. 3D visualization of XFEL beam focusing properties using LiF crystal X-ray detector.

    PubMed

    Pikuz, Tatiana; Faenov, Anatoly; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ozaki, Norimasa; Albertazzi, Bruno; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Sato, Yuya; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Pikuz, Sergei; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report, that by means of direct irradiation of lithium fluoride a (LiF) crystal, in situ 3D visualization of the SACLA XFEL focused beam profile along the propagation direction is realized, including propagation inside photoluminescence solid matter. High sensitivity and large dynamic range of the LiF crystal detector allowed measurements of the intensity distribution of the beam at distances far from the best focus as well as near the best focus and evaluation of XFEL source size and beam quality factor M(2). Our measurements also support the theoretical prediction that for X-ray photons with energies ~10 keV the radius of the generated photoelectron cloud within the LiF crystal reaches about 600 nm before thermalization. The proposed method has a spatial resolution ~0.4-2.0 μm for photons with energies 6-14 keV and potentially could be used in a single shot mode for optimization of different focusing systems developed at XFEL and synchrotron facilities. PMID:26634431

  19. Bayesian 3D X-ray computed tomography image reconstruction with a scaled Gaussian mixture prior model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Gac, Nicolas; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve quality of 3D X-ray tomography reconstruction for Non Destructive Testing (NDT), we investigate in this paper hierarchical Bayesian methods. In NDT, useful prior information on the volume like the limited number of materials or the presence of homogeneous area can be included in the iterative reconstruction algorithms. In hierarchical Bayesian methods, not only the volume is estimated thanks to the prior model of the volume but also the hyper parameters of this prior. This additional complexity in the reconstruction methods when applied to large volumes (from 5123 to 81923 voxels) results in an increasing computational cost. To reduce it, the hierarchical Bayesian methods investigated in this paper lead to an algorithm acceleration by Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA) [1] and hardware acceleration thanks to projection and back-projection operators paralleled on many core processors like GPU [2]. In this paper, we will consider a Student-t prior on the gradient of the image implemented in a hierarchical way [3, 4, 1]. Operators H (forward or projection) and Ht (adjoint or back-projection) implanted in multi-GPU [2] have been used in this study. Different methods will be evalued on synthetic volume "Shepp and Logan" in terms of quality and time of reconstruction. We used several simple regularizations of order 1 and order 2. Other prior models also exists [5]. Sometimes for a discrete image, we can do the segmentation and reconstruction at the same time, then the reconstruction can be done with less projections.

  20. 3D Atomic Arrangement at Functional Interfaces Inside Nanoparticles by Resonant High-Energy X-ray Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Shastri, Sarvjit; Chen, Tsan-Yao

    2015-10-21

    With current science and technology moving rapidly into smaller scales, nanometer-sized materials, often referred to as NPs, are produced in increasing numbers and explored for numerous useful applications. Evidence is mounting, however, that useful properties of NPs can be improved further and even new NP functionality achieved by not only controlling the NP size and shape but also interfacing chemically or structurally distinct entities into single, so-called "composite" NPs. A typical example is core-shell NPs wherein the synergy of distinct atoms at the core\\shell interface endows the NPs with otherwise unachievable functionality. However, though advantageous, the concept of functional interfaces inside NPs is still pursued largely by trial-and-error. That is because it is difficut to assess the interfaces precisely at the atomic level using traditional experimental techniques and, hence, difficult to take control of. Using the core\\shell interface in less than 10 nm in size Ru core-Pt shells NPs as an example, we demonstrate that precise knowledge of the 3D atomic arrangement at functional interfaces inside NPs can be obtained by resonant high-energy X-ray diffraction (XRD) coupled to element-specific atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis. On the basis of the unique structure knowledge obtained, we scrutinize the still-debatable influence of core\\shell interface on the catalytic functionality of Ru core-Pt shell NPs, thus evidencing the usefulness of this nontraditional technique for practical applications. PMID:26415142

  1. A study of internal structure in components made by additive manufacturing process using 3 D X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Raguvarun, K. Balasubramaniam, Krishnan Rajagopal, Prabhu; Palanisamy, Suresh; Nagarajah, Romesh; Kapoor, Ajay; Hoye, Nicholas; Curiri, Dominic

    2015-03-31

    Additive manufacturing methods are gaining increasing popularity for rapidly and efficiently manufacturing parts and components in the industrial context, as well as for domestic applications. However, except when used for prototyping or rapid visualization of components, industries are concerned with the load carrying capacity and strength achievable by additive manufactured parts. In this paper, the wire-arc additive manufacturing (AM) process based on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been examined for the internal structure and constitution of components generated by the process. High-resolution 3D X-ray tomography is used to gain cut-views through wedge-shaped parts created using this GTAW additive manufacturing process with titanium alloy materials. In this work, two different control conditions for the GTAW process are considered. The studies reveal clusters of porosities, located in periodic spatial intervals along the sample cross-section. Such internal defects can have a detrimental effect on the strength of the resulting AM components, as shown in destructive testing studies. Closer examination of this phenomenon shows that defect clusters are preferentially located at GTAW traversal path intervals. These results highlight the strong need for enhanced control of process parameters in ensuring components with minimal defects and higher strength.

  2. 3D visualization of XFEL beam focusing properties using LiF crystal X-ray detector

    PubMed Central

    Pikuz, Tatiana; Faenov, Anatoly; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ozaki, Norimasa; Albertazzi, Bruno; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Sato, Yuya; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Pikuz, Sergei; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N.; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report, that by means of direct irradiation of lithium fluoride a (LiF) crystal, in situ 3D visualization of the SACLA XFEL focused beam profile along the propagation direction is realized, including propagation inside photoluminescence solid matter. High sensitivity and large dynamic range of the LiF crystal detector allowed measurements of the intensity distribution of the beam at distances far from the best focus as well as near the best focus and evaluation of XFEL source size and beam quality factor M2. Our measurements also support the theoretical prediction that for X-ray photons with energies ~10 keV the radius of the generated photoelectron cloud within the LiF crystal reaches about 600 nm before thermalization. The proposed method has a spatial resolution ~ 0.4–2.0 μm for photons with energies 6–14 keV and potentially could be used in a single shot mode for optimization of different focusing systems developed at XFEL and synchrotron facilities. PMID:26634431

  3. Plant Tissues in 3D via X-Ray Tomography: Simple Contrasting Methods Allow High Resolution Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Staedler, Yannick M.; Masson, David; Schönenberger, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography remains strongly underused in plant sciences despite its high potential in delivering detailed 3D phenotypical information because of the low X-ray absorption of most plant tissues. Existing protocols to study soft tissues display poor performance, especially when compared to those used on animals. More efficient protocols to study plant material are therefore needed. Flowers of Arabidopsis thaliana and Marcgravia caudata were immersed in a selection of contrasting agents used to treat samples for transmission electron microscopy. Grayscale values for floral tissues and background were measured as a function of time. Contrast was quantified via a contrast index. The thick buds of Marcgravia were scanned to determine which contrasting agents best penetrate thick tissues. The highest contrast increase with cytoplasm-rich tissues was obtained with phosphotungstate, whereas osmium tetroxide and bismuth tatrate displayed the highest contrast increase with vacuolated tissues. Phosphotungstate also displayed the best sample penetration. Furthermore, infiltration with phosphotungstate allowed imaging of all plants parts at a high resolution of 3 µm, which approaches the maximum resolution of our equipment: 1.5 µm. The high affinity of phosphotungstate for vasculature, cytoplasm-rich tissue, and pollen causes these tissues to absorb more X-rays than the surrounding tissues, which, in turn, makes these tissues appear brighter on the scan data. Tissues with different brightness can then be virtually dissected from each other by selecting the bracket of grayscale to be visualized. Promising directions for the future include in silico phenotyping and developmental studies of plant inner parts (e.g., ovules, vasculature, pollen, and cell nuclei) via virtual dissection as well as correlations of quantitative phenotypes with omics datasets. Therefore, this work represents a crucial improvement of previous methods, allowing new directions of research to be

  4. Plant tissues in 3D via X-ray tomography: simple contrasting methods allow high resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Staedler, Yannick M; Masson, David; Schönenberger, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography remains strongly underused in plant sciences despite its high potential in delivering detailed 3D phenotypical information because of the low X-ray absorption of most plant tissues. Existing protocols to study soft tissues display poor performance, especially when compared to those used on animals. More efficient protocols to study plant material are therefore needed. Flowers of Arabidopsis thaliana and Marcgravia caudata were immersed in a selection of contrasting agents used to treat samples for transmission electron microscopy. Grayscale values for floral tissues and background were measured as a function of time. Contrast was quantified via a contrast index. The thick buds of Marcgravia were scanned to determine which contrasting agents best penetrate thick tissues. The highest contrast increase with cytoplasm-rich tissues was obtained with phosphotungstate, whereas osmium tetroxide and bismuth tatrate displayed the highest contrast increase with vacuolated tissues. Phosphotungstate also displayed the best sample penetration. Furthermore, infiltration with phosphotungstate allowed imaging of all plants parts at a high resolution of 3 µm, which approaches the maximum resolution of our equipment: 1.5 µm. The high affinity of phosphotungstate for vasculature, cytoplasm-rich tissue, and pollen causes these tissues to absorb more X-rays than the surrounding tissues, which, in turn, makes these tissues appear brighter on the scan data. Tissues with different brightness can then be virtually dissected from each other by selecting the bracket of grayscale to be visualized. Promising directions for the future include in silico phenotyping and developmental studies of plant inner parts (e.g., ovules, vasculature, pollen, and cell nuclei) via virtual dissection as well as correlations of quantitative phenotypes with omics datasets. Therefore, this work represents a crucial improvement of previous methods, allowing new directions of research to be

  5. Fast stereoscopic images with ray-traced volume rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Adelson, S.J.; Hansen, C.D.

    1994-05-01

    One of the drawbacks of standard volume rendering techniques is that is it often difficult to comprehend the three-dimensional structure of the volume from a single frame; this is especially true in cases where there is no solid surface. Generally, several frames must be generated and viewed sequentially, using motion parallax to relay depth. Another option is to generate a single spectroscopic pair, resulting in clear and unambiguous depth information in both static and moving images. Methods have been developed which take advantage of the coherence between the two halves of a stereo pair for polygon rendering and ray-tracing, generating the second half of the pair in significantly less time than that required to completely render a single image. This paper reports the results of implementing these techniques with parallel ray-traced volume rendering. In tests with different data types, the time savings is in the range of 70--80%.

  6. Ray tracing homogenizing mirrors for synchrotron x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homer, Michael; Rosser, Roy J.; Speer, R. J.

    1991-12-01

    Saddle toroid array mirrors (STAMs) are novel grazing-incidence mirrors. They have been proposed as the optical component that most efficiently matches synchrotron orbital radiation (SOR) to the needs of proximity x-ray lithography. However, STAMs have yet to be accepted by the synchrotron lithography community because of the lack of detailed data on their expected performance, due primarily to the difficulty of raytracing such mirrors using existing optical raytrace programs. A raytracing package written especially to study the design and optimization of these unusually shaped mirrors and the very encouraging results obtained with the package to date are described. The optimum STAM designs turn out to be the most effective way of homogeneously illuminating a rectangular proximity x-ray lithography mask, improving on existing scanning mirror systems by at least a factor of four. They have the added advantage of being stationary, which should lead to greater reliability--a quality of considerable value in the production environment these mirrors are intended for, namely the ultra-high vacuum of a synchrotron beamline. Based on the results of the raytracing, a prototype STAM has been constructed, and preparations are being made for an x-ray test of the device.

  7. Investigation of 3D glenohumeral displacements from 3D reconstruction using biplane X-ray images: Accuracy and reproducibility of the technique and preliminary analysis in rotator cuff tear patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Skalli, Wafa; Lagacé, Pierre-Yves; Billuart, Fabien; Ohl, Xavier; Cresson, Thierry; Bureau, Nathalie J; Rouleau, Dominique M; Roy, André; Tétreault, Patrice; Sauret, Christophe; de Guise, Jacques A; Hagemeister, Nicola

    2016-08-01

    Rotator cuff (RC) tears may be associated with increased glenohumeral instability; however, this instability is difficult to quantify using currently available diagnostic tools. Recently, the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and registration method of the scapula and humeral head, based on sequences of low-dose biplane X-ray images, has been proposed for glenohumeral displacement assessment. This research aimed to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of this technique and to investigate its potential with a preliminary application comparing RC tear patients and asymptomatic volunteers. Accuracy was assessed using CT scan model registration on biplane X-ray images for five cadaveric shoulder specimens and showed differences ranging from 0.6 to 1.4mm depending on the direction of interest. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility was assessed through two operators who repeated the reconstruction of five subjects three times, allowing defining 95% confidence interval ranging from ±1.8 to ±3.6mm. Intraclass correlation coefficient varied between 0.84 and 0.98. Comparison between RC tear patients and asymptomatic volunteers showed differences of glenohumeral displacements, especially in the superoinferior direction when shoulder was abducted at 20° and 45°. This study thus assessed the accuracy of the low-dose 3D biplane X-ray reconstruction technique for glenohumeral displacement assessment and showed potential in biomechanical and clinical research. PMID:26350569

  8. grtrans: Polarized general relativistic radiative transfer via ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason

    2016-05-01

    grtrans calculates ray tracing radiative transfer in the Kerr metric, including the full treatment of polarised radiative transfer and parallel transport along geodesics, for comparing theoretical models of black hole accretion flows and jets with observations. The code is written in Fortran 90 and parallelizes with OpenMP; the full code and several components have Python interfaces. grtrans includes Geokerr (ascl:1011.015) and requires cfitsio (ascl:1010.001) and pyfits (ascl:1207.009).

  9. Ray tracing for point distribution in unstructured grid generation

    SciTech Connect

    Khamayseh, A.; Ortega, F.; Trease, H.

    1995-12-31

    We present a procedure by which grid points are generated on surfaces or within three-dimensional volumes to produce high quality unstructed grids for complex geometries. The virtue of this method is based on ray-tracing approach for curved polyhedra whose faces may lie on natural quadrics (planes, cylinders, cones, or spheres) or triangular faceted surfaces. We also present an efficient point location algorithm for identifying points relative to various regions with classification of inside/on/outside.

  10. grtrans: Polarized general relativistic radiative transfer via ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason

    2016-05-01

    grtrans calculates ray tracing radiative transfer in the Kerr metric, including the full treatment of polarised radiative transfer and parallel transport along geodesics, for comparing theoretical models of black hole accretion flows and jets with observations. The code is written in Fortran 90 and parallelizes with OpenMP; the full code and several components have Python interfaces. grtrans requires Geokerr (ascl:1011.015), cfitsio (ascl:1010.001), and pyfits (ascl:1207.009).

  11. Ray tracing software application in VIP lamp design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehn, Henning

    2002-08-01

    In our contribution we demonstrate a wide variety of ray tracing software applications for the design of VIP short-arc discharge video projection lamps. On the basis of simulations we derive design rules for the lamp itself and for its optical environment. Light Tools software acts as a means to understand the collection efficiency of a VIP lamp with an elliptical reflector and as an instrument to prove the conclusions.

  12. Accelerated ray tracing algorithm under urban macro cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.-Y.; Guo, L.-X.; Guan, X.-W.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, an ray tracing propagation prediction model, which is based on creating a virtual source tree, is used because of their high efficiency and reliable prediction accuracy. In addition, several acceleration techniques are also adopted to improve the efficiency of ray-tracing-based prediction over large areas. However, in the process of employing the ray tracing method for coverage zone prediction, runtime is linearly proportional to the total number of prediction points, leading to large and sometimes prohibitive computation time requirements under complex geographical urban macrocell environments. In order to overcome this bottleneck, the compute unified device architecture (CUDA), which provides fine-grained data parallelism and thread parallelism, is implemented to accelerate the calculation. Taking full advantage of tens of thousands of threads in CUDA program, the decomposition of the coverage prediction problem is firstly conducted by partitioning the image tree and the visible prediction points to different sources. Then, we make every thread calculate the electromagnetic field of one propagation path and then collect these results. Comparing this parallel algorithm with the traditional sequential algorithm, it can be found that computational efficiency has been improved.

  13. Three dimensional ray tracing of the Jovian magnetosphere in the low frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Ray tracing studies of Jovian low frequency emissions were studied. A comprehensive three-dimensional ray tracing computer code for examination of model Jovian decametric (DAM) emission was developed. The improvements to the computer code are outlined and described. The results of the ray tracings of Jovian emissions will be presented in summary form.

  14. Method for dose-reduced 3D catheter tracking on a scanning-beam digital x-ray system using dynamic electronic collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkerley, David A. P.; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system capable of tomosynthesis-based 3D catheter tracking. This work proposes a method of dose-reduced 3D tracking using dynamic electronic collimation (DEC) of the SBDX scanning x-ray tube. Positions in the 2D focal spot array are selectively activated to create a regionof- interest (ROI) x-ray field around the tracked catheter. The ROI position is updated for each frame based on a motion vector calculated from the two most recent 3D tracking results. The technique was evaluated with SBDX data acquired as a catheter tip inside a chest phantom was pulled along a 3D trajectory. DEC scans were retrospectively generated from the detector images stored for each focal spot position. DEC imaging of a catheter tip in a volume measuring 11.4 cm across at isocenter required 340 active focal spots per frame, versus 4473 spots in full-FOV mode. The dose-area-product (DAP) and peak skin dose (PSD) for DEC versus full field-of-view (FOV) scanning were calculated using an SBDX Monte Carlo simulation code. DAP was reduced to 7.4% to 8.4% of the full-FOV value, consistent with the relative number of active focal spots (7.6%). For image sequences with a moving catheter, PSD was 33.6% to 34.8% of the full-FOV value. The root-mean-squared-deviation between DEC-based 3D tracking coordinates and full-FOV 3D tracking coordinates was less than 0.1 mm. The 3D distance between the tracked tip and the sheath centerline averaged 0.75 mm. Dynamic electronic collimation can reduce dose with minimal change in tracking performance.

  15. 3D Non-destructive morphological analysis of a solid oxide fuel cell anode using full-field X-ray nano-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karen Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen; Cronin, J. Scott; Yuan, Qingxi; Yakal-Kremski, Kyle J.; Barnett, Scott A.; Wang, Jun

    2012-11-01

    An accurate 3D morphological analysis is critically needed to study the process-structure-property relationship in many application fields such as battery electrodes, fuel cells and porous materials for sensing and actuating. Here we present the application of a newly developed full field X-ray nano-scale transmission microscopy (TXM) imaging for a non-destructive, comprehensive 3D morphology analysis of a porous Ni-YSZ solid oxide fuel cell anode. A unique combination of improved 3D resolution and large analyzed volume (˜3600 μm3) yields structural data with excellent statistical accuracy. 3D morphological parameters quantified include phase volume fractions, surface and interfacial area densities, phase size distribution, directional connectivity, tortuosity, and electrochemically active triple phase boundary density. A prediction of electrochemical anode polarization resistance based on this microstructural data yielded good agreement with a measured anode resistance via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The Mclachlan model is used to estimate the anode electrical conductivity.

  16. Effect of annealing treatment on K{beta}-to-K{alpha} x-ray intensity ratios of 3d transition-metal alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Han, I.; Demir, L.

    2010-06-15

    The influence of heat annealing treatment on the K{beta}-to-K{alpha} x-ray intensity ratios of 3d transition metal was carried out by x-ray fluorescence studies of various alloy compositions. K{beta}-to-K{alpha} x-ray intensity ratios of Fe, Ni, Ti, Co, and Cu in Fe{sub x}Ni{sub 1-x}, Ti{sub x}Ni{sub 1-x}, and Co{sub x}Cu{sub 1-x} alloys unannealed and thermally annealed at different temperatures have been measured following excitation by 22.69-keV x rays from a 10-mCi {sup 109}Cd radioactive point source. The experimental data obtained after annealing treatment indicate deviations of K{beta}-to-K{alpha} x-ray intensity ratios for 3d transition metals in different alloy compositions from the corresponding ratios for unannealed samples. The present investigation makes it possible to perform reliable interpretation of experimental K{beta}-to-K{alpha} x-ray intensity ratios for various 3d transition metals in their alloys and can also provide quantitative information about the changes of the K{beta}-to-K{alpha} x-ray intensity ratios of these metals with annealing treatment in considered systems.

  17. Bayesian 3D X-ray computed tomography image reconstruction with a scaled Gaussian mixture prior model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li; Gac, Nicolas; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2015-01-13

    In order to improve quality of 3D X-ray tomography reconstruction for Non Destructive Testing (NDT), we investigate in this paper hierarchical Bayesian methods. In NDT, useful prior information on the volume like the limited number of materials or the presence of homogeneous area can be included in the iterative reconstruction algorithms. In hierarchical Bayesian methods, not only the volume is estimated thanks to the prior model of the volume but also the hyper parameters of this prior. This additional complexity in the reconstruction methods when applied to large volumes (from 512{sup 3} to 8192{sup 3} voxels) results in an increasing computational cost. To reduce it, the hierarchical Bayesian methods investigated in this paper lead to an algorithm acceleration by Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA) [1] and hardware acceleration thanks to projection and back-projection operators paralleled on many core processors like GPU [2]. In this paper, we will consider a Student-t prior on the gradient of the image implemented in a hierarchical way [3, 4, 1]. Operators H (forward or projection) and H{sup t} (adjoint or back-projection) implanted in multi-GPU [2] have been used in this study. Different methods will be evalued on synthetic volume 'Shepp and Logan' in terms of quality and time of reconstruction. We used several simple regularizations of order 1 and order 2. Other prior models also exists [5]. Sometimes for a discrete image, we can do the segmentation and reconstruction at the same time, then the reconstruction can be done with less projections.

  18. 3D tissue-engineered construct analysis via conventional high-resolution microcomputed tomography without X-ray contrast.

    PubMed

    Voronov, Roman S; VanGordon, Samuel B; Shambaugh, Robert L; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I

    2013-05-01

    As the field of tissue engineering develops, researchers are faced with a large number of degrees of freedom regarding the choice of material, architecture, seeding, and culturing. To evaluate the effectiveness of a tissue-engineered strategy, histology is typically done by physically slicing and staining a construct (crude, time-consuming, and unreliable). However, due to recent advances in high-resolution biomedical imaging, microcomputed tomography (μCT) has arisen as a quick and effective way to evaluate samples, while preserving their structure in the original state. However, a major barrier for using μCT to do histology has been its inability to differentiate between materials with similar X-ray attenuation. Various contrasting strategies (hardware and chemical staining agents) have been proposed to address this problem, but at a cost of additional complexity and limited access. Instead, here we suggest a strategy for how virtual 3D histology in silico can be conducted using conventional μCT, and we provide an illustrative example from bone tissue engineering. The key to our methodology is an implementation of scaffold surface architecture that is ordered in relation to cells and tissue, in concert with straightforward image-processing techniques, to minimize the reliance on contrasting for material segmentation. In the case study reported, μCT was used to image and segment porous poly(lactic acid) nonwoven fiber mesh scaffolds that were seeded dynamically with mesenchymal stem cells and cultured to produce soft tissue and mineralized tissue in a flow perfusion bioreactor using an osteogenic medium. The methodology presented herein paves a new way for tissue engineers to identify and distinguish components of cell/tissue/scaffold constructs to easily and effectively evaluate the tissue-engineering strategies that generate them. PMID:23020551

  19. Design of smart 3D-digital X-ray microtomographic scanners for non-destructive testing of materials and components of electronic devices with a multilayered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syryamkin, V. I.; Suntsov, S. B.; Klestov, S. A.; Echina, E. S.

    2015-10-01

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. Chapter 4 covers general procedures of defect search, which is based on vector analysis principles. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  20. Design of smart 3D-digital X-ray microtomographic scanners for non-destructive testing of materials and components of electronic devices with a multilayered structure

    SciTech Connect

    Syryamkin, V. I. Klestov, S. A. Echina, E. S.; Suntsov, S. B.

    2015-10-27

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. Chapter 4 covers general procedures of defect search, which is based on vector analysis principles. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  1. Precise 3D dimensional metrology using high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (μCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunke, Oliver; Santillan, Javier; Suppes, Alexander

    2010-09-01

    Over the past decade computed tomography (CT) with conventional x-ray sources has evolved from an imaging method in medicine to a well established technology for industrial applications in fields such as material science, light metals and plastics processing, microelectronics and geology. By using modern microfocus and nanofocus X-ray tubes, parts can be scanned with sub-micrometer resolutions. Currently, micro-CT is a technology increasingly used for metrology applications in the automotive industry. CT offers big advantages compared with conventional tactile or optical coordinate measuring machines (CMMs). This is of greater importance if complex parts with hidden or difficult accessible surfaces have to be measured. In these cases, CT offers the advantage of a high density of measurement points and a non-destructive and fast capturing of the sample's complete geometry. When using this growing technology the question arises how precise a μCT based CMM can measure as compared to conventional and established methods for coordinate measurements. For characterizing the metrological capabilities of a tactile or optical CMM, internationally standardized parameters like length measurement error and probing error are defined and used. To increase the acceptance of CT as a metrological method, our work seeks to clarify the definition and usage of parameters used in the field of metrology as these apply to CT. In this paper, an overview of the process chain in CT based metrology will be given and metrological characteristics will be described. For the potential user of CT as 3D metrology tool it is important to show the measurement accuracy and repeatability on realistic samples. Following a discussion of CT metrology techniques, two samples are discussed. The first compares a measured CT Data set to CAD data using CMM data as a standard for comparison of results. The second data second realistic data set will compare the results of applying both the CMM method of

  2. The Use of Pro/Engineer CAD Software and Fishbowl Tool Kit in Ray-tracing Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nounu, Hatem N.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    This document is designed as a manual for a user who wants to operate the Pro/ENGINEER (ProE) Wildfire 3.0 with the NASA Space Radiation Program's (SRP) custom-designed Toolkit, called 'Fishbowl', for the ray tracing of complex spacecraft geometries given by a ProE CAD model. The analysis of spacecraft geometry through ray tracing is a vital part in the calculation of health risks from space radiation. Space radiation poses severe risks of cancer, degenerative diseases and acute radiation sickness during long-term exploration missions, and shielding optimization is an important component in the application of radiation risk models. Ray tracing is a technique in which 3-dimensional (3D) vehicle geometry can be represented as the input for the space radiation transport code and subsequent risk calculations. In ray tracing a certain number of rays (on the order of 1000) are used to calculate the equivalent thickness, say of aluminum, of the spacecraft geometry seen at a point of interest called the dose point. The rays originate at the dose point and terminate at a homogenously distributed set of points lying on a sphere that circumscribes the spacecraft and that has its center at the dose point. The distance a ray traverses in each material is converted to aluminum or other user-selected equivalent thickness. Then all equivalent thicknesses are summed up for each ray. Since each ray points to a direction, the aluminum equivalent of each ray represents the shielding that the geometry provides to the dose point from that particular direction. This manual will first list for the user the contact information for help in installing ProE and Fishbowl in addition to notes on the platform support and system requirements information. Second, the document will show the user how to use the software to ray trace a Pro/E-designed 3-D assembly and will serve later as a reference for troubleshooting. The user is assumed to have previous knowledge of ProE and CAD modeling.

  3. Graphical User Interface for Interactive Seismic Ray Tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jianli; ten Brink, Uri

    2005-03-01

    RayGUI 2.0 is a new version of RayGUI, a graphical user interface (GUI) to the seismic travel time modeling program of Zelt and Smith [1992]. It represents a significant improvement over the previous version of RayGUI (RayGUI 1.04; Loss et al. [1998a,1998b]). RayGUI 2.0 uses an updated Java version (1.3), and can run on various operating systems (UNIX, Linux, and Mac OS X). Several new functions have been incorporated, including executing the forward and inversion codes of Zelt and Smith [1992], creating models or adding new parts of models from an ASCII file, graphically adding layers or points, graphically pinching layers, changing the velocity value of a control point, reporting point location and velocity, importing travel-time lists, generating postscript files, exporting the velocity model into an ASCII file, generating 1-D velocity profiles at specified locations, calculating root-mean-square errors between observed and calculated arrivals for selected phases, and accessing the ray trace log, as well as several other new display features.

  4. 2D/3D Quantification of bone morphometric parameter changes using X-ray microtomograpphy with different pixel sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, F.; de Assis, J. T.; Lopes, R. T.; Lima, I.

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, bone quantification led to a deeper knowledge of the 3D microarchitecture. In this study the bone architecture of rats was investigated based on 2D/3D morphometric analysis using microcomputed tomography, aiming at determining the effect of the image acquisition pixel on the quality of some 2D/3D morphometric parameters, such as porosity and trabecular density.Six pairs of bone samples were used and the scans were carried out using high microcomputed tomography system, operating at three different pixel sizes of 33.3 μm, 15.0 μm and 9.5 μm. The results showed 2D parameters values lower than those obtained in the 3D analysis, mainly for trabecular density, separation and thickness.

  5. New BNL 3D-Trench electrode Si detectors for radiation hard detectors for sLHC and for X-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng

    2011-12-01

    . Since the large electrode spacing (up to 500 μm) can be realized in the 3D-Trench electrode detector due to their advantage of greatly reduced full depletion voltage, detectors with large pixel cells (therefore small dead volume) can be made for applications in photon science (e.g. X-ray).

  6. Dynamic ray tracing and its application in triangulated media

    SciTech Connect

    Rueger, A.

    1993-07-01

    Hale and Cohen (1991) developed software to generate two-dimensional computer models of complex geology. Their method uses a triangulation technique designed to support efficient and accurate computation of seismic wavefields for models of the earth`s interior. Subsequently, Hale (1991) used this triangulation approach to perform dynamic ray tracing and create synthetic seismograms based on the method of Gaussian beams. Here, I extend this methodology to allow an increased variety of ray-theoretical experiments. Specifically, the developed program GBmod (Gaussian Beam MODeling) can produce arbitrary multiple sequences and incorporate attenuation and density variations. In addition, I have added an option to perform Fresnel-volume ray tracing (Cerveny and Soares, 1992). Corrections for reflection and transmission losses at interfaces, and for two-and-one-half-dimensional (2.5-D) spreading are included. However, despite these enhancements, difficulties remain in attempts to compute accurate synthetic seismograms if strong lateral velocity inhomogeneities are present. Here, these problems are discussed and, to a certain extent, reduced. I provide example computations of high-frequency seismograms based on the method of Gaussian beams to exhibit the advantages and disadvantages of the proposed modeling method and illustrate new features for both surface and vertical seismic profiling (VSP) acquisition geometries.

  7. Adaptive sample map for Monte Carlo ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Jun; Luo, Lixin; Chen, Zhibo

    2010-07-01

    Monte Carlo ray tracing algorithm is widely used by production quality renderers to generate synthesized images in films and TV programs. Noise artifact exists in synthetic images generated by Monte Carlo ray tracing methods. In this paper, a novel noise artifact detection and noise level representation method is proposed. We first apply discrete wavelet transform (DWT) on a synthetic image; the high frequency sub-bands of the DWT result encode the noise information. The sub-bands coefficients are then combined to generate a noise level description of the synthetic image, which is called noise map in the paper. This noise map is then subdivided into blocks for robust noise level metric calculation. Increasing the samples per pixel in Monte Carlo ray tracer can reduce the noise of a synthetic image to visually unnoticeable level. A noise-to-sample number mapping algorithm is thus performed on each block of the noise map, higher noise value is mapped to larger sample number, and lower noise value is mapped to smaller sample number, the result of mapping is called sample map. Each pixel in a sample map can be used by Monte Carlo ray tracer to reduce the noise level in the corresponding block of pixels in a synthetic image. However, this block based scheme produces blocky artifact as appeared in video and image compression algorithms. We use Gaussian filter to smooth the sample map, the result is adaptive sample map (ASP). ASP serves two purposes in rendering process; its statistics information can be used as noise level metric in synthetic image, and it can also be used by a Monte Carlo ray tracer to refine the synthetic image adaptively in order to reduce the noise to unnoticeable level but with less rendering time than the brute force method.

  8. Comment on "Improved ray tracing air mass numbers model"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Werf, Siebren Y.

    2008-01-01

    Air mass numbers have traditionally been obtained by techniques that use height as the integration variable. This introduces an inherent singularity at the horizon, and ad hoc solutions have been invented to cope with it. A survey of the possible options including integration by height, zenith angle, and horizontal distance or path length is presented. Ray tracing by path length is shown to avoid singularities both at the horizon and in the zenith. A fourth-order Runge-Kutta numerical integration scheme is presented, which treats refraction and air mass as path integrals. The latter may optionally be split out into separate contributions of the atmosphere's constituents.

  9. A complete ray-trace analysis of the Mirage toy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhya, Sriya; Noé, John W.

    2007-06-01

    The `Mirage' (Opti-Gone International) is a well-known optics demonstration (PIRA index number 6A20.35) that uses two opposed concave mirrors to project a real image of a small object into space. We studied image formation in the Mirage by standard 2x2 matrix methods and by exact ray tracing, with particular attention to additional real images that can be observed when the mirror separation is increased beyond one focal length. We find that the three readily observed secondary images correspond to 4, 6, or 8 reflections, respectively, contrary to previous reports.

  10. Ray tracing study for non-imaging daylight collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wittkopf, Stephen; Oliver Grobe, Lars; Geisler-Moroder, David; Compagnon, Raphael; Kaempf, Jerome; Linhart, Friedrich; Scartezzini, Jean-Louis

    2010-06-15

    This paper presents a novel method to study how well non-imaging daylight collectors pipe diffuse daylight into long horizontal funnels for illuminating deep buildings. Forward ray tracing is used to derive luminous intensity distributions curves (LIDC) of such collectors centered in an arc-shaped light source representing daylight. New photometric characteristics such as 2D flux, angular spread and horizontal offset are introduced as a function of such LIDC. They are applied for quantifying and thus comparing different collector contours. (author)

  11. Photorealistic ray tracing to visualize automobile side mirror reflective scenes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hocheol; Kim, Kyuman; Lee, Gang; Lee, Sungkoo; Kim, Jingu

    2014-10-20

    We describe an interactive visualization procedure for determining the optimal surface of a special automobile side mirror, thereby removing the blind spot, without the need for feedback from the error-prone manufacturing process. If the horizontally progressive curvature distributions are set to the semi-mathematical expression for a free-form surface, the surface point set can then be derived through numerical integration. This is then converted to a NURBS surface while retaining the surface curvature. Then, reflective scenes from the driving environment can be virtually realized using photorealistic ray tracing, in order to evaluate how these reflected images would appear to drivers. PMID:25401606

  12. Final report of LDRD project : compact ultrabright multikilovolt x-ray sources for advanced materials studies, 3D nanoimaging, and attosecond x-ray technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Rhodes, Charles Kirkham; Mar, Alan

    2005-02-01

    Experimental evidence and corresponding theoretical analyses have led to the conclusion that the system composed of Xe hollow atom states, that produce a characteristic Xe(L) spontaneous emission spectrum at 1 {at} 2.9 {angstrom} and arise from the excitation of Xe clusters with an intense pulse of 248 nm radiation propagating in a self-trapped plasma channel, closely represents the ideal situation sought for amplification in the multikilovolt region. The key innovation that is central to all aspects of the proposed work is the controlled compression of power to the level ({approx} 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 3}) corresponding to the maximum achieved by thermonuclear events. Furthermore, since the x-ray power that is produced appears in a coherent form, an entirely new domain of physical interaction is encountered that involves states of matter that are both highly excited and highly ordered. Moreover, these findings lead to the concept of 'photonstaging', an idea which offers the possibility of advancing the power compression by an additional factor of {approx} 10{sup 9} to {approx} 10{sup 29} W/cm{sup 3}. In this completely unexplored regime, g-ray production ({h_bar}{omega}{sub {gamma}} {approx} 1 MeV) is expected to be a leading process. A new technology for the production of very highly penetrating radiation would then be available. The Xe(L) source at {h_bar}{omega}{sub x} {approx} 4.5 keV can be applied immediately to the experimental study of many aspects of the coupling of intense femtosecond x-ray pulses to materials. In a joint collaboration, the UIC group and Sandia plan to explore the following areas. These are specifically, (1) anomalous electromagnetic coupling to solid state materials, (2) 3D nanoimaging of solid matter and hydrated biological materials (e.g. interchromosomal linkers and actin filaments in muscle), and (3) EMP generation with attosecond x-rays.

  13. In situ investigation of high humidity stress corrosion cracking of 7075 aluminum alloy by three-dimensional (3D) X-ray synchrotron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. S.; Williams, J. J.; Lin, M. F.; Xiao, X.; De Carlo, F.; Chawla, N.

    2014-05-14

    In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was used to investigate the stress corrosion cracking behavior of under-aged Al–Zn–Mg–Cu alloy in moisture. The discontinuous surface cracks (crack jumps) mentioned in the literature are actually a single continuous and tortuous crack when observed in three dimension (3D). Contrary to 2D measurements made at the surface which suggest non-uniform crack growth rates, 3D measurements of the crack length led to a much more accurate measurement of crack growth rates.

  14. In situ investigation of high humidity stress corrosion cracking of 7075 aluminum alloy by three-dimensional (3D) X-ray synchrotron tomography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Singh, S. S.; Williams, J. J.; Lin, M. F.; Xiao, X.; De Carlo, F.; Chawla, N.

    2014-05-14

    In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was used to investigate the stress corrosion cracking behavior of under-aged Al–Zn–Mg–Cu alloy in moisture. The discontinuous surface cracks (crack jumps) mentioned in the literature are actually a single continuous and tortuous crack when observed in three dimension (3D). Contrary to 2D measurements made at the surface which suggest non-uniform crack growth rates, 3D measurements of the crack length led to a much more accurate measurement of crack growth rates.

  15. 3D neutron and X-ray imaging of diamondiferous eclogites, Siberia: Evidence for the secondary origin of diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, G. H.; Pernet-Fisher, J. F.; Sobolev, N. V.; Penumadu, D.; Puplampu, S.; Ketcham, R. A.; Maisano, J. A.; Taylor, D.; Taylor, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Non-destructive, 3D tomography of diamondiferous eclogites (Siberia) has effectively imaged diamonds and their spatial and textural relationships in situ. A rare suite of 17 diamondiferous eclogites have been analyzed, representing the largest collection outside of Siberia. New innovations in X-ray imaging, in combination with the first effective use of neutron imaging techniques, allow for the identification of secondary metasomatic minerals and the delineation of metasomatic pathways through the eclogites. Combining observations from both imaging techniques provides first-order characterizations and textural descriptions critical for understanding diamond genesis that has heretofore been absent in the literature. Eclogitic diamonds are generally octahedral in morphology, but dodecahedral diamonds are also observed, completely enclosed within the eclogites, implying in situ resorption. Diamonds are never observed in contact with primary minerals - i.e., always surrounded by secondary phases. Primary garnet and clinopyroxene show varying degrees of alteration, discerning the delineation of metasomatic pathways. In general, such pathways are observed as interconnected networks of veinlets, commonly cross-cutting the eclogites. Furthermore, clinopyroxene-rich layers observed show higher degrees of alteration, relative to garnet-rich layers within the same sample, highlighting clinopyroxene as more susceptible to metasomatic alteration than garnet. Diamonds are always observed within such metasomatic pathways. For example, eclogite U-112 contains ~22 macro-diamonds, all of which are contained within an altered clinopyroxene-rich layer. In addition, no spatial relationship is observed between diamonds and sulfide phases. The ubiquitous association of diamonds with metasomatic minerals and pathways provides compelling evidence for the secondary origin of diamonds, in agreement with current interpretations on the origin of diamonds [1,2]. However, diamonds are generally

  16. Development of a lab-scale, high-resolution, tube-generated X-ray computed-tomography system for three-dimensional (3D) materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Mertens, J.C.E. Williams, J.J. Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2014-06-01

    The design and construction of a modular high resolution X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system is highlighted in this paper. The design approach is detailed for meeting a specified set of instrument performance goals tailored towards experimental versatility and high resolution imaging. The XCT tool is unique in the detector and X-ray source design configuration, enabling control in the balance between detection efficiency and spatial resolution. The system package is also unique: The sample manipulation approach implemented enables a wide gamut of in situ experimentation to analyze structure evolution under applied stimulus, by optimizing scan conditions through a high degree of controllability. The component selection and design process is detailed: Incorporated components are specified, custom designs are shared, and the approach for their integration into a fully functional XCT scanner is provided. Custom designs discussed include the dual-target X-ray source cradle which maintains position and trajectory of the beam between the two X-ray target configurations with respect to a scintillator mounting and positioning assembly and the imaging sensor, as well as a novel large-format X-ray detector with enhanced adaptability. The instrument is discussed from an operational point of view, including the details of data acquisition and processing implemented for 3D imaging via micro-CT. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated on a silica-glass particle/hydroxyl-terminated-polybutadiene (HTPB) matrix binder PBX simulant. Post-scan data processing, specifically segmentation of the sample's relevant microstructure from the 3D reconstruction, is provided to demonstrate the utility of the instrument. - Highlights: • Custom built X-ray tomography system for microstructural characterization • Detector design for maximizing polychromatic X-ray detection efficiency • X-ray design offered for maximizing X-ray flux with respect to imaging resolution • Novel lab

  17. Classification and quantification of pore shapes in sandstone reservoir rocks with 3-D X-ray micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, M.; Halisch, M.; Müller, C.; Fernandes, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the characterization of the pore morphologies of reservoir rocks and how the spatial organization of pore traits affects the macro behaviour of rock-fluid systems. With the availability of 3-D high-resolution imaging (e.g. μ-CT), the detailed quantification of particle shapes has been facilitated by progress in computer science. Here, we show how the shapes of irregular rock particles (pores) can be classified and quantified based on binary 3-D images. The methodology requires the measurement of basic 3-D particle descriptors and a shape classification that involves the similarity of artificial objects, which is based on main pore network detachments and 3-D sample sizes. The results were validated for three sandstones (S1, S2 and S3) from distinct reservoirs, and most of the pore shapes were found to be plate- and cube-like. Furthermore, this study generalizes a practical way to correlate specific particle shapes, such as rods, blades, cuboids, plates and cubes, to characterize asymmetric particles of any material type with 3-D image analysis.

  18. An analysis of options available for developing a common laser ray tracing package for Ares and Kull code frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Weeratunga, S K

    2008-11-06

    Ares and Kull are mature code frameworks that support ALE hydrodynamics for a variety of HEDP applications at LLNL, using two widely different meshing approaches. While Ares is based on a 2-D/3-D block-structured mesh data base, Kull is designed to support unstructured, arbitrary polygonal/polyhedral meshes. In addition, both frameworks are capable of running applications on large, distributed-memory parallel machines. Currently, both these frameworks separately support assorted collections of physics packages related to HEDP, including one for the energy deposition by laser/ion-beam ray tracing. This study analyzes the options available for developing a common laser/ion-beam ray tracing package that can be easily shared between these two code frameworks and concludes with a set of recommendations for its development.

  19. The Best of Both Worlds: 3D X-ray Microscopy with Ultra-high Resolution and a Large Field of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Gelb, J.; Yang, Y.; Guan, Y.; Wu, W.; Chen, J.; Tian, Y.

    2011-09-01

    3D visualizations of complex structures within various samples have been achieved with high spatial resolution by X-ray computed nanotomography (nano-CT). While high spatial resolution generally comes at the expense of field of view (FOV). Here we proposed an approach that stitched several 3D volumes together into a single large volume to significantly increase the size of the FOV while preserving resolution. Combining this with nano-CT, 18-μm FOV with sub-60-nm resolution has been achieved for non-destructive 3D visualization of clustered yeasts that were too large for a single scan. It shows high promise for imaging other large samples in the future.

  20. Ray-tracing software comparison for linear focusing solar collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osório, Tiago; Horta, Pedro; Larcher, Marco; Pujol-Nadal, Ramón; Hertel, Julian; van Rooyen, De Wet; Heimsath, Anna; Schneider, Simon; Benitez, Daniel; Frein, Antoine; Denarie, Alice

    2016-05-01

    Ray-Tracing software tools have been widely used in the optical design of solar concentrating collectors. In spite of the ability of these tools to assess the geometrical and material aspects impacting the optical performance of concentrators, their use in combination with experimental measurements in the framework of collector testing procedures as not been implemented, to the date, in none of the current solar collector testing standards. In the latest revision of ISO9806 an effort was made to include linear focusing concentrating collectors but some practical and theoretical difficulties emerged. A Ray-Tracing analysis could provide important contributions to overcome these issues, complementing the experimental results obtained through thermal testing and allowing the achievement of more thorough testing outputs with lower experimental requirements. In order to evaluate different available software tools a comparison study was conducted. Taking as representative technologies for line-focus concentrators the Parabolic Trough Collector and the Linear Fresnel Reflector Collector, two exemplary cases with predefined conditions - geometry, sun model and material properties - were simulated with different software tools. This work was carried out within IEA/SHC Task 49 "Solar Heat Integration in Industrial Processes".

  1. Ray Tracing Modeling of Gravity Wave Propagation and Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, Sharon; Crowley, Geoff

    In this paper, we describe a ray trace model which calculates the wavevector, location and phase of a gravity wave (GW) as it propagates in the lower atmosphere and thermosphere. If used for a discreet transient source (such as a deep convective plume), we describe how this model can calculate the body forcing and the heat/cooling that are created when the GWs within a wave packet dissipate in the thermosphere from kinematic viscosity and thermal diffusivity. Although the body force calculation requires only the divergence of the momentum flux, the heat/cooling calculation requires the reconstructed GW field (e.g., density, velocity perturbations), which in turn requires the GW dissipative polarization relations. We describe these relations. We then describe the results of a recent study involving GWs identified from TIDDBIT HF Doppler sounder data taken at Wallops Island, VI, USA. Using this ray trace model, we determine if the unusual neutral wind profile measured by a rocket experiment at high altitudes (~290-370 km) could have been caused by the propagation and dissipation of several waves observed by TIDDBIT at lower altitudes.

  2. Multi-scale 3D X-ray Imaging Capabilities at the Advanced Photon Source - Current status and future direction (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCarlo, F.; Xiao, X.; Khan, F.; Glowacki, A.; Schwarz, N.; Jacobsen, C.

    2013-12-01

    In x-ray computed μ-tomography (μ-XCT), a thin scintillator screen is coupled to a visible light lens and camera system to obtain micrometer-scale transmission imaging of specimens as large as a few millimeters. Recent advances in detector technology allow collecting these images at unprecedented frame rates. For a high x-ray flux density synchrotron facility like the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the detector exposure time ranges from hundreds of milliseconds to hundreds of picoseconds, making possible to acquire a full 3D micrometer-resolution dataset in less than one second. The micron resolution limitation of parallel x-ray beam projection systems can be overcame by Transmission X-ray Microscopes (TXM) where part of the image magnification is done in x-ray regime using x-ray optics like capillary condensers and Fresnel zone plates. These systems, when installed on a synchrotron x-ray source, can generate 2D images with up to 20 nm resolution with second exposure time and collect a full 3D nano-resolution dataset in few minutes. μ-XCT and TXM systems available at the x-ray imaging beamlines of the APS are routinely used in material science and geoscience applications where high-resolution and fast 3D imaging are instrumental in extracting in situ four-dimensional dynamic information. In this presentation we describe the computational challenges associated with μ-XCT and TXM systems and present the framework and infrastructure developed at the APS to allow for routine multi-scale data integration between the two systems.

  3. Multi-scale 3D X-ray Imaging Capabilities at the Advanced Photon Source - Current status and future direction (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCarlo, F.; Xiao, X.; Khan, F.; Glowacki, A.; Schwarz, N.; Jacobsen, C.

    2011-12-01

    In x-ray computed μ-tomography (μ-XCT), a thin scintillator screen is coupled to a visible light lens and camera system to obtain micrometer-scale transmission imaging of specimens as large as a few millimeters. Recent advances in detector technology allow collecting these images at unprecedented frame rates. For a high x-ray flux density synchrotron facility like the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the detector exposure time ranges from hundreds of milliseconds to hundreds of picoseconds, making possible to acquire a full 3D micrometer-resolution dataset in less than one second. The micron resolution limitation of parallel x-ray beam projection systems can be overcame by Transmission X-ray Microscopes (TXM) where part of the image magnification is done in x-ray regime using x-ray optics like capillary condensers and Fresnel zone plates. These systems, when installed on a synchrotron x-ray source, can generate 2D images with up to 20 nm resolution with second exposure time and collect a full 3D nano-resolution dataset in few minutes. μ-XCT and TXM systems available at the x-ray imaging beamlines of the APS are routinely used in material science and geoscience applications where high-resolution and fast 3D imaging are instrumental in extracting in situ four-dimensional dynamic information. In this presentation we describe the computational challenges associated with μ-XCT and TXM systems and present the framework and infrastructure developed at the APS to allow for routine multi-scale data integration between the two systems.

  4. Analysis of Ablative Performance of C/C Composite Throat Containing Defects Based on X-ray 3D Reconstruction in a Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Wei-Hua; Bao, Fu-Ting; Wei, Xiang-Geng; Liu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a new measuring method of ablation rate was proposed based on X-ray three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. The ablation of 4-direction carbon/carbon composite nozzles was investigated in the combustion environment of a solid rocket motor, and the macroscopic ablation and linear recession rate were studied through the X-ray 3D reconstruction method. The results showed that the maximum relative error of the X-ray 3D reconstruction was 0.0576%, which met the minimum accuracy of the ablation analysis; along the nozzle axial direction, from convergence segment, throat to expansion segment, the ablation gradually weakened; in terms of defect ablation, the middle ablation was weak, while the ablation in both sides was more serious. In a word, the proposed reconstruction method based on X-ray about C/C nozzle ablation can construct a clear model of ablative nozzle which characterizes the details about micro-cracks, deposition, pores and surface to analyze ablation, so that this method can create the ablation curve in any surface clearly.

  5. 3D chemical mapping: application of scanning transmission (soft) X-ray microscopy (STXM) in combination with angle-scan tomography in bio-, geo-, and environmental sciences.

    PubMed

    Obst, Martin; Schmid, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    The identification of environmental processes and mechanisms often requires information on the organochemical and inorganic composition of specimens at high spatial resolution. X-ray spectroscopy (XAS) performed in the soft X-ray range (100-2,200 eV) provides chemical speciation information for elements that are of high biogeochemical relevance such as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen but also includes transition metals such as iron, manganese, or nickel. Synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) combines XAS with high resolution mapping on the 20-nm scale. This provides two-dimensional (2D) quantitative information about the distribution of chemical species such as organic macromolecules, metals, or mineral phases within environmental samples. Furthermore, the combination of STXM with angle-scan tomography allows for three-dimensional (3D) spectromicroscopic analysis of bio-, geo-, or environmental samples. For the acquisition of STXM tomography data, the sample is rotated around an axis perpendicular to the X-ray beam. Various sample preparation approaches such as stripes cut from TEM grids or the preparation of wet cells allow for preparing environmentally relevant specimens in a dry or in a fully hydrated state for 2D and 3D STXM measurements. In this chapter we give a short overview about the principles of STXM, its application to environmental sciences, different preparation techniques, and the analysis and 3D reconstruction of STXM tomography data. PMID:24357389

  6. In situ 3-D mapping of pore structures and hollow grains of interplanetary dust particles with phase contrast X-ray nanotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Winarski, R. P.

    2016-06-01

    Unlocking the 3-D structure and properties of intact chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in nanoscale detail is challenging, which is also complicated by atmospheric entry heating, but is important for advancing our understanding of the formation and origins of IDPs and planetary bodies as well as dust and ice agglomeration in the outer protoplanetary disk. Here, we show that indigenous pores, pristine grains, and thermal alteration products throughout intact particles can be noninvasively visualized and distinguished morphologically and microstructurally in 3-D detail down to ~10 nm by exploiting phase contrast X-ray nanotomography. We have uncovered the surprisingly intricate, submicron, and nanoscale pore structures of a ~10-μm-long porous IDP, consisting of two types of voids that are interconnected in 3-D space. One is morphologically primitive and mostly submicron-sized intergranular voids that are ubiquitous; the other is morphologically advanced and well-defined intragranular nanoholes that run through the approximate centers of ~0.3 μm or lower submicron hollow grains. The distinct hollow grains exhibit complex 3-D morphologies but in 2-D projections resemble typical organic hollow globules observed by transmission electron microscopy. The particle, with its outer region characterized by rough vesicular structures due to thermal alteration, has turned out to be an inherently fragile and intricately submicron- and nanoporous aggregate of the sub-μm grains or grain clumps that are delicately bound together frequently with little grain-to-grain contact in 3-D space.

  7. In situ 3-D mapping of pore structures and hollow grains of interplanetary dust particles with phase contrast X-ray nanotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Winarski, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    Unlocking the 3-D structure and properties of intact chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in nanoscale detail is challenging, which is also complicated by atmospheric entry heating, but is important for advancing our understanding of the formation and origins of IDPs and planetary bodies as well as dust and ice agglomeration in the outer protoplanetary disk. Here, we show that indigenous pores, pristine grains, and thermal alteration products throughout intact particles can be noninvasively visualized and distinguished morphologically and microstructurally in 3-D detail down to ~10 nm by exploiting phase contrast X-ray nanotomography. We have uncovered the surprisingly intricate, submicron, and nanoscale pore structures of a ~10-μm-long porous IDP, consisting of two types of voids that are interconnected in 3-D space. One is morphologically primitive and mostly submicron-sized intergranular voids that are ubiquitous; the other is morphologically advanced and well-defined intragranular nanoholes that run through the approximate centers of ~0.3 μm or lower submicron hollow grains. The distinct hollow grains exhibit complex 3-D morphologies but in 2-D projections resemble typical organic hollow globules observed by transmission electron microscopy. The particle, with its outer region characterized by rough vesicular structures due to thermal alteration, has turned out to be an inherently fragile and intricately submicron- and nanoporous aggregate of the sub-μm grains or grain clumps that are delicately bound together frequently with little grain-to-grain contact in 3-D space.

  8. Ray-traced tropospheric total slant delays for GNSS processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobiger, T.; Ichikawa, R.; Hatanaka, Y.; Yutsudo, T.; Iwashita, C.; Miyahara, B.; Koyama, Y.; Kondo, T.

    2007-12-01

    Numerical weather models have undergone an improvement of spatial and temporal resolution in the recent years, which made their use for GNSS applications feasible. Ray-tracing through such models permits the computation of total troposphere delays and ray-bending angles. At the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), Japan the so-called KAshima RAy-tracing Tools (KARAT) have been developed which allow to obtain troposphere delay corrections in real-time. Together with fine-mesh weather models from the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA) huge parts of the East Asian region, including Japan, Korea, Taiwan and East China, can be covered. The Japanese GEONET with its more than 1300 GNSS receivers represent an ideal test-bed for the evaluation of the performance of KARAT. In cooperation with the Geographical Survey Institute (GSI), Japan more than 1.6 billion observations, covering measurements from July 1st until August 31st, 2006, were processed and the corresponding troposphere delays were used to modify the original RINEX files by subtraction of code- and phase delays. These modified observations were processed by a dedicated analysis run of the GEONET operation center, taking advantage of the computer cluster at GSI. First results from this study, together with an in-depth discussion about the assets and drawbacks of the reduction of troposphere total slant delays will be given in this presentation. Additionally an overview about KARAT, the treatment of observational data and the impact of future refined numerical weather models on GNSS analysis will be included in this contribution.

  9. Optical analysis of a curved-slats fixed-mirror solar concentrator by a forward ray-tracing procedure.

    PubMed

    Pujol Nadal, Ramon; Martínez Moll, Víctor

    2013-10-20

    Fixed-mirror solar concentrators (FMSCs) use a static reflector and a moving receiver. They are easily installable on building roofs. However, for high-concentration factors, several flat mirrors would be needed. If curved mirrors are used instead, high-concentration levels can be achieved, and such a solar concentrator is called a curved-slats fixed-mirror solar concentrator (CSFMSC), on which little information is available. Herein, a methodology is proposed to characterize the CSFMSC using 3D ray-tracing tools. The CSFMSC shows better optical characteristics than the FMSC, as it needs fewer reflector segments for achieving the same concentration and optical efficiency. PMID:24216595

  10. Two step formation of metal aggregates by surface X-ray radiolysis under Langmuir monolayers: 2D followed by 3D growth.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Smita; Fauré, Marie-Claude; Goldmann, Michel; Fontaine, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In order to form a nanostructured metallic layer below a Langmuir monolayer, radiolysis synthesis was carried out in an adapted geometry that we call surface X-ray radiolysis. In this procedure, an X-ray beam produced by a synchrotron beamline intercepts the surface of an aqueous metal-ion solution covered by a Langmuir monolayer at an angle of incidence below the critical angle for total internal reflection. Underneath the organic layer, the X-ray beam induces the radiolytic synthesis of a nanostructured metal-organic layer whose ultrathin thickness is defined by the vertical X-ray penetration depth. We have shown that increasing the X-ray flux on the surface, which considerably enhances the kinetics of the silver layer formation, results in a second growth regime of silver nanocrystals. Here the formation of the oriented thin layer is followed by the appearance of a 3D powder of silver clusters. PMID:26734531

  11. Two step formation of metal aggregates by surface X-ray radiolysis under Langmuir monolayers: 2D followed by 3D growth

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Smita; Fauré, Marie-Claude; Goldmann, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary In order to form a nanostructured metallic layer below a Langmuir monolayer, radiolysis synthesis was carried out in an adapted geometry that we call surface X-ray radiolysis. In this procedure, an X-ray beam produced by a synchrotron beamline intercepts the surface of an aqueous metal-ion solution covered by a Langmuir monolayer at an angle of incidence below the critical angle for total internal reflection. Underneath the organic layer, the X-ray beam induces the radiolytic synthesis of a nanostructured metal–organic layer whose ultrathin thickness is defined by the vertical X-ray penetration depth. We have shown that increasing the X-ray flux on the surface, which considerably enhances the kinetics of the silver layer formation, results in a second growth regime of silver nanocrystals. Here the formation of the oriented thin layer is followed by the appearance of a 3D powder of silver clusters. PMID:26734531

  12. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Chemical Characteristics at Micrometric Scale by Combining 2D SEM-EDX Data and 3D X-Ray CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Hapca, Simona; Baveye, Philippe C.; Wilson, Clare; Lark, Richard Murray; Otten, Wilfred

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a significant need to improve our understanding of the factors that control a number of critical soil processes by integrating physical, chemical and biological measurements on soils at microscopic scales to help produce 3D maps of the related properties. Because of technological limitations, most chemical and biological measurements can be carried out only on exposed soil surfaces or 2-dimensional cuts through soil samples. Methods need to be developed to produce 3D maps of soil properties based on spatial sequences of 2D maps. In this general context, the objective of the research described here was to develop a method to generate 3D maps of soil chemical properties at the microscale by combining 2D SEM-EDX data with 3D X-ray computed tomography images. A statistical approach using the regression tree method and ordinary kriging applied to the residuals was developed and applied to predict the 3D spatial distribution of carbon, silicon, iron, and oxygen at the microscale. The spatial correlation between the X-ray grayscale intensities and the chemical maps made it possible to use a regression-tree model as an initial step to predict the 3D chemical composition. For chemical elements, e.g., iron, that are sparsely distributed in a soil sample, the regression-tree model provides a good prediction, explaining as much as 90% of the variability in some of the data. However, for chemical elements that are more homogenously distributed, such as carbon, silicon, or oxygen, the additional kriging of the regression tree residuals improved significantly the prediction with an increase in the R2 value from 0.221 to 0.324 for carbon, 0.312 to 0.423 for silicon, and 0.218 to 0.374 for oxygen, respectively. The present research develops for the first time an integrated experimental and theoretical framework, which combines geostatistical methods with imaging techniques to unveil the 3-D chemical structure of soil at very fine scales. The methodology presented

  13. Accuracy of x-ray image-based 3D localization from two C-arm views: a comparison between an ideal system and a real device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Alexander; Strobel, Norbert; Yatziv, Liron; Gilson, Wesley; Meyer, Bernhard; Hornegger, Joachim; Lewin, Jonathan; Wacker, Frank

    2009-02-01

    arm X-ray imaging devices are commonly used for minimally invasive cardiovascular or other interventional procedures. Calibrated state-of-the-art systems can, however, not only be used for 2D imaging but also for three-dimensional reconstruction either using tomographic techniques or even stereotactic approaches. To evaluate the accuracy of X-ray object localization from two views, a simulation study assuming an ideal imaging geometry was carried out first. This was backed up with a phantom experiment involving a real C-arm angiography system. Both studies were based on a phantom comprising five point objects. These point objects were projected onto a flat-panel detector under different C-arm view positions. The resulting 2D positions were perturbed by adding Gaussian noise to simulate 2D point localization errors. In the next step, 3D point positions were triangulated from two views. A 3D error was computed by taking differences between the reconstructed 3D positions using the perturbed 2D positions and the initial 3D positions of the five points. This experiment was repeated for various C-arm angulations involving angular differences ranging from 15° to 165°. The smallest 3D reconstruction error was achieved, as expected, by views that were 90° degrees apart. In this case, the simulation study yielded a 3D error of 0.82 mm +/- 0.24 mm (mean +/- standard deviation) for 2D noise with a standard deviation of 1.232 mm (4 detector pixels). The experimental result for this view configuration obtained on an AXIOM Artis C-arm (Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim, Germany) system was 0.98 mm +/- 0.29 mm, respectively. These results show that state-of-the-art C-arm systems can localize instruments with millimeter accuracy, and that they can accomplish this almost as well as an idealized theoretical counterpart. High stereotactic localization accuracy, good patient access, and CT-like 3D imaging capabilities render state-of-the-art C-arm systems ideal devices for X-ray

  14. A fast rigid-registration method of inferior limb X-ray image and 3D CT images for TKA surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Fumihito; O. D. A, Prima; Uwano, Ikuko; Ito, Kenzo

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a fast rigid-registration method of inferior limb X-ray films (two-dimensional Computed Radiography (CR) images) and three-dimensional Computed Tomography (CT) images for Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) surgery planning. The position of the each bone, such as femur and tibia (shin bone), in X-ray film and 3D CT images is slightly different, and we must pay attention how to use the two different images, since X-ray film image is captured in the standing position, and 3D CT is captured in decubitus (face up) position, respectively. Though the conventional registration mainly uses cross-correlation function between two images,and utilizes optimization techniques, it takes enormous calculation time and it is difficult to use it in interactive operations. In order to solve these problems, we calculate the center line (bone axis) of femur and tibia (shin bone) automatically, and we use them as initial positions for the registration. We evaluate our registration method by using three patient's image data, and we compare our proposed method and a conventional registration, which uses down-hill simplex algorithm. The down-hill simplex method is an optimization algorithm that requires only function evaluations, and doesn't need the calculation of derivatives. Our registration method is more effective than the downhill simplex method in computational time and the stable convergence. We have developed the implant simulation system on a personal computer, in order to support the surgeon in a preoperative planning of TKA. Our registration method is implemented in the simulation system, and user can manipulate 2D/3D translucent templates of implant components on X-ray film and 3D CT images.

  15. A method for 3D electron density imaging using single scattered x-rays with application to mammographic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Uytven, Eric; Pistorius, Stephen; Gordon, Richard

    2008-10-01

    Screening mammography is the current standard in detecting breast cancer. However, its fundamental disadvantage is that it projects a 3D object into a 2D image. Small lesions are difficult to detect when superimposed over layers of normal, heterogeneous tissue. In this work, we examine the potential of single scattered photon electron density imaging in a mammographic environment. Simulating a low-energy (<20 keV) scanning pencil beam, we have developed an algorithm capable of producing 3D electron density images from a single projection. We have tested the algorithm by imaging parts of a simulated mammographic accreditation phantom containing lesions of various sizes. The results indicate that the group of imaged lesions differ significantly from background breast tissue (p < 0.005), confirming that electron density imaging may be a useful diagnostic test for the presence of breast cancer.

  16. Direct inversion of surface wave dispersion for three-dimensional shallow crustal structure based on ray tracing: methodology and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongjian; Yao, Huajian; Zhang, Haijiang; Huang, Yu-Chih; van der Hilst, Robert D.

    2015-06-01

    We propose a method to invert surface wave dispersion data directly for 3-D variations of shear wave speed, that is, without the intermediate step of phase or group velocity maps, using frequency-dependent ray tracing and a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic inversion. A fast marching method is used to compute, at each period, surface wave traveltimes and ray paths between sources and receivers. This avoids the assumption of great-circle propagation that is used in most surface wave tomographic studies, but which is not appropriate in complex media. To simplify the problem we consider quasi-stratified media with smoothly varying seismic properties. We represent the 3-D shear wave speed model by means of 1-D profiles beneath grid points, which are determined from all dispersion data simultaneously using a wavelet-based sparsity-constrained tomographic method. The wavelet coefficients of the wave speed model are estimated with an iteratively reweighted least squares algorithm, and upon iteration the surface wave ray paths and the data sensitivity matrix are updated using the newly obtained wave speed model. To demonstrate its feasibility, we apply the method to determine the 3-D shallow crustal shear wave speed variations in the Taipei basin of Taiwan using short period interstation Rayleigh wave phase velocity dispersion measurements extracted from the ambient noise cross-correlation method. The results are consistent with previous studies and reveal strong shallow crustal heterogeneity that correlates with surface geology.

  17. Mechanical, Electromagnetic, and X-ray Shielding Characterization of a 3D Printable Tungsten-Polycarbonate Polymer Matrix Composite for Space-Based Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemelya, Corey M.; Rivera, Armando; Perez, Angel Torrado; Rocha, Carmen; Liang, Min; Yu, Xiaoju; Kief, Craig; Alexander, David; Stegeman, James; Xin, Hao; Wicker, Ryan B.; MacDonald, Eric; Roberson, David A.

    2015-08-01

    Material-extrusion three-dimensional (3D) printing has recently attracted much interest because of its process flexibility, rapid response to design alterations, and ability to create structures "on-the-go". For this reason, 3D printing has possible applications in rapid creation of space-based devices, for example cube satellites (CubeSat). This work focused on fabrication and characterization of tungsten-doped polycarbonate polymer matrix composites specifically designed for x-ray radiation-shielding applications. The polycarbonate-tungsten polymer composite obtained intentionally utilizes low loading levels to provide x-ray shielding while limiting effects on other properties of the material, for example weight, electromagnetic functionality, and mechanical strength. The fabrication process, from tungsten functionalization to filament extrusion and material characterization, is described, including printability, determination of x-ray attenuation, tensile strength, impact resistance, and gigahertz permittivity, and failure analysis. The proposed materials are uniquely advantageous when implemented in 3D printed structures, because even a small volume fraction of tungsten has been shown to substantially alter the properties of the resulting composite.

  18. Multiscale microstructural characterization of Sn-rich alloys by three dimensional (3D) X-ray synchrotron tomography and focused ion beam (FIB) tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yazzie, K.E.; Williams, J.J.; Phillips, N.C.; De Carlo, F.; Chawla, N.

    2012-08-15

    Sn-rich (Pb-free) alloys serve as electrical and mechanical interconnects in electronic packaging. It is critical to quantify the microstructures of Sn-rich alloys to obtain a fundamental understanding of their properties. In this work, the intermetallic precipitates in Sn-3.5Ag and Sn-0.7Cu, and globular lamellae in Sn-37Pb solder joints were visualized and quantified using 3D X-ray synchrotron tomography and focused ion beam (FIB) tomography. 3D reconstructions were analyzed to extract statistics on particle size and spatial distribution. In the Sn-Pb alloy the interconnectivity of Sn-rich and Pb-rich constituents was quantified. It will be shown that multiscale characterization using 3D X-ray and FIB tomography enabled the characterization of the complex morphology, distribution, and statistics of precipitates and contiguous phases over a range of length scales. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiscale characterization by X-ray synchrotron and focused ion beam tomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characterized microstructural features in several Sn-based alloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantified size, fraction, and clustering of microstructural features.

  19. Application of synchrotron X-ray microtomography for visualizing bacterial biofilms 3D microstructure in porous media.

    PubMed

    Rolland du Roscoat, S; Martins, J M F; Séchet, P; Vince, E; Latil, P; Geindreau, C

    2014-06-01

    The development of reliable models to accurately predict biofilm growth in porous media relies on a good knowledge of the temporal evolution of biofilms structure within the porous network. Since little is known on the true 3D structure of biofilms developed in porous media, this work aimed at developing a new experimental protocol to visualize the 3D microstructure of bacterial biofilms in porous media. The main originality of the proposed procedure lies on the combination of the more recent advances in synchrotron microtomography (Paganin mode) and of a new contrast agent (1-chloronaphtalene) that has never been applied to biofilm visualization. It is shown that the proposed methodology takes advantage of the contrasting properties of 1-chloronaphtalene to prevent some limitations observed with more classical contrast agents. A quantitative analysis of the microstructural properties (volume fractions and specific surface area) of bacterial biofilms developed in columns of clay beads is also proposed on the basis of the obtained 3D images. PMID:24293082

  20. Ray Tracing to Predict Optical Behaviour of Shock Compressed Dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tear, Gareth R.; Proud, William G.

    2015-06-01

    In order to investigate the optical response of dielectric materials under shock compression, a characteristics model has been combined with a three dimensional optical ray tracing model. A general biaxial optical model is used along with a first order photoelastic model which couples the characteristics component to the optical component. This optical model is three dimensional and as such can be used to investigate small deviations from the perfect one dimensional shock wave which is typically assumed in plate impact experiments. A detailed description of the model will be presented, and comparison to available literature as well as recent experiments on the optical behaviour of shock compressed a-cut calcite and a-cut sapphire. The authors would like to thank Dr D E Eakins and Dr D J Chapman for fruitful discussions. The Institute of Shock Physics acknowledges the continued support of AWE and Imperial College London.

  1. Ray tracing in FLRW flat space-times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; Bonetti, Luca; Cognola, Guido; Zerbini, Sergio

    2013-12-01

    In this work we take moves from the debate triggered by Melia et al. in [J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 09 (2012) 029; Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 421, 3356 (2012)] and followed by opposite comments by Lewis and Oirschot in [Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. Lett. 423, 26 (2012); 431, 25 (2013)]. The point in question regards the role of the Hubble horizon as a limit for observability in a cosmological setting. We propose to tackle the issue in a broader way by relating it to the causal character of the Hubble surface and to the tracing of null trajectories, focusing on both three-fluids and generalized Chaplygin gas models. The results should make clear that for quite reasonable and physically motivated models, light rays reaching a comoving observer at R(t0)=0 have never traveled a distance greater than the proper radius of the horizon until t0.

  2. Calculation of material properties and ray tracing in transformation media.

    PubMed

    Schurig, D; Pendry, J B; Smith, D R

    2006-10-16

    Complex and interesting electromagnetic behavior can be found in spaces with non-flat topology. When considering the properties of an electromagnetic medium under an arbitrary coordinate transformation an alternative interpretation presents itself. The transformed material property tensors may be interpreted as a different set of material properties in a flat, Cartesian space. We describe the calculation of these material properties for coordinate transformations that describe spaces with spherical or cylindrical holes in them. The resulting material properties can then implement invisibility cloaks in flat space. We also describe a method for performing geometric ray tracing in these materials which are both inhomogeneous and anisotropic in their electric permittivity and magnetic permeability. PMID:19529371

  3. Polarization Ray Trace Model of the MODIS Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Xiong, Jack; Esaias, Wayne E.; Voss, Kenneth; Souaidia, Nordine; Pellicori, Samuel; Moyer, David; Guenther, Bruce; Barnes, William

    2004-01-01

    Sunlight reflected from the earth is, to a certain extent, polarized. Radiometers, such as the MODIS instrument on board the TERRA and AQUA spacecraft, are to a certain extent polarizers. Accurate radiometric measurements must take into account both the polarization state of the scene and the polarization sensitivity of the measuring instrument. The measured polarization characteristics of the MODIS instruments are contained in various radiometric models. Continued use of these radiometric math models, over a number of years, have shown where these models can be improved. Currently a MODIS polarization ray trace model has been created which models the thin film structure on the optical elements. This approach is described and modeled and measured instrument polarization sensitivity results presented.

  4. A FORMALISM FOR COVARIANT POLARIZED RADIATIVE TRANSPORT BY RAY TRACING

    SciTech Connect

    Gammie, Charles F.; Leung, Po Kin

    2012-06-20

    We write down a covariant formalism for polarized radiative transfer appropriate for ray tracing through a turbulent plasma. The polarized radiation field is represented by the polarization tensor (coherency matrix) N{sup {alpha}{beta}} {identical_to} (a{sup {alpha}}{sub k} a*{sup {beta}}{sub k}), where a{sub k} is a Fourier coefficient for the vector potential. Using Maxwell's equations, the Liouville-Vlasov equation, and the WKB approximation, we show that the transport equation in vacuo is k{sup {mu}}{nabla}{sub {mu}} N{sup {alpha}{beta}} = 0. We show that this is equivalent to Broderick and Blandford's formalism based on invariant Stokes parameters and a rotation coefficient, and suggest a modification that may reduce truncation error in some situations. Finally, we write down several alternative approaches to integrating the transfer equation.

  5. Ray trace calculation of ionospheric propagation at lower frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, Michael H.

    2006-10-01

    The Raytrace/Ionospheric Conductivity and Electron Density-Bent-Gallagher model has been revised to make it applicable to ionospheric propagation at low radio frequencies (0.5-5.0 MHz), where the ionosphere and magnetic anisotropy drastically alter propagation paths and provide a severe test of propagation model algorithms. The necessary revisions are discussed, and the model is applied to the problem of ionospheric penetration from a source below the ionosphere to a receiver above the ionosphere. It is necessary to include the electron collision frequency in the Appleton-Hartree index of refraction in order to permit ionospheric penetration for radio frequencies below the maximum plasma frequency (e.g., whistler modes). The associated reformulation of the ray trace equations for a complex index of refraction is straightforward. Difficulties with numerical methods are cited for the lowest frequencies, and future improvements are indicated.

  6. Ionospheric Plasma Drift Analysis Technique Based On Ray Tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ari, Gizem; Toker, Cenk

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric drift measurements provide important information about the variability in the ionosphere, which can be used to quantify ionospheric disturbances caused by natural phenomena such as solar, geomagnetic, gravitational and seismic activities. One of the prominent ways for drift measurement depends on instrumentation based measurements, e.g. using an ionosonde. The drift estimation of an ionosonde depends on measuring the Doppler shift on the received signal, where the main cause of Doppler shift is the change in the length of the propagation path of the signal between the transmitter and the receiver. Unfortunately, ionosondes are expensive devices and their installation and maintenance require special care. Furthermore, the ionosonde network over the world or even Europe is not dense enough to obtain a global or continental drift map. In order to overcome the difficulties related to an ionosonde, we propose a technique to perform ionospheric drift estimation based on ray tracing. First, a two dimensional TEC map is constructed by using the IONOLAB-MAP tool which spatially interpolates the VTEC estimates obtained from the EUREF CORS network. Next, a three dimensional electron density profile is generated by inputting the TEC estimates to the IRI-2015 model. Eventually, a close-to-real situation electron density profile is obtained in which ray tracing can be performed. These profiles can be constructed periodically with a period of as low as 30 seconds. By processing two consequent snapshots together and calculating the propagation paths, we estimate the drift measurements over any coordinate of concern. We test our technique by comparing the results to the drift measurements taken at the DPS ionosonde at Pruhonice, Czech Republic. This study is supported by TUBITAK 115E915 and Joint TUBITAK 114E092 and AS CR14/001 projects.

  7. Propagation in 3D spiral-arm cosmic-ray source distribution models and secondary particle production using PICARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissmann, R.; Werner, M.; Reimer, O.; Strong, A. W.

    2015-10-01

    We study the impact of possible spiral-arm distributions of Galactic cosmic-ray sources on the flux of various cosmic-ray nuclei throughout our Galaxy. We investigate model cosmic-ray spectra at the nominal position of the sun and at different positions within the Galaxy. The modelling is performed using the recently introduced numerical cosmic ray propagation code PICARD. Assuming non-axisymmetric cosmic-ray source distributions yields new insights on the behaviour of primary versus secondary nuclei. We find that primary cosmic rays are more strongly confined to the vicinity of the sources, while the distribution of secondary cosmic rays is much more homogeneous compared to the primaries. This leads to stronger spatial variation in secondary to primary ratios when compared to axisymmetric source distribution models. A good fit to the cosmic-ray data at Earth can be accomplished in different spiral-arm models, although leading to decisively different spatial distributions of the cosmic-ray flux. These lead to different cosmic ray anisotropies, where even reproducing the data becomes possible. Consequently, we advocate directions to seek best fit propagation parameters that take into account the higher complexity introduced by the spiral-arm structure on the cosmic-ray distribution. We specifically investigate whether the flux at Earth is representative for a large fraction of the Galaxy. The variance among possible spiral-arm models allows us to quantify the spatial variation of the cosmic-ray flux within the Galaxy in presence of non-axisymmetric source distributions.

  8. Image transfer through cirrus clouds. I. Ray trace analysis and wave-front reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Landesman, B T; Kindilien, P J; Matson, C L; Caudill, T R

    2000-10-20

    A new technique for modeling image transfer through cirrus clouds is presented. The technique uses a ray trace to model beam propagation through a three-dimensional volume of polydisperse, hexagonal ice crystals. Beyond the cloud, the technique makes use of standard Huygens-Fresnel propagation methods. At the air-cloud interface, each wave front is resolved into a ray distribution for input to the ray trace software. Similarly, a wave front is reconstructed from the output ray distribution at the cloud-air interface. Simulation output from the ray trace program is presented and the modulation transfer function for stars imaged through cirrus clouds of varying depths is discussed. PMID:18354542

  9. Three-dimensional (3D) microstructural characterization and quantification of reflow porosity in Sn-rich alloy/copper joints by X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Ling; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Pacheco, Mario; Noveski, Vladimir

    2011-10-15

    In this paper high resolution X-ray tomography was used to characterize reflow porosity in Sn-3.9Ag-0.7Cu/Cu solder joints. The combination of two segmentation techniques was applied for the three-dimensional (3D) visualization of pores in the joints and the quantification on the characteristics of reflow porosity, including pore size, volume fraction and morphology. The size, morphology and distribution of porosity were visualized in 3D for three different solder joints. Since the results are relatively similar for all three, only the results of one joint are presented. Solder reflow porosity was mostly spherical, segregated along the solder/Cu interface, and had an average pore size of 30 {mu}m in diameter. A few large pores (larger than 100 {mu}m in diameter) were present, some of which had lower sphericity, i.e., they were more irregular. The presence of these large pores may significantly influence the mechanical behavior of solder joints. - Highlights: {yields} Non-destructive 3D characterization and quantification of porosity in Pb-free solders by X-ray tomography {yields} Two new image analysis and reconstruction tools are presented that can be used by the community at large {yields} Pore size, volume fraction, and sphericity, is critical to understanding microstructure and modeling of these systems.

  10. Laser gain on 3p-3d and 3s-3p transitions and X-ray line ratios for the nitrogen isoelectronic sequence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Seely, J. F.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented on calculations of the 72 levels belonging to the 2s(2)2p(3), 2s2p(4), 2p(5), 2s(2)2p(2)3s, 2s(2)2p(2)3p, and 2s(2)2p(2)3d configurations of the N I isoelectronic sequence for the ions Ar XII, Ti XVI, Fe XX, Zn XXIV, and Kr XXX, for electron densities up to 10 to the 24th/cu cm. It was found that large population inversions and gain occur between levels in the 2s(2)2p(2)3p configuration and levels in the 2s(2)2p(2)3d configuration that cannot decay to the ground configuration by an electric dipole transition. For increasing electron densities, the intensities of the X-ray transitions from the 2s(2)2p(2)3p configuration to the ground configuration decrease relative to the transitions from the 2s(2)2p(2)3s and 2s(2)2p(2)3d configurations to the ground configuration. The density dependence of these X-ray line ratios is presented.

  11. Design, Synthesis, and X-ray Crystal Structures of 2,4-Diaminofuro[2,3-d]pyrimidines as Multireceptor Tyrosine Kinase and Dihydrofolate Reductase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gangjee, Aleem; Li, Wei; Lin, Lu; Zeng, Yibin; Ihnat, Michael; Warnke, Linda A.; Green, Dixy W.; Cody, Vivian; Pace, Jim; Queener, Sherry F.

    2009-01-01

    To optimize dual receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibition, the E- and Z-isomers of 5-[2-(2-methoxyphenyl)prop-1-en-1-yl]furo[2,3-d]pyrimidine-2,4-diamines (1a and 1b) were separated by HPLC and the X-ray crystal structures (2.0 Å and 1.4 Å respectively) with mouse DHFR and NADPH as well as 1b with human DHFR (1.5 Å) were determined. The E- and Z-isomers adopt different binding modes when bound to mouse DHFR. A series of 2,4-diaminofuro[2,3-d]pyrimidines 2–13 were designed and synthesized using the X-ray crystal structures of 1a and 1b with DHFR to increase their DHFR inhibitory activity. Wittig reactions of appropriate 2-methoxyphenyl ketones with 2,4-diamino-6-chloromethyl furo[2,3-d]pyrimidine afforded the C8–C9 unsaturated compounds 2–7 and catalytic reduction gave the saturated 8–13. Homologation of the C9-methyl analog maintains DHFR inhibitory activity. In addition, inhibition of EGFR and PDGFR-β were discovered for saturated C9-homologated analogs 9 and 10 that were absent in the saturated C9-methyl analogs. PMID:19748785

  12. Non Destructive High-Resolution 3D Investigation of Vesicle Textures in Pumice and Scoria by Synchrotron X-Ray Computed Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polacci, M.; Baker, D.; Mancini, L.; Tromba, G.; Zanini, F.

    2005-12-01

    High resolution X-ray computed microtomography was applied to investigate the 3D structure of pyroclastic material from different active, explosive, hazardous volcanic areas. The experiments were performed at the SYRMEP beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility in Trieste (Italy). The 2D image slices resulting from tomography of selected pumice and scoria samples were transformed into volume renderings via specific tomographic software. The reconstructed volumes allowed us to test the applicability of this technique, novel in the field of volcanology, to volcanic specimens with different textural characteristics. The use of a third generation synchrotron radiation facility allowed optimal visualization of vesicle and crystal geometry in the reconstructed volume where conventional X-ray methods are strongly limited. The BLOB3D software package was used to accomplish quantitative descriptions of vesicle textures in terms of vesicularity, number density, volume and connectivity. The results exhibited complex patterns of the vesicle content, size, shape and distribution within the different pyroclasts and allowed us to track the degassing history of each single clast. With this preliminary study we demonstrate that computed microtomography is a feasible tool complementary to conventional microscopy methods for the full 3D textural characterization of volcanic clasts, and that it may be used to provide further constraints to models of degassing at active volcanoes.

  13. LLNL-Earth3D

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  14. General Relativistic Ray Tracing for X-ray Reverberation and Polarimetry Studies of Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoormann, Janie; Krawczynski, Henric

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of General Relativistic (GR) ray tracing calculations of the X-ray emission from mass accreting stellar mass and supermassive black holes. Our study aims at exploring the X-ray reverberation and X-ray polarimetry signatures of different accretion flow geometries and different spacetime backgrounds (GR and non-GR backgrounds). We present first results derived for the well-known lamp-post model, where a point source of continuum emission illuminates an accretion disk with high energy photons which are tracked by parallel transporting the photon wave and polarization vectors. The simulation code models the reprocessing and reflection by of photons impinging on the accretion disk. We study the degeneracy of astrophysical parameters (parametrizing the geometry of the accretion disk and the location and properties of the lamppost photon source) and the parameters describing the underlying metrics. We emphasize furthermore the difference of the observational signatures for stellar mass and supermassive black holes.

  15. RAY-RAMSES: a code for ray tracing on the fly in N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreira, Alexandre; Llinares, Claudio; Bose, Sownak; Li, Baojiu

    2016-05-01

    We present a ray tracing code to compute integrated cosmological observables on the fly in AMR N-body simulations. Unlike conventional ray tracing techniques, our code takes full advantage of the time and spatial resolution attained by the N-body simulation by computing the integrals along the line of sight on a cell-by-cell basis through the AMR simulation grid. Moroever, since it runs on the fly in the N-body run, our code can produce maps of the desired observables without storing large (or any) amounts of data for post-processing. We implemented our routines in the RAMSES N-body code and tested the implementation using an example of weak lensing simulation. We analyse basic statistics of lensing convergence maps and find good agreement with semi-analytical methods. The ray tracing methodology presented here can be used in several cosmological analysis such as Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect studies as well as modified gravity. Our code can also be used in cross-checks of the more conventional methods, which can be important in tests of theory systematics in preparation for upcoming large scale structure surveys.

  16. Wolter X-Ray Microscope Computed Tomography Ray-Trace Model with Preliminary Simulation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J A

    2006-02-27

    It is proposed to build a Wolter X-ray Microscope Computed Tomography System in order to characterize objects to sub-micrometer resolution. Wolter Optics Systems use hyperbolic, elliptical, and/or parabolic mirrors to reflect x-rays in order to focus or magnify an image. Wolter Optics have been used as telescopes and as microscopes. As microscopes they have been used for a number of purposes such as measuring emission x-rays and x-ray fluoresce of thin biological samples. Standard Computed Tomography (CT) Systems use 2D radiographic images, from a series of rotational angles, acquired by passing x-rays through an object to reconstruct a 3D image of the object. The x-ray paths in a Wolter X-ray Microscope will be considerably different than those of a standard CT system. There is little information about the 2D radiographic images that can be expected from such a system. There are questions about the quality, resolution and focusing range of an image created with such a system. It is not known whether characterization information can be obtained from these images and whether these 2D images can be reconstructed to 3D images of the object. A code has been developed to model the 2D radiographic image created by an object in a Wolter X-ray Microscope. This code simply follows the x-ray through the object and optics. There is no modeling at this point of other effects, such as scattering, reflection losses etc. Any object, of appropriate size, can be used in the model code. A series of simulations using a number of different objects was run to study the effects of the optics. The next step will be to use this model to reconstruct an object from the simulated data. Funding for the project ended before this goal could be accomplished. The following documentation includes: (1) background information on current X-ray imaging systems, (2) background on Wolter Optics, (3) description of the Wolter System being used, (4) purpose, limitations and development of the modeling

  17. Ray-tracing WKB analysis of Whistler waves in non-uniform magnetic fields applied to space thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinali, A.; Melazzi, D.; Manente, M.; Pavarin, D.

    2014-02-01

    Radiofrequency magnetized cylindrical plasma sources are proposed for the development of space thrusters, whose thrust efficiency and specific impulse depend on the power coupled into the plasma. At this stage of research, emphasis has been on the absorption of Whistler wave energy by non-uniform plasmas but not much on the role played by the magneto-static confinement field, considered uniform, constant and aligned with the axis of the source. We present RAYWh (RAY-tracing Whistler), a three-dimensional (3D) ray-tracing solver for electromagnetic propagation and power deposition in cylindrical plasma sources for space plasma thrusters, where actual magnetic confinement configurations along with plasma density profiles are included. The propagation and absorption of Whistler waves are investigated by solving the 3D Maxwell-Vlasov model equations by a Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) asymptotic expansion. The reduced set of equations for the wave phase and for the square amplitude of the electric field is solved numerically by means of a modified Runge-Kutta algorithm. Unexpected cut-offs, resonances, radial reflections, mode conversions and power deposition profile of the excited waves are found, when realistic confinement magnetic fields are considered. An analysis of the influence of axial wavenumbers and the axial length of the system on the power deposition is presented.

  18. Enhancement of radiation effects by bismuth oxide nanoparticles for kilovoltage x-ray beams: A dosimetric study using a novel multi-compartment 3D radiochromic dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqathami, M.; Blencowe, A.; Yeo, U. J.; Franich, R.; Doran, S.; Qiao, G.; Geso, M.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study is to present the first experimental validation and quantification of the dose enhancement capability of bismuth oxide nanoparticles (Bi2O3-Nps). A recently introduced multi-compartment 3D radiochromic dosimeter for measuring radiation dose enhancement produced from the interaction of X-rays with metal nanoparticles was employed to investigate the 3D spatial distribution of ionizing radiation dose deposition. Dose-enhancement factor for the dosimeters doped with Bi2O3-NPs was ~1.9 for both spectrophotometry and optical CT analyses. Our results suggest that bismuth-based nanomaterials are efficient dose enhancing agents and have great potential for application in clinical radiotherapy.

  19. Optical cone beam tomography of Cherenkov-mediated signals for fast 3D dosimetry of x-ray photon beams in water

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, Adam K. E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Pogue, Brian W. E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu; Gladstone, David J.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To test the use of a three-dimensional (3D) optical cone beam computed tomography reconstruction algorithm, for estimation of the imparted 3D dose distribution from megavoltage photon beams in a water tank for quality assurance, by imaging the induced Cherenkov-excited fluorescence (CEF). Methods: An intensified charge-coupled device coupled to a standard nontelecentric camera lens was used to tomographically acquire two-dimensional (2D) projection images of CEF from a complex multileaf collimator (MLC) shaped 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray photon beam operating at a dose rate of 600 MU/min. The resulting projections were used to reconstruct the 3D CEF light distribution, a potential surrogate of imparted dose, using a Feldkamp–Davis–Kress cone beam back reconstruction algorithm. Finally, the reconstructed light distributions were compared to the expected dose values from one-dimensional diode scans, 2D film measurements, and the 3D distribution generated from the clinical Varian ECLIPSE treatment planning system using a gamma index analysis. A Monte Carlo derived correction was applied to the Cherenkov reconstructions to account for beam hardening artifacts. Results: 3D light volumes were successfully reconstructed over a 400 × 400 × 350 mm{sup 3} volume at a resolution of 1 mm. The Cherenkov reconstructions showed agreement with all comparative methods and were also able to recover both inter- and intra-MLC leaf leakage. Based upon a 3%/3 mm criterion, the experimental Cherenkov light measurements showed an 83%–99% pass fraction depending on the chosen threshold dose. Conclusions: The results from this study demonstrate the use of optical cone beam computed tomography using CEF for the profiling of the imparted dose distribution from large area megavoltage photon beams in water.

  20. Optical cone beam tomography of Cherenkov-mediated signals for fast 3D dosimetry of x-ray photon beams in water

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Adam K.; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Pogue, Brian W.; Gladstone, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To test the use of a three-dimensional (3D) optical cone beam computed tomography reconstruction algorithm, for estimation of the imparted 3D dose distribution from megavoltage photon beams in a water tank for quality assurance, by imaging the induced Cherenkov-excited fluorescence (CEF). Methods: An intensified charge-coupled device coupled to a standard nontelecentric camera lens was used to tomographically acquire two-dimensional (2D) projection images of CEF from a complex multileaf collimator (MLC) shaped 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray photon beam operating at a dose rate of 600 MU/min. The resulting projections were used to reconstruct the 3D CEF light distribution, a potential surrogate of imparted dose, using a Feldkamp–Davis–Kress cone beam back reconstruction algorithm. Finally, the reconstructed light distributions were compared to the expected dose values from one-dimensional diode scans, 2D film measurements, and the 3D distribution generated from the clinical Varian ECLIPSE treatment planning system using a gamma index analysis. A Monte Carlo derived correction was applied to the Cherenkov reconstructions to account for beam hardening artifacts. Results: 3D light volumes were successfully reconstructed over a 400 × 400 × 350 mm3 volume at a resolution of 1 mm. The Cherenkov reconstructions showed agreement with all comparative methods and were also able to recover both inter- and intra-MLC leaf leakage. Based upon a 3%/3 mm criterion, the experimental Cherenkov light measurements showed an 83%–99% pass fraction depending on the chosen threshold dose. Conclusions: The results from this study demonstrate the use of optical cone beam computed tomography using CEF for the profiling of the imparted dose distribution from large area megavoltage photon beams in water. PMID:26133613

  1. 3D structure of liquid sprays: X-ray μ -radiography and tomography by polycapillary based technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchitto, L.; Allocca, L.; Hampai, D.; Alfuso, S.; Dabagov, S. B.; Liedl, A.; Polese, C.

    2015-07-01

    This work reports the results of X-ray μ -tomographic investigation on the inner structure of high pressure fuel sprays. X-ray imaging is widely used in industry where non-destructive and high accuracy measurements of the samples morphology are required. A high flux beam can overcome the problems related to the low absorption of hydrocarbon chains as fossil fuels, therefore synchrotron X-ray sources are generally used for fuel sprays investigation. A desktop facility has successfully been used to characterize high pressure gasoline sprays for automotive applications. A X-ray tube coupled with polycapillary optics has been used providing a high flux beam with low divergence. In this paper the last improvements concerning quantitative measurements carried out on fuel sprays are reported.

  2. Non-destructive 3D Imaging of Extraterrestrial Materials by Synchrotron X-ray Micro- tomography (XR-CMT) and Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy (LCSM): Beyond Pretty Pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, D. S.; Greenberg, M.

    2009-05-01

    We report scientific results made possible only by the use these two non-destructive 3D imaging techniques. XR-CMT provides 3D image reconstructions at spatial resolutions of 1 to 17 micron/voxel edge. We use XR- CMT to locate potential melt-inclusion-bearing phenocrysts in batches of 100-200 micron lunar fire-fountain spherules; to locate and visualize the morphology of 1-2mm size, irregular, unmelted Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) and to quantify chondrule/matrix ratios and chondrule size distributions in 6x6x20mm chunks of carbonaceous chondrites; to quantify the modal abundance of opaque phases in similar sized Martian meteorite fragments, and in individual 1-2mm diameter chondrules from chondrites. LCSM provides 3D image stacks at resolutions < 100 nm/pixel. We are the only group creating deconvolved image stacks of 100 to over 1000 micron long comet particle tracks in aerogel keystones from the Stardust mission. We present measurements of track morphology in 3D, and locate high-value particles using complementary synchrotron x- ray fluorescence (XRF) examination. We show that bench-top LCSM extracts maximum information about tracks and particles rapidly and cheaply prior to destructive disassembly. Using XR-CMT we quantify, for the first time, the volumetric abundances of metal grains in 1-2 mm diameter CR chondrite chondrules. Metal abundances vary from 1 to 37 vol.% between 8 chondrules (and more by inspection), in a meteorite with solar (chondritic) Fe/Si ratio, indicating that chondrules formed and accreted locally from bulk solar composition material. They are 'complementary' to each other in Fe/Si ratios. Void spaces in chondritic CAIs and chondrules are shown to be a primary feature, not due to plucking during sectioning. CAI morphology in 3D reveals pre-accretionary impact features, and various types of mineralogical layering, seen in 3D, reveal the formation history of these building blocks of planets and asteroids. We also quantify the x-ray

  3. Laser ray tracing in a parallel arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian adaptive mesh refinement hydrocode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, N. D.; Kaiser, T. B.; Anderson, R. W.; Eder, D. C.; Fisher, A. C.; Koniges, A. E.

    2010-08-01

    ALE-AMR is a new hydrocode that we are developing as a predictive modeling tool for debris and shrapnel formation in high-energy laser experiments. In this paper we present our approach to implementing laser ray tracing in ALE-AMR. We present the basic concepts of laser ray tracing and our approach to efficiently traverse the adaptive mesh hierarchy.

  4. Using Divergent Δ12CH2D2 and Δ13CH3D to Trace the Provenance and Evolution of Methane Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, E. D.; Freedman, P.; Mills, M.; Rumble, D.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of Δ13CH3D (deviations in Δ13CH3D/12CH4 from stochastic; Ono et al. Anal. Chem. v.86, p.6487, 2014) or Δ18 (from (12CH2D2 + 13CH3D)/12CH4; Stolper et al. Science, v.344, p.1500, 2014, ) have been used to infer temperatures of formation of methane gas. However, departures from thermodynamic equilibrium isotopic bond ordering will result from any fractionating process that do not include bond rupture and reformation, including mixing, diffusion, and kinetic processing. This is because the isotopic bond ordering no longer reflects the bulk isotopic composition once fractionation occurs. A direct measure of departures from thermodynamic equilibrium isotopic bond ordering in methane comes from both Δ12CH2D2 and Δ13CH3D in the same gas. Until now, this has not been possible due to instrumental limitations. We have carried out measurements of Δ12CH2D2 and Δ13CH3D in methane gas mixtures using a unique, large-geometry double-focusing isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS), the Panorama, in order to investigate the usefulness of these two mass-18 isotopologues as tracers of mixing of methane sources. This instrument has a dispersion/magnification ratio, the parameter of merit for mass resolving power, of ~ 1400 mm that exceeds that of any other gas-source IRMS by more than 3.5x and is slightly larger than that for large-geometry SIMS instruments. With this geometry we routinely operate with mass resolving power (M/ΔM, 5% and 95%) of 40,000 or greater with useful sensitivity for isotope ratio analysis. For these experiments we mixed two gases with bulk D/H differing by 100 ‰. The results follow theoretical expectations within uncertainties of 0.5 ‰ for Δ12CH2D2 and 0.1 ‰ for Δ13CH3D. Precision is sufficient to detect as little as 10% mixing in this system. This precision would also be capable of detecting subtle departures from equilibrium caused by diffusion and kinetic bond rupture (e.g. CH4 + OH).

  5. GPU-based four-dimensional general-relativistic ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchelmeister, Daniel; Müller, Thomas; Ament, Marco; Wunner, Günter; Weiskopf, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a new general-relativistic ray tracer that enables image synthesis on an interactive basis by exploiting the performance of graphics processing units (GPUs). The application is capable of visualizing the distortion of the stellar background as well as trajectories of moving astronomical objects orbiting a compact mass. Its source code includes metric definitions for the Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetimes that can be easily extended to other metric definitions, relying on its object-oriented design. The basic functionality features a scene description interface based on the scripting language Lua, real-time image output, and the ability to edit almost every parameter at runtime. The ray tracing code itself is implemented for parallel execution on the GPU using NVidia's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), which leads to performance improvement of an order of magnitude compared to a single CPU and makes the application competitive with small CPU cluster architectures. Program summary Program title: GpuRay4D Catalog identifier: AEMV_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 73649 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1334251 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, CUDA. Computer: Linux platforms with a NVidia CUDA enabled GPU (Compute Capability 1.3 or higher), C++ compiler, NVCC (The CUDA Compiler Driver). Operating system: Linux. RAM: 2 GB Classification: 1.5. External routines: OpenGL Utility Toolkit development files, NVidia CUDA Toolkit 3.2, Lua5.2 Nature of problem: Ray tracing in four-dimensional Lorentzian spacetimes. Solution method: Numerical integration of light rays, GPU-based parallel programming using CUDA, 3D

  6. 3D Imaging of Nickel Oxidation States using Full Field X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Nanotomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, George; Harris, William; Izzo, John; Grew, Kyle N.

    2012-01-20

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) cycling of the nickel electrocatalyst phase in the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode can lead to performance degradation and cell failure. A greater understanding of nickel redox mechanisms at the microstructural level is vital to future SOFC development. Transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) provides several key techniques for exploring oxidation states within SOFC electrode microstructure. Specifically, x-ray nanotomography and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy have been applied to study samples of varying nickel (Ni) and nickel oxide (NiO) compositions. The imaged samples are treated as mock SOFC anodes containing distinct regions of the materials in question. XANES spectra presented for the individual materials provide a basis for the further processing and analysis of mixed samples. Images of composite samples obtained are segmented, and the distinct nickel and nickel oxide phases are uniquely identified using full field XANES spectroscopy. Applications to SOFC analysis are discussed.

  7. Development of Gamma-Ray Compton Imager Using Room-Temperature 3-D Position Sensitive Semiconductor Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong He; David Whe; Glenn Knoll

    2003-05-14

    During the three years of this project, two 3-dimensional position sensitive CdZnTe spectrometers were upgraded in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. A prototype Compton-scattering gamma-ray imager was assembled using the two upgraded CdZnTe detectors. The performance of both gamma-ray spectrometers were individually tested. The angular resolution and detection sensitivity of the imaging system were measured using both a point and a line-shaped 137 Cs radiation source. The measurement results are consistent with that obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations performed during the early phase of the project.

  8. 3D Algebraic Iterative Reconstruction for Cone-Beam X-Ray Differential Phase-Contrast Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jian; Hu, Xinhua; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Jiang, Ming; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution and contrast, cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) has attracted significant interest. The current proposed FDK reconstruction algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter will induce severe cone-beam artifacts when the cone-beam angle becomes large. In this paper, we propose an algebraic iterative reconstruction (AIR) method for cone-beam DPC-CT and report its experiment results. This approach considers the reconstruction process as the optimization of a discrete representation of the object function to satisfy a system of equations that describes the cone-beam DPC-CT imaging modality. Unlike the conventional iterative algorithms for absorption-based CT, it involves the derivative operation to the forward projections of the reconstructed intermediate image to take into account the differential nature of the DPC projections. This method is based on the algebraic reconstruction technique, reconstructs the image ray by ray, and is expected to provide better derivative estimates in iterations. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a mini-focus x-ray tube source. It is shown that the proposed method can reduce the cone-beam artifacts and performs better than FDK under large cone-beam angles. This algorithm is of interest for future cone-beam DPC-CT applications. PMID:25775480

  9. Fast Ray Tracing of Lunar Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R. D.; Mitrofanov, I.

    2009-01-01

    Ray-tracing (RT) of Lunar Digital Elevation Models (DEM)'s is performed to virtually derive the degree of radiation incident to terrain as a function of time, orbital and ephemeris constraints [I- 4]. This process is an integral modeling process in lunar polar research and exploration due to the present paucity of terrain information at the poles and mission planning activities for the anticipated spring 2009 launch of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). As part of the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) and Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) preparations RI methods are used to estimate the critical conditions presented by the combined effects of high latitude, terrain and the moons low obliquity [5-7]. These factors yield low incident solar illumination and subsequently extreme thermal, and radiation conditions. The presented research uses RT methods both for radiation transport modeling in space and regolith related research as well as to derive permanently shadowed regions (PSR)'s in high latitude topographic minima, e.g craters. These regions are of scientific and human exploration interest due to the near constant low temperatures in PSRs, inferred to be < 100 K. Hydrogen is thought to have accumulated in PSR's through the combined effects of periodic cometary bombardment and/or solar wind processes, and the extreme cold which minimizes hydrogen sublimation [8-9]. RT methods are also of use in surface position optimization for future illumination dependent on surface resources e.g. power and communications equipment.

  10. Comparison of focused ion beam versus nano-scale X-ray computed tomography for resolving 3-D microstructures of porous fuel cell materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wargo, E. A.; Kotaka, T.; Tabuchi, Y.; Kumbur, E. C.

    2013-11-01

    Focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) and nano-scale X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) have emerged as two popular nanotomography techniques for quantifying the 3-D microstructure of porous materials. The objective of this study is to assess the unique features and limitations of FIB-SEM and nano-CT in capturing the 3-D microstructure and structure-related transport properties of porous fuel cell materials. As a test case, a sample of a micro-porous layer used in polymer electrolyte fuel cells is analyzed to obtain 3-D microstructure datasets using these two nanotomography techniques. For quantitative comparison purposes, several key transport properties are determined for these two datasets, including the porosity, pore connectivity, tortuosity, structural diffusivity coefficient, and chord length (i.e., void size) distributions. The results obtained for both datasets are evaluated against each other and experimental data when available. Additionally, these two techniques are compared qualitatively in terms of the acquired images, image segmentation, and general systems operation. The particular advantages and disadvantages of both techniques are highlighted, along with suggestions for best practice.

  11. Assessment of the 3 D Pore Structure and Individual Components of Preshaped Catalyst Bodies by X-Ray Imaging

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Julio C; Mader, Kevin; Holler, Mirko; Haberthür, David; Diaz, Ana; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Cheng, Wu-Cheng; Shu, Yuying; Raabe, Jörg; Menzel, Andreas; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2015-01-01

    Porosity in catalyst particles is essential because it enables reactants to reach the active sites and it enables products to leave the catalyst. The engineering of composite-particle catalysts through the tuning of pore-size distribution and connectivity is hampered by the inability to visualize structure and porosity at critical-length scales. Herein, it is shown that the combination of phase-contrast X-ray microtomography and high-resolution ptychographic X-ray tomography allows the visualization and characterization of the interparticle pores at micro- and nanometer-length scales. Furthermore, individual components in preshaped catalyst bodies used in fluid catalytic cracking, one of the most used catalysts, could be visualized and identified. The distribution of pore sizes, as well as enclosed pores, which cannot be probed by traditional methods, such as nitrogen physisorption and isotherm analysis, were determined. PMID:26191088

  12. Three-dimensional X-ray absorptiometry (3D-XA): a method for reconstruction of human bones using a dual X-ray absorptiometry device.

    PubMed

    Kolta, S; Le Bras, A; Mitton, D; Bousson, V; de Guise, J A; Fechtenbaum, J; Laredo, J D; Roux, C; Skalli, W

    2005-08-01

    Three-dimensional accurate evaluation of the geometry of the proximal femur may be helpful for hip fracture risk evaluation. The purpose of this study was to apply and validate a stereo-radiographic 3D reconstruction method of the proximal femur, using contours identification from biplanar DXA images. Twenty-five excised human proximal femurs were investigated using a standard DXA unit. Three-dimensional personalized models were reconstructed using a dedicated non-stereo corresponding contours (NSCC) algorithm. Three-dimensional CT-scan reconstructions obtained on a clinical CT-scan unit were defined as geometric references for the comparison protocol, in order to assess accuracy and reproducibility of the 3D stereo-radiographic reconstructions. The precision of a set of 3D geometric parameters (femoral-neck axis length, mid-neck cross-section area, neck-shaft angle), obtained from stereo-radiographic models was also evaluated. This study shows that the NSCC method may be applied to obtain 3D reconstruction from biplanar DXA acquisitions. Applied to the proximal femur, this method showed good accuracy as compared with high-resolution personalized CT-scan models (mean error = 0.8 mm). Moreover, precision study for the set of 3D parameters yielded coefficients of variation lower than 5%. This is the first study providing 3D geometric parameters from standard 2D DXA images using the NSCC method. It has good accuracy and reproducibility in the present study on cadaveric femurs. In vivo prospective studies are needed to evaluate its discriminating potential on hip fracture risk prediction. PMID:15599494

  13. High-resolution real-time x-ray and 3D imaging for physical contamination detection in deboned poultry meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Jing, Hansong; Tao, Yang; Cheng, Xuemei

    2004-03-01

    This paper describes a novel approach for detection of foreign materials in deboned poultry patties based on real-time imaging technologies. Uneven thickness of poultry patties could lead to a significant classification error in a typical X-ray imaging system, and we addressed this issue successfully by fusing laser range imaging (3D imaging) into the x-ray inspection system. In order for this synergic technology to work effectively for on-line industrial applications, the vision system should be able to identify various physical contaminations automatically and have viable real-time capabilities. To meet these challenges, a rule-based approach was formulated under a unified framework for detection of diversified subjects, and a multithread scheme was developed for real-time image processing. Algorithms of data fusion, feature extraction and pattern classification of this approach are described in this paper. Detection performance and overall throughput of the system are also discussed.

  14. Estimation of three-dimensional knee joint movement using bi-plane x-ray fluoroscopy and 3D-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haneishi, Hideaki; Fujita, Satoshi; Kohno, Takahiro; Suzuki, Masahiko; Miyagi, Jin; Moriya, Hideshige

    2005-04-01

    Acquisition of exact information of three-dimensional knee joint movement is desired in plastic surgery. Conventional X-ray fluoroscopy provides dynamic but just two-dimensional projected image. On the other hand, three-dimensional CT provides three-dimensional but just static image. In this paper, a method for acquiring three-dimensional knee joint movement using both bi-plane, dynamic X-ray fluoroscopy and static three-dimensional CT is proposed. Basic idea is use of 2D/3D registration using digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) or virtual projection of CT data. Original ideal is not new but the application of bi-plane fluoroscopy to natural bones of knee is reported for the first time. The technique was applied to two volunteers and successful results were obtained. Accuracy evaluation through computer simulation and phantom experiment with a knee joint of a pig were also conducted.

  15. Inversion of the 3D exponential x-ray transform for a half equatorial band and other semi-circular geometries.

    PubMed

    Noo, Frédéric; Clackdoyle, Rolf; Wagner, Jean-Marc

    2002-08-01

    This work presents new mathematical results on the inversion of the exponential x-ray transform. It is shown that a reconstruction formula can be obtained for any dataset whose projection directions consist of a union of half great circles on the unit sphere. A basic example of such a dataset is the semi-equatorial band. The discussion in the paper is mostly focused on this example. The reconstruction formula takes the form of a Neumann (geometric) series and is both exact and stable. The exponential x-ray transform has been mainly studied in SPECT imaging. In this context, our results demonstrate mathematically that fully 3D image reconstruction in SPECT with non-zero attenuation does not always require symmetric datasets (opposing views). PMID:12200935

  16. A 3D point-kernel multiple scatter model for parallel-beam SPECT based on a gamma-ray buildup factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinkovic, Predrag; Ilic, Radovan; Spaic, Rajko

    2007-09-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) point-kernel multiple scatter model for point spread function (PSF) determination in parallel-beam single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), based on a dose gamma-ray buildup factor, is proposed. This model embraces nonuniform attenuation in a voxelized object of imaging (patient body) and multiple scattering that is treated as in the point-kernel integration gamma-ray shielding problems. First-order Compton scattering is done by means of the Klein-Nishina formula, but the multiple scattering is accounted for by making use of a dose buildup factor. An asset of the present model is the possibility of generating a complete two-dimensional (2D) PSF that can be used for 3D SPECT reconstruction by means of iterative algorithms. The proposed model is convenient in those situations where more exact techniques are not economical. For the proposed model's testing purpose calculations (for the point source in a nonuniform scattering object for parallel beam collimator geometry), the multiple-order scatter PSF generated by means of the proposed model matched well with those using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Discrepancies are observed only at the exponential tails mostly due to the high statistic uncertainty of MC simulations in this area, but not because of the inappropriateness of the model.

  17. X-ray 3D computed tomography of large objects: investigation of an ancient globe created by Vincenzo Coronelli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morigi, Maria Pia; Casali, Franco; Berdondini, Andrea; Bettuzzi, Matteo; Bianconi, Davide; Brancaccio, Rosa; Castellani, Alice; D'Errico, Vincenzo; Pasini, Alessandro; Rossi, Alberto; Labanti, C.; Scianna, Nicolangelo

    2007-07-01

    X-ray cone-beam Computed Tomography is a powerful tool for the non-destructive investigation of the inner structure of works of art. With regard to Cultural Heritage conservation, different kinds of objects have to be inspected in order to acquire significant information such as the manufacturing technique or the presence of defects and damages. The knowledge of these features is very useful for determining adequate maintenance and restoration procedures. The use of medical CT scanners gives good results only when the investigated objects have size and density similar to those of the human body, however this requirement is not always fulfilled in Cultural Heritage diagnostics. For this reason a system for Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography of large objects, especially works of art, has been recently developed by researchers of the Physics Department of the University of Bologna. The design of the system is very different from any commercial available CT machine. The system consists of a 200 kVp X-ray source, a detector and a motorized mechanical structure for moving the detector and the object in order to collect the required number of radiographic projections. The detector is made up of a 450x450 mm2 structured CsI(Tl) scintillating screen, optically coupled to a CCD camera. In this paper we will present the results of the tomographic investigation recently performed on an ancient globe, created by the famous cosmographer, cartographer and encyclopedist Vincenzo Coronelli.

  18. Ray-tracing simulations of coupled dark energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Francesco; Baldi, Marco; Moscardini, Lauro; Bacon, David; Crittenden, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Dark matter and dark energy are usually assumed to couple only gravitationally. An extension to this picture is to model dark energy as a scalar field coupled directly to cold dark matter. This coupling leads to new physical effects, such as a fifth force and a time-dependent dark matter particle mass. In this work we examine the impact that coupling has on weak lensing statistics by constructing realistic simulated weak lensing maps using ray-tracing techniques through N-body cosmological simulations. We construct maps for different lensing quantities, covering a range of scales from a few arcminutes to several degrees. The concordance Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model is compared to different coupled dark energy models, described either by an exponential scalar field potential (standard coupled dark energy scenario) or by a SUGRA potential (bouncing model). We analyse several statistical quantities and our results, with sources at low redshifts are largely consistent with previous work on cosmic microwave background lensing by Carbone et al. The most significant differences from the ΛCDM model are due to the enhanced growth of the perturbations and to the effective friction term in non-linear dynamics. For the most extreme models, we see differences in the power spectra up to 40 per cent compared to the ΛCDM model. The different time evolution of the linear matter overdensity can account for most of the differences, but when controlling for this using a ΛCDM model having the same normalization, the overall signal is smaller due to the effect of the friction term appearing in the equation of motion for dark matter particles.

  19. Multiscale 3D virtual dissections of 100-million-year-old flowers using X-ray synchrotron micro- and nanotomography.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Jean-David; Cloetens, Peter; Gomez, Bernard; Daviero-Gomez, Véronique; Néraudeau, Didier; Lafford, Tamzin A; Tafforeau, Paul

    2014-02-01

    A multiscale approach combining phase-contrast X-ray micro- and nanotomography is applied for imaging a Cretaceous fossil inflorescence in the resolution range from 0.75 μm to 50 nm. The wide range of scale views provides three-dimensional reconstructions from the external gross morphology of the inflorescence fragment to the finest exine sculptures of in situ pollen. This approach enables most of the characteristics usually observed under light microscopy, or with low magnification under scanning and transmission electron microscopy, to be obtained nondestructively. In contrast to previous tomography studies of fossil and extant flowers that used resolutions down to the micron range, we used voxels with a 50 nm side in local tomography scans. This high level of resolution enables systematic affinities of fossil flowers to be established without breaking or slicing specimens. PMID:24397959

  20. Solidification of Al Alloys Under Electromagnetic Pulses and Characterization of the 3D Microstructures Using Synchrotron X-ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuwong, Theerapatt; Zhang, Wei; Kazinczi, Peter Lobo; Bodey, Andrew J.; Rau, Christoph; Mi, Jiawei

    2015-07-01

    A novel programmable electromagnetic pulse device was developed and used to study the solidification of Al-15 pct Cu and Al-35 pct Cu alloys. The pulsed magnetic fluxes and Lorentz forces generated inside the solidifying melts were simulated using finite element methods, and their effects on the solidification microstructures were characterized using electron microscopy and synchrotron X-ray tomography. Using a discharging voltage of 120 V, a pulsed magnetic field with the peak Lorentz force of ~1.6 N was generated inside the solidifying Al-Cu melts which were showed sufficiently enough to disrupt the growth of the primary Al dendrites and the Al2Cu intermetallic phases. The microstructures exhibit a strong correlation to the characteristics of the applied pulse, forming a periodical pattern that resonates the frequency of the applied electromagnetic field.

  1. Degradation of Li/S Battery Electrodes On 3D Current Collectors Studied Using X-ray Phase Contrast Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zielke, L.; Barchasz, C.; Waluś, S.; Alloin, F.; Leprêtre, J.-C.; Spettl, A.; Schmidt, V.; Hilger, A.; Manke, I.; Banhart, J.; Zengerle, R.; Thiele, S.

    2015-01-01

    Lithium/sulphur batteries are promising candidates for future energy storage systems, mainly due to their high potential capacity. However low sulphur utilization and capacity fading hinder practical realizations. In order to improve understanding of the system, we investigate Li/S electrode morphology changes for different ageing steps, using X-ray phase contrast tomography. Thereby we find a strong decrease of sulphur loading after the first cycle, and a constant loading of about 15% of the initial loading afterwards. While cycling, the mean sulphur particle diameters decrease in a qualitatively similar fashion as the discharge capacity fades. The particles spread, migrate into the current collector and accumulate in the upper part again. Simultaneously sulphur particles lose contact area with the conducting network but regain it after ten cycles because their decreasing size results in higher surface areas. Since the capacity still decreases, this regain could be associated with effects such as surface area passivation and increasing charge transfer resistance. PMID:26043280

  2. Development of the 3-D Track Imager for Medium and High-Energy Gamma-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) and Advanced Pair Telescope (APT) are envisioned as the next medium (0.3 ^ 50 MeV) and high-energy (30 MeV - greater than 100 GeV) gamma-ray missions. These missions will address many research focus areas of the Structure and Evolution of the Universe Roadmap. These areas include: element formation, matter, energy, & magnetic field interactions in galaxies, AGN & GRB emission, and behavior of matter in extreme environments of black holes & pulsars. Achieving these science goals requires a substantial increases in telescope sensitivity and angular resolution. This talk will discuss how these goals can be met with the three-dimensional track imager (3-DTI), a large volume, low density, time projection chamber with two-dimensional micro-well detector readout and report on our development of a 10 cm x 10 cm x 30 prototype instrument.

  3. 3D-printed photo-spectroelectrochemical devices for in situ and in operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation.

    PubMed

    Achilli, Elisabetta; Minguzzi, Alessandro; Visibile, Alberto; Locatelli, Cristina; Vertova, Alberto; Naldoni, Alberto; Rondinini, Sandra; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Marconi, Stefania; Fracchia, Martina; Ghigna, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional printed multi-purpose electrochemical devices for X-ray absorption spectroscopy are presented in this paper. The aim of this work is to show how three-dimensional printing can be a strategy for the creation of electrochemical cells for in situ and in operando experiments by means of synchrotron radiation. As a case study, the description of two cells which have been employed in experiments on photoanodes for photoelectrochemical water splitting are presented. The main advantages of these electrochemical devices are associated with their compactness and with the precision of the three-dimensional printing systems which allows details to be obtained that would otherwise be difficult. Thanks to these systems it was possible to combine synchrotron-based methods with complementary techniques in order to study the mechanism of the photoelectrocatalytic process. PMID:26917152

  4. A physico-mathematical formulation based on ray equation for reconstructing refraction-based 3-D image of soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuasa, T.; Sunaguchi, N.; Ichihara, S.; Ando, M.

    2013-05-01

    Refraction-contrast computed tomography (CT) can image biological soft tissues and soft materials at a high contrast, which cannot be clearly depicted by contemporary CT based on absorption contrast. It reconstructs a distribution of refractive index from projections, whose data each is an angular deviation from incident direction due to refraction by an object, and is acquired by imaging methods using an angular analyzer, e.g., DEI (diffraction enhance imaging), or DFI (dark field imaging). First, a reconstruction algorithm for refraction-contrast CT is derived from the ray equation of a fundamental equation describing refraction phenomena in geometrical optics. Then, in order to demonstrate its efficacy, we performed imaging experiment using DFI-CT imaging system. A reconstructed image of human breast cancer tissue is presented.

  5. 3D Morphochemistry of Basaltic/Rhyolitic Mixed Eruptions revealed via Microanalysis and X-ray microtomography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgavi, D.; Arzilli, F.; Pritchard, C. J.; Perugini, D.; Mancini, L.; Larson, P. B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Magma Mixing, a widespread petrogenetic process often operates in concert with fractional crystallisation and assimilation, to produce chemical and temperature gradients in magma. The injection of mafic magmas into felsic magma chambers is widely regarded as a key driver in the sudden triggering of what often become highly explosive volcanic eruptions. Understanding the mechanistic chain leading to such hazardous events is the goal of the present study of the morphochemistry of mingled lavas. This study involves the combination of X-ray microtomographic and electron microprobe analyses, to unravel the complex textures and attendant chemical heterogeneities of the mixed basaltic and rhyolitic eruption of Grizzly Lake in the Norris-Mammoth corridor of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YPVF). We observe that both magmatic viscous interfingering and disequilibrium crystallization/dissolution processes provide vital information on the timescale of interaction between the two magmatic components prior to the eruption. Mixed rocks in the YPVF appear to have a complicated history and evolution. Therefore a very considerable amount of chemical analysis was employed here. In addition, X-ray microtomography images show variegated textural features, such as vesicle and crystal distributions, filament morphology, the distribution of enclaves, and further textural features otherwise obscured in a simple 2D analyses. Here most effort was applied to the determination of the characterisation of mixing end members. Nevertheless, analysis of the hybrid portion has led to the unexpected discovery that mixing in the Grizzly Lake system was also characterised by the disintegration/dissolution of mafic crystals into the rhyolitic magma. The results of this study expose the complexity of mixing in natural magmatic systems, identifying several textural reactive factors that must be understood more deeply for our understanding of this potential eruptive trigger to proceed.

  6. 3-D laser radar simulation for autonomous spacecraft landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiley, Michael F.; Carmer, Dwayne C.; Pont, W. F.

    1991-01-01

    A sophisticated 3D laser radar sensor simulation, developed and applied to the task of autonomous hazard detection and avoidance, is presented. This simulation includes a backward ray trace to sensor subpixels, incoherent subpixel integration, range dependent noise, sensor point spread function effects, digitization noise, and AM-CW modulation. Specific sensor parameters, spacecraft lander trajectory, and terrain type have been selected to generate simulated sensor data.

  7. The Devil is in the Details: Using X-Ray Computed Tomography to Develop Accurate 3D Grain Characteristics and Bed Structure Metrics for Gravel Bed Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voepel, H.; Hodge, R. A.; Leyland, J.; Sear, D. A.; Ahmed, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty for bedload estimates in gravel bed rivers is largely driven by our inability to characterize the arrangement and orientation of the sediment grains within the bed. The characteristics of the surface structure are produced by the water working of grains, which leads to structural differences in bedforms through differential patterns of grain sorting, packing, imbrication, mortaring and degree of bed armoring. Until recently the technical and logistical difficulties of characterizing the arrangement of sediment in 3D have prohibited a full understanding of how grains interact with stream flow and the feedback mechanisms that exist. Micro-focus X-ray CT has been used for non-destructive 3D imaging of grains within a series of intact sections of river bed taken from key morphological units (see Figure 1). Volume, center of mass, points of contact, protrusion and spatial orientation of individual surface grains are derived from these 3D images, which in turn, facilitates estimates of 3D static force properties at the grain-scale such as pivoting angles, buoyancy and gravity forces, and grain exposure. By aggregating representative samples of grain-scale properties of localized interacting sediment into overall metrics, we can compare and contrast bed stability at a macro-scale with respect to stream bed morphology. Understanding differences in bed stability through representative metrics derived at the grain-scale will ultimately lead to improved bedload estimates with reduced uncertainty and increased understanding of interactions between grain-scale properties on channel morphology. Figure 1. CT-Scans of a water worked gravel-filled pot. a. 3D rendered scan showing the outer mesh, and b. the same pot with the mesh removed. c. vertical change in porosity of the gravels sampled in 5mm volumes. Values are typical of those measured in the field and lab. d. 2-D slices through the gravels at 20% depth from surface (porosity = 0.35), and e. 75% depth from

  8. Critical factors affecting the 3D microstructural formation in hybrid conductive adhesive materials studied by X-ray nano-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen-Wiegart, Yu-Chen Karen; Figueroa-Santos, Miriam Aileen; Petrash, Stanislas; Garcia-Miralles, Jose; Wang, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A `stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to elaborate such a phenomenon. The findings and the technique developed in this work will facilitate the future advancement of conductive adhesives to have a great impact in micro-electronics and other applications.Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A `stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to

  9. Local ISM 3D distribution and soft X-ray background. Inferences on nearby hot gas and the North Polar Spur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitarini, L.; Lallement, R.; Vergely, J.-L.; Snowden, S. L.

    2014-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interstellar medium (ISM) maps can be used to locate not only interstellar (IS) clouds, but also IS bubbles between the clouds that are blown by stellar winds and supernovae, and that are filled by hot gas. To demonstrate this and to derive a clearer picture of the local ISM, we compare our recent 3D maps of the IS dust distribution to the ROSAT diffuse X-ray background maps after removing heliospheric emission. In the Galactic plane, there is a good correspondence between the locations and extents of the mapped nearby cavities and the soft (0.25 keV) background emission distribution, showing that most of these nearby cavities contribute to this soft X-ray emission. Assuming a constant dust-to-gas ratio and homogeneous 106 K hot gas filling the cavities, we modeled the 0.25 keV surface brightness in a simple way along the Galactic plane as seen from the Sun, taking the absorption by the mapped clouds into account. The data-model comparison favors the existence of hot gas in the solar neighborhood, the so-called Local Bubble (LB). The inferred average mean pressure in the local cavities is found to be on the order of 10 000 cm-3 K, in agreement with previous studies, providing a validation test for the method. On the other hand, the model overestimates the emission from the huge cavities located in the third quadrant. Using CaII absorption data, we show that the dust-to-CaII ratio is very low in this region, implying there is a large quantity of lower temperature (non-X-ray emitting) ionized gas and, as a consequence, a reduction in the volume filled by hot gas, explaining at least part of the discrepancy. In the meridian plane, the main two brightness enhancements coincide well with the LB's most elongated parts and chimneys connecting the LB to the halo, but no particular nearby cavity is found towards the enhancement in the direction of the bright North Polar Spur (NPS) at high latitude. We searched in the 3D maps for the source regions of

  10. Ray Tracing through the Edge Focusing of Rectangular Benders and an Improved Model for the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kolski, Jeffrey S.; Barlow, David B.; Macek, Robert J.; McCrady, Rodney C.

    2011-01-01

    Particle ray tracing through simulated 3D magnetic fields was executed to investigate the effective quadrupole strength of the edge focusing of the rectangular bending magnets in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). The particle rays receive a kick in the edge field of the rectangular dipole. A focal length may be calculated from the particle tracking and related to the fringe field integral (FINT) model parameter. This tech note introduces the baseline lattice model of the PSR and motivates the need for an improvement in the baseline model's vertical tune prediction, which differs from measurement by .05. An improved model of the PSR is created by modifying the fringe field integral parameter to those suggested by the ray tracing investigation. This improved model is then verified against measurement at the nominal PSR operating set point and at set points far away from the nominal operating conditions. Lastly, Linear Optics from Closed Orbits (LOCO) is employed in an orbit response matrix method for model improvement to verify the quadrupole strengths of the improved model.

  11. 3D mapping of water in oolithic limestone at atmospheric and vacuum saturation using X-ray micro-CT differential imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, M.A.; De Kock, T.; Bultreys, T.; De Schutter, G.; Vontobel, P.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Cnudde, V.

    2014-11-15

    Determining the distribution of fluids in porous sedimentary rocks is of great importance in many geological fields. However, this is not straightforward, especially in the case of complex sedimentary rocks like limestone, where a multidisciplinary approach is often needed to capture its broad, multimodal pore size distribution and complex pore geometries. This paper focuses on the porosity and fluid distribution in two varieties of Massangis limestone, a widely used natural building stone from the southeast part of the Paris basin (France). The Massangis limestone shows locally varying post-depositional alterations, resulting in different types of pore networks and very different water distributions within the limestone. Traditional techniques for characterizing the porosity and pore size distribution are compared with state-of-the-art neutron radiography and X-ray computed microtomography to visualize the distribution of water inside the limestone at different imbibition conditions. X-ray computed microtomography images have the great advantage to non-destructively visualize and analyze the pore space inside of a rock, but are often limited to the larger macropores in the rock due to resolution limitations. In this paper, differential imaging is successfully applied to the X-ray computed microtomography images to obtain sub-resolution information about fluid occupancy and to map the fluid distribution in three dimensions inside the scanned limestone samples. The detailed study of the pore space with differential imaging allows understanding the difference in the water uptake behavior of the limestone, a primary factor that affects the weathering of the rock. - Highlights: • The water distribution in a limestone was visualized in 3D with micro-CT. • Differential imaging allowed to map both macro and microporous zones in the rock. • The 3D study of the pore space clarified the difference in water uptake behavior. • Trapped air is visualized in the moldic

  12. Numerical investigation of the high Reynolds number 3D flow field generated by a self-propelling manta ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pederzani, Jean-Noel; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2012-11-01

    An embedded-boundary (or cut-cell) method for complex geometry with moving boundaries is used to solve the three dimensional Navier-Stokes equation around a self-propelling manta swimming at moderately high Reynolds numbers. The motion of the ray is prescribed using a kinematic model fitted to actual biological data. The dependence of thrust production mechanism on Strouhal and Reynolds numbers is investigated. The vortex core structures are accurately plotted and a correlation between wake structures and propulsive performance is established. This insight is critical in understanding the key flow features that a bio-inspired autonomous vehicle should reproduce in order to swim efficiently. The solution method is implemented, on a block-structured Cartesian grid using a cut-cell approach enabling the code to correctly evaluate the wall shear-stress, a key feature necessary at higher Reynolds. To enhance computational efficiency, a parallel adaptive mesh refinement technique is used. The present method is validated against published experimental results. Supported by ONR MURI.

  13. Exceptionally Preserved Cambrian Trilobite Digestive System Revealed in 3D by Synchrotron-Radiation X-Ray Tomographic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Mats E.; Terfelt, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    The Cambrian ‘Orsten’ fauna comprises exceptionally preserved and phosphatised microscopic arthropods. The external morphology of these fossils is well known, but their internal soft-tissue anatomy has remained virtually unknown. Here, we report the first non-biomineralised tissues from a juvenile polymerid trilobite, represented by digestive structures, glands, and connective strands harboured in a hypostome from the Swedish ‘Orsten’ fauna. Synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy enabled three-dimensional internal recordings at sub-micrometre resolution. The specimen provides the first unambiguous evidence for a J-shaped anterior gut and the presence of a crop with a constricted alimentary tract in the Trilobita. Moreover, the gut is Y-shaped in cross section, probably due to a collapsed lumen of that shape, another feature which has not previously been observed in trilobites. The combination of anatomical features suggests that the trilobite hypostome is functionally analogous to the labrum of euarthropods and that it was a sophisticated element closely integrated with the digestive system. This study also briefly addresses the preservational bias of the ‘Orsten’ fauna, particularly the near-absence of polymerid trilobites, and the taphonomy of the soft-tissue-harbouring hypostome. PMID:22558180

  14. Quantitative 3D shape description of dust particles from treated seeds by means of X-ray micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Devarrewaere, Wouter; Foqué, Dieter; Heimbach, Udo; Cantre, Dennis; Nicolai, Bart; Nuyttens, David; Verboven, Pieter

    2015-06-16

    Crop seeds are often treated with pesticides before planting. Pesticide-laden dust particles can be abraded from the seed coating during planting and expelled into the environment, damaging nontarget organisms. Drift of these dust particles depends on their size, shape and density. In this work, we used X-ray micro-CT to examine the size, shape (sphericity) and porosity of dust particles from treated seeds of various crops. The dust properties quantified in this work were very variable in different crops. This variability may be a result of seed morphology, seed batch, treatment composition, treatment technology, seed cleaning or an interaction of these factors. The intraparticle porosity of seed treatment dust particles varied from 0.02 to 0.51 according to the crop and generally increased with particle size. Calculated settling velocities demonstrated that accounting for particle shape and porosity is important in drift studies. For example, the settling velocity of dust particles with an equivalent diameter of 200 μm may vary between 0.1 and 1.2 m s(-1), depending on their shape and density. Our analysis shows that in a wind velocity of 5 m s(-1), such particles ejected at 1 m height may travel between 4 and 50 m from the source before settling. Although micro-CT is a valuable tool to characterize dust particles, the current image processing methodology limits the number of particles that can be analyzed. PMID:26023822

  15. The Heidelberg Airborne Imaging DOAS Instrument (HAIDI) - a novel Imaging DOAS device for 2-D and 3-D imaging of trace gases and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    General, S.; Pöhler, D.; Sihler, H.; Bobrowski, N.; Frieß, U.; Zielcke, J.; Horbanski, M.; Shepson, P. B.; Stirm, B. H.; Simpson, W. R.; Weber, K.; Fischer, C.; Platt, U.

    2014-03-01

    Many relevant processes in tropospheric chemistry take place on rather small scales (e.g. tens to hundreds of meters) but often influence areas of several square kilometer. Thus, measurements of the involved trace gases with high spatial resolution are of great scientific interest. In order to identify individual sources and sinks and ultimately to improve chemical transport models, we developed a new airborne instrument, which is based on the well established DOAS method. The Heidelberg Airborne Imaging Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer Instrument (HAIDI) is a passive imaging DOAS spectrometer, which is capable of recording horizontal and vertical trace gas distributions with a resolution of better than 100 m. Observable species include NO2, HCHO, C2H2O2, H2O, O3, O4, SO2, IO, OClO and BrO. Here we report a technical description of the instrument including its custom build spectrographs and CCD detectors. Also first results from measurements with the new instrument are presented. These comprise spatial resolved SO2 and BrO in volcanic plumes, mapped at Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy), NO2 emissions in the metropolitan area of Indianapolis (Indiana, USA) as well as BrO and NO2 distributions measured during arctic springtime in context of the BROMEX campaign, which was performed 2012 in Barrow (Alaska, USA).

  16. The Heidelberg Airborne Imaging DOAS Instrument (HAIDI) - a novel imaging DOAS device for 2-D and 3-D imaging of trace gases and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    General, S.; Pöhler, D.; Sihler, H.; Bobrowski, N.; Frieß, U.; Zielcke, J.; Horbanski, M.; Shepson, P. B.; Stirm, B. H.; Simpson, W. R.; Weber, K.; Fischer, C.; Platt, U.

    2014-10-01

    Many relevant processes in tropospheric chemistry take place on rather small scales (e.g., tens to hundreds of meters) but often influence areas of several square kilometer. Thus, measurements of the involved trace gases with high spatial resolution are of great scientific interest. In order to identify individual sources and sinks and ultimately to improve chemical transport models, we developed a new airborne instrument, which is based on the well established Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method. The Heidelberg Airborne Imaging DOAS Instrument (HAIDI) is a passive imaging DOAS spectrometer, which is capable of recording horizontal and vertical trace gas distributions with a resolution of better than 100 m. Observable species include NO2, HCHO, C2H2O2, H2O, O3, O4, SO2, IO, OClO and BrO. Here we give a technical description of the instrument including its custom-built spectrographs and CCD detectors. Also first results from measurements with the new instrument are presented. These comprise spatial resolved SO2 and BrO in volcanic plumes, mapped at Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy), NO2 emissions in the metropolitan area of Indianapolis (Indiana, USA) as well as BrO and NO2 distributions measured during arctic springtime in context of the BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX) campaign, which was performed 2012 in Barrow (Alaska, USA).

  17. Fokker-Planck/Ray Tracing for Electron Bernstein and Fast Wave Modeling in Support of NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R. W.

    2009-11-12

    This DOE grant supported fusion energy research, a potential long-term solution to the world's energy needs. Magnetic fusion, exemplified by confinement of very hot ionized gases, i.e., plasmas, in donut-shaped tokamak vessels is a leading approach for this energy source. Thus far, a mixture of hydrogen isotopes has produced 10's of megawatts of fusion power for seconds in a tokamak reactor at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in New Jersey. The research grant under consideration, ER54684, uses computer models to aid in understanding and projecting efficacy of heating and current drive sources in the National Spherical Torus Experiment, a tokamak variant, at PPPL. The NSTX experiment explores the physics of very tight aspect ratio, almost spherical tokamaks, aiming at producing steady-state fusion plasmas. The current drive is an integral part of the steady-state concept, maintaining the magnetic geometry in the steady-state tokamak. CompX further developed and applied models for radiofrequency (rf) heating and current drive for applications to NSTX. These models build on a 30 year development of rf ray tracing (the all-frequencies GENRAY code) and higher dimensional Fokker-Planck rf-collisional modeling (the 3D collisional-quasilinear CQL3D code) at CompX. Two mainline current-drive rf modes are proposed for injection into NSTX: (1) electron Bernstein wave (EBW), and (2) high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) modes. Both these current drive systems provide a means for the rf to access the especially high density plasma--termed high beta plasma--compared to the strength of the required magnetic fields. The CompX studies entailed detailed modeling of the EBW to calculate the efficiency of the current drive system, and to determine its range of flexibility for driving current at spatial locations in the plasma cross-section. The ray tracing showed penetration into NSTX bulk plasma, relatively efficient current drive, but a limited ability to produce current over the whole

  18. Reduction of discretization error for ray tracing of MOC through a correction on collision probabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Tabuchi, M.; Tatsumi, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Endo, T.

    2013-07-01

    A new correction model for ray tracing of the method of characteristics is proposed in order to reduce discretization error. As the ray tracing parameters such as azimuthal angle division, polar angle division and ray separation are considered in this study. In the method of characteristics, region average scalar fluxes can be implicitly expressed by collision probabilities, although these collision probabilities are not directly treated in the ordinary calculation scheme. From this viewpoint, difference between a coarse ray tracing condition and a detailed one can be interpreted as the difference in the estimation of collision probabilities. In other words, the discretization error for ray tracing can be recognized as a consequence of inaccurate collision probabilities caused by coarse ray tracing. This discussion suggests that accurate region average scalar flux can be obtained through an appropriate correction on collision probabilities. In this paper, a correction model on collision probabilities is theoretically derived based on the neutron balance equation, and its validity is confirmed through typical single assembly calculations. The effectiveness of the present correction method is also discussed in this paper. It is confirmed that discretization error for ray tracing can be significantly reduced by the present correction method in a multi-assembly calculation, though the correction factor is estimated in single assembly geometry. (authors)

  19. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  20. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  1. Comprehensive Non-Destructive Conservation Documentation of Lunar Samples Using High-Resolution Image-Based 3D Reconstructions and X-Ray CT Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenfeld, E. H.; Evans, C. A.; Oshel, E. R.; Liddle, D. A.; Beaulieu, K.; Zeigler, R. A.; Hanna, R. D.; Ketcham, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    Established contemporary conservation methods within the fields of Natural and Cultural Heritage encourage an interdisciplinary approach to preservation of heritage material (both tangible and intangible) that holds "Outstanding Universal Value" for our global community. NASA's lunar samples were acquired from the moon for the primary purpose of intensive scientific investigation. These samples, however, also invoke cultural significance, as evidenced by the millions of people per year that visit lunar displays in museums and heritage centers around the world. Being both scientifically and culturally significant, the lunar samples require a unique conservation approach. Government mandate dictates that NASA's Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office develop and maintain protocols for "documentation, preservation, preparation and distribution of samples for research, education and public outreach" for both current and future collections of astromaterials. Documentation, considered the first stage within the conservation methodology, has evolved many new techniques since curation protocols for the lunar samples were first implemented, and the development of new documentation strategies for current and future astromaterials is beneficial to keeping curation protocols up to date. We have developed and tested a comprehensive non-destructive documentation technique using high-resolution image-based 3D reconstruction and X-ray CT (XCT) data in order to create interactive 3D models of lunar samples that would ultimately be served to both researchers and the public. These data enhance preliminary scientific investigations including targeted sample requests, and also provide a new visual platform for the public to experience and interact with the lunar samples. We intend to serve these data as they are acquired on NASA's Astromaterials Acquisistion and Curation website at http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/. Providing 3D interior and exterior documentation of astromaterial

  2. High density resolution synchrotron radiation based x-ray microtomography (SR μCT) for quantitative 3D-morphometrics in zoological sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickel, Michael; Hammel, Jörg U.; Herzen, Julia; Bullinger, Eric; Beckmann, Felix

    2008-08-01

    Zoological sciences widely rely on morphological data to reconstruct and understand body structures of animals. The best suitable methods like tomography allow for a direct representation of 3D-structures. In recent years, synchrotron radiation based x-ray microtomography (SR μCT) placed high resolutions to the disposal of morphologists. With the development of highly brilliant and collimated third generation synchrotron sources, phase contrast SR μCT became widely available. A number of scientific contributions stressed the superiority of phase contrast over absorption contrast. However, here we demonstrate the power of high density resolution methods based on absorption-contrast SRμCT for quantitative 3D-measurements of tissues and other delicate bio-structures in zoological sciences. We used beamline BW2 at DORIS III (DESY, Hamburg, Germany) to perform microtomography on tissue and mineral skeletons of marine sponges (Porifera) which were shock frozen and/or fixed in a glutamate osmium tetroxide solution, followed by critical point drying. High density resolution tomographic reconstructions allowed running quantitative 3D-image analyses in Matlab and ImageJ. By applying contrast and shape rule based algorithms we semi-automatically extracted and measured sponge body structures like mineral spicules, elements of the canal system or tissue structures. This lead to a better understanding of sponge biology: from skeleton functional morphology and internal water flow regimes to body contractility. Our high density resolution based quantitative approach can be applied to a wide variety of biological structures. However, two prerequisites apply: (1) maximum density resolution is necessary; (2) edge effects as seen for example in phase outline contrast SR μCT must not be present. As a consequence, to allow biological sciences to fully exploit the power of SR μCT further increase of density resolution in absorption contrast methods is desirable.

  3. Three-dimensional ray tracing on Delaunay-based reconstructed surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Sergio; Siedlecki, Damian; Remon, Laura; Marcos, Susana

    2009-07-10

    A method of ray tracing for free-form optical surfaces has been developed. The ray tracing through such surfaces is based on Delaunay triangulation of the discrete data of the surface and is related to finite-element modeling. Some numerical examples of applications to analytical, noisy, and experimental free-form surfaces (in particular, a corneal topography map) are presented. Ray-tracing results (i.e., spot diagram root-mean-square error) with the new method are in agreement with those obtained using a modal fitting of the surface, for sampling densities higher than 40 x 40 elements. The method competes in flexibility, simplicity, and computing times with standard methods for surface fitting and ray tracing. PMID:19593339

  4. Critical factors affecting the 3D microstructural formation in hybrid conductive adhesive materials studied by X-ray nano-tomography.

    PubMed

    Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Figueroa-Santos, Miriam Aileen; Petrash, Stanislas; Garcia-Miralles, Jose; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-21

    Conductive adhesives are found favorable in a wide range of applications including a lead-free solder in micro-chips, flexible and printable electronics and enhancing the performance of energy storage devices. Composite materials comprised of metallic fillers and a polymer matrix are of great interest to be implemented as hybrid conductive adhesives. Here we investigated a cost-effective conductive adhesive material consisting of silver-coated copper as micro-fillers using synchrotron-based three-dimensional (3D) X-ray nano-tomography. The key factors affecting the quality and performance of the material were quantitatively studied in 3D on the nanometer scale for the first time. A critical characteristic parameter, defined as a shape-factor, was determined to yield a high-quality silver coating, leading to satisfactory performance. A 'stack-and-screen' mechanism was proposed to elaborate such a phenomenon. The findings and the technique developed in this work will facilitate the future advancement of conductive adhesives to have a great impact in micro-electronics and other applications. PMID:25474162

  5. Compressed-sensing (CS)-based digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstruction for low-dose, accurate 3D breast X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yeonok; Cho, Hyosung; Je, Uikyu; Hong, Daeki; Lee, Minsik; Park, Chulkyu; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo

    2014-08-01

    In practical applications of three-dimensional (3D) tomographic techniques, such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), computed tomography (CT), etc., there are often challenges for accurate image reconstruction from incomplete data. In DBT, in particular, the limited-angle and few-view projection data are theoretically insufficient for exact reconstruction; thus, the use of common filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithms leads to severe image artifacts, such as the loss of the average image value and edge sharpening. One possible approach to alleviate these artifacts may employ iterative statistical methods because they potentially yield reconstructed images that are in better accordance with the measured projection data. In this work, as another promising approach, we investigated potential applications to low-dose, accurate DBT imaging with a state-of-the-art reconstruction scheme based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory. We implemented an efficient CS-based DBT algorithm and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the imaging characteristics. We successfully obtained DBT images of substantially very high accuracy by using the algorithm and expect it to be applicable to developing the next-generation 3D breast X-ray imaging system.

  6. X-Ray Emission Spectra and Electronic Structures of Red Phosphorus, 3d Transition-Metal Phosphides and III V Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Chikara

    1995-07-01

    The P Kβ emission spectra in fluorescence from red amorphous phosphorus, 3d transition-metal phosphides TiP, CrP, FeP, Fe2P, Fe3P, CoP, Co2P, Ni5P4, Ni2P, Ni3P, Cu3P, ZnP2 (black) and Zn3P2, and the semiconducting phosphides of the III-V type, BP, AlP, GaP and InP are measured with a high-resolution two-crystal vacuum spectrometer equipped with Ge(111) crystals. The influence of the metal atoms appears distinctly on the P Kβ fluorescence emission spectra. The measured spectra are compared with available X-ray emission and XPS valence-band spectra and theoretical energy-band calculations on a common energy scale. It is shown that considerable p-d, s mixing occurs in the valence bands of the 3d transition-metal phosphides and the P 3p states mix fairly with the P 3s states in the valence bands of red phosphorus, Gap and InP

  7. Statistically deformable 2D/3D registration for accurate determination of post-operative cup orientation from single standard X-ray radiograph.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoyan

    2009-01-01

    The widely used procedure of evaluation of cup orientation following total hip arthroplasty using single standard anteroposterior (AP) radiograph is known inaccurate, largely due to the wide variability in individual pelvic orientation relative to X-ray plate. 2D/3D rigid image registration methods have been introduced for an accurate determination of the post-operative cup alignment with respect to an anatomical reference extracted from the CT data. Although encouraging results have been reported, their extensive usage in clinical routine is still limited. This may be explained by their requirement of a CAD model of the prosthesis, which is often difficult to be organized from the manufacturer due to the proprietary issue, and by their requirement of a pre-operative CT scan, which is not available for most retrospective studies. To address these issues, we developed and validated a statistically deformable 2D/3D registration approach for accurate determination of post-operative cup orientation. No CAD model and pre-operative CT data is required any more. Quantitative and qualitative results evaluated on cadaveric and clinical datasets are given, which indicate the validity of the approach. PMID:20426064

  8. Mapping strain gradients in the FIB-structured InGaN/GaN multilayered films with 3D x-ray microbeam.

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, R. I.; Gao, Y. F.; Ice, G. E.; Barabash, O. M.; Chung, J.; Liu, W.; Lohmeyer, H.; Sebald, K.; Gutowski, J.; Bottcher, T.; Hommel, D.; Kroger, R.

    2010-11-25

    This research presents a combined experimental-modeling study of lattice rotations and deviatoric strain gradients induced by focused-ion beam (FIB) milling in nitride heterostructures. 3D X-ray polychromatic microdiffraction (PXM) is used to map the local lattice orientation distribution in FIB-structured areas. Results are discussed in connection with microphotoluminescence ({mu}-PL), fluorescent analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) data. It is demonstrated that FIB-milling causes both direct and indirect damage to the InGaN/GaN layers. In films subjected to direct ion beam impact, a narrow amorphidized top layer is formed. Near the milling area, FIB-induced stress relaxation and formation of complicated 3D strain fields are observed. The resulting lattice orientation changes are found to correlate with a decrease and/or loss of PL intensity, and agree well with finite element simulations of the three-dimensional strain fields near the relaxed trenches. Experimentally, it is found that the lattice surface normal has an in-plane rotation, which only appears in simulations when the GaN-substrate lattice mismatch annihilates the InGaN-substrate mismatch. This behavior further supports the notion that the film/substrate interface is incoherent.

  9. Tracing man's impact on groundwater dependent ecosystem using geochemical an isotope tools combined with 3D flow and transport modeling: case study from southern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Anna; Witczak, Stanislaw; Kania, Jaroslaw; Wachniew, Przemyslaw; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Dulinski, Marek; Jench, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Niepolomice Forest. There is a growing concern that continued exploitation of those wells may lead to lowering water table in the Niepolomice Forest area and, as a consequence, may trigger drastic changes in this unique ecosystem. A dedicated study was launched with the main aim to quantify the interaction between Niepolomice Forest, with the focus the Wielkie Bloto fen, and the underlying Bogucice Sands aquifer. The work was pursued along three major lines: (i) vertical profiling of the Wielkie Bloto fen aimed at characterizing chemical and isotope contrast in the shallow groundwater occupying the Quaternary cover in order to identify upward leakage of deeper groundwater in the investigated area, (ii) regular monitoring of flow rate, chemistry and environmental isotopes of the Dluga Woda stream draining the Wielkie Bloto fen, and (iii) 3D modeling of groundwater flow in the vicinity of the Wielkie Bloto fen focusing on quantifying the impact of the Wola Batorska well field on the regional groundwater flow patterns. The results of isotope and chemical analyses confirmed existence of upward seepage of groundwater from the Bogucice Sands aquifer in the area of Wielkie Bloto fen. Preliminary assessment of the water balance of Dluga Woda catchment indicates that the baseflow originating from groundwater seepage is equal approximately 16% of the annual precipitation. Results of 3D flow model applied to the study area indicate that prolonged operation of the well-field Wola Batorska at maximum capacity may lead to substantial lowering of water table in the Niepolomice Forest area and, as a consequence, endanger further existence of this unique GDTE. Acknowledgements. Partial financial support of this work through GENESIS project (http:/www.thegenesisproject.eu) funded by the European Commission 7FP contract 226536, and through statutory funds of the AGH University of Science and Technology (projects No.11.11.140.026 and 11.11.220.01) is kindly acknowledged.

  10. Can we trace the eastern Gondwanan margin in Australia? New perspectives from transdimensional inversion of ambient noise for 3D shear velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilia, S.; Rawlinson, N.; Direen, N. G.

    2013-12-01

    Although the notion of Rodinia is quite well accepted in the geoscience community, the location and nature of the eastern continental margin of the Gondwana fragment in Australia is still vague and remains one of the most hotly debated topics in Australian geology. Moreover, most post-Rodinian reconstructions models choose not to tackle the ';Tasmanian challenge', and focus only on the tectonic evolution of mainland southeast Australia, thereby conveniently ignoring the wider tectonic implications of Tasmania's complex geological history. One of the chief limitations of the tectonic reconstructions in this region is a lack of information on Paleozoic (possibly Proterozoic) basement structures. Vast Mesozoic-Cainozoic sedimentary and volcanic cover sequences obscure older outcrops and limit the power of direct observational techniques. In response to these challenges, our effort is focused on ambient seismic noise for imaging 3D crustal shear velocity structure using surface waves, which is capable of illuminating basement structure beneath younger cover. The data used in this study is sourced from the WOMBAT transportable seismic array, which is compounded by around 650 stations spanning the majority of southeastern Australia, including Tasmania and several islands in Bass Strait. To produce the highest quality Green's functions, careful processing of the data has been performed, after which group velocity dispersion measurements have been carried out using a frequency-time analysis method on the symmetric component of the empirical Green's functions (EGFs). Group dispersion measurements from the EGFs have been inverted using a novel hierarchical, transdimensional, Bayesian algorithm to obtain Rayleigh-wave group velocity maps at different periods from 2 to 30 s. The new approach has several advantages in that the number and distribution of model parameters are implicitly controlled by the data, in which the noise is treated as unknown in the inversion. This

  11. X-ray and gamma-ray polarization signatures of 3D multi-zone time-dependent hadronic model of blazar emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Diltz, Chris Scott; Boettcher, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The origin of the high-energy spectral component of blazar emission is still controversial. Polarization signatures can provide additional diagnostics on the leptonic and the hadronic models. We have developed a 3D multi-zone, time-dependent hadronic model based on Fokker-Planck equations. Coupled with a polarization-dependent radiation transfer code 3DPol, we derive the snap-shot spectral energy distributions and frequency-dependent polarization signatures, as well as multi-wavelength light curves and polarization variations. These findings can be confronted with future high-energy polarization observations to distinguish between the leptonic and the hadronic models.

  12. Three-dimensional ray tracing through curvilinear interfaces with application to laser Doppler anemometry in a blood analogue fluid.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Allen H; Bertram, Christopher D

    2010-02-01

    Prediction of the effects of refractive index (RI) mismatch on laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) measurements within a curvilinear cavity (an artificial ventricle) was achieved by developing a general technique for modelling the paths of the convergent beams of the LDA system using 3D vector geometry. Validated by ray tracing through CAD drawings, the predicted maximum tolerance in RI between the solid model and the working fluid was +/- 0.0005, equivalent to focusing errors commensurate with the geometric and alignment uncertainties associated with the flow model and the LDA arrangement. This technique supports predictions of the effects of refraction within a complex geometry. Where the RI mismatch is unavoidable but known, it is possible not only to calculate the true position of the measuring volume (using the probe location and model geometry), but also to estimate degradation in signal quality arising from differential displacement and refraction of the laser beams. PMID:19669821

  13. TU-C-BRE-04: 3D Gel Dosimetry Using ViewRay On-Board MR Scanner: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L; Du, D; Green, O; Rodriguez, V; Wooten, H; Xiao, Z; Yang, D; Hu, Y; Li, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: MR based 3D gel has been proposed for radiation therapy dosimetry. However, access to MR scanner has been one of the limiting factors for its wide acceptance. Recent commercialization of an on-board MR-IGRT device (ViewRay) may render the availability issue less of a concern. This work reports our attempts to simulate MR based dose measurement accuracy on ViewRay using three different gels. Methods: A spherical BANG gel dosimeter was purchased from MGS Research. Cylindrical MAGIC gel and Fricke gel were fabricated in-house according to published recipes. After irradiation, BANG and MAGIC were imaged using a dual-echo spin echo sequence for T2 measurement on a Philips 1.5T MR scanner, while Fricke gel was imaged using multiple spin echo sequences. Difference between MR measured and TPS calculated dose was defined as noise. The noise power spectrum was calculated and then simulated for the 0.35 T magnetic field associated with ViewRay. The estimated noise was then added to TG-119 test cases to simulate measured dose distributions. Simulated measurements were evaluated against TPS calculated doses using gamma analysis. Results: Given same gel, sequence and coil setup, with a FOV of 180×90×90 mm3, resolution of 3×3×3 mm3, and scanning time of 30 minutes, the simulated measured dose distribution using BANG would have a gamma passing rate greater than 90% (3%/3mm and absolute). With a FOV 180×90×90 mm3, resolution of 4×4×5 mm3, and scanning time of 45 minutes, the simulated measuremened dose distribution would have a gamma passing rate greater than 97%. MAGIC exhibited similar performance while Fricke gel was inferior due to much higher noise. Conclusions: The simulation results demonstrated that it may be feasible to use MAGIC and BANG gels for 3D dose verification using ViewRay low-field on-board MRI scanner.

  14. Paraxial ray-tracing approach for the simulation of ultrasonic inspection of welds

    SciTech Connect

    Gardahaut, Audrey; Jezzine, Karim; Cassereau, Didier

    2014-02-18

    On-site inspection of bimetallic or austenitic welds can be very difficult to interpret owing to their internal structures. Skewing and splitting of the ultrasonic beam may occur due to the anisotropic and inhomogeneous properties of the welding material. In this paper, we present a ray-based method to simulate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such structures. The formalism is based on dynamic ray tracing system in Cartesian coordinates along a reference ray. Standard ray tracing consists in the solution of a system of linear ordinary differential equations of the first order and is used to determine the trajectory of the ray. Likewise, dynamic ray tracing (DRT) also called paraxial ray tracing consists in the solution of an additional system of linear ordinary differential equations along the ray allowing paraxial quantities to be computed. It is used to evaluate the geometrical spreading and amplitude along the ray and in its vicinity. DRT is applied on a smooth representation of the elastic properties of the weld obtained thanks to an image processing technique applied on a macrograph of the weld. Simulation results are presented and compared to finite elements and experimental results.

  15. Paraxial ray-tracing approach for the simulation of ultrasonic inspection of welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardahaut, Audrey; Jezzine, Karim; Cassereau, Didier

    2014-02-01

    On-site inspection of bimetallic or austenitic welds can be very difficult to interpret owing to their internal structures. Skewing and splitting of the ultrasonic beam may occur due to the anisotropic and inhomogeneous properties of the welding material. In this paper, we present a ray-based method to simulate the propagation of ultrasonic waves in such structures. The formalism is based on dynamic ray tracing system in Cartesian coordinates along a reference ray. Standard ray tracing consists in the solution of a system of linear ordinary differential equations of the first order and is used to determine the trajectory of the ray. Likewise, dynamic ray tracing (DRT) also called paraxial ray tracing consists in the solution of an additional system of linear ordinary differential equations along the ray allowing paraxial quantities to be computed. It is used to evaluate the geometrical spreading and amplitude along the ray and in its vicinity. DRT is applied on a smooth representation of the elastic properties of the weld obtained thanks to an image processing technique applied on a macrograph of the weld. Simulation results are presented and compared to finite elements and experimental results.

  16. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  17. Image fusion of Ultrasound Computer Tomography volumes with X-ray mammograms using a biomechanical model based 2D/3D registration.

    PubMed

    Hopp, T; Duric, N; Ruiter, N V

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a promising breast imaging modality under development. Comparison to a standard method like mammography is essential for further development. Due to significant differences in image dimensionality and compression state of the breast, correlating USCT images and X-ray mammograms is challenging. In this paper we present a 2D/3D registration method to improve the spatial correspondence and allow direct comparison of the images. It is based on biomechanical modeling of the breast and simulation of the mammographic compression. We investigate the effect of including patient-specific material parameters estimated automatically from USCT images. The method was systematically evaluated using numerical phantoms and in-vivo data. The average registration accuracy using the automated registration was 11.9mm. Based on the registered images a method for analysis of the diagnostic value of the USCT images was developed and initially applied to analyze sound speed and attenuation images based on X-ray mammograms as ground truth. Combining sound speed and attenuation allows differentiating lesions from surrounding tissue. Overlaying this information on mammograms, combines quantitative and morphological information for multimodal diagnosis. PMID:25456144

  18. MRI - 3D Ultrasound - X-ray Image Fusion with Electromagnetic Tracking for Transendocardial Therapeutic Injections: In-vitro Validation and In-vivo Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Hatt, Charles R.; Jain, Ameet K.; Parthasarathy, Vijay; Lang, Andrew; Raval, Amish N.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Small animal studies have shown that stem-cell therapy offers dramatic functional improvement post-MI. An endomyocardial catheter injection approach to therapeutic agent delivery has been proposed to improve efficacy through increased cell retention. Accurate targeting is critical for reaching areas of greatest therapeutic potential while avoiding a life-threatening myocardial perforation. Multimodal image fusion has been proposed as a way to improve these procedures by augmenting traditional intra-operative imaging modalities with high resolution pre-procedural images. Previous approaches have suffered from a lack of real-time tissue imaging and dependence on X-ray imaging to track devices, leading to increased ionizing radiation dose. In this paper, we present a new image fusion system for catheter-based targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. The system registers real-time 3D echocardiography, magnetic resonance, X-ray, and electromagnetic sensor tracking within a single flexible framework. All system calibrations and registrations were validated and found to have target registration errors less than 5 mm in the worst case. Injection accuracy was validated in a motion enabled cardiac injection phantom, where targeting accuracy ranged from 0.57 to 3.81 mm. Clinical feasibility was demonstrated with in-vivo swine experiments, where injections were successfully made into targeted regions of the heart. PMID:23561056

  19. Ray tracing a three-dimensional scene using a hierarchical data structure

    DOEpatents

    Wald, Ingo; Boulos, Solomon; Shirley, Peter

    2012-09-04

    Ray tracing a three-dimensional scene made up of geometric primitives that are spatially partitioned into a hierarchical data structure. One example embodiment is a method for ray tracing a three-dimensional scene made up of geometric primitives that are spatially partitioned into a hierarchical data structure. In this example embodiment, the hierarchical data structure includes at least a parent node and a corresponding plurality of child nodes. The method includes a first act of determining that a first active ray in the packet hits the parent node and a second act of descending to each of the plurality of child nodes.

  20. Laser Ray Tracing in a Parallel Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Adaptive Mesh Refinement Hydrocode

    SciTech Connect

    Masters, N D; Kaiser, T B; Anderson, R W; Eder, D C; Fisher, A C; Koniges, A E

    2009-09-28

    ALE-AMR is a new hydrocode that we are developing as a predictive modeling tool for debris and shrapnel formation in high-energy laser experiments. In this paper we present our approach to implementing laser ray-tracing in ALE-AMR. We present the equations of laser ray tracing, our approach to efficient traversal of the adaptive mesh hierarchy in which we propagate computational rays through a virtual composite mesh consisting of the finest resolution representation of the modeled space, and anticipate simulations that will be compared to experiments for code validation.

  1. A fast, angle-dependent, analytical model of CsI detector response for optimization of 3D x-ray breast imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Melanie; Park, Subok; Badano, Aldo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate models of detector blur are crucial for performing meaningful optimizations of three-dimensional (3D) x-ray breast imaging systems as well as for developing reconstruction algorithms that faithfully reproduce the imaged object anatomy. So far, x-ray detector blur has either been ignored or modeled as a shift-invariant symmetric function for these applications. The recent development of a Monte Carlo simulation package called MANTIS has allowed detailed modeling of these detector blur functions and demonstrated the magnitude of the anisotropy for both tomosynthesis and breast CT imaging systems. Despite the detailed results that MANTIS produces, the long simulation times required make inclusion of these results impractical in rigorous optimization and reconstruction algorithms. As a result, there is a need for detector blur models that can be rapidly generated. Methods: In this study, the authors have derived an analytical model for deterministic detector blur functions, referred to here as point response functions (PRFs), of columnar CsI phosphor screens. The analytical model is x-ray energy and incidence angle dependent and draws on results from MANTIS to indirectly include complicated interactions that are not explicitly included in the mathematical model. Once the mathematical expression is derived, values of the coefficients are determined by a two-dimensional (2D) fit to MANTIS-generated results based on a figure-of-merit (FOM) that measures the normalized differences between the MANTIS and analytical model results averaged over a region of interest. A smaller FOM indicates a better fit. This analysis was performed for a monochromatic x-ray energy of 25 keV, a CsI scintillator thickness of 150 μm, and four incidence angles (0°, 15°, 30°, and 45°). Results: The FOMs comparing the analytical model to MANTIS for these parameters were 0.1951±0.0011, 0.1915±0.0014, 0.2266±0.0021, and 0.2416±0.0074 for 0°, 15°, 30°, and 45

  2. SolTrace: A Ray-Tracing Code for Complex Solar Optical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wendelin, Tim; Dobos, Aron; Lewandowski, Allan

    2013-10-01

    SolTrace is an optical simulation tool designed to model optical systems used in concentrating solar power (CSP) applications. The code was first written in early 2003, but has seen significant modifications and changes since its inception, including conversion from a Pascal-based software development platform to C++. SolTrace is unique in that it can model virtually any optical system utilizingthe sun as the source. It has been made available for free and as such is in use worldwide by industry, universities, and research laboratories. The fundamental design of the code is discussed, including enhancements and improvements over the earlier version. Comparisons are made with other optical modeling tools, both non-commercial and commercial in nature. Finally, modeled results are shownfor some typical CSP systems and, in one case, compared to measured optical data.

  3. Can We Trace "Arbitrary" Rays to Locate an Image Formed by a Thin Lens?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suppapittayaporn, Decha; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Emarat, Narumon

    2010-01-01

    After learning how to trace the principal rays [Fig. 1(i)] through a thin lens in order to form the image in the conventional way, students sometimes ask whether it is possible to use other rays emanating from the object to form exactly the same image--for example, the two arbitrary rays shown in Fig. 1(ii). The answer is a definite yes, and this…

  4. Assessment of Image Processing and Resolution on Permeability and Drainage Simulations Through 3D Pore-networks Obtained Using X-ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, G.; Willson, C. S.; Thompson, K. E.; Rivers, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Typically, continuum-scale flow parameters are obtained through laboratory experiments. Over the past several years, image-based modeling, which is a direct simulation of flow through the structural arrangements of the voids and solids obtained using X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in a sample porous medium, has become a reliable technique for predicting certain flow parameters. Even though XCT is capable of resolving micron-level details, the voxel resolution of the reconstructed image is still dependent upon a number of factors, including the sample size, X-ray energy and XCT beamline setup. Thus, each imaging experiment requires a tradeoff between the sample size that can be imaged, the voxel resolution, and the length scale of the pore space that can be extracted. In addition, the geometric and topological properties of the void space and 3D pore network structure are dictated by the image processing and the choice of pore network generation method. In this research, image-based pore network models are used to quantitatively assess the impact of image resolution, image processing and the choice of pore network generation methods on simulated parameters. A 5 mm diameter and ~15 mm in length Berea sandstone core was scanned two times. First, a ~12 mm long section of the entire cross-section was scanned at 4.1 micron voxel resolution; next, a ~1.4 mm diameter and ~4.12 mm length section within the 1st domain was scanned at 1 micron voxel resolution. The resulting 3D datasets were filtered and segmented into solid and void space. The low resolution image was filtered and segmented using two different approaches in order to evaluate the potential of each approach in identifying the different solid phases in the original 16 bit dataset. A set of networks were created by varying the pore density on both the high and low resolution datasets in order to assess the impact of these factors on flow simulations. Single-phase permeability and a two-phase drainage pore

  5. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  6. Ray-tracing method for creeping waves on arbitrarily shaped nonuniform rational B-splines surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; He, Si-Yuan; Yu, Ding-Feng; Yin, Hong-Cheng; Hu, Wei-Dong; Zhu, Guo-Qiang

    2013-04-01

    An accurate creeping ray-tracing algorithm is presented in this paper to determine the tracks of creeping waves (or creeping rays) on arbitrarily shaped free-form parametric surfaces [nonuniform rational B-splines (NURBS) surfaces]. The main challenge in calculating the surface diffracted fields on NURBS surfaces is due to the difficulty in determining the geodesic paths along which the creeping rays propagate. On one single parametric surface patch, the geodesic paths need to be computed by solving the geodesic equations numerically. Furthermore, realistic objects are generally modeled as the union of several connected NURBS patches. Due to the discontinuity of the parameter between the patches, it is more complicated to compute geodesic paths on several connected patches than on one single patch. Thus, a creeping ray-tracing algorithm is presented in this paper to compute the geodesic paths of creeping rays on the complex objects that are modeled as the combination of several NURBS surface patches. In the algorithm, the creeping ray tracing on each surface patch is performed by solving the geodesic equations with a Runge-Kutta method. When the creeping ray propagates from one patch to another, a transition method is developed to handle the transition of the creeping ray tracing across the border between the patches. This creeping ray-tracing algorithm can meet practical requirements because it can be applied to the objects with complex shapes. The algorithm can also extend the applicability of NURBS for electromagnetic and optical applications. The validity and usefulness of the algorithm can be verified from the numerical results. PMID:23595326

  7. Atmospheric Delay Reduction using Ray Tracing Technique through Meso-scale Numerical Weather Data for Space Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Hobiger, Thomas; Shoji, Yoshinori; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Tesuro

    2010-05-01

    We have been developing a state-of-art tool to estimate the atmospheric path delays by ray-tracing through meso-scale analysis (MANAL data) data with 10km grid interval, which is operationally used for numerical weather prediction by Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). The tools, which we have named 'KAshima RAytracing Tools (KARAT)', are capable of calculating total slant delays and ray-bending angles considering real atmospheric phenomena. The KARAT can estimate atmospheric slant delays by three different calculation schemes. These are (1) a piece-wise linear propagation, (2) an analytical 2-D ray-propagation model by Thayer, and (3) a 3-D Eikonal solver. By computing GPS PPP solutions for 57 GPS sites of the GEONET (GPS Earth Observation Network System) operated by Geographical Survey Institute (GSI) of Japan it could be shown that KARAT performs slightly better than results based on the Global Mapping Function (GMF) and the Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1), whereas for the latter two also linear gradient models had to be applied. The grid interval of the MANAL data was updated from 10km to 5km on April 7, 2009. In addition, on October 27, 2009 the JMA started data assimilation of zenith wet delay obtained by the GEONET for meso-scale numerical weather prediction. We are now evaluating impacts of data scheme improvements and assimilation strategy change on the slant delay reduction. We will include these preliminary results in our presentation.

  8. Automated extraction of aorta and pulmonary artery in mediastinum from 3D chest x-ray CT images without contrast medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mori, Kensaku; Hasegawa, Jun-ichi; Toriwaki, Jun-ichiro; Katada, Kazuhiro

    2002-05-01

    This paper proposes a method for automated extraction of the aorta and pulmonary artery (PA) in the mediastinum of the chest from uncontrasted chest X-ray CT images. The proposed method employs a model fitting technique to use shape features of blood vessels for extraction. First, edge voxels are detected based on the standard deviation of CT values. A likelihood image, which shows the degree of likelihood on medial axes of vessels, are calculated by applying the Euclidean distance transformation to non-edge voxels. Second, the medial axis of each vessel is obtained by fitting the model. This is done by referring the likelihood image. Finally, the aorta and PA areas are recovered from the medial axes by executing the reverse Euclidean distance transformation. We applied the proposed method to seven cases of uncontrasted chest X-ray CT images and evaluated the results by calculating the coincidence index computed from the extracted regions and the regions manually traced. Experimental results showed that the extracted aorta and the PA areas coincides with manually input regions with the coincidence indexes values 90% and 80-90%,respectively.

  9. In situ 3D topographic and shape analysis by synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography for crystal form identification in polymorphic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xian-Zhen; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; Nangia, Ashwini; Yang, Shuo; Lu, Xiao-Long; Li, Hai-Yan; Shao, Qun; He, You; York, Peter; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism denotes the existence of more than one crystal structure of a substance, and great practical and theoretical interest for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In many cases, it is challenging to produce a pure crystal form and establish a sensitive detection method for the identification of crystal form in a mixture of polymorphs. In this study, an accurate and sensitive method based on synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography (SR-μCT) was devised to identify the polymorphs of clopidogrel bisulphate (CLP). After 3D reconstruction, crystal particles were extracted and dozens of structural parameters were calculated. Whilst, the particle shapes of the two crystal forms were all irregular, the surface of CLP II was found to be rougher than CLP I. In order to classify the crystal form based on the quantitative morphological property of particles, Volume Bias Percentage based on Surface Smoothing (VBP) was defined and a new method based on VBP was successfully developed, with a total matching rate of 99.91% for 4544 particles and a lowest detectable limit of 1%. More important for the mixtures in solid pharmaceutical formulations, the interference of excipients can be avoided, a feature cannot achieved by other available analytical methods. PMID:27097672

  10. In situ 3D topographic and shape analysis by synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography for crystal form identification in polymorphic mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xian-Zhen; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; Nangia, Ashwini; Yang, Shuo; Lu, Xiao-Long; Li, Hai-Yan; Shao, Qun; He, You; York, Peter; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism denotes the existence of more than one crystal structure of a substance, and great practical and theoretical interest for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In many cases, it is challenging to produce a pure crystal form and establish a sensitive detection method for the identification of crystal form in a mixture of polymorphs. In this study, an accurate and sensitive method based on synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography (SR-μCT) was devised to identify the polymorphs of clopidogrel bisulphate (CLP). After 3D reconstruction, crystal particles were extracted and dozens of structural parameters were calculated. Whilst, the particle shapes of the two crystal forms were all irregular, the surface of CLP II was found to be rougher than CLP I. In order to classify the crystal form based on the quantitative morphological property of particles, Volume Bias Percentage based on Surface Smoothing (VBP) was defined and a new method based on VBP was successfully developed, with a total matching rate of 99.91% for 4544 particles and a lowest detectable limit of 1%. More important for the mixtures in solid pharmaceutical formulations, the interference of excipients can be avoided, a feature cannot achieved by other available analytical methods. PMID:27097672

  11. In situ 3D topographic and shape analysis by synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography for crystal form identification in polymorphic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xian-Zhen; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; Nangia, Ashwini; Yang, Shuo; Lu, Xiao-Long; Li, Hai-Yan; Shao, Qun; He, You; York, Peter; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2016-04-01

    Polymorphism denotes the existence of more than one crystal structure of a substance, and great practical and theoretical interest for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In many cases, it is challenging to produce a pure crystal form and establish a sensitive detection method for the identification of crystal form in a mixture of polymorphs. In this study, an accurate and sensitive method based on synchrotron radiation X-ray computed microtomography (SR-μCT) was devised to identify the polymorphs of clopidogrel bisulphate (CLP). After 3D reconstruction, crystal particles were extracted and dozens of structural parameters were calculated. Whilst, the particle shapes of the two crystal forms were all irregular, the surface of CLP II was found to be rougher than CLP I. In order to classify the crystal form based on the quantitative morphological property of particles, Volume Bias Percentage based on Surface Smoothing (VBP) was defined and a new method based on VBP was successfully developed, with a total matching rate of 99.91% for 4544 particles and a lowest detectable limit of 1%. More important for the mixtures in solid pharmaceutical formulations, the interference of excipients can be avoided, a feature cannot achieved by other available analytical methods.

  12. High-Resolution X-Ray Techniques as New Tool to Investigate the 3D Vascularization of Engineered-Bone Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bukreeva, Inna; Fratini, Michela; Campi, Gaetano; Pelliccia, Daniele; Spanò, Raffaele; Tromba, Giuliana; Brun, Francesco; Burghammer, Manfred; Grilli, Marco; Cancedda, Ranieri; Cedola, Alessia; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of structure–function relationships in normal and pathologic mammalian tissues is at the basis of a tissue engineering (TE) approach for the development of biological substitutes to restore or improve tissue function. In this framework, it is interesting to investigate engineered bone tissue, formed when porous ceramic constructs are loaded with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and implanted in vivo. To monitor the relation between bone formation and vascularization, it is important to achieve a detailed imaging and a quantitative description of the complete three-dimensional vascular network in such constructs. Here, we used synchrotron X-ray phase-contrast micro-tomography to visualize and analyze the three-dimensional micro-vascular networks in bone-engineered constructs, in an ectopic bone formation mouse-model. We compared samples seeded and not seeded with BMSC, as well as samples differently stained or unstained. Thanks to the high quality of the images, we investigated the 3D distribution of both vessels and collagen matrix and we obtained quantitative information for all different samples. We propose our approach as a tool for quantitative studies of angiogenesis in TE and for any pre-clinical investigation where a quantitative analysis of the vascular network is required. PMID:26442248

  13. Synchrotron X-ray 2D and 3D Elemental Imaging of CdSe/ZnS Quantum dot Nanoparticles in Daphnia Magna

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, B.; Pace, H; Lanzirotti, A; Smith, R; Ranville, J

    2009-01-01

    The potential toxicity of nanoparticles to aquatic organisms is of interest given that increased commercialization will inevitably lead to some instances of inadvertent environmental exposures. Cadmium selenide quantum dots (QDs) capped with zinc sulfide are used in the semiconductor industry and in cellular imaging. Their small size (<10 nm) suggests that they may be readily assimilated by exposed organisms. We exposed Daphnia magna to both red and green QDs and used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to study the distribution of Zn and Se in the organism over a time period of 36 h. The QDs appeared to be confined to the gut, and there was no evidence of further assimilation into the organism. Zinc and Se fluorescence signals were highly correlated, suggesting that the QDs had not dissolved to any extent. There was no apparent difference between red or green QDs, i.e., there was no effect of QD size. 3D tomography confirmed that the QDs were exclusively in the gut area of the organism. It is possible that the QDs aggregated and were therefore too large to cross the gut wall.

  14. X-ray fluorescence (conventional and 3D) and scanning electron microscopy for the investigation of Portuguese polychrome glazed ceramics: Advances in the knowledge of the manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilherme, A.; Coroado, J.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Lühl, L.; Wolff, T.; Kanngießer, B.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2011-05-01

    This work shows the first analytical results obtained by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) (conventional and 3D) and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive System (SEM-EDS) on original Portuguese ceramic pieces produced between the 16th and 18th centuries in Coimbra and Lisbon. Experts distinguished these productions based only on the color, texture and brightness, which originates mislabeling in some cases. Thanks to lateral and spatial resolution in the micrometer regime, the results obtained with μ-XRF were essential in determining the glaze and pigment thicknesses by monitoring the profile of the most abundant element in each "layer". Furthermore, the dissemination of these elements throughout the glaze is different depending on the glaze composition, firing temperature and on the pigment itself. Hence, the crucial point of this investigation was to analyze and understand the interfaces color/glaze and glaze/ceramic support. Together with the XRF results, images captured by SEM and the corresponding semi-quantitative EDS data revealed different manufacturing processes used by the two production centers. Different capture modes were suitable to distinguish different crystals from the minerals that confer the color of the pigments used and to enhance the fact that some of them are very well spread through the glassy matrix, sustaining the theory of an evolved and careful procedure in the manufacturing process of the glaze.

  15. Optimizing detector geometry for trace element mapping by X-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yue; Gleber, Sophie -Charlotte; Jacobsen, Chris; Kirz, Janos; Vogt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We report that trace metals play critical roles in a variety of systems, ranging from cells to photovoltaics. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) microscopy using X-ray excitation provides one of the highest sensitivities available for imaging the distribution of trace metals at sub-100 nm resolution. With the growing availability and increasing performance of synchrotron light source based instruments and X-ray nanofocusing optics, and with improvements in energy-dispersive XRF detectors, what are the factors that limit trace element detectability? To address this question, we describe an analytical model for the total signal incident on XRF detectors with various geometries, including the spectral response of energy dispersive detectors. This model agrees well with experimentally recorded X-ray fluorescence spectra, and involves much shorter calculation times than with Monte Carlo simulations. With such a model, one can estimate the signal when a trace element is illuminated with an X-ray beam, and when just the surrounding non-fluorescent material is illuminated. From this signal difference, a contrast parameter can be calculated and this can in turn be used to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for detecting a certain elemental concentration. We apply this model to the detection of trace amounts of zinc in biological materials, and to the detection of small quantities of arsenic in semiconductors. In conclusion, we conclude that increased detector collection solid angle is (nearly) always advantageous even when considering the scattered signal. However, given the choice between a smaller detector at 90° to the beam versus a larger detector at 180° (in a backscatter-like geometry), the 90° detector is better for trace element detection in thick samples, while the larger detector in 180° geometry is better suited to trace element detection in thin samples.

  16. Optimizing detector geometry for trace element mapping by X-ray fluorescence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Yue; Gleber, Sophie -Charlotte; Jacobsen, Chris; Kirz, Janos; Vogt, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We report that trace metals play critical roles in a variety of systems, ranging from cells to photovoltaics. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) microscopy using X-ray excitation provides one of the highest sensitivities available for imaging the distribution of trace metals at sub-100 nm resolution. With the growing availability and increasing performance of synchrotron light source based instruments and X-ray nanofocusing optics, and with improvements in energy-dispersive XRF detectors, what are the factors that limit trace element detectability? To address this question, we describe an analytical model for the total signal incident on XRF detectors with various geometries, including the spectral responsemore » of energy dispersive detectors. This model agrees well with experimentally recorded X-ray fluorescence spectra, and involves much shorter calculation times than with Monte Carlo simulations. With such a model, one can estimate the signal when a trace element is illuminated with an X-ray beam, and when just the surrounding non-fluorescent material is illuminated. From this signal difference, a contrast parameter can be calculated and this can in turn be used to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for detecting a certain elemental concentration. We apply this model to the detection of trace amounts of zinc in biological materials, and to the detection of small quantities of arsenic in semiconductors. In conclusion, we conclude that increased detector collection solid angle is (nearly) always advantageous even when considering the scattered signal. However, given the choice between a smaller detector at 90° to the beam versus a larger detector at 180° (in a backscatter-like geometry), the 90° detector is better for trace element detection in thick samples, while the larger detector in 180° geometry is better suited to trace element detection in thin samples.« less

  17. Optimizing detector geometry for trace element mapping by X-ray fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yue; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Jacobsen, Chris; Kirz, Janos; Vogt, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Trace metals play critical roles in a variety of systems, ranging from cells to photovoltaics. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) microscopy using X-ray excitation provides one of the highest sensitivities available for imaging the distribution of trace metals at sub-100 nm resolution. With the growing availability and increasing performance of synchrotron light source based instruments and X-ray nanofocusing optics, and with improvements in energy-dispersive XRF detectors, what are the factors that limit trace element detectability? To address this question, we describe an analytical model for the total signal incident on XRF detectors with various geometries, including the spectral response of energy dispersive detectors. This model agrees well with experimentally recorded X-ray fluorescence spectra, and involves much shorter calculation times than with Monte Carlo simulations. With such a model, one can estimate the signal when a trace element is illuminated with an X-ray beam, and when just the surrounding non-fluorescent material is illuminated. From this signal difference, a contrast parameter can be calculated and this can in turn be used to calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for detecting a certain elemental concentration. We apply this model to the detection of trace amounts of zinc in biological materials, and to the detection of small quantities of arsenic in semiconductors. We conclude that increased detector collection solid angle is (nearly) always advantageous even when considering the scattered signal. However, given the choice between a smaller detector at 90° to the beam versus a larger detector at 180° (in a backscatter-like geometry), the 90° detector is better for trace element detection in thick samples, while the larger detector in 180° geometry is better suited to trace element detection in thin samples. PMID:25600825

  18. A data distributed parallel algorithm for ray-traced volume rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Kwan-Liu; Painter, James S.; Hansen, Charles D.; Krogh, Michael F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a divide-and-conquer ray-traced volume rendering algorithm and a parallel image compositing method, along with their implementation and performance on the Connection Machine CM-5, and networked workstations. This algorithm distributes both the data and the computations to individual processing units to achieve fast, high-quality rendering of high-resolution data. The volume data, once distributed, is left intact. The processing nodes perform local ray tracing of their subvolume concurrently. No communication between processing units is needed during this locally ray-tracing process. A subimage is generated by each processing unit and the final image is obtained by compositing subimages in the proper order, which can be determined a priori. Test results on both the CM-5 and a group of networked workstations demonstrate the practicality of our rendering algorithm and compositing method.

  19. Long gamma-ray bursts trace the star formation history

    SciTech Connect

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2014-04-10

    We show that if the broad-line supernova explosions of Type Ic (SNeIc) produce the bulk of the observed long duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), including high- and low-luminosity LGRBs and X-ray flashes, and if the LGRBs have the geometry assumed in the cannonball model of LGRBs, then their rate, measured by Swift, and their redshift distribution are consistent with the star formation rate (SFR) over the entire range of redshifts where the SFR has been measured with sufficient accuracy.

  20. Ray Tracing Through Non-Rotationally Symmetrical Systems With A Desktop Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, R. M.; Busse lle, F. J.

    1986-10-01

    A general ray-trace program has been developed for use on a desktop computer which traces finite rays through any non-rotationally symmetrical system. In particular any combination of decentred, tilted and rotated surface has been considered. Surface types such as Conic sections with and without Aspherics, Toric surfaces, surfaces of S and T Cylindrical sections, and Axicons, may be ray-traced. Each surface is defined in terms of a local rectangular co-ordinate system and has a particular aperture shape attributed to it. Aperture shapes may be defined as circular, elliptical, rectangular or quadrilateral. Also the centre of any aperture shape may be displaced from its local coordinate origin to facilitate the tracing of off-axis paraboloids. Before transferring to the next surface, the local coordinates are referred back to an initial reference coordinate system. Finally a means of assessing aberrations has been included. The main task here was to get a mathematical model of a non-rotationally symmetrical finite ray-trace running on an inexpensive desk top computer. The program was written for the BBC MICRO in order to investigate devices such as scanning systems for modern Thermal Imagers etc.

  1. Time-resolved non-sequential ray-tracing modelling of non-line-of-sight picosecond pulse LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Adam; Chan, Susan; Warburton, Ryan; Gariepy, Genevieve; Henderson, Robert; Leach, Jonathan; Faccio, Daniele; Lee, Stephen T.

    2016-05-01

    The ability to detect motion and to track a moving object that is hidden around a corner or behind a wall provides a crucial advantage when physically going around the obstacle is impossible or dangerous. One recently demonstrated approach to achieving this goal makes use of non-line-of-sight picosecond pulse laser ranging. This approach has recently become interesting due to the availability of single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) receivers with picosecond time resolution. We present a time-resolved non-sequential ray-tracing model and its application to indirect line-of-sight detection of moving targets. The model makes use of the Zemax optical design programme's capabilities in stray light analysis where it traces large numbers of rays through multiple random scattering events in a 3D non-sequential environment. Our model then reconstructs the generated multi-segment ray paths and adds temporal analysis. Validation of this model against experimental results is shown. We then exercise the model to explore the limits placed on system design by available laser sources and detectors. In particular we detail the requirements on the laser's pulse energy, duration and repetition rate, and on the receiver's temporal response and sensitivity. These are discussed in terms of the resulting implications for achievable range, resolution and measurement time while retaining eye-safety with this technique. Finally, the model is used to examine potential extensions to the experimental system that may allow for increased localisation of the position of the detected moving object, such as the inclusion of multiple detectors and/or multiple emitters.

  2. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  3. Ray-tracing in a two-dimensional ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labahn, R. W.

    1985-08-01

    The quasi-parabolic method is adapted to ray-track through a medium with horizontal gradients in electron density. The resulting method is applicable to any model ionosphere without the requirements for numerical derivatives. Example calculations are given for model ledges and troughs and an average worldwide ionospheric model.

  4. A method of 2D/3D registration of a statistical mouse atlas with a planar X-ray projection and an optical photo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongkai; Stout, David B; Chatziioannou, Arion F

    2013-01-01

    The development of sophisticated and high throughput whole body small animal imaging technologies has created a need for improved image analysis and increased automation. The registration of a digital mouse atlas to individual images is a prerequisite for automated organ segmentation and uptake quantification. This paper presents a fully-automatic method for registering a statistical mouse atlas with individual subjects based on an anterior-posterior X-ray projection and a lateral optical photo of the mouse silhouette. The mouse atlas was trained as a statistical shape model based on 83 organ-segmented micro-CT images. For registration, a hierarchical approach is applied which first registers high contrast organs, and then estimates low contrast organs based on the registered high contrast organs. To register the high contrast organs, a 2D-registration-back-projection strategy is used that deforms the 3D atlas based on the 2D registrations of the atlas projections. For validation, this method was evaluated using 55 subjects of preclinical mouse studies. The results showed that this method can compensate for moderate variations of animal postures and organ anatomy. Two different metrics, the Dice coefficient and the average surface distance, were used to assess the registration accuracy of major organs. The Dice coefficients vary from 0.31±0.16 for the spleen to 0.88±0.03 for the whole body, and the average surface distance varies from 0.54±0.06 mm for the lungs to 0.85±0.10 mm for the skin. The method was compared with a direct 3D deformation optimization (without 2D-registration-back-projection) and a single-subject atlas registration (instead of using the statistical atlas). The comparison revealed that the 2D-registration-back-projection strategy significantly improved the registration accuracy, and the use of the statistical mouse atlas led to more plausible organ shapes than the single-subject atlas. This method was also tested with shoulder xenograft

  5. New Insights into the Lithospheric Mantle Carbon Storage in an Intra-Continental Area: A Geochemical and 3D X-Ray Micro-Tomography Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creon, L.; Rouchon, V.; Rosenberg, E.; Delpech, G.; Youssef, S.; Guyot, F. J.; Szabo, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Pannonian Basins situated in a context of lithospheric fluxing by mantle CO2-rich fluids, as evidenced by Plio-Pleistocene alkaline basalts and Basin gas geochemical data [1]. Such type of intracontinental CO2-fluxes remain poorly constrained at the scale of the global C-cycle. We report here the first quantification of the CO2 volumes stored in the lithospheric mantle, by coupling geochemical and 3D micro-tomography studies of lherzolitic and harzburgitic mantle xenoliths. The Pannonian Basin xenolith peridotites present numerous signs of melt/fluid migration. The compositions of glasses found in the peridotites vary from sub-alkaline (Na2O + K2O = 3.8 wt. %) to alkaline (Na2O + K2O = 12.6 wt. %) and from mafic (SiO2 = 48.2 wt. %) to more felsic (SiO2 = 62.1 wt. %) compositions and differ markedly from the host basalts of the xenoliths. Microthermometric and Raman spectroscopic studies on fluid inclusions (n = 115) show pure CO2 compositions with densities range between 0.6 and 0.9 g.cm3 [290 to 735 MPa (PCO2)], corresponding to deep fluid trapping on both sides of the Moho. High-resolution synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography (Micro-CT), together with laboratory micro-CT were performed to obtain information about structure, volume and density of each phase (minerals, melts and fluids). Fluids and melts are mainly located at grain boundaries and secondary trails cut off the grain boundaries, which implies a contemporary introduction of such fluids [Figure 1]. The amount of fluid inclusions in xenoliths is heterogeneous and varied from 0.79 ± 0.15 to 4.58 ± 0.54 vol % of the peridotite. The carbon-dioxide content stored in the lithospheric mantle, due to the percolation of asthenospheric melts produced in the mantle beneath the Pannonian Basin, can be estimated by the combination of 3D reconstruction (Micro-CT) and CO2 pressures from inclusions. [1] B. Sherwood Lollar et al., 1997. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, vol. 61, no. 11, pp. 2295-2307

  6. Efficient ray tracing algorithms based on wavefront construction and model based interpolation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung Jin

    Understanding and modeling seismic wave propagation is important in regional and exploration seismology. Ray tracing is a powerful and popular method for this purpose. Wavefront construction (WFC) method handles wavefronts instead of individual rays, thereby controlling proper ray density on the wavefront. By adaptively controlling rays over a wavefront, it efficiently models wave propagation. Algorithms for a quasi-P wave wavefront construction method and a new coordinate system used to generate wavefront construction mesh are proposed and tested for numerical properties and modeling capabilities. Traveltimes, amplitudes, and other parameters, which can be used for seismic imaging such as migrations and synthetic seismograms, are computed from the wavefront construction method. Modeling with wavefront construction code is applied to anisotropic media as well as isotropic media. Synthetic seismograms are computed using the wavefront construction method as a new way of generating synthetics. To incorporate layered velocity models, the model based interpolation (MBI) ray tracing method, which is designed to take advantage of the wavefront construction method as well as conventional ray tracing methods, is proposed and experimental codes are developed for it. Many wavefront construction codes are limited to smoothed velocity models for handling complicated problems in layered velocity models and the conventional ray tracing methods suffer from the inability to control ray density during wave propagation. By interpolating the wavefront near model boundaries, it is possible to handle the layered velocity model as well as overcome ray density control problems in conventional methods. The test results revealed this new method can be an effective modeling tool for accurate and effective computing.

  7. Magnetospheric Whistler Mode Ray Tracing with the Inclusion of Finite Electron and Ion Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxworth, A. S.; Golkowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    Ray tracing is an important technique for the study of whistler mode wave propagation in the Earth's magnetosphere. In numerical ray tracing the trajectory of a wave packet is calculated at each point in space by solving the Haselgrove equations, assuming a smooth, loss-less medium with no mode coupling. Previous work on ray tracing has assumed a cold plasma environment with negligible electron and ion temperatures. In this work we present magnetospheric whistler mode wave ray tracing results with the inclusion of finite ion and electron temperature. The inclusion of finite temperature effects makes the fourth order dispersion relation become sixth order. We compare our results with the work done by previous researchers for cold plasma environments, using two near earth space models (NGO and GCPM). Inclusion of finite temperature closes the otherwise open refractive index surface near the lower hybrid resonance frequency and affects the magnetospheric reflection of whistler waves. We also asses the main changes in the ray trajectory and implications for cyclotron resonance wave particle interactions including energetic particle precipitation.

  8. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  9. Automatic creation of object hierarchies for ray tracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, Jeffrey; Salmon, John

    1987-01-01

    Various methods for evaluating generated trees are proposed. The use of the hierarchical extent method of Rubin and Whitted (1980) to find the objects that will be hit by a ray is examined. This method employs tree searching; the construction of a tree of bounding volumes in order to determine the number of objects that will be hit by a ray is discussed. A tree generation algorithm, which uses a heuristic tree search strategy, is described. The effects of shuffling and sorting on the input data are investigated. The cost of inserting an object into the hierarchy during the construction of a tree algorithm is estimated. The steps involved in estimating the number of intersection calculations are presented.

  10. A boundary integral formalism for stochastic ray tracing in billiards

    SciTech Connect

    Chappell, David J.; Tanner, Gregor

    2014-12-15

    Determining the flow of rays or non-interacting particles driven by a force or velocity field is fundamental to modelling many physical processes. These include particle flows arising in fluid mechanics and ray flows arising in the geometrical optics limit of linear wave equations. In many practical applications, the driving field is not known exactly and the dynamics are determined only up to a degree of uncertainty. This paper presents a boundary integral framework for propagating flows including uncertainties, which is shown to systematically interpolate between a deterministic and a completely random description of the trajectory propagation. A simple but efficient discretisation approach is applied to model uncertain billiard dynamics in an integrable rectangular domain.

  11. On the presence of Fe(IV) in Fe-ZSM-5 and FeSrO3-x --unequivocal detection of the 3d4 spin system by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Pirngruber, Gerhard D; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Kalytta, Andreas; Reller, Armin; Safonova, Olga V; Glatzel, Pieter

    2006-09-21

    The contribution of a 3d(4) spin configuration to the valence electronic structure of Fe compounds can be probed via spin-selective Fe K-pre-edge absorption spectra, using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). The 3d(4) configuration of Fe(IV) can be unequivocally detected even in a mixture with the high-spin 3d(5) configuration of Fe(III). This is demonstrated on the perovskite FeSrO(3-x) with formal oxidation state Fe(IV). When the technique was applied to an Fe-ZSM-5 catalyst during reaction with N(2)O, no 3d(4) configuration was detected. The formation of Fe(IV) upon reaction of Fe-ZSM-5 with N(2)O can, therefore, be ruled out. PMID:16970419

  12. 3D Structure of Sulfolobus solfataricus Carboxypeptidase Developed by Molecular Modeling is Confirmed by Site-Directed Mutagenesis and Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Emanuela; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Spinozzi, Francesco; Corsi, Federica; Formantici, Cristina; Molteni, Laura; Amenitsch, Heintz; Mariani, Paolo; Tortora, Paolo; Casadio, Rita

    2003-01-01

    Sulfolobus solfataricus carboxypeptidase (CPSso) is a thermostable zinc-metalloenzyme with a Mr of 43,000. Taking into account the experimentally determined zinc content of one ion per subunit, we developed two alternative 3D models, starting from the available structures of Thermoactinomyces vulgaris carboxypeptidase (Model A) and Pseudomonas carboxypeptidase G2 (Model B). The former enzyme is monomeric and has one metal ion in the active site, while the latter is dimeric and has two bound zinc ions. The two models were computed by exploiting the structural alignment of the one zinc- with the two zinc-containing active sites of the two templates, and with a threading procedure. Both computed structures resembled the respective template, with only one bound zinc with tetrahedric coordination in the active site. With these models, two different quaternary structures can be modeled: one using Model A with a hexameric symmetry, the other from Model B with a tetrameric symmetry. Mutagenesis experiments directed toward the residues putatively involved in metal chelation in either of the models disproved Model A and supported Model B, in which the metal-binding site comprises His108, Asp109, and His168. We also identified Glu142 as the acidic residue interacting with the water molecule occupying the fourth chelation site. Furthermore, the overall fold and the oligomeric structure of the molecule was validated by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). An ab initio original approach was used to reconstruct the shape of the CPSso in solution from the experimental curves. The results clearly support a tetrameric structure. The Monte Carlo method was then used to compare the crystallographic coordinates of the possible quaternary structures for CPSso with the SAXS profiles. The fitting procedure showed that only the model built using the Pseudomonas carboxypeptidase G2 structure as a template fitted the experimental data. PMID:12885660

  13. Odyssey: Ray tracing and radiative transfer in Kerr spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Hung-Yi; Yun, Kiyun; Younsi, Ziri; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Odyssey is a GPU-based General Relativistic Radiative Transfer (GRRT) code for computing images and/or spectra in Kerr metric describing the spacetime around a rotating black hole. Odyssey is implemented in CUDA C/C++. For flexibility, the namespace structure in C++ is used for different tasks; the two default tasks presented in the source code are the redshift of a Keplerian disk and the image of a Keplerian rotating shell at 340GHz. Odyssey_Edu, an educational software package for visualizing the ray trajectories in the Kerr spacetime that uses Odyssey, is also available.

  14. SoilJ - An ImageJ plugin for semi-automatized image-processing of 3-D X-ray images of soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koestel, John

    2016-04-01

    3-D X-ray imaging is a formidable tool for quantifying soil structural properties which are known to be extremely diverse. This diversity necessitates the collection of large sample sizes for adequately representing the spatial variability of soil structure at a specific sampling site. One important bottleneck of using X-ray imaging is however the large amount of time required by a trained specialist to process the image data which makes it difficult to process larger amounts of samples. The software SoilJ aims at removing this bottleneck by automatizing most of the required image processing steps needed to analyze image data of cylindrical soil columns. SoilJ is a plugin of the free Java-based image-processing software ImageJ. The plugin is designed to automatically process all images located with a designated folder. In a first step, SoilJ recognizes the outlines of the soil column upon which the column is rotated to an upright position and placed in the center of the canvas. Excess canvas is removed from the images. Then, SoilJ samples the grey values of the column material as well as the surrounding air in Z-direction. Assuming that the column material (mostly PVC of aluminium) exhibits a spatially constant density, these grey values serve as a proxy for the image illumination at a specific Z-coordinate. Together with the grey values of the air they are used to correct image illumination fluctuations which often occur along the axis of rotation during image acquisition. SoilJ includes also an algorithm for beam-hardening artefact removal and extended image segmentation options. Finally, SoilJ integrates the morphology analyses plugins of BoneJ (Doube et al., 2006, BoneJ Free and extensible bone image analysis in ImageJ. Bone 47: 1076-1079) and provides an ASCII file summarizing these measures for each investigated soil column, respectively. In the future it is planned to integrate SoilJ into FIJI, the maintained and updated edition of ImageJ with selected

  15. An Energy Conservative Ray-Tracing Method With a Time Interpolation of the Force Field

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jin

    2015-02-10

    A new algorithm that constructs a continuous force field interpolated in time is proposed for resolving existing difficulties in numerical methods for ray-tracing. This new method has improved accuracy, but with the same degree of algebraic complexity compared to Kaisers method.

  16. Tracing Chromospheric Evaporation in Radio and Soft X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    1997-01-01

    There are three publications in refereed journals and several presentations at scientific conferences resulted from this work, over a period of 6 months during 1995/1996. In the first paper, the discovery of the chromospheric evaporation process at radio wavelengths is described. In the second paper, the radio detection is used to quantify electron densities in the upflowing heated plasma in flare loops, which is then compared with independent other density measurements from soft X-rays, or the plasma frequency of electron beams originating in the acceleration region. In the third paper, the diagnostic results of the chromospheric evaporation process are embedded into a broader picture of a standard flare scenario. Abstracts of these three papers are attached.

  17. A comparison of three different ray trace programs for x-ray and infrared synchrotron beamline designs

    SciTech Connect

    Irick, S.C.; Jung, C.R.

    1997-07-01

    There are a number of ray trace programs currently used for the design of synchrotron beamlines. While several of these programs have been written and used mostly within the programmer`s institution, many have also been available to the general public. This paper discusses three such programs. One is a commercial product oriented for the general optical designer (not specifically for synchrotron beamlines). One is designed for synchrotron beamlines and is free with restricted availability. Finally, one is designed for synchrotron beamlines and is used primarily in one institution. The wealth of information from general optical materials and components catalogs is readily available in the commercial program for general optical designs. This makes the design of an infrared beamline easier from the standpoint of component selection. However, this program is not easily configured for synchrotron beamline designs, particularly for a bending magnet source. The synchrotron ray trace programs offer a variety of sources, but generally are not as easy to use from the standpoint of the user interface. This paper shows ray traces of the same beamline Optikwerks, SHADOW, and RAY, and compares the results.

  18. Ray tracing in a finite-element domain using nodal basis functions.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Karl N; Subia, Samuel R; Myre, John W; Summers, Kenneth L

    2014-08-20

    A method is presented for tracing rays through a medium discretized as finite-element volumes. The ray-trajectory equations are cast into the local element coordinate frame, and the full finite-element interpolation is used to determine instantaneous index gradient for the ray-path integral equation. The finite-element methodology is also used to interpolate local surface deformations and the surface normal vector for computing the refraction angle when launching rays into the volume, and again when rays exit the medium. The procedure is applied to a finite-element model of an optic with a severe refractive-index gradient, and the results are compared to the closed-form gradient ray-path integral approach. PMID:25321137

  19. Reverse Monte Carlo ray-tracing for radiative heat transfer in combustion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaojing

    Radiative heat transfer is a dominant heat transfer phenomenon in high temperature systems. With the rapid development of massive supercomputers, the Monte-Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) method starts to see its applications in combustion systems. This research is to find out if Monte-Carlo ray tracing can offer more accurate and efficient calculations than the discrete ordinates method (DOM). Monte-Carlo ray tracing method is a statistical method that traces the history of a bundle of rays. It is known as solving radiative heat transfer with almost no approximation. It can handle nonisotropic scattering and nongray gas mixtures with relative ease compared to conventional methods, such as DOM and spherical harmonics method, etc. There are two schemes in Monte-Carlo ray tracing method: forward and backward/reverse. Case studies and the governing equations demonstrate the advantages of reverse Monte-Carlo ray tracing (RMCRT) method. The RMCRT can be easily implemented for domain decomposition parallelism. In this dissertation, different efficiency improvements techniques for RMCRT are introduced and implemented. They are the random number generator, stratified sampling, ray-surface intersection calculation, Russian roulette, and important sampling. There are two major modules in solving the radiative heat transfer problems: the RMCRT RTE solver and the optical property models. RMCRT is first fully verified in gray, scattering, absorbing and emitting media with black/nonblack, diffuse/nondiffuse bounded surface problems. Sensitivity analysis is carried out with regard to the ray numbers, the mesh resolutions of the computational domain, optical thickness of the media and effects of variance reduction techniques (stratified sampling, Russian roulette). Results are compared with either analytical solutions or benchmark results. The efficiency (the product of error and computation time) of RMCRT has been compared to DOM and suggest great potential for RMCRT's application

  20. 3D reconstruction methods of coronal structures by radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Bastian, T. S.; White, Stephen M.

    1992-11-01

    The ability to carry out the three dimensional (3D) reconstruction of structures in the solar corona would represent a major advance in the study of the physical properties in active regions and in flares. Methods which allow a geometric reconstruction of quasistationary coronal structures (for example active region loops) or dynamic structures (for example flaring loops) are described: stereoscopy of multi-day imaging observations by the VLA (Very Large Array); tomography of optically thin emission (in radio or soft x-rays); multifrequency band imaging by the VLA; and tracing of magnetic field lines by propagating electron beams.

  1. 3D reconstruction methods of coronal structures by radio observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Bastian, T. S.; White, Stephen M.

    1992-01-01

    The ability to carry out the three dimensional (3D) reconstruction of structures in the solar corona would represent a major advance in the study of the physical properties in active regions and in flares. Methods which allow a geometric reconstruction of quasistationary coronal structures (for example active region loops) or dynamic structures (for example flaring loops) are described: stereoscopy of multi-day imaging observations by the VLA (Very Large Array); tomography of optically thin emission (in radio or soft x-rays); multifrequency band imaging by the VLA; and tracing of magnetic field lines by propagating electron beams.

  2. Effective algorithm for ray-tracing simulations of lobster eye and similar reflective optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichý, Vladimír; Hudec, René; Němcová, Šárka

    2016-06-01

    The algorithm presented is intended mainly for lobster eye optics. This type of optics (and some similar types) allows for a simplification of the classical ray-tracing procedure that requires great many rays to simulate. The method presented performs the simulation of a only few rays; therefore it is extremely effective. Moreover, to simplify the equations, a specific mathematical formalism is used. Only a few simple equations are used, therefore the program code can be simple as well. The paper also outlines how to apply the method to some other reflective optical systems.

  3. Effective algorithm for ray-tracing simulations of lobster eye and similar reflective optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichý, Vladimír; Hudec, René; Němcová, Šárka

    2016-03-01

    The algorithm presented is intended mainly for lobster eye optics. This type of optics (and some similar types) allows for a simplification of the classical ray-tracing procedure that requires great many rays to simulate. The method presented performs the simulation of a only few rays; therefore it is extremely effective. Moreover, to simplify the equations, a specific mathematical formalism is used. Only a few simple equations are used, therefore the program code can be simple as well. The paper also outlines how to apply the method to some other reflective optical systems.

  4. Solar Proton Transport Within an ICRU Sphere Surrounded by a Complex Shield: Ray-trace Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Wilson, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2015-01-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code with enhanced neutron and light ion (Z is less than or equal to 2) propagation was recently developed for complex, inhomogeneous shield geometry described by combinatorial objects. Comparisons were made between 3DHZETRN results and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations at locations within the combinatorial geometry, and it was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with the MC codes to the extent they agree with each other. In the present report, the 3DHZETRN code is extended to enable analysis in ray-trace geometry. This latest extension enables the code to be used within current engineering design practices utilizing fully detailed vehicle and habitat geometries. Through convergence testing, it is shown that fidelity in an actual shield geometry can be maintained in the discrete ray-trace description by systematically increasing the number of discrete rays used. It is also shown that this fidelity is carried into transport procedures and resulting exposure quantities without sacrificing computational efficiency.

  5. Exact ray tracing formulas based on a nontrigonometric alternative to Snell's law.

    PubMed

    Elagha, Hassan A

    2012-12-01

    In this work, Fermat's principle is applied to derive a simple exact formula for refraction (reflection) in terms of the lengths of the incident and refracted rays. This formula is a nontrigonometric alternative to Snell's law and is general for all optical surfaces. It is used to derive the paraxial optics equations in a more simple and direct way than that often used in the literature. It's also applied to derive a new single, exact ray tracing formula for the nonparaxial refraction (reflection) at a single optical surface. The obtained formulas are used to develop a simple ray tracing procedure for meridional refraction through systems of spherical surfaces without the need to use any form of Snell's law. Numerical examples are provided and discussed. PMID:23455919

  6. Runge-Kutta ray tracing technique for solving radiative heat transfer in a two-dimensional graded-index medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Shi, Guo-Dong; Zhu, Ke-Yong

    2016-06-01

    This paper adopts the Runge-Kutta ray tracing method to obtain the ray-trajectory numerical solution in a two-dimensional gradient index medium. The emitting, absorbing and scattering processes are simulated by the Monte Carlo method. The temperature field and ray trajectory in the medium are obtained by the three methods, the Runge-Kutta ray tracing method, the ray tracing method with the cell model and the discrete curved ray tracing method with the linear refractive index cell model. Comparing the results of the three methods, it is found that the results by the Monte Carlo Runge-Kutta ray tracing method are of the highest accuracy. To improve the computational speed, the variable step-size Runge-Kutta ray tracing method is proposed, and the maximum relative error between the temperature field in the nonscattering medium by this method and the benchmark solution is less than 0.5%. The results also suggest that the Runge-Kutta ray tracing method would make the radiative transfer solution in the three-dimensional graded index media much easier.

  7. Three-dimensional mapping of soil chemical characteristics at micrometric scale: Statistical prediction by combining 2D SEM-EDX data and 3D X-ray computed micro-tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapca, Simona

    2015-04-01

    Many soil properties and functions emerge from interactions of physical, chemical and biological processes at microscopic scales, which can be understood only by integrating techniques that traditionally are developed within separate disciplines. While recent advances in imaging techniques, such as X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT), offer the possibility to reconstruct the 3D physical structure at fine resolutions, for the distribution of chemicals in soil, existing methods, based on scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray detection (EDX), allow for characterization of the chemical composition only on 2D surfaces. At present, direct 3D measurement techniques are still lacking, sequential sectioning of soils, followed by 2D mapping of chemical elements and interpolation to 3D, being an alternative which is explored in this study. Specifically, we develop an integrated experimental and theoretical framework which combines 3D X-ray CT imaging technique with 2D SEM-EDX and use spatial statistics methods to map the chemical composition of soil in 3D. The procedure involves three stages 1) scanning a resin impregnated soil cube by X-ray CT, followed by precision cutting to produce parallel thin slices, the surfaces of which are scanned by SEM-EDX, 2) alignment of the 2D chemical maps within the internal 3D structure of the soil cube, and 3) development, of spatial statistics methods to predict the chemical composition of 3D soil based on the observed 2D chemical and 3D physical data. Specifically, three statistical models consisting of a regression tree, a regression tree kriging and cokriging model were used to predict the 3D spatial distribution of carbon, silicon, iron and oxygen in soil, these chemical elements showing a good spatial agreement between the X-ray grayscale intensities and the corresponding 2D SEM-EDX data. Due to the spatial correlation between the physical and chemical data, the regression-tree model showed a great potential

  8. Automatic localization of vertebral levels in x-ray fluoroscopy using 3D-2D registration: a tool to reduce wrong-site surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Y.; Schafer, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Kleinszig, G.; Graumann, R.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-09-01

    Surgical targeting of the incorrect vertebral level (wrong-level surgery) is among the more common wrong-site surgical errors, attributed primarily to the lack of uniquely identifiable radiographic landmarks in the mid-thoracic spine. The conventional localization method involves manual counting of vertebral bodies under fluoroscopy, is prone to human error and carries additional time and dose. We propose an image registration and visualization system (referred to as LevelCheck), for decision support in spine surgery by automatically labeling vertebral levels in fluoroscopy using a GPU-accelerated, intensity-based 3D-2D (namely CT-to-fluoroscopy) registration. A gradient information (GI) similarity metric and a CMA-ES optimizer were chosen due to their robustness and inherent suitability for parallelization. Simulation studies involved ten patient CT datasets from which 50 000 simulated fluoroscopic images were generated from C-arm poses selected to approximate the C-arm operator and positioning variability. Physical experiments used an anthropomorphic chest phantom imaged under real fluoroscopy. The registration accuracy was evaluated as the mean projection distance (mPD) between the estimated and true center of vertebral levels. Trials were defined as successful if the estimated position was within the projection of the vertebral body (namely mPD <5 mm). Simulation studies showed a success rate of 99.998% (1 failure in 50 000 trials) and computation time of 4.7 s on a midrange GPU. Analysis of failure modes identified cases of false local optima in the search space arising from longitudinal periodicity in vertebral structures. Physical experiments demonstrated the robustness of the algorithm against quantum noise and x-ray scatter. The ability to automatically localize target anatomy in fluoroscopy in near-real-time could be valuable in reducing the occurrence of wrong-site surgery while helping to reduce radiation exposure. The method is applicable beyond

  9. Trace metal content in aspirin and women's cosmetics via proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)

    SciTech Connect

    Hichwa, B.P.; Pun, D.D.; Wang, D.

    1981-04-01

    A multielemental analysis to determine the trace metal content of generic and name-brand aspirins and name-brand lipsticks was done via proton induced x-ray (PIXE) measurements. The Hope College PIXE system is described as well as the target preparation methods. The trace metal content of twelve brands of aspirin and aspirin substitutes and fourteen brands of lipstick are reported. Detection limits for most elements are in the range of 100 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 parts per million (ppm).

  10. Determination of a three-dimensional velocity structure for the Southeastern of Mexico, by means of seismic ray tracing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Perez, Q.; Valdes-Gozalez, C.

    2007-05-01

    The objective of the present study is to obtain a three-dimensional velocity structure for three different tectonic provinces (Oaxaca, Chiapas and north of Guatemala). The Southeastern of Mexico is a seismic active region, in which several geologic structures of great importance are located: the Tehuantepec ridge, the Central-American volcanic arc, the Chiapas batholit, the extension of the Motagua-Polochic fault system, and also the existance of complex tectonostratigrafic terrenes at cortical level. In this area of study, there are a considerable number of tectonic studies and cortical velocity models (1D). For this reason is desired to obtain a three-dimensional realistic velocity model that agrees with the results obtained in previous studies. To make it posible, a preliminary velocity model has been proposed and has been discretized, and is now at the test stage. Also the geometry of the Cocos plate is determined (variation of the subduction angle) and we will try to obtain the interaction between the Motagua-Polochic fault system and the previously described subduction provinces. We will use P and S waves, from local and regional earthquakes from 1994 to 2004 reported by National Seismological Service (SSN) in eight broadband seismic stations in the Southeastern of Mexico (CCIG, CMIG, EVV, HUIG, OXIG, SCX TPX, TUIG). In the study earthquake relocalizations with the DD method will be performed, and a 3-D ray tracing will be used to test the seismic model. The 3-D velocity model will allow us to better understand the wave propagation characteristics, and apply them to the mitigation of the seismic risk in the region. 1. Earth Science Graduate Program. UNAM. 2. Institute of Geophysics. UNAM.

  11. Nonlinear teleseismic tomography at Long Valley caldera, using three-dimensional minimum travel time ray tracing

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, C.M.; Steck, L.K.; Dawson, P.B.

    1995-10-10

    The authors explore the impact of three-dimensional minimum travel time ray tracing on nonlinear teleseismic inversion. This problem has particular significance when trying to image strongly contrasting low-velocity bodies, such as magma chambers, because strongly refracted/and/or diffracted rays may precede the direct P wave arrival traditionally used in straight-ray seismic tomography. They use a simplex-based ray tracer to compute the three-dimensional, minimum travel time ray paths and employ an interative technique to cope with nonlinearity. Results from synthetic data show that their algorithm results in better model reconstructions compared with traditional straight-ray inversions. The authors reexamine the teleseismic data collected at Long Valley caldera by the U.S. Geological Survey. The most prominent feature of their result is a 25-30% low-velocity zone centered at 11.5 km depth beneath the northwestern quandrant of the caldera. Beneath this at a depth of 24.5 km is a more diffuse 15% low-velocity zone. In general, the low velocities tend to deepen to the south and east. The authors interpret the shallow feature to be the residual Long Valley caldera magma chamber, while the deeper feature may represent basaltic magmas ponded in the midcrust. The deeper position of the prominent low-velocity region in comparison to earlier tomographic images is a result of using three-dimensional rays rather than straight rays in the ray tracing. The magnitude of the low-velocity anomaly is a factor of {approximately}3 times larger than earlier models from linear arrival time inversions and is consistent with models based on observations of ray bending at sites within the caldera. These results imply the presence of anywhere from 7 to 100% partial melt beneath the caldera. 40 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Improvements of the Ray-Tracing Based Method Calculating Hypocentral Loci for Earthquake Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Hypocentral loci are very useful to reliable and visual earthquake location. However, they can hardly be analytically expressed when the velocity model is complex. One of methods numerically calculating them is based on a minimum traveltime tree algorithm for tracing rays: a focal locus is represented in terms of ray paths in its residual field from the minimum point (namely initial point) to low residual points (referred as reference points of the focal locus). The method has no restrictions on the complexity of the velocity model but still lacks the ability of correctly dealing with multi-segment loci. Additionally, it is rather laborious to set calculation parameters for obtaining loci with satisfying completeness and fineness. In this study, we improve the ray-tracing based numerical method to overcome its advantages. (1) Reference points of a hypocentral locus are selected from nodes of the model cells that it goes through, by means of a so-called peeling method. (2) The calculation domain of a hypocentral locus is defined as such a low residual area that its connected regions each include one segment of the locus and hence all the focal locus segments are respectively calculated with the minimum traveltime tree algorithm for tracing rays by repeatedly assigning the minimum residual reference point among those that have not been traced as an initial point. (3) Short ray paths without branching are removed to make the calculated locus finer. Numerical tests show that the improved method becomes capable of efficiently calculating complete and fine hypocentral loci of earthquakes in a complex model.

  13. 3D Dynamic Echocardiography with a Digitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiro, Osamu; Matani, Ayumu; Chihara, Kunihiro

    1998-05-01

    In this paper,a three-dimensional (3D) dynamic ultrasound (US) imaging system,where a US brightness-mode (B-mode) imagetriggered with an R-wave of electrocardiogram (ECG)was obtained with an ultrasound diagnostic deviceand the location and orientation of the US probewere simultaneously measured with a 3D digitizer, is described.The obtained B-mode imagewas then projected onto a virtual 3D spacewith the proposed interpolation algorithm using a Gaussian operator.Furthermore, a 3D image was presented on a cathode ray tube (CRT)and stored in virtual reality modeling language (VRML).We performed an experimentto reconstruct a 3D heart image in systole using this system.The experimental results indicatethat the system enables the visualization ofthe 3D and internal structure of a heart viewed from any angleand has potential for use in dynamic imaging,intraoperative ultrasonography and tele-medicine.

  14. Analytical calculation of spectral phase of grism pairs by the geometrical ray tracing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, L.; Askari, A. A.; Saghafifar, H.

    2016-07-01

    The most optimum operation of a grism pair is practically approachable when an analytical expression of its spectral phase is in hand. In this paper, we have employed the accurate geometrical ray tracing method to calculate the analytical phase shift of a grism pair, at transmission and reflection configurations. As shown by the results, for a great variety of complicated configurations, the spectral phase of a grism pair is in the same form of that of a prism pair. The only exception is when the light enters into and exits from different facets of a reflection grism. The analytical result has been used to calculate the second-order dispersions of several examples of grism pairs in various possible configurations. All results are in complete agreement with those from ray tracing method. The result of this work can be very helpful in the optimal design and application of grism pairs at various configurations.

  15. Nonparaxial geometrical Ronchi test for spherical mirrors: an inverse ray-tracing approach.

    PubMed

    Juarez-Salazar, Rigoberto

    2016-08-01

    A geometrical model based on an inverse ray-tracing approach to describe the Ronchi test for a concave spherical mirror is presented. In contrast to the conventional ray-tracing method, which refers to information unavailable in ronchigrams, the proposed model provides an explicit relation between the available information in the ronchigram and the parameters of the setup (radius of the sphere, position of the source, position and orientation of the observation, and grating planes). This allows for extracting the parameters of interest by a simple fitting procedure, as demonstrated by an application. The derived model exhibits new unexplored potential applications of the Ronchi test, establishing it as a very useful, simple, and universal tool for optical evaluation. PMID:27505380

  16. Three-dimensional ray tracing of the Jovian magnetosphere in the low-frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Green, J. L.; Gulkis, S.; Six, F.

    1984-01-01

    Three-dimensional ray tracing of the Jovian DAM emission has been performed utilizing the O-4 magnetic field model (Acuna and Ness, 1979) and a realistic plasma model. Minimal assumptions about the emission mechanism have been made that include radiation in the right-hand extraordinary mode, propagating nearly perpendicular to the field line at source points located just above the RX cutoff frequency along Io flux tubes. Ray tracing has been performed in the frequency range from 2-35 MHz from successive Io flux tubes separated by ten degrees of central meridian longitude for a full circumference of northern hemisphere sources. The results show unusual complexity in model arc spectra that is displayed in a constant Io phase format with many similarities to the Voyager PRA data. The results suggest much of the variation in observed DAM spectral features is a result of propagation effects rather than emission process differences.

  17. Thermal radiation characteristics of nonisothermal cylindrical enclosures using a numerical ray tracing technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Joseph F.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of energy emitted from simple or complex cavity designs can lead to intricate solutions due to nonuniform radiosity and irradiation within a cavity. A numerical ray tracing technique was applied to simulate radiation propagating within and from various cavity designs. To obtain the energy balance relationships between isothermal and nonisothermal cavity surfaces and space, the computer code NEVADA was utilized for its statistical technique applied to numerical ray tracing. The analysis method was validated by comparing results with known theoretical and limiting solutions, and the electrical resistance network method. In general, for nonisothermal cavities the performance (apparent emissivity) is a function of cylinder length-to-diameter ratio, surface emissivity, and cylinder surface temperatures. The extent of nonisothermal conditions in a cylindrical cavity significantly affects the overall cavity performance. Results are presented over a wide range of parametric variables for use as a possible design reference.

  18. Stochastic ray tracing for simulation of high intensity focal ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Koskela, Julius; Vahala, Erkki; de Greef, Martijn; Lafitte, Luc P; Ries, Mario

    2014-09-01

    An algorithm is presented for rapid simulation of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields. Essentially, the method combines ray tracing with Monte Carlo integration to evaluate the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral. A large number of computational particles, phonons, are distributed among the elements of a phase-array transducer. The phonons are emitted into random directions and are propagated along trajectories computed with the ray tracing method. As the simulation progresses, an improving stochastic estimate of the acoustic field is obtained. The method can adapt to complicated geometries, and it is well suited to parallelization. The method is verified against reference simulations and pressure measurements from an ex vivo porcine thoracic tissue sample. Results are presented for acceleration with graphics processing units (GPUs). The method is expected to serve in applications, where flexibility and rapid computation time are crucial, in particular clinical HIFU treatment planning. PMID:25190416

  19. Mapping of endoscopic images to object surfaces via ray-traced texture mapping for image guidance in neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Damini; Gobbi, David G.; Surry, Kathleen J. M.; Slomka, Piotr J.; Peters, Terence M.

    2000-04-01

    A major limitation of the use of endoscopes in minimally invasive surgery is the lack of relative context between the endoscope and its surroundings. The purpose of this work is to map endoscopic images to surfaces obtained from 3D preoperative MR or CT data, for assistance in surgical planning and guidance. To test our methods, we acquired pre- operative CT images of a standard brain phantom from which object surfaces were extracted. Endoscopic images were acquired using a neuro-endoscope tracked with an optical tracking system, and the optical properties of the endoscope were characterized using a simple calibration procedure. Registration of the phantom and CT images was accomplished using markers that could be identified both on the physical object and in the pre-operative images. The endoscopic images were rectified for radial lens distortion, and then mapped onto the extracted surfaces via a ray-traced texture- mapping algorithm, which explicitly accounts for surface obliquity. The optical tracker has an accuracy of about 0.3 mm, which allows the endoscope tip to be localized to within mm. The mapping operation allows the endoscopic images to be effectively 'painted' onto the surfaces as they are acquired. Panoramic and stereoscopic visualization and navigation of the painted surfaces may then be reformed from arbitrary orientations, that were not necessarily those from which the original endoscopic views were acquired.

  20. Reflectance Estimation from Urban Terrestrial Images: Validation of a Symbolic Ray-Tracing Method on Synthetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coubard, F.; Brédif, M.; Paparoditis, N.; Briottet, X.

    2011-04-01

    Terrestrial geolocalized images are nowadays widely used on the Internet, mainly in urban areas, through immersion services such as Google Street View. On the long run, we seek to enhance the visualization of these images; for that purpose, radiometric corrections must be performed to free them from illumination conditions at the time of acquisition. Given the simultaneously acquired 3D geometric model of the scene with LIDAR or vision techniques, we face an inverse problem where the illumination and the geometry of the scene are known and the reflectance of the scene is to be estimated. Our main contribution is the introduction of a symbolic ray-tracing rendering to generate parametric images, for quick evaluation and comparison with the acquired images. The proposed approach is then based on an iterative estimation of the reflectance parameters of the materials, using a single rendering pre-processing. We validate the method on synthetic data with linear BRDF models and discuss the limitations of the proposed approach with more general non-linear BRDF models.

  1. Using Monte Carlo ray tracing simulations to model the quantum harmonic oscillator modes observed in uranium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J. Y. Y.; Aczel, Adam A; Abernathy, Douglas L; Nagler, Stephen E; Buyers, W. J. L.; Granroth, Garrett E

    2014-01-01

    Recently an extended series of equally spaced vibrational modes was observed in uranium nitride (UN) by performing neutron spectroscopy measurements using the ARCS and SEQUOIA time-of- flight chopper spectrometers [A.A. Aczel et al, Nature Communications 3, 1124 (2012)]. These modes are well described by 3D isotropic quantum harmonic oscillator (QHO) behavior of the nitrogen atoms, but there are additional contributions to the scattering that complicate the measured response. In an effort to better characterize the observed neutron scattering spectrum of UN, we have performed Monte Carlo ray tracing simulations of the ARCS and SEQUOIA experiments with various sample kernels, accounting for the nitrogen QHO scattering, contributions that arise from the acoustic portion of the partial phonon density of states (PDOS), and multiple scattering. These simulations demonstrate that the U and N motions can be treated independently, and show that multiple scattering contributes an approximate Q-independent background to the spectrum at the oscillator mode positions. Temperature dependent studies of the lowest few oscillator modes have also been made with SEQUOIA, and our simulations indicate that the T-dependence of the scattering from these modes is strongly influenced by the uranium lattice.

  2. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  3. Mathematic models for a ray tracing method and its applications in wireless optical communications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minglun; Zhang, Yangan; Yuan, Xueguang; Zhang, Jinnan

    2010-08-16

    This paper presents a new ray tracing method, which contains a whole set of mathematic models, and its validity is verified by simulations. In addition, both theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the computational complexity of the method is much lower than that of previous ones. Therefore, the method can be used to rapidly calculate the impulse response of wireless optical channels for complicated systems. PMID:20721238

  4. Detection and quantification of trace elements in rice and rice products using x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foran, Kelly A.; Fleming, David E. B.

    2015-12-01

    We used X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to examine the presence of arsenic (As) and other trace elements (manganese, iron, nickel, copper, and zinc) in rice and rice products. A portable XRF analyzer was used to test samples, and amplitudes for the analyzed elements were identified in the resulting data. The detection limit of the system was sufficiently low to detect As in some rice and rice product samples.

  5. Multiscale optical simulation settings: challenging applications handled with an iterative ray-tracing FDTD interface method.

    PubMed

    Leiner, Claude; Nemitz, Wolfgang; Schweitzer, Susanne; Kuna, Ladislav; Wenzl, Franz P; Hartmann, Paul; Satzinger, Valentin; Sommer, Christian

    2016-03-20

    We show that with an appropriate combination of two optical simulation techniques-classical ray-tracing and the finite difference time domain method-an optical device containing multiple diffractive and refractive optical elements can be accurately simulated in an iterative simulation approach. We compare the simulation results with experimental measurements of the device to discuss the applicability and accuracy of our iterative simulation procedure. PMID:27140556

  6. Modeling pyramidal sensors in ray-tracing software by a suitable user-defined surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antichi, Jacopo; Munari, Matteo; Magrin, Demetrio; Riccardi, Armando

    2016-04-01

    Following the unprecedented results in terms of performances delivered by the first light adaptive optics system at the Large Binocular Telescope, there has been a wide-spread and increasing interest on the pyramid wavefront sensor (PWFS), which is the key component, together with the adaptive secondary mirror, of the adaptive optics (AO) module. Currently, there is no straightforward way to model a PWFS in standard sequential ray-tracing software. Common modeling strategies tend to be user-specific and, in general, are unsatisfactory for general applications. To address this problem, we have developed an approach to PWFS modeling based on user-defined surface (UDS), whose properties reside in a specific code written in C language, for the ray-tracing software ZEMAX™. With our approach, the pyramid optical component is implemented as a standard surface in ZEMAX™, exploiting its dynamic link library (DLL) conversion then greatly simplifying ray tracing and analysis. We have utilized the pyramid UDS DLL surface-referred to as pyramidal acronyms may be too risky (PAM2R)-in order to design the current PWFS-based AO system for the Giant Magellan Telescope, evaluating tolerances, with particular attention to the angular sensitivities, by means of sequential ray-tracing tools only, thus verifying PAM2R reliability and robustness. This work indicates that PAM2R makes the design of PWFS as simple as that of other optical standard components. This is particularly suitable with the advent of the extremely large telescopes era for which complexity is definitely one of the main challenges.

  7. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-01

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions < ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge C T . We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N . We also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  8. Reflectivity and imaging capabilities of spherically bent crystals studied by ray-tracing simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrinenko, Ya S.; Morozov, I. V.; Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu

    2015-11-01

    Spherically bent crystals are widely used in focusing monochromators, spectrometers and other x-ray optical systems. In particular, they are used in focusing spectrometers with spatial resolution, applied in high energy density diagnostics and warm dense matter studies. In this case, plasma parameters are obtained via measurements of relative intensities of characteristic spectral emission lines for multiply charged ions, which are affected by an instrumental function. Here we develop and use the ray-tracing computer simulations to study reflectivity properties of spherically bent crystals in a particular experimental conditions and to provide the method to adjust and validate the measured spectral line intensities on quantitative basis.

  9. A new kind of splines and their use for fast ray-tracing in reflective cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelic, Dejan V.; Janevski, Zoran D.

    1989-08-01

    In this paper we are presenting a new kind of splines that are very effective in ray-tracing applications. They are designed in such a way to enable the fast and efficient computation of line-spline intersections (line representing the light ray, and spline representing the reflective cavity). These splines are piecewise parabolic polynomials, but with additional degrees of freedom. Polynomial sections of the spline can be rotated to a certain angle (each section has its own angle of rotation), enabling thus the continuity of the first derivative.

  10. Stress optical path difference analysis of off-axis lens ray trace footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ming-Ying; Chan, Chia-Yen; Lin, Wei-Cheng; Wu, Kun-Huan; Chen, Chih-Wen; Chan, Shenq-Tsong; Huang, Ting-Ming

    2013-06-01

    The mechanical and thermal stress on lens will cause the glass refractive index different, the refractive index of light parallel and light perpendicular to the direction of stress. The refraction index changes will introduce Optical Path Difference (OPD). This study is applying Finite Element Method (FEM) and optical ray tracing; calculate off axis ray stress OPD. The optical system stress distribution result is calculated from finite element simulation, and the stress coordinate need to rotate to optical path direction. Meanwhile, weighting stress to each optical ray path and sum the ray path OPD. The Z-direction stress OPD can be fitted by Zernike polynomial, the separated to sag difference, and rigid body motion. The fitting results can be used to evaluate the stress effect on optical component.

  11. Chorus wave-normal statistics in the Earth's radiation belts from ray tracing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuillard, H.; Zaliznyak, Y.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Agapitov, O.; Artemyev, A.; Rolland, G.

    2012-08-01

    Discrete ELF/VLF (Extremely Low Frequency/Very Low Frequency) chorus emissions are one of the most intense electromagnetic plasma waves observed in radiation belts and in the outer terrestrial magnetosphere. These waves play a crucial role in the dynamics of radiation belts, and are responsible for the loss and the acceleration of energetic electrons. The objective of our study is to reconstruct the realistic distribution of chorus wave-normals in radiation belts for all magnetic latitudes. To achieve this aim, the data from the electric and magnetic field measurements onboard Cluster satellite are used to determine the wave-vector distribution of the chorus signal around the equator region. Then the propagation of such a wave packet is modeled using three-dimensional ray tracing technique, which employs K. Rönnmark's WHAMP to solve hot plasma dispersion relation along the wave packet trajectory. The observed chorus wave distributions close to waves source are first fitted to form the initial conditions which then propagate numerically through the inner magnetosphere in the frame of the WKB approximation. Ray tracing technique allows one to reconstruct wave packet properties (electric and magnetic fields, width of the wave packet in k-space, etc.) along the propagation path. The calculations show the spatial spreading of the signal energy due to propagation in the inhomogeneous and anisotropic magnetized plasma. Comparison of wave-normal distribution obtained from ray tracing technique with Cluster observations up to 40° latitude demonstrates the reliability of our approach and applied numerical schemes.

  12. A data distributed, parallel algorithm for ray-traced volume rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Kwan-Liu; Painter, J.S.; Hansen, C.D.; Krogh, M.F.

    1993-03-30

    This paper presents a divide-and-conquer ray-traced volume rendering algorithm and its implementation on networked workstations and a massively parallel computer, the Connection Machine CM-5. This algorithm distributes the data and the computational load to individual processing units to achieve fast, high-quality rendering of high-resolution data, even when only a modest amount of memory is available on each machine. The volume data, once distributed, is left intact. The processing nodes perform local ray-tracing of their subvolume concurrently. No communication between processing units is needed during this locally ray-tracing process. A subimage is generated by each processing unit and the final image is obtained by compositing subimages in the proper order, which can be determined a priori. Implementations and tests on a group of networked workstations and on the Thinking Machines CM-5 demonstrate the practicality of our algorithm and expose different performance tuning issues for each platform. We use data sets from medical imaging and computational fluid dynamics simulations in the study of this algorithm.

  13. Trace element abundance determinations by Synchrotron X Ray Fluorescence (SXRF) on returned comet nucleus mineral grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    Trace element analyses were performed on bulk cosmic dust particles by Proton Induced X Ray Emission (PIXE) and Synchrotron X Ray Fluorescence (SXRF). When present at or near chondritic abundances the trace elements K, Ti, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, Se, and Br are presently detectable by SXRF in particles of 20 micron diameter. Improvements to the SXRF analysis facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source presently underway should increase the range of detectable elements and permit the analysis of smaller samples. In addition the Advanced Photon Source will be commissioned at Argonne National Laboratory in 1995. This 7 to 8 GeV positron storage ring, specifically designed for high-energy undulator and wiggler insertion devices, will be an ideal source for an x ray microprobe with one micron spatial resolution and better than 100 ppb elemental sensitivity for most elements. Thus trace element analysis of individual micron-sized grains should be possible by the time of the comet nucleus sample return mission.

  14. Ray tracing in the human eye: measurement and modeling of optical aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Rafael M.; Rodriguez, P.; Gonzalez, L.; Aporta, J.; Hdez-Matamoros, J. L.

    2004-10-01

    The rapid development of cataract and refractive surgery requires new methods to assess the optical quality of the eye. The optimized optical design of custom treatments to improve the optical performance of individual eyes requires, at least, to have the technology to (1) measure the geometry (anatomy) of the optics of the eye; (2) measure the optical performance (refractive state, aberrations, etc); (3) Build a custom optical and anatomical model of the individual eye to treat; (4) Optimal design of custom treatments. In this communication we will present the work carried out by our group to develop methods for measuring and modeling the optical performance of the eye. In particular, we will focus, first, on the Laser Ray Tracing method that we have developed to measure the optical aberrations of the eye, as a physical in vivo implementation of the classical numerical ray tracing used by optical designers; and second, on the development of custom optical models of the eye to perform that numerical ray tracing which predicts with a high fidelity experimental measurements. The methods developed have been applied to design both custom surgery and optical aids to improve optical performance.

  15. Ray-tracing and physical-optics analysis of the aperture efficiency in a radio telescope.

    PubMed

    Olmi, Luca; Bolli, Pietro

    2007-07-01

    The performance of telescope systems working at microwave or visible-IR wavelengths is typically described in terms of different parameters according to the wavelength range. Most commercial ray-tracing packages have been specifically designed for use with visible-IR systems and thus, though very flexible and sophisticated, do not provide the appropriate parameters to fully describe microwave antennas and to compare with specifications. We demonstrate that the Strehl ratio is equal to the phase efficiency when the apodization factor is taken into account. The phase efficiency is the most critical contribution to the aperture efficiency of an antenna and the most difficult parameter to optimize during the telescope design. The equivalence between the Strehl ratio and the phase efficiency gives the designer/user of the telescope the opportunity to use the faster commercial ray-tracing software to optimize the design. We also discuss the results of several tests performed to check the validity of this relationship that we carried out using a ray-tracing software, ZEMAX, and a full Physical Optics software, GRASP9.3, applied to three different telescope designs that span a factor of approximately 10 in terms of D/lambda. The maximum measured discrepancy between phase efficiency and Strehl ratio varies between approximately 0.4% and 1.9% up to an offset angle of >40 beams, depending on the optical configuration, but it is always less than 0.5% where the Strehl ratio is >0.95. PMID:17571151

  16. Discrete Method of Images for 3D Radio Propagation Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Discretization by rasterization is introduced into the method of images (MI) in the context of 3D deterministic radio propagation modeling as a way to exploit spatial coherence of electromagnetic propagation for fine-grained parallelism. Traditional algebraic treatment of bounding regions and surfaces is replaced by computer graphics rendering of 3D reflections and double refractions while building the image tree. The visibility of reception points and surfaces is also resolved by shader programs. The proposed rasterization is shown to be of comparable run time to that of the fundamentally parallel shooting and bouncing rays. The rasterization does not affect the signal evaluation backtracking step, thus preserving its advantage over the brute force ray-tracing methods in terms of accuracy. Moreover, the rendering resolution may be scaled back for a given level of scenario detail with only marginal impact on the image tree size. This allows selection of scene optimized execution parameters for faster execution, giving the method a competitive edge. The proposed variant of MI can be run on any GPU that supports real-time 3D graphics.

  17. Parallel 3-D method of characteristics in MPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Kochunas, B.; Dovvnar, T. J.; Liu, Z.

    2013-07-01

    A new parallel 3-D MOC kernel has been developed and implemented in MPACT which makes use of the modular ray tracing technique to reduce computational requirements and to facilitate parallel decomposition. The parallel model makes use of both distributed and shared memory parallelism which are implemented with the MPI and OpenMP standards, respectively. The kernel is capable of parallel decomposition of problems in space, angle, and by characteristic rays up to 0(104) processors. Initial verification of the parallel 3-D MOC kernel was performed using the Takeda 3-D transport benchmark problems. The eigenvalues computed by MPACT are within the statistical uncertainty of the benchmark reference and agree well with the averages of other participants. The MPACT k{sub eff} differs from the benchmark results for rodded and un-rodded cases by 11 and -40 pcm, respectively. The calculations were performed for various numbers of processors and parallel decompositions up to 15625 processors; all producing the same result at convergence. The parallel efficiency of the worst case was 60%, while very good efficiency (>95%) was observed for cases using 500 processors. The overall run time for the 500 processor case was 231 seconds and 19 seconds for the case with 15625 processors. Ongoing work is focused on developing theoretical performance models and the implementation of acceleration techniques to minimize the number of iterations to converge. (authors)

  18. Opacity of iron, nickel, and copper plasmas in the x-ray wavelength range: Theoretical interpretation of 2p-3d absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blenski, T.; Loisel, G.; Poirier, M.; Thais, F.; Arnault, P.; Caillaud, T.; Fariaut, J.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.-C.; Porcherot, Q.; Reverdin, C.; Silvert, V.; Villette, B.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Turck-Chièze, S.; Foelsner, W.; de Gaufridy de Dortan, F.

    2011-09-01

    This paper deals with theoretical studies on the 2p-3d absorption in iron, nickel, and copper plasmas related to LULI2000 (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, 2000J facility) measurements in which target temperatures were of the order of 20 eV and plasma densities were in the range 0.004-0.01 g/cm3. The radiatively heated targets were close to local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The structure of 2p-3d transitions has been studied with the help of the statistical superconfiguration opacity code sco and with the fine-structure atomic physics codes hullac and fac. A new mixed version of the sco code allowing one to treat part of the configurations by detailed calculation based on the Cowan’s code rcg has been also used in these comparisons. Special attention was paid to comparisons between theory and experiment concerning the term features which cannot be reproduced by sco. The differences in the spin-orbit splitting and the statistical (thermal) broadening of the 2p-3d transitions have been investigated as a function of the atomic number Z. It appears that at the conditions of the experiment the role of the term and configuration broadening was different in the three analyzed elements, this broadening being sensitive to the atomic number. Some effects of the temperature gradients and possible non-LTE effects have been studied with the help of the radiative-collisional code scric. The sensitivity of the 2p-3d structures with respect to temperature and density in medium-Z plasmas may be helpful for diagnostics of LTE plasmas especially in future experiments on the Δn=0 absorption in medium-Z plasmas for astrophysical applications.

  19. Opacity of iron, nickel, and copper plasmas in the x-ray wavelength range: Theoretical interpretation of 2p-3d absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Blenski, T.; Loisel, G.; Poirier, M.; Thais, F.; Arnault, P.; Caillaud, T.; Fariaut, J.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.-C.; Porcherot, Q.; Reverdin, C.; Silvert, V.; Villette, B.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Foelsner, W.; Gaufridy de Dortan, F. de

    2011-09-15

    This paper deals with theoretical studies on the 2p-3d absorption in iron, nickel, and copper plasmas related to LULI2000 (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, 2000J facility) measurements in which target temperatures were of the order of 20 eV and plasma densities were in the range 0.004-0.01 g/cm{sup 3}. The radiatively heated targets were close to local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The structure of 2p-3d transitions has been studied with the help of the statistical superconfiguration opacity code sco and with the fine-structure atomic physics codes hullac and fac. A new mixed version of the sco code allowing one to treat part of the configurations by detailed calculation based on the Cowan's code rcg has been also used in these comparisons. Special attention was paid to comparisons between theory and experiment concerning the term features which cannot be reproduced by sco. The differences in the spin-orbit splitting and the statistical (thermal) broadening of the 2p-3d transitions have been investigated as a function of the atomic number Z. It appears that at the conditions of the experiment the role of the term and configuration broadening was different in the three analyzed elements, this broadening being sensitive to the atomic number. Some effects of the temperature gradients and possible non-LTE effects have been studied with the help of the radiative-collisional code scric. The sensitivity of the 2p-3d structures with respect to temperature and density in medium-Z plasmas may be helpful for diagnostics of LTE plasmas especially in future experiments on the {Delta}n=0 absorption in medium-Z plasmas for astrophysical applications.

  20. Fast robust non-sequential optical ray-tracing with implicit algebraic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greynolds, Alan W.

    2015-09-01

    The fastest, most robust, general technique for non-sequentially ray-tracing a large class of imaging and non-imaging optical systems is by geometric modeling with algebraic (i.e. polynomial) implicit surfaces. The basic theory of these surfaces with special attention to optimizing their precise intersection with a ray (even at grazing incidence) is outlined for an admittedly limited software implementation. On a couple of "tame" examples, a 64-bit Windows 7 version is significantly faster than the fastest commercial design software (all multi-threaded). Non-sequential ray-surface interactions approaching 30M/sec are achieved on a 12-core 2.67 GHz Mac Pro desktop computer. For a more exotic example of a 6th degree Wood's horn beam dump (light trap), a 32-bit Windows single thread version traces rays nearly 4 times faster than the commercial ASAP software's implicit algebraic surface and over 13 times faster than its equivalent NURBS surface. However, implicit surfaces are foreign to most CAD systems and thus unfortunately, don't easily fit into a modern workflow.

  1. Comparing FDTD and Ray-Tracing Models in Numerical Simulation of HgCdTe LWIR Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallone, Marco; Goano, Michele; Bertazzi, Francesco; Ghione, Giovanni; Schirmacher, Wilhelm; Hanna, Stefan; Figgemeier, Heinrich

    2016-04-01

    We present a simulation study of HgCdTe-based long-wavelength infrared detectors, focusing on methodological comparisons between the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and ray-tracing optical models. We performed three-dimensional simulations to determine the absorbed photon density distributions and the corresponding photocurrent and quantum efficiency spectra of isolated n-on-p uniform-composition pixels, systematically comparing the results obtained with FDTD and ray tracing. Since ray tracing is a classical optics approach, unable to describe interference effects, its applicability has been found to be strongly wavelength dependent, especially when reflections from metallic layers are relevant. Interesting cavity effects around the material cutoff wavelength are described, and the cases where ray tracing can be considered a viable approximation are discussed.

  2. Comparing FDTD and Ray-Tracing Models in Numerical Simulation of HgCdTe LWIR Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallone, Marco; Goano, Michele; Bertazzi, Francesco; Ghione, Giovanni; Schirmacher, Wilhelm; Hanna, Stefan; Figgemeier, Heinrich

    2016-09-01

    We present a simulation study of HgCdTe-based long-wavelength infrared detectors, focusing on methodological comparisons between the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and ray-tracing optical models. We performed three-dimensional simulations to determine the absorbed photon density distributions and the corresponding photocurrent and quantum efficiency spectra of isolated n-on- p uniform-composition pixels, systematically comparing the results obtained with FDTD and ray tracing. Since ray tracing is a classical optics approach, unable to describe interference effects, its applicability has been found to be strongly wavelength dependent, especially when reflections from metallic layers are relevant. Interesting cavity effects around the material cutoff wavelength are described, and the cases where ray tracing can be considered a viable approximation are discussed.

  3. Three-dimensional trace element analysis by confocal X-ray microfluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Vincze, Laszlo; Vekemans, Bart; Brenker, Frank E; Falkenberg, Gerald; Rickers, Karen; Somogyi, Andrea; Kersten, Michael; Adams, Freddy

    2004-11-15

    A three-dimensional (3D) variant of scanning micro X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is described and evaluated at the ID18F instrument of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The method is based on confocal excitation/detection using a polycapillary half-lens in front of the energy-dispersive detector. The experimental arrangement represents a significant generalization of regular two-dimensional (2D) scanning micro-XRF and employs a detector half-lens whose focus coincides with that of the focused incoming beam. The detection volume defined by the intersection of the exciting beam and the energy-dependent acceptance of the polycapillary optics is 100-350 mum(3). Minimum detection limits are sub-ppm, and sensitivities are comparable with regular scanning XRF. Next to the reduction of in-sample single/multiple scattering, the setup provides the possibility of sample depth scans with an energy-dependent resolution of 10-35 mum in the energy range of 3-23 keV and the possibility of performing 3D-XRF analysis by simple XYZ linear scanning. This provides a suitable alternative to X-ray fluorescence tomography. The method is illustrated with results of the analysis of solid inclusions in diamond and fluid inclusions in quartz. PMID:15538804

  4. Trace the polymerization induced by gamma-ray irradiated silica particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoik; Ryu, Jungju; Kim, Myungwoong; Im, Seung Soon; Kim, Ick Soo; Sohn, Daewon

    2016-08-01

    A γ-ray irradiation to inorganic particles is a promising technique for preparation of organic/inorganic composites as it offers a number of advantages such as an additive-free polymerizations conducted under mild conditions, avoiding undesired damage to organic components in the composites. Herein, we demonstrated a step-wise formation mechanism of organic/inorganic nanocomposite hydrogel in detail. The γ-ray irradiation to silica particles dispersed in water generates peroxide groups on their surface, enabling surface-initiated polymerization of acrylic acid from the inorganic material. As a result, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) covers the silica particles in the form of a core-shell at the initial stage. Then, PAA-coated silica particles associate with each other by combination of radicals at the end of chains on different particles, leading to micro-gel domains. Finally, the micro-gels are further associated with each other to form a 3D network structure. We investigated this mechanism using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our result strongly suggests that controlling reaction time is critical to achieve specific and desirable organic/inorganic nanocomposite structure among core-shell particles, micro-gels and 3D network bulk hydrogel.

  5. HipMatch: an object-oriented cross-platform program for accurate determination of cup orientation using 2D-3D registration of single standard X-ray radiograph and a CT volume.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoyan; Zhang, Xuan; Steppacher, Simon D; Murphy, Stephen B; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Tannast, Moritz

    2009-09-01

    The widely used procedure of evaluation of cup orientation following total hip arthroplasty using single standard anteroposterior (AP) radiograph is known inaccurate, largely due to the wide variability in individual pelvic orientation relative to X-ray plate. 2D-3D image registration methods have been introduced for an accurate determination of the post-operative cup alignment with respect to an anatomical reference extracted from the CT data. Although encouraging results have been reported, their extensive usage in clinical routine is still limited. This may be explained by their requirement of a CAD model of the prosthesis, which is often difficult to be organized from the manufacturer due to the proprietary issue, and by their requirement of either multiple radiographs or a radiograph-specific calibration, both of which are not available for most retrospective studies. To address these issues, we developed and validated an object-oriented cross-platform program called "HipMatch" where a hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme combining an iterative landmark-to-ray registration with a 2D-3D intensity-based registration was implemented to estimate a rigid transformation between a pre-operative CT volume and the post-operative X-ray radiograph for a precise estimation of cup alignment. No CAD model of the prosthesis is required. Quantitative and qualitative results evaluated on cadaveric and clinical datasets are given, which indicate the robustness and the accuracy of the program. HipMatch is written in object-oriented programming language C++ using cross-platform software Qt (TrollTech, Oslo, Norway), VTK, and Coin3D and is transportable to any platform. PMID:19328585

  6. Line shape and ray trace calculations in saturated X-ray lasers: Application to Ni-like silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benredjem, D.; Guilbaud, O.; Möller, C.; Klisnick, A.; Ros, D.; Dubau, J.; Calisti, A.; Talin, B.

    2006-05-01

    Longitudinal coherence length in X-ray laser