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Sample records for 3d reference frame

  1. Reference Frames and 3-D Shape Perception of Pictured Objects: On Verticality and Viewpoint-From-Above

    PubMed Central

    van Doorn, Andrea J.; Wagemans, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Research on the influence of reference frames has generally focused on visual phenomena such as the oblique effect, the subjective visual vertical, the perceptual upright, and ambiguous figures. Another line of research concerns mental rotation studies in which participants had to discriminate between familiar or previously seen 2-D figures or pictures of 3-D objects and their rotated versions. In the present study, we disentangled the influence of the environmental and the viewer-centered reference frame, as classically done, by comparing the performances obtained in various picture and participant orientations. However, this time, the performance is the pictorial relief: the probed 3-D shape percept of the depicted object reconstructed from the local attitude settings of the participant. Comparisons between the pictorial reliefs based on different picture and participant orientations led to two major findings. First, in general, the pictorial reliefs were highly similar if the orientation of the depicted object was vertical with regard to the environmental or the viewer-centered reference frame. Second, a viewpoint-from-above interpretation could almost completely account for the shears occurring between the pictorial reliefs. More specifically, the shears could largely be considered as combinations of slants generated from the viewpoint-from-above, which was determined by the environmental as well as by the viewer-centered reference frame. PMID:27433329

  2. Reference Frames and Relativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Clifford

    1989-01-01

    Stresses the importance of a reference frame in mechanics. Shows the Galilean transformation in terms of relativity theory. Discusses accelerated reference frames and noninertial reference frames. Provides examples of reference frames with diagrams. (YP)

  3. Reliable measurement of 3D foot bone angles based on the frame-of-reference derived from a sole of the foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeho; Lee, Dong Yeon; Park, Jinah

    2016-03-01

    Clinical management of foot pathology requires accurate and robust measurement of the anatomical angles. In order to measure a 3D angle, recent approaches have adopted a landmark-based local coordinate system to establish bone angles used in orthopedics. These measurement methods mainly assess the relative angle between bones using a representative axis derived from the morphological feature of the bone and therefore, the results can be affected by bone deformities. In this study, we propose a method of deriving a global frame-of-reference to acquire consistent direction of the foot by extracting the undersurface of the foot from the CT image data. The two lowest positions of the foot skin are identified from the surface to define the base plane, and the direction from the hallux to the fourth toe is defined together to construct the global coordinate system. We performed the experiment on 10 volumes of foot CT images of healthy subjects to verify that the proposed method provides reliable measurements. We measured 3D angles for talus-calcaneus and talus-navicular using facing articular surfaces of paired bones. The angle was reported in 3 projection angles based on both coordinate systems defined by proposed global frame-of-reference and by CT image planes (saggital, frontal, and transverse). The result shows that the quantified angle using the proposed method considerably reduced the standard deviation (SD) against the angle using the conventional projection planes, and it was also comparable with the measured angles obtained from local coordinate systems of the bones. Since our method is independent from any individual local shape of a bone, unlike the measurement method using the local coordinate system, it is suitable for inter-subject comparison studies.

  4. Celestial Reference Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.

    2013-03-01

    Concepts and Background: This paper gives an overview of modern celestial reference frames as realized at radio frequencies using the Very Long baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technique. We discuss basic celestial reference frame concepts, desired properties, and uses. We review the networks of antennas used for this work. We briefly discuss the history of the science of astrometry touching upon the discovery of precession, proper motion, nutation, and parallax, and the field of radio astronomy. Building Celestial Frames: Next, we discuss the multi-step process of building a celestial frame: First candidate sources are identified based on point-like properties from single dish radio telescopes surveys. Second, positions are refined using connected element interferometers such as the Very Large Array, and the ATCA. Third, positions of approximately milli-arcsecond (mas) accuracy are determined using intercontinental VLBI surveys. Fourth, sub-mas positions are determined by multiyear programs using intercontinental VLBI. These sub-mas sets of positions are then verified by multiple teams in preparation for release to non-specialists in the form of an official IAU International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The process described above has until recently been largely restricted to work at S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz). However, in the last decade sub-mas work has expanded to include celestial frames at K-band (24 GHz), Ka-band (32 GHz), and Q-band (43 GHz). While these frames currently have the disadvantage of far smaller data sets, the astrophysical quality of the sources themselves improves at these higher frequencies and thus make these frequencies attractive for realizations of celestial reference frames. Accordingly, we review progress at these higher frequency bands. Path to the Future: We discuss prospects for celestial reference frames over the next decade. We present an example of an error budget for astrometric VLBI and discuss the budget's use as a tool for

  5. Celestial Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.

    2013-09-01

    Concepts and Background: This paper gives an overview of modern celestial reference frames as realized at radio frequencies using the Very Long baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technique. We discuss basic celestial reference frame concepts, desired properties, and uses. We review the networks of antennas used for this work. We briefly discuss the history of the science of astrometry touching upon the discovery of precession, proper motion, nutation, and parallax, and the field of radio astronomy. Building Celestial Frames: Next, we discuss the multi-step process of building a celestial frame: First candidate sources are identified based on point-like properties from single dish radio telescopes surveys. Second, positions are refined using connected element interferometers such as the Very Large Array, and the ATCA. Third, positions of approximately milli-arcsecond (mas) accuracy are determined using intercontinental VLBI surveys. Fourth, sub-mas positions are determined by multiyear programs using intercontinental VLBI. These sub-mas sets of positions are then verified by multiple teams in preparation for release to non-specialists in the form of an official IAU International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The process described above has until recently been largely restricted to work at S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz). However, in the last decade sub-mas work has expanded to include celestial frames at K-band (24 GHz), Ka-band (32 GHz), and Q-band (43 GHz). While these frames currently have the disadvantage of far smaller data sets, the astrophysical quality of the sources themselves improves at these higher frequencies and thus make these frequencies attractive for realizations of celestial reference frames. Accordingly, we review progress at these higher frequency bands. Path to the Future: We discuss prospects for celestial reference frames over the next decade. We present an example of an error budget for astrometric VLBI and discuss the budget's use as a tool for

  6. Ties Between Celestial And Planetary Reference Frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, Mark H.; Folkner, William M.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents new determination of relative orientation (or frame tie) between reference frame of extra-galactic radio sources and reference frame of planetary ephemeris. Method employed for improved frame-tie estimate relies on ability to measure orientation of Earth with respect to inertial reference frame. Improves orbit determination for interplanetary spacecraft.

  7. Astrophysics of Reference Frame Tie Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Kenneth J.; Boboltz, David; Fey, Alan Lee; Gaume, Ralph A.; Zacharias, Norbert

    2004-01-01

    The Astrophysics of Reference Frame Tie Objects Key Science program will investigate the underlying physics of SIM grid objects. Extragalactic objects in the SIM grid will be used to tie the SIM reference frame to the quasi-inertial reference frame defined by extragalactic objects and to remove any residual frame rotation with respect to the extragalactic frame. The current realization of the extragalactic frame is the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The ICRF is defined by the radio positions of 212 extragalactic objects and is the IAU sanctioned fundamental astronomical reference frame. This key project will advance our knowledge of the physics of the objects which will make up the SIM grid, such as quasars and chromospherically active stars, and relates directly to the stability of the SIM reference frame. The following questions concerning the physics of reference frame tie objects will be investigated.

  8. Frames of Reference in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    The classic film "Frames of Reference" effectively illustrates concepts involved with inertial and non-inertial reference frames. In it, Donald G. Ivey and Patterson Hume use the cameras perspective to allow the viewer to see motion in reference frames translating with a constant velocity, translating while accelerating, and rotating--all with…

  9. KB3D Reference Manual. Version 1.a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar; Siminiceanu, Radu; Carreno, Victor A.; Dowek, Gilles

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a reference manual describing the implementation of the KB3D conflict detection and resolution algorithm. The algorithm has been implemented in the Java and C++ programming languages. The reference manual gives a short overview of the detection and resolution functions, the structural implementation of the program, inputs and outputs to the program, and describes how the program is used. Inputs to the program can be rectangular coordinates or geodesic coordinates. The reference manual also gives examples of conflict scenarios and the resolution outputs the program produces.

  10. Computational integral-imaging reconstruction-based 3-D volumetric target object recognition by using a 3-D reference object.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Cheol; Park, Seok-Chan; Kim, Eun-Soo

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel computational integral-imaging reconstruction (CIIR)-based three-dimensional (3-D) image correlator system for the recognition of 3-D volumetric objects by employing a 3-D reference object. That is, a number of plane object images (POIs) computationally reconstructed from the 3-D reference object are used for the 3-D volumetric target recognition. In other words, simultaneous 3-D image correlations between two sets of target and reference POIs, which are depth-dependently reconstructed by using the CIIR method, are performed for effective recognition of 3-D volumetric objects in the proposed system. Successful experiments with this CIIR-based 3-D image correlator confirmed the feasibility of the proposed method.

  11. Mechanical Energy Change in Inertial Reference Frames

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghanbari, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical energy change of a system in an inertial frame of reference equals work done by the total nonconservative force in the same frame. This relation is covariant under the Galilean transformations from inertial frame S to S', where S' moves with constant velocity relative to S. In the presence of nonconservative forces, such as normal…

  12. Handheld camera 3D modeling system using multiple reference panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, Kouta; Oue, Yasuhiro; Terauchi, Tomoya; Emi, Tetsuichi

    2002-03-01

    A novel 3D modeling system in which a target object is easily captured and modeled by using a hand-held camera with several reference panels is presented in this paper. The reference panels are designed to be able to obtain the camera position and discriminate between each other. A conventional 3D modeling system using a reference panel has several restrictions regarding the target object, specifically the size and its location. Our system uses multiple reference panels, which are set around the target object to remove these restrictions. The main features of this system are as follows: 1) The whole shape and photo-realistic textures of the target object can be digitized based on several still images or a movie captured by using a hand-held camera; as well as each location of the camera that can be calculated using the reference panels. 2) Our system can be provided as a software product only. That means there are no special requirements for hardware; even the reference panels , because they can be printed from image files or software. 3) This system can be applied to digitize a larger object. In the experiments, we developed and used an interactive region selection tool to detect the silhouette on each image instead of using the chroma -keying method. We have tested our system with a toy object. The calculation time is about 10 minutes (except for the capturing the images and extracting the silhouette by using our tool) on a personal computer with a Pentium-III processor (600MHz) and 320MB memory. However, it depends on how complex the images are and how many images you use. Our future plan is to evaluate the system with various kind of objects, specifically, large ones in outdoor environments.

  13. Independent Study Unit on Accelerated Reference Frames

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poultney, S. K.

    1973-01-01

    Presents a list of topics, research areas, references, and laboratory equipment which is prepared to facilitate general-science students' understanding of physics aspects in accelerated reference frames after their study of circular motion and Galilean relativity in mechanics. (CC)

  14. Spatial Reference Frame of Incidentally Learned Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Yuhong V.; Swallow, Khena M.

    2013-01-01

    Visual attention prioritizes information presented at particular spatial locations. These locations can be defined in reference frames centered on the environment or on the viewer. This study investigates whether incidentally learned attention uses a viewer-centered or environment-centered reference frame. Participants conducted visual search on a…

  15. Terrestrial Reference Frame from GPS and SLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jan; Bertiger, Willy; Desai, Shailen; Haines, Bruce; Sibois, Aurore

    2015-04-01

    We present strategies for realizing the terrestrial reference frame (TRF) using tracking data from terrestrial GPS receivers alone and in tandem with the GRACE and LAGEOS satellites. We generate solutions without apriori ties to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). Our approach relies on processing multi-day orbit arcs to take advantage of the satellite dynamics, GPS receiver and transmitter calibrations derived from low-Earth orbiter (LEO) data, and estimation strategies tuned for realizing a stable and accurate TRF. We furthermore take advantage of the geometric diversity provided by GPS tracking from GRACE, and explore the impacts of including ground-based satellite laser range (SLR) measurements to LAGEOS-1 and -2 with local ties relating the two geodetic techniques. We process data from 2003-2014 and compute Helmert transformations relative to ITRF/IGb08. With GPS alone we achieve a 3D origin offset and rate of <7 mm and <1 mm/yr, and reduce the offset to <4 mm when GRACE is included in the global solutions. Scale bias and rate are 3.1 ppb and 0.01 ppb/yr in either solution. Including SLR tracking from 11 ground stations to the LAGEOS satellites from 2012-2014 yields a reduction in scale bias of 0.5-1.0 ppb depending on the weight assigned to the SLR measurements. However, scatter is increased due to the relatively sparse SLR tracking network. We conclude with approaches for improving the TRF realized from GPS and SLR combined at the measurement level.

  16. Mechanical Energy Change in Inertial Reference Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Saeed

    2016-09-01

    The mechanical energy change of a system in an inertial frame of reference equals work done by the total nonconservative force in the same frame. This relation is covariant under the Galilean transformations from inertial frame S to S', where S' moves with constant velocity relative to S. In the presence of nonconservative forces, such as normal and tension forces, the mechanical energy of a system can be conserved in S and not be conserved in S'. In this paper we find useful relations between the mechanical energy changes in two inertial frames of reference.

  17. Physics of Non-Inertial Reference Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamalov, Timur F.

    2010-12-01

    Physics of non-inertial reference frames is a generalizing of Newton's laws to any reference frames. It is the system of general axioms for classical and quantum mechanics. The first, Kinematics Principle reads: the kinematic state of a body free of forces conserves and equal in absolute value to an invariant of the observer's reference frame. The second, Dynamics Principle extended Newton's second law to non-inertial reference frames and also contains additional variables there are higher derivatives of coordinates. Dynamics Principle reads: a force induces a change in the kinematic state of the body and is proportional to the rate of its change. It is mean that if the kinematic invariant of the reference frame is n-th derivative with respect the time, then the dynamics of a body being affected by the force F is described by the 2n-th differential equation. The third, Statics Principle reads: the sum of all forces acting a body at rest is equal to zero.

  18. Physics of Non-Inertial Reference Frames

    SciTech Connect

    Kamalov, Timur F.

    2010-12-22

    Physics of non-inertial reference frames is a generalizing of Newton's laws to any reference frames. It is the system of general axioms for classical and quantum mechanics. The first, Kinematics Principle reads: the kinematic state of a body free of forces conserves and equal in absolute value to an invariant of the observer's reference frame. The second, Dynamics Principle extended Newton's second law to non-inertial reference frames and also contains additional variables there are higher derivatives of coordinates. Dynamics Principle reads: a force induces a change in the kinematic state of the body and is proportional to the rate of its change. It is mean that if the kinematic invariant of the reference frame is n-th derivative with respect the time, then the dynamics of a body being affected by the force F is described by the 2n-th differential equation. The third, Statics Principle reads: the sum of all forces acting a body at rest is equal to zero.

  19. 3-D model-based frame interpolation for distributed video coding of static scenes.

    PubMed

    Maitre, Matthieu; Guillemot, Christine; Morin, Luce

    2007-05-01

    This paper addresses the problem of side information extraction for distributed coding of videos captured by a camera moving in a 3-D static environment. Examples of targeted applications are augmented reality, remote-controlled robots operating in hazardous environments, or remote exploration by drones. It explores the benefits of the structure-from-motion paradigm for distributed coding of this type of video content. Two interpolation methods constrained by the scene geometry, based either on block matching along epipolar lines or on 3-D mesh fitting, are first developed. These techniques are based on a robust algorithm for sub-pel matching of feature points, which leads to semi-dense correspondences between key frames. However, their rate-distortion (RD) performances are limited by misalignments between the side information and the actual Wyner-Ziv (WZ) frames due to the assumption of linear motion between key frames. To cope with this problem, two feature point tracking techniques are introduced, which recover the camera parameters of the WZ frames. A first technique, in which the frames remain encoded separately, performs tracking at the decoder and leads to significant RD performance gains. A second technique further improves the RD performances by allowing a limited tracking at the encoder. As an additional benefit, statistics on tracks allow the encoder to adapt the key frame frequency to the video motion content.

  20. Ray Effect Mitigation Through Reference Frame Rotation

    DOE PAGES

    Tencer, John

    2016-05-01

    The discrete ordinates method is a popular and versatile technique for solving the radiative transport equation, a major drawback of which is the presence of ray effects. Mitigation of ray effects can yield significantly more accurate results and enhanced numerical stability for combined mode codes. Moreover, when ray effects are present, the solution is seen to be highly dependent upon the relative orientation of the geometry and the global reference frame. It is an undesirable property. A novel ray effect mitigation technique of averaging the computed solution for various reference frame orientations is proposed.

  1. Celestial Reference Frames at Multiple Radio Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    In 1997 the IAU adopted the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) built from S/X VLBI data. In response to IAU resolutions encouraging the extension of the ICRF to additional frequency bands, VLBI frames have been made at 24, 32, and 43 gigahertz. Meanwhile, the 8.4 gigahertz work has been greatly improved with the 2009 release of the ICRF-2. This paper discusses the motivations for extending the ICRF to these higher radio bands. Results to date will be summarized including evidence that the high frequency frames are rapidly approaching the accuracy of the 8.4 gigahertz ICRF-2. We discuss current limiting errors and prospects for the future accuracy of radio reference frames. We note that comparison of multiple radio frames is characterizing the frequency dependent systematic noise floor from extended source morphology and core shift. Finally, given Gaia's potential for high accuracy optical astrometry, we have simulated the precision of a radio-optical frame tie to be approximately10-15 microarcseconds ((1-sigma) (1-standard deviation), per component).

  2. On Translators' Cultural Frame of Functionist Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fu, Zhiyi

    2009-01-01

    A deep cognition with translators' cultural frame of functionist reference can help instructors and teachers adjust and extend patterns and schemes of translation and generate the optimal classroom conditions for acquisition of the target language. The author of the paper, in the perspectives of motivational, cognitive and communicative…

  3. Connecting VLBI and Gaia celestial reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, Zinovy

    2016-09-01

    The current state of the link problem between radio and optical celestial reference frames is considered. The main objectives of the investigations in this direction during the next few years are the preparation of a comparison and the mutual orientation and rotation between the optical Gaia Celestial Reference Frame (GCRF) and the 3rd generation radio International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF3), obtained from VLBI observations. Both systems, ideally, should be a realization of the ICRS (International Celestial Reference System) at micro-arcsecond level accuracy. Therefore, the link accuracy between the ICRF and GCRF should be obtained with similar error level, which is not a trivial task due to relatively large systematic and random errors in source positions at different frequency bands. In this paper, a brief overview of recent work on the GCRF--ICRF link is presented. Additional possibilities to improve the GCRF--ICRF link accuracy are discussed. The suggestion is made to use astrometric radio sources with optical magnitude to 20^m rather than to 18^m as currently planned for the GCRF--ICRF link. In addition, the use of radio stars is also a prospective method to obtain independent and accurate orientation between the Gaia frame and the ICRF.

  4. Cultural background shapes spatial reference frame proclivity

    PubMed Central

    Goeke, Caspar; Kornpetpanee, Suchada; Köster, Moritz; Fernández-Revelles, Andrés B.; Gramann, Klaus; König, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Spatial navigation is an essential human skill that is influenced by several factors. The present study investigates how gender, age, and cultural background account for differences in reference frame proclivity and performance in a virtual navigation task. Using an online navigation study, we recorded reaction times, error rates (confusion of turning axis), and reference frame proclivity (egocentric vs. allocentric reference frame) of 1823 participants. Reaction times significantly varied with gender and age, but were only marginally influenced by the cultural background of participants. Error rates were in line with these results and exhibited a significant influence of gender and culture, but not age. Participants’ cultural background significantly influenced reference frame selection; the majority of North-Americans preferred an allocentric strategy, while Latin-Americans preferred an egocentric navigation strategy. European and Asian groups were in between these two extremes. Neither the factor of age nor the factor of gender had a direct impact on participants’ navigation strategies. The strong effects of cultural background on navigation strategies without the influence of gender or age underlines the importance of socialized spatial cognitive processes and argues for socio-economic analysis in studies investigating human navigation. PMID:26073656

  5. A semi-automatic 2D-to-3D video conversion with adaptive key-frame selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Kuanyu; Xiong, Hongkai

    2014-11-01

    To compensate the deficit of 3D content, 2D to 3D video conversion (2D-to-3D) has recently attracted more attention from both industrial and academic communities. The semi-automatic 2D-to-3D conversion which estimates corresponding depth of non-key-frames through key-frames is more desirable owing to its advantage of balancing labor cost and 3D effects. The location of key-frames plays a role on quality of depth propagation. This paper proposes a semi-automatic 2D-to-3D scheme with adaptive key-frame selection to keep temporal continuity more reliable and reduce the depth propagation errors caused by occlusion. The potential key-frames would be localized in terms of clustered color variation and motion intensity. The distance of key-frame interval is also taken into account to keep the accumulated propagation errors under control and guarantee minimal user interaction. Once their depth maps are aligned with user interaction, the non-key-frames depth maps would be automatically propagated by shifted bilateral filtering. Considering that depth of objects may change due to the objects motion or camera zoom in/out effect, a bi-directional depth propagation scheme is adopted where a non-key frame is interpolated from two adjacent key frames. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme has better performance than existing 2D-to-3D scheme with fixed key-frame interval.

  6. Reference Frames in Earth Rotation Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrándiz, José M.; Belda, Santiago; Heinkelmann, Robert; Getino, Juan; Schuh, Harald; Escapa, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays the determination of the Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) and the different Terrestrial Reference Frames (TRF) are not independent. The available theories of Earth rotation aims at providing the orientation of a certain reference system linked somehow to the Earth with respect to a given celestial system, considered as inertial. In the past years a considerable effort has been dedicated to the improvement of the TRF realizations, following the lines set up in the 1980's. However, the reference systems used in the derivation of the theories have been rather considered as something fully established, not deserving a special attention. In this contribution we review the definitions of the frames used in the main theoretical approaches, focusing on those used in the construction of IAU2000, and the extent to which their underlying hypotheses hold. The results are useful to determine the level of consistency of the predicted and determined EOP.

  7. Frames of Reference in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Joshua

    2012-12-01

    The classic film "Frames of Reference"1,2 effectively illustrates concepts involved with inertial and non-inertial reference frames. In it, Donald G. Ivey and Patterson Hume use the cameras perspective to allow the viewer to see motion in reference frames translating with a constant velocity, translating while accelerating, and rotating—all with respect to the Earth frame. The film is a classic for good reason, but today it does have a couple of drawbacks: 1) The film by nature only accommodates passive learning. It does not give students the opportunity to try any of the experiments themselves. 2) The dated style of the 50-year-old film can distract students from the physics content. I present here a simple setup that can recreate many of the movies demonstrations in the classroom. The demonstrations can be used to supplement the movie or in its place, if desired. All of the materials except perhaps the inexpensive web camera should likely be available already in most teaching laboratories. Unlike previously described activities, these experiments do not require travel to another location3 or an involved setup.4,5

  8. Dense 3D Reconstruction from High Frame-Rate Video Using a Static Grid Pattern.

    PubMed

    Sagawa, Ryusuke; Furukawa, Ryo; Kawasaki, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Dense 3D reconstruction of fast moving objects could contribute to various applications such as body structure analysis, accident avoidance, and so on. In this paper, we propose a technique based on a one-shot scanning method, which reconstructs 3D shapes for each frame of a high frame-rate video capturing the scenes projected by a static pattern. To avoid instability of image processing, we restrict the number of colors used in the pattern to less than two. The proposed technique comprises (1) an efficient algorithm to eliminate ambiguity of projected parallel-line patterns by using intersection points, (2) a batch reconstruction algorithm of multiple frames by using spatio-temporal constraints, and (3) an efficient detection method of color-encoded grid pattern based on de Bruijn sequence. In the experiments, the line detection algorithm worked effectively and the dense reconstruction algorithm produces accurate and robust results. We also show the improved results by using temporal constraints. Finally, the dense reconstructions of fast moving objects in a high frame-rate video are presented. PMID:26352228

  9. Image quality of up-converted 2D video from frame-compatible 3D video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speranza, Filippo; Tam, Wa James; Vázquez, Carlos; Renaud, Ronald; Blanchfield, Phil

    2011-03-01

    In the stereoscopic frame-compatible format, the separate high-definition left and high-definition right views are reduced in resolution and packed to fit within the same video frame as a conventional two-dimensional high-definition signal. This format has been suggested for 3DTV since it does not require additional transmission bandwidth and entails only small changes to the existing broadcasting infrastructure. In some instances, the frame-compatible format might be used to deliver both 2D and 3D services, e.g., for over-the-air television services. In those cases, the video quality of the 2D service is bound to decrease since the 2D signal will have to be generated by up-converting one of the two views. In this study, we investigated such loss by measuring the perceptual image quality of 1080i and 720p up-converted video as compared to that of full resolution original 2D video. The video was encoded with either a MPEG-2 or a H.264/AVC codec at different bit rates and presented for viewing with either no polarized glasses (2D viewing mode) or with polarized glasses (3D viewing mode). The results confirmed a loss of video quality of the 2D video up-converted material. The loss due to the sampling processes inherent to the frame-compatible format was rather small for both 1080i and 720p video formats; the loss became more substantial with encoding, particularly for MPEG-2 encoding. The 3D viewing mode provided higher quality ratings, possibly because the visibility of the degradations was reduced.

  10. Frames of reference in spatial language acquisition.

    PubMed

    Shusterman, Anna; Li, Peggy

    2016-08-01

    Languages differ in how they encode spatial frames of reference. It is unknown how children acquire the particular frame-of-reference terms in their language (e.g., left/right, north/south). The present paper uses a word-learning paradigm to investigate 4-year-old English-speaking children's acquisition of such terms. In Part I, with five experiments, we contrasted children's acquisition of novel word pairs meaning left-right and north-south to examine their initial hypotheses and the relative ease of learning the meanings of these terms. Children interpreted ambiguous spatial terms as having environment-based meanings akin to north and south, and they readily learned and generalized north-south meanings. These studies provide the first direct evidence that children invoke geocentric representations in spatial language acquisition. However, the studies leave unanswered how children ultimately acquire "left" and "right." In Part II, with three more experiments, we investigated why children struggle to master body-based frame-of-reference words. Children successfully learned "left" and "right" when the novel words were systematically introduced on their own bodies and extended these words to novel (intrinsic and relative) uses; however, they had difficulty learning to talk about the left and right sides of a doll. This difficulty was paralleled in identifying the left and right sides of the doll in a non-linguistic memory task. In contrast, children had no difficulties learning to label the front and back sides of a doll. These studies begin to paint a detailed account of the acquisition of spatial terms in English, and provide insights into the origins of diverse spatial reference frames in the world's languages. PMID:27423134

  11. Frames of reference in spatial language acquisition.

    PubMed

    Shusterman, Anna; Li, Peggy

    2016-08-01

    Languages differ in how they encode spatial frames of reference. It is unknown how children acquire the particular frame-of-reference terms in their language (e.g., left/right, north/south). The present paper uses a word-learning paradigm to investigate 4-year-old English-speaking children's acquisition of such terms. In Part I, with five experiments, we contrasted children's acquisition of novel word pairs meaning left-right and north-south to examine their initial hypotheses and the relative ease of learning the meanings of these terms. Children interpreted ambiguous spatial terms as having environment-based meanings akin to north and south, and they readily learned and generalized north-south meanings. These studies provide the first direct evidence that children invoke geocentric representations in spatial language acquisition. However, the studies leave unanswered how children ultimately acquire "left" and "right." In Part II, with three more experiments, we investigated why children struggle to master body-based frame-of-reference words. Children successfully learned "left" and "right" when the novel words were systematically introduced on their own bodies and extended these words to novel (intrinsic and relative) uses; however, they had difficulty learning to talk about the left and right sides of a doll. This difficulty was paralleled in identifying the left and right sides of the doll in a non-linguistic memory task. In contrast, children had no difficulties learning to label the front and back sides of a doll. These studies begin to paint a detailed account of the acquisition of spatial terms in English, and provide insights into the origins of diverse spatial reference frames in the world's languages.

  12. Reference frame requirements and the MERIT campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, I. I.; Zhu, S. Y.; Bock, Y.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis is given of how satellite, lunar laser, and very long base interferometry stations available during the MERIT Campaign in 1983/84 can contribute to the detection of short periodic variations in the rotational parameters of the earth, as well as the determination of the differences between the various Conventional Terrestrial and Inertial Reference Frames inherent in the above systems. Specific observational requirements are given both by objective and by country.

  13. Time evolution of an SLR reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angermann, D.; Gerstl, M.; Kelm, R.; Müller, H.; Seemüller, W.; Vei, M.

    2002-07-01

    On the basis of LAGEOS-1 and LAGEOS-2 data we computed a 10-years (1990-2000) solution for SLR station positions and velocities. The paper describes the data processing with the DGFI software package DOGS. We present results for station coordinates and their time variation for 41 stations of the global SLR network, and discuss the stability and time evolution of the SLR reference frame established in the same way. We applied different methods to assess the quality and consistency of the SLR results. The results presented in this paper include: (1) a time series of weekly estimated station coordinates; (2) a comparison of a 10-year LAGEOS-1 and LAGEOS-2 solution; (3) a comparison of 2.5-year solutions with the combined 10-year solution to assess the internal stability and the time evolution of the SLR reference frame; (4) a comparison of the SLR reference frame with ITRF97; and (5) a comparison of SLR station velocities with those of ITRF97 and NNR NUVEL-1A.

  14. Seismic Response of 3D Steel Buildings considering the Effect of PR Connections and Gravity Frames

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Achintya; López-Barraza, Arturo; Rivera-Salas, J. Luz

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear seismic responses of 3D steel buildings with perimeter moment resisting frames (PMRF) and interior gravity frames (IGF) are studied explicitly considering the contribution of the IGF. The effect on the structural response of the stiffness of the beam-to-column connections of the IGF, which is usually neglected, is also studied. It is commonly believed that the flexibility of shear connections is negligible and that 2D models can be used to properly represent 3D real structures. The results of the study indicate, however, that the moments developed on columns of IGF can be considerable and that modeling buildings as plane frames may result in very conservative designs. The contribution of IGF to the lateral structural resistance may be significant. The contribution increases when their connections are assumed to be partially restrained (PR). The incremented participation of IGF when the stiffness of their connections is considered helps to counteract the no conservative effect that results in practice when lateral seismic loads are not considered in IGF while designing steel buildings with PMRF. Thus, if the structural system under consideration is used, the three-dimensional model should be used in seismic analysis and the IGF and the stiffness of their connections should be considered as part of the lateral resistance system. PMID:24995357

  15. Seismic response of 3D steel buildings considering the effect of PR connections and gravity frames.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Bojórquez, Edén; Haldar, Achintya; López-Barraza, Arturo; Rivera-Salas, J Luz

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear seismic responses of 3D steel buildings with perimeter moment resisting frames (PMRF) and interior gravity frames (IGF) are studied explicitly considering the contribution of the IGF. The effect on the structural response of the stiffness of the beam-to-column connections of the IGF, which is usually neglected, is also studied. It is commonly believed that the flexibility of shear connections is negligible and that 2D models can be used to properly represent 3D real structures. The results of the study indicate, however, that the moments developed on columns of IGF can be considerable and that modeling buildings as plane frames may result in very conservative designs. The contribution of IGF to the lateral structural resistance may be significant. The contribution increases when their connections are assumed to be partially restrained (PR). The incremented participation of IGF when the stiffness of their connections is considered helps to counteract the no conservative effect that results in practice when lateral seismic loads are not considered in IGF while designing steel buildings with PMRF. Thus, if the structural system under consideration is used, the three-dimensional model should be used in seismic analysis and the IGF and the stiffness of their connections should be considered as part of the lateral resistance system.

  16. Seismic response of 3D steel buildings considering the effect of PR connections and gravity frames.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Bojórquez, Edén; Haldar, Achintya; López-Barraza, Arturo; Rivera-Salas, J Luz

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear seismic responses of 3D steel buildings with perimeter moment resisting frames (PMRF) and interior gravity frames (IGF) are studied explicitly considering the contribution of the IGF. The effect on the structural response of the stiffness of the beam-to-column connections of the IGF, which is usually neglected, is also studied. It is commonly believed that the flexibility of shear connections is negligible and that 2D models can be used to properly represent 3D real structures. The results of the study indicate, however, that the moments developed on columns of IGF can be considerable and that modeling buildings as plane frames may result in very conservative designs. The contribution of IGF to the lateral structural resistance may be significant. The contribution increases when their connections are assumed to be partially restrained (PR). The incremented participation of IGF when the stiffness of their connections is considered helps to counteract the no conservative effect that results in practice when lateral seismic loads are not considered in IGF while designing steel buildings with PMRF. Thus, if the structural system under consideration is used, the three-dimensional model should be used in seismic analysis and the IGF and the stiffness of their connections should be considered as part of the lateral resistance system. PMID:24995357

  17. The celestial reference frame defined by VLBI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, C.; Shaffer, D. B.

    1988-01-01

    VLBI currently produces the most accurate positions of celestial objects. From 1979 to 1987, 114 extragalactic radio sources have been observed with dual-frequency Mark III VLBI as part of the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project and the NGS POLARIS/IRIS program. The formal statistical errors of conventional celestial coordinates are as small as 0.3 milliarcseconds. The fundamental quantity measured by VLBI is the arc length between radio sources. Thus, it is suggested that VLBI be used to establish a coordinate reference frame based solely on radio positions, and that this system not necessarily be coupled to right ascension and declination.

  18. On the Assessment of Global Terrestrial Reference Frame Temporal Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampatzidis, Dimitrios; Koenig, Rolf; Zhu, Shengyuan

    2015-04-01

    Global Terrestrial Reference Frames (GTRFs) as the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) provide reliable 4-D position information (3-D coordinates and their evolution through time). The given 3-D velocities play a significant role in precise position acquisition and are estimated from long term coordinate time series from the space-geodetic techniques DORIS, GNSS, SLR, and VLBI. GTRFs temporal evolution is directly connected with their internal stability: The more intense and inhomogeneous velocity field, the less stable TRF is derived. The assessment of the quality of the GTRF is mainly realized by comparing it to each individual technique's reference frame. E.g the comparison of GTRFs to SLR-only based TRF gives the sense of the ITRF stability with respect to the Geocenter and scale and their associated rates respectively. In addition, the comparison of ITRF to the VLBI-only based TRF can be used for the scale validation. However, till now there is not any specified methodology for the total assessment (in terms of origin, orientation and scale respectively) of the temporal evolution and GTRFs associated accuracy. We present a new alternative diagnostic tool for the assessment of GTRFs temporal evolution based on the well-known time-dependent Helmert type transformation formula (three shifts, three rotations and scale rates respectively). The advantage of the new methodology relies on the fact that it uses the full velocity field of the TRF and therefore all points not just the ones common to different techniques. It also examines simultaneously rates of origin, orientation and scale. The methodology is presented and implemented to the two existing GTRFs on the market (ITRF and DTRF which is computed from DGFI) , the results are discussed. The results also allow to compare directly each GTRF dynamic behavior. Furthermore, the correlations of the estimated parameters can also provide useful information to the proposed GTRFs assessment scheme.

  19. Single-Frame 3D Human Pose Recovery from Multiple Views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Michael; Gavrila, Dariu M.

    We present a system for the estimation of unconstrained 3D human upper body pose from multi-camera single-frame views. Pose recovery starts with a shape detection stage where candidate poses are generated based on hierarchical exemplar matching in the individual camera views. The hierarchy used in this stage is created using a hybrid clustering approach in order to efficiently deal with the large number of represented poses. In the following multi-view verification stage, poses are re-projected to the other camera views and ranked according to a multi-view matching score. A subsequent gradient-based local pose optimization stage bridges the gap between the used discrete pose exemplars and the underlying continuous parameter space. We demonstrate that the proposed clustering approach greatly outperforms state-of-the-art bottom-up clustering in parameter space and present a detailed experimental evaluation of the complete system on a large data set.

  20. Enabling Lorentz boosted frame particle-in-cell simulations of laser wakefield acceleration in quasi-3D geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peicheng; Xu, Xinlu; Davidson, Asher; Tableman, Adam; Dalichaouch, Thamine; Li, Fei; Meyers, Michael D.; An, Weiming; Tsung, Frank S.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Fiuza, Frederico; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O.; Mori, Warren B.

    2016-07-01

    When modeling laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm in a Lorentz boosted frame, the plasma is drifting relativistically at βb c towards the laser, which can lead to a computational speedup of ∼ γb2 = (1 - βb2)-1. Meanwhile, when LWFA is modeled in the quasi-3D geometry in which the electromagnetic fields and current are decomposed into a limited number of azimuthal harmonics, speedups are achieved by modeling three dimensional (3D) problems with the computational loads on the order of two dimensional r - z simulations. Here, we describe a method to combine the speedups from the Lorentz boosted frame and quasi-3D algorithms. The key to the combination is the use of a hybrid Yee-FFT solver in the quasi-3D geometry that significantly mitigates the Numerical Cerenkov Instability (NCI) which inevitably arises in a Lorentz boosted frame due to the unphysical coupling of Langmuir modes and EM modes of the relativistically drifting plasma in these simulations. In addition, based on the space-time distribution of the LWFA data in the lab and boosted frame, we propose to use a moving window to follow the drifting plasma, instead of following the laser driver as is done in the LWFA lab frame simulations, in order to further reduce the computational loads. We describe the details of how the NCI is mitigated for the quasi-3D geometry, the setups for simulations which combine the Lorentz boosted frame, quasi-3D geometry, and the use of a moving window, and compare the results from these simulations against their corresponding lab frame cases. Good agreement is obtained among these sample simulations, particularly when there is no self-trapping, which demonstrates it is possible to combine the Lorentz boosted frame and the quasi-3D algorithms when modeling LWFA. We also discuss the preliminary speedups achieved in these sample simulations.

  1. Diverse spatial reference frames of vestibular signals in parietal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaodong; DeAngelis, Gregory C; Angelaki, Dora E

    2013-01-01

    Summary Reference frames are important for understanding how sensory cues from different modalities are coordinated to guide behavior, and the parietal cortex is critical to these functions. We compare reference frames of vestibular self-motion signals in the ventral intraparietal area (VIP), parietoinsular vestibular cortex (PIVC), and dorsal medial superior temporal area (MSTd). Vestibular heading tuning in VIP is invariant to changes in both eye and head positions, indicating a body (or world)-centered reference frame. Vestibular signals in PIVC have reference frames that are intermediate between head- and body-centered. In contrast, MSTd neurons show reference frames between head- and eye-centered, but not body-centered. Eye and head position gain fields were strongest in MSTd and weakest in PIVC. Our findings reveal distinct spatial reference frames for representing vestibular signals, and pose new challenges for understanding the respective roles of these areas in potentially diverse vestibular functions. PMID:24239126

  2. Classical and quantum communication without a shared reference frame.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Stephen D; Rudolph, Terry; Spekkens, Robert W

    2003-07-11

    We show that communication without a shared reference frame is possible using entangled states. Both classical and quantum information can be communicated with perfect fidelity without a shared reference frame at a rate that asymptotically approaches one classical bit or one encoded qubit per transmitted qubit. We present an optical scheme to communicate classical bits without a shared reference frame using entangled photon pairs and linear optical Bell state measurements.

  3. Waveform Simulations For TAIGER Data Sets From Taiwan 3D Reference Velocity And Moho Boundary Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, M.; Chen, H.; Zhao, L.

    2008-12-01

    Studying seismic waveform variations in space and time is an important issue to investigate structural heterogeneities and ground motion responses for seismic hazard mitigation. The available 3D reference velocity models from transmission tomography studies are mainly limited by depth resolution, refraction arrival picks without explicit considering later phases and the spatial distribution of earthquakes and stations. Seismic data collected from the TAIGER (TAiwan Integrated GEodynamics Research) project can provide a valuable opportunity for studying deep crust structures. Evaluation of 3D reference models and update their shallow velocity structure is presented through travel-time and waveforms studies. Even though a well-defined multi-scaled reference velocity model of Taiwan is being debated, existing models are still important to study the structural heterogeneities and path effects through parallel computation of 4th-order staggered grid FD 3D waveform simulation. Simulation utilizes both far-field point and finite-dimensional moment tensor sources to investigate effects on Moho reflections and lateral velocity variations. Constraints on Moho reference boundary obtained from receiver function studies is discussed and compared with data collected from TAIGER project. For controlled source experiments, synthetic simulations show clear and focused Moho reflections in the 3-C data. Simultaneous 3D simulation of all available seismic records provides unique constraints on reference velocity model known so far. The waveform simulation will provide a fundamental research platform for future full 3D waveform inversion.

  4. Intuitive presentation of clinical forensic data using anonymous and person-specific 3D reference manikins.

    PubMed

    Urschler, Martin; Höller, Johannes; Bornik, Alexander; Paul, Tobias; Giretzlehner, Michael; Bischof, Horst; Yen, Kathrin; Scheurer, Eva

    2014-08-01

    The increasing use of CT/MR devices in forensic analysis motivates the need to present forensic findings from different sources in an intuitive reference visualization, with the aim of combining 3D volumetric images along with digital photographs of external findings into a 3D computer graphics model. This model allows a comprehensive presentation of forensic findings in court and enables comparative evaluation studies correlating data sources. The goal of this work was to investigate different methods to generate anonymous and patient-specific 3D models which may be used as reference visualizations. The issue of registering 3D volumetric as well as 2D photographic data to such 3D models is addressed to provide an intuitive context for injury documentation from arbitrary modalities. We present an image processing and visualization work-flow, discuss the major parts of this work-flow, compare the different investigated reference models, and show a number of cases studies that underline the suitability of the proposed work-flow for presenting forensically relevant information in 3D visualizations. PMID:24952238

  5. Communication between inertial observers with partially correlated reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, Mehdi; Smith, Alexander R. H.; Dragan, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    In quantum communication protocols the existence of a shared reference frame between two spatially separated parties is normally presumed. However, in many practical situations we are faced with the problem of misaligned reference frames. In this paper, we study communication between two inertial observers who have partial knowledge about the Lorentz transformation that relates their frames of reference. Since every Lorentz transformation can be decomposed into a pure boost followed by a rotation, we begin by analyzing the effects on communication when the parties have partial knowledge about the transformation relating their frames, when the transformation is either a rotation or a pure boost. This then enables us to investigate how the efficiency of communication is affected due to partially correlated inertial reference frames related by an arbitrary Lorentz transformation. Furthermore, we show how the results of previous studies where reference frames are completely uncorrelated are recovered from our results in appropriate limits.

  6. Spatial vision within egocentric and exocentric frames of reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Ian P.

    1991-01-01

    It is remarkable that we are able to perceive a stable visual world and judge the directions, orientations, and movements of visual objects given that images move on the retina, the eyes move in the head, the head moves on the body, and the body moves in space. An understanding of the mechanisms underlying perceptual stability and spatial judgements requires precise definitions of relevant coordinate systems. An egocentric frame of reference is defined with respect to some part of the observer. There are four principal egocentric frames of reference, a station-point frame associated with the nodal point of the eye, an retinocentric frame associated with the retina, a headcentric frame associated with the head, and a bodycentric frame (torsocentric) associated with the torso. Additional egocentric frames can be identified with respect to any segment of the body. An egocentric task is one in which the position, orientation, or motion of an object is judged with respect to an egocentric frame of reference. A proprioceptive is a special kind of egocentric task in which the object being judged is also part of the body. An example of a proprioceptive task is that of directing the gaze toward the seen or unseen toe. An exocentric frame of reference is external to the observer. Geographical coordinates and the direction of gravity are examples of exocentric frames of reference. These various frames are listed in tabular form, together with examples of judgements of each type.

  7. The Dirac oscillator in a rotating frame of reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strange, P.; Ryder, L. H.

    2016-10-01

    The Dirac equation in a rotating frame of reference is derived from first principles within a linear approximation. This equation is employed to exhibit an equivalence between a particle in a Dirac oscillator potential and a free particle in a rotating frame of reference. A zero-point contribution to the energy of the particle, resulting from its spin, is also noted.

  8. Two reference frames for visual perception in two gravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Lipshits, Mark; Bengoetxea, Ana; Cheron, Guy; McIntyre, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The processing and storage of visual information concerning the orientation of objects in space is carried out in anisotropic reference frames in which all orientations are not treated equally. The perceptual anisotropies, and the implicit reference frames that they define, are evidenced by the observation of 'oblique effects' in which performance on a given perceptual task is better for horizontally and vertically oriented stimuli. The question remains how the preferred horizontal and vertical reference frames are defined. In these experiments cosmonaut subjects reproduced the remembered orientation of a visual stimulus in 1g (on the ground) and in 0g, both attached to a chair and while free-floating within the International Space Station. Results show that while the remembered orientation of a visual stimulus may be stored in a multimodal reference frame that includes gravity, an egocentric reference is sufficient to elicit the oblique effect when all gravitational and haptic cues are absent.

  9. Egocentric and allocentric reference frames for catching a falling object.

    PubMed

    Le Séac'h, Anne Brec'hed; Senot, Patrice; McIntyre, Joseph

    2010-04-01

    When programming movement, one must account for gravitational acceleration. This is particularly important when catching a falling object because the task requires a precise estimate of time-to-contact. Knowledge of gravity's effects is intimately linked to our definition of 'up' and 'down'. Both directions can be described in an allocentric reference frame, based on visual and/or gravitational cues, or in an egocentric reference frame in which the body axis is taken as vertical. To test which frame humans use to predict gravity's effect, we asked participants to intercept virtual balls approaching from above or below with artificially controlled acceleration that could be congruent or not with gravity. To dissociate between these frames, subjects were seated upright (trunk parallel to gravity) or lying down (body axis orthogonal to the gravitational axis). We report data in line with the use of an allocentric reference frame and discuss its relevance depending on available gravity-related cues. PMID:20024651

  10. The definition and stability of local inertial reference frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, R. N.; Lowe, S. T.

    1990-01-01

    VLBI measurements of extragalactic radio sources are utilized to develop a definition system for local inertial reference frames. Significant astrometric errors are identified and minimized by means of a parameter-estimation technique. A reference frame is measured for 30 min to observe the radio emission of the object to be located in the frame as well as the emission from about five additional sources which define the frame. Because the structures of the objects are unknown and tropospheric fluctuations exist, limiting errors exist for both single-epoch position determination and epoch-to-epoch differential position measurements. Data are presented regarding relativistic gravitational deflection by Jupiter which show that the local reference frame is stable at 240 microarcseconds over 12 days.

  11. Future National Reference Frames for the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, W. A.

    2015-12-01

    The mission of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) is "to define, maintain and provide access to the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS) to meet our nation's economic, social, and environmental needs." NSRS is the nation's system of latitude, longitude, elevation, and related geophysical and geodetic models and tools, which provides a consistent spatial reference framework for the broad spectrum of geoscientific applications and other positioning-related requirements. Technological developments - notably Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) - and user accuracy requirements necessitate that NGS endeavor to modernize the NSRS. Preparations are underway by NGS for a comprehensive NSRS makeover, to be completed in 2022 and delivered through a new generation of horizontal and vertical datums (reference frames), featuring unprecedented accuracy, repeatability, and efficiency of access. This evolution is outlined in the "National Geodetic Survey Ten-Year Strategic Plan, 2013-2023." This presentation will outline the motivation for this effort and the history, current status and planned evolution of NSRS. Fundamental to the delivery of the future reference frame paradigm are new geometric and geopotential (elevation) frameworks. The new geometric reference frame, realized through GNSS Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS), will replace the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD83) and will provide the nationwide framework for determination of latitude, longitude, and ellipsoid height. Designed to complement the new geometric reference frame, a corresponding geopotential reference frame - based on a national gravimetric geoid and replacing the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD88) - will be developed and co-released. The gravimetric geoid - or definitional reference surface (zero elevation) - for the future geopotential reference frame will be built in part from airborne gravimetric data collected in

  12. 3D Mandibular Superimposition: Comparison of Regions of Reference for Voxel-Based Registration

    PubMed Central

    Ruellas, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira; Yatabe, Marilia Sayako; Souki, Bernardo Quiroga; Benavides, Erika; Nguyen, Tung; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Franchi, Lorenzo; Cevidanes, Lucia Helena Soares

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim was to evaluate three regions of reference (Björk, Modified Björk and mandibular Body) for mandibular registration testing them in a patients’ CBCT sample. Methods Mandibular 3D volumetric label maps were built from CBCTs taken before (T1) and after treatment (T2) in a sample of 16 growing subjects and labeled with eight landmarks. Registrations of T1 and T2 images relative to the different regions of reference were performed, and 3D surface models were generated. Seven mandibular dimensions were measured separately for each time-point (T1 and T2) in relation to a stable reference structure (lingual cortical of symphysis), and the T2-T1 differences were calculated. These differences were compared to differences measured between the superimposed T2 (generated from different regions of reference: Björk, Modified Björk and Mandibular Body) over T1 surface models. ICC and the Bland-Altman method tested the agreement of the changes obtained by nonsuperimposition measurements from the patients’ sample, and changes between the overlapped surfaces after registration using the different regions of reference. Results The Björk region of reference (or mask) did work properly only in 2 of 16 patients. Evaluating the two other masks (Modified Björk and Mandibular body) on patients’ scans registration, the concordance and agreement of the changes obtained from superimpositions (registered T2 over T1) compared to results obtained from non superimposed T1 and T2 separately, indicated that Mandibular Body mask displayed more consistent results. Conclusions The mandibular body mask (mandible without teeth, alveolar bone, rami and condyles) is a reliable reference for 3D regional registration. PMID:27336366

  13. Newton-Cartan Gravity in Noninertial Reference Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Leo; St. Germaine-Fuller, James; Wickramasekara, Sujeev

    2015-03-01

    We study Newton-Cartan gravity under transformations into all noninertial, nonrelativistic reference frames. These transformations form an infinite dimensional Lie group, called the Galilean line group, which contains as a subgroup the Galilei group. The fictitious forces of noninertial reference frames are encoded in the Cartan connection transformed under the Galilean line group. These fictitious forces, which are coordinate effects, do not contribute to the Ricci tensor. Only the 00-component of the Ricci tensor is non-zero and equals (4 π times) the matter density in all reference frames. While the Ricci field equation and Gauss' law are fulfilled by the physical matter density in inertial and linearly accelerating reference frames, in rotating reference frames Gauss' law holds for an effective mass density that differs from the physical matter density. This effective density has its origin in the simulated magnetic field of rotating frames, highlighting a striking difference between linearly and rotationally accelerating frames. The equations governing the simulated fields have the same form as Maxwell's equations, a surprising result given that these equations obey special relativity (and U (1) -gauge symmetry), rather than Galilean symmetry. This work was supported in part by the HHMI Undergraduate Science Education Award 52006298 and the Grinnell College Academic Affairs' CSFS and MAP programs.

  14. Are All Spatial Reference Frames Egocentric? Reinterpreting Evidence for Allocentric, Object-Centered, or World-Centered Reference Frames

    PubMed Central

    Filimon, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    The use and neural representation of egocentric spatial reference frames is well-documented. In contrast, whether the brain represents spatial relationships between objects in allocentric, object-centered, or world-centered coordinates is debated. Here, I review behavioral, neuropsychological, neurophysiological (neuronal recording), and neuroimaging evidence for and against allocentric, object-centered, or world-centered spatial reference frames. Based on theoretical considerations, simulations, and empirical findings from spatial navigation, spatial judgments, and goal-directed movements, I suggest that all spatial representations may in fact be dependent on egocentric reference frames. PMID:26696861

  15. Spatial vision within egocentric and exocentric frames of reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Ian P.

    1989-01-01

    The extent to which perceptual judgements within egocentric and exocentric frames of reference are subject to illusory disturbances and long term modifications is discussed. It is argued that well known spatial illusions, such as the oculogyral illusion and induced visual motion have usually been discussed without proper attention being paid to the frame of reference within which they occur, and that this has led to the construction of inadequate theories and inappropriate procedures for testing them.

  16. Reference frames in learning from maps and navigation.

    PubMed

    Meilinger, Tobias; Frankenstein, Julia; Watanabe, Katsumi; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Hölscher, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    In everyday life, navigators often consult a map before they navigate to a destination (e.g., a hotel, a room, etc.). However, not much is known about how humans gain spatial knowledge from seeing a map and direct navigation together. In the present experiments, participants learned a simple multiple corridor space either from a map only, only from walking through the virtual environment, first from the map and then from navigation, or first from navigation and then from the map. Afterwards, they conducted a pointing task from multiple body orientations to infer the underlying reference frames. We constructed the learning experiences in a way such that map-only learning and navigation-only learning triggered spatial memory organized along different reference frame orientations. When learning from maps before and during navigation, participants employed a map- rather than a navigation-based reference frame in the subsequent pointing task. Consequently, maps caused the employment of a map-oriented reference frame found in memory for highly familiar urban environments ruling out explanations from environmental structure or north preference. When learning from navigation first and then from the map, the pattern of results reversed and participants employed a navigation-based reference frame. The priority of learning order suggests that despite considerable difference between map and navigation learning participants did not use the more salient or in general more useful information, but relied on the reference frame established first. PMID:25416007

  17. Reference frames in learning from maps and navigation.

    PubMed

    Meilinger, Tobias; Frankenstein, Julia; Watanabe, Katsumi; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Hölscher, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    In everyday life, navigators often consult a map before they navigate to a destination (e.g., a hotel, a room, etc.). However, not much is known about how humans gain spatial knowledge from seeing a map and direct navigation together. In the present experiments, participants learned a simple multiple corridor space either from a map only, only from walking through the virtual environment, first from the map and then from navigation, or first from navigation and then from the map. Afterwards, they conducted a pointing task from multiple body orientations to infer the underlying reference frames. We constructed the learning experiences in a way such that map-only learning and navigation-only learning triggered spatial memory organized along different reference frame orientations. When learning from maps before and during navigation, participants employed a map- rather than a navigation-based reference frame in the subsequent pointing task. Consequently, maps caused the employment of a map-oriented reference frame found in memory for highly familiar urban environments ruling out explanations from environmental structure or north preference. When learning from navigation first and then from the map, the pattern of results reversed and participants employed a navigation-based reference frame. The priority of learning order suggests that despite considerable difference between map and navigation learning participants did not use the more salient or in general more useful information, but relied on the reference frame established first.

  18. A 3D framing camera with pulse laser and modulated receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiuda; Yan, Huiming; Jiang, Yanbing; Yin, Shenbao

    2007-01-01

    It is convenient to apply three-dimensional (3D) detecting instruments to automatic drive, virtual reality modeling, terrain reconnaissance, etc. It is presented that a new high-speed camera which achieves one three-dimensions image by only one light pulse in this paper. It has a measurement range of one kilometer and a distance resolution of five meters. This camera is composed with a pulse laser and three receivers which are made up with a Micro Channel Plate (MCP) and a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) each. These parts are mature commercial productions that provide low cost and high reliable to the 3D camera. As soon as the pulse laser emits a light pulse, the three receivers are modulated with synchronistical control circuits. A 3D picture can be calculated by three different density images which are obtained by that. The one-light-pulse-one-picture mode gives a flexible way to work with a gate signal. A 3D camera working with high-speed gate signal can achieve high-speed photography easily. A mathematic model is established to describe measurement range, distance detection precision and space resolving of the camera. The best modulation functions of the receivers are given with consideration of white noise by Euler-Lagrange equation. Due to the best modulation function we give a scheme is follows: The first receiver is modulated by a const gain, the second one is modulated by a linearly increasing gain and the last one is modulated by a linear decreasing gain. This combination achieve both low noise and simple structure. Because of the simple structure, several fibers which we named amending fibers can be used to amend error of receiver modulation and synchronistical error. Analysis of the detection precisions of the camera and continuous wave detection systems are carried out both in time domain and frequency domain. The results indicate pulse laser can increase the detection range by suppressing background light greatly and decreasing imaging time. But it

  19. Single Nanoparticle to 3D Supercage: Framing for an Artificial Enzyme System.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ren; Yang, Dan; Peng, Shengjie; Chen, Xigao; Huang, Yun; Liu, Yuan; Hou, Weijia; Yang, Shengyuan; Liu, Zhenbao; Tan, Weihong

    2015-11-01

    A facile strategy has been developed to fabricate Cu(OH)2 supercages (SCs) as an artificial enzyme system with intrinsic peroxidase-mimic activities (PMA). SCs with high catalytic activity and excellent recyclability were generated via direct conversion of amorphous Cu(OH)2 nanoparticles (NPs) at room temperature. More specifically, the process that takes a single nanoparticle to a 3D supercage involves two basic steps. First, with addition of a copper-ammonia complex, the Cu(2+) ions that are located on the surface of amorphous Cu(OH)2 NPs would evolve into a fine lamellar structure by coordination and migration and eventually convert to 1D nanoribbons around the NPs. Second, accompanied by the migration of Cu(2+), a hollow cavity is generated in the inner NPs, such that a single nanoparticle eventually becomes a nanoribbon-assembled 3D hollow cage. These Cu(OH)2 SCs were then engineered as an artificial enzymatic system with higher efficiency for intrinsic PMA than the peroxidase activity of a natural enzyme, horseradish peroxidase. PMID:26464081

  20. Reference frames in virtual spatial navigation are viewpoint dependent.

    PubMed

    Török, Agoston; Nguyen, T Peter; Kolozsvári, Orsolya; Buchanan, Robert J; Nadasdy, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    Spatial navigation in the mammalian brain relies on a cognitive map of the environment. Such cognitive maps enable us, for example, to take the optimal route from a given location to a known target. The formation of these maps is naturally influenced by our perception of the environment, meaning it is dependent on factors such as our viewpoint and choice of reference frame. Yet, it is unknown how these factors influence the construction of cognitive maps. Here, we evaluated how various combinations of viewpoints and reference frames affect subjects' performance when they navigated in a bounded virtual environment without landmarks. We measured both their path length and time efficiency and found that (1) ground perspective was associated with egocentric frame of reference, (2) aerial perspective was associated with allocentric frame of reference, (3) there was no appreciable performance difference between first and third person egocentric viewing positions and (4) while none of these effects were dependent on gender, males tended to perform better in general. Our study provides evidence that there are inherent associations between visual perspectives and cognitive reference frames. This result has implications about the mechanisms of path integration in the human brain and may also inspire designs of virtual reality applications. Lastly, we demonstrated the effective use of a tablet PC and spatial navigation tasks for studying spatial and cognitive aspects of human memory.

  1. Asynchronous reference frame agreement in a quantum network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Tanvirul; Wehner, Stephanie

    2016-03-01

    An efficient implementation of many multiparty protocols for quantum networks requires that all the nodes in the network share a common reference frame. Establishing such a reference frame from scratch is especially challenging in an asynchronous network where network links might have arbitrary delays and the nodes do not share synchronised clocks. In this work, we study the problem of establishing a common reference frame in an asynchronous network of n nodes of which at most t are affected by arbitrary unknown error, and the identities of the faulty nodes are not known. We present a protocol that allows all the correctly functioning nodes to agree on a common reference frame as long as the network graph is complete and not more than t\\lt n/4 nodes are faulty. As the protocol is asynchronous, it can be used with some assumptions to synchronise clocks over a network. Also, the protocol has the appealing property that it allows any existing two-node asynchronous protocol for reference frame agreement to be lifted to a robust protocol for an asynchronous quantum network.

  2. Reference frames in virtual spatial navigation are viewpoint dependent

    PubMed Central

    Török, Ágoston; Nguyen, T. Peter; Kolozsvári, Orsolya; Buchanan, Robert J.; Nadasdy, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    Spatial navigation in the mammalian brain relies on a cognitive map of the environment. Such cognitive maps enable us, for example, to take the optimal route from a given location to a known target. The formation of these maps is naturally influenced by our perception of the environment, meaning it is dependent on factors such as our viewpoint and choice of reference frame. Yet, it is unknown how these factors influence the construction of cognitive maps. Here, we evaluated how various combinations of viewpoints and reference frames affect subjects' performance when they navigated in a bounded virtual environment without landmarks. We measured both their path length and time efficiency and found that (1) ground perspective was associated with egocentric frame of reference, (2) aerial perspective was associated with allocentric frame of reference, (3) there was no appreciable performance difference between first and third person egocentric viewing positions and (4) while none of these effects were dependent on gender, males tended to perform better in general. Our study provides evidence that there are inherent associations between visual perspectives and cognitive reference frames. This result has implications about the mechanisms of path integration in the human brain and may also inspire designs of virtual reality applications. Lastly, we demonstrated the effective use of a tablet PC and spatial navigation tasks for studying spatial and cognitive aspects of human memory. PMID:25249956

  3. Improved grid-noise removal in single-frame digital moiré 3D shape measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Fatemeh; Kofman, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    A single-frame grid-noise removal technique was developed for application in single-frame digital-moiré 3D shape measurement. The ability of the stationary wavelet transform (SWT) to prevent oscillation artifacts near discontinuities, and the ability of the Fourier transform (FFT) applied to wavelet coefficients to separate grid-noise from useful image information, were combined in a new technique, SWT-FFT, to remove grid-noise from moiré-pattern images generated by digital moiré. In comparison to previous grid-noise removal techniques in moiré, SWT-FFT avoids the requirement for mechanical translation of optical components and capture of multiple frames, to enable single-frame moiré-based measurement. Experiments using FFT, Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), DWT-FFT, and SWT-FFT were performed on moiré-pattern images containing grid noise, generated by digital moiré, for several test objects. SWT-FFT had the best performance in removing high-frequency grid-noise, both straight and curved lines, minimizing artifacts, and preserving the moiré pattern without blurring and degradation. SWT-FFT also had the lowest noise amplitude in the reconstructed height and lowest roughness index for all test objects, indicating best grid-noise removal in comparison to the other techniques.

  4. Change of reference frame for tactile localization during child development.

    PubMed

    Pagel, Birthe; Heed, Tobias; Röder, Brigitte

    2009-11-01

    Temporal order judgements (TOJ) for two tactile stimuli, one presented to the left and one to the right hand, are less precise when the hands are crossed over the midline than when the hands are uncrossed. This 'crossed hand' effect has been considered as evidence for a remapping of tactile input into an external reference frame. Since late, but not early, blind individuals show such remapping, it has been hypothesized that the use of an external reference frame develops during childhood. Five- to 10-year-old children were therefore tested with the tactile TOJ task, both with uncrossed and crossed hands. Overall performance in the TOJ task improved with age. While children older than 5 1/2 years displayed a crossed hand effect, younger children did not. Therefore the use of an external reference frame for tactile, and possibly multisensory, localization seems to be acquired at age 5. PMID:19840048

  5. Transport equations of electrodiffusion processes in the laboratory reference frame.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Javier

    2006-02-23

    The transport equations of electrodiffusion processes use three reference frames for defining the fluxes: Fick's reference in diffusion, solvent-fixed reference in transference numbers, and laboratory fluxes in electric conductivity. The convenience of using only one reference frame is analyzed here from the point of view of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. A relation between the fluxes of ions and solvent and the electric current density is deduced first from a mass and volume balance. This is then used to show that (i) the laboratory and Fick's diffusion coefficients are identical and (ii) the transference numbers of both the solvent and the ion in the laboratory reference frame are related. Finally, four experimental methods for the measurement of ion transference numbers are analyzed critically. New expressions for evaluating transference numbers for the moving boundary method and the chronopotentiometry technique are deduced. It is concluded that the ion transport equation in the laboratory reference frame plays a key role in the description of electrodiffusion processes. PMID:16494340

  6. Transport equations of electrodiffusion processes in the laboratory reference frame.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Javier

    2006-02-23

    The transport equations of electrodiffusion processes use three reference frames for defining the fluxes: Fick's reference in diffusion, solvent-fixed reference in transference numbers, and laboratory fluxes in electric conductivity. The convenience of using only one reference frame is analyzed here from the point of view of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. A relation between the fluxes of ions and solvent and the electric current density is deduced first from a mass and volume balance. This is then used to show that (i) the laboratory and Fick's diffusion coefficients are identical and (ii) the transference numbers of both the solvent and the ion in the laboratory reference frame are related. Finally, four experimental methods for the measurement of ion transference numbers are analyzed critically. New expressions for evaluating transference numbers for the moving boundary method and the chronopotentiometry technique are deduced. It is concluded that the ion transport equation in the laboratory reference frame plays a key role in the description of electrodiffusion processes.

  7. The equations of relative motion in the orbital reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casotto, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of relative motion of two spacecraft in Earth-bound orbits is usually carried out on the basis of simplifying assumptions. In particular, the reference spacecraft is assumed to follow a circular orbit, in which case the equations of relative motion are governed by the well-known Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire equations. Circular motion is not, however, a solution when the Earth's flattening is accounted for, except for equatorial orbits, where in any case the acceleration term is not Newtonian. Several attempts have been made to account for the J_2 effects, either by ingeniously taking advantage of their differential effects, or by cleverly introducing ad-hoc terms in the equations of motion on the basis of geometrical analysis of the J_2 perturbing effects. Analysis of relative motion about an unperturbed elliptical orbit is the next step in complexity. Relative motion about a J_2-perturbed elliptic reference trajectory is clearly a challenging problem, which has received little attention. All these problems are based on either the Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire equations for circular reference motion, or the de Vries/Tschauner-Hempel equations for elliptical reference motion, which are both approximate versions of the exact equations of relative motion. The main difference between the exact and approximate forms of these equations consists in the expression for the angular velocity and the angular acceleration of the rotating reference frame with respect to an inertial reference frame. The rotating reference frame is invariably taken as the local orbital frame, i.e., the RTN frame generated by the radial, the transverse, and the normal directions along the primary spacecraft orbit. Some authors have tried to account for the non-constant nature of the angular velocity vector, but have limited their correction to a mean motion value consistent with the J_2 perturbation terms. However, the angular velocity vector is also affected in direction, which causes precession

  8. Mesoscopic mechanical resonators as quantum noninertial reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, B. N.; Blencowe, M. P.; Schwab, K. C.

    2015-10-01

    An atom attached to a micrometer-scale wire that is vibrating at a frequency ˜100 MHz and with displacement amplitude ˜1 nm experiences an acceleration magnitude ˜109ms -2 , approaching the surface gravity of a neutron star. As one application of such extreme noninertial forces in a mesoscopic setting, we consider a model two-path atom interferometer with one path consisting of the 100 MHz vibrating wire atom guide. The vibrating wire guide serves as a noninertial reference frame and induces an in principle measurable phase shift in the wave function of an atom traversing the wire frame. We furthermore consider the effect on the two-path atom wave interference when the vibrating wire is modeled as a quantum object, hence functioning as a quantum noninertial reference frame. We outline a possible realization of the vibrating wire, atom interferometer using a superfluid helium quantum interference setup.

  9. Frames of reference and categorical/coordinate spatial relations in a "what was where" task.

    PubMed

    Ruotolo, Francesco; Iachini, Tina; Ruggiero, Gennaro; van der Ham, Ineke J M; Postma, Albert

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how people use egocentric (i.e., with respect to their body) and allocentric (i.e., with respect to another element in the environment) references in combination with coordinate (metric) or categorical (abstract) spatial information to identify a target element. Participants were asked to memorize triads of 3D objects or 2D figures, and immediately or after a delay of 5 s, they had to verbally indicate what was the object/figure: (1) closest/farthest to them (egocentric coordinate task); (2) on their right/left (egocentric categorical task); (3) closest/farthest to another object/figure (allocentric coordinate task); (4) on the right/left of another object/figure (allocentric categorical task). Results showed that the use of 2D figures favored categorical judgments over the coordinate ones with either an egocentric or an allocentric reference frame, whereas the use of 3D objects specifically favored egocentric coordinate judgments rather than the allocentric ones. Furthermore, egocentric judgments were more accurate than allocentric judgments when the response was Immediate rather than delayed and 3D objects rather than 2D figures were used. This pattern of results is discussed in the light of the functional roles attributed to the frames of reference and spatial relations by relevant theories of visuospatial processing. PMID:27180248

  10. Limited Aspects of Reality: Frames of Reference in Language Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Glenn; Svalberg, Agneta

    2013-01-01

    Language testers operate within two frames of reference: norm-referenced (NRT) and criterion-referenced testing (CRT). The former underpins the world of large-scale standardized testing that prioritizes variability and comparison. The latter supports substantive score meaning in formative and domain specific assessment. Some claim that the…

  11. Frame of Reference: Communicating with Understanding. Essay and Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markham, Reed

    Each individual views the world from a frame of reference that is unique and personal. Messages are perceived in three steps: (1) data is selected data; (2) information is organized in some meaningful way; and (3) the information is interpreted. Three activities (paperfolding, T-puzzle, and cooperative geometry) were devised to display the need…

  12. Cross-Sensory Transfer of Reference Frames in Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Jonathan W.; Avraamides, Marios N.

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments investigated whether visual cues influence spatial reference frame selection for locations learned through touch. Participants experienced visual cues emphasizing specific environmental axes and later learned objects through touch. Visual cues were manipulated and haptic learning conditions were held constant. Imagined perspective…

  13. Reference Frames during the Acquisition and Development of Spatial Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Jonathan W.; McNamara, Timothy P.

    2010-01-01

    Four experiments investigated the role of reference frames during the acquisition and development of spatial knowledge, when learning occurs incrementally across views. In two experiments, participants learned overlapping spatial layouts. Layout 1 was first studied in isolation, and Layout 2 was later studied in the presence of Layout 1. The…

  14. Change of Reference Frame for Tactile Localization during Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagel, Birthe; Heed, Tobias; Roder, Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    Temporal order judgements (TOJ) for two tactile stimuli, one presented to the left and one to the right hand, are less precise when the hands are crossed over the midline than when the hands are uncrossed. This "crossed hand" effect has been considered as evidence for a remapping of tactile input into an external reference frame. Since late, but…

  15. The Bernoulli Equation in a Moving Reference Frame

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2011-01-01

    Unlike other standard equations in introductory classical mechanics, the Bernoulli equation is not Galilean invariant. The explanation is that, in a reference frame moving with respect to constrictions or obstacles, those surfaces do work on the fluid, constituting an extra term that needs to be included in the work-energy calculation. A…

  16. Deriving a geocentric reference frame for satellite positioning and navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malla, R. P.; Wu, S.-C.

    1988-01-01

    With the advent of Earth-orbiting geodetic satellites, nongeocentric datums or reference frames have become things of the past. Accurate geocentric three-dimensional positioning is now possible and is of great importance for various geodetic and oceanographic applications. While relative positioning accuracy of a few centimeters has become a reality using very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), the uncertainty in the offset of the adopted coordinate system origin from the geocenter is still believed to be on the order of 1 meter. Satellite laser ranging (SLR), however, is capable of determining this offset to better than 10 cm, but this is possible only after years of measurements. Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements provide a powerful tool for an accurate determination of this origin offset. Two strategies are discussed. The first strategy utilizes the precise relative positions that were predetermined by VLBI to fix the frame orientation and the absolute scaling, while the offset from the geocenter is determined from GPS measurements. Three different cases are presented under this strategy. The reference frame thus adopted will be consistent with the VLBI coordinate system. The second strategy establishes a reference frame by holding only the longitude of one of the tracking sites fixed. The absolute scaling is determined by the adopted gravitational constant (GM) of the Earth; and the latitude is inferred from the time signature of the Earth rotation in the GPS measurements. The coordinate system thus defined will be a geocentric Earth-fixed coordinate system.

  17. The Bernoulli equation in a moving reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2011-03-01

    Unlike other standard equations in introductory classical mechanics, the Bernoulli equation is not Galilean invariant. The explanation is that, in a reference frame moving with respect to constrictions or obstacles, those surfaces do work on the fluid, constituting an extra term that needs to be included in the work-energy calculation. A quantitative example is presented here for a horizontal tapered pipe. A frame-independent expression for the pressure drop in the pipe is obtained. The concepts discussed in this paper are accessible to introductory undergraduate physics majors.

  18. The International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) and the Relationship Between Frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Chopo

    2000-01-01

    The International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF), a catalog of VLBI source positions, is now the basis for astrometry and geodesy. Its construction and extension/maintenance will be discussed as well as the relationship of the ICRF, ITRF, and EOP/nutation.

  19. Quantum image coding with a reference-frame-independent scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Belin, Etienne

    2016-07-01

    For binary images, or bit planes of non-binary images, we investigate the possibility of a quantum coding decodable by a receiver in the absence of reference frames shared with the emitter. Direct image coding with one qubit per pixel and non-aligned frames leads to decoding errors equivalent to a quantum bit-flip noise increasing with the misalignment. We show the feasibility of frame-invariant coding by using for each pixel a qubit pair prepared in one of two controlled entangled states. With just one common axis shared between the emitter and receiver, exact decoding for each pixel can be obtained by means of two two-outcome projective measurements operating separately on each qubit of the pair. With strictly no alignment information between the emitter and receiver, exact decoding can be obtained by means of a two-outcome projective measurement operating jointly on the qubit pair. In addition, the frame-invariant coding is shown much more resistant to quantum bit-flip noise compared to the direct non-invariant coding. For a cost per pixel of two (entangled) qubits instead of one, complete frame-invariant image coding and enhanced noise resistance are thus obtained.

  20. The Digital Bee Brain: Integrating and Managing Neurons in a Common 3D Reference System

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, Jürgen; Kuß, Anja; Lamecker, Hans; Zachow, Stefan; Hege, Hans-Christian; Lienhard, Matthias; Singer, Jochen; Neubert, Kerstin; Menzel, Randolf

    2010-01-01

    The honeybee standard brain (HSB) serves as an interactive tool for relating morphologies of bee brain neurons and provides a reference system for functional and bibliographical properties (http://www.neurobiologie.fu-berlin.de/beebrain/). The ultimate goal is to document not only the morphological network properties of neurons collected from separate brains, but also to establish a graphical user interface for a neuron-related data base. Here, we review the current methods and protocols used to incorporate neuronal reconstructions into the HSB. Our registration protocol consists of two separate steps applied to imaging data from two-channel confocal microscopy scans: (1) The reconstruction of the neuron, facilitated by an automatic extraction of the neuron's skeleton based on threshold segmentation, and (2) the semi-automatic 3D segmentation of the neuropils and their registration with the HSB. The integration of neurons in the HSB is performed by applying the transformation computed in step (2) to the reconstructed neurons of step (1). The most critical issue of this protocol in terms of user interaction time – the segmentation process – is drastically improved by the use of a model-based segmentation process. Furthermore, the underlying statistical shape models (SSM) allow the visualization and analysis of characteristic variations in large sets of bee brain data. The anatomy of neural networks composed of multiple neurons that are registered into the HSB are visualized by depicting the 3D reconstructions together with semantic information with the objective to integrate data from multiple sources (electrophysiology, imaging, immunocytochemistry, molecular biology). Ultimately, this will allow the user to specify cell types and retrieve their morphologies along with physiological characterizations. PMID:20827403

  1. Determination and Maintenance of the Galileo Terrestrial Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsche, Mathias

    2016-04-01

    A highly precise and stable Galileo Terrestrial Reference Frame (GTRF) is a crucial prerequisite for the provision of precise Galileo products and related services. The GTRF determination shall be compatible with the latest International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) providing the same level of accuracy, long-term stability, and reliability to the maximum extent possible. The connection to ITRF is realized and validated by stations of the International GNSS Service (IGS) and by geodetic local ties to stations equipped with other geodetic techniques. Primary GTRF input data are provided by the Orbit Validation Facility (OVF) including precise satellite orbit and clocks, ground tracking station coordinates and Earth rotation parameters. The OVF service is delivered by the GGSP consortium, a group of five European institutes having a strong geodetic background. In this presentation, we provide an up-to-date overview on the latest GTRF release and the current OVF status.

  2. Disentangling the External Reference Frames Relevant to Tactile Localization

    PubMed Central

    Backhaus, Jenny; Röder, Brigitte; Badde, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Different reference frames appear to be relevant for tactile spatial coding. When participants give temporal order judgments (TOJ) of two tactile stimuli, one on each hand, performance declines when the hands are crossed. This effect is attributed to a conflict between anatomical and external location codes: hand crossing places the anatomically right hand into the left side of external space. However, hand crossing alone does not specify the anchor of the external reference frame, such as gaze, trunk, or the stimulated limb. Experiments that used explicit localization responses, such as pointing to tactile stimuli rather than crossing manipulations, have consistently implicated gaze-centered coding for touch. To test whether crossing effects can be explained by gaze-centered coding alone, participants made TOJ while the position of the hands was manipulated relative to gaze and trunk. The two hands either lay on different sides of space relative to gaze or trunk, or they both lay on one side of the respective space. In the latter posture, one hand was on its "regular side of space" despite hand crossing, thus reducing overall conflict between anatomical and external codes. TOJ crossing effects were significantly reduced when the hands were both located on the same side of space relative to gaze, indicating gaze-centered coding. Evidence for trunk-centered coding was tentative, with an effect in reaction time but not in accuracy. These results link paradigms that use explicit localization and TOJ, and corroborate the relevance of gaze-related coding for touch. Yet, gaze and trunk-centered coding did not account for the total size of crossing effects, suggesting that tactile localization relies on additional, possibly limb-centered, reference frames. Thus, tactile location appears to be estimated by integrating multiple anatomical and external reference frames. PMID:27391805

  3. Disentangling the External Reference Frames Relevant to Tactile Localization.

    PubMed

    Heed, Tobias; Backhaus, Jenny; Röder, Brigitte; Badde, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Different reference frames appear to be relevant for tactile spatial coding. When participants give temporal order judgments (TOJ) of two tactile stimuli, one on each hand, performance declines when the hands are crossed. This effect is attributed to a conflict between anatomical and external location codes: hand crossing places the anatomically right hand into the left side of external space. However, hand crossing alone does not specify the anchor of the external reference frame, such as gaze, trunk, or the stimulated limb. Experiments that used explicit localization responses, such as pointing to tactile stimuli rather than crossing manipulations, have consistently implicated gaze-centered coding for touch. To test whether crossing effects can be explained by gaze-centered coding alone, participants made TOJ while the position of the hands was manipulated relative to gaze and trunk. The two hands either lay on different sides of space relative to gaze or trunk, or they both lay on one side of the respective space. In the latter posture, one hand was on its "regular side of space" despite hand crossing, thus reducing overall conflict between anatomical and external codes. TOJ crossing effects were significantly reduced when the hands were both located on the same side of space relative to gaze, indicating gaze-centered coding. Evidence for trunk-centered coding was tentative, with an effect in reaction time but not in accuracy. These results link paradigms that use explicit localization and TOJ, and corroborate the relevance of gaze-related coding for touch. Yet, gaze and trunk-centered coding did not account for the total size of crossing effects, suggesting that tactile localization relies on additional, possibly limb-centered, reference frames. Thus, tactile location appears to be estimated by integrating multiple anatomical and external reference frames. PMID:27391805

  4. Disentangling the External Reference Frames Relevant to Tactile Localization.

    PubMed

    Heed, Tobias; Backhaus, Jenny; Röder, Brigitte; Badde, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Different reference frames appear to be relevant for tactile spatial coding. When participants give temporal order judgments (TOJ) of two tactile stimuli, one on each hand, performance declines when the hands are crossed. This effect is attributed to a conflict between anatomical and external location codes: hand crossing places the anatomically right hand into the left side of external space. However, hand crossing alone does not specify the anchor of the external reference frame, such as gaze, trunk, or the stimulated limb. Experiments that used explicit localization responses, such as pointing to tactile stimuli rather than crossing manipulations, have consistently implicated gaze-centered coding for touch. To test whether crossing effects can be explained by gaze-centered coding alone, participants made TOJ while the position of the hands was manipulated relative to gaze and trunk. The two hands either lay on different sides of space relative to gaze or trunk, or they both lay on one side of the respective space. In the latter posture, one hand was on its "regular side of space" despite hand crossing, thus reducing overall conflict between anatomical and external codes. TOJ crossing effects were significantly reduced when the hands were both located on the same side of space relative to gaze, indicating gaze-centered coding. Evidence for trunk-centered coding was tentative, with an effect in reaction time but not in accuracy. These results link paradigms that use explicit localization and TOJ, and corroborate the relevance of gaze-related coding for touch. Yet, gaze and trunk-centered coding did not account for the total size of crossing effects, suggesting that tactile localization relies on additional, possibly limb-centered, reference frames. Thus, tactile location appears to be estimated by integrating multiple anatomical and external reference frames.

  5. The Effect of Companions on the SIM Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Turyshev, Slava G.

    2000-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is a 10-m Michelson space-based optical interferometer designed for precision astrometry (4 microarcseconds, 3 microarcseconds/year) with better accuracy than before over a narrow field of view. One of the primary objectives of the SIM instrument is to determine accurately the directions to a grid of stars, together with their proper motions and parallax, improving a priori knowledge by nearly three orders of magnitude over Hipparcos and one order of magnitude over FAME's planned accuracy (Johnston, 2000). The instrument does not measure directly the angular separation between stars, but rather it measures the projection of each star's direction vector onto the interferometer baseline vector by measuring the pathlength delay of starlight as it passes through the two arms of the interferometer. The accuracy and stability of SIM's celestial reference frame is subject to degradation over the 5-year mission from the reflex motion induced by massive companions of the objects used to construct the celestial reference frame. The authors present the results of simulations that show the sensitivity of reference frame accuracy to companions as a function of mass and period. They assume that pre-launch ground surveys will eliminate all objects with RMS radial velocity greater than 10 m/s. They further assume that the standard astrometric parameters of position, parallax, and proper motion plus acceleration terms in right ascension and declination will be allowed to absorb reflex motion.

  6. On the transition towards slow manifold in shallow-water and 3D Euler equations in a rotating frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalov, A.

    1994-01-01

    The long-time, asymptotic state of rotating homogeneous shallow-water equations is investigated. Our analysis is based on long-time averaged rotating shallow-water equations describing interactions of large-scale, horizontal, two-dimensional motions with surface inertial-gravity waves field for a shallow, uniformly rotating fluid layer. These equations are obtained in two steps: first by introducing a Poincare/Kelvin linear propagator directly into classical shallow-water equations, then by averaging. The averaged equations describe interaction of wave fields with large-scale motions on time scales long compared to the time scale 1/f(sub o) introduced by rotation (f(sub o)/2-angular velocity of background rotation). The present analysis is similar to the one presented by Waleffe (1991) for 3D Euler equations in a rotating frame. However, since three-wave interactions in rotating shallow-water equations are forbidden, the final equations describing the asymptotic state are simplified considerably. Special emphasis is given to a new conservation law found in the asymptotic state and decoupling of the dynamics of the divergence free part of the velocity field. The possible rising of a decoupled dynamics in the asymptotic state is also investigated for homogeneous turbulence subjected to a background rotation. In our analysis we use long-time expansion, where the velocity field is decomposed into the 'slow manifold' part (the manifold which is unaffected by the linear 'rapid' effects of rotation or the inertial waves) and a formal 3D disturbance. We derive the physical space version of the long-time averaged equations and consider an invariant, basis-free derivation. This formulation can be used to generalize Waleffe's (1991) helical decomposition to viscous inhomogeneous flows (e.g. problems in cylindrical geometry with no-slip boundary conditions on the cylinder surface and homogeneous in the vertical direction).

  7. Building a 3d Reference Model for Canal Tunnel Surveying Using Sonar and Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisan, E.; Charbonnier, P.; Foucher, P.; Grussenmeyer, P.; Guillemin, S.; Koehl, M.

    2015-04-01

    Maintaining canal tunnels is not only a matter of cultural and historical preservation, but also a commercial necessity and a security issue. This contribution adresses the problem of building a full 3D reference model of a canal tunnel by merging SONAR (for underwater data recording) and LASER data (for the above-water parts). Although both scanning devices produce point clouds, their properties are rather different. In particular, SONAR data are very noisy and their processing raises several issues related to the device capacities, the acquisition setup and the tubular shape of the tunnel. The proposed methodology relies on a denoising step by meshing, followed by the registration of SONAR data with the geo-referenced LASER data. Since there is no overlap between point clouds, a 3-step procedure is proposed to robustly estimate the registration parameters. In this paper, we report a first experimental survey, which concerned the entrance of a canal tunnel. The obtained results are promising and the analysis of the method raises several improvement directions that will help obtaining more accurate models, in a more automated fashion, in the limits of the involved technology.

  8. Optical position meters analyzed in the noninertial reference frames

    SciTech Connect

    Tarabrin, Sergey P.; Seleznyov, Alexander A.

    2008-09-15

    In the framework of general relativity we develop a method for the analysis of the operation of the optical position meters in their photodetectors proper reference frames. These frames are noninertial in general due to the action of external fluctuative forces on meters test masses, including detectors. For comparison we also perform the calculations in the laboratory (globally inertial) reference frame and demonstrate that for certain optical schemes laboratory-based analysis results in unmeasurable quantities, in contrast to the detector-based analysis. We also calculate the response of the simplest optical meters to weak plane gravitational waves and fluctuative motions of their test masses. It is demonstrated that for the round-trip meter analysis in both the transverse-traceless (TT) and local Lorentz (LL) gauges produces equal results, while for the forward-trip meter corresponding results differ in accordance with different physical assumptions (e.g. procedure of clocks synchronization) implicitly underlying the construction of the TT and LL gauges.

  9. Multiple 3D reference system analyses for Phobos grooves, a novel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simioni, Emanuele; Pajola, Maurizio; Massironi, Matteo; Cremonese, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    Grooves analysis has represented in the last decade a robust method for geomorphological study of small bodies, as is the case for asteroids 951 Gaspra (Veverka et al., 1994), 243 Ida (Belton et al., 1994), 433 Eros (Thomas et al., (2002), Buczkowski et al., 2008), 21 Lutetia (Massironi et al., 2011, *Besse et al., 2014*) and 4 Vesta (Buczkowski et al., 2*012). Hence, such source of information can be deeper used for a novel approach presented on Phobos with the aim of providing more hints on its harshly debated origin. Stereo-plots and cyclographs represent two methods, unified under the name of stereographic projections, commonly used to describe the statistic of the orientations (dip-angle and dip-direction) of different planes with respect to cardinal points and a reference horizontal plane (Bucher, 1944; Phillips, 1954; Ragan, 1985). However this reference system is ambiguous for any applications on small irregular bodies such as asteroids or comets since it does not permit to highlight systems of parallel anisotropies and to have an idea of their distribution with respect to a given surface feature (for example an impact crater). In this work we show a novel approach for stereographic projections focusing to a multi-reference system. The multi-reference system can be centered on a specific surface feature such as a crater and can alternatively use an absolute reference plane containing the center of figure of the body (to retrieve systems of parallel anisotropies) or a relative horizontal plane (to understand the distribution of the anisotropies with respect to the central feature). In this way we are able to well define the distribution of the grooves expected to be originated from a impact cratering event in a small body. Following this methodology, we have extracted 352 3D fracture planes from the attitudes of the grooves over the surface topography of Phobos and, for each plane, the local surface versor has been defined. Consequently, stereo-plots on

  10. A digital frame of reference for viewing digital images.

    PubMed

    Brettle, D S

    2001-01-01

    Digital imaging is becoming widespread in diagnostic radiology. Most diagnostic digital images do not relate explicitly to the physical processes involved in their generation but are, in essence, a "pseudo" image generated from digital data using pre- and post-processing. Without knowledge of how the image was generated, there is a potential to misinterpret the image data. A new design of digitally generated graphic is presented that is intended to help maintain the frame of reference when viewing digitally processed images. The intention is that the digital frame of reference (DFOR) be included with all digitally processed images and be processed using the same factors as were used on the image. An unprocessed DFOR can then be displayed adjacent to the processed DFOR to re-introduce a frame of reference and to clearly illustrate the effect of any processes that have been applied to the image. This would allow the viewer to perceive any artefacts that may have been introduced into the image by the processing. This is particularly important where the image requires interpretation by the viewer, as in medical diagnosis. This paper presents a grey scale version of the DFOR that is suitable for applications such as medical imaging. The DFOR includes: grey scale from 0 to the maximum bit depth in 0%, 30%, 70% and 100% steps on a 50% background; the full frequency range from 0 to the Nyquist frequency; high, medium and low contrast boundaries; and linear/curvilinear features. The same method could be extended to any other digital image system and could be easily modified to include colour.

  11. A Regional Geodetic Reference Frame for Asia and the Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, J.; Hu, G.; Jia, M.

    2009-04-01

    In 1994, the United Nations Regional Cartographic Conference for Asia and the Pacific resolved to establish a Permanent Committee comprising of national surveying and mapping agencies to address the concept of establishing a common geographic information infrastructure for the region. This resolution subsequently led to the establishment of the Permanent Committee for GIS Infrastructure for the Asia and Pacific (PCGIAP). One of the goals of the PCGIAP was to establish and maintain a precise understanding of the relationship between permanent geodetic stations across the region. To this end, campaign-style geodetic-GPS observations, coordinated by Geoscience Australia, have been undertaken throughout the region since 1997. In this presentation, we discuss the development of an Asia Pacific regional reference frame based on the PCGIAP GPS campaign data, which now includes data from 417 non-IGS GPS stations and provides long term crustal deformation estimates for over 200 GPS stations throughout the region. We overview and evaluate: our combination strategy with particular emphasis on the alignment of the solution onto the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF); the sensitivity of the solution to reference frame site selection; the treatment of regional co-seismic and post-seismic deformation; and the Asia-Pacific contribution to the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) Working Group on "Regional Dense Velocity Fields". The level of consistency of the coordinate estimates with respect to ITRF2005 is 6, 5, 15 mm, in the east, north and up components, respectively, while the velocity estimates are consistent at 2, 2, 6 mm/yr in the east, north and up components, respectively.

  12. Inhibition within a Reference Frame during the Interpretation of Spatial Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Laura A.; Van Deman, Shannon R.

    2008-01-01

    Spatial terms such as "right" are potentially ambiguous because they can refer to different regions of space when defined by competing reference frames (e.g., my "right" within a relative reference frame versus an object's "right" within an intrinsic reference frame). In such situations, previous research has suggested that multiple reference…

  13. Spatial Reasoning With Multiple Intrinsic Frames of Reference

    PubMed Central

    Tamborello, Franklin P; Sun, Yanlong; Wang, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Establishing and updating spatial relationships between objects in the environment is vital to maintaining situation awareness and supporting many socio-spatial tasks. In a complex environment, people often need to utilize multiple reference systems that are intrinsic to different objects (intrinsic frame of reference, IFOR), but these IFORs may conflict with each other in one or more ways. Current spatial cognition theories do not adequately address how people handle multi-IFOR reasoning problems. Two experiments manipulated relative orientations of two task-relevant objects with intrinsic axes of orientation as well as their relative task salience. Response times (RTs) decreased with increasing salience of the targeted IFOR. In addition, RTs increased as a consequence of intrinsic orientation conflict, but not by amount of orientation difference. The results suggest that people encounter difficulties when they have to process two conflicting IFOR representations, and that they seem to prioritize processing of each IFOR by salience. PMID:21768066

  14. Reference-frame-independent quantum key distribution with source flaws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Can; Sun, Shi-Hai; Ma, Xiang-Chun; Tang, Guang-Zhao; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2015-10-01

    Compared with the traditional protocols of quantum key distribution (QKD), the reference-frame-independent (RFI)-QKD protocol has been generally proved to be very useful and practical, since its experimental implementation can be simplified without the alignment of a reference frame. In most RFI-QKD systems, the encoding states are always taken to be perfect, which, however, is not practical in realizations. In this paper, we consider the security of RFI QKD with source flaws based on the loss-tolerant method proposed by Tamaki et al. [Phys. Rev. A 90, 052314 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.052314]. As the six-state protocol can be realized with four states, we show that the RFI-QKD protocol can also be performed with only four encoding states instead of six encoding states in its standard version. Furthermore, the numerical simulation results show that the source flaws in the key-generation basis (Z basis) will reduce the key rate but are loss tolerant, while the ones in X and Y bases almost have no effect and the key rate remains almost the same even when they are very large. Hence, our method and results will have important significance in practical experiments, especially in earth-to-satellite or chip-to-chip quantum communications.

  15. Terrestrial Reference Systems and Frames. A review of current activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, C. C.

    2009-12-01

    Terrestrial Reference Systems (TRS) refer to an important domain of Geodesy, involving both theoretical and applied aspects, as well as deep connections with Astronomy, Earth Sciences and Geo-information. The concept of TRS implies several visions : - An astronomical vision, using TRS to study translational and rotational motion of the Earth in inertial space - An Earth Science vision, using TRS to build physical models of the Earth system, and its various components (solid earth, oceans, atmosphere, hydrosphere) - A metrological vision, using TRS together with suitable coordinate systems (geographical coordinates, map projections…) to define geographical position of objects in the Earth’s vicinity A survey of current activities in this area is presented, referring to works done by the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) and more specifically its Commission 1, GGOS and IERS. A focus is done on concepts and terminology, as well as progresses to get a wide acceptance on the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) and its system of realizations through global, regional and national frames, as well as through specific systems such as satellite navigation systems.

  16. USNO programs to improve the optical reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Sean E.

    The United States Naval Observatory (USNO) is working toward improving the optical reference frame by two approaches: 1) converting older data to the Hipparcos system, and 2) making new, high quality observations. Taken together, these approaches will improve individual proper motion of stars, extend the frame to magnitude 16.5 by adding 60 million additional stars, and strengthen the tie between the optical and radio frames. A new reference catalog, currently called ``ACT 2'' (an acronym from the words Astrographic Catalog and Tycho), is being compiled. The main difference between this new catalog and the ACT is that the Astrographic Catalogue (AC) data will be re-reduced with a new version of ACRS (Astrographic Catalog Reference Stars), whose 160 input catalogs are being directly transformed to the ICRS via Hipparcos. Additionally, the AC data will not only be combined with the Tycho positions to form the proper motions (as was the case with ACT), but they will be added to the positional data from all catalogs forming the ACRS. Then, for each star, a comparison of the standard errors of proper motion will be made between these data, the Hipparcos catalog and Tycho catalog. In each case, the best astrometry will be extracted to form the ACT 2. The ACT 2 will be utilized in the reduction of the USNO CCD Astrograph (UCAC-S) program. This program, currently in progress at CTIO, uses the newly automated USNO CCD Astrograph and a 4k-by-4k Kodak CCD camera to observe the entire Southern Hemisphere down to mv = 16.5. Positional accuracies of the final catalog are expected to be 20 mas for stars of mv = 7.5 to 15.0; the accuracies degrade to 60 mas for stars at mv = 16.5. Additional deep exposures are being taken surrounding 200 of the brighter ICRF sources. With these deep exposures, an investigation of the rotation in the Hipparcos proper motion system at a level of 0.1 mas/year will be made. To derive proper motions for the stars in the UCAC-S project, the observed

  17. Reframing Student Affairs Leadership: An Analysis of Organizational Frames of Reference and Locus of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tull, Ashley; Freeman, Jerrid P.

    2011-01-01

    Examined in this study were the identified frames of reference and locus of control used by 478 student affairs administrators. Administrator responses were examined to identify frames of reference most commonly used and their preference order. Locus of control most commonly used and the relationship between frames of reference and locus of…

  18. Comparison of Realizations of the Terrestrial Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, C.; Macmillan, D.; Bolotin, S.; Le Bail, K.; Gordon, D.; Gipson, J.

    2015-01-01

    IGN and DGFI both generated realizations of the terrestrial reference frame under the auspices of the IERS from combination of the same space geodetic data. We compared the IGN and DGFI TRFs with a GSFC CALC/SOLVE TRF. WRMS position and velocity differences for the 40 most frequently observed sites were 2-3 mm and 0.3-0.4 mm/year. There was a scale difference of 0.39/0.09 ppb between the IGN/DGFI realizations and the GSFC solution. When we fixed positions and velocities to either the IGN or DGFI values in CALC/SOLVE solutions, the resulting EOP estimates were not significantly different from the estimates from a standard TRF solution.

  19. VLBI terrestrial reference frame contributions to ITRF2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böckmann, Sarah; Artz, T.; Nothnagel, A.

    2010-03-01

    In late 2008, the Product Center for the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) issued a call for contributions to the next realization of the International Terrestrial Reference System, ITRF2008. The official contribution of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) to ITRF2008 consists of session-wise datum-free normal equations of altogether 4,539 daily Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) sessions from 1979.7 to 2009.0 including data of 115 different VLBI sites. It is the result of a combination of individual series of session-wise datum-free normal equations provided by seven analysis centers (ACs) of the IVS. All series are completely reprocessed following homogeneous analysis options according to the IERS Conventions 2003 and IVS Analysis Conventions. Altogether, nine IVS ACs analyzed the full history of VLBI observations with four different software packages. Unfortunately, the contributions of two ACs, Institute of Applied Astronomy (IAA) and Geoscience Australia (AUS), had to be excluded from the combination process. This was mostly done because the IAA series exhibits a clear scale offset while the solution computed from normal equations contained in the AUS SINEX files yielded unreliable results. Based on the experience gathered since the combination efforts for ITRF2005, some discrepancies between the individual series were discovered and overcome. Thus, the consistency of the individual VLBI solutions has improved considerably. The agreement in terms of WRMS of the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) horizontal components is 1 mm, of the height component 2 mm. Comparisons between ITRF2005 and the combined TRF solution for ITRF2008 yielded systematic height differences of up to 5 mm with a zonal signature. These differences can be related to a pole tide correction referenced to a zero mean pole used by four of five IVS ACs in the ITRF2005

  20. Accurate Realization of GPS Vertical Global Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elosegui, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project is to improve our current understanding of GPS error sources associated with estimates of radial velocities at global scales. An improvement in the accuracy of radial global velocities would have a very positive impact on a large number of geophysical studies of current general interest such as global sea-level and climate change, coastal hazards, glacial isostatic adjustment, atmospheric and oceanic loading, glaciology and ice mass variability, tectonic deformation and volcanic inflation, and geoid variability. A set of GPS error sources relevant to this project are those related to the combination of the positions and velocities of a set of globally distributed stations as determined &om the analysis of GPS data, including possible methods of combining and defining terrestrial reference frames. This is were our research activities during this reporting period have concentrated. During this reporting period, we have researched two topics: (1) The effect of errors on the GPS satellite antenna models (or lack thereof) on global GPS vertical position and velocity estimates; (2) The effect of reference W e definition and practice on estimates of the geocenter variations.

  1. 3D-MAD: A Full Reference Stereoscopic Image Quality Estimator Based on Binocular Lightness and Contrast Perception.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Chandler, Damon M

    2015-11-01

    Algorithms for a stereoscopic image quality assessment (IQA) aim to estimate the qualities of 3D images in a manner that agrees with human judgments. The modern stereoscopic IQA algorithms often apply 2D IQA algorithms on stereoscopic views, disparity maps, and/or cyclopean images, to yield an overall quality estimate based on the properties of the human visual system. This paper presents an extension of our previous 2D most apparent distortion (MAD) algorithm to a 3D version (3D-MAD) to evaluate 3D image quality. The 3D-MAD operates via two main stages, which estimate perceived quality degradation due to 1) distortion of the monocular views and 2) distortion of the cyclopean view. In the first stage, the conventional MAD algorithm is applied on the two monocular views, and then the combined binocular quality is estimated via a weighted sum of the two estimates, where the weights are determined based on a block-based contrast measure. In the second stage, intermediate maps corresponding to the lightness distance and the pixel-based contrast are generated based on a multipathway contrast gain-control model. Then, the cyclopean view quality is estimated by measuring the statistical-difference-based features obtained from the reference stereopair and the distorted stereopair, respectively. Finally, the estimates obtained from the two stages are combined to yield an overall quality score of the stereoscopic image. Tests on various 3D image quality databases demonstrate that our algorithm significantly improves upon many other state-of-the-art 2D/3D IQA algorithms. PMID:26186775

  2. Gaia Reference frame determination: the AVU/GSR pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchiato, Alberto; Abbas, Ummi; Becciani, Ugo; Bianchi, Luca; Bucciarelli, Beatrice; Crosta, Mariateresa; Lattanzi, Mario G.

    2015-08-01

    The main goal of the Gaia ESA mission is the production of a 5 parameters astrometric catalog - i.e. including positions, parallaxes and the two components of the proper motions - of about 1 billion stars of our Galaxy at an accuracy level going from the few micro-arcseconds of the brightest objects to some ~100 micro-arcseconds of the faintests. This goal will be reached by means of high-precision astrometric measurements conducted by a satellite sweeping continuously the celestial sphere during its 5-years mission.A fundamental step toward the realization of this catalog is the so-called ''Sphere Reconstruction'', which determines the celestial reference frame using the observations of a subset of up to 100 million ''primary stars'' among those observed by Gaia.From a mathematical point of view, these observations translate into a large number of equations, linearized with respect to the unknown parameters around known initial values, whose solution in the least-squares sense eventually provides the catalog with its errors, and determines the Gaia reference frame.This represents an extremely challenging problem because of the high accuracy of the observations and of the large number of unknowns involved. The former issue implies that an adequately accurate relativistic astrometric model has to be used, while the huge number of unknowns and observations puts this task at the forefront of the High-Performance Computing problems.These challenges, and the absolute character of the Gaia measurements and results, calls for a careful scientific validation of the sphere reconstruction, as it was done for the previous HIPPARCOS mission. For these reasons the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) decided to replicate the baseline process, named AGIS (Astrometric Global Iterative Solution) with another independent solution, named GSR (Global Sphere Reconstruction) which uses a different astrometric model and different algorithms for the system solution

  3. Navigating in a virtual three-dimensional maze: how do egocentric and allocentric reference frames interact?

    PubMed

    Vidal, Manuel; Amorim, Michel-Ange; Berthoz, Alain

    2004-05-01

    Spatial navigation in the presence of gravity restricts one's displacement to two-dimensional (2D) planes. Therefore, self-motion only includes translations and yaw rotations. In contrast, in weightlessness, one can translate and turn in any direction. In the first experiment, we compared the ability to memorize a virtual three-dimensional (3D) maze after passive exploration in three self-motion conditions, each using a different set of rotations for turning. Subjects indicated which pathway they traversed among four successive corridors presented from an outside perspective. Results showed that exploring in the terrestrial condition (including only yaw rotations, the viewer's virtual body remaining upright) allowed better recognition of the corridor than in the weightless condition (which included pitch and yaw rotations according to the turns), particularly for more complex 3D structures. The more frequently the viewer-defined (egocentric) and the global environment (allocentric) verticals were aligned during exploration, the more easily subjects could memorize the 3D maze, suggesting that simplifying the relationship between the egocentric and allocentric reference frames facilitates spatial updating. Nevertheless, with practice, performance in the weightless condition improved whereas in the natural terrestrial condition performance remained at its initial maximum, indicating that the cognitive processes involved were innate for this particular condition. The second experiment revealed that single rotations in the terrestrial condition must be performed around the body axis in order to obtain optimal spatial updating performance, and that the latter is independent of the conflict with gravity that might favor this condition when one is actually upright. This suggests that although humans can memorize 3D-structured environments their innate neurocognitive functions appear to be specialized for natural 2D navigation.

  4. Learning to Provide 3D Virtual Reference: A Library Science Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Megan; Purpur, Geraldine; Abbott, Lisa T.

    2009-01-01

    In spring semester 2009, two of the authors taught LIB 5020--Information Sources & Services to graduate library science students at Appalachian State University. The course covers information seeking patterns and provides an overview of reference services. The course is also designed to examine and evaluate library reference materials and other…

  5. Neglect of radial and vertical space: importance of the retinotopic reference frame.

    PubMed Central

    Adair, J C; Williamson, D J; Jacobs, D H; Na, D L; Heilman, K M

    1995-01-01

    Neglect from bilateral brain injury can disrupt responses along space defined by the vertical and radial axes. The spatial reference frames for vertical and radial neglect remain largely undefined, however. The viewer centred system, for example, consists of retinocentric and cephalocentric/corporacentric frames. In the present study, different viewer centred reference frames were dissociated in a patient with combined far radial superior vertical neglect through performance of radial line bisections above and below eye level. To separate reference frames for vertical space, bisections were performed while the patient was lying sideways. Results suggest that this patient's neglect respected a retinotopic viewer centred reference frame. Images PMID:7608675

  6. Geodetic Reference System Transformations of 3d Archival Geospatial Data Using a Single SSC Terrasar-X Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilaki, D. I.; Stamos, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Many older maps were created using reference coordinate systems which are no longer available, either because no information to a datum was taken in the first place or the reference system is forgotten. In other cases the relationship between the map's coordinate system is not known with precision, meaning that its absolute error is much larger than its relative error. In this paper the georeferencing of medium-scale maps is computed using a single TerraSAR-X image. A single TerraSAR-X image has high geolocation accuracy but it has no 3D information. The map, however, provides the missing 3D information, and thus it is possible to compute the georeferencing of the map using the TerraSAR-X geolocation information, assembling the information of both sources to produce 3D points in the reference system of the TerraSAR-X image. Two methods based on this concept are proposed. The methods are tested with real world examples and the results are promising for further research.

  7. GPS inferred geocentric reference frame for satellite positioning and navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malla, Rajendra P.; Wu, Sien-Chong

    1989-01-01

    Accurate geocentric three-dimensional positioning is of great importance for various geodetic and oceanographic applications. While relative positioning accuracy of a few centimeters has become a reality using Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), the uncertainty in the offset of the adopted coordinate system origin from the geocenter is still believed to be of the order of one meter. Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is capable of determining this offset to better than 10 cm, though, because of the limited number of satellites, this requires a long arc of data. The Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements provide a powerful alternative for an accurate determination of this origin offset in relatively short period of time. Two strategies are discussed, the first utilizes the precise relative positions predetermined by VLBI, whereas the second establishes a reference frame by holding only one of the tracking sites longitude fixed. Covariance analysis studies indicate that geocentric positioning to an accuracy of a few centimeters can be achieved with just one day of precise GPS pseudorange and carrier phase data.

  8. Electron Microscopy: From 2D to 3D Images with Special Reference to Muscle

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief and necessarily very sketchy presentation of the evolution in electron microscopy (EM) imaging that was driven by the necessity of extracting 3-D views from the essentially 2-D images produced by the electron beam. The lens design of standard transmission electron microscope has not been greatly altered since its inception. However, technical advances in specimen preparation, image collection and analysis gradually induced an astounding progression over a period of about 50 years. From the early images that redefined tissues, cell and cell organelles at the sub-micron level, to the current nano-resolution reconstructions of organelles and proteins the step is very large. The review is written by an investigator who has followed the field for many years, but often from the sidelines, and with great wonder. Her interest in muscle ultrastructure colors the writing. More specific detailed reviews are presented in this issue. PMID:26913146

  9. Electron Microscopy: From 2D to 3D Images with Special Reference to Muscle.

    PubMed

    Franzini-Armstrong, Clara

    2015-01-01

    This is a brief and necessarily very sketchy presentation of the evolution in electron microscopy (EM) imaging that was driven by the necessity of extracting 3-D views from the essentially 2-D images produced by the electron beam. The lens design of standard transmission electron microscope has not been greatly altered since its inception. However, technical advances in specimen preparation, image collection and analysis gradually induced an astounding progression over a period of about 50 years. From the early images that redefined tissues, cell and cell organelles at the sub-micron level, to the current nano-resolution reconstructions of organelles and proteins the step is very large. The review is written by an investigator who has followed the field for many years, but often from the sidelines, and with great wonder. Her interest in muscle ultrastructure colors the writing. More specific detailed reviews are presented in this issue. PMID:26913146

  10. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manos, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the "TPT" theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity…

  11. Form finding and analysis of extensible membranes attached to 2-D and 3-D frames intended for micro air vehicles via experimentally validated finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudaram, Yaakov Jack

    This work is concerned with a new method to apply consistent and known pretension to silicone rubber membranes intended for micro air vehicles as well as an understanding in the science of developed pre-tension in membranes constrained by 2- D and 3-D frames and structures. Pre-tension has a marked effect on the static and dynamic response of membrane wings and controls the overall deflections, as such control and measurement of the membrane pre-tension is important. Two different 2-D frame geometries were fabricated to evaluate the technique. For open-cell frames, the pretension was not uniform, whereas it was for closed-cell frames. Results show developed full-field stress and strain fields as a function of membrane attachment temperature and frame geometry along with experimental iterations to prove repeatability. The membranes can be stretched to a specific pretension according to the temperature at which it adheres to frames. Strain fields in membranes attached to 3-D frames at various temperatures are modeled through FEA utilizing Abaqus to be able to predict the developed membrane deformations, stresses, and strains. Rigid frames with various curvatures are built via appropriate molds and then adhered to silicone rubber membranes and elevated to various temperatures to achieve different pre-strains for experimental validation. Additional experiments are conducted for more complex frame geometries involving both convex and concave topologies embedded within frames. Results are then compared with the Abaqus outputs to validate the accuracy of the FEA model. Highly compliant wings have been used for MAV platforms, where the wing structure is determined by some combination of carbon fiber composites and a membrane skin, adhered in between the layers of composite material. Another new technique of attaching membranes firmly on wing structures is introduced, which involves the application of a technology known as corona treatment coupled with another method of

  12. Improved DORIS Reference Frame Solution from NASA GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank; Chinn, D. S.; Le Bail, K.; Zelensky, N. P.; Ray, R. D.; Beckley, B. D.; Beall, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    At GSFC, since 2008, we have been routinely processing data to DORIS and SLR satellites from 1993. A SINEX time series, based on processing of DORIS data from 1993 to 2008 (designated wd10) was included in the IDS combination for ITRF2008 (Le Bail et al., 2010; Valette et al., 2010). We have updated this series with the addition of new satellites Cryosat2 and Jason-2, and the new series (designated wd12) is routinely submitted to the IDS combination center for inclusion in the DORIS operational combination. In preparation for an eventual reprocessing of all the DORIS data for eventual inclusion in a new ITRF we are now updating our processing standards. As a first step, we update to the ITRF2008 reference frame as expressed through DPOD2008. In addition, we apply the GMF and GPT models for the troposphere, and we update the modeling for the change in pitch of SPOT-5 solar arrays after January 2008. Finally, we consider updated standards for static and time-variable gravity modeling. With this base series, we compute cumulative solution, expressed in ITRF2008, and examine the week-by-week station solution parameters, in particular scale, WRMS and Helmert transformation parameters. Finally we consider a joint solution with SLR, where the DORIS system is tied to SLR in two ways, first through the orbit computations using satellites tracked by both SLR and DORIS (e.g. TOPEX, Envisat, Jason-2, Cryosat2), and second through explicit ties at collocated sites. As one of the means of testing of these DORIS-only and SLR+DORIS solutions, we examine the vertical rates at sites in the vicinity of tide gauges.

  13. Evaluating the output stability of LINAC with a reference detector using 3D water phantom.

    PubMed

    Shimozato, Tomohiro; Kojima, Tomo; Sakamoto, Masataka; Hata, Yuji; Sasaki, Koji; Araki, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    We report the discovery of abnormal fluctuations in the output obtained when measuring a water phantom and adjustments that reduce these outliers. Using a newly developed three-dimensional scanning water phantom system, we obtained the depth dose and off-axis dose ratio required for the beam data of a medical linear accelerator (LINAC). The field and reference detectors were set such that the measured values could be viewed in real time. We confirmed the scanning data using the field detector and the change in the output using the reference detector while measuring by using the water phantom. Prior to output adjustment of the LINAC, we observed output abnormalities as high as 18.4%. With optimization of accelerator conditions, the average of the output fluctuation width was reduced to less than +/-0.5%. Through real-time graphing of reference detector measurements during measurement of field detector, we were able to rapidly identify abnormal fluctuations. Although beam data collected during radiation treatment planning are corrected for output fluctuations, it is possible that sudden abnormal fluctuations actually occur in the output. Therefore, the equipment should be tested for output fluctuations at least once a year. Even after minimization of fluctuations, we recommend determining the potential dose administered to the human body taking into account the width of the output fluctuation.

  14. Real-time cardiac synchronization with fixed volume frame rate for reducing physiological instabilities in 3D FMRI.

    PubMed

    Tijssen, Rob H N; Okell, Thomas W; Miller, Karla L

    2011-08-15

    Although 2D echo-planar imaging (EPI) remains the dominant method for functional MRI (FMRI), 3D readouts are receiving more interest as these sequences have favorable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and enable imaging at a high isotropic resolution. Spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) and balanced steady-state free-precession (bSSFP) are rapid sequences that are typically acquired with highly segmented 3D readouts, and thus less sensitive to image distortion and signal dropout. They therefore provide a powerful alternative for FMRI in areas with strong susceptibility offsets, such as deep gray matter structures and the brainstem. Unfortunately, the multi-shot nature of the readout makes these sequences highly sensitive to physiological fluctuations, and large signal instabilities are observed in the inferior regions of the brain. In this work a characterization of the source of these instabilities is given and a new method is presented to reduce the instabilities observed in 3D SPGR and bSSFP. Rapidly acquired single-slice data, which critically sampled the respiratory and cardiac waveforms, showed that cardiac pulsation is the dominant source of the instabilities. Simulations further showed that synchronizing the readout to the cardiac cycle minimizes the instabilities considerably. A real-time synchronization method was therefore developed, which utilizes parallel-imaging techniques to allow cardiac synchronization without alteration of the volume acquisition rate. The implemented method significantly improves the temporal stability in areas that are affected by cardiac-related signal fluctuations. In bSSFP data the tSNR in the brainstem increased by 45%, at the cost of a small reduction in tSNR in the cortical areas. In SPGR the temporal stability is improved by approximately 20% in the subcortical structures and as well as cortical gray matter when synchronization was performed.

  15. Geometric Cues, Reference Frames, and the Equivalence of Experienced-Aligned and Novel-Aligned Views in Human Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Jonathan W.; Sjolund, Lori A.; Sturz, Bradley R.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial memories are often organized around reference frames, and environmental shape provides a salient cue to reference frame selection. To date, however, the environmental cues responsible for influencing reference frame selection remain relatively unknown. To connect research on reference frame selection with that on orientation via…

  16. Effect of Laterally Wedged Insoles on the External Knee Adduction Moment across Different Reference Frames

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Kitamura, Masako; Ushikubo, Tomohiro; Murata, Atsushi; Akagi, Ryuichiro; Sasho, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Objective Biomechanical effects of laterally wedged insoles are assessed by reduction in the knee adduction moment. However, the degree of reduction may vary depending on the reference frame with which it is calculated. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of reference frame on the reduction in the knee adduction moment by laterally wedged insoles. Methods Twenty-nine healthy participants performed gait trials with a laterally wedged insole and with a flat insole as a control. The knee adduction moment, including the first and second peaks and the angular impulse, were calculated using four different reference frames: the femoral frame, tibial frame, laboratory frame and the Joint Coordinate System. Results There were significant effects of reference frame on the knee adduction moment first and second peaks (P < 0.001 for both variables), while the effect was not significant for the angular impulse (P = 0.84). No significant interaction between the gait condition and reference frame was found in either of the knee adduction moment variables (P = 0.99 for all variables), indicating that the effects of laterally wedged insole on the knee adduction moments were similar across the four reference frames. On the other hand, the average percent changes ranged from 9% to 16% for the first peak, from 16% to 18% for the second peak and from 17% to 21% for the angular impulse when using the different reference frames. Conclusion The effects of laterally wedged insole on the reduction in the knee adduction moment were similar across the reference frames. On the other hand, Researchers need to recognize that when the percent change was used as the parameter of the efficacy of laterally wedged insole, the choice of reference frame may influence the interpretation of how laterally wedged insoles affect the knee adduction moment. PMID:26397375

  17. Connection Between the ICRF and the Dynamical Reference Frame for the Outer Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Neto, D. N.; Assafin, M.; Andrei, A. H.; Vieira Martins, R.

    2005-01-01

    This work brings an approach intending to improve the connection between the Dynamical Reference Frame and the Extragalactic Reference Frame. For that, close encounters of outer Solar System objects and quasars are used. With this goal, Uranus, Neptune and two quasars were observed at Laborat´orio Nacional de Astrof´ısica (LNA), Brazil. The optical reference frame is the HCRF, as given by the UCAC2 catalogue. The first results show an accuracy of 45 mas - 50 mas in the optical positions. The optical minus radio offsets give the local orientation between the catalogue and radio frame. From this, it is possible to place the optical planet coordinates on the extragalactic frame. A comparison between the new corrected optical coordinates and the respective DE ephemeris to these planets can give the instant orientations of the Dynamical Reference Frame with regard to the ICRS, for this zone of outer Solar System.

  18. The Inertial Property of Approximately Inertial Frames of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chubykalo, Andrew E.; Espinoza, Augusto; Kosyakov, B. P.

    2011-01-01

    Is it possible to compare approximately inertial frames in the inertial property? If this is the case, the inertial property becomes a measurable quantity. We give a positive answer to this question, and discuss the general principle of design of devices for making the required measurements. This paper is intended for advanced undergraduate and…

  19. On the Framing of One Kind of Indefinite Referring Expression: Learning Challenges and Pedagogical Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tickoo, Asha

    2002-01-01

    Shows that two key principles of communication (the Shared Knowledge Principle and the Economy Principle), which monitor the framing of all well-formed referring expressions, are manifest in a specialized mode in the framing of focal specific indefinite referring expressions. Suggests that the special features associated with this type of…

  20. Tracking down abstract linguistic meaning: neural correlates of spatial frame of reference ambiguities in language.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Gabriele; Haun, Daniel B M; Levinson, Stephen C

    2012-01-01

    This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigates a crucial parameter in spatial description, namely variants in the frame of reference chosen. Two frames of reference are available in European languages for the description of small-scale assemblages, namely the intrinsic (or object-oriented) frame and the relative (or egocentric) frame. We showed participants a sentence such as "the ball is in front of the man", ambiguous between the two frames, and then a picture of a scene with a ball and a man--participants had to respond by indicating whether the picture did or did not match the sentence. There were two blocks, in which we induced each frame of reference by feedback. Thus for the crucial test items, participants saw exactly the same sentence and the same picture but now from one perspective, now the other. Using this method, we were able to precisely pinpoint the pattern of neural activation associated with each linguistic interpretation of the ambiguity, while holding the perceptual stimuli constant. Increased brain activity in bilateral parahippocampal gyrus was associated with the intrinsic frame of reference whereas increased activity in the right superior frontal gyrus and in the parietal lobe was observed for the relative frame of reference. The study is among the few to show a distinctive pattern of neural activation for an abstract yet specific semantic parameter in language. It shows with special clarity the nature of the neural substrate supporting each frame of spatial reference. PMID:22363462

  1. Second-Order Inelastic Dynamic Analysis of 3D Semi-Rigid Steel Frames Under Earthquake Loads with Three Components

    SciTech Connect

    Ozakgul, Kadir

    2008-07-08

    In this study, it has been presented an algorithm for second-order elastoplastic dynamic time-history analysis of three dimensional frames that have steel members with semirigid joints. The proposed analysis accounts for material, geometric and connection nonlinearities. Material nonlinearity have been modeled by the Ramberg-Osgood relation. While the geometric nonlinearity caused by axial force has been described by the use of the geometric stiffness matrix, the nonlinearity caused by the interaction between the axial force and bending moment has been also described by the use of the stability functions. The independent hardening model has been used to describe the nonlinear behaviour of semi-rigid connections. Dynamic equation of motion has been solved by Newmark's constant acceleration method in time history domain.

  2. Reference Frames and Coordinate Transformations for Advanced Post-Newtonian Theory of the Lunar Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yi; Kopeikin, S.

    2009-05-01

    We construct a set of reference frames for description of the orbital and rotational motion of the Moon. We use a scalar-tensor theory of gravity depending on two parameters of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism and utilize the concepts of the relativistic resolutions on reference frames adopted by the International Astronomical Union in 2000. We assume that the solar system is isolated and space-time is asymptotically flat. The primary reference frame has the origin at the solar-system barycentric (SSB) frame and spatial axes are going to infinity. The SSB frame is not rotating with respect to distant quasars. The secondary reference frame has the origin at the Earth-Moon barycenter (EMB). The EMB frame is local with its spatial axes spreading out to the orbits of Venus and Mars and not rotating dynamically in the sense that both the Coriolis and centripetal forces acting on a free-falling test particle, moving with respect to the EMB frame, are excluded. Two other local frames, the geocentric (GRS) and the selenocentric (SRS) frames, have the origin at the center of mass of the Earth and Moon respectively. They are both introduced in order to connect the coordinate description of the lunar motion, observer on the Earth, and a retro-reflector on the Moon to the observable quantities which are the proper time and the laser-ranging distance. We solve the gravity field equations and find the metric tensor and the scalar field in all frames. We also derive the post-Newtonian coordinate transformations between the frames and analyze the residual gauge freedom imposed by the scalar-tensor theory on the coordinate transformations.

  3. Full-Frame Reference for Test Photo of Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This pair of views shows how little of the full image frame was taken up by the Moon in test images taken Sept. 8, 2005, by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The Mars-bound camera imaged Earth's Moon from a distance of about 10 million kilometers (6 million miles) away -- 26 times the distance between Earth and the Moon -- as part of an activity to test and calibrate the camera. The images are very significant because they show that the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft and this camera can properly operate together to collect very high-resolution images of Mars. The target must move through the camera's telescope view in just the right direction and speed to acquire a proper image. The day's test images also demonstrate that the focus mechanism works properly with the telescope to produce sharp images.

    Out of the 20,000-pixel-by-6,000-pixel full frame, the Moon's diameter is about 340 pixels, if the full Moon could be seen. The illuminated crescent is about 60 pixels wide, and the resolution is about 10 kilometers (6 miles) per pixel. At Mars, the entire image region will be filled with high-resolution information.

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, launched on Aug. 12, 2005, is on course to reach Mars on March 10, 2006. After gradually adjusting the shape of its orbit for half a year, it will begin its primary science phase in November 2006. From the mission's planned science orbit about 300 kilometers (186 miles) above the surface of Mars, the high resolution camera will be able to discern features as small as one meter or yard across.

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, for the NASA Science Mission Directorate. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, prime contractor for the project, built the spacecraft. Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo

  4. Four-Year-Olds Use a Mixture of Spatial Reference Frames

    PubMed Central

    Negen, James; Nardini, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Keeping track of unseen objects is an important spatial skill. In order to do this, people must situate the object in terms of different frames of reference, including body position (egocentric frame of reference), landmarks in the surrounding environment (extrinsic frame reference), or other attached features (intrinsic frame of reference). Nardini et al. hid a toy in one of 12 cups in front of children, turned the array when they were not looking, and then asked them to point to the cup with the toy. This forced children to use the intrinsic frame (information about the array of cups) to locate the hidden toy. Three-year-olds made systematic errors by using the wrong frame of reference, 4-year-olds were at chance, and only 5- and 6-year-olds were successful. Can we better understand the developmental change that takes place at four years? This paper uses a modelling approach to re-examine the data and distinguish three possible strategies that could lead to the previous results at four years: (1) Children were choosing cups randomly, (2) Children were pointing between the egocentric/extrinsic-cued location and the correct target, and (3) Children were pointing near the egocentric/extrinsic-cued location on some trials and near the target on the rest. Results heavily favor the last possibility: 4-year-olds were not just guessing or trying to combine the available frames of reference. They were using the intrinsic frame on some trials, but not doing so consistently. These insights suggest that accounts of improving spatial performance at 4 years need to explain why there is a mixture of responses. Further application of the selected model also suggests that children become both more reliant on the correct frame and more accurate with any chosen frame as they mature. PMID:26133990

  5. From Laboratory to Practice: Neglected Issues in Implementing Frame-of-Reference Rate-Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauenstein, Neil M. A.; Foti, Roseanne J.

    1989-01-01

    Data collected at two law enforcement agencies were used to address three specific issues concerning frame-of-reference rater training: (1) prototype-anchored rating system; (2) sensitivity and threshold analyses to identify idiosyncratic raters; and (3) areas of performance where supervisors and subordinates were likely to disagree on frame of…

  6. Report of the panel on earth rotation and reference frames, section 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.; Dickman, Steven R.; Eubanks, Marshall T.; Feissel, Martine; Herring, Thomas A.; Mueller, Ivan I.; Rosen, Richard D.; Schutz, Robert E.; Wahr, John M.; Wilson, Charles R.

    1991-01-01

    Objectives and requirements for Earth rotation and reference frame studies in the 1990s are discussed. The objectives are to observe and understand interactions of air and water with the rotational dynamics of the Earth, the effects of the Earth's crust and mantle on the dynamics and excitation of Earth rotation variations over time scales of hours to centuries, and the effects of the Earth's core on the rotational dynamics and the excitation of Earth rotation variations over time scales of a year or longer. Another objective is to establish, refine and maintain terrestrial and celestrial reference frames. Requirements include improvements in observations and analysis, improvements in celestial and terrestrial reference frames and reference frame connections, and improved observations of crustal motion and mass redistribution on the Earth.

  7. Reference frames, gauge transformations and gravitomagnetism in the post-Newtonian theory of the lunar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yi; Kopeikin, Sergei

    2010-01-01

    We construct a set of reference frames for description of the orbital and rotational motion of the Moon. We use a scalar-tensor theory of gravity depending on two parameters of the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism and utilize the concepts of the relativistic resolutions on reference frames adopted by the International Astronomical Union in 2000. We assume that the solar system is isolated and space-time is asymptotically flat. The primary reference frame has the origin at the solar-system barycenter (SSB) and spatial axes are going to infinity. The SSB frame is not rotating with respect to distant quasars. The secondary reference frame has the origin at the Earth-Moon barycenter (EMB). The EMB frame is local with its spatial axes spreading out to the orbits of Venus and Mars and not rotating dynamically in the sense that both the Coriolis and centripetal forces acting on a free-falling test particle, moving with respect to the EMB frame, are excluded. Two other local frames, the geocentric (GRF) and the selenocentric (SRF) frames, have the origin at the center of mass of the Earth and Moon respectively. They are both introduced in order to connect the coordinate description of the lunar motion, observer on the Earth, and a retro-reflector on the Moon to the observable quantities which are the proper time and the laser-ranging distance. We solve the gravity field equations and find the metric tensor and the scalar field in all frames. We also derive the post-Newtonian coordinate transformations between the frames and analyze the residual gauge freedom of the solutions of the field equations. We discuss the gravitomagnetic effects in the barycentric equations of the motion of the Moon and argue that they are beyond the current accuracy of lunar laser ranging (LLR) observations.

  8. The task of the relativistic oscillator in a non-inertial frame of reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepelkin, E. E.; Sadovnikov, B. I.; Inozemtseva, N. G.

    2016-09-01

    The relativistic theory is one of the most difficult parts of theoretical physics to understand by high school students and scientists alike. In this paper, the important aspects from this theory are considered. The case of the non-inertial reference frame in which the space-time interval was presented for the Lorentz-like transformations, and the condition by which the transition to the inertial reference frame takes place, is shown.

  9. Establishing a celestial VLBI reference frame. 1: Searching for VLBI sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, R. A.; Morabito, D. D.; Williams, J. G.; Slade, M. A.; Harris, A. W.; Finley, S. G.; Skjerve, L. J.; Tanida, L.; Spitzmesser, D. J.; Johnson, B.

    1978-01-01

    The Deep Space Network is currently engaged in establishing a new high-accuracy VLBI celestial reference frame. The present status of the task of finding suitable celestial radio sources for constructing this reference frame is discussed. To date, 564 VLBI sources were detected, with 166 of these lying within 10 deg of the ecliptic plane. The variation of the sky distribution of these sources with source strength is examined.

  10. The task of the relativistic oscillator in a non-inertial frame of reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepelkin, E. E.; Sadovnikov, B. I.; Inozemtseva, N. G.

    2016-09-01

    The relativistic theory is one of the most difficult parts of theoretical physics to understand by high school students and scientists alike. In this paper, the important aspects from this theory are considered. The case of the non-inertial reference frame in which the space–time interval was presented for the Lorentz-like transformations, and the condition by which the transition to the inertial reference frame takes place, is shown.

  11. The role of perspective taking in how children connect reference frames when explaining astronomical phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Julia D.; Bower, Corinne A.; Liben, Lynn S.

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the role of perspective-taking skills in how children explain spatially complex astronomical phenomena. Explaining many astronomical phenomena, especially those studied in elementary and middle school, requires shifting between an Earth-based description of the phenomena and a space-based reference frame. We studied 7- to 9-year-old children (N = 15) to (a) develop a method for capturing how children make connections between reference frames and to (b) explore connections between perspective-taking skill and the nature of children's explanations. Children's explanations for the apparent motion of the Sun and stars and for seasonal changes in constellations were coded for accuracy of explanation, connection between frames of reference, and use of gesture. Children with higher spatial perspective-taking skills made more explicit connections between reference frames and used certain gesture-types more frequently, although this pattern was evident for only some phenomena. Findings suggest that children - particularly those with lower perspective-taking skills - may need additional support in learning to explicitly connect reference frames in astronomy. Understanding spatial thinking among children who successfully made explicit connections between reference frames in their explanations could be a starting point for future instruction in this domain.

  12. Frontal eye fields involved in shifting frame of reference within working memory for scenes.

    PubMed

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Roepstorff, Andreas; Burgess, Neil

    2008-01-31

    Working memory (WM) evoked by linguistic cues for allocentric spatial and egocentric spatial aspects of a visual scene was investigated by correlating fMRI BOLD signal (or "activation") with performance on a spatial-relations task. Subjects indicated the relative positions of a person or object (referenced by the personal pronouns "he/she/it") in a previously shown image relative to either themselves (egocentric reference frame) or shifted to a reference frame anchored in another person or object in the image (allocentric reference frame), e.g. "Was he in front of you/her?" Good performers had both shorter response time and more correct responses than poor performers in both tasks. These behavioural variables were entered into a principal component analysis. The first component reflected generalised performance level. We found that the frontal eye fields (FEF), bilaterally, had a higher BOLD response during recall involving allocentric compared to egocentric spatial reference frames, and that this difference was larger in good performers than in poor performers as measured by the first behavioural principal component. The frontal eye fields may be used when subjects move their internal gaze during shifting reference frames in representational space. Analysis of actual eye movements in three subjects revealed no difference between egocentric and allocentric recall tasks where visual stimuli were also absent. Thus, the FEF machinery for directing eye movements may also be involved in changing reference frames within WM. PMID:17915262

  13. A Unified Global Reference Frame of Vertical Crustal Movements by Satellite Laser Ranging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinhui; Wang, Ren; Sun, Fuping; Wang, Jinling

    2016-01-01

    Crustal movement is one of the main factors influencing the change of the Earth system, especially in its vertical direction, which affects people’s daily life through the frequent occurrence of earthquakes, geological disasters, and so on. In order to get a better study and application of the vertical crustal movement, as well as its changes, the foundation and prerequisite areto devise and establish its reference frame; especially, a unified global reference frame is required. Since SLR (satellite laser ranging) is one of the most accurate space techniques for monitoring geocentric motion and can directly measure the ground station’s geocentric coordinates and velocities relative to the centre of the Earth’s mass, we proposed to take the vertical velocity of the SLR technique in the ITRF2008 framework as the reference frame of vertical crustal motion, which we defined as the SLR vertical reference frame (SVRF). The systematic bias between other velocity fields and the SVRF was resolved by using the GPS (Global Positioning System) and VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) velocity observations, and the unity of other velocity fields and SVRF was realized, as well. The results show that it is feasible and suitable to take the SVRF as a reference frame, which has both geophysical meanings and geodetic observations, so we recommend taking the SLR vertical velocity under ITRF2008 as the global reference frame of vertical crustal movement. PMID:26867197

  14. A Unified Global Reference Frame of Vertical Crustal Movements by Satellite Laser Ranging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinhui; Wang, Ren; Sun, Fuping; Wang, Jinling

    2016-01-01

    Crustal movement is one of the main factors influencing the change of the Earth system, especially in its vertical direction, which affects people's daily life through the frequent occurrence of earthquakes, geological disasters, and so on. In order to get a better study and application of the vertical crustal movement,as well as its changes, the foundation and prerequisite areto devise and establish its reference frame; especially, a unified global reference frame is required. Since SLR (satellite laser ranging) is one of the most accurate space techniques for monitoring geocentric motion and can directly measure the ground station's geocentric coordinates and velocities relative to the centre of the Earth's mass, we proposed to take the vertical velocity of the SLR technique in the ITRF2008 framework as the reference frame of vertical crustal motion, which we defined as the SLR vertical reference frame (SVRF). The systematic bias between other velocity fields and the SVRF was resolved by using the GPS (Global Positioning System) and VLBI (very long baseline interferometry) velocity observations, and the unity of other velocity fields and SVRF was realized,as well. The results show that it is feasible and suitable to take the SVRF as a reference frame, which has both geophysical meanings and geodetic observations, so we recommend taking the SLR vertical velocity under ITRF2008 as the global reference frame of vertical crustal movement. PMID:26867197

  15. Post-trial anatomical frame alignment procedure for comparison of 3D joint angle measurement from magnetic/inertial measurement units and camera-based systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingguo; Zhang, Jun-Tian

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic and inertial measurement units (MIMUs) have been widely used as an alternative to traditional camera-based motion capture systems for 3D joint kinematics measurement. Since these sensors do not directly measure position, a pre-trial anatomical calibration, either with the assistance of a special protocol/apparatus or with another motion capture system is required to establish the transformation matrices between the local sensor frame and the anatomical frame (AF) of each body segment on which the sensors are attached. Because the axes of AFs are often used as the rotational axes in the joint angle calculation, any difference in the AF determination will cause discrepancies in the calculated joint angles. Therefore, a direct comparison of joint angles between MIMU systems and camera-based systems is less meaningful because the calculated joint angles contain a systemic error due to the differences in the AF determination. To solve this problem a new post-trial AF alignment procedure is proposed. By correcting the AF misalignments, the joint angle differences caused by the difference in AF determination are eliminated and the remaining discrepancies are mainly from the measurement accuracy of the systems themselves. Lower limb joint angles from 30 walking trials were used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed AF alignment procedure. This technique could serve as a new means for calibrating magnetic/inertial sensor-based motion capture systems and correcting for AF misalignment in scenarios where joint angles are compared directly.

  16. Toward the establishment of IERS reference frame through the intercomparison of Earth Rotation Parameters determined with independent VLBI networks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, T.

    The celestial and the terrestrial reference frames were improved with VLBI techniques. To extend VLBI network or to combine VLBI stations into a new network, the celestial and terrestrial reference frames should be unique and consistent. Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) can be used both to test the self-consistency of the data set through the intercomparison of the results with independent networks and to establish the IERS reference frame because ERP are conversion parameters between celestial and terrestrial reference frames.

  17. Accurate Realization of GPS Vertical Global Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elosegui, Pedro

    2004-01-01

    The few millimeter per year level accuracy of radial global velocity estimates with the Global Positioning System (GPS) is at least an order of magnitude poorer than the accuracy of horizontal global motions. An improvement in the accuracy of radial global velocities would have a very positive impact on a number of geophysical studies of current general interest such as global sea-level and climate change, coastal hazards, glacial isostatic adjustment, atmospheric and oceanic loading, glaciology and ice mass variability, tectonic deformation and volcanic inflation, and geoid variability. The goal of this project is to improve our current understanding of GPS error sources associated with estimates of radial velocities at global scales. GPS error sources relevant to this project can be classified in two broad categories: (1) those related to the analysis of the GPS phase observable, and (2) those related to the combination of the positions and velocities of a set of globally distributed stations as determined from the analysis of GPS data important aspect in the first category include the effect on vertical rate estimates due to standard analysis choices, such as orbit modeling, network geometry, ambiguity resolution, as well as errors in models (or simply the lack of models) for clocks, multipath, phase-center variations, atmosphere, and solid-Earth tides. The second category includes the possible methods of combining and defining terrestrial reference flames for determining vertical velocities in a global scale. The latter has been the subject of our research activities during this reporting period.

  18. Disentangling gravitational, environmental, and egocentric reference frames in spatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Karnath, H O; Fetter, M; Niemeier, M

    1998-11-01

    gravity-based reference system.

  19. Gauge-invariant disturbing function in precessing frames of reference.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efroimsky, M.; Goldreich, P.

    2003-08-01

    reference-system choice. We apply our results to description of a satellite motion about a precessing planet.

  20. Visual Experience Determines the Use of External Reference Frames in Joint Action Control

    PubMed Central

    Dolk, Thomas; Liepelt, Roman; Prinz, Wolfgang; Fiehler, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Vision plays a crucial role in human interaction by facilitating the coordination of one's own actions with those of others in space and time. While previous findings have demonstrated that vision determines the default use of reference frames, little is known about the role of visual experience in coding action-space during joint action. Here, we tested if and how visual experience influences the use of reference frames in joint action control. Dyads of congenitally-blind, blindfolded-sighted, and seeing individuals took part in an auditory version of the social Simon task, which required each participant to respond to one of two sounds presented to the left or right of both participants. To disentangle the contribution of external—agent-based and response-based—reference frames during joint action, participants performed the task with their respective response (right) hands uncrossed or crossed over one another. Although the location of the auditory stimulus was completely task-irrelevant, participants responded overall faster when the stimulus location spatially corresponded to the required response side than when they were spatially non-corresponding: a phenomenon known as the social Simon effect (SSE). In sighted participants, the SSE occurred irrespective of whether hands were crossed or uncrossed, suggesting the use of external, response-based reference frames. Congenitally-blind participants also showed an SSE, but only with uncrossed hands. We argue that congenitally-blind people use both agent-based and response-based reference frames resulting in conflicting spatial information when hands are crossed and, thus, canceling out the SSE. These results imply that joint action control functions on the basis of external reference frames independent of the presence or (transient/permanent) absence of vision. However, the type of external reference frames used for organizing motor control in joint action seems to be determined by visual experience. PMID

  1. The X/Ka Celestial Reference Frame: Results from combined NASA-ESA baselines including Malargüe, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Clark, J. E.; Garcí-Miró, C.; Goodhart, C. E.; Horiuchi, S.; Madde, R.; Mercolino, M.; Naudet, C. J.; Snedeker, L. G.; Sotuela, I.; White, L. A.

    2014-03-01

    An X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) celestial reference frame has been constructed using a combined NASA and ESA Deep Space Network. Observations at X/Ka-band are motivated by their ability to access more compact source morphology and reduced core shift relative to observations at the historically standard S/X-band. In 86 observing sessions we detected 631 sources covering the full 24 hours of right ascension and the full range of declinations. The collaboration between NASA and ESA's deep space antenna in Malargüe, Argentina was created with an emphasis on addressing weaknesses in the southern hemisphere. The accuracy of the resulting CRF was quantified by comparison of 520 X/Ka sources in common with the S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 producing wRMS agreement of 175 μas in RA cos(dec) and 220 μas in Declination. There is evidence for systematic errors at the ~100 μas level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of phase calibration, troposphere mismodelling, and terrestrial frame distortions. Actions are underway to reduce all of these errors. The recent successful launch of the Gaia optical astrometric satellite motivates work to tie the radio and optical frames. Existing X/Ka data and simulated Gaia data predict a frame tie precision of ~10 μas (1-sigma, per 3-D rotation component) with anticipated improvements having the potential to produce a tie of 5 μas per component. If XKa precision can be pushed below 100 µas, the XKa frame has potential to produce a tie to Gaia that is superior to S/X due to reduced astrophysical systematics at X/Ka relative to S/X.

  2. Aligning VLBI and Gaia Extragalactic Celestial Reference Frames: source selection scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourda, Geraldine; Charlot, Patrick; Collioud, Arnaud

    2015-08-01

    The European space astrometry mission Gaia will construct a dense optical celestial reference frame based on Quasi Stellar Objects. Accordingly, by 2020, two extragalactic celestial reference frames will coexist: the VLBI frame (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) in the radio domain, currently adopted by the IAU as the fundamental one, and the Gaia frame determined from direct optical observations of quasars by the satellite.For consistency between optical and radio positions of any celestial targets, it will be fundamental to align the Gaia and VLBI frames with the highest accuracy. This issue is also important in the framework of astrophysics, for example to probe properly the jets properties and the physics of the Active Galactic Nuclei.In this paper, based on the ICRF2 catalogue (International Celestial Reference Frame) and specific dedicated VLBI projects (e.g. designed to observe additional weaker extragalactic radio sources), we will discuss the selection of the VLBI-Gaia transfer sources, present our initiatives to reach this alignment, review the status of the various projects in question and draw plans for the future.

  3. A spatial reference frame model of Beijing based on spatial cognitive experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yu

    2006-10-01

    Orientation relation in the spatial relation is very important in GIS. People can obtain orientation information by making use of map reading and the cognition of the surrounding environment, and then create the spatial reference frame. City is a kind of special spatial environment, a person with life experiences has some spatial knowledge about the city where he or she lives in. Based on the spatial knowledge of the city environment, people can position, navigate and understand the meaning embodied in the environment correctly. Beijing as a real geographic space, its layout is very special and can form a kind of new spatial reference frame. Based on the characteristics of the layout of Beijing city, this paper will introduce a new spatial reference frame of Beijing and use two psychological experiments to validate its cognitive plausibility.

  4. Impact of the VLBA on reference frames and earth orientation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, David

    2016-09-01

    The geodetic VLBI community began using VLBA antennas in 1989 for geodesy and astrometry. We examine how usage of the VLBA has improved the celestial reference frame, the terrestrial reference frame, and Earth orientation parameters. Without the VLBA, ICRF2 would have had only 1011 sources instead of 3414. ICRF3 will contain at least 4121 sources, with approximately 70 % or more coming exclusively from VLBA astrometry and geodesy sessions. The terrestrial reference frame is also more stable and precise due to VLBA geodesy sessions. Approximately two dozen geodesy stations that have participated in VLBA sessions show average position formal errors that are ˜ 13-14 % better in the horizontal components and ˜ 5 % better in the vertical component than would be expected solely from the increased number of observations. Also the Earth orientation parameters obtained from the RDV sessions represent the most accurate EOP series of any of the long-term VLBI session types.

  5. Influences of indigenous language on spatial frames of reference in Aboriginal English

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds-Wathen, Cris

    2014-06-01

    The Aboriginal English spoken by Indigenous children in remote communities in the Northern Territory of Australia is influenced by the home languages spoken by themselves and their families. This affects uses of spatial terms used in mathematics such as `in front' and `behind.' Speakers of the endangered Indigenous Australian language Iwaidja use the intrinsic frame of reference in contexts where speakers of Standard Australian English use the relative frame of reference. Children speaking Aboriginal English show patterns of use that parallel the Iwaidja contexts. This paper presents detailed examples of spatial descriptions in Iwaidja and Aboriginal English that demonstrate the parallel patterns of use. The data comes from a study that investigated how an understanding of spatial frame of reference in Iwaidja could assist teaching mathematics to Indigenous language-speaking students. Implications for teaching mathematics are explored for teachers without previous experience in a remote Indigenous community.

  6. Experimental demonstration of genuine multipartite quantum nonlocality without shared reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhao; Zhang, Chao; Huang, Yun-Feng; Liu, Bi-Heng; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-03-01

    Multipartite quantum nonlocality is an important diagnostic tool and resource for both researches in fundamental quantum mechanics and applications in quantum information protocols. Shared reference frames among all parties are usually required for experimentally observing quantum nonlocality, which is not possible in many circumstances. Previous results have shown violations of bipartite Bell inequalities with approaching unit probability, without shared reference frames. Here we experimentally demonstrate genuine multipartite quantum nonlocality without shared reference frames, using the Svetlichny inequality. A significant violation probability of 0.58 is observed with a high-fidelity three-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state. Furthermore, when there is one shared axis among all the parties, which is the usual case in fiber-optic or earth-satellite links, the experimental results demonstrate the genuine three-partite nonlocality with certainty. Our experiment will be helpful for applications in multipartite quantum communication protocols.

  7. Effects of adopting new precession, nutation and equinox corrections on the terrestrial reference frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S. Y.; Mueller, I. I.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of adopting definitive precession and equinox corrections on the terrestrial reference frame was investigated. It is noted that the effect on polar motion is a diurnal periodic term with an amplitude increasing linearly in time whole on UT1 it is a linear term: general principles are given to determine the effects of small rotations of the frame of a conventional inertial reference system (CIS) on the frame of the conventional terrestrial reference system (CTS); seven CTS options are presented, one of which is necessary to accommodate such rotation. Accommodating possible future changes in the astronomical nutation is discussed. The effects of differences which may exist between the various CTS's and CIS's on Earth rotation parameters (ERP) and how these differences can be determined are examined. It is shown that the CTS differences can be determined from observations made at the same site. The CIS differences by comparing the ERP's are determined by the different techniques during the same time period.

  8. Gaia reference frame amid quasar variability and proper motion patterns in the data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachchan, R. K.; Hobbs, D.; Lindegren, L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Gaia's very accurate astrometric measurements will allow the optical realisation of the International Celestial Reference System to be improved by a few orders of magnitude. Several sets of quasars are used to define a kinematically stable non-rotating reference frame with the barycentre of the solar system as its origin. Gaia will also observe a large number of galaxies. Although they are not point-like, it may be possible to determine accurate positions and proper motions for some of their compact bright features. Aims: The optical stability of the quasars is critical, and we investigate how accurately the reference frame can be recovered. Various proper motion patterns are also present in the data, the best known is caused by the acceleration of the solar system barycentre, presumably, towards the Galactic centre. We review some other less well-known effects that are not part of standard astrometric models. Methods: We modelled quasars and galaxies using realistic sky distributions, magnitudes, and redshifts. Position variability was introduced using a Markov chain model. The reference frame was determined using the algorithm developed for the Gaia mission, which also determines the acceleration of the solar system. We also tested a method for measuring the velocity of the solar system barycentre in a cosmological frame. Results: We simulated the recovery of the reference frame and the acceleration of the solar system and conclude that they are not significantly disturbed by quasar variability, which is statistically averaged. However, the effect of a non-uniform sky distribution of the quasars can result in a correlation between the parameters describing the spin components of the reference frame and the acceleration components, which degrades the solution. Our results suggest that an attempt should be made to astrometrically determine the redshift-dependent apparent drift of galaxies that is due to our velocity relative to the cosmic microwave

  9. Formulation of blade-flutter spectral analyses in stationary reference frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkov, A. P.

    1984-01-01

    Analytic representations are developed for the discrete blade deflection and the continuous tip static pressure fields in a stationary reference frame. Considered are the sampling rates equal to the rotational frequency, equal to blade passing frequency, and for the pressure, equal to a multiple of the blade passing frequency. For the last two rates the expressions for determining the nodal diameters from the spectra are included. A procedure is presented for transforming the complete unsteady pressure field into a rotating frame of reference. The determination of the true flutter frequency by using two sensors is described. To illustrate their use, the developed procedures are used to interpret selected experimental results.

  10. Quantum mechanics in noninertial reference frames: Relativistic accelerations and fictitious forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klink, W. H.; Wickramasekara, S.

    2016-06-01

    One-particle systems in relativistically accelerating reference frames can be associated with a class of unitary representations of the group of arbitrary coordinate transformations, an extension of the Wigner-Bargmann definition of particles as the physical realization of unitary irreducible representations of the Poincaré group. Representations of the group of arbitrary coordinate transformations become necessary to define unitary operators implementing relativistic acceleration transformations in quantum theory because, unlike in the Galilean case, the relativistic acceleration transformations do not themselves form a group. The momentum operators that follow from these representations show how the fictitious forces in noninertial reference frames are generated in quantum theory.

  11. Interpretation versus Reference Framing: Assimilation and Contrast Effects in the Organizational Domain.

    PubMed

    Stapel; Koomen

    1998-11-01

    We examined conditions under which contextually activated information affects strategic decision-making and found that the subjective framing of organizational issues may be affected by variables other than semantic manipulation. Context information may be used as an interpretation frame (and lead to assimilation) or as a reference frame (and lead to contrast). Whether context information instigates assimilative interpretation or contrastive comparison processes may depend on the level of categorical context-target similarity. This is demonstrated in three experiments in which participants read an unambiguous business threat or opportunity scenario prior to judging an ambiguous, strategic issue. Findings are discussed in the light of previous judgment and decision-making studies of framing and context effects. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9831519

  12. How coordinate and categorical spatial relations combine with egocentric and allocentric reference frames in a motor task: effects of delay and stimuli characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ruotolo, Francesco; van der Ham, Ineke; Postma, Albert; Ruggiero, Gennaro; Iachini, Tina

    2015-05-01

    This study explores how people represent spatial information in order to accomplish a visuo-motor task. To this aim we combined two fundamental components of the human visuo-spatial system: egocentric and allocentric frames of reference and coordinate and categorical spatial relations. Specifically, participants learned the position of three objects and then had to judge the distance (coordinate information) and the relation (categorical information) of a target object with respect to themselves (egocentric frame) or with respect to another object (allocentric frame). They gave spatial judgments by reaching and touching the exact position or the side previously occupied by the target object. The possible influence of stimuli characteristics (3D objects vs. 2D images) and delay between learning phase and testing phase (1.5 vs. 5s) was also assessed. Results showed an advantage of egocentric coordinate judgments over the allocentric coordinate ones independently from the kind of stimuli used and the temporal parameters of the response, whereas egocentric categorical judgments were more accurate than allocentric categorical ones only with 3D stimuli and when an immediate response was requested. This pattern of data is discussed in the light of the "perception-action" model by Milner and Goodale [13] and of neuroimaging evidence about frames of reference and spatial relations.

  13. How coordinate and categorical spatial relations combine with egocentric and allocentric reference frames in a motor task: effects of delay and stimuli characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ruotolo, Francesco; van der Ham, Ineke; Postma, Albert; Ruggiero, Gennaro; Iachini, Tina

    2015-05-01

    This study explores how people represent spatial information in order to accomplish a visuo-motor task. To this aim we combined two fundamental components of the human visuo-spatial system: egocentric and allocentric frames of reference and coordinate and categorical spatial relations. Specifically, participants learned the position of three objects and then had to judge the distance (coordinate information) and the relation (categorical information) of a target object with respect to themselves (egocentric frame) or with respect to another object (allocentric frame). They gave spatial judgments by reaching and touching the exact position or the side previously occupied by the target object. The possible influence of stimuli characteristics (3D objects vs. 2D images) and delay between learning phase and testing phase (1.5 vs. 5s) was also assessed. Results showed an advantage of egocentric coordinate judgments over the allocentric coordinate ones independently from the kind of stimuli used and the temporal parameters of the response, whereas egocentric categorical judgments were more accurate than allocentric categorical ones only with 3D stimuli and when an immediate response was requested. This pattern of data is discussed in the light of the "perception-action" model by Milner and Goodale [13] and of neuroimaging evidence about frames of reference and spatial relations. PMID:25698602

  14. A survey of clearing techniques for 3D imaging of tissues with special reference to connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Azaripour, Adriano; Lagerweij, Tonny; Scharfbillig, Christina; Jadczak, Anna Elisabeth; Willershausen, Brita; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F

    2016-08-01

    For 3-dimensional (3D) imaging of a tissue, 3 methodological steps are essential and their successful application depends on specific characteristics of the type of tissue. The steps are 1° clearing of the opaque tissue to render it transparent for microscopy, 2° fluorescence labeling of the tissues and 3° 3D imaging. In the past decades, new methodologies were introduced for the clearing steps with their specific advantages and disadvantages. Most clearing techniques have been applied to the central nervous system and other organs that contain relatively low amounts of connective tissue including extracellular matrix. However, tissues that contain large amounts of extracellular matrix such as dermis in skin or gingiva are difficult to clear. The present survey lists methodologies that are available for clearing of tissues for 3D imaging. We report here that the BABB method using a mixture of benzyl alcohol and benzyl benzoate and iDISCO using dibenzylether (DBE) are the most successful methods for clearing connective tissue-rich gingiva and dermis of skin for 3D histochemistry and imaging of fluorescence using light-sheet microscopy.

  15. Maintenance of the Geodetic Reference Frame in the Global Positioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oria, A.; Brodsky, B. L.; Labrecque, J.; Miller, J. J.; Moreau, M.; Pearlman, M.; Nelson, R.

    2007-12-01

    In the Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of the satellite coordinates and the underlying World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 84) reference frame are derived from observables such as pseudorandom noise (PRN) signals, and carrier phase, which are referenced to on-board atomic clocks. Systematic errors exist in both the estimated satellite coordinates and the reference frame. The reference frame utilizes external inputs in the form of International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) coordinates and constrains the results to be compatible with the ITRF coordinates for a set of global reference stations. The ITRF is, in turn, obtained from the combined analysis of GPS, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), and Doppler Orbitography and Radio-positioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) data. The current realization of the reference frame could be described as circular in that an independent method of external verification is currently not available. To ensure the continued successful operation of the GPS it is necessary to have the capability of analyzing systematic errors by an independent means from current radiometric observables and data from foreign sources. In practice, accuracy of the standards used for measurement should be better than the expected, required operational measurement accuracy by a factor of ten to ensure that the desired requirement is met. Currently, the accuracy of both the ITRF and the WGS 84 is estimated to be on the order of 1 to 2 parts per billion, leading to expected drifts of 0.6 to 1.2 cm per year. The experience of the last three decades has indicated an approximate improvement by a factor of ten per decade. Therefore, while current accuracy of the ITRF and WGS 84 reference frames marginally meets civilian and military requirements, it is very likely that, within the lifetime of GPS III, the accuracy of the reference frames will be unable to meet the anticipated requirements. This report examines

  16. On the consistency of the current conventional EOP series and the celestial and terrestrial reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belda, Santiago; Heinkelmann, Robert; Ferrándiz, José M.; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2016-08-01

    Precise transformation between the celestial reference frames (CRF) and terrestrial reference frames (TRF) is needed for many purposes in Earth and space sciences. According to the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) recommendations, the accuracy of positions and stability of reference frames should reach 1 mm and 0.1 mm year^{-1} , and thus, the Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) should be estimated with similar accuracy. Different realizations of TRFs, based on the combination of solutions from four different space geodetic techniques, and CRFs, based on a single technique only (VLBI, Very Long Baseline Interferometry), might cause a slow degradation of the consistency among EOP, CRFs, and TRFs (e.g., because of differences in geometry, orientation and scale) and a misalignment of the current conventional EOP series, IERS 08 C04. We empirically assess the consistency among the conventional reference frames and EOP by analyzing the record of VLBI sessions since 1990 with varied settings to reflect the impact of changing frames or other processing strategies on the EOP estimates. Our tests show that the EOP estimates are insensitive to CRF changes, but sensitive to TRF variations and unmodeled geophysical signals at the GGOS level. The differences between the conventional IERS 08 C04 and other EOP series computed with distinct TRF settings exhibit biases and even non-negligible trends in the cases where no differential rotations should appear, e.g., a drift of about 20 μ as year^{-1 } in y_{pol } when the VLBI-only frame VTRF2008 is used. Likewise, different strategies on station position modeling originate scatters larger than 150 μ as in the terrestrial pole coordinates.

  17. An experimental Kalman filter approach to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Abbondanza, C.; Altamimi, Z.; Chin, T.; Gross, R.; Heflin, M.

    2012-04-01

    To monitor global geophysical changes with realistic uncertainties using millimeter-precision geodesy, it is essential to define, realize and maintain the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) consistently and accurately. Precise determinations of geocentric site positions and motions, satellite orbits, geocenter motion, Earth orientation and its variations, mean sea level rise, and polar ice mass changes at various time scales all depend critically on the accuracy and stability of the ITRF. By definition, the ITRF is a secular frame based on a linear model and consisting of mean epoch positions and velocities for a global set of stations. It is needed to serve as a standard reference frame in which geophysical results can be formulated and compared. The neglected up-to centimeter-level non-linear station motion can bias the linear station velocities, which can be significantly compounded for stations with short time-span. Here, we conceptually define an experimental reference frame with its origin at the nearly instantaneous center-of-mass (CM) of the total Earth system, by specifying the frame and combining different technique data weekly (daily for Earth orientation parameters). For co-located sites, available local ties are applied only once; but site motions are usually constrained to be the same. A Kalman filter and smoother algorithm has been developed and coupled to the ITRF/CATREF software to solve for geocentric coordinate time series, as well as a model of secular, periodical and stochastic motion components. Preliminary results using linear and linear plus sinusoidal motion models without stochastic components compare very favorably with the ITRF2005 solution. With only a subset of the ITRF2005 input data time series from 1996 onward, we have obtained reference frame solutions that differ from ITRF2005 in origin by 0.6 mm and 0.3 mm/yr. Filtering strategies and time series results will also be presented.

  18. Layout Geometry in the Selection of Intrinsic Frames of Reference from Multiple Viewpoints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mou, Weimin; Zhao, Mintao; McNamara, Timothy P.

    2007-01-01

    Four experiments investigated the roles of layout geometry in the selection of intrinsic frames of reference in spatial memory. Participants learned the locations of objects in a room from 2 or 3 viewing perspectives. One view corresponded to the axis of bilateral symmetry of the layout, and the other view(s) was (were) nonorthogonal to the axis…

  19. Does Changing the Reference Frame Affect Infant Categorization of the Spatial Relation BETWEEN?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Paul C.; Doran, Matthew M.; Papafragou, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Past research has shown that variation in the target objects depicting a given spatial relation disrupts the formation of a category representation for that relation. In the current research, we asked whether changing the orientation of the referent frame depicting the spatial relation would also disrupt the formation of a category representation…

  20. On multi-timescale variability of temperature in China in modulated annual cycle reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Cheng; Wu, Zhaohua; Fu, Congbin; Zhou, Tianjun

    2010-09-01

    The traditional anomaly (TA) reference frame and its corresponding anomaly for a given data span changes with the extension of data length. In this study, the modulated annual cycle (MAC), instead of the widely used climatological mean annual cycle, is used as an alternative reference frame for computing climate anomalies to study the multi-timescale variability of surface air temperature (SAT) in China based on homogenized daily data from 1952 to 2004. The Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) method is used to separate daily SAT into a high frequency component, a MAC component, an interannual component, and a decadal-to-trend component. The results show that the EEMD method can reflect historical events reasonably well, indicating its adaptive and temporally local characteristics. It is shown that MAC is a temporally local reference frame and will not be altered over a particular time span by an extension of data length, thereby making it easier for physical interpretation. In the MAC reference frame, the low frequency component is found more suitable for studying the interannual to longer timescale variability (ILV) than a 13-month window running mean, which does not exclude the annual cycle. It is also better than other traditional versions (annual or summer or winter mean) of ILV, which contains a portion of the annual cycle. The analysis reveals that the variability of the annual cycle could be as large as the magnitude of interannual variability. The possible physical causes of different timescale variability of SAT in China are further discussed.

  1. Operationalization of a Frame of Reference for Studying Organizational Culture in Middle Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Larry G.

    A frame of reference for studying culture in middle schools was developed. Items for the Middle School Description Survey (MSDS), which was designed to test elements of the ideal middle school culture, were created based on middle school advocacy literature. The items were conceptually categorized according to E. H. Schein's (1985) cultural…

  2. Spatial Mental Representations Derived from Survey and Route Descriptions: When Individuals Prefer Extrinsic Frame of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meneghetti, Chiara; Pazzaglia, Francesca; De Beni, Rossana

    2011-01-01

    The present research investigates the role of individual differences in preference for adopting extrinsic frame of reference (EFR) in ability to represent mentally spatial information learned through survey and route descriptions. A sample of 191 participants (100 females and 91 males) was categorized as four groups with high (H-EFR), medium-high…

  3. Quantum mechanics in non-inertial reference frames: Time-dependent rotations and loop prolongations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klink, W. H.; Wickramasekara, S.

    2013-09-01

    This is the fourth in a series of papers on developing a formulation of quantum mechanics in non-inertial reference frames. This formulation is grounded in a class of unitary cocycle representations of what we have called the Galilean line group, the generalization of the Galilei group to include transformations amongst non-inertial reference frames. These representations show that in quantum mechanics, just as the case in classical mechanics, the transformations to accelerating reference frames give rise to fictitious forces. In previous work, we have shown that there exist representations of the Galilean line group that uphold the non-relativistic equivalence principle as well as representations that violate the equivalence principle. In these previous studies, the focus was on linear accelerations. In this paper, we undertake an extension of the formulation to include rotational accelerations. We show that the incorporation of rotational accelerations requires a class of loop prolongations of the Galilean line group and their unitary cocycle representations. We recover the centrifugal and Coriolis force effects from these loop representations. Loops are more general than groups in that their multiplication law need not be associative. Hence, our broad theoretical claim is that a Galilean quantum theory that holds in arbitrary non-inertial reference frames requires going beyond groups and group representations, the well-established framework for implementing symmetry transformations in quantum mechanics.

  4. Antecedents of Academic Emotions: Testing the Internal/External Frame of Reference Model for Academic Enjoyment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Thomas; Frenzel, Anne C.; Hall, Nathan C.; Pekrun, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    The present study focused on students' academic enjoyment as predicted by achievement in multiple academic domains. Assumptions were based on Marsh's internal/external (I/E) frame of reference model and Pekrun's control-value theory of achievement emotions, and were tested in a sample of 1380 German students from grades 5 to 10. Students' academic…

  5. Myths, Misconceptions, and Misunderstandings: A Different Spin on Coriolis--Applying Frame of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiSpezio, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses misconceptions surrounding the Coriolis force and describes how it should be presented as a function within inertial and noninertial frames of reference. Not only does this demonstrate the nature of science as it strives to best interpret the natural world (and presents alternative explanations), but it offers a rich…

  6. The Role of Perspective Taking in How Children Connect Reference Frames When Explaining Astronomical Phenomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Julia D.; Bower, Corinne A.; Liben, Lynn S.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the role of perspective-taking skills in how children explain spatially complex astronomical phenomena. Explaining many astronomical phenomena, especially those studied in elementary and middle school, requires shifting between an Earth-based description of the phenomena and a space-based reference frame. We studied 7- to…

  7. Aligning Body and World: Stable Reference Frames Improve Young Children's Search for Hidden Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Lynn K.; Samuelson, Larissa K.; Spencer, John P.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated how young children's increasingly flexible use of spatial reference frames enables accurate search for hidden objects by using a task that 3-year-olds have been shown to perform with great accuracy and 2-year-olds have been shown to perform inaccurately. Children watched as an object was rolled down a ramp, behind a panel…

  8. Aligning body and world: stable reference frames improve young children's search for hidden objects.

    PubMed

    Perry, Lynn K; Samuelson, Larissa K; Spencer, John P

    2009-04-01

    This study investigated how young children's increasingly flexible use of spatial reference frames enables accurate search for hidden objects by using a task that 3-year-olds have been shown to perform with great accuracy and 2-year-olds have been shown to perform inaccurately. Children watched as an object was rolled down a ramp, behind a panel of doors, and stopped at a barrier visible above the doors. In two experiments, we gave 2- and 2.5-year-olds a strong reference frame by increasing the relative salience and stability of the barrier. In Experiment 1, 2.5-year-olds performed at above-chance levels with the more salient barrier. In Experiment 2, we highlighted the stability of the barrier (or ramp) by maximizing the spatial extent of each reference frame across the first four training trials. Children who were given a stable barrier (and moving ramp) during these initial trials performed at above-chance levels and significantly better than children who were given a stable ramp (and moving barrier). This work highlights that factors central to spatial cognition and motor planning-aligning egocentric and object-centered reference frames-play a role in the ramp task during this transitional phase in development.

  9. Recovery of a geocentric reference frame using the present-day GPS system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malla, Rajendra P.; Wu, Sien-Chong

    1990-01-01

    A geocentric reference frame adopts the center of mass of the earth as the origin of the coordinate axes. The center of mass of the earth is the natural and unambiguous origin of a geocentric satellite dynamical system. But in practice a kinematically obtained terrestrial reference frame may assume an origin other than the geocenter. The establishment of a geocentric reference frame, to which all relevant observations and results can be referred and in which geodynamic theories or models for the dynamic behavior of earth can be formulated, requires the ability to accurately recover a given coordinate frame origin offset from the geocenter. GPS measurements, because of their abundance and broad distribution, provide a powerful tool to obtain this origin offset in a short period of time. Two effective strategies have been devised. Data from the First Central And South America (Casa Uno) geodynamics experiment has been studied, in order to demonstrate the ability of recovering the geocenter location with present day GPS satellites and receivers.

  10. Differential Developmental Trajectories for Egocentric, Environmental and Intrinsic Frames of Reference in Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardini, Marko; Burgess, Neil; Breckenridge, Kate; Atkinson, Janette

    2006-01-01

    We studied the development of spatial frames of reference in children aged 3-6 years, who retrieved hidden toys from an array of identical containers bordered by landmarks under four conditions. By moving the child and/or the array between presentation and test, we varied the consistency of the hidden toy with (1) the body, and (2) the testing…

  11. The Reciprocal Internal/External Frame of Reference Model Using Grades and Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Möller, Jens; Zimmermann, Friederike; Köller, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Background: The reciprocal I/E model (RI/EM) combines the internal/external frame of reference model (I/EM) with the reciprocal effects model (REM). The RI/EM extends the I/EM longitudinally and the REM across domains. The model predicts that, within domains, mathematics and verbal achievement (VACH) and academic self-concept have positive effects…

  12. The Period of a Swinging Rod in an Oscillating Frame of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biezeveld, Hubert

    2012-01-01

    It was obvious long ago that for mechanical behavior a gravitational field and an accelerating frame of reference are equivalent. Or in other words: it is impossible to decide whether you are in an accelerating elevator or in a closed room on a planet with a different value of "g". In the first section of this article I will describe a simple…

  13. Students' Frames of Reference and Their Assessments of Interest for Statistical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmichael, Colin

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the influence of middle school students' frames of reference on their assessments of interest for statistical literacy. Based on the responses of 406 middle school students to a previously validated interest measure, the study explores students' use of "external"--perceived self-competency when compared with others--and…

  14. Common Observables of Trench Migration and Plate Motion in Different Global Reference Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellart, W. P.; Stegman, D. A.; Freeman, J.; Moresi, L.

    2007-12-01

    Plate velocities and trench migration velocities are commonly described in some sort of global "absolute" reference frame. From calculating such motions for all plates and subduction zones on Earth, one might obtain insight into the importance of various driving and resistive forces of plate tectonics and plate boundary migration. Trench migration velocities and plate velocities have been calculated for all subduction zones on Earth in eight global reference frames. The calculations show that such velocities can differ substantially between different global reference frames (up to 4 cm/yr), in particular between one Pacific hotspot reference frame (HS3- NUVEL1A) and all the others. In addition, this reference frame shows a bimodal distribution of trench velocities, while all the others show a Gaussian distribution. Nevertheless, some common features are observed irrespective of the reference frame. First, trench retreat always dominates over trench advance, with 62-78% of the trench segments retreating, while the mean and median trench velocities are always positive (retreating). Second, trench retreat is always slow in the middle of wide subduction zones, i.e. far (>2000 km) from lateral slab edges (<2 cm/yr in seven reference frames). Third, fast trench retreat (>6 cm/yr) is only found close (<1500 km) to lateral slab edges. Fourth, plates with a substantial percentage of their circumference attached to a subducting slab (Pacific, Nazca, Cocos, Philippine, Australia) move trenchward. These calculations are predicted by three-dimensional geodynamic models of free subduction with a variable slab width (300-7000 km), in which the slab to upper mantle viscosity ratio is low (100-200). This suggests that trench velocities and plate velocities are indeed primarily controlled by the negative buoyancy and width of subducting slabs. It further suggests that slab/upper mantle viscosity ratios in nature are 100-200, as the models show trench motion dominated by retreat, and

  15. Quantum mechanics in non-inertial reference frames: Time-dependent rotations and loop prolongations

    SciTech Connect

    Klink, W.H.; Wickramasekara, S.

    2013-09-15

    This is the fourth in a series of papers on developing a formulation of quantum mechanics in non-inertial reference frames. This formulation is grounded in a class of unitary cocycle representations of what we have called the Galilean line group, the generalization of the Galilei group to include transformations amongst non-inertial reference frames. These representations show that in quantum mechanics, just as the case in classical mechanics, the transformations to accelerating reference frames give rise to fictitious forces. In previous work, we have shown that there exist representations of the Galilean line group that uphold the non-relativistic equivalence principle as well as representations that violate the equivalence principle. In these previous studies, the focus was on linear accelerations. In this paper, we undertake an extension of the formulation to include rotational accelerations. We show that the incorporation of rotational accelerations requires a class of loop prolongations of the Galilean line group and their unitary cocycle representations. We recover the centrifugal and Coriolis force effects from these loop representations. Loops are more general than groups in that their multiplication law need not be associative. Hence, our broad theoretical claim is that a Galilean quantum theory that holds in arbitrary non-inertial reference frames requires going beyond groups and group representations, the well-established framework for implementing symmetry transformations in quantum mechanics. -- Highlights: •A formulation of Galilean quantum mechanics in non-inertial reference frames is presented. •The Galilei group is generalized to infinite dimensional Galilean line group. •Loop prolongations of Galilean line group contain central extensions of Galilei group. •Unitary representations of the loops are constructed. •These representations lead to terms in the Hamiltonian corresponding to fictitious forces, including centrifugal and Coriolis

  16. Adjustment of Sonar and Laser Acquisition Data for Building the 3D Reference Model of a Canal Tunnel.

    PubMed

    Moisan, Emmanuel; Charbonnier, Pierre; Foucher, Philippe; Grussenmeyer, Pierre; Guillemin, Samuel; Koehl, Mathieu

    2015-12-11

    In this paper, we focus on the construction of a full 3D model of a canal tunnel by combining terrestrial laser (for its above-water part) and sonar (for its underwater part) scans collected from static acquisitions. The modeling of such a structure is challenging because the sonar device is used in a narrow environment that induces many artifacts. Moreover, the location and the orientation of the sonar device are unknown. In our approach, sonar data are first simultaneously denoised and meshed. Then, above- and under-water point clouds are co-registered to generate directly the full 3D model of the canal tunnel. Faced with the lack of overlap between both models, we introduce a robust algorithm that relies on geometrical entities and partially-immersed targets, which are visible in both the laser and sonar point clouds. A full 3D model, visually promising, of the entrance of a canal tunnel is obtained. The analysis of the method raises several improvement directions that will help with obtaining more accurate models, in a more automated way, in the limits of the involved technology.

  17. Adjustment of Sonar and Laser Acquisition Data for Building the 3D Reference Model of a Canal Tunnel.

    PubMed

    Moisan, Emmanuel; Charbonnier, Pierre; Foucher, Philippe; Grussenmeyer, Pierre; Guillemin, Samuel; Koehl, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the construction of a full 3D model of a canal tunnel by combining terrestrial laser (for its above-water part) and sonar (for its underwater part) scans collected from static acquisitions. The modeling of such a structure is challenging because the sonar device is used in a narrow environment that induces many artifacts. Moreover, the location and the orientation of the sonar device are unknown. In our approach, sonar data are first simultaneously denoised and meshed. Then, above- and under-water point clouds are co-registered to generate directly the full 3D model of the canal tunnel. Faced with the lack of overlap between both models, we introduce a robust algorithm that relies on geometrical entities and partially-immersed targets, which are visible in both the laser and sonar point clouds. A full 3D model, visually promising, of the entrance of a canal tunnel is obtained. The analysis of the method raises several improvement directions that will help with obtaining more accurate models, in a more automated way, in the limits of the involved technology. PMID:26690444

  18. Adjustment of Sonar and Laser Acquisition Data for Building the 3D Reference Model of a Canal Tunnel †

    PubMed Central

    Moisan, Emmanuel; Charbonnier, Pierre; Foucher, Philippe; Grussenmeyer, Pierre; Guillemin, Samuel; Koehl, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the construction of a full 3D model of a canal tunnel by combining terrestrial laser (for its above-water part) and sonar (for its underwater part) scans collected from static acquisitions. The modeling of such a structure is challenging because the sonar device is used in a narrow environment that induces many artifacts. Moreover, the location and the orientation of the sonar device are unknown. In our approach, sonar data are first simultaneously denoised and meshed. Then, above- and under-water point clouds are co-registered to generate directly the full 3D model of the canal tunnel. Faced with the lack of overlap between both models, we introduce a robust algorithm that relies on geometrical entities and partially-immersed targets, which are visible in both the laser and sonar point clouds. A full 3D model, visually promising, of the entrance of a canal tunnel is obtained. The analysis of the method raises several improvement directions that will help with obtaining more accurate models, in a more automated way, in the limits of the involved technology. PMID:26690444

  19. Crustal Motion Geodesy, PGR and Sea Level Rise: Eliminating Reference Frame Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevis, M. G.; Brown, A. K.; Kendrick, E. C.; Caccamise, D. J.; Merrifield, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Long-term geodetic observations of vertical crustal motion can be used to assess and constrain PGR models and to assess and constrain 'absolute' versus 'relative' rates of sea level change. All geodetic estimates for the vertical velocities of GPS stations are stated in a specific reference frame (RF). In effect, this RF provides a datum for the vertical velocity measurements. Geodesists have long known that two geodetic groups using fairly similar GPS data sets (in terms of station distribution and temporal extent) often fail to realize equivalent RFs, even when they agree, in principle, on the definition of their 'target' RF. This phenomenon has sometimes been referred to as 'RF realization error'. This problem becomes more pronounced as the spatial and temporal sampling of the GPS networks under analysis by two or more geodesy groups becomes more diverse. A similar phenomenon occurs with PGR models. Many PGR models are nominally posed in the same physical frame - usually a Center of Mass (CM) frame - but in practice the global vertical velocity fields they predict are quite distinct. We shall argue that part of this discrepancy arises from RF realization error. We shall argue that the best way to address the RF problem in the context of vertical velocities is to estimate a component of the global vertical velocity field (evaluated at a given set of stations) consistent with a constant rate of displacement between the two frames, and then remove this component so as to isolate differences that cannot be explained in terms of frame drift. In effect, the resulting set of vertical velocity differences is 'frameless'. We will argue that such frameless comparisons are much safer than imagining that any two groups (be they geodesists or GPR theorists) can ever realize exactly equivalent frames. The distinction between these two approaches is sometimes subtle, but in practice the frameless approach means we must estimate frame translation rates for each distinct

  20. The ICRF-3: Proposed Roadmap to the Next Generation International Celestial Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Arias, F.; Boboltz, D.; Boehm, J.; Bolotin, S.; Bourda, G.; Charlot, P.; de Witt, A.; Fey, A.; Gaume, R.; Gordon, D.; Heinkelmann, R.; Lambert, S.; Ma, C.; Malkin, Z.; Nothnagel, A.; Seitz, M.; Skurikhina, E.; Souchay, J.; Titov, O.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a 3rd generation radio-based International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF- 3) to improve upon the highly successful ICRF-2. Our goals are to improve the precision, spatial and frequency coverages relative to the ICRF-2 by 2018. This date is driven by the desire to create radio frames early enough to test the Gaia optical frame during its construction. Several specific actions are underway. A collaboration has been started to improve S/X-band precision of the 2000+ VLBA Calibrator Survey sources which are typically 5 times less precise than the rest of the ICRF-2. S/X-band southern precision improvements are planned from observations with southern antennas such as the AuScope and HartRAO, S. Africa. We seek to improve radio frequency coverage with X/Ka and K- band work. An X/Ka frame of 631 sources now has full sky coverage from the addition of a 2nd southern station in Argentina which should strengthen the southern hemisphere in general. A K-band collaboration has formed with similar coverage and southern precision goals. On the analysis front, special attention will be given to combination techniques both of VLBI catalogs and of multiple data types (e.g. VLBI+GPS). Finally, work is underway to identify and pinpoint sources bright enough in both radio and optical to allow for a robust frame tie between VLBI and Gaia optical frames.

  1. Global, Regional and National Geodetic Reference Frames for Geodesy and Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosy, Jaroslaw

    2014-06-01

    In July 2003 the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) established the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). The GGOS is integrating the three basic components: geometry, the earth rotation and gravity. The backbone of this integration is the existing global ground network, based on the geodetic space techniques: very long baseline interferometry, satellite laser ranging, global navigation satellite systems and Doppler orbitography and radiopositioning integrated by satellite. These techniques have to operate as one global entity and in one global reference frame. The global reference frame in the GGOS is a realization of the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS). The ITRS is a world spatial reference system co-rotating with the Earth in its diurnal motion in the space. The IAG Subcommision for the European Reference Frame (EUREF) in 1991 recommended that the terrestrial reference system for Europe should be coincident with ITRS at the epoch t 0 = 1989.0 and fixed to the stable part of the Eurasian Plate. It was named the European Terrestrial Reference System 89 (ETRS89). On the 2nd of June 2008, the Head Office of Geodesy and Cartography in Poland commenced operating the ASG-EUPOS multifunctional precise satellite positioning system. The ASG-EUPOS network defines the European Terrestrial Reference System ETRS89 in Poland. A close connection between the ASG-EUPOS stations and 15 out of 18 Polish EUREF permanent network stations controls the realization of the ETRS89 on Polish territory. This paper is a review of the global ITRS, as well as a regional and a national geodetic reference systems ETRS89.

  2. The Gaia inertial reference frame and the tilting of the Milky Way disk

    SciTech Connect

    Perryman, Michael; Spergel, David N.; Lindegren, Lennart

    2014-07-10

    While the precise relationship between the Milky Way disk and the symmetry planes of the dark matter halo remains somewhat uncertain, a time-varying disk orientation with respect to an inertial reference frame seems probable. Hierarchical structure formation models predict that the dark matter halo is triaxial and tumbles with a characteristic rate of ∼2 rad H{sub 0}{sup −1} (∼30 μas yr{sup –1}). These models also predict a time-dependent accretion of gas, such that the angular momentum vector of the disk should be misaligned with that of the halo. These effects, as well as tidal effects of the LMC, will result in the rotation of the angular momentum vector of the disk population with respect to the quasar reference frame. We assess the accuracy with which the positions and proper motions from Gaia can be referred to a kinematically non-rotating system, and show that the spin vector of the transformation from any rigid self-consistent catalog frame to the quasi-inertial system defined by quasars should be defined to better than 1 μas yr{sup –1}. Determination of this inertial frame by Gaia will reveal any signature of the disk orientation varying with time, improve models of the potential and dynamics of the Milky Way, test theories of gravity, and provide new insights into the orbital evolution of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds.

  3. KALREF—A Kalman filter and time series approach to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoping; Abbondanza, Claudio; Altamimi, Zuheir; Chin, T. Mike; Collilieux, Xavier; Gross, Richard S.; Heflin, Michael B.; Jiang, Yan; Parker, Jay W.

    2015-05-01

    The current International Terrestrial Reference Frame is based on a piecewise linear site motion model and realized by reference epoch coordinates and velocities for a global set of stations. Although linear motions due to tectonic plates and glacial isostatic adjustment dominate geodetic signals, at today's millimeter precisions, nonlinear motions due to earthquakes, volcanic activities, ice mass losses, sea level rise, hydrological changes, and other processes become significant. Monitoring these (sometimes rapid) changes desires consistent and precise realization of the terrestrial reference frame (TRF) quasi-instantaneously. Here, we use a Kalman filter and smoother approach to combine time series from four space geodetic techniques to realize an experimental TRF through weekly time series of geocentric coordinates. In addition to secular, periodic, and stochastic components for station coordinates, the Kalman filter state variables also include daily Earth orientation parameters and transformation parameters from input data frames to the combined TRF. Local tie measurements among colocated stations are used at their known or nominal epochs of observation, with comotion constraints applied to almost all colocated stations. The filter/smoother approach unifies different geodetic time series in a single geocentric frame. Fragmented and multitechnique tracking records at colocation sites are bridged together to form longer and coherent motion time series. While the time series approach to TRF reflects the reality of a changing Earth more closely than the linear approximation model, the filter/smoother is computationally powerful and flexible to facilitate incorporation of other data types and more advanced characterization of stochastic behavior of geodetic time series.

  4. Using radio stars to link the Gaia and VLBI reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, Zinovy

    2016-09-01

    A possible method for linking the optical Gaia Celestial Reference Frame (GCRF) to the VLBI-based International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) is to use radio stars in a manner similar to that in the linking of the Hipparcos Celestial Reference Frame (HCRF) to ICRF. In this work, an obtainable accuracy of the orientation angles between GCRF and ICRF frames was estimated by Monte Carlo simulation. If the uncertainties in the radio star positions obtained by VLBI are in the range of 0.1-4 mas and those obtained by Gaia are in the range of 0.005-0.4 mas, the orientation angle uncertainties are 0.018-0.72 mas if 46 radio stars are used, 0.013-0.51 mas if 92 radio stars are used, and 0.010-0.41 mas if 138 radio stars are used. The general conclusion from this study is that a properly organized VLBI programme for radio star observation with a reasonable load on the VLBI network can allow for the realization of GCRF-ICRF link with an error of about 0.1 mas.

  5. A Ka-Band Celestial Reference Frame with Applications to Deep Space Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Clark, J. Eric; Garcia-Miro, Cristina; Horiuchi, Shinji; Sotuela, Ioana

    2011-01-01

    The Ka-band radio spectrum is now being used for a wide variety of applications. This paper highlights the use of Ka-band as a frequency for precise deep space navigation based on a set of reference beacons provided by extragalactic quasars which emit broadband noise at Ka-band. This quasar-based celestial reference frame is constructed using X/Ka-band (8.4/32 GHz) from fifty-five 24-hour sessions with the Deep Space Network antennas in California, Australia, and Spain. We report on observations which have detected 464 sources covering the full 24 hours of Right Ascension and declinations down to -45 deg. Comparison of this X/Ka-band frame to the international standard S/X-band (2.3/8.4 GHz) ICRF2 shows wRMS agreement of approximately 200 micro-arcsec in alpha cos(delta) and approximately 300 micro-arcsec in delta. There is evidence for systematic errors at the 100 micro-arcsec level. Known errors include limited SNR, lack of instrumental phase calibration, tropospheric refraction mis-modeling, and limited southern geometry. The motivation for extending the celestial reference frame to frequencies above 8 GHz is to access more compact source morphology for improved frame stability and to support spacecraft navigation for Ka-band based NASA missions.

  6. Making Inexpensive 3-D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Harry

    2016-03-01

    Visual aids are important to student learning, and they help make the teacher's job easier. Keeping with the TPT theme of "The Art, Craft, and Science of Physics Teaching," the purpose of this article is to show how teachers, lacking equipment and funds, can construct a durable 3-D model reference frame and a model gravity well tailored to specific class lessons. Most of the supplies are readily available in the home or at school: rubbing alcohol, a rag, two colors of spray paint, art brushes, and masking tape. The cost of these supplies, if you don't have them, is less than 20.

  7. Age-related effects on spatial memory across viewpoint changes relative to different reference frames.

    PubMed

    Montefinese, Maria; Sulpizio, Valentina; Galati, Gaspare; Committeri, Giorgia

    2015-07-01

    Remembering object positions across different views is a fundamental competence for acting and moving appropriately in a large-scale space. Behavioural and neurological changes in elderly subjects suggest that the spatial representations of the environment might decline compared to young participants. However, no data are available on the use of different reference frames within topographical space in aging. Here we investigated the use of allocentric and egocentric frames in aging, by asking young and older participants to encode the location of a target in a virtual room relative either to stable features of the room (allocentric environment-based frame), or to an unstable objects set (allocentric objects-based frame), or to the viewer's viewpoint (egocentric frame). After a viewpoint change of 0° (absent), 45° (small) or 135° (large), participants judged whether the target was in the same spatial position as before relative to one of the three frames. Results revealed a different susceptibility to viewpoint changes in older than young participants. Importantly, we detected a worst performance, in terms of reaction times, for older than young participants in the allocentric frames. The deficit was more marked for the environment-based frame, for which a lower sensitivity was revealed as well as a worst performance even when no viewpoint change occurred. Our data provide new evidence of a greater vulnerability of the allocentric, in particular environment-based, spatial coding with aging, in line with the retrogenesis theory according to which cognitive changes in aging reverse the sequence of acquisition in mental development. PMID:25037856

  8. The Relationship Between Global Mean Sea Level Rise and the Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, F.; Luthcke, S.; Zelensky, N.; Pavlis, E.; Beckley, B.; Ray, R.; Petrov, L.; Pavlis, D.; Rowlands, D.

    2006-01-01

    The Terrestrial Reference Frame is the fundamental means by which we relate observations in space and time. For example, in order to generate a homogeneous and consistent time series of geo-referenced altimeter measurements over the span of the Topex/Poseidon and Jason-1 missions, we must examine carefully the role of improvements in measurement modelling, force modelling, and improved reference frame realizations. In this paper, we quantify the effects of improvements in force modelling, for example the use of new GRACE-derived gravity models, the effect of time-variable gravity derived from GRACE on altimeter satellite orbits. In addition, we examine the effects of modelling geocenter in altimeteric satellite POD, and look at how the application of atmospheric loading might affect the time-series of precise orbits for Topex/Poseidon and Jason-1.

  9. Research Activities for the DORIS Contribution to the Next International Terrestrial Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soudarin, L.; Moreaux, G.; Lemoine, F.; Willis, P.; Stepanek, P.; Otten, M.; Govind, R.; Kuzin, S.; Ferrage, P.

    2012-01-01

    For the preparation of ITRF2008, the IDS processed data from 1993 to 2008, including data from TOPEX/Poseidon, the SPOT satellites and Envisat in the weekly solutions. Since the development of ITRF2008, the IDS has been engaged in a number of efforts to try and improve the reference frame solutions. These efforts include (i) assessing the contribution of the new DORIS satellites, Jason-2 and Cryosat2 (2008-2011), (ii) individually analyzing the DORIS satellite contributions to geocenter and scale, and (iii) improving orbit dynamics (atmospheric loading effects, satellite surface force modeling. . . ). We report on the preliminary results from these research activities, review the status of the IDS combination which is now routinely generated from the contributions of the IDS analysis centers, and discuss the prospects for continued improvement in the DORIS contribution to the next international reference frame.

  10. Personnel selection and the five-factor model: reexamining the effects of appplicant's frame of reference.

    PubMed

    Smith, D B; Hanges, P J; Dickson, M W

    2001-04-01

    Recently, 2 separate yet related criticisms have been levied against the adequacy of the five-factor model (or Big Five) as a descriptive taxonomy of job applicant personality: frame of reference effects (M. J. Schmit & A. M. Ryan, 1993) and socially desirable responding (A. F. Snell & M. A. McDaniel, 1998). Of interest, although both criticisms suggest that the five-factor model is inadequate, the frame of reference effects criticism suggests that the factor structure should be more complex, whereas socially desirable responding suggests that it should be less complex in job applicant contexts. The current research reports the results of a new study demonstrating the adequacy of the five-factor model as a descriptor of job applicant, job incumbent, and student personality. Implications for personality assessment and concurrent validation designs using personality measures are also discussed.

  11. Transfer of spatial reference frame using singlet states and classical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahder, Thomas B.

    2016-03-01

    A simple protocol is described for transferring spatial orientation from Alice to Bob (two spatially separated observers). The two observers are assumed to share quantum singlet states and classical communication. The protocol assumes that Alice and Bob have complete free will (measurement independence) and is based on maximizing the Shannon mutual information between Alice and Bob's measurement outcomes. Repeated use of this protocol for each spatial axis of Alice allows transfer of a complete three-dimensional reference frame, up to inversion of each of the axes. The technological complexity of this protocol is similar to that needed for BB84 quantum key distribution and hence is much simpler to implement than recently proposed schemes for transmission of reference frames. A second protocol based on a Bayesian formalism is also discussed.

  12. Proof-of-principle experiment of reference-frame-independent quantum key distribution with phase coding

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wen-Ye; Wang, Shuang; Li, Hong-Wei; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Chen, Wei; Yao, Yao; Huang, Jing-Zheng; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated a proof-of-principle experiment of reference-frame-independent phase coding quantum key distribution (RFI-QKD) over an 80-km optical fiber. After considering the finite-key bound, we still achieve a distance of 50 km. In this scenario, the phases of the basis states are related by a slowly time-varying transformation. Furthermore, we developed and realized a new decoy state method for RFI-QKD systems with weak coherent sources to counteract the photon-number-splitting attack. With the help of a reference-frame-independent protocol and a Michelson interferometer with Faraday rotator mirrors, our system is rendered immune to the slow phase changes of the interferometer and the polarization disturbances of the channel, making the procedure very robust. PMID:24402550

  13. Frames of reference for helicopter electronic maps - The relevance of spatial cognition and componential analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwood, Kelly; Wickens, Christopher D.

    1991-01-01

    Computer-generated map displays for NOE and low-level helicopter flight were formed according to prior research on maps, navigational problem solving, and spatial cognition in large-scale environments. The north-up map emphasized consistency of object location, wheareas, the track-up map emphasized map-terrain congruency. A component analysis indicates that different cognitive components, e.g., orienting and absolute object location, are supported to varying degrees by properties of different frames of reference.

  14. Brownian motion of a harmonic oscillator in a noninertial reference frame.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Aquino, J I; Romero-Bastida, M

    2013-08-01

    The Brownian motion of a charged harmonic oscillator in the presence of additional force fields, such as a constant magnetic field and arbitrary time-dependent electric and mechanical forces, is studied in a rotational reference frame under uniform motion. By assuming an isotropic surrounding medium (a scalar friction constant), we solve explicitly the Smoluchowski equation associated with the Langevin equation for the charged harmonic oscillator and calculate the mean square displacements along and orthogonal to the rotation axis.

  15. From a Somatotopic to a Spatiotopic Frame of Reference for the Localization of Nociceptive Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    De Paepe, Annick L.; Crombez, Geert; Legrain, Valéry

    2015-01-01

    To react efficiently to potentially threatening stimuli, we have to be able to localize these stimuli in space. In daily life we are constantly moving so that our limbs can be positioned at the opposite side of space. Therefore, a somatotopic frame of reference is insufficient to localize nociceptive stimuli. Here we investigated whether nociceptive stimuli are mapped into a spatiotopic frame of reference, and more specifically a peripersonal frame of reference, which takes into account the position of the body limbs in external space, as well as the occurrence of external objects presented near the body. Two temporal order judgment (TOJ) experiments were conducted, during which participants had to decide which of two nociceptive stimuli, one applied to either hand, had been presented first while their hands were either uncrossed or crossed over the body midline. The occurrence of the nociceptive stimuli was cued by uninformative visual cues. We found that the visual cues prioritized the perception of nociceptive stimuli applied to the hand laying in the cued side of space, irrespective of posture. Moreover, the influence of the cues was smaller when they were presented far in front of participants’ hands as compared to when they were presented in close proximity. Finally, participants’ temporal sensitivity was reduced by changing posture. These findings are compatible with the existence of a peripersonal frame of reference for the localization of nociceptive stimuli. This allows for the construction of a stable representation of our body and the space closely surrounding our body, enabling a quick and efficient reaction to potential physical threats. PMID:26317671

  16. Generalization of Dexterous Manipulation Is Sensitive to the Frame of Reference in Which It Is Learned

    PubMed Central

    Marneweck, Michelle; Knelange, Elisabeth; Lee-Miller, Trevor; Santello, Marco; Gordon, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that internal representations of manipulations of objects with asymmetric mass distributions that are generated within a specific orientation are not generalizable to novel orientations, i.e., subjects fail to prevent object roll on their first grasp-lift attempt of the object following 180° object rotation. This suggests that representations of these manipulations are specific to the reference frame in which they are formed. However, it is unknown whether that reference frame is specific to the hand, the body, or both, because rotating the object 180° modifies the relation between object and body as well as object and hand. An alternative, untested explanation for the above failure to generalize learned manipulations is that any rotation will disrupt grasp performance, regardless if the reference frame in which the manipulation was learned is maintained or modified. We examined the effect of rotations that (1) maintain and (2) modify relations between object and body, and object and hand, on the generalizability of learned two-digit manipulation of an object with an asymmetric mass distribution. Following rotations that maintained the relation between object and body and object and hand (e.g., rotating the object and subject 180°), subjects continued to use appropriate digit placement and load force distributions, thus generating sufficient compensatory moments to minimize object roll. In contrast, following rotations that modified the relation between (1) object and hand (e.g. rotating the hand around to the opposite object side), (2) object and body (e.g. rotating subject and hand 180°), or (3) both (e.g. rotating the subject 180°), subjects used the same, yet inappropriate digit placement and load force distribution, as those used prior to the rotation. Consequently, the compensatory moments were insufficient to prevent large object rolls. These findings suggest that representations of learned manipulation of objects with asymmetric mass

  17. Reference frame stability and nonlinear distortion in minimum-constrained network adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsakis, C.

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of the minimum constraints (MCs) on the reference frame parameters in a free-net solution. The non-estimable part of these parameters (which is not reduced by the available data) is analysed in terms of its stability under a numerical perturbation of the constrained datum functionals. In practice, such a perturbation can be ascribed either to hidden errors in the known coordinates/velocities that participate in the MCs or to a simple change of their a priori values due to a datum switch on a different fiducial dataset. In addition, a perturbation of this type may cause a nonlinear variation to the estimable part of the reference frame parameters, since it theoretically affects the adjusted observations that are implied by the network's nonlinear observational model. The aforementioned effects have an impact on the quality of a terrestrial reference frame (TRF) that is established via a minimum-constrained adjustment, and our study shows that they are both controlled through a characteristic matrix which is inherently linked to the MC system (the so-called TRF stability matrix). The structure of this matrix depends on the network's spatial configuration and the `geometry' of the datum constraints, while its main role is the filtering of any MC-related errors into the least-squares adjustment results. A number of examples with different types of geodetic networks are also presented to demonstrate the theoretical findings of our study.

  18. Regional differences in spatial frame of reference systems for people in different areas of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Kan

    2009-04-01

    Levinson defined spatial frame of reference systems into three types and found that people who spoke different languages all over the world had different habits in the use of these systems. Some quasi-experimental designed research in China suggested that Chinese people in various areas had different preferences for frame of reference systems in nonlinguistic spatial tasks. In this study, a newly designed and strictly controlled laboratory experiment was conducted to measure performance on linguistic spatial tasks. Response times of two groups of participants, respectively selected from the north (10 men and 12 women; M age = 24 yr., SD = 4) and south (11 men and 12 women; M age = 24 yr., SD = 3) of China, were compared on processing of spatial terms used in different systems: absolute (e.g., east) versus relative (e.g., right). To reduce the effect of living experience, the Northern participants with less than 4 yr. living experience in the south of China were included, and vice versa. Analysis showed that Southerners, but not Northerners, differed in response times to terms between absolute and relative systems. This finding suggests that speed of processing spatial terms differs among people who speak the uniform language Mandarin but live in geographically distinct home areas in China and use different frame of reference systems.

  19. Reference frames in reading: evidence from visually and memory-guided saccades.

    PubMed

    Vergilino, D; Beauvillain, C

    2001-01-01

    In order to examine the frames of reference used for the planning of inter- and intra-word saccades, subjects were required to execute a two-saccade sequence toward one or two words. The first saccade was visually guided while the second saccade was visually or memory-guided. Results demonstrate that readers hold an internal representation of the target word in at least two different reference frames that are specific to the action to be performed: to aim for a new target word or to read it over with a second fixation. When a word is selected as a target for the next saccade, the spatial location of the second word is stored in memory. Then, the second saccade is updated with respect to the current eye position in the first word in order to aim a functional target location in the second word that is the word's center. When the second saccade is directed within the fixated word, the saccadic system uses the intrinsic features of the word to code a fixed-motor vector relative to the word's length. Our present results demonstrate that readers hold an internal representation of the saccade target in different reference frames specific to the action performed on the word.

  20. Spatial scale, rather than nature of task or locomotion, modulates the spatial reference frame of attention

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuhong V.; Won, Bo-Yeong

    2015-01-01

    Visuospatial attention is strongly biased to locations that frequently contained a search target before. However, the function of this bias depends on the reference frame in which attended locations are coded. Previous research has shown a striking difference between tasks administered on a computer monitor and in a large environment, with the former inducing viewer-centered learning and the latter environment-centered learning. Why does environment-centered learning fail on a computer? Here we tested three possibilities: differences in spatial scale, nature of task, and locomotion may influence the reference frame of attention. Participants searched for a target on a monitor placed flat on a stand. On each trial they stood at a different location around the monitor. The target was frequently located in a fixed area of the monitor, but changes in participants’ perspective rendered this area random relative to the participants. Under incidental learning conditions participants failed to acquire environment-centered learning even when (i) the task and display resembled the large-scale task, and (ii) the search task required locomotion. The difficulty in inducing environment-centered learning on a computer underscores the egocentric nature of visual attention. It supports the idea that spatial scale modulates the reference frame of attention. PMID:25867510

  1. Effects of adopting new precession, nutation and equinox corrections on the terrestrial reference frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S. Y.; Mueller, I. I.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of adopting new definitive precession and equinox corrections on the terrestrial reference frame was investigated. It is noted that: (1) the effect on polar motion is a diurnal periodic term with an amplitude increasing linearly in time whole on UT1 it is a linear term; (2) general principles are given to determine the effects of small rotations of the frame of a conventional inertial reference system (CIS) on the frame of the conventional terrestrial reference system (CTS); (3) seven CTS options are presented, one of which is necessary to accommodate such rotation. Accommodating possible future changes in the astronomical nutation is discussed. The effects of differences which may exist between the various CTS's and CIS's on Earth rotation parameters (ERP) and how these differences can be determined are examined. It is shown that the CTS differences can be determined from observations made at the same site, while the CIS differences by comparing the ERP's determined by the different techniques during the same time period.

  2. The scientific implications of the re-reductions in Hipparcos reference frame for Earth rotation studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitaine, N.

    After recalling the present knowledge in Earth rotation and the precision which is presently achieved on the Earth Rotation parameters (ERP) by the new techniques such as VLBI or satellite and lunar laser ranging, this paper investigates what will be the scientific implications of the re-reduction of the existing astrometric data which will be performed by the IAU Working Group "Earth Rotation in the Hipparcos Reference Frame". One of the main advantages of such a re-reduction over previous reductions is to refer to a much better realization of the optical Celestial Reference System as well as to an improved realization of the Terrestrial Reference System using corrections for the deviation of the vertical and for plate motions. An other advantage of the planned re-reduction is to use very long series of observations as compared to similar series obtained by the new techniques.

  3. Quantum reference frames associated with noncompact groups: The case of translations and boosts and the role of mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Alexander R. H.; Piani, Marco; Mann, Robert B.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum communication without a shared reference frame or the construction of a relational quantum theory requires the notion of a quantum reference frame. We analyze aspects of quantum reference frames associated with noncompact groups, specifically, the group of spatial translations and Galilean boosts. We begin by demonstrating how the usually employed group average, used to dispense of the notion of an external reference frame, leads to unphysical states when applied to reference frames associated with noncompact groups. However, we show that this average does lead naturally to a reduced state on the relative degrees of freedom of a system, which was previously considered by Angelo et al. [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 44, 145304 (2011), 10.1088/1751-8113/44/14/145304]. We then study in detail the informational properties of this reduced state for systems of two and three particles in Gaussian states.

  4. Colour and magnitude effects in optical astrometry observations; implications for re-reductions in Hipparcos reference frame.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hefty, J.

    The prepared project of re-reduction of past optical astrometry observations in the Hipparcos reference frame will be based on processing of individual star observations referred to unique celestial reference frame. The quite new approach for the calculation of the new series of Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) involves the simultaneous derivation of ERP with other relevant parameters as nutation corrections, tidal effects, constant of refraction etc. The spectral class and magnitude dependence is analyzed in order to account for this effect in algorithms for calculations in Hipparcos reference frame.

  5. The Influence of Massive Companions on the SIM Celestial Reference Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Turyshev, Slava

    1999-12-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is a 10-m Michelson space-based optical interferometer designed for precision astrometry (4 μ as, 2 μ as/yr) with better accuracy hoped for over a narrow field of view. It is intended to search for planets and investigate a number of problems in Galactic and extra-galactic astronomy. The accuracy and stability of SIM's celestial reference frame is subject to degradation from the reflex motion induced by massive companions of the reference objects over the 5 year mission. We present the results of simulations which show the sensitivity of reference frame accuracy to companions as a function of mass and period. The implications for planet detection will be briefly explored. We will focus on the components of reflex motion that will not be absorbed by the standard astrometric parameters of position, parallax, and proper motion and the consequences for mission accuracy. Lastly, we discuss the suitability of A-V, G-V, and K-III stars as reference objects in light of our simulations of companion induced reflex motion and suggest directions for further research on this problem. This work was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  6. The role of the brain's frontal eye fields in constructing frame of reference.

    PubMed

    Wallentin, Mikkel

    2012-08-01

    Establishing contextual reference during discourse is a vital part of language function. Personal pronouns (e.g., he/she/it) are used to refer to previously experienced objects, utterances and events. These items, however, are often no longer present in the environment and have to be maintained and manipulated in working memory (WM). One aspect of this is the construction of a spatial frame of reference (e.g., "He was in front of it" where "he" is established as figure and "it" is the ground). The WM processes underlying this function may be different from those involved in establishing a non-spatial relation (e.g., "He was older than her"). The brain's frontal eye fields (FEFs), responsible for eye movement control, are known to be involved in processing spatial WM. This paper reviews both functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments and a subsequent behavioral interference study demonstrating a specific role for the FEFs and the brain's eye movement control system in manipulation of WM content for establishing object-centered spatial reference frames during verbally cued recall of recent visual and linguistic experiences.

  7. Evaluation of local electric fields generated by transcranial direct current stimulation with an extracephalic reference electrode based on realistic 3D body modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Chang-Hwan; Park, Ji-Hye; Shim, Miseon; Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2012-04-01

    In this study, local electric field distributions generated by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) with an extracephalic reference electrode were evaluated to address extracephalic tDCS safety issues. To this aim, we generated a numerical model of an adult male human upper body and applied the 3D finite element method to electric current conduction analysis. In our simulations, the active electrode was placed over the left primary motor cortex (M1) and the reference electrode was placed at six different locations: over the right temporal lobe, on the right supraorbital region, on the right deltoid, on the left deltoid, under the chin, and on the right buccinator muscle. The maximum current density and electric field intensity values in the brainstem generated by the extracephalic reference electrodes were comparable to, or even less than, those generated by the cephalic reference electrodes. These results suggest that extracephalic reference electrodes do not lead to unwanted modulation of the brainstem cardio-respiratory and autonomic centers, as indicated by recent experimental studies. The volume energy density was concentrated at the neck area by the use of deltoid reference electrodes, but was still smaller than that around the active electrode locations. In addition, the distributions of elicited cortical electric fields demonstrated that the use of extracephalic reference electrodes might allow for the robust prediction of cortical modulations with little dependence on the reference electrode locations.

  8. The Influence of the Terrestrial Reference Frame on Studies of Sea Level Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerem, R. S.; Bar-Sever, Y. E.; Haines, B. J.; Desai, S.; Heflin, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    The terrestrial reference frame (TRF) provides the foundation for the accurate monitoring of sea level using both ground-based (tide gauges) and space-based (satellite altimetry) techniques. For the latter, tide gauges are also used to monitor drifts in the satellite instruments over time. The accuracy of the terrestrial reference frame (TRF) is thus a critical component for both types of sea level measurements. The TRF is central to the formation of geocentric sea-surface height (SSH) measurements from satellite altimeter data. The computed satellite orbits are linked to a particular TRF via the assumed locations of the ground-based tracking systems. The manner in which TRF errors are expressed in the orbit solution (and thus SSH) is not straightforward, and depends on the models of the forces underlying the satellite's motion. We discuss this relationship, and provide examples of the systematic TRF-induced errors in the altimeter derived sea-level record. The TRF is also crucial to the interpretation of tide-gauge measurements, as it enables the separation of vertical land motion from volumetric changes in the water level. TRF errors affect tide gauge measurements through GNSS estimates of the vertical land motion at each tide gauge. This talk will discuss the current accuracy of the TRF and how errors in the TRF impact both satellite altimeter and tide gauge sea level measurements. We will also discuss simulations of how the proposed Geodetic Reference Antenna in SPace (GRASP) satellite mission could reduce these errors and revolutionize how reference frames are computed in general.

  9. Accurate registration of random radiographic projections based on three spherical references for the purpose of few-view 3D reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, Ralf; Heil, Ulrich; Weinheimer, Oliver; Gross, Daniel; Bruellmann, Dan; Thomas, Eric; Schwanecke, Ulrich; Schoemer, Elmar

    2008-02-15

    Precise registration of radiographic projection images acquired in almost arbitrary geometries for the purpose of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction is beset with difficulties. We modify and enhance a registration method [R. Schulze, D. D. Bruellmann, F. Roeder, and B. d'Hoedt, Med. Phys. 31, 2849-2854 (2004)] based on coupling a minimum amount of three reference spheres in arbitrary positions to a rigid object under study for precise a posteriori pose estimation. Two consecutive optimization procedures (a, initial guess; b, iterative coordinate refinement) are applied to completely exploit the reference's shadow information for precise registration of the projections. The modification has been extensive, i.e., only the idea of using the sphere shadows to locate each sphere in three dimensions from each projection was retained whereas the approach to extract the shadow information has been changed completely and extended. The registration information is used for subsequent algebraic reconstruction of the 3D information inherent in the projections. We present a detailed mathematical theory of the registration process as well as simulated data investigating its performance in the presence of error. Simulation of the initial guess revealed a mean relative error in the critical depth coordinate ranging between 2.1% and 4.4%, and an evident error reduction by the subsequent iterative coordinate refinement. To prove the applicability of the method for real-world data, algebraic 3D reconstructions from few ({<=}9) projection radiographs of a human skull, a human mandible and a teeth-containing mandible segment are presented. The method facilitates extraction of 3D information from only few projections obtained from off-the-shelf radiographic projection units without the need for costly hardware. Technical requirements as well as radiation dose are low.

  10. Dynamics of an artificial satellite in an earth-fixed reference frame - Effects of polar motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinella, P.; Milani, A.; Nobili, A. M.; Sacerdote, F.

    Since such polar motions as precession, lunisolar nutation and free nutation introduce small, apparent forces in earth satellite equations of motion in earth-fixed reference frames, attention is given to the possibility of (1) integrating the orbit in such frames when tracking data are used for geophysical applications, and (2) determining a set of unknown parameters which describe long-period polar wandering from orbital data. It is shown that accuracy limits depend on the precision and geometry of the available range data, with the laser ranging method used in the LASSO system carried by the SIRIO 2 satellite equalling the performance of traditional methods, and more advanced laser ranging surpassing those accuracies.

  11. Numerical methods for the weakly compressible Generalized Langevin Model in Eulerian reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarnykh, Dmitrii; Litvinov, Sergey; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-06-01

    A well established approach for the computation of turbulent flow without resolving all turbulent flow scales is to solve a filtered or averaged set of equations, and to model non-resolved scales by closures derived from transported probability density functions (PDF) for velocity fluctuations. Effective numerical methods for PDF transport employ the equivalence between the Fokker-Planck equation for the PDF and a Generalized Langevin Model (GLM), and compute the PDF by transporting a set of sampling particles by GLM (Pope (1985) [1]). The natural representation of GLM is a system of stochastic differential equations in a Lagrangian reference frame, typically solved by particle methods. A representation in a Eulerian reference frame, however, has the potential to significantly reduce computational effort and to allow for the seamless integration into a Eulerian-frame numerical flow solver. GLM in a Eulerian frame (GLMEF) formally corresponds to the nonlinear fluctuating hydrodynamic equations derived by Nakamura and Yoshimori (2009) [12]. Unlike the more common Landau-Lifshitz Navier-Stokes (LLNS) equations these equations are derived from the underdamped Langevin equation and are not based on a local equilibrium assumption. Similarly to LLNS equations the numerical solution of GLMEF requires special considerations. In this paper we investigate different numerical approaches to solving GLMEF with respect to the correct representation of stochastic properties of the solution. We find that a discretely conservative staggered finite-difference scheme, adapted from a scheme originally proposed for turbulent incompressible flow, in conjunction with a strongly stable (for non-stochastic PDE) Runge-Kutta method performs better for GLMEF than schemes adopted from those proposed previously for the LLNS. We show that equilibrium stochastic fluctuations are correctly reproduced.

  12. Impact of seasonal and postglacial surface displacement on global reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krásná, Hana; Böhm, Johannes; King, Matt; Memin, Anthony; Shabala, Stanislav; Watson, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    The calculation of actual station positions requires several corrections which are partly recommended by the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) Conventions (e.g., solid Earth tides and ocean tidal loading) as well as other corrections, e.g. accounting for hydrology and atmospheric loading. To investigate the pattern of omitted non-linear seasonal motion we estimated empirical harmonic models for selected stations within a global solution of suitable Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) sessions as well as mean annual models by stacking yearly time series of station positions. To validate these models we compare them to displacement series obtained from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data and to hydrology corrections determined from global models. Furthermore, we assess the impact of the seasonal station motions on the celestial reference frame as well as on Earth orientation parameters derived from real and also artificial VLBI observations. In the second part of the presentation we apply vertical rates of the ICE-5G_VM2_2012 vertical land movement grid on vertical station velocities. We assess the impact of postglacial uplift on the variability in the scale given different sampling of the postglacial signal in time and hence on the uncertainty in the scale rate of the estimated terrestrial reference frame.

  13. Future global SLR network evolution and its impact on the terrestrial reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehm, Alexander; Bloßfeld, Mathis; Pavlis, Erricos C.

    2016-04-01

    SLR is the unique technique that allows determining the geocentre with very high accuracy and contributes to the realization of the scale of a conventional reference frame. In addition, due to the high sensitivity of the SLR-tracked satellites on the Earth's gravitational field, SLR is a crucial technique for determining important geodetic parameters such as Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) and low-degree spherical harmonics of the Earth's gravitational field model. So far, the distribution of SLR stations has been quite inhomogeneous, especially in the southern hemisphere, mostly due to the lack of land-masses. With the set-up of a new SLR station in Brasilia in 2014 and the transfer of the former TIGO observatory from Concepción (Chile) to La Plata (Argentina) - now known as AGGO Argentinian-German Geodetic Observatory -, the shape of SLR subnetwork in South America has changed significantly. Furthermore, additional SLR stations in India (Mount Abu and Ponmundi), as well as a new station in Hartebeesthoek, are scheduled to start operations in 2016 and they will further improve the global SLR network geometry. In this work, SLR data has been simulated in order to determine the influence of the changing SLR network geometry on the geodetic parameters such as a global terrestrial reference frame, EOP and the low-degree harmonics of the Earth's gravitational field. The simulations have been performed for different network geometries as well as different satellites. In this investigation, a special emphasis is placed on the improvement of the geocentric realization of a global SLR-derived reference frame.

  14. Optical Spectra of Candidate International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) Flat-spectrum Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, O.; Stanford, Laura M.; Johnston, Helen M.; Pursimo, T.; Hunstead, Richard W.; Jauncey, David L.; Maslennikov, K.; Boldycheva, A.

    2013-07-01

    Continuing our program of spectroscopic observations of International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) sources, we present redshifts for 120 quasars and radio galaxies. Data were obtained with five telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes, the 2.5 m Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), and the 6.0 m Big Azimuthal Telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in Russia. The targets were selected from the International VLBI Service for Geodesy & Astrometry candidate International Celestial Reference Catalog which forms part of an observational very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) program to strengthen the celestial reference frame. We obtained spectra of the potential optical counterparts of more than 150 compact flat-spectrum radio sources, and measured redshifts of 120 emission-line objects, together with 19 BL Lac objects. These identifications add significantly to the precise radio-optical frame tie to be undertaken by Gaia, due to be launched in 2013, and to the existing data available for analyzing source proper motions over the celestial sphere. We show that the distribution of redshifts for ICRF sources is consistent with the much larger sample drawn from Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, implying that the ultra-compact VLBI sources are not distinguished from the overall radio-loud quasar population. In addition, we obtained NOT spectra for five radio sources from the FIRST and NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalogs, selected on the basis of their red colors, which yielded three quasars with z > 4.

  15. OPTICAL SPECTRA OF CANDIDATE INTERNATIONAL CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAME (ICRF) FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Titov, O.; Stanford, Laura M.; Johnston, Helen M.; Hunstead, Richard W.; Pursimo, T.; Jauncey, David L.; Maslennikov, K.

    2013-07-01

    Continuing our program of spectroscopic observations of International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) sources, we present redshifts for 120 quasars and radio galaxies. Data were obtained with five telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes, the 2.5 m Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), and the 6.0 m Big Azimuthal Telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in Russia. The targets were selected from the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry candidate International Celestial Reference Catalog which forms part of an observational very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) program to strengthen the celestial reference frame. We obtained spectra of the potential optical counterparts of more than 150 compact flat-spectrum radio sources, and measured redshifts of 120 emission-line objects, together with 19 BL Lac objects. These identifications add significantly to the precise radio-optical frame tie to be undertaken by Gaia, due to be launched in 2013, and to the existing data available for analyzing source proper motions over the celestial sphere. We show that the distribution of redshifts for ICRF sources is consistent with the much larger sample drawn from Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, implying that the ultra-compact VLBI sources are not distinguished from the overall radio-loud quasar population. In addition, we obtained NOT spectra for five radio sources from the FIRST and NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalogs, selected on the basis of their red colors, which yielded three quasars with z > 4.

  16. Evidence for a reference frame transformation of vestibular signal contributions to voluntary reaching.

    PubMed

    Moreau-Debord, Ian; Martin, Christophe Z; Landry, Marianne; Green, Andrea M

    2014-05-01

    To contribute appropriately to voluntary reaching during body motion, vestibular signals must be transformed from a head-centered to a body-centered reference frame. We quantitatively investigated the evidence for this transformation during online reach execution by using galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) to simulate rotation about a head-fixed, roughly naso-occipital axis as human subjects made planar reaching movements to a remembered location with their head in different orientations. If vestibular signals that contribute to reach execution have been transformed from a head-centered to a body-centered reference frame, the same stimulation should be interpreted as body tilt with the head upright but as vertical-axis rotation with the head inclined forward. Consequently, GVS should perturb reach trajectories in a head-orientation-dependent way. Consistent with this prediction, GVS applied during reach execution induced trajectory deviations that were significantly larger with the head forward compared with upright. Only with the head forward were trajectories consistently deviated in opposite directions for rightward versus leftward simulated rotation, as appropriate to compensate for body vertical-axis rotation. These results demonstrate that vestibular signals contributing to online reach execution have indeed been transformed from a head-centered to a body-centered reference frame. Reach deviation amplitudes were comparable to those predicted for ideal compensation for body rotation using a biomechanical limb model. Finally, by comparing the effects of application of GVS during reach execution versus prior to reach onset we also provide evidence that spatially transformed vestibular signals contribute to at least partially distinct compensation mechanisms for body motion during reach planning versus execution.

  17. ``Frames of Reference" as an Element in the Learning of Astronomy Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, J. R.; Chandra, N. R.; Kalchman, M.; Mutlak, H.; Woodruff, E.; Yoon, S.

    2000-12-01

    Pre-service elementary and middle school teachers possess large gaps in conceptual knowledge between what they understand about astronomy, and what they are required to teach according to the national standards for science education (Percy et al. 1999, BAAS, 31, 1520). The topics involved are not esoteric or trivial, and the knowledge gaps are very resistant to change. Thus, there is a need to understand the thinking processes involved in learning astronomy in order to identify, develop, and test professional development strategies that focus on issues around conceptual change. Our data suggest that teachers often try to change their frame of reference or perspective as they attempt to make sense of a concept. Detailed analyses on preservice teachers' performance on the astronomy self-assessment instrument, their audio- or videotaped discourse during relevant hands-on workshops, and their responses to an oral post-test interview allow us to identify (i) problems that require a ``frame of reference" approach, (ii) thinking processes which preservice teachers use during collaborative learning sessions, and (iii) strategies which distinguish successful from less successful learners. The results support our conjecture that the idea of frames of reference in thinking processes may support the learning of astronomy concepts. Indeed, our findings help to extend our view of knowledge gaps, and to identify thinking processes which may facilitate conceptual change. We believe that these insights apply to the learning of astronomy at the college and pre-college level, as well as in teacher education. Supported in part by SSHRC Canada, and the Ministry of Education, Ontario.

  18. Entanglement and symmetry: A case study in superselection rules, reference frames, and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S. J.; Wiseman, H. M.; Vaccaro, J. A.; Pope, D. T.; Bartlett, S. D.

    2006-12-15

    In recent years it has become apparent that constraints on possible quantum operations, such as those constraints imposed by superselection rules (SSRs), have a profound effect on quantum information theoretic concepts like bipartite entanglement. This paper concentrates on a particular example: the constraint that applies when the parties (Alice and Bob) cannot distinguish among certain quantum objects they have. This arises naturally in the context of ensemble quantum information processing such as in liquid NMR. We discuss how a SSR for the symmetric group can be applied, and show how the extractable entanglement can be calculated analytically in certain cases, with a maximum bipartite entanglement in an ensemble of N Bell-state pairs scaling as log(N) as N{yields}{infinity}. We discuss the apparent disparity with the asymptotic (N{yields}{infinity}) recovery of unconstrained entanglement for other sorts of superselection rules, and show that the disparity disappears when the correct notion of applying the symmetric group SSR to multiple copies is used. Next we discuss reference frames in the context of this SSR, showing the relation to the work of von Korff and Kempe [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 260502 (2004)]. The action of a reference frame can be regarded as the analog of activation in mixed-state entanglement. We also discuss the analog of distillation: there exist states such that one copy can act as an imperfect reference frame for another copy. Finally we present an example of a stronger operational constraint, that operations must be noncollective as well as symmetric. Even under this stronger constraint we, nevertheless, show that Bell nonlocality (and hence entanglement) can be demonstrated for an ensemble of N Bell-state pairs no matter how large N is. This last work is a generalization of that of Mermin [Phys. Rev. D 22, 356 (1980)].

  19. Contribution to defining a geodetic reference frame for Africa (AFREF): Geodynamics implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saria, Elifuraha E.

    African Reference Frame (AFREF) is the proposed regional three-dimensional standard frame, which will be used to reference positions and velocities for geodetic sites in Africa and surrounding. This frame will play a crucial role in scientific application for example plate motion and crustal deformation studies, and also in mapping when it involves for example national boundary surveying, remote sensing, GIS, engineering projects and other development programs in Africa. To contribute to the definition of geodetic reference frame for Africa and provide the first continent-wide position/velocity solution for Africa, we processed and analyzed 16 years of GPS and 17 years of DORIS data at 133 GPS sites and 9 DORIS sites continuously operating geodetic sites in Africa and surroundings to describe the present-day kinematics of the Nubian and Somalian plates and constrain relative motions across the East African Rift. We use the resulting horizontal velocities to determine the level of rigidity of Nubia and updated a plate motion model for the East African Rift and revise the counter clockwise rotation of the Victoria plate and clockwise rotation of the Rovuma plate with respect to Nubia. The vertical velocity ranges from -2 to +2 mm/yr, close to their uncertainties with no clear geographical pattern. This study provides the first continent-wide position/velocity solution for Africa, expressed in International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF2008), a contribution to the upcoming African Reference Frame (AFREF). In the next step we used the substantial increase in the geologic, geophysical and geodetic data in Africa to improve our understanding of the rift geometry and the block kinematics of the EAR. We determined the best-fit fault structure of the rift in terms of the locking depth and dip angle and use a block modeling approach where observed velocities are described as the contribution of rigid block rotation and strain accumulation on locked faults. Our results

  20. POINTS - A global reference frame opportunity. [Precision Optical Interferometer in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, J. F.; Reasenberg, R. D.

    1990-01-01

    POINTS is a space-based optical astrometric interferometer capable of measuring the angular separation of two stars about 90 degrees apart with 5-microarcsec nominal accuracy . During the intended ten-year mission, a repeated survey of a few hundred targets over the whole sky, including a few bright quasars, establish a 'rigid' reference grid with 0.5 microarcsec position uncertainties. At that level, the grid is free of regional biases and tied to the extra-Galactic frame that is the present best candidate for an inertial frame. POINTS will also determine parallaxes and annual proper motions at about the same level. Further, the planetary ephemeris frame is tied through stellar aberration to the grid at about 300 microarcsec. Additional targets of interest, to a limiting magnitude of greater than 20, are observed relative to the grid, yielding determinations with uncertainties depending on the observing schedule. Measurement at the microarcsec/year level of the apparent relative velocities of quasars that are widely separated on the sky severely test the assumption of cosmological quasar distances and may also constrain models of the early universe.

  1. How do object reference frames and motion vector decomposition emerge in laminar cortical circuits?

    PubMed

    Grossberg, Stephen; Léveillé, Jasmin; Versace, Massimiliano

    2011-05-01

    How do spatially disjoint and ambiguous local motion signals in multiple directions generate coherent and unambiguous representations of object motion? Various motion percepts, starting with those of Duncker (Induced motion, 1929/1938) and Johansson (Configurations in event perception, 1950), obey a rule of vector decomposition, in which global motion appears to be subtracted from the true motion path of localized stimulus components, so that objects and their parts are seen as moving relative to a common reference frame. A neural model predicts how vector decomposition results from multiple-scale and multiple-depth interactions within and between the form- and motion-processing streams in V1-V2 and V1-MST, which include form grouping, form-to-motion capture, figure-ground separation, and object motion capture mechanisms. Particular advantages of the model are that these mechanisms solve the aperture problem, group spatially disjoint moving objects via illusory contours, capture object motion direction signals on real and illusory contours, and use interdepth directional inhibition to cause a vector decomposition, whereby the motion directions of a moving frame at a nearer depth suppress those directions at a farther depth, and thereby cause a peak shift in the perceived directions of object parts moving with respect to the frame.

  2. Celestial reference frames and the gauge freedom in the post-Newtonian mechanics of the Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei; Xie, Yi

    2010-11-01

    We introduce the Jacobi coordinates adopted to the advanced theoretical analysis of the relativistic Celestial Mechanics of the Earth-Moon system. Theoretical derivation utilizes the relativistic resolutions on reference frames adopted by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) in 2000. The resolutions assume that the Solar System is isolated and space-time is asymptotically flat at infinity and the primary reference frame covers the entire space-time, has its origin at the Solar System barycenter (SSB) with spatial axes stretching up to infinity. The SSB frame is not rotating with respect to a set of distant quasars that are assumed to be at rest on the sky forming the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The second reference frame has its origin at the Earth-Moon barycenter (EMB). The EMB frame is locally inertial and is not rotating dynamically in the sense that equation of motion of a test particle moving with respect to the EMB frame, does not contain the Coriolis and centripetal forces. Two other local frames—geocentric and selenocentric—have their origins at the center of mass of Earth and Moon respectively and do not rotate dynamically. Each local frame is subject to the geodetic precession both with respect to other local frames and with respect to the ICRF because of their relative motion with respect to each other. Theoretical advantage of the dynamically non-rotating local frames is in a more simple mathematical description of the metric tensor and relative equations of motion of the Moon with respect to Earth. Each local frame can be converted to kinematically non-rotating one after alignment with the axes of ICRF by applying the matrix of the relativistic precession as recommended by the IAU resolutions. The set of one global and three local frames is introduced in order to decouple physical effects of gravity from the gauge-dependent effects in the equations of relative motion of the Moon with respect to Earth.

  3. Effects of battlefield display frames of reference on navigation tasks, spatial judgements, and change detection.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lisa C; Wickens, Christopher D

    This paper describes an experiment which illustrates the cause of 'cognitive tunnelling' as it affects information gathering and perception-based task performance in computer-generated terrain displays of varying frames of reference. Cognitive tunnelling refers to the effect where observers focus attention on information from specific areas of a display to the exclusion of information presented outside these areas. Previous research suggests that cognitive tunnelling is induced by more immersive or egocentric visual displays. Results from our preceding study suggested that an immersed split-screen display induces cognitive tunnelling and results in poorer information extraction and situation awareness than an exocentric display of the same information. The current study determined that failure of the observers to integrate information across the two views of the immersed display led to the cognitive tunnelling effect. Cognitive tunnelling was also affected by primacy of information initially presented within the larger egocentric view in the immersed display.

  4. Unit Template Synchronous Reference Frame Theory Based Control Algorithm for DSTATCOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangarraju, J.; Rajagopal, V.; Jayalaxmi, A.

    2014-04-01

    This article proposes new and simplified unit templates instead of standard phase locked loop (PLL) for Synchronous Reference Frame Theory Control Algorithm (SRFT). The extraction of synchronizing components (sinθ and cosθ) for parks and inverse parks transformation using standard PLL takes more execution time. This execution time in control algorithm delays the extraction of reference source current generation. The standard PLL not only takes more execution time but also increases the reactive power burden on the Distributed Static Compensator (DSTATCOM). This work proposes a unit template based SRFT control algorithm for four-leg insulated gate bipolar transistor based voltage source converter for DSTATCOM in distribution systems. This will reduce the execution time and reactive power burden on the DSTATCOM. The proposed DSTATCOM suppress harmonics, regulates the terminal voltage along with neutral current compensation. The DSTATCOM in distribution systems with proposed control algorithm is modeled and simulated using MATLAB using SIMULINK and Simpower systems toolboxes.

  5. OPTICAL SPECTRA OF CANDIDATE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE INTERNATIONAL CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAME (ICRF) RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Titov, O.; Jauncey, D. L.; Johnston, H. M.; Hunstead, R. W.; Christensen, L.

    2011-11-15

    We present the results of spectroscopic observations of the optical counterparts of 47 southern radio sources from the candidate International Celestial Reference Catalogue as part of a very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) program to strengthen the celestial reference frame, especially in the south. We made the observations with the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope. We obtained redshifts for 30 quasars and one radio galaxy, with a further seven objects being probable BL Lac objects with featureless spectra. Of the remainder, four were clear misidentifications with Galactic stars and five had low signal-to-noise spectra and could not be classified. These results, in combination with new VLBI data of the radio sources with redshifts more than 2, add significantly to the existing data needed to refine the distribution of source proper motions over the celestial sphere.

  6. Post-Newtonian Reference Frames for Advanced Theory of the Lunar Motion and a New Generation of Lunar Laser Ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yi; Kopeikin, Sergei

    2010-08-01

    We overview a set of post-Newtonian reference frames for a comprehensive study of the orbital dynamics and rotational motion of Moon and Earth by means of lunar laser ranging (LLR). We employ a scalar-tensor theory of gravity depending on two post-Newtonian parameters, and , and utilize the relativistic resolutions on reference frames adopted by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) in 2000. We assume that the solar system is isolated and space-time is asymptotically flat at infinity. The primary reference frame covers the entire space-time, has its origin at the solar-system barycenter (SSB) and spatial axes stretching up to infinity. The SSB frame is not rotating with respect to a set of distant quasars that are forming the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The secondary reference frame has its origin at the Earth-Moon barycenter (EMB). The EMB frame is locally-inertial and is not rotating dynamically in the sense that equation of motion of a test particle moving with respect to the EMB frame, does not contain the Coriolis and centripetal forces. Two other local frames geocentric (GRF) and selenocentric (SRF) have their origins at the center of mass of Earth and Moon respectively and do not rotate dynamically. Each local frame is subject to the geodetic precession both with respect to other local frames and with respect to the ICRF because of their relative motion with respect to each other. Theoretical advantage of the dynamically non-rotating local frames is in a more simple mathematical description. Each local frame can be aligned with the axes of ICRF after applying the matrix of the relativistic precession. The set of one global and three local frames is introduced in order to fully decouple the relative motion of Moon with respect to Earth from the orbital motion of the Earth-Moon barycenter as well as to connect the coordinate description of the lunar motion, an observer on Earth, and a retro-reflector on Moon to directly measurable

  7. Different Effects of Numerical Magnitude on Visual and Proprioceptive Reference Frames

    PubMed Central

    Blini, Elvio; Cattaneo, Zaira; Vallar, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed whether numerical magnitude affects the setting of basic spatial coordinates and reference frames, namely the subjective straight ahead. Three tasks were given to 24 right-handed healthy participants: a proprioceptive and a visuo-proprioceptive task, requiring pointing to the subjective straight ahead, and a visual task, requiring a perceptual judgment about the straight ahead position of a light moving left-to-right, or right-to-left. A control task, requiring the bisection of rods of different lengths, was also given. The four tasks were performed under conditions of passive auditory numerical (i.e., listening to small, “2,” and large, “8,” numbers), and neutral auditory-verbal (“blah”) stimulation. Numerical magnitude modulated the participants’ deviations in the visual straight ahead task, when the movement of the light was from left-to-right, with the small number bringing about a leftward deviation, the large number a rightward deviation. A similar directional modulation was found in the rod bisection task, in line with previous evidence. No effects of numerical magnitude were found on the proprioceptive and visuo-proprioceptive straight ahead tasks. These results suggest that the spatial effects induced by the activation of the mental number line extend to an egocentric frame of reference but only when a portion of horizontal space has to be “actively” explored. PMID:23616777

  8. Determination of a terrestrial reference frame via Kalman filtering of very long baseline interferometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, Benedikt; Nilsson, Tobias; Balidakis, Kyriakos; Glaser, Susanne; Heinkelmann, Robert; Schuh, Harald

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial reference frames (TRF), such as the ITRF2008, are primary products of geodesy. In this paper, we present TRF solutions based on Kalman filtering of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) data, for which we estimate steady station coordinates over more than 30 years that are updated for every single VLBI session. By applying different levels of process noise, non-linear signals, such as seasonal and seismic effects, are taken into account. The corresponding stochastic model is derived site-dependent from geophysical loading deformation time series and is adapted during periods of post-seismic deformations. Our results demonstrate that the choice of stochastic process has a much smaller impact on the coordinate time series and velocities than the overall noise level. If process noise is applied, tests with and without additionally estimating seasonal signals indicate no difference between the resulting coordinate time series for periods when observational data are available. In a comparison with epoch reference frames, the Kalman filter solutions provide better short-term stability. Furthermore, we find out that the Kalman filter solutions are of similar quality when compared to a consistent least-squares solution, however, with the enhanced attribute of being easier to update as, for instance, in a post-earthquake period.

  9. Impact of GPS Satellite Antenna Phase Center Variations and Modified Sidereal Filtering on Reference Frame Determination.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, S. E.; Webb, F.

    2005-12-01

    Errors in the satellite and ground station antenna phase center variations are among the limiting sources of error in high precision GPS positioning. Recent determinations of phase-center variations (PCV) for both the transmitting satellite and receiving ground station antennas have shown promise for improving geodetic estimates of reference frame parameters, such as scale. While the PCV for the transmitting antennas is reasonably well determined and includes some variation from satellite to satellite, the apparent PCV at ground station antennas are likely to be site specific and dominated by local environmental effects, such as signal multipath. To mitigate these effects, we implement a modified sidereal filter (MSF). The MSF is applied as a correction to the phase and range data. The correction is based on stacking several days of phase and range residuals where each day is shifted by the actual orbital period of each satellite, rather than sidereal time. We will evaluate the effect of stacking several days to 1 month of residuals on such metrics as phase rms and point positioning repeatability. We will present an evaluation the impact of these PCV and MSF corrections on reference frame parameters. The corrections will be applied to several years of observations from a global set of IGS stations.

  10. Mysterious misalignments between geomagnetic and stellar reference frames seen in CHAMP and Swarm satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maus, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    The orientation of a spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit can be determined accurately from either magnetic field measurements or star camera images. Ideally, the independently computed spacecraft attitudes should agree. However, we find that the German CHAMP and European Space Agency triple-satellite Swarm geomagnetic satellites exhibit consistent misalignments between the stellar and geomagnetic reference frames, which oscillate with the local time of the orbit. Having an amplitude of 20 arcsec, these oscillations are more than an order of magnitude larger than the stability of the optical bench, which cohosts the magnetometers and star cameras. The misalignments could originate either from the magnetometer or star camera measurements. On one hand, as-yet-unknown external magnetic field contributions could appear as a rotation of the geomagnetic reference frame. On the other hand, the observed misalignments agree in amplitude and phase with the effects of stellar aberration, caused by the movement of the star cameras relative to the light rays emitted by the stars. This is surprising because stellar aberration is allegedly already corrected for by the star image processing system. Resolving these mysterious misalignments is key to fulfilling the measurement accuracy requirements and science objectives of the ongoing Swarm mission. If caused by stellar aberration, fully correcting for this effect could significantly improve the attitude accuracy not only of CHAMP and Swarm, but also of several other past and ongoing scientific satellite missions.

  11. Long term dose monitoring onboard the European Columbus module of the International Space Station (ISS) in the frame of the DOSIS and DOSIS 3D project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas

    The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on earth, consisting mostly of high energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones present on earth for occupational radiation workers. Accurate knowledge of the physical characteristics of the space radiation field in dependence on the solar activity, the orbital parameters and the different shielding configurations of the International Space Station (ISS) is therefore needed. For the investigation of the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiation field inside the European Columbus module the experiment “Dose Distribution Inside the ISS” (DOSIS), under the project and science lead of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), was launched on July 15th 2009 with STS-127 to the ISS. The DOSIS experiment consists of a combination of “Passive Detector Packages” (PDP) distributed at eleven locations inside Columbus for the measurement of the spatial variation of the radiation field and two active Dosimetry Telescopes (DOSTELs) with a Data and Power Unit (DDPU) in a dedicated nomex pouch mounted at a fixed location beneath the European Physiology Module rack (EPM) for the measurement of the temporal variation of the radiation field parameters. The DOSIS experiment suite measured during the lowest solar minimum conditions in the space age from July 2009 to June 2011. In July 2011 the active hardware was transferred to ground for refurbishment and preparation for the follow up DOSIS 3D experiment. The hardware for DOSIS 3D was launched with Soyuz 30S to the ISS on May 15th 2012. The PDPs are replaced with each even number Soyuz flight starting with Soyuz 30S. Data from the active detectors is transferred to ground via the EPM rack which is activated once a month for this action. The presentation will give an overview of the DOSIS and DOSIS 3D experiment and focus on the results from the passive radiation detectors from the DOSIS 3D experiment

  12. Internal reference frames for representation and storage of visual information: the role of gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Joseph; Lipshits, Mark; Zaoui, Mohamed; Berthoz, Alain; Gurfinkel, Victor

    2001-08-01

    Experimental studies of visual mechanisms suggest that the CNS represents image information with respect to preferred horizontal and vertical axes, as shown by a phenomenon known as the "oblique effect". In the current study we used this effect to evaluate the influence of gravity on the representation and storage of visual orientation information. Subjects performed a psychophysical task in which a visually-presented stimulus line was aligned with the remembered orientation of a reference stimulus line presented moments before. The experiments were made on 5 cosmonauts during orbital space flight and additionally on 13 subjects in conditions of normal gravity with a tilting chair. Data were analyzed with respect to response variability and timing. On earth, these measurements for this task show a distinct preference for horizontally and vertically oriented stimuli when the body and gravitational axes were aligned. This preference was markedly decreased or disappeared when the body axis was tilted with respect to gravity; this effect was not connected with ocular counter-rolling nor could we find a preference of any other intermediate axis between the gravity and body aligned axes. On the other hand, the preference for vertical and horizontal axes was maintained for tests performed in microgravity over the course of a 6 month flight, starting from flight day 6. We concluded that subjects normally process visual orientation information in a multi-modal reference frame that combines both proprioceptive and gravitational cues when both are available, but that a proprioceptive reference frame is sufficient for this task in the absence of gravity after a short period of adaptation. Some of the results from this study have been previously published in a preliminary report [7].

  13. Coordinated turn-and-reach movements. II. Planning in an external frame of reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pigeon, Pascale; Bortolami, Simone B.; DiZio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

    2003-01-01

    The preceding study demonstrated that normal subjects compensate for the additional interaction torques generated when a reaching movement is made during voluntary trunk rotation. The present paper assesses the influence of trunk rotation on finger trajectories and on interjoint coordination and determines whether simultaneous turn-and-reach movements are most simply described relative to a trunk-based or an external reference frame. Subjects reached to targets requiring different extents of arm joint and trunk rotation at a natural pace and quickly in normal lighting and in total darkness. We first examined whether the larger interaction torques generated during rapid turn-and-reach movements perturb finger trajectories and interjoint coordination and whether visual feedback plays a role in compensating for these torques. These issues were addressed using generalized Procrustes analysis (GPA), which attempts to overlap a group of configurations (e.g., joint trajectories) through translations and rotations in multi-dimensional space. We first used GPA to identify the mean intrinsic patterns of finger and joint trajectories (i.e., their average shape irrespective of location and orientation variability in the external and joint workspaces) from turn-and-reach movements performed in each experimental condition and then calculated their curvatures. We then quantified the discrepancy between each finger or joint trajectory and the intrinsic pattern both after GPA was applied individually to trajectories from a pair of experimental conditions and after GPA was applied to the same trajectories pooled together. For several subjects, joint trajectories but not finger trajectories were more curved in fast than slow movements. The curvature of both joint and finger trajectories of turn-and-reach movements was relatively unaffected by the vision conditions. Pooling across speed conditions significantly increased the discrepancy between joint but not finger trajectories for

  14. Factors influencing superimposition error of 3D cephalometric landmarks by plane orientation method using 4 reference points: 4 point superimposition error regression model.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Joon; Kim, Kee-Deog; Park, Hyok; Park, Chang Seo; Jeong, Ho-Gul

    2014-01-01

    Superimposition has been used as a method to evaluate the changes of orthodontic or orthopedic treatment in the dental field. With the introduction of cone beam CT (CBCT), evaluating 3 dimensional changes after treatment became possible by superimposition. 4 point plane orientation is one of the simplest ways to achieve superimposition of 3 dimensional images. To find factors influencing superimposition error of cephalometric landmarks by 4 point plane orientation method and to evaluate the reproducibility of cephalometric landmarks for analyzing superimposition error, 20 patients were analyzed who had normal skeletal and occlusal relationship and took CBCT for diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder. The nasion, sella turcica, basion and midpoint between the left and the right most posterior point of the lesser wing of sphenoidal bone were used to define a three-dimensional (3D) anatomical reference co-ordinate system. Another 15 reference cephalometric points were also determined three times in the same image. Reorientation error of each landmark could be explained substantially (23%) by linear regression model, which consists of 3 factors describing position of each landmark towards reference axes and locating error. 4 point plane orientation system may produce an amount of reorientation error that may vary according to the perpendicular distance between the landmark and the x-axis; the reorientation error also increases as the locating error and shift of reference axes viewed from each landmark increases. Therefore, in order to reduce the reorientation error, accuracy of all landmarks including the reference points is important. Construction of the regression model using reference points of greater precision is required for the clinical application of this model. PMID:25372707

  15. Ages of Massive Galaxies at 0.5 > z > 2.0 from 3D-HST Rest-frame Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumagalli, Mattia; Franx, Marijn; van Dokkum, Pieter; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Brammer, Gabriel; Nelson, Erica; Maseda, Michael; Momcheva, Ivelina; Kriek, Mariska; Labbé, Ivo; Lundgren, Britt; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-05-01

    We present low-resolution near-infrared stacked spectra from the 3D–HST survey up to z = 2.0 and fit them with commonly used stellar population synthesis models: BC03, FSPS10 (Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis), and FSPS-C3K. The accuracy of the grism redshifts allows the unambiguous detection of many emission and absorption features and thus a first systematic exploration of the rest-frame optical spectra of galaxies up to z = 2. We select massive galaxies ({log}({M}*/{M}ȯ )\\gt 10.8), we divide them into quiescent and star-forming via a rest-frame color–color technique, and we median-stack the samples in three redshift bins between z = 0.5 and z = 2.0. We find that stellar population models fit the observations well at wavelengths below the 6500 Å rest frame, but show systematic residuals at redder wavelengths. The FSPS-C3K model generally provides the best fits (evaluated with χ 2 red statistics) for quiescent galaxies, while BC03 performs the best for star-forming galaxies. The stellar ages of quiescent galaxies implied by the models, assuming solar metallicity, vary from 4 Gyr at z ˜ 0.75 to 1.5 Gyr at z ˜ 1.75, with an uncertainty of a factor of two caused by the unknown metallicity. On average, the stellar ages are half the age of the universe at these redshifts. We show that the inferred evolution of ages of quiescent galaxies is in agreement with fundamental plane measurements, assuming an 8 Gyr age for local galaxies. For star-forming galaxies, the inferred ages depend strongly on the stellar population model and the shape of the assumed star-formation history.

  16. Numerical Analysis of a Rotating Detonation Engine in the Relative Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    A two-dimensional, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation of a semi-idealized rotating detonation engine (RDE) is described. The simulation operates in the detonation frame of reference and utilizes a relatively coarse grid such that only the essential primary flow field structure is captured. This construction yields rapidly converging, steady solutions. Results from the simulation are compared to those from a more complex and refined code, and found to be in reasonable agreement. The performance impacts of several RDE design parameters are then examined. Finally, for a particular RDE configuration, it is found that direct performance comparison can be made with a straight-tube pulse detonation engine (PDE). Results show that they are essentially equivalent.

  17. Superfluid vortex front at T→0: decoupling from the reference frame.

    PubMed

    Hosio, J J; Eltsov, V B; de Graaf, R; Heikkinen, P J; Hänninen, R; Krusius, M; L'vov, V S; Volovik, G E

    2011-09-23

    Steady-state turbulent motion is created in superfluid (3)He-B at low temperatures in the form of a turbulent vortex front, which moves axially along a rotating cylindrical container of (3)He-B and replaces vortex-free flow with vortex lines at constant density. We present the first measurements on the thermal signal from dissipation as a function of time, recorded at 0.2T(c) during the front motion, which is monitored using NMR techniques. Both the measurements and the numerical calculations of the vortex dynamics show that at low temperatures the density of the propagating vortices falls well below the equilibrium value, i.e., the superfluid rotates at a smaller angular velocity than the container. This is the first evidence for the decoupling of the superfluid from the container reference frame in the zero-temperature limit.

  18. Geometry of the submanifolds of SEXn. I. The C-nonholonomic frame of reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kyung Tae; So, Keum Sook; Lee, Jong Woo

    1989-08-01

    A connection which is both Einstein and semisymmetric is called an SE connection. A generalized n-dimensional Riemannian manifold on which the differential geometric structure is imposed by g λμ through an SE connection is called an n-dimensional SE manifold and denoted by SEXn. This paper is the introductory part of a systematic study of the submanifolds of SEXn. It introduces a new concept of the C-nonholonomic frame of references in SEXn at points of its submanifold and deals with its consequences. The second part will deal with the generalized fundamental equations on an SE hypersubmanifold of SEXn. The third part will be devoted to the theory of parallelism in SEXn and in its submanifold. Finally, the last part will study the curvature theory in a submanifold of SEXn.

  19. Using Space Telescope to tie the HIPPARCOS and extragalactic reference frames together

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemenway, P. D.; Duncombe, R. L.; Jefferys, W. H.; Shelus, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope observations will be made to tie the HIPPARCOS Instrumental System (HIS) to extragalactic objects, to determine the overall rotation of the HIS with respect to a set of extragalactic objects; to compare the HIS to an accurate radio reference frame; and to look for motions in the optical centroids of compact extragalactic objects at the level of 0.001 arcseconds per year. About 75 radio sources and extragalactic objects will be chosen from the initial group of 414 pairs. The egos will have their positions and proper motions determined relative to the HIPPARCOS Input Catalog stars. The candidate stars are being screened by ground based speckle interferometry to select a final set.

  20. Temperature and solute-transport simulation in streamflow using a Lagrangian reference frame

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program for simulating one-dimensional, unsteady temperature and solute transport in a river has been developed and documented for general use. The solution approach to the convective-diffusion equation uses a moving reference frame (Lagrangian) which greatly simplifies the mathematics of the solution procedure and dramatically reduces errors caused by numerical dispersion. The model documentation is presented as a series of four programs of increasing complexity. The conservative transport model can be used to route a single conservative substance. The simplified temperature model is used to predict water temperature in rivers when only temperature and windspeed data are available. The complete temperature model is highly accurate but requires rather complete meteorological data. Finally, the 10-parameter model can be used to route as many as 10 interacting constituents through a river reach. (USGS)

  1. Global Reference Frame Realization on National Level Based on the Integration of National CORS Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyeres, A.; Caporali, A.; Horvath, T.; Baron, A.; Doncker, F. D.; Droscak, B.; Duret, A.; Franke, P.; Georgiev, I.; Gianniou, M.; Hansen, D.; Huisman, L.; Morozova, K.; Nagl, J.; Pihlak, P.; Stangl, G.; Valdes, M.; Ryczywolski, M.; Zurutuza, J.

    2015-12-01

    The national permanent GNSS networks are not only serving the general surveying practice in real-time mode, but they are deployed at reference frame maintenance and geodynamic studies relying on their homogeneously analyzed long-term data series. The ongoing EPN (EUREF Permanent Network) densification targets the integration of the national CORS networks and a homogeneous, dense position and velocity product is derived using the EPN as backbone infrastructure. The homogeneous cumulative solution relies on the national weekly SINEX products in order to minimize inconsistencies (e.g. site naming, discontinuities). The integration is done with the CATREF software (Altamimi et al, IGN) using the Minimum Constraint approach. The derived position and velocity product will be an essential material for various geokinematic studies (PGR, intraplate and plate boundary zone investigations), and also for the better realization of ETRS89 over tectonically active regions. This work is very well inline with the goals of other European initiatives as EPOS and EUPOS. The preparatory work is well in progress, several years of weekly SINEX files are already available and analyzed. The database contains more than 2000 stations stemming from 15 contributing Analysis Centres. A significant effort is devoted to the cleaning and organization of the station metadata and publish on the EPNCB website, which is necessary to improve the quality and reliabilty of the combination product.This presentation, beyond the publication of the state-of the-art combination results partly focuses on the analysis of existing reference frame realization issues caused by the GNSS antenna PCV updates not yet eliminated on the national CORS level.

  2. ITRF2014: A new release of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame modeling nonlinear station motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamimi, Zuheir; Rebischung, Paul; Métivier, Laurent; Collilieux, Xavier

    2016-08-01

    For the first time in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) history, the ITRF2014 is generated with an enhanced modeling of nonlinear station motions, including seasonal (annual and semiannual) signals of station positions and postseismic deformation for sites that were subject to major earthquakes. Using the full observation history of the four space geodetic techniques (very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), satellite laser ranging (SLR), Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), and Doppler orbitography and radiopositioning integrated by satellite (DORIS)), the corresponding international services provided reprocessed time series (weekly from SLR and DORIS, daily from GNSS, and 24 h session-wise from VLBI) of station positions and daily Earth Orientation Parameters. ITRF2014 is demonstrated to be superior to past ITRF releases, as it precisely models the actual station trajectories leading to a more robust secular frame and site velocities. The ITRF2014 long-term origin coincides with the Earth system center of mass as sensed by SLR observations collected on the two LAGEOS satellites over the time span between 1993.0 and 2015.0. The estimated accuracy of the ITRF2014 origin, as reflected by the level of agreement with the ITRF2008 (both origins are defined by SLR), is at the level of less than 3 mm at epoch 2010.0 and less than 0.2 mm/yr in time evolution. The ITRF2014 scale is defined by the arithmetic average of the implicit scales of SLR and VLBI solutions as obtained by the stacking of their respective time series. The resulting scale and scale rate differences between the two solutions are 1.37 (±0.10) ppb at epoch 2010.0 and 0.02 (±0.02) ppb/yr. While the postseismic deformation models were estimated using GNSS/GPS data, the resulting parametric models at earthquake colocation sites were applied to the station position time series of the three other techniques, showing a very high level of consistency which enforces more the link

  3. Evaluation of the Quantitative Accuracy of 3D Reconstruction of Edentulous Jaw Models with Jaw Relation Based on Reference Point System Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiwei; Yuan, Fusong; Lv, Peijun; Wang, Yong; Sun, Yuchun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To apply contact measurement and reference point system (RPS) alignment techniques to establish a method for 3D reconstruction of the edentulous jaw models with centric relation and to quantitatively evaluate its accuracy. Methods Upper and lower edentulous jaw models were clinically prepared, 10 pairs of resin cylinders with same size were adhered to axial surfaces of upper and lower models. The occlusal bases and the upper and lower jaw models were installed in the centric relation position. Faro Edge 1.8m was used to directly obtain center points of the base surface of the cylinders (contact method). Activity 880 dental scanner was used to obtain 3D data of the cylinders and the center points were fitted (fitting method). 3 pairs of center points were used to align the virtual model to centric relation. An observation coordinate system was interactively established. The straight-line distances in the X (horizontal left/right), Y (horizontal anterior/posterior), and Z (vertical) between the remaining 7 pairs of center points derived from contact method and fitting method were measured respectively and analyzed using a paired t-test. Results The differences of the straight-line distances of the remaining 7 pairs of center points between the two methods were X: 0.074 ± 0.107 mm, Y: 0.168 ± 0.176 mm, and Z: −0.003± 0.155 mm. The results of paired t-test were X and Z: p >0.05, Y: p <0.05. Conclusion By using contact measurement and the reference point system alignment technique, highly accurate reconstruction of the vertical distance and centric relation of a digital edentulous jaw model can be achieved, which meets the design and manufacturing requirements of the complete dentures. The error of horizontal anterior/posterior jaw relation was relatively large. PMID:25659133

  4. UTC(SU) and EOP(SU) - the only legal reference frames of Russian Federation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshelyaevsky, Nikolay B.; Blinov, Igor Yu; Pasynok, Sergey L.

    2015-08-01

    There are two legal time reference frames in Russian Federation. UTC(SU) deals with atomic time and play a role of reference for legal timing through the whole country. The other one, EOP(SU), deals with Earth's orientation parameters and provides the official EOP data for scientific, technical and metrological applications in Russia.The atomic time is based on two essential hardware components: primary Cs fountain standards and ensemble of continuously operating H-masers as a time unit/time scale keeper. Basing on H-maser intercomparison system data, regular H-maser frequency calibration against Cs standards and time algorithm autonomous TA(SU) time scale is maintained by the Main Metrological Center. Since 2013 time unit in TA(SU) is the second (SU) reproduced independently by VNIIFTRI Cs primary standards in accordance to it’s definition in the SI. UTC(SU) is relied on TA(SU) and steering to UTC basing on TWSTFT/GNSS time link data. As a result TA(SU) stability level relative to TT considerably exceeds 1×10-15 for sample time one month and more, RMS[UTC-UTC(SU)] ≤ 3 ns for the period of 2013-2015. UTC(SU) is broadcasted by different national means such as specialized radio and TV stations, NTP servers and GLONASS. Signals of Russian radio stations contains DUT1 and dUT1 values at 0.1s and 0.02s resolution respectively.The definitive EOP(SU) are calculated by the Main Metrological Center basing on composition of the eight independent individual EOP data streams delivered by four Russian analysis centers: VNIIFTRI, Institute of Applied Astronomy, Information-Analytical Center of Russian Space Agency and Analysis Center of Russian Space Agency. The accuracy of ultra-rapid EOP values for 2014 is estimated ≤ 0.0006" for polar motion, ≤ 70 microseconds for UT1-UTC and ≤ 0.0003" for celestial pole offsets respectively.The other VNIIFTRI EOP activities can be grouped in three basic directions:- arrangement and carrying out GNSS and SLR observations at five

  5. Reference frames in allocentric representations are invariant across static and active encoding

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Edgar; Baumann, Oliver; Bellgrove, Mark A.; Mattingley, Jason B.

    2013-01-01

    An influential model of spatial memory—the so-called reference systems account—proposes that relationships between objects are biased by salient axes (“frames of reference”) provided by environmental cues, such as the geometry of a room. In this study, we sought to examine the extent to which a salient environmental feature influences the formation of spatial memories when learning occurs via a single, static viewpoint and via active navigation, where information has to be integrated across multiple viewpoints. In our study, participants learned the spatial layout of an object array that was arranged with respect to a prominent environmental feature within a virtual arena. Location memory was tested using judgments of relative direction. Experiment 1A employed a design similar to previous studies whereby learning of object-location information occurred from a single, static viewpoint. Consistent with previous studies, spatial judgments were significantly more accurate when made from an orientation that was aligned, as opposed to misaligned, with the salient environmental feature. In Experiment 1B, a fresh group of participants learned the same object-location information through active exploration, which required integration of spatial information over time from a ground-level perspective. As in Experiment 1A, object-location information was organized around the salient environmental cue. Taken together, the findings suggest that the learning condition (static vs. active) does not affect the reference system employed to encode object-location information. Spatial reference systems appear to be a ubiquitous property of spatial representations, and might serve to reduce the cognitive demands of spatial processing. PMID:24009595

  6. The Two-Wrongs model explains perception-action dissociations for illusions driven by distortions of the egocentric reference frame

    PubMed Central

    Dassonville, Paul; Reed, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated a dissociation of the effects of illusion on perception and action, with perception generally reported to be susceptible to illusions, while actions are seemingly immune. These findings have been interpreted to support Milner and Goodale's Two Visual Systems model, which proposes the existence of separate visual processing streams for perception and action. However, an alternative interpretation suggests that this type of behavioral dissociation will occur for any illusion that is caused by a distortion of the observer's egocentric reference frame, without requiring the existence of separate perception and action systems that are differently affected by the illusion. In this scenario, movements aimed at illusory targets will be accurate if they are guided within the same distorted reference frame used for target encoding, since the error of motor guidance will cancel with the error of encoding (hence, for actions, two wrongs do make a right). We further test this Two-Wrongs model by examining two illusions for which the hypothesis makes very different predictions: the rod-and-frame illusion (which affects perception but not actions) and the simultaneous-tilt illusion (which affects perception and actions equally). We demonstrate that the rod-and-frame illusion is caused by a distortion of the observer's egocentric reference frame suitable for the cancellation of errors predicted by the Two-Wrongs model. In contrast, the simultaneous-tilt illusion is caused by local interactions between stimulus elements within an undistorted reference frame, precluding the cancellation of errors associated with the Two-Wrongs model such that the illusion is reflected in both perception and actions. These results provide evidence for a class of illusions that lead to dissociations of perception and action through distortions of the observer's spatial reference frame, rather than through the actions of functionally separate visual processing streams

  7. Rotor reference frame models of a multiloop 2-phase motor drive in brushless DC and microstepping modes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes non-linear models of a 2-phase permanent magnet synchronous motor drive in brushless DC and microstepping modes. The models account for everything from the main power bus up to and including the mechanical load and velocity feedback loop. In particular, the models include the power electronics for each phase complete with their internal feedback loops. Classical state space averaged power electronics models are transformed to the rotor reference frame along with the usual electromechanical variables. Since SPICE linearizes the rotor reference frame model about shaft velocity, instead of shaft angle, frequency domain methods apply. The frequency domain analysis detects unstable interactions between torque angle and deliberate feedback within the drives. Time domain simulations using stator reference frame models confirm the results. All models are SPICE-compatible but were developed on Cadence`s Analog Workbench.

  8. Reference frame preferences in haptics differ for the blind and sighted in the horizontal but not in the vertical plane.

    PubMed

    Struiksma, Marijn E; Noordzij, Matthijs L; Postma, Albert

    2011-01-01

    We investigated which reference frames are preferred when matching spatial language to the haptic domain. Sighted, low-vision, and blind participants were tested on a haptic-sentence-verification task where participants had to haptically explore different configurations of a ball and a shoe and judge the relation between them. Results from the spatial relation "above", in the vertical plane, showed that various reference frames are available after haptic inspection of a configuration. Moreover, the pattern of results was similar for all three groups and resembled patterns found for the sighted on visual sentence-verification tasks. In contrast, when judging the spatial relation "in front", in the horizontal plane, the blind showed a markedly different response pattern. The sighted and low-vision participants did not show a clear preference for either the absolute/relative or the intrinsic reference frame when these frames were dissociated. The blind, on the other hand, showed a clear preference for the intrinsic reference frame. In the absence of a dominant cue, such as gravity in the vertical plane, the blind might emphasise the functional relationship between the objects owing to enhanced experience with haptic exploration of objects.

  9. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  10. International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF): mantenimiento y extensión

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.; Arias, E. F.; Eubanks, T.; Fey, A. L.; Gontier, A.-M.; Jacobs, C. S.; Sovers, O. J.; Archinal, B. A.; Charlot, P.

    A partir de enero de 1998 el sistema de referencia celeste convencional está representado por el International Celestial Reference System (ICRS) y materializado a través de las coordenadas VLBI del conjunto de radiofuentes extragalácticas que conforman el International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). La primera realización del ICRF, fue elaborada en 1995 por un grupo de expertos designado por la IAU, la que encomendó al International Earth Rotation Service el mantenimiento del ICRS, del ICRF y del vínculo con marcos de referencia en otras frecuencias. Una primera extensión del ICRF se realizó entre abril y junio de 1999, con el objetivo primario de proveer posiciones de radiofuentes extragalácticas observadas a partir de julio de 1995 y de mejorar las posiciones de las fuentes ``candidatas" con la inclusión de observaciones adicionales. Objetivos secundarios fueron monitorear a las radiofuentes para verificar que siguen siendo adecuadas para realizar al ICRF y mejorar las técnicas de análisis de datos. Como resultado del nuevo análisis se obtuvo una solución a partir de la cual se construyó la primera extensión del ICRF, denominada ICRF - Ext.1. Ella representa al ICRS, sus fuentes de definición se mantienen con las mismas posiciones y errores que en la primera realización del ICRF; las demás radiofuentes tienen coordenadas mejor determinadas que en ICRF; el marco de referencia se densificó con el agregado de 59 nuevas radiofuentes.

  11. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  12. Multi-point Adjoint-Based Design of Tilt-Rotors in a Noninertial Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William T.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Acree, Cecil W.

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of tilt-rotor systems requires the consideration of performance at multiple design points. In the current study, an adjoint-based optimization of a tilt-rotor blade is considered. The optimization seeks to simultaneously maximize the rotorcraft figure of merit in hover and the propulsive efficiency in airplane-mode for a tilt-rotor system. The design is subject to minimum thrust constraints imposed at each design point. The rotor flowfields at each design point are cast as steady-state problems in a noninertial reference frame. Geometric design variables used in the study to control blade shape include: thickness, camber, twist, and taper represented by as many as 123 separate design variables. Performance weighting of each operational mode is considered in the formulation of the composite objective function, and a build up of increasing geometric degrees of freedom is used to isolate the impact of selected design variables. In all cases considered, the resulting designs successfully increase both the hover figure of merit and the airplane-mode propulsive efficiency for a rotor designed with classical techniques.

  13. Applicability of the "Frame of Reference" approach for environmental monitoring of offshore renewable energy projects.

    PubMed

    Garel, Erwan; Rey, Cibran Camba; Ferreira, Oscar; van Koningsveld, Mark

    2014-08-01

    This paper assesses the applicability of the Frame of Reference (FoR) approach for the environmental monitoring of large-scale offshore Marine Renewable Energy (MRE) projects. The focus is on projects harvesting energy from winds, waves and currents. Environmental concerns induced by MRE projects are reported based on a classification scheme identifying stressors, receptors, effects and impacts. Although the potential effects of stressors on most receptors are identified, there are large knowledge gaps regarding the corresponding (positive and negative) impacts. In that context, the development of offshore MRE requires the implementation of fit-for-purpose monitoring activities aimed at environmental protection and knowledge development. Taking European legislation as an example, it is suggested to adopt standardized monitoring protocols for the enhanced usage and utility of environmental indicators. Towards this objective, the use of the FoR approach is advocated since it provides guidance for the definition and use of coherent set of environmental state indicators. After a description of this framework, various examples of applications are provided considering a virtual MRE project located in European waters. Finally, some conclusions and recommendations are provided for the successful implementation of the FoR approach and for future studies.

  14. Deep mantle structure as a reference frame for movements in and on the Earth

    PubMed Central

    Torsvik, Trond H.; van der Voo, Rob; Doubrovine, Pavel V.; Burke, Kevin; Steinberger, Bernhard; Ashwal, Lewis D.; Trønnes, Reidar G.; Webb, Susan J.; Bull, Abigail L.

    2014-01-01

    Earth’s residual geoid is dominated by a degree-2 mode, with elevated regions above large low shear-wave velocity provinces on the core–mantle boundary beneath Africa and the Pacific. The edges of these deep mantle bodies, when projected radially to the Earth’s surface, correlate with the reconstructed positions of large igneous provinces and kimberlites since Pangea formed about 320 million years ago. Using this surface-to-core–mantle boundary correlation to locate continents in longitude and a novel iterative approach for defining a paleomagnetic reference frame corrected for true polar wander, we have developed a model for absolute plate motion back to earliest Paleozoic time (540 Ma). For the Paleozoic, we have identified six phases of slow, oscillatory true polar wander during which the Earth’s axis of minimum moment of inertia was similar to that of Mesozoic times. The rates of Paleozoic true polar wander (<1°/My) are compatible with those in the Mesozoic, but absolute plate velocities are, on average, twice as high. Our reconstructions generate geologically plausible scenarios, with large igneous provinces and kimberlites sourced from the margins of the large low shear-wave velocity provinces, as in Mesozoic and Cenozoic times. This absolute kinematic model suggests that a degree-2 convection mode within the Earth’s mantle may have operated throughout the entire Phanerozoic. PMID:24889632

  15. Effect of light level on the reference frames of visual motion processing.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Sanae; Uchida-Ota, Mariko; Takeuchi, Tatsuto

    2014-01-01

    It is empirically known that some action-related visual tasks, which may rely on the construction of spatiotopic coordinates, are not well conducted under mesopic vision. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of light level on the reference frame, such as retinotopic and spatiotopic coordinate bases, associated with visual motion processing. For this purpose, we used a phenomenon called visual motion priming in which the perceived direction of a directionally ambiguous test stimulus is influenced by the moving direction of a priming stimulus. Previous studies have shown that negative and positive motion priming are conspicuously observed in retinotopic and spatiotopic coordinates, respectively. In the experiments, participants made a saccade after the termination of the priming stimulus and judged the perceived direction of the test stimulus presented subsequently in retinotopic or spatiotopic coordinates at different light levels. We found that in retinotopic coordinates, negative motion priming was observed at all light levels. In spatiotopic coordinates, positive motion priming was observed at photopic and scotopic light levels, whereas the strength of motion priming was greatly reduced at mesopic light levels. These results were robust to the change in the luminance contrast or the saccadic eye movement per se. Different spatiotemporal properties of cones and rods at mesopic light levels may disturb the construction of a spatiotopic representation of motion, which leads to the disappearance of visual motion priming in spatiotopic coordinates during mesopic vision. PMID:25378370

  16. Force encoding in stick insect legs delineates a reference frame for motor control

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Josef; Chaudhry, Sumaiya; Büschges, Ansgar

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of forces is integral to motor control. However, it is unclear how information from sense organs that detect forces at individual muscles or joints is incorporated into a frame of reference for motor control. Campaniform sensilla are receptors that monitor forces by cuticular strains. We studied how loads and muscle forces are encoded by trochanteral campaniform sensilla in stick insects. Forces were applied to the middle leg to emulate loading and/or muscle contractions. Selective sensory ablations limited activities recorded in the main leg nerve to specific receptor groups. The trochanteral campaniform sensilla consist of four discrete groups. We found that the dorsal groups (Groups 3 and 4) encoded force increases and decreases in the plane of movement of the coxo-trochanteral joint. Group 3 receptors discharged to increases in dorsal loading and decreases in ventral load. Group 4 showed the reverse directional sensitivities. Vigorous, directional responses also occurred to contractions of the trochanteral depressor muscle and to forces applied at the muscle insertion. All sensory discharges encoded the amplitude and rate of loading or muscle force. Stimulation of the receptors produced reflex effects in the depressor motoneurons that could reverse in sign during active movements. These data, in conjunction with findings of previous studies, support a model in which the trochanteral receptors function as an array that can detect forces in all directions relative to the intrinsic plane of leg movement. The array could provide requisite information about forces and simplify the control and adaptation of posture and walking. PMID:22673329

  17. Question of reference frames: visual direction-selective neurons in the accessory optic system of goldfish.

    PubMed

    Masseck, Olivia Andrea; Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter

    2009-11-01

    We investigated if visual direction-selective neurons in the pretectal area (APT) of goldfish (Carassius auratus auratus) preferred visual stimuli resulting from rotations around axes corresponding to the best responsive axes of the semicircular canals [optic flow that is consistent to a maximal activation of the horizontal canal pair (yaw), to a maximal activation of the right anterior/left posterior semicircular canal pair (RALP), and to a maximal activation of the left anterior/right posterior semicircular canal pair (LARP)]. Our sample of neurons recorded in the left pretectum had two preferred axes of rotation: first, rotation around the yaw axis and second, rotation around the RALP axis. Both axes of rotation correspond to best responsive axes of the semicircular canals. For this reason, coding in a reference frame defined by the vestibular system or the pulling direction of the eye muscles is suggested. In our population of recorded APT neurons, we did not find segregation of different preferred axes of rotation into different anatomical structures. Furthermore in all axes no bias for clockwise or counterclockwise rotations was obvious. This is particularly noteworthy for the yaw axis because preference for temporo-nasal and naso-temporal rotations was found at the same recording side. Hence we conclude that in fish the accessory optic system may consist of one nucleus on each side of the midbrain only, the APT. Segregation into different nuclei coding for different axes and different senses of rotation probably first developed in amphibians.

  18. Deep Mantle Structure As a Reference Frame for Absolute Plate Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsvik, T. H.; Van Der Voo, R.; Doubrovine, P. V.; Burke, K. C.; Steinberger, B. M.; Domeier, M.

    2014-12-01

    Since the Pangea supercontinent formed some 320 million years ago, the majority of large igneous provinces and diamond-bearing rocks (kimberlites) near Earth's surface can be sourced to plumes erupting from the margins of two large thermochemical reservoirs at the core-mantle boundary. Using this surface to core-mantle boundary correlation to locate continents in longitude and a new iterative approach for defining a paleomagnetic reference frame corrected for true polar wander, we present a model for plate motion back to earliest Paleozoic time (540 Ma). We have identified six phases of slow, oscillatory true polar wander during the Paleozoic. True polar wander rates (<1 Degree/Myr) are compatible to those in the Mesozoic but plate velocities are on average twice as high. We show that a geologically reasonable model that reconstructs continents in longitude in such a way that large igneous provinces and kimberlites are positioned above the plume generation zones at the times of their formation can be successfully applied to the entire Phanerozoic. Our model is a kinematic model for only the continents. The next step in improving it will be developing a model for the entire lithosphere, including synthetic oceanic lithosphere. This is challenging, but we will demonstrate a full-plate model back to the Late Paleozoic (410 Ma).

  19. Deep mantle structure as a reference frame for movements in and on the Earth.

    PubMed

    Torsvik, Trond H; van der Voo, Rob; Doubrovine, Pavel V; Burke, Kevin; Steinberger, Bernhard; Ashwal, Lewis D; Trønnes, Reidar G; Webb, Susan J; Bull, Abigail L

    2014-06-17

    Earth's residual geoid is dominated by a degree-2 mode, with elevated regions above large low shear-wave velocity provinces on the core-mantle boundary beneath Africa and the Pacific. The edges of these deep mantle bodies, when projected radially to the Earth's surface, correlate with the reconstructed positions of large igneous provinces and kimberlites since Pangea formed about 320 million years ago. Using this surface-to-core-mantle boundary correlation to locate continents in longitude and a novel iterative approach for defining a paleomagnetic reference frame corrected for true polar wander, we have developed a model for absolute plate motion back to earliest Paleozoic time (540 Ma). For the Paleozoic, we have identified six phases of slow, oscillatory true polar wander during which the Earth's axis of minimum moment of inertia was similar to that of Mesozoic times. The rates of Paleozoic true polar wander (<1°/My) are compatible with those in the Mesozoic, but absolute plate velocities are, on average, twice as high. Our reconstructions generate geologically plausible scenarios, with large igneous provinces and kimberlites sourced from the margins of the large low shear-wave velocity provinces, as in Mesozoic and Cenozoic times. This absolute kinematic model suggests that a degree-2 convection mode within the Earth's mantle may have operated throughout the entire Phanerozoic.

  20. Effect of light level on the reference frames of visual motion processing.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Sanae; Uchida-Ota, Mariko; Takeuchi, Tatsuto

    2014-01-01

    It is empirically known that some action-related visual tasks, which may rely on the construction of spatiotopic coordinates, are not well conducted under mesopic vision. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of light level on the reference frame, such as retinotopic and spatiotopic coordinate bases, associated with visual motion processing. For this purpose, we used a phenomenon called visual motion priming in which the perceived direction of a directionally ambiguous test stimulus is influenced by the moving direction of a priming stimulus. Previous studies have shown that negative and positive motion priming are conspicuously observed in retinotopic and spatiotopic coordinates, respectively. In the experiments, participants made a saccade after the termination of the priming stimulus and judged the perceived direction of the test stimulus presented subsequently in retinotopic or spatiotopic coordinates at different light levels. We found that in retinotopic coordinates, negative motion priming was observed at all light levels. In spatiotopic coordinates, positive motion priming was observed at photopic and scotopic light levels, whereas the strength of motion priming was greatly reduced at mesopic light levels. These results were robust to the change in the luminance contrast or the saccadic eye movement per se. Different spatiotemporal properties of cones and rods at mesopic light levels may disturb the construction of a spatiotopic representation of motion, which leads to the disappearance of visual motion priming in spatiotopic coordinates during mesopic vision.

  1. Geometric accuracy of 3D coordinates of the Leksell stereotactic skull frame in 1.5 Tesla- and 3.0 Tesla-magnetic resonance imaging: a comparison of three different fixation screw materials.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Mori, Yoshimasa; Yamamuro, Osamu; Komori, Masataka; Shibamoto, Yuta; Uchiyama, Yukio; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Hagiwara, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    We assessed the geometric distortion of 1.5-Tesla (T) and 3.0-T magnetic resonance (MR) images with the Leksell skull frame system using three types of cranial quick fixation screws (QFSs) of different materials-aluminum, aluminum with tungsten tip, and titanium-for skull frame fixation. Two kinds of acrylic phantoms were placed on a Leksell skull frame using the three types of screws, and were scanned with computed tomography (CT), 1.5-T MR imaging and 3.0-T MR imaging. The 3D coordinates for both strengths of MR imaging were compared with those for CT. The deviations of the measured coordinates at selected points (x = 50, 100 and 150; y = 50, 100 and 150) were indicated on different axial planes (z = 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150). The errors of coordinates with QFSs of aluminum, tungsten-tipped aluminum, and titanium were <1.0, 1.0 and 2.0 mm in the entire treatable area, respectively, with 1.5 T. In the 3.0-T field, the errors with aluminum QFSs were <1.0 mm only around the center, while the errors with tungsten-tipped aluminum and titanium were >2.0 mm in most positions. The geometric accuracy of the Leksell skull frame system with 1.5-T MR imaging was high and valid for clinical use. However, the geometric errors with 3.0-T MR imaging were larger than those of 1.5-T MR imaging and were acceptable only with aluminum QFSs, and then only around the central region.

  2. The Internal/External Frame of Reference Model Revisited: Incorporating General Cognitive Ability and General Academic Self-Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Martin; Ludtke, Oliver; Trautwein, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    The internal/external frame of reference model (I/E model; Marsh, 1986) is a highly influential model of self-concept formation, which predicts that domain-specific abilities have positive effects on academic self-concepts in the corresponding domain and negative effects across domains. Investigations of the I/E model do not typically incorporate…

  3. Justifying Alternative Models in Learning Astronomy: A Study of K-8 Science Teachers' Understanding of Frames of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Ji; Confrey, Jere

    2010-01-01

    Understanding frames of reference is critical in describing planetary motion and learning astronomy. Historically, the geocentric and heliocentric models were defended and advocated against each other. Today, there are still many people who do not understand the relationship between the two models. This topic is not adequately treated in astronomy…

  4. Asymmetric Learning Transfer between Imagined Viewer- and Object-Rotations: Evidence of a Hierarchical Organization of Spatial Reference Frames

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellizzer, Giuseppe; Ba, Maryse Badan; Zanello, Adriano; Merlo, Marco C. G.

    2009-01-01

    Neural resources subserving spatial processing in either egocentric or allocentric reference frames are, at least partly, dissociated. However, it is unclear whether these two types of representations are independent or whether they interact. We investigated this question using a learning transfer paradigm. The experiment and material were…

  5. Facing the Sunrise: Cultural Worldview Underlying Intrinsic-Based Encoding of Absolute Frames of Reference in Aymara

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunez, Rafael E.; Cornejo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The Aymara of the Andes use absolute (cardinal) frames of reference for describing the relative position of ordinary objects. However, rather than encoding them in available absolute lexemes, they do it in lexemes that are intrinsic to the body: "nayra" ("front") and "qhipa" ("back"), denoting east and west, respectively. Why? We use different but…

  6. Business vs. Cultural Frames of Reference in Group Decision Making: Interactions among Austrian, Finnish, and Swedish Business Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auer-Rizzi, Werner; Berry Michael

    2000-01-01

    Examines ways business and cultural frames of reference affect decision making in multicultural groups. Finds students' reactions to two class activities shows how "groupthink" arose in both exercises; cultural interference paralyzed group decision making in one group; and cultural interference demonstrated the importance of a cultural negotiation…

  7. Flying over uneven moving terrain based on optic-flow cues without any need for reference frames or accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Expert, Fabien; Ruffier, Franck

    2015-04-01

    Two bio-inspired guidance principles involving no reference frame are presented here and were implemented in a rotorcraft, which was equipped with panoramic optic flow (OF) sensors but (as in flying insects) no accelerometer. To test these two guidance principles, we built a tethered tandem rotorcraft called BeeRotor (80 grams), which was tested flying along a high-roofed tunnel. The aerial robot adjusts its pitch and hence its speed, hugs the ground and lands safely without any need for an inertial reference frame. The rotorcraft's altitude and forward speed are adjusted via two OF regulators piloting the lift and the pitch angle on the basis of the common-mode and differential rotor speeds, respectively. The robot equipped with two wide-field OF sensors was tested in order to assess the performances of the following two systems of guidance involving no inertial reference frame: (i) a system with a fixed eye orientation based on the curved artificial compound eye (CurvACE) sensor, and (ii) an active system of reorientation based on a quasi-panoramic eye which constantly realigns its gaze, keeping it parallel to the nearest surface followed. Safe automatic terrain following and landing were obtained with CurvACE under dim light to daylight conditions and the active eye-reorientation system over rugged, changing terrain, without any need for an inertial reference frame. PMID:25717052

  8. Learning to Explain Astronomy across Moving Frames of Reference: Exploring the Role of Classroom and Planetarium-Based Instructional Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Julia Diane; Kocareli, Alicia; Slagle, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Learning astronomy involves significant spatial reasoning, such as learning to describe Earth-based phenomena and understanding space-based explanations for those phenomena as well as using the relevant size and scale information to interpret these frames of reference. This study examines daily celestial motion (DCM) as one case of how children…

  9. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 4 OF 6, Newb, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH-FIXED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  10. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 4 OF 6, Newb, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  11. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Newhip-D Part 6 OF 8 - Continuation of 2565, Cycle 4 High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  12. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Newhip-A Part 3 OF 8 - Continuation of 2565, Cycle 4 High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  13. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Newhip-C Part 5 OF 8 - Continuation of 2565, Cycle 4 High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  14. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 6 OF 6, Newd, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  15. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 5 OF 6, Newc, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH-FIXED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  16. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 5 OF 6, Newc, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  17. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 6 OF 6, Newd, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH - Fixed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  18. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Newhip-B Part 4 OF 8 - Continuation of 2565, Cycle 4 High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  19. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 3 OF 6, Newa, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  20. Teachers' Interpretations of the Internet. An Applied Case Study for the Evaluation of Technological Frames of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camilleri, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    In 1994 Orlikowski and Gash articulated Technological Frames of Reference as a systematic theoretical lens to examine technological developments in organisations. A decade later, in 2004, Davidson and Pai expressed concern that while the lens was widely cited in academic discourse, the incidence and adoption of the model as an analytical framework…

  1. Flying over uneven moving terrain based on optic-flow cues without any need for reference frames or accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Expert, Fabien; Ruffier, Franck

    2015-02-26

    Two bio-inspired guidance principles involving no reference frame are presented here and were implemented in a rotorcraft, which was equipped with panoramic optic flow (OF) sensors but (as in flying insects) no accelerometer. To test these two guidance principles, we built a tethered tandem rotorcraft called BeeRotor (80 grams), which was tested flying along a high-roofed tunnel. The aerial robot adjusts its pitch and hence its speed, hugs the ground and lands safely without any need for an inertial reference frame. The rotorcraft's altitude and forward speed are adjusted via two OF regulators piloting the lift and the pitch angle on the basis of the common-mode and differential rotor speeds, respectively. The robot equipped with two wide-field OF sensors was tested in order to assess the performances of the following two systems of guidance involving no inertial reference frame: (i) a system with a fixed eye orientation based on the curved artificial compound eye (CurvACE) sensor, and (ii) an active system of reorientation based on a quasi-panoramic eye which constantly realigns its gaze, keeping it parallel to the nearest surface followed. Safe automatic terrain following and landing were obtained with CurvACE under dim light to daylight conditions and the active eye-reorientation system over rugged, changing terrain, without any need for an inertial reference frame.

  2. An Extension to the Internal/External Frame of Reference Model to Two Verbal and Numerical Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moller, Jens; Streblow, Lilian; Pohlmann, Britta; Koller, Olaf

    2006-01-01

    Beside interindividual social comparisons, intraindividual dimensional comparisons in which students compare their achievements in one subject with their achievements in other subjects have an impact on their academic self-concepts. The internal/external frame of reference (I/E) model by Marsh (1986) assumes that dimensional comparisons lead to…

  3. An improved optical reference frame for long-term Earth rotation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrák, J.; Ron, C.

    The Earth orientation parameters, based on optical astrometry observations of latitude/universal time variations and the HIPPARCOS Catalogue, covering the interval 1899.7 - 1992.0, were determined in past years at the Astronomical Institute in Prague, in close cooperation with the Czech Technical University in Prague. During the solution we discovered that not all HIPPARCOS stars are suitable for such a long-term study; many of them proved to have large errors in proper motions, mostly due to their multiplicity and shortness of the HIPPARCOS mission. Eventually, we had to improve about 20% of the proper motions from the same observations that we used to estimate the Earth orientation parameters. New catalogues have appeared recently that are based on the combination of the HIPPARCOS Catalogue with past ground-based observations: FK6, TYCHO 2, and most recently ARIHIP, being a selection of the Combination Catalogues FK6, GC+HIP, TYC2+HIP and HIP. We made the inventory of all stars observed in Earth orientation programs at 33 observatories during the 20th century, and found 4480 different stars. Out of these we constructed the Earth Orientation Catalogue (EOC) that is basically given in the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRS). Whenever possible, we take over the positions, proper motions, parallaxes and radial velocities from the following catalogues, in the order of their importance: ARIHIP (3023 stars), TYCHO 2 (1271 stars), and HIPPARCOS (140 stars); 46 stars were identified in none of them. However, not all of these stars are astrometrically excellent in the sense of the classification introduced by Wielen et al.; only 1982 belong to categories 1-3. The positions and proper motions of the remaining 2498 stars will therefore be thoroughly checked and, if necessary, improved on the basis of the latitude/universal time observations.

  4. Supercontinent Pangea, Mantle Dynamics, and Reference Frame of Global Plate Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, S.; Rudolph, M. L.; Liu, X.

    2014-12-01

    Arguably the most important and challenging goal in geodynamics is to understand the two-way dynamics between tectonic plates and mantle convection. While it has long been recognized that the present-day degree-2 mantle structure as imaged seismically is closely related to the plate motions (Hager and O'Connell, 1981) and their history (<119 Ma) (Ricard et al., 1993; McNamara and Zhong, 2005), recent studies have expanded this concept, from two different perspectives, by seeking connections between Pangea assembly and breakup and mantle structure and dynamics. First, it has been proposed that the large igneous provinces (LIPs) and kimberlite volcanism erupted mainly along the edges of the two major seismically slow anomalies above the core-mantle boundary (often referred to as the Africa and Pacific LLSVPs) (Torsvik et al, 2010). This has led to the proposal that the present-day degree-2 mantle structure has existed for >500 Ma (Torsvik et al., 2014), although its statistical significance has been challenged (Austermann et al., 2013). The proposals of the spatially stable Africa and Pacific LLSVPs and of the LIP eruptions along their edges have also been exploited in attempts to build global plate motion models since the Pangea assembly by providing a plate motion reference frame or inferring true polar wander (TPW) corrections to the plate motions (Torsvik et al., 2014). Second, mantle dynamics studies indicate that degree-1 mantle convection, which is expected with realistic lithospheric and mantle viscosity, may be needed for assembly of a supercontinent (e.g., Pangea) (Zhong et al., 2007). This suggests that the present degree-2 mantle structure may have been formed only after the Pangea assembly from an initially degree-1 structure - a scenario that is consistent with convection calculations with a proxy plate motion model that considers Pangea process (Zhang et al., 2010). In this presentation, in addition to critically reviewing these arguments, we will

  5. Implications of a comprehensive, spreading-aligned plate motion reference frame in light of seismic anisotropy and global trench migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, T. W.; Schaeffer, A. J.; Lebedev, S.; Conrad, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    An absolute plate motion model is required to address issues such as the thermo-chemical evolution of Earth's mantle, yet all such models have to rely on indirect inferences. Given that azimuthal seismic anisotropy in the uppermost mantle appears to show fast axes parallel to seafloor spreading, we explore a new, spreading-aligned reference frame. We show that this reference frame indeed fits azimuthal seismic anisotropy from surface waves and SKS splitting very well. The corresponding Euler pole (at 64∘E, 61∘S, with rotation of ~0.25∘/Myr) is close to those of hot spot reference frames, as expected if hot spots were due to relatively stationary mantle plumes. The new Euler pole is also close to that of ridge motion minimizing models, and its amplitude broadly consistent with estimates of net rotation generation by mantle convection with strong continental keels and a weak asthenosphere. The finding that relative spreading aligns with absolute plate motions implies that ridges are passive and that transform faults weak, allowing for easy realignment of spreading centers during slab-driven plate reorganizations. We also explore the implications of our new reference frame for slabs where we find that all of the major eastern Pacific subduction zone trenches are rolling back (away from the overriding plate). Fast trench advance is only predicted in regions with strong corner flow and pivoting (Tonga), continental plate interactions (Sumatra and Caribbean), and most clearly in an ocean-ocean setting for the Philippine Sea Plate where double subduction, slab-slab interactions may explain the fast advance of the Marianas. We conclude that a net rotation pole guided by the spreading-aligned model could indeed represent a comprehensive reference frame for present-day plate motions with respect to the deep mantle.

  6. GPS derived ground motions (2005-2014) within the Gulf of Mexico region referred to a stable Gulf of Mexico reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Wang, G.

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates current ground motions derived from the GPS geodesy infrastructure in the Gulf of Mexico region. The positions and velocity vectors of 161 continuous GPS (CGPS) stations are presented with respect to a newly established local reference frame, the Stable Gulf of Mexico Reference Frame (SGOMRF). Thirteen long-term (> 5 years) CGPS are used to realize the local reference frame. The root-mean-square (RMS) of the velocities of the 13 SGOMRF reference stations achieves 0.2 mm yr-1 in the horizontal and 0.3 mm yr-1 in the vertical directions. GPS observations presented in this study indicate significant land subsidence in the coastal area of southeastern Louisiana, the greater Houston metropolitan area, and two cities in Mexico (Aguascalientes and Mexico City). The most rapid subsidence is recorded at the Mexico City International airport, which is up to 26.6 cm yr-1 (2008-2014). Significant spatial variation of subsidence rates is observed in both Mexico City and the Houston area. The overall subsidence rate in the Houston area is decreasing. GPS observations in southeastern Louisiana indicate minor (4.0-6.0 mm yr-1) but consistent subsidence over time and space. This poses a potential threat to the safety of costal infrastructure in the long-term.

  7. GPS-derived ground deformation (2005-2014) within the Gulf of Mexico region referred to a stable Gulf of Mexico reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiangbo; Wang, Guoquan

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates current ground deformation derived from the GPS geodesy infrastructure in the Gulf of Mexico region. The positions and velocity vectors of 161 continuous GPS (CGPS) stations are presented with respect to a newly established local reference frame, the Stable Gulf of Mexico Reference Frame (SGOMRF). Thirteen long-term (> 5 years) CGPS are used to realize the local reference frame. The root mean square (RMS) of the velocities of the 13 SGOMRF reference stations achieves 0.2 mm yr-1 in the horizontal and 0.3 mm yr-1 in the vertical directions. GPS observations presented in this study indicate significant land subsidence in the coastal area of southeastern Louisiana, the greater Houston metropolitan area, and two cities in Mexico (Aguascalientes and Mexico City). The most rapid subsidence is recorded at the Mexico City International airport, which is up to 26.6 cm yr-1 (2008-2014). Significant spatial variation of subsidence rates is observed in both Mexico City and the Houston area. The overall subsidence rate in the Houston area is decreasing. The subsidence rate in southeastern Louisiana is relatively smaller (4.0-6.0 mm yr-1) but tends to be steady over time. This poses a potential threat to the safety of coastal infrastructure in the long-term.

  8. The ICRF-3: Status, Plans, and Multi-wavelength Progress on the next generation Celestial Reference Frame.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    ICRF-3 seeks to improve upon the highly successful ICRF-2. Our goals are to improve the precision, spatial and frequency coverage relative to the ICRF-2 by 2018. This date is driven by the desire to create radio frames that are ready for comparison with the Gaia optical frame.Several specific actions are underway. A collaboration to improve at S/X-band precision of the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) Calibrator Survey's ~2200 sources, which are typically 5 times less precise than the rest of the ICRF-2, is bearing fruit and is projected to yield a factor of 3 improvement in precision. S/X-band southern hemisphere precision improvements are underway with observations using southern antennas such as the AuScope, Warkworth, and HartRAO, South Africa.We also seek to improve radio frequency coverage with X/Ka-band and K-band work. An X/Ka frame of 660 sources now has full sky coverage from the addition of a 2nd southern station in Argentina which is strengthening the southern hemisphere in general. The X/Ka-band frame's precision is now comparable to the ICRF-2 for the 530 sources in common. A K-band collaboration has formed with similar coverage and southern precision goals. By the time of this meeting, we expect K-band to complete full sky coverage with south polar cap observations and to improve spatial density north of -30 deg declination with VLBA observations.On the analysis front, special attention is being given to combination techniques both of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) frames and of multiple data types. Consistency of the Celestial Reference Frame (CRF) with the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) and Earth Oreintation Parameters (EOP) is another area of concern. Comparison of celestial frame solutions from various groups is underway in order to identify and correct systematic errors. We will discuss evidence emerging for 100 µas zonal errors in the ICRF2 in the declination range from 0 to -30 deg.Finally, work is underway to identify and

  9. A radio/optical reference frame. 5: Additional source positions in the mid-latitude southern hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. L.; Reynolds, J. E.; Jauncey, D. L.; De Vegt, C.; Zacharias, N.; Ma, C.; Fey, A. L.; Johnston, K. J.; Hindsley, R.; Hughes, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    We report new accurate radio position measurements for 30 sources, preliminary positions for two sources, improved radio postions for nine additional sources which had limited previous observations, and optical positions and optical-radio differences for six of the radio sources. The Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations are part of the continuing effort to establish a global radio reference frame of about 400 compact, flat spectrum sources, which are evenly distributed across the sky. The observations were made using Mark III data format in four separate sessions in 1988-89 with radio telescopes at Tidbinbilla, Australia, Kauai, USA, and Kashima, Japan. We observed a total of 54 sources, including ten calibrators and three which were undetected. The 32 new source positions bring the total number in the radio reference frame catalog to 319 (172 northern and 147 southern) and fill in the zone -25 deg greater than delta greater than -45 deg which, prior to this list, had the lowest source density. The VLBI positions have an average formal precision of less than 1 mas, although unknown radio structure effects of about 1-2 mas may be present. The six new optical postion measurements are part of the program to obtain positions of the optical counterparts of the radio reference frame source and to map accurately the optical on to the radio reference frames. The optical measurements were obtained from United States Naval Observatory (USNO) Black Birch astrograph plates and source plates from the AAT, and Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) 4 m, and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Schmidt. The optical positions have an average precision of 0.07 sec, mostly due to the zero point error when adjusted to the FK5 optical frame using the IRS catalog. To date we have measured optical positions for 46 sources.

  10. Automatic 3D video format detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Zhe; Zhai, Jiefu; Doyen, Didier

    2011-03-01

    Many 3D formats exist and will probably co-exist for a long time even if 3D standards are today under definition. The support for multiple 3D formats will be important for bringing 3D into home. In this paper, we propose a novel and effective method to detect whether a video is a 3D video or not, and to further identify the exact 3D format. First, we present how to detect those 3D formats that encode a pair of stereo images into a single image. The proposed method detects features and establishes correspondences between features in the left and right view images, and applies the statistics from the distribution of the positional differences between corresponding features to detect the existence of a 3D format and to identify the format. Second, we present how to detect the frame sequential 3D format. In the frame sequential 3D format, the feature points are oscillating from frame to frame. Similarly, the proposed method tracks feature points over consecutive frames, computes the positional differences between features, and makes a detection decision based on whether the features are oscillating. Experiments show the effectiveness of our method.

  11. Investigation of student ability to relate measurements of physical quantities made in different inertial reference frames*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreaux, Andrew

    1999-05-01

    The Physics Education Group at the University of Washington has been examining student understanding of relative motion in one and two dimensions. We have found that many students in introductory physics treat some vector quantities as being frame-independent or have difficulty in transforming these quantities from one frame to another. Evidence will be presented from results of interviews and written questions. * This work has been funded in part by NSF Grants DUE 9354501 and DUE 9727648, which include support from other Divisions of EHR and the Physics Division of MPS.

  12. Learning to Explain Astronomy Across Moving Frames of Reference: Exploring the role of classroom and planetarium-based instructional contexts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Julia Diane; Kocareli, Alicia; Slagle, Cynthia

    2014-05-01

    Learning astronomy involves significant spatial reasoning, such as learning to describe Earth-based phenomena and understanding space-based explanations for those phenomena as well as using the relevant size and scale information to interpret these frames of reference. This study examines daily celestial motion (DCM) as one case of how children learn to move between frames of reference in astronomy wherein one explains Earth-based descriptions of the Sun's, Moon's, and stars' apparent motion using the Earth's daily rotation. We analysed interviews with 8-9-year-old students (N = 99) who participated in one of four instructional conditions emphasizing: the space-based perspective; the Earth-based perspective in the planetarium; constructing explanations for the Earth-based observations; and a combination of the planetarium plus constructing explanations in the classroom. We used an embodied cognition framework to analyse outcomes while also considering challenges learners face due to the high cognitive demands of spatial reasoning. Results support the hypothesis that instruction should engage students in learning both the Earth-based observations and space-based explanations, as focusing on a single frame of reference resulted in less sophisticated explanations; however, few students were able to construct a fully scientific explanation after instruction.

  13. Differential School Contextual Effects for Math and English: Integrating the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect and the Internal/External Frame of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Philip D.; Marsh, Herbert W.; Ludtke, Oliver; Trautwein, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    The internal/external frame of reference and the big-fish-little-pond effect are two major models of academic self-concept formation which have considerable theoretical and empirical support. Integrating the domain specific and compensatory processes of the internal/external frame of reference model with the big-fish-little-pond effect suggests a…

  14. The Reciprocal Internal/External Frame of Reference Model: An Integration of Models of Relations between Academic Achievement and Self-Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moller, Jens; Retelsdorf, Jan; Koller, Olaf; Marsh, Herb W.

    2011-01-01

    The reciprocal internal/external frame of reference model (RI/EM) combines the internal/external frame of reference model and the reciprocal effects model. The RI/EM predicts positive effects of mathematics and verbal achievement and academic self-concepts (ASC) on subsequent mathematics and verbal achievements and ASCs within domains and negative…

  15. Can space ties on board GNSS satellites replace terrestrial ties in the implementation of Terrestrial Reference Frames?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni, Sara; Zerbini, Susanna; Altamimi, Zuheir; Rebischung, Paul; Errico, Maddalena; Santi, Efisio

    2016-04-01

    The realization of Terrestrial Reference Frames (TRFs) must be periodically updated in order to account for newly acquired observations and for upgrades in data analysis procedures and/or combination techniques. Any innovative computation strategy should ameliorate the definition of the frame physical parameters, upon which a number of scientific applications critically rely. On the basis of the requirements of scientific cutting edge studies, the geodetic community has estimated that the present day challenge in the determination of TRFs is to provide a frame that is accurate and long-term stable at the level of 1 mm and 0.1 mm/y respectively. This work aims at characterizing the frame realized by a combination of Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) observations via their co-location on board GNSS spacecrafts. In particular, it is established how such a frame compares to the traditional ITRF computation and what is the impact on the realization of the frame origin and scale. Four years of data from a global network encompassing about one hundred GNSS stations and all SLR sites have been analyzed. In order to ensure the highest possible consistency, the raw data of both techniques are treated with the same analysis Software (Bernese GNSS Software 5.2) following IERS2010 Conventions. Both weekly and long term solutions are carried out exploiting either the Bernese or the Combination and Analysis of Terrestrial Reference Frames (CATREF) Software packages. We present the results of a combination study involving GNSS data and SLR observations to the two LAGEOS and to the GNSS satellites equipped with retroreflector arrays. The latter type of measurements is currently not included in the computation of the official ITRF solutions. The assessment of the benefit that they could provide to the definition of the origin and scale of the ITRF is however worth investigating, as such data provide the potential for linking the GNSS and

  16. PLOT3D user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela P.; Buning, Pieter G.; Pierce, Larry; Elson, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    PLOT3D is a computer graphics program designed to visualize the grids and solutions of computational fluid dynamics. Seventy-four functions are available. Versions are available for many systems. PLOT3D can handle multiple grids with a million or more grid points, and can produce varieties of model renderings, such as wireframe or flat shaded. Output from PLOT3D can be used in animation programs. The first part of this manual is a tutorial that takes the reader, keystroke by keystroke, through a PLOT3D session. The second part of the manual contains reference chapters, including the helpfile, data file formats, advice on changing PLOT3D, and sample command files.

  17. User’s guide and reference to Ash3d: a three-dimensional model for Eulerian atmospheric tephra transport and deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, Larry G.; Randall, Michael J.; Schwaiger, Hans F.; Denlinger, Roger P.

    2013-01-01

    Ash3d is a three-dimensional Eulerian atmospheric model for tephra transport, dispersal, and deposition, written by the authors to study and forecast hazards of volcanic ash clouds and tephra fall. In this report, we explain how to set up simulations using both a web interface and an ASCII input file, and how to view and interpret model output. We also summarize the architecture of the model and some of its properties.

  18. Modeling moving systems with RELAP5-3D

    DOE PAGES

    Mesina, G. L.; Aumiller, David L.; Buschman, Francis X.; Kyle, Matt R.

    2015-12-04

    RELAP5-3D is typically used to model stationary, land-based reactors. However, it can also model reactors in other inertial and accelerating frames of reference. By changing the magnitude of the gravitational vector through user input, RELAP5-3D can model reactors on a space station or the moon. The field equations have also been modified to model reactors in a non-inertial frame, such as occur in land-based reactors during earthquakes or onboard spacecraft. Transient body forces affect fluid flow in thermal-fluid machinery aboard accelerating crafts during rotational and translational accelerations. It is useful to express the equations of fluid motion in the acceleratingmore » frame of reference attached to the moving craft. However, careful treatment of the rotational and translational kinematics is required to accurately capture the physics of the fluid motion. Correlations for flow at angles between horizontal and vertical are generated via interpolation where no experimental studies or data exist. The equations for three-dimensional fluid motion in a non-inertial frame of reference are developed. As a result, two different systems for describing rotational motion are presented, user input is discussed, and an example is given.« less

  19. Modeling moving systems with RELAP5-3D

    SciTech Connect

    Mesina, G. L.; Aumiller, David L.; Buschman, Francis X.; Kyle, Matt R.

    2015-12-04

    RELAP5-3D is typically used to model stationary, land-based reactors. However, it can also model reactors in other inertial and accelerating frames of reference. By changing the magnitude of the gravitational vector through user input, RELAP5-3D can model reactors on a space station or the moon. The field equations have also been modified to model reactors in a non-inertial frame, such as occur in land-based reactors during earthquakes or onboard spacecraft. Transient body forces affect fluid flow in thermal-fluid machinery aboard accelerating crafts during rotational and translational accelerations. It is useful to express the equations of fluid motion in the accelerating frame of reference attached to the moving craft. However, careful treatment of the rotational and translational kinematics is required to accurately capture the physics of the fluid motion. Correlations for flow at angles between horizontal and vertical are generated via interpolation where no experimental studies or data exist. The equations for three-dimensional fluid motion in a non-inertial frame of reference are developed. As a result, two different systems for describing rotational motion are presented, user input is discussed, and an example is given.

  20. Modular neuron-based body estimation: maintaining consistency over different limbs, modalities, and frames of reference

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenfeld, Stephan; Herbort, Oliver; Butz, Martin V.

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of how the brain maintains a probabilistic body state estimate over time from a modeling perspective. The neural Modular Modality Frame (nMMF) model simulates such a body state estimation process by continuously integrating redundant, multimodal body state information sources. The body state estimate itself is distributed over separate, but bidirectionally interacting modules. nMMF compares the incoming sensory and present body state information across the interacting modules and fuses the information sources accordingly. At the same time, nMMF enforces body state estimation consistency across the modules. nMMF is able to detect conflicting sensory information and to consequently decrease the influence of implausible sensor sources on the fly. In contrast to the previously published Modular Modality Frame (MMF) model, nMMF offers a biologically plausible neural implementation based on distributed, probabilistic population codes. Besides its neural plausibility, the neural encoding has the advantage of enabling (a) additional probabilistic information flow across the separate body state estimation modules and (b) the representation of arbitrary probability distributions of a body state. The results show that the neural estimates can detect and decrease the impact of false sensory information, can propagate conflicting information across modules, and can improve overall estimation accuracy due to additional module interactions. Even bodily illusions, such as the rubber hand illusion, can be simulated with nMMF. We conclude with an outlook on the potential of modeling human data and of invoking goal-directed behavioral control. PMID:24191151

  1. Endostyle cell recruitment as a frame of reference for development and growth in the Urochordate Oikopleura dioica.

    PubMed

    Troedsson, Christofer; Ganot, Philippe; Bouquet, Jean-Marie; Aksnes, Dag L; Thompson, Eric M

    2007-12-01

    In models of growth and life history, and in molecular and cell biology, there is a need for more accurate frames of reference to characterize developmental progression. In Caenorhabditis elegans, complete fate maps of cell lineage provide such a standard of reference. To be more widely applicable, reference frames should be easier to measure while still providing strong predictive capacity. Towards this aim, we have analyzed growth of the endostyle in the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica at the cellular level, and measured its response to temperature and food availability. Specifically, we test the hypothesis that age of a specific developmental stage in O. dioica can be predicted from the number of endostyle cells and temperature. We show that the endostyle grows by recruiting cells from the posterior tip into the lateral arms of the organ in an anterior-posterior orientation and that the rate of increase in lateral arm endostyle cells is temperature-dependent but unresponsive to nutritional intake. Endostyle cells therefore serve as an accurate and easily measured marker to describe developmental progression. Conceptually, such a method of characterizing developmental progression should help bridge life-history events and molecular mechanisms throughout organismal aging, facilitating cross-disciplinary understanding by providing a common experimental framework.

  2. Transforming 2d Cadastral Data Into a Dynamic Smart 3d Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiliakou, E.; Labropoulos, T.; Dimopoulou, E.

    2013-08-01

    3D property registration has become an imperative need in order to optimally reflect all complex cases of the multilayer reality of property rights and restrictions, revealing their vertical component. This paper refers to the potentials and multiple applications of 3D cadastral systems and explores the current state-of-the art, especially the available software with which 3D visualization can be achieved. Within this context, the Hellenic Cadastre's current state is investigated, in particular its data modeling frame. Presenting the methodologies and specifications addressing the registration of 3D properties, the operating cadastral system's shortcomings and merits are pointed out. Nonetheless, current technological advances as well as the availability of sophisticated software packages (proprietary or open source) call for 3D modeling. In order to register and visualize the complex reality in 3D, Esri's CityEngine modeling software has been used, which is specialized in the generation of 3D urban environments, transforming 2D GIS Data into Smart 3D City Models. The application of the 3D model concerns the Campus of the National Technical University of Athens, in which a complex ownership status is established along with approved special zoning regulations. The 3D model was built using different parameters based on input data, derived from cadastral and urban planning datasets, as well as legal documents and architectural plans. The process resulted in a final 3D model, optimally describing the cadastral situation and built environment and proved to be a good practice example of 3D visualization.

  3. The assessment of the transformation of global tectonic plate models and the global terrestrial reference frames using the Velocity Decomposition Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampatzidis, Dimitrios; König, Rolf; Glaser, Susanne; Heinkelmann, Robert; Schuh, Harald; Flechtner, Frank; Nilsson, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    The aim of our study is to assess the classical Helmert similarity transformation using the Velocity Decomposition Analysis (VEDA). The VEDA is a new methodology, developed by GFZ for the assessment of the reference frames' temporal variation and it is based on the separation of the velocities into two specified parts: The first is related to the reference system choice (the so called datum effect) and the latter one which refers to the real deformation of the terrestrial points. The advantage of the VEDA is its ability to detect the relative biases and reference system effects between two different frames or two different realizations of the same frame, respectively. We apply the VEDA for the assessment between several modern tectonic plate models and the recent global terrestrial reference frames.

  4. Transformation from proper time on earth to coordinate time in solar system barycentric space-time frame of reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, T. D.

    1976-01-01

    An expression was derived for the time transformation t - tau, where t is coordinate time in the solar system barycentric space-time frame of reference and tau is proper time obtained from a fixed atomic clock on earth. This transformation is suitable for use in the computation of high-precision earth-based range and Doppler observables of a spacecraft or celestial body located anywhere in the solar system; it can also be used in obtaining computed values of very long baseline interferometry data types. The formulation for computing range and Doppler observables, which is an explicit function of the transformation t - tau, is described briefly.

  5. Dynamic (computer) modelling of the particulate environment: Transformations from the LDEF reference frame to decode geocentric and interplanetary populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonnell, J. A. M.; Sullivan, K.

    1991-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility's impact signature record and the size frequency distribution of craters and perforations offers a unique record of environmental data referenced conveniently to the geocentric reference frame. Chemical analysis of residues can offer only limited assistance. Hence, flux modelling has been developed to transform from both geocentric orbital distributions and geocentrically unbounded interplanetary source distributions. This is applied to the foil and crater penetration records in the Ram (E), Trailing (W), and Space Pointing directions to offer the means of decoding the records. It shows that the mix of the components is size dependent. Parametric forms of the modelling transformations are presented for the orbital and unbound populations.

  6. Dynamic (computer) modelling of the particulate environment: Transformations from the LDEF reference frame to decode geocentric and interplanetary populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonnell, J. A. M.; Sullivan, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) impact signature record and the size frequency distribution of craters and perforations offers a unique record of environmental data referenced conveniently to the geocentric reference frame. Chemical analysis of residues can offer only limited assistance. Hence, flux modeling has been developed to transform both geocentric orbital distributions and geocentrically unbounded interplanetary source distributions. This is applied to the foil and crater penetration records in the Ram (E), Trailing (W), and Space Pointing directions to offer the means of decoding the records. It shows that the mix of the components is size dependent. Parametric forms of the modeling transformations are presented for the orbital and unbounded populations.

  7. Reference-frame-independent quantum-key-distribution server with a telecom tether for an on-chip client.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Aungskunsiri, K; Martín-López, E; Wabnig, J; Lobino, M; Nock, R W; Munns, J; Bonneau, D; Jiang, P; Li, H W; Laing, A; Rarity, J G; Niskanen, A O; Thompson, M G; O'Brien, J L

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate a client-server quantum key distribution (QKD) scheme. Large resources such as laser and detectors are situated at the server side, which is accessible via telecom fiber to a client requiring only an on-chip polarization rotator, which may be integrated into a handheld device. The detrimental effects of unstable fiber birefringence are overcome by employing the reference-frame-independent QKD protocol for polarization qubits in polarization maintaining fiber, where standard QKD protocols fail, as we show for comparison. This opens the way for quantum enhanced secure communications between companies and members of the general public equipped with handheld mobile devices, via telecom-fiber tethering.

  8. Center-of-Mass Reference Frame Technique applied to Conservation of Energy for Ideal Inelastic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdye, Edward, Jr.

    2010-02-01

    Findings show that the law of conservation of kinetic energy directly applies to inelastic collisions as well as to elastic collisions. The kinetic energy transfer is consistent with the law of conservation of energy which states that energy can neither be created nor annihilated. In an ideal inelastic collision, two colliding masses, M1 and M2, will move jointly at their center-of-mass velocity, VCM=M1V1+M2V2 M1+M2. As a consequence, the equation 1 2M1V1^2+1 2M2V2^2-1 2M1( V1-VCM )^2-1 2M2( V2-VCM )^2=1 2( M1+M2 )VCM^2 applies to the ideal inelastic collision. The quantities 1 2M1V1^2 and 1 2M2V2^2 are the initial kinetic energies of the masses M1 and M2, respectively, that would be available in the rest frame if the two masses were to come to a complete stop, V1 = 0 and V2 = 0. The negative terms, -1 2M1( V1-VCM )^2 and -1 2M2( V2-VCM )^2, are the kinetic energies transferred into the center-of-mass frame as M1 and M2 go from velocities, V1 and V2 , respectively, to the velocity VCM. The kinetic equation leads directly to the valid conservation of momentum equation M1V1+M2V2=( M1+M2 )VCM , a mathematical proof that the kinetic energy is totally conserved for the ideal inelastic collision. For details: http://www.extinctionshift.com/SignificantFindingsInelastic.htm )

  9. Iranian and American Perceptions and Cultural Frames of Reference: A Communication Lexicon for Cultural Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szalay, Lorand B.; And Others

    Differences in perceptions and values between Americans and Iranians are described with reference to the following cultural categories: country images, self images, family, marriage, love and sex, friendship, society, government and politics, and freedom. Within each category, comparisons are based on an analysis of the differing cultural…

  10. Power quality improvement by unified power quality conditioner based on CSC topology using synchronous reference frame theory.

    PubMed

    Dharmalingam, Rajasekaran; Dash, Subhransu Sekhar; Senthilnathan, Karthikrajan; Mayilvaganan, Arun Bhaskar; Chinnamuthu, Subramani

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the performance of unified power quality conditioner (UPQC) based on current source converter (CSC) topology. UPQC is used to mitigate the power quality problems like harmonics and sag. The shunt and series active filter performs the simultaneous elimination of current and voltage problems. The power fed is linked through common DC link and maintains constant real power exchange. The DC link is connected through the reactor. The real power supply is given by the photovoltaic system for the compensation of power quality problems. The reference current and voltage generation for shunt and series converter is based on phase locked loop and synchronous reference frame theory. The proposed UPQC-CSC design has superior performance for mitigating the power quality problems.

  11. Europeana and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletinckx, D.

    2011-09-01

    The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  12. Time-Dependent Selection of an Optimal Set of Sources to Define a Stable Celestial Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Bail, Karine; Gordon, David

    2010-01-01

    Temporal statistical position stability is required for VLBI sources to define a stable Celestial Reference Frame (CRF) and has been studied in many recent papers. This study analyzes the sources from the latest realization of the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF2) with the Allan variance, in addition to taking into account the apparent linear motions of the sources. Focusing on the 295 defining sources shows how they are a good compromise of different criteria, such as statistical stability and sky distribution, as well as having a sufficient number of sources, despite the fact that the most stable sources of the entire ICRF2 are mostly in the Northern Hemisphere. Nevertheless, the selection of a stable set is not unique: studying different solutions (GSF005a and AUG24 from GSFC and OPA from the Paris Observatory) over different time periods (1989.5 to 2009.5 and 1999.5 to 2009.5) leads to selections that can differ in up to 20% of the sources. Observing, recording, and network improvement are some of the causes, showing better stability for the CRF over the last decade than the last twenty years. But this may also be explained by the assumption of stationarity that is not necessarily right for some sources.

  13. Functional correlates of the lateral and medial entorhinal cortex: objects, path integration and local–global reference frames

    PubMed Central

    Knierim, James J.; Neunuebel, Joshua P.; Deshmukh, Sachin S.

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus receives its major cortical input from the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) and the lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC). It is commonly believed that the MEC provides spatial input to the hippocampus, whereas the LEC provides non-spatial input. We review new data which suggest that this simple dichotomy between ‘where’ versus ‘what’ needs revision. We propose a refinement of this model, which is more complex than the simple spatial–non-spatial dichotomy. MEC is proposed to be involved in path integration computations based on a global frame of reference, primarily using internally generated, self-motion cues and external input about environmental boundaries and scenes; it provides the hippocampus with a coordinate system that underlies the spatial context of an experience. LEC is proposed to process information about individual items and locations based on a local frame of reference, primarily using external sensory input; it provides the hippocampus with information about the content of an experience. PMID:24366146

  14. Speaking Volumes About 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, Genex submitted a proposal to Stennis Space Center for a volumetric 3-D display technique that would provide multiple users with a 360-degree perspective to simultaneously view and analyze 3-D data. The futuristic capabilities of the VolumeViewer(R) have offered tremendous benefits to commercial users in the fields of medicine and surgery, air traffic control, pilot training and education, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing, and military/battlefield management. The technology has also helped NASA to better analyze and assess the various data collected by its satellite and spacecraft sensors. Genex capitalized on its success with Stennis by introducing two separate products to the commercial market that incorporate key elements of the 3-D display technology designed under an SBIR contract. The company Rainbow 3D(R) imaging camera is a novel, three-dimensional surface profile measurement system that can obtain a full-frame 3-D image in less than 1 second. The third product is the 360-degree OmniEye(R) video system. Ideal for intrusion detection, surveillance, and situation management, this unique camera system offers a continuous, panoramic view of a scene in real time.

  15. Validation of reference materials for uranium radiochronometry in the frame of nuclear forensic investigations.

    PubMed

    Varga, Z; Mayer, K; Bonamici, C E; Hubert, A; Hutcheon, I; Kinman, W; Kristo, M; Pointurier, F; Spencer, K; Stanley, F; Steiner, R; Tandon, L; Williams, R

    2015-08-01

    The results of a joint effort by expert nuclear forensic laboratories in the area of age dating of uranium, i.e. the elapsed time since the last chemical purification of the material are presented and discussed. Completely separated uranium materials of known production date were distributed among the laboratories, and the samples were dated according to routine laboratory procedures by the measurement of the (230)Th/(234)U ratio. The measurement results were in good agreement with the known production date showing that the concept for preparing uranium age dating reference material based on complete separation is valid. Detailed knowledge of the laboratory procedures used for uranium age dating allows the identification of possible improvements in the current protocols and the development of improved practice in the future. The availability of age dating reference materials as well as the evolvement of the age dating best-practice protocol will increase the relevance and applicability of age dating as part of the tool-kit available for nuclear forensic investigations.

  16. Investigations on the hierarchy of reference frames in geodesy and geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grafarend, E. W.; Mueller, I. I.; Papo, H. B.; Richter, B.

    1979-01-01

    Problems related to reference directions were investigated. Space and time variant angular parameters are illustrated in hierarchic structures or towers. Using least squares techniques, model towers of triads are presented which allow the formation of linear observation equations. Translational and rotational degrees of freedom (origin and orientation) are discussed along with and the notion of length and scale degrees of freedom. According to the notion of scale parallelism, scale factors with respect to a unit length are given. Three-dimensional geodesy was constructed from the set of three base vectors (gravity, earth-rotation and the ecliptic normal vector). Space and time variations are given with respect to a polar and singular value decomposition or in terms of changes in translation, rotation, deformation (shear, dilatation or angular and scale distortions).

  17. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hee-Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d {N}=2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. We also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  18. 3d-3d correspondence revisited

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, Hee -Joong; Dimofte, Tudor; Gukov, Sergei; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-04-21

    In fivebrane compactifications on 3-manifolds, we point out the importance of all flat connections in the proper definition of the effective 3d N = 2 theory. The Lagrangians of some theories with the desired properties can be constructed with the help of homological knot invariants that categorify colored Jones polynomials. Higgsing the full 3d theories constructed this way recovers theories found previously by Dimofte-Gaiotto-Gukov. As a result, we also consider the cutting and gluing of 3-manifolds along smooth boundaries and the role played by all flat connections in this operation.

  19. The impact of non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading on global reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloßfeld, Mathis; Roggenbuck, Ole; Seitz, Manuela; Angermann, Detlef; Thaller, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    The most recent realization of the ITRS, the ITRF2014, will account for non-tidal atmospheric loading corrections applied at the normal equation or the parameter (solution) level. In its function as one of the three contributing ITRS Combination Centers, DGFI-TUM investigates the methodology to apply these corrections at the normal equation level. In this paper, the derived procedure is presented in detail and the following four global SLR-only TRF solutions are compared with each other: (1) conventional SLR-only TRF without non-tidal loading corrections, (2) SLR-only TRF corrected for the displacement due to non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading at the observation equation level, (3) SLR-only TRF corrected for the displacement due to non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading at the normal equation level, (4) SLR-only TRF corrected for the displacement and gravitational effect due to non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading at the observation level. The four solutions are compared w.r.t. the time series of epoch-wise estimated station coordinates, the station coordinate offsets at a reference epoch, the velocities, the commonly adjusted EOPs and the formal errors. The results allow to study the impact of the different methodologies to account for the non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading correction on global TRF solutions. Finally, the presented SLR case study is summarized and the obtained findings are interpreted in the framework of the current ITRF2014 computation.

  20. The first privately produced map in Norway with a geodetic reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, B. R.

    2009-04-01

    A map of the district surrounding lake Mjøsa in Norway was published in 1796 by the Topographical Society of Norway. Their members contributed private funds for this unique map and for the publication of the Topographical Journal, containing multidisciplinary descriptions, including environmental, of many regions of the country. The map was produced by Niels S. Darre, an army surveyor and cartographer, as a private undertaking in his own home district. The geodetic reference point of the map is the church at Vang, the position of which had been determined by repeated astronomical observations by its vicar, Abraham Pihl. He had been trained as an astronomical observer by professor Thomas Bugge at the Round Tower Observatory in Copenhagen. A supporting latitude determination near Lillehammer is also noted on the map, obtained by Maximillian Hell in 1769 on his return from Vardø in North-Norway to Vienna after a successful observation of the transit of Venus. The observed magnetic deviation from astronomically determined north is given. The map also identifies a marker of the great flood of the river Glomma in 1789, causing environmental and social devastation.

  1. Moving Forward in Space and Time: How Strong is the Conceptual Link between Spatial and Temporal Frames of Reference?

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Andrea; Rothe-Wulf, Annelie; Hüther, Lisa; Beller, Sieghard

    2012-01-01

    People often use spatial vocabulary to describe temporal relations, and this increasingly has motivated attempts to map spatial frames of reference (FoRs) onto time. Recent research suggested that speech communities, which differ in how they conceptualize space, may also differ in how they conceptualize time and, more specifically, that the preferences for spatial FoRs should carry over to the domain of time. Here, we scrutinize this assumption (a) by reviewing data from recent studies on temporal references, (b) by comparing data we had collected in previous studies on preferences for spatial and temporal FoRs in four languages, (c) by analyzing new data from dynamic spatial tasks that resemble the temporal tasks more closely, and (d) by assessing the co-variation of individual preferences of English speakers across space and time. While the first set of data paints a mixed picture, the latter three do not support the assumption of a close link between referencing preferences across domains. We explore possible reasons for this lack of consistency and discuss implications for research on temporal references. PMID:23162519

  2. Adjoint-Based Design of Rotors using the Navier-Stokes Equations in a Noninertial Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Jones, William T.

    2009-01-01

    Optimization of rotorcraft flowfields using an adjoint method generally requires a time-dependent implementation of the equations. The current study examines an intermediate approach in which a subset of rotor flowfields are cast as steady problems in a noninertial reference frame. This technique permits the use of an existing steady-state adjoint formulation with minor modifications to perform sensitivity analyses. The formulation is valid for isolated rigid rotors in hover or where the freestream velocity is aligned with the axis of rotation. Discrete consistency of the implementation is demonstrated using comparisons with a complex-variable technique, and a number of single- and multi-point optimizations for the rotorcraft figure of merit function are shown for varying blade collective angles. Design trends are shown to remain consistent as the grid is refined.

  3. Adjoint-Based Design of Rotors Using the Navier-Stokes Equations in a Noninertial Reference Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Eric J.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Jones, William T.

    2010-01-01

    Optimization of rotorcraft flowfields using an adjoint method generally requires a time-dependent implementation of the equations. The current study examines an intermediate approach in which a subset of rotor flowfields are cast as steady problems in a noninertial reference frame. This technique permits the use of an existing steady-state adjoint formulation with minor modifications to perform sensitivity analyses. The formulation is valid for isolated rigid rotors in hover or where the freestream velocity is aligned with the axis of rotation. Discrete consistency of the implementation is demonstrated by using comparisons with a complex-variable technique, and a number of single- and multipoint optimizations for the rotorcraft figure of merit function are shown for varying blade collective angles. Design trends are shown to remain consistent as the grid is refined.

  4. Terrestrial reference frame solution with the Vienna VLBI Software VieVS and implication of tropospheric gradient estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicakova, H.; Plank, L.; Nilsson, T.; Böhm, J.; Schuh, H.

    2011-07-01

    The Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS) has been developed at the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics at TU Vienna since 2008. In this presentation, we present the module Vie_glob which is the part of VieVS that allows the parameter estimation from multiple VLBI sessions in a so-called global solution. We focus on the determination of the terrestrial reference frame (TRF) using all suitable VLBI sessions since 1984. We compare different analysis options like the choice of loading corrections or of one of the models for the tropospheric delays. The effect of atmosphere loading corrections on station heights if neglected at observation level will be shown. Time series of station positions (using a previously determined TRF as a priori values) are presented and compared to other estimates of site positions from individual IVS (International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry) Analysis Centers.

  5. Quantum frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Matthew J.

    2014-02-01

    The framework of quantum frames can help unravel some of the interpretive difficulties i the foundation of quantum mechanics. In this paper, I begin by tracing the origins of this concept in Bohr's discussion of quantum theory and his theory of complementarity. Engaging with various interpreters and followers of Bohr, I argue that the correct account of quantum frames must be extended beyond literal space-time reference frames to frames defined by relations between a quantum system and the exosystem or external physical frame, of which measurement contexts are a particularly important example. This approach provides superior solutions to key EPR-type measurement and locality paradoxes.

  6. Vehicle-track interaction at high frequencies - Modelling of a flexible rotating wheelset in non-inertial reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiral, A.; Alonso, A.; Giménez, J. G.

    2015-10-01

    Vehicle-track interaction in the mid- and high-frequency range has become an important issue for rolling-stock manufacturers, railway operators and administrations. Previous modelling approaches have been focused on the development of flexible wheelset-track systems based on the assumption that the unsprung masses are decoupled from the high-frequency dynamic behaviour of carbody and bogies. In this respect, the available flexible wheelset models account for gyroscopic and inertial effects due to the main rotation but are, in general, developed from the viewpoint of inertial spaces and consequently restricted to the study of tangent layouts. The aim of this paper is to present the formulation of a flexible rotating wheelset derived within the framework of a non-inertial vehicle moving reference frame. This brings a double advantage; on the one hand, the formulation is not restricted to tangent tracks, but is also suitable for the study of transition curves and curve negotiation. On the other hand, the use of a vehicle moving reference frame allows the introduction of the hypothesis of small displacement for the degrees of freedom of the wheelset. This hypothesis is not applied to the pitch angle, as it is associated with the main axis of rotation. In addition, unlike previous flexible wheelset models that only consider the rotation around the main axis, all the degrees of freedom will be considered when developing the dynamic equations of motion. Results for the proposed model will be presented and the influence of the inertial and gyroscopic terms not taken into account in previous derived formulations will be evaluated.

  7. 3D and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulien Ohlmann, Odile

    2013-02-01

    Today the industry offers a chain of 3D products. Learning to "read" and to "create in 3D" becomes an issue of education of primary importance. 25 years professional experience in France, the United States and Germany, Odile Meulien set up a personal method of initiation to 3D creation that entails the spatial/temporal experience of the holographic visual. She will present some different tools and techniques used for this learning, their advantages and disadvantages, programs and issues of educational policies, constraints and expectations related to the development of new techniques for 3D imaging. Although the creation of display holograms is very much reduced compared to the creation of the 90ies, the holographic concept is spreading in all scientific, social, and artistic activities of our present time. She will also raise many questions: What means 3D? Is it communication? Is it perception? How the seeing and none seeing is interferes? What else has to be taken in consideration to communicate in 3D? How to handle the non visible relations of moving objects with subjects? Does this transform our model of exchange with others? What kind of interaction this has with our everyday life? Then come more practical questions: How to learn creating 3D visualization, to learn 3D grammar, 3D language, 3D thinking? What for? At what level? In which matter? for whom?

  8. SNL3dFace

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial featuresmore » of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.« less

  9. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  10. Technical Note: Modification of the standard gain correction algorithm to compensate for the number of used reference flat frames in detector performance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinidis, Anastasios C.; Olivo, Alessandro; Speller, Robert D.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The x-ray performance evaluation of digital x-ray detectors is based on the calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS), and the resultant detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The flat images used for the extraction of the NPS should not contain any fixed pattern noise (FPN) to avoid contamination from nonstochastic processes. The ''gold standard'' method used for the reduction of the FPN (i.e., the different gain between pixels) in linear x-ray detectors is based on normalization with an average reference flat-field. However, the noise in the corrected image depends on the number of flat frames used for the average flat image. The aim of this study is to modify the standard gain correction algorithm to make it independent on the used reference flat frames. Methods: Many publications suggest the use of 10-16 reference flat frames, while other studies use higher numbers (e.g., 48 frames) to reduce the propagated noise from the average flat image. This study quantifies experimentally the effect of the number of used reference flat frames on the NPS and DQE values and appropriately modifies the gain correction algorithm to compensate for this effect. Results: It is shown that using the suggested gain correction algorithm a minimum number of reference flat frames (i.e., down to one frame) can be used to eliminate the FPN from the raw flat image. This saves computer memory and time during the x-ray performance evaluation. Conclusions: The authors show that the method presented in the study (a) leads to the maximum DQE value that one would have by using the conventional method and very large number of frames and (b) has been compared to an independent gain correction method based on the subtraction of flat-field images, leading to identical DQE values. They believe this provides robust validation of the proposed method.

  11. Vombat: an open source proof-of-concept for the use of Digital outcrop models as reference frame for stratigraphic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penasa, Luca; Franceschi, Marco; Preto, Nereo; Girardeau-Montaut, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional Virtual Outcrop Models (VOMs), often produced using terrestrial laser scanning or photogrammetry, have become popular in the Geosciences. The main feature of a VOM is that it allows for a quantification of the 3D geometry and/or distribution of geologic features that range from rock properties to structural elements. This actually generated much of the interest in VOMs by the oil and gas industry. The potential importance of a VOM in stratigraphy, however, does not seems completely disclosed yet. Indeed outcrops are the primary sources of data for a number of stratigraphic studies (e.g. palaeontology, sedimentology, cyclostratigraphy, geochemistry...). All the observations are typically reported on stratigraphic logs which constitute an idealized representation of the stratigraphic series, drawn by the researcher on the basis of the features that has to be highlighted. The observations are localized by means of manual measurements and a certain amount of subjectivity in log drawing is involved. These facts can prevent the log from being properly pinned to the real outcrop. Moreover, the integration of stratigraphic logs made by different researchers studying the same outcrop may be difficult. The exposure conditions of outcrops can change through time, to the point that they can become unaccessible or even be destroyed. In such a case, linking the stratigraphic log to its physical counterpart becomes impossible. This can be particularly relevant when a classical outcrop or even a GSSP is considered. A VOM may prove useful to tackle these issues, by providing a more objective stratigraphic reference for measurements and by preserving an outcrop through time as a visual representation, thus permitting reference and accurate comparison between observations made through time. Finally, a VOM itself may contain relevant stratigraphic information (e.g. scalar fields associated with the point cloud as intensity, rgb data or hyperspectral information from

  12. 3D Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses 3 D imaging as it relates to digital representations in virtual library collections. Highlights include X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT); the National Science Foundation (NSF) Digital Library Initiatives; output peripherals; image retrieval systems, including metadata; and applications of 3 D imaging for libraries and museums. (LRW)

  13. Comparative study of reference currents and DC bus voltage control for Three-Phase Four-Wire Four-Leg SAPF to compensate harmonics and reactive power with 3D SVM.

    PubMed

    Chebabhi, A; Fellah, M K; Kessal, A; Benkhoris, M F

    2015-07-01

    In this paper the performances of three reference currents and DC bus voltage control techniques for Three-Phase Four-Wire Four-Leg SAPF are compared for balanced and unbalanced load conditions. The main goals are to minimize the harmonics, reduce the magnitude of neutral current, eliminate the zero-sequence current components caused by single-phase nonlinear loads and compensate the reactive power, and on the other hand improve performances such as robustness, stabilization, trajectory pursuit, and reduce time response. The three techniques are analyzed mathematically and simulation results are compared. The techniques considered for comparative study are the PI Control, Sliding Mode Control and the Backstepping Control. Synchronous reference frame theory (SRF) in the dqo-axes is used to generate the reference currents, of the inverter.

  14. Comparative study of reference currents and DC bus voltage control for Three-Phase Four-Wire Four-Leg SAPF to compensate harmonics and reactive power with 3D SVM.

    PubMed

    Chebabhi, A; Fellah, M K; Kessal, A; Benkhoris, M F

    2015-07-01

    In this paper the performances of three reference currents and DC bus voltage control techniques for Three-Phase Four-Wire Four-Leg SAPF are compared for balanced and unbalanced load conditions. The main goals are to minimize the harmonics, reduce the magnitude of neutral current, eliminate the zero-sequence current components caused by single-phase nonlinear loads and compensate the reactive power, and on the other hand improve performances such as robustness, stabilization, trajectory pursuit, and reduce time response. The three techniques are analyzed mathematically and simulation results are compared. The techniques considered for comparative study are the PI Control, Sliding Mode Control and the Backstepping Control. Synchronous reference frame theory (SRF) in the dqo-axes is used to generate the reference currents, of the inverter. PMID:25704056

  15. Mechanically assisted 3D ultrasound guided prostate biopsy system.

    PubMed

    Bax, Jeffrey; Cool, Derek; Gardi, Lori; Knight, Kerry; Smith, David; Montreuil, Jacques; Sherebrin, Shi; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron

    2008-12-01

    There are currently limitations associated with the prostate biopsy procedure, which is the most commonly used method for a definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer. With the use of two-dimensional (2D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) for needle-guidance in this procedure, the physician has restricted anatomical reference points for guiding the needle to target sites. Further, any motion of the physician's hand during the procedure may cause the prostate to move or deform to a prohibitive extent. These variations make it difficult to establish a consistent reference frame for guiding a needle. We have developed a 3D navigation system for prostate biopsy, which addresses these shortcomings. This system is composed of a 3D US imaging subsystem and a passive mechanical arm to minimize prostate motion. To validate our prototype, a series of experiments were performed on prostate phantoms. The 3D scan of the string phantom produced minimal geometric distortions, and the geometric error of the 3D imaging subsystem was 0.37 mm. The accuracy of 3D prostate segmentation was determined by comparing the known volume in a certified phantom to a reconstructed volume generated by our system and was shown to estimate the volume with less then 5% error. Biopsy needle guidance accuracy tests in agar prostate phantoms showed that the mean error was 2.1 mm and the 3D location of the biopsy core was recorded with a mean error of 1.8 mm. In this paper, we describe the mechanical design and validation of the prototype system using an in vitro prostate phantom. Preliminary results from an ongoing clinical trial show that prostate motion is small with an in-plane displacement of less than 1 mm during the biopsy procedure.

  16. A Logarithmic Complexity Floating Frame of Reference Formulation with Interpolating Splines for Articulated Multi-Flexible-Body Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, W.; Anderson, K.S.; De, S.

    2013-01-01

    An interpolating spline-based approach is presented for modeling multi-flexible-body systems in the divide-and-conquer (DCA) scheme. This algorithm uses the floating frame of reference formulation and piecewise spline functions to construct and solve the non-linear equations of motion of the multi-flexible-body system undergoing large rotations and translations. The new approach is compared with the flexible DCA (FDCA) that uses the assumed modes method [1]. The FDCA, in many cases, must resort to sub-structuring to accurately model the deformation of the system. We demonstrate, through numerical examples, that the interpolating spline-based approach is comparable in accuracy and superior in efficiency to the FDCA. The present approach is appropriate for modeling flexible mechanisms with thin 1D bodies undergoing large rotations and translations, including those with irregular shapes. As such, the present approach extends the current capability of the DCA to model deformable systems. The algorithm retains the theoretical logarithmic complexity inherent in the DCA when implemented in parallel. PMID:24124265

  17. Non-singular expressions for the spherical harmonic synthesis of gravitational curvatures in a local north-oriented reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamáčková, Eliška; Šprlák, Michal; Pitoňák, Martin; Novák, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Third-order gradients of the gravitational potential (gravitational curvatures) have already found some applications in geosciences. Observability of these parameters, describing the Earth's gravitational field in a more complex way than any other currently available gravitational parameter, such as gravitational acceleration (first-order gradient) or gravitational (second-order) gradient, is currently discussed by physicists. Moreover, first designs of observational devices (sensors) have already been proposed. The spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis are the common tools used by geoscientists to study spectral properties of various functionals of the Earth's gravitational potential. However, the conventional spherical harmonic expansions of the gravitational curvatures in the local north-oriented reference frame have rather complicated forms that depend on the first-, second- and third-order derivatives of the associated Legendre functions. Moreover, some of these expansions also contain singular terms at the poles. In this paper, the conventional series are transformed to new simpler and non-singular forms based on relations between the associated Legendre functions and their derivatives. Numerical experiments demonstrate the applicability and correctness of the new expressions.

  18. Effect of general relativity on a near-Earth satellite in the geocentric and barycentric reference frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ries, J. C.; Huang, C.; Watkins, M. M.

    1988-01-01

    Whether one uses a solar-system barycentric frame or a geocentric frame when including the general theory of relativity in orbit determinations for near-Earth satellites, the results should be equivalent to some limiting accuracy. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the effects of relativity in each frame and to demonstrate their equivalence through the analysis of real laser-tracking data. A correction to the conventional barycentric equations of motion is shown to be required.

  19. High Speed Video Data Acquisition System (VDAS) for H. E. P. , including Reference Frame Subtractor, Data Compactor and 16 megabyte FIFO

    SciTech Connect

    Knickerbocker, K.L.; Baumbaugh, A.E.; Ruchti, R.; Baumbaugh, B.W.

    1987-02-01

    A Video-Data-Acquisition-System (VDAS) has been developed to record image data from a scintillating glass fiber-optic target developed for High Energy Physics. VDAS consists of a combination flash ADC, reference frame subtractor, high speed data compactor, an N megabyte First-In-First-Out (FIFO) memory (where N is a multiple of 4), and a single board computer as a control processor. System data rates are in excess of 30 megabytes/second. The reference frame subtractor, in conjunction with the data compactor, records only the differences from a standard frame. This greatly reduces the amount of data needed to record an image. Typical image sizes are reduced by as much as a factor of 20. With the exception of the ECL ADC board, the system uses standard TTL components to minimize power consumption and cost. VDAS operation as well as enhancements to the original system are discussed.

  20. Frame of Reference Model of Self-Concept and Locus of Control: A Cross Gender Study in the United Arab Emirates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Hilal, Maher M.

    A study tested predictions for I/E (internal external) frame of reference model and extended this model to include locus of control. A sample of upper elementary (n=181) and junior high (n=191) students in the United Arab Emirates participated in the study. Structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses provided support to the external comparison…

  1. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame FT0-11, Part 7 OF 8 - Continuation of 2565, Cycle 4 High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  2. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame BR12-23, Part 2 OF 8 - Continuation of 2565, Cycle 4 High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  3. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame BR0-11, Part 1 OF 8 - Continuation of 2565, Cycle 4 High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  4. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 1 OF 6, BR0-11, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  5. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 2 OF 6, BR12-23, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH-FIXED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  6. Linking HIPPARCOS to the Extragalactic Reference Frame Part 2 OF 6, BR12-23, Cycle 2,CONTINUATION of 2565-HIGH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Paul

    1991-07-01

    Determination of a non-rotating Reference Frame is crucial to progress in many areas, including: Galactic motions, local (Oort's A and B) and global (R0) parameters derived from them, solar system motion discrepancies (Planet X); and in conjunction with the VLBI radio reference frame, the registration of radio and optical images at an accuracy well below the resolution limit of HST images (0.06 arcsec). The goal of the Program is to tie the HIPPARCOS and Extra- galactic Reference Frames together at the 0.0005 arcsec and 0.0005 arcsec/year level. The HST data will allow a deter- mination of the brightness distribution in the stellar and extragalactic objects observed and time dependent changes therein at the 0.001 arcsec/year level. The Program requires targets distributed over the whole sky to define a rigid Reference Frame. GTO observations will provide initial first epoch data and preliminary proper motions. The observations will consist of relative positions of Extra- galactic objects (EGOs) and HIPPARCOS stars, measured with the FGSs.

  7. The Internal/External Frame of Reference Model of Self-Concept and Achievement Relations: Age-Cohort and Cross-Cultural Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Herbert W.; Abduljabbar, Adel Salah; Parker, Philip D.; Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Abdelfattah, Faisal; Nagengast, Benjamin; Möller, Jens; Abu-Hilal, Maher M.

    2015-01-01

    The internal/external frame of reference (I/E) model and dimensional comparison theory posit paradoxical relations between achievement (ACH) and self-concept (SC) in mathematics (M) and verbal (V) domains; ACH in each domain positively affects SC in the matching domain (e.g., MACH to MSC) but negatively in the nonmatching domain (e.g., MACH to…

  8. Explaining as Mediated Action: An Analysis of Pre-Service Teachers' Account of Forces of Inertia in Non-Inertial Frames of Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Pereira, Alexsandro Pereira; Lima Junior, Paulo; Rodrigues, Renato Felix

    2016-01-01

    Explaining is one of the most important everyday practices in science education. In this article, we examine how scientific explanations could serve as cultural tools for members of a group of pre-service physics teachers. Specifically, we aim at their use of explanations about forces of inertia in non-inertial frames of reference. A basic…

  9. The Internal/External Frame of Reference of Academic Self-Concept: Extension to a Foreign Language and the Role of Language of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Man K.; Marsh, Herbert W.; Hau, Kit-Tai; Ho, Irene T.; Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Abduljabbar, Adel S.

    2013-01-01

    The internal/external frame of reference (I/E) model (Marsh, 1986) posits that the effects of contrasting math and verbal domains of achievement are positive for matching academic self-concepts (ASCs) but negative for nonmatching ASCs (i.e., math achievement on verbal ASC; verbal achievement on math ASC). We extend the classic I/E model by…

  10. Extension of the Internal/External Frame of Reference Model of Self-Concept Formation: Importance of Native and Nonnative Languages for Chinese Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hau, Kit-Tai; Kong, Chit-Kwong; Marsh, Herbert W.; Cheng, Zi-Juan

    The internal/external frame of reference (I/E) model of self-concept formation was extended by relating Chinese, English, and mathematics achievement to Chinese, English, and mathematics self-concepts in a 5-year longitudinal study based on a large (N=9,482) representative sample of Hong Kong high school students. Tests of the I/E model are…

  11. Explaining Paradoxical Relations Between Academic Self-Concepts and Achievements: Cross-Cultural Generalizability of the Internal/External Frame of Reference Predictions Across 26 Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Herbert W.; Hau, Kit-Tai

    2004-01-01

    The internal/external frame of reference (I/E) model explains a seemingly paradoxical pattern of relations between math and verbal self-concepts and corresponding measures of achievement, extends social comparison theory, and has important educational implications. In a cross-cultural study of nationally representative samples of 15-year-olds from…

  12. Radiochromic 3D Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Radiochromic materials exhibit a colour change when exposed to ionising radiation. Radiochromic film has been used for clinical dosimetry for many years and increasingly so recently, as films of higher sensitivities have become available. The two principle advantages of radiochromic dosimetry include greater tissue equivalence (radiologically) and the lack of requirement for development of the colour change. In a radiochromic material, the colour change arises direct from ionising interactions affecting dye molecules, without requiring any latent chemical, optical or thermal development, with important implications for increased accuracy and convenience. It is only relatively recently however, that 3D radiochromic dosimetry has become possible. In this article we review recent developments and the current state-of-the-art of 3D radiochromic dosimetry, and the potential for a more comprehensive solution for the verification of complex radiation therapy treatments, and 3D dose measurement in general.

  13. Long term dose monitoring onboard the European Columbus module of the international space station (ISS) in the frame of DOSIS and DOSIS 3D project - results from the active instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmeister, Soenke; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Guenther; Boehme, Matthias; Haumann, Lutz; Labrenz, Johannes

    Besides the effects of the microgravity environment, and the psychological and psychosocial problems encountered in confined spaces, radiation is the main health detriment for long duration human space missions. The radiation environment encountered in space differs in nature from that on earth, consisting mostly of high energetic ions from protons up to iron, resulting in radiation levels far exceeding the ones encountered on earth for occupational radiation workers. Accurate knowledge of the physical characteristics of the space radiation field in dependence on the solar activity, the orbital parameters and the different shielding configurations of the International Space Station ISS is therefore needed. For the investigation of the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiation field inside the European COLUMBUS module the experiment DOSIS (Dose Distribution Inside the ISS) under the lead of DLR has been launched on July 15 (th) 2009 with STS-127 to the ISS. The experimental package was transferred from the Space Shuttle into COLUMBUS on July 18 (th) . It consists of a combination of passive detector packages (PDP) distributed at 11 locations inside the European Columbus Laboratory and two active radiation detectors (Dosimetry Telescopes = DOSTELs) with a DDPU (DOSTEL Data and Power Unit) in a Nomex pouch (DOSIS MAIN BOX) mounted at a fixed location beneath the European Physiology Module rack (EPM) inside COLUMBUS. The active components of the DOSIS experiment were operational from July 18 (th) 2009 to June 16 (th) 2011. After refurbishment the hardware has been reactivated on May 15 (th) 2012 as active part of the DOSIS 3D experiment and provides continuous data since this activation. The presentation will focus on the latest results from the two DOSTEL instruments as absorbed dose, dose equivalent and the related LET spectra gathered within the DOSIS (2009 - 2011) and DOSIS 3D (2012 - 2014) experiment. The CAU contributions to DOSIS and DOSIS 3D are

  14. Bootstrapping 3D fermions

    DOE PAGES

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-03-17

    We study the conformal bootstrap for a 4-point function of fermions <ψψψψ> in 3D. We first introduce an embedding formalism for 3D spinors and compute the conformal blocks appearing in fermion 4-point functions. Using these results, we find general bounds on the dimensions of operators appearing in the ψ × ψ OPE, and also on the central charge CT. We observe features in our bounds that coincide with scaling dimensions in the GrossNeveu models at large N. Finally, we also speculate that other features could coincide with a fermionic CFT containing no relevant scalar operators.

  15. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability.

  16. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  17. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  18. GPU-Accelerated Denoising in 3D (GD3D)

    2013-10-01

    The raw computational power GPU Accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. This software addresses two facets of this promising application: what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? And what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? To answer the first question, the software performs an autotuning step to empirically determine optimal memory blocking on the GPU. To answer themore » second, it performs a sweep of algorithm parameters to determine the combination that best reduces the mean squared error relative to a noiseless reference image.« less

  19. Venus in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaut, J. J.

    1993-08-01

    Stereographic images of the surface of Venus which enable geologists to reconstruct the details of the planet's evolution are discussed. The 120-meter resolution of these 3D images make it possible to construct digital topographic maps from which precise measurements can be made of the heights, depths, slopes, and volumes of geologic structures.

  20. 3D reservoir visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Van, B.T.; Pajon, J.L.; Joseph, P. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper shows how some simple 3D computer graphics tools can be combined to provide efficient software for visualizing and analyzing data obtained from reservoir simulators and geological simulations. The animation and interactive capabilities of the software quickly provide a deep understanding of the fluid-flow behavior and an accurate idea of the internal architecture of a reservoir.

  1. High-precision square-root filter/smoother for near-singular system in estimation of terrestrial reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, T. M.; Gross, R. S.; Heflin, M. B.; Abbondanza, C.; Parker, J. W.; Wu, X.

    2015-12-01

    In most space and ground-based Earth observations, the accuracy with which objects can be positioned depends ultimately on the accuracy of the underlying terrestrial reference frame (TRF). For example, errors in the currently available TRFs could account for as much as 15% of the observed sea level rise signal. Determination of a TRF typically involves precise estimation of the positions and velocities of surface stations using decades of space geodetic observations. The model of station motions needs to address heterogeneous time scales including secular drifts of plate tectonics and seasonal periodicities due to atmospheric and ground water loadings. Seismic events and post-seismic relaxation tend to lead to discontinuities in the observation time series, which become sources of nonlinearity in the estimation problem. The state dimension of the smoothing problem is usually on the order of ten thousands, which is two to four orders of magnitude smaller than that of a typical atmospheric and ocean data assimilation problem. However, TRF requires a precision of 1mm in position out of a mean dynamic range of about 1 meter, as well as a full posterior error covariance matrix. These requirements challenge the available computation capabilities. Moreover, the use of prior models are kept minimal to prevent introduction of biases in the observations, leading to a smoothing problem that involves matrices with relatively high condition numbers. A filter/smoother solution based on the information matrix is desirable here since the prior model tends to be only partial or implicit. A "square-root" solution is also desirable since a major source of numerical instability is round-off error affecting positive definiteness of covariance and information matrices. The well-known Square-Root Information Filter followed by the Dyer-McReynolds Covariance Smoother seem suitable although this approach requires a large array for Householder transformations. The Modified Bryson

  2. What Lies Ahead (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D cylindrical-perspective mosaic taken by the navigation camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit on sol 82 shows the view south of the large crater dubbed 'Bonneville.' The rover will travel toward the Columbia Hills, seen here at the upper left. The rock dubbed 'Mazatzal' and the hole the rover drilled in to it can be seen at the lower left. The rover's position is referred to as 'Site 22, Position 32.' This image was geometrically corrected to make the horizon appear flat.

  3. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  4. Magmatic Systems in 3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. M.; Harding, A. J.; Babcock, J. M.; Orcutt, J. A.; Bazin, S.; Singh, S.; Detrick, R. S.; Canales, J. P.; Carbotte, S. M.; Diebold, J.

    2002-12-01

    , even if one data object lies behind another. Stereoscopic viewing is another powerful tool to investigate 3-D relationships between objects. This form of immersion is constructed through viewing two separate images that are interleaved--typically 48 frames per second, per eye--and synced through an emitter and a set of specialized polarizing eyeglasses. The polarizing lenses flicker at an equivalent rate, blanking the eye for which a particular image was not drawn, producing the desired stereo effect. Volumetric visualization of the ARAD 3-D seismic dataset will be presented. The effective use of transparency reveals detailed structure of the melt-lens beneath the 9°03'N overlapping spreading center (OSC) along the East Pacific Rise, including melt-filled fractures within the propagating rift-tip. In addition, range-gated images of seismic reflectivity will be co-registered to investigate the physical properties (melt versus mush) of the magma chamber at this locale. Surface visualization of a dense, 2-D grid of MCS seismic data beneath Axial seamount (Juan de Fuca Ridge) will also be highlighted, including relationships between the summit caldera and rift zones, and the underlying (and humongous) magma chamber. A selection of Quicktime movies will be shown. Popcorn will be served, really!

  5. A 3D polarizing display system base on backlight control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pu; Huang, Ziqiang

    2011-08-01

    In this paper a new three-dimensional (3D) liquid crystal display (LCD) display mode based on backlight control is presented to avoid the left and right eye images crosstalk in 3D display. There are two major issues in this new black frame 3D display mode. One is continuously playing every frame images twice. The other is controlling the backlight switch periodically. First, this paper explains the cause of the left and right eye images crosstalk, and presents a solution to avoid this problem. Then, we propose to play the entire frame images twice by repeating each frame image after it was played instead of playing the left images and the right images frame by frame alternately. Finally, the backlight is switched periodically instead of turned on all the time. The backlight is turned off while a frame of image is played for the first time, then turned on during the second time, after that it will be turned off again and run the next period with the next frame of image start to refresh. Controlling the backlight switch periodically like this is the key to achieve the black frame 3D display mode. This mode can not only achieve better 3D display effect by avoid the left and right image crosstalk, but also save the backlight power consumption. Theoretical analysis and experiments show that our method is reasonable and efficient.

  6. 3D rapid mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksson, Folke; Borg, Johan; Haglund, Leif

    2008-04-01

    In this paper the performance of passive range measurement imaging using stereo technique in real time applications is described. Stereo vision uses multiple images to get depth resolution in a similar way as Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) uses multiple measurements to obtain better spatial resolution. This technique has been used in photogrammetry for a long time but it will be shown that it is now possible to do the calculations, with carefully designed image processing algorithms, in e.g. a PC in real time. In order to get high resolution and quantitative data in the stereo estimation a mathematical camera model is used. The parameters to the camera model are settled in a calibration rig or in the case of a moving camera the scene itself can be used for calibration of most of the parameters. After calibration an ordinary TV camera has an angular resolution like a theodolite, but to a much lower price. The paper will present results from high resolution 3D imagery from air to ground. The 3D-results from stereo calculation of image pairs are stitched together into a large database to form a 3D-model of the area covered.

  7. Multigrid Computations of 3-D Incompressible Internal and External Viscous Rotating Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheng, Chunhua; Taylor, Lafayette K.; Chen, Jen-Ping; Jiang, Min-Yee; Whitfield, David L.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents multigrid methods for solving the 3-D incompressible viscous rotating flows in a NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor and a marine propeller 4119. Numerical formulations are given in both the rotating reference frame and the absolute frame. Comparisons are made for the accuracy, efficiency, and robustness between the steady-state scheme and the time-accurate scheme for simulating viscous rotating flows for complex internal and external flow applications. Prospects for further increase in efficiency and accuracy of unsteady time-accurate computations are discussed.

  8. A radio optical reference frame. I - Precise radio source positions determined by Mark III VLBI - Observations from 1979 to 1988 and a tie to the FK5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, C.; Shaffer, D. B.; De Vegt, C.; Johnston, K. J.; Russell, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    Observations from 600 Mark III VLBI experiments from 1979 to 1988, resulting in 237,681 acceptable pairs of group delay and phase delay rate observations, have been used to derive positions of 182 extragalactic radio sources with typical formal standard errors less than 1 mas. The sources are distributed fairly evenly above delta = -30 deg, and 70 sources have delta greater than 0 deg. Analysis with different troposphere models, as well as internal and external comparisons, indicates that a coordinate frame defined by this set of radio sources should be reliable at the 1 mas level. The right ascension zero point of this reference frame has been aligned with the FK5 by using the optical positions of 28 extragalactic radio sources whose positions are on the FK5 system. Because of known defects in the knowledge of astronomical constants, daily nutation offsets in longitude and obliquity were determined relative to an arbitrary reference day in the set of experiments.

  9. Orbital motions of astronomical bodies and their centre of mass from different reference frames: a conceptual step between the geocentric and heliocentric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, André G. C.; Simeão Carvalho, Paulo

    2016-09-01

    The motion of astronomical bodies and the centre of mass of the system is not always well perceived by students. One of the struggles is the conceptual change of reference frame, which is the same that held back the acceptance of the Heliocentric model over the Geocentric one. To address the question, the notion of centre of mass, motion equations (and their numerical solution for a system of multiple bodies), and change of frame of reference is introduced. The discussion is done based on conceptual and real world examples, using the solar system. Consequently, through the use of simple ‘do it yourself’ methods and basic equations, students can debate complex motions, and have a wider and potentially effective understanding of physics.

  10. 3D Modeling Engine Representation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Prescott; Ramprasad Sampath; Curtis Smith; Timothy Yang

    2014-09-01

    Computers have been used for 3D modeling and simulation, but only recently have computational resources been able to give realistic results in a reasonable time frame for large complex models. This summary report addressed the methods, techniques, and resources used to develop a 3D modeling engine to represent risk analysis simulation for advanced small modular reactor structures and components. The simulations done for this evaluation were focused on external events, specifically tsunami floods, for a hypothetical nuclear power facility on a coastline.

  11. Innovations in 3D printing: a 3D overview from optics to organs.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Carl; van Langeveld, Mark C; Donoso, Larry A

    2014-02-01

    3D printing is a method of manufacturing in which materials, such as plastic or metal, are deposited onto one another in layers to produce a three dimensional object, such as a pair of eye glasses or other 3D objects. This process contrasts with traditional ink-based printers which produce a two dimensional object (ink on paper). To date, 3D printing has primarily been used in engineering to create engineering prototypes. However, recent advances in printing materials have now enabled 3D printers to make objects that are comparable with traditionally manufactured items. In contrast with conventional printers, 3D printing has the potential to enable mass customisation of goods on a large scale and has relevance in medicine including ophthalmology. 3D printing has already been proved viable in several medical applications including the manufacture of eyeglasses, custom prosthetic devices and dental implants. In this review, we discuss the potential for 3D printing to revolutionise manufacturing in the same way as the printing press revolutionised conventional printing. The applications and limitations of 3D printing are discussed; the production process is demonstrated by producing a set of eyeglass frames from 3D blueprints. PMID:24288392

  12. Innovations in 3D printing: a 3D overview from optics to organs.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Carl; van Langeveld, Mark C; Donoso, Larry A

    2014-02-01

    3D printing is a method of manufacturing in which materials, such as plastic or metal, are deposited onto one another in layers to produce a three dimensional object, such as a pair of eye glasses or other 3D objects. This process contrasts with traditional ink-based printers which produce a two dimensional object (ink on paper). To date, 3D printing has primarily been used in engineering to create engineering prototypes. However, recent advances in printing materials have now enabled 3D printers to make objects that are comparable with traditionally manufactured items. In contrast with conventional printers, 3D printing has the potential to enable mass customisation of goods on a large scale and has relevance in medicine including ophthalmology. 3D printing has already been proved viable in several medical applications including the manufacture of eyeglasses, custom prosthetic devices and dental implants. In this review, we discuss the potential for 3D printing to revolutionise manufacturing in the same way as the printing press revolutionised conventional printing. The applications and limitations of 3D printing are discussed; the production process is demonstrated by producing a set of eyeglass frames from 3D blueprints.

  13. Taming supersymmetric defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    We study knots in 3d Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group {SL}(N,{{C}}), in the context of its relation with 3d { N }=2 theory (the so-called 3d-3d correspondence). The defect has either co-dimension 2 or co-dimension 4 inside the 6d (2,0) theory, which is compactified on a 3-manifold \\hat{M}. We identify such defects in various corners of the 3d-3d correspondence, namely in 3d {SL}(N,{{C}}) CS theory, in 3d { N }=2 theory, in 5d { N }=2 super Yang-Mills theory, and in the M-theory holographic dual. We can make quantitative checks of the 3d-3d correspondence by computing partition functions at each of these theories. This Letter is a companion to a longer paper [1], which contains more details and more results.

  14. 3D Audio System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Ames Research Center research into virtual reality led to the development of the Convolvotron, a high speed digital audio processing system that delivers three-dimensional sound over headphones. It consists of a two-card set designed for use with a personal computer. The Convolvotron's primary application is presentation of 3D audio signals over headphones. Four independent sound sources are filtered with large time-varying filters that compensate for motion. The perceived location of the sound remains constant. Possible applications are in air traffic control towers or airplane cockpits, hearing and perception research and virtual reality development.

  15. Use of 3D vision for fine robot motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokshin, Anatole; Litwin, Todd

    1989-01-01

    An integration of 3-D vision systems with robot manipulators will allow robots to operate in a poorly structured environment by visually locating targets and obstacles. However, by using computer vision for objects acquisition makes the problem of overall system calibration even more difficult. Indeed, in a CAD based manipulation a control architecture has to find an accurate mapping between the 3-D Euclidean work space and a robot configuration space (joint angles). If a stereo vision is involved, then one needs to map a pair of 2-D video images directly into the robot configuration space. Neural Network approach aside, a common solution to this problem is to calibrate vision and manipulator independently, and then tie them via common mapping into the task space. In other words, both vision and robot refer to some common Absolute Euclidean Coordinate Frame via their individual mappings. This approach has two major difficulties. First a vision system has to be calibrated over the total work space. And second, the absolute frame, which is usually quite arbitrary, has to be the same with a high degree of precision for both robot and vision subsystem calibrations. The use of computer vision to allow robust fine motion manipulation in a poorly structured world which is currently in progress is described along with the preliminary results and encountered problems.

  16. Stereoscopic display technologies for FHD 3D LCD TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Sik; Ko, Young-Ji; Park, Sang-Moo; Jung, Jong-Hoon; Shestak, Sergey

    2010-04-01

    Stereoscopic display technologies have been developed as one of advanced displays, and many TV industrials have been trying commercialization of 3D TV. We have been developing 3D TV based on LCD with LED BLU (backlight unit) since Samsung launched the world's first 3D TV based on PDP. However, the data scanning of panel and LC's response characteristics of LCD TV cause interference among frames (that is crosstalk), and this makes 3D video quality worse. We propose the method to reduce crosstalk by LCD driving and backlight control of FHD 3D LCD TV.

  17. 3D reconstruction and restoration monitoring of sculptural artworks by a multi-sensor framework.

    PubMed

    Barone, Sandro; Paoli, Alessandro; Razionale, Armando Viviano

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, optical sensors are used to digitize sculptural artworks by exploiting various contactless technologies. Cultural Heritage applications may concern 3D reconstructions of sculptural shapes distinguished by small details distributed over large surfaces. These applications require robust multi-view procedures based on aligning several high resolution 3D measurements. In this paper, the integration of a 3D structured light scanner and a stereo photogrammetric sensor is proposed with the aim of reliably reconstructing large free form artworks. The structured light scanner provides high resolution range maps captured from different views. The stereo photogrammetric sensor measures the spatial location of each view by tracking a marker frame integral to the optical scanner. This procedure allows the computation of the rotation-translation matrix to transpose the range maps from local view coordinate systems to a unique global reference system defined by the stereo photogrammetric sensor. The artwork reconstructions can be further augmented by referring metadata related to restoration processes. In this paper, a methodology has been developed to map metadata to 3D models by capturing spatial references using a passive stereo-photogrammetric sensor. The multi-sensor framework has been experienced through the 3D reconstruction of a Statue of Hope located at the English Cemetery in Florence. This sculptural artwork has been a severe test due to the non-cooperative environment and the complex shape features distributed over a large surface. PMID:23223079

  18. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist.

    PubMed

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B; Grant, Gerald T; Rybicki, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  19. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist.

    PubMed

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B; Grant, Gerald T; Rybicki, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26562233

  20. Medical 3D Printing for the Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Mitsouras, Dimitris; Liacouras, Peter; Imanzadeh, Amir; Giannopoulos, Andreas A.; Cai, Tianrun; Kumamaru, Kanako K.; George, Elizabeth; Wake, Nicole; Caterson, Edward J.; Pomahac, Bohdan; Ho, Vincent B.; Grant, Gerald T.

    2015-01-01

    While use of advanced visualization in radiology is instrumental in diagnosis and communication with referring clinicians, there is an unmet need to render Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images as three-dimensional (3D) printed models capable of providing both tactile feedback and tangible depth information about anatomic and pathologic states. Three-dimensional printed models, already entrenched in the nonmedical sciences, are rapidly being embraced in medicine as well as in the lay community. Incorporating 3D printing from images generated and interpreted by radiologists presents particular challenges, including training, materials and equipment, and guidelines. The overall costs of a 3D printing laboratory must be balanced by the clinical benefits. It is expected that the number of 3D-printed models generated from DICOM images for planning interventions and fabricating implants will grow exponentially. Radiologists should at a minimum be familiar with 3D printing as it relates to their field, including types of 3D printing technologies and materials used to create 3D-printed anatomic models, published applications of models to date, and clinical benefits in radiology. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26562233

  1. Prominent rocks - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Many prominent rocks near the Sagan Memorial Station are featured in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. Wedge is at lower left; Shark, Half-Dome, and Pumpkin are at center. Flat Top, about four inches high, is at lower right. The horizon in the distance is one to two kilometers away.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  2. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  3. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This area of terrain near the Sagan Memorial Station was taken on Sol 3 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye.' It stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  4. Nonlaser-based 3D surface imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shin-yee; Johnson, R.K.; Sherwood, R.J.

    1994-11-15

    3D surface imaging refers to methods that generate a 3D surface representation of objects of a scene under viewing. Laser-based 3D surface imaging systems are commonly used in manufacturing, robotics and biomedical research. Although laser-based systems provide satisfactory solutions for most applications, there are situations where non laser-based approaches are preferred. The issues that make alternative methods sometimes more attractive are: (1) real-time data capturing, (2) eye-safety, (3) portability, and (4) work distance. The focus of this presentation is on generating a 3D surface from multiple 2D projected images using CCD cameras, without a laser light source. Two methods are presented: stereo vision and depth-from-focus. Their applications are described.

  5. The Influence of Application a Simplified Transformation Model Between Reference Frames ECEF and ECI onto Prediction Accuracy of Position and Velocity of GLONASS Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzyżek, Robert; Skorupa, Bogdan

    2015-12-01

    In computational tasks of satellite geodesy there is a need for transformation of coordinates between reference frames ECEF - Earth Centered, Earth Fixed and ECI - Earth Centered, Inertial. Strict and simplified transformation models, which can be used in case of the position and velocity short-term predictions of GLONASS satellites, have been presented in this study. Comparison of the results of state vector components predictions of the GLONASS satellites, in dependence of the used transformation model, have also been presented. Accuracy of the prediction has been determined on the basis of the analyse of deviations of the predicted positions and velocities of GLONASS satellites from their values given in broadcast ephemeris.

  6. 2D-3D Registration of CT Vertebra Volume to Fluoroscopy Projection: A Calibration Model Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bifulco, P.; Cesarelli, M.; Allen, R.; Romano, M.; Fratini, A.; Pasquariello, G.

    2009-12-01

    This study extends a previous research concerning intervertebral motion registration by means of 2D dynamic fluoroscopy to obtain a more comprehensive 3D description of vertebral kinematics. The problem of estimating the 3D rigid pose of a CT volume of a vertebra from its 2D X-ray fluoroscopy projection is addressed. 2D-3D registration is obtained maximising a measure of similarity between Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (obtained from the CT volume) and real fluoroscopic projection. X-ray energy correction was performed. To assess the method a calibration model was realised a sheep dry vertebra was rigidly fixed to a frame of reference including metallic markers. Accurate measurement of 3D orientation was obtained via single-camera calibration of the markers and held as true 3D vertebra position; then, vertebra 3D pose was estimated and results compared. Error analysis revealed accuracy of the order of 0.1 degree for the rotation angles of about 1 mm for displacements parallel to the fluoroscopic plane, and of order of 10 mm for the orthogonal displacement.

  7. Highway 3D model from image and lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinfeng; Chu, Henry; Sun, Xiaoduan

    2014-05-01

    We present a new method of highway 3-D model construction developed based on feature extraction in highway images and LIDAR data. We describe the processing road coordinate data that connect the image frames to the coordinates of the elevation data. Image processing methods are used to extract sky, road, and ground regions as well as significant objects (such as signs and building fronts) in the roadside for the 3D model. LIDAR data are interpolated and processed to extract the road lanes as well as other features such as trees, ditches, and elevated objects to form the 3D model. 3D geometry reasoning is used to match the image features to the 3D model. Results from successive frames are integrated to improve the final model.

  8. 1024 pixels single photon imaging array for 3D ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellisai, S.; Guerrieri, F.; Tisa, S.; Zappa, F.; Tosi, A.; Giudice, A.

    2011-01-01

    Three dimensions (3D) acquisition systems are driving applications in many research field. Nowadays 3D acquiring systems are used in a lot of applications, such as cinema industry or in automotive (for active security systems). Depending on the application, systems present different features, for example color sensitivity, bi-dimensional image resolution, distance measurement accuracy and acquisition frame rate. The system we developed acquires 3D movie using indirect Time of Flight (iTOF), starting from phase delay measurement of a sinusoidally modulated light. The system acquires live movie with a frame rate up to 50frame/s in a range distance between 10 cm up to 7.5 m.

  9. Gravity and spatial orientation in virtual 3D-mazes.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Manuel; Lipshits, Mark; McIntyre, Joseph; Berthoz, Alain

    2003-01-01

    In order to bring new insights into the processing of 3D spatial information, we conducted experiments on the capacity of human subjects to memorize 3D-structured environments, such as buildings with several floors or the potentially complex 3D structure of an orbital space station. We had subjects move passively in one of two different exploration modes, through a visual virtual environment that consisted of a series of connected tunnels. In upright displacement, self-rotation when going around corners in the tunnels was limited to yaw rotations. For horizontal translations, subjects faced forward in the direction of motion. When moving up or down through vertical segments of the 3D tunnels, however, subjects facing the tunnel wall, remaining upright as if moving up and down in a glass elevator. In the unconstrained displacement mode, subjects would appear to climb or dive face-forward when moving vertically; thus, in this mode subjects could experience visual flow consistent with rotations about any of the 3 canonical axes. In a previous experiment, subjects were asked to determine whether a static, outside view of a test tunnel corresponded or not to the tunnel through which they had just passed. Results showed that performance was better on this task for the upright than for the unconstrained displacement mode; i.e. when subjects remained "upright" with respect to the virtual environment as defined by subject's posture in the first segment. This effect suggests that gravity may provide a key reference frame used in the shift between egocentric and allocentric representations of the 3D virtual world. To check whether it is the polarizing effects of gravity that leads to the favoring of the upright displacement mode, the experimental paradigm was adapted for orbital flight and performed by cosmonauts onboard the International Space Station. For these flight experiments the previous recognition task was replaced by a computerized reconstruction task, which proved

  10. Electric fields and field-aligned currents in polar regions of the solar corona: 3-D MHD consideration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisanko, Yu. V.

    1995-01-01

    The calculation of the solar rotation electro-dynamical effects in the near-the-Sun solar wind seems more convenient from the non-inertial corotating reference frame. This implies some modification of the 3-D MHD equations generally on the base of the General Theory of Relativity. The paper deals with the search of stationary (in corotating non-inertial reference frame) solutions of the modified 3-D MHD equations for the in near-the-Sun high latitude sub-alfvenic solar wind. The solution is obtained requiring electric fields and field-aligned electric currents in the high latitude near-the-Sun solar wind. Various scenario are explored self-consistently via a number of numerical experiments. The analogy with the high latitude Earth's magnetosphere is used for the interpretation of the results. Possible observational manifestations are discussed.

  11. Assessing 3d Photogrammetry Techniques in Craniometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshobane, M. C.; de Bruyn, P. J. N.; Bester, M. N.

    2016-06-01

    Morphometrics (the measurement of morphological features) has been revolutionized by the creation of new techniques to study how organismal shape co-varies with several factors such as ecophenotypy. Ecophenotypy refers to the divergence of phenotypes due to developmental changes induced by local environmental conditions, producing distinct ecophenotypes. None of the techniques hitherto utilized could explicitly address organismal shape in a complete biological form, i.e. three-dimensionally. This study investigates the use of the commercial software, Photomodeler Scanner® (PMSc®) three-dimensional (3D) modelling software to produce accurate and high-resolution 3D models. Henceforth, the modelling of Subantarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus tropicalis) and Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella) skulls which could allow for 3D measurements. Using this method, sixteen accurate 3D skull models were produced and five metrics were determined. The 3D linear measurements were compared to measurements taken manually with a digital caliper. In addition, repetitive measurements were recorded by varying researchers to determine repeatability. To allow for comparison straight line measurements were taken with the software, assuming that close accord with all manually measured features would illustrate the model's accurate replication of reality. Measurements were not significantly different demonstrating that realistic 3D skull models can be successfully produced to provide a consistent basis for craniometrics, with the additional benefit of allowing non-linear measurements if required.

  12. Motion corrected LV quantification based on 3D modelling for improved functional assessment in cardiac MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Y. M.; McLaughlin, R. A.; Chan, B. T.; Aziz, Y. F. Abdul; Chee, K. H.; Ung, N. M.; Tan, L. K.; Lai, K. W.; Ng, S.; Lim, E.

    2015-04-01

    Cine MRI is a clinical reference standard for the quantitative assessment of cardiac function, but reproducibility is confounded by motion artefacts. We explore the feasibility of a motion corrected 3D left ventricle (LV) quantification method, incorporating multislice image registration into the 3D model reconstruction, to improve reproducibility of 3D LV functional quantification. Multi-breath-hold short-axis and radial long-axis images were acquired from 10 patients and 10 healthy subjects. The proposed framework reduced misalignment between slices to subpixel accuracy (2.88 to 1.21 mm), and improved interstudy reproducibility for 5 important clinical functional measures, i.e. end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, ejection fraction, myocardial mass and 3D-sphericity index, as reflected in a reduction in the sample size required to detect statistically significant cardiac changes: a reduction of 21-66%. Our investigation on the optimum registration parameters, including both cardiac time frames and number of long-axis (LA) slices, suggested that a single time frame is adequate for motion correction whereas integrating more LA slices can improve registration and model reconstruction accuracy for improved functional quantification especially on datasets with severe motion artefacts.

  13. Self assembled structures for 3D integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Madhav

    Three dimensional (3D) micro-scale structures attached to a silicon substrate have various applications in microelectronics. However, formation of 3D structures using conventional micro-fabrication techniques are not efficient and require precise control of processing parameters. Self assembly is a method for creating 3D structures that takes advantage of surface area minimization phenomena. Solder based self assembly (SBSA), the subject of this dissertation, uses solder as a facilitator in the formation of 3D structures from 2D patterns. Etching a sacrificial layer underneath a portion of the 2D pattern allows the solder reflow step to pull those areas out of the substrate plane resulting in a folded 3D structure. Initial studies using the SBSA method demonstrated low yields in the formation of five different polyhedra. The failures in folding were primarily attributed to nonuniform solder deposition on the underlying metal pads. The dip soldering method was analyzed and subsequently refined. A modified dip soldering process provided improved yield among the polyhedra. Solder bridging referred as joining of solder deposited on different metal patterns in an entity influenced the folding mechanism. In general, design parameters such as small gap-spacings and thick metal pads were found to favor solder bridging for all patterns studied. Two types of soldering: face and edge soldering were analyzed. Face soldering refers to the application of solder on the entire metal face. Edge soldering indicates application of solder only on the edges of the metal face. Mechanical grinding showed that face soldered SBSA structures were void free and robust in nature. In addition, the face soldered 3D structures provide a consistent heat resistant solder standoff height that serve as attachments in the integration of dissimilar electronic technologies. Face soldered 3D structures were developed on the underlying conducting channel to determine the thermo-electric reliability of

  14. Demonstration of digital hologram recording and 3D-scenes reconstruction in real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Kulakov, Mikhail N.; Kurbatova, Ekaterina A.; Molodtsov, Dmitriy Y.; Rodin, Vladislav G.

    2016-04-01

    Digital holography is technique that allows to reconstruct information about 2D-objects and 3D-scenes. This is achieved by registration of interference pattern formed by two beams: object and reference ones. Pattern registered by the digital camera is processed. This allows to obtain amplitude and phase of the object beam. Reconstruction of shape of the 2D objects and 3D-scenes can be obtained numerically (using computer) and optically (using spatial light modulators - SLMs). In this work camera Megaplus II ES11000 was used for digital holograms recording. The camera has 4008 × 2672 pixels with sizes of 9 μm × 9 μm. For hologram recording, 50 mW frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser with wavelength 532 nm was used. Liquid crystal on silicon SLM HoloEye PLUTO VIS was used for optical reconstruction of digital holograms. SLM has 1920 × 1080 pixels with sizes of 8 μm × 8 μm. At objects reconstruction 10 mW He-Ne laser with wavelength 632.8 nm was used. Setups for digital holograms recording and their optical reconstruction with the SLM were combined as follows. MegaPlus Central Control Software allows to display registered frames by the camera with a little delay on the computer monitor. The SLM can work as additional monitor. In result displayed frames can be shown on the SLM display in near real-time. Thus recording and reconstruction of the 3D-scenes was obtained in real-time. Preliminary, resolution of displayed frames was chosen equaled to the SLM one. Quantity of the pixels was limited by the SLM resolution. Frame rate was limited by the camera one. This holographic video setup was applied without additional program implementations that would increase time delays between hologram recording and object reconstruction. The setup was demonstrated for reconstruction of 3D-scenes.

  15. A kinematic model for 3-D head-free gaze-shifts

    PubMed Central

    Daemi, Mehdi; Crawford, J. Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Rotations of the line of sight are mainly implemented by coordinated motion of the eyes and head. Here, we propose a model for the kinematics of three-dimensional (3-D) head-unrestrained gaze-shifts. The model was designed to account for major principles in the known behavior, such as gaze accuracy, spatiotemporal coordination of saccades with vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), relative eye and head contributions, the non-commutativity of rotations, and Listing's and Fick constraints for the eyes and head, respectively. The internal design of the model was inspired by known and hypothesized elements of gaze control physiology. Inputs included retinocentric location of the visual target and internal representations of initial 3-D eye and head orientation, whereas outputs were 3-D displacements of eye relative to the head and head relative to shoulder. Internal transformations decomposed the 2-D gaze command into 3-D eye and head commands with the use of three coordinated circuits: (1) a saccade generator, (2) a head rotation generator, (3) a VOR predictor. Simulations illustrate that the model can implement: (1) the correct 3-D reference frame transformations to generate accurate gaze shifts (despite variability in other parameters), (2) the experimentally verified constraints on static eye and head orientations during fixation, and (3) the experimentally observed 3-D trajectories of eye and head motion during gaze-shifts. We then use this model to simulate how 2-D eye-head coordination strategies interact with 3-D constraints to influence 3-D orientations of the eye-in-space, and the implications of this for spatial vision. PMID:26113816

  16. Counter-sniper 3D laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Orr; LePage, Andrew J.; Wijntjes, Geert J.; Zehnpfennig, Theodore F.; Sackos, John T.; Nellums, Robert O.

    1999-01-01

    Visidyne, Inc., teaming with Sandia National Laboratories, has developed the preliminary design for an innovative scannerless 3-D laser radar capable of acquiring, tracking, and determining the coordinates of small caliber projectiles in flight with sufficient precision, so their origin can be established by back projecting their tracks to their source. The design takes advantage of the relatively large effective cross-section of a bullet at optical wavelengths. Kay to its implementation is the use of efficient, high- power laser diode arrays for illuminators and an imaging laser receiver using a unique CCD imager design, that acquires the information to establish x, y (angle-angle) and range coordinates for each bullet at very high frame rates. The detection process achieves a high degree of discrimination by using the optical signature of the bullet, solar background mitigation, and track detection. Field measurements and computer simulations have been used to provide the basis for a preliminary design of a robust bullet tracker, the Counter Sniper 3-D Laser Radar. Experimental data showing 3-D test imagery acquired by a lidar with architecture similar to that of the proposed Counter Sniper 3-D Lidar are presented. A proposed Phase II development would yield an innovative, compact, and highly efficient bullet-tracking laser radar. Such a device would meet the needs of not only the military, but also federal, state, and local law enforcement organizations.

  17. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  18. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  19. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  20. 3D ultrafast laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, A.; Goda, K.; Wang, C.; Fard, A.; Adam, J.; Gossett, D. R.; Ayazi, A.; Sollier, E.; Malik, O.; Chen, E.; Liu, Y.; Brown, R.; Sarkhosh, N.; Di Carlo, D.; Jalali, B.

    2013-03-01

    Laser scanners are essential for scientific research, manufacturing, defense, and medical practice. Unfortunately, often times the speed of conventional laser scanners (e.g., galvanometric mirrors and acousto-optic deflectors) falls short for many applications, resulting in motion blur and failure to capture fast transient information. Here, we present a novel type of laser scanner that offers roughly three orders of magnitude higher scan rates than conventional methods. Our laser scanner, which we refer to as the hybrid dispersion laser scanner, performs inertia-free laser scanning by dispersing a train of broadband pulses both temporally and spatially. More specifically, each broadband pulse is temporally processed by time stretch dispersive Fourier transform and further dispersed into space by one or more diffractive elements such as prisms and gratings. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we perform 1D line scans at a record high scan rate of 91 MHz and 2D raster scans and 3D volumetric scans at an unprecedented scan rate of 105 kHz. The method holds promise for a broad range of scientific, industrial, and biomedical applications. To show the utility of our method, we demonstrate imaging, nanometer-resolved surface vibrometry, and high-precision flow cytometry with real-time throughput that conventional laser scanners cannot offer due to their low scan rates.

  1. Crowdsourcing Based 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.; Molnar, B.; Lovas, T.

    2016-06-01

    Web-based photo albums that support organizing and viewing the users' images are widely used. These services provide a convenient solution for storing, editing and sharing images. In many cases, the users attach geotags to the images in order to enable using them e.g. in location based applications on social networks. Our paper discusses a procedure that collects open access images from a site frequently visited by tourists. Geotagged pictures showing the image of a sight or tourist attraction are selected and processed in photogrammetric processing software that produces the 3D model of the captured object. For the particular investigation we selected three attractions in Budapest. To assess the geometrical accuracy, we used laser scanner and DSLR as well as smart phone photography to derive reference values to enable verifying the spatial model obtained from the web-album images. The investigation shows how detailed and accurate models could be derived applying photogrammetric processing software, simply by using images of the community, without visiting the site.

  2. Tilted frames of reference have similar effects on the perception of gravitational vertical and the planning of vertical saccadic eye movements.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Michael; Grant, Simon; Melmoth, Dean; Solomon, Joshua A

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the effects of a tilted reference frame (i.e., allocentric visual context) on the perception of the gravitational vertical and saccadic eye movements along a planned egocentric vertical path. Participants (n = 5) in a darkened room fixated a point in the center of a circle on an LCD display and decided which of two sequentially presented dots was closer to the unmarked '6 o'clock' position on that circle (i.e., straight down toward their feet). The slope of their perceptual psychometric functions showed that participants were able to locate which dot was nearer the vertical with a precision of 1°-2°. For three of the participants, a square frame centered at fixation and tilted (in the roll direction) 5.6° from the vertical caused a strong perceptual bias, manifest as a shift in the psychometric function, in the direction of the traditional 'rod-and-frame' effect, without affecting precision. The other two participants showed negligible or no equivalent biases. The same subjects participated in the saccade version of the task, in which they were instructed to shift their gaze to the 6 o'clock position as soon as the central fixation point disappeared. The participants who showed perceptual biases showed biases of similar magnitude in their saccadic endpoints, with a strong correlation between perceptual and saccadic biases across all subjects. Tilting of the head 5.6° reduced both perceptual and saccadic biases in all but one observer, who developed a strong saccadic bias. Otherwise, the overall pattern and significant correlations between results remained the same. We conclude that our observers' saccades-to-vertical were dominated by perceptual input, which outweighed any gravitational or head-centered input.

  3. The role of rat posterior parietal cortex in coordinating spatial representations during place avoidance in dissociated reference frames on a continuously rotating arena (Carousel).

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Jan; Telensky, Petr; Blahna, Karel; Vodicka, Martin; Stuchlik, Ales

    2015-10-01

    On the Carousel maze, rats are trained to avoid a sector of a circular rotating arena, punishable by a mild electric foot-shock. In the room frame (RF) variant, the punishable sector remains stable relative to the room, while in the arena frame (AF) version, the sector rotates with the arena. The rats therefore need to disregard local olfactory, tactile and self-motion cues in RF condition and distal extra-maze landmarks in the AF task. In both primates and rodents, the coordination of various spatial reference frames is thought to depend on the posterior parietal cortex (PPC). We have previously shown that PPC-lesioned rats can solve both variants of the Carousel avoidance task. Here we aimed to determine the effects of bilateral thermocoagulation lesion of the PPC in Long-Evans rats on the ability to transition between multiple spatial strategies. The rats were first trained in five sessions in one condition and then another five sessions in the other. The following training schemes were used: RF to AF, RF to RF reversal (sector on the opposite side), and AF to RF. We found a PPC lesion-associated impairment in the transition from the AF to RF task, but not vice versa. Furthermore, PPC lesion impaired performance in RF reversal. In accordance to the literature, we also found an impairment in navigation guided by intra-maze visuospatial cues, but not by extra-maze cues in the water maze. Therefore, the PPC lesion-induced impairment is neither specific to distant cues nor to allocentric processing. Our results thus indicate a role of the PPC in the flexibility in spatial behaviors guided by visual orientation cues. PMID:25986405

  4. Automatic 2D-to-3D image conversion using 3D examples from the internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, J.; Brown, G.; Wang, M.; Ishwar, P.; Wu, C.; Mukherjee, D.

    2012-03-01

    The availability of 3D hardware has so far outpaced the production of 3D content. Although to date many methods have been proposed to convert 2D images to 3D stereopairs, the most successful ones involve human operators and, therefore, are time-consuming and costly, while the fully-automatic ones have not yet achieved the same level of quality. This subpar performance is due to the fact that automatic methods usually rely on assumptions about the captured 3D scene that are often violated in practice. In this paper, we explore a radically different approach inspired by our work on saliency detection in images. Instead of relying on a deterministic scene model for the input 2D image, we propose to "learn" the model from a large dictionary of stereopairs, such as YouTube 3D. Our new approach is built upon a key observation and an assumption. The key observation is that among millions of stereopairs available on-line, there likely exist many stereopairs whose 3D content matches that of the 2D input (query). We assume that two stereopairs whose left images are photometrically similar are likely to have similar disparity fields. Our approach first finds a number of on-line stereopairs whose left image is a close photometric match to the 2D query and then extracts depth information from these stereopairs. Since disparities for the selected stereopairs differ due to differences in underlying image content, level of noise, distortions, etc., we combine them by using the median. We apply the resulting median disparity field to the 2D query to obtain the corresponding right image, while handling occlusions and newly-exposed areas in the usual way. We have applied our method in two scenarios. First, we used YouTube 3D videos in search of the most similar frames. Then, we repeated the experiments on a small, but carefully-selected, dictionary of stereopairs closely matching the query. This, to a degree, emulates the results one would expect from the use of an extremely large 3D

  5. Mental rotation of letters, body parts and scenes during whole-body tilt: role of a body-centered versus a gravitational reference frame.

    PubMed

    Bock, Otmar L; Dalecki, Marc

    2015-04-01

    It is known that in mental-rotation tasks, subjects mentally transform the displayed material until it appears "upright" and then make a judgment. Here we evaluate, by using three typical mental rotation tasks with different degrees of embodiment, whether "upright" is coded to a gravitational or egocentric reference frame, or a combination of both. Observers stood erect or were whole-body tilted by 60°, with their left ear down. In either posture, they saw stimuli presented at different orientation angles in their frontal plane: in condition LETTER, they judged whether the stimuli were normal or mirror-reversed letters, in condition HAND whether they represented a left or a right hand, and in condition SCENE whether a weapon laid left or right in front of a displayed person. Data confirm that reaction times are modulated by stimulus orientation angle, and the modulation curve in LETTER and HAND differs from that in SCENE. More importantly, during 60° body tilt, the modulation curve shifted 12° away from the gravitational towards the egocentric vertical reference; this shift was comparable in all three conditions and independent of the degree of embodiment. We conclude that mental rotation in all conditions relied on a similar spatial reference, which seems to be a weighted average of the gravitational and the egocentric vertical, with a higher weight given to the former.

  6. Mental rotation of letters, body parts and scenes during whole-body tilt: role of a body-centered versus a gravitational reference frame.

    PubMed

    Bock, Otmar L; Dalecki, Marc

    2015-04-01

    It is known that in mental-rotation tasks, subjects mentally transform the displayed material until it appears "upright" and then make a judgment. Here we evaluate, by using three typical mental rotation tasks with different degrees of embodiment, whether "upright" is coded to a gravitational or egocentric reference frame, or a combination of both. Observers stood erect or were whole-body tilted by 60°, with their left ear down. In either posture, they saw stimuli presented at different orientation angles in their frontal plane: in condition LETTER, they judged whether the stimuli were normal or mirror-reversed letters, in condition HAND whether they represented a left or a right hand, and in condition SCENE whether a weapon laid left or right in front of a displayed person. Data confirm that reaction times are modulated by stimulus orientation angle, and the modulation curve in LETTER and HAND differs from that in SCENE. More importantly, during 60° body tilt, the modulation curve shifted 12° away from the gravitational towards the egocentric vertical reference; this shift was comparable in all three conditions and independent of the degree of embodiment. We conclude that mental rotation in all conditions relied on a similar spatial reference, which seems to be a weighted average of the gravitational and the egocentric vertical, with a higher weight given to the former. PMID:25682375

  7. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-21

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K(+) channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44(+) EGFR(+) KV1.1(+) MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44(-) EGFR(-) KV1.1(+) 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third

  8. A new velocity field for Africa from combined GPS and DORIS space geodetic Solutions: Contribution to the definition of the African reference frame (AFREF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saria, E.; Calais, E.; Altamimi, Z.; Willis, P.; Farah, H.

    2013-04-01

    We analyzed 16 years of GPS and 17 years of Doppler orbitography and radiopositioning integrated by satellite (DORIS) data at continuously operating geodetic sites in Africa and surroundings to describe the present-day kinematics of the Nubian and Somalian plates and constrain relative motions across the East African Rift. The resulting velocity field describes horizontal and vertical motion at 133 GPS sites and 9 DORIS sites. Horizontal velocities at sites located on stable Nubia fit a single plate model with a weighted root mean square residual of 0.6 mm/yr (maximum residual 1 mm/yr), an upper bound for plate-wide motions and for regional-scale deformation in the seismically active southern Africa and Cameroon volcanic line. We confirm significant southward motion ( ˜ 1.5 mm/yr) in Morocco with respect to Nubia, consistent with earlier findings. We propose an updated angular velocity for the divergence between Nubia and Somalia, which provides the kinematic boundary conditions to rifting in East Africa. We update a plate motion model for the East African Rift and revise the counterclockwise rotation of the Victoria plate and clockwise rotation of the Rovuma plate with respect to Nubia. Vertical velocities range from - 2 to +2 mm/yr, close to their uncertainties, with no clear geographic pattern. This study provides the first continent-wide position/velocity solution for Africa, expressed in International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF2008), a contribution to the upcoming African Reference Frame (AFREF). Except for a few regions, the African continent remains largely under-sampled by continuous space geodetic data. Efforts are needed to augment the geodetic infrastructure and openly share existing data sets so that the objectives of AFREF can be fully reached.

  9. Shim3d Helmholtz Solution Package

    2009-01-29

    This suite of codes solves the Helmholtz Equation for the steady-state propagation of single-frequency electromagnetic radiation in an arbitrary 2D or 3D dielectric medium. Materials can be either transparent or absorptive (including metals) and are described entirely by their shape and complex dielectric constant. Dielectric boundaries are assumed to always fall on grid boundaries and the material within a single grid cell is considered to be uniform. Input to the problem is in the formmore » of a Dirichlet boundary condition on a single boundary, and may be either analytic (Gaussian) in shape, or a mode shape computed using a separate code (such as the included eigenmode solver vwave20), and written to a file. Solution is via the finite difference method using Jacobi iteration for 3D problems or direct matrix inversion for 2D problems. Note that 3D problems that include metals will require different iteration parameters than described in the above reference. For structures with curved boundaries not easily modeled on a rectangular grid, the auxillary codes helmholtz11(2D), helm3d (semivectoral), and helmv3d (full vectoral) are provided. For these codes the finite difference equations are specified on a topological regular triangular grid and solved using Jacobi iteration or direct matrix inversion as before. An automatic grid generator is supplied.« less

  10. Market study: 3-D eyetracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A market study of a proposed version of a 3-D eyetracker for initial use at NASA's Ames Research Center was made. The commercialization potential of a simplified, less expensive 3-D eyetracker was ascertained. Primary focus on present and potential users of eyetrackers, as well as present and potential manufacturers has provided an effective means of analyzing the prospects for commercialization.

  11. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  12. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-30

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  13. LLNL-Earth3D

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Earth3D is a computer code designed to allow fast calculation of seismic rays and travel times through a 3D model of the Earth. LLNL is using this for earthquake location and global tomography efforts and such codes are of great interest to the Earth Science community.

  14. [3-D ultrasound in gastroenterology].

    PubMed

    Zoller, W G; Liess, H

    1994-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) sonography represents a development of noninvasive diagnostic imaging by real-time two-dimensional (2D) sonography. The use of transparent rotating scans, comparable to a block of glass, generates a 3D effect. The objective of the present study was to optimate 3D presentation of abdominal findings. Additional investigations were made with a new volumetric program to determine the volume of selected findings of the liver. The results were compared with the estimated volumes of 2D sonography and 2D computer tomography (CT). For the processing of 3D images, typical parameter constellations were found for the different findings, which facilitated processing of 3D images. In more than 75% of the cases examined we found an optimal 3D presentation of sonographic findings with respect to the evaluation criteria developed by us for the 3D imaging of processed data. Great differences were found for the estimated volumes of the findings of the liver concerning the three different techniques applied. 3D ultrasound represents a valuable method to judge morphological appearance in abdominal findings. The possibility of volumetric measurements enlarges its potential diagnostic significance. Further clinical investigations are necessary to find out if definite differentiation between benign and malign findings is possible.

  15. Euro3D Science Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    The Euro3D RTN is an EU funded Research Training Network to foster the exploitation of 3D spectroscopy in Europe. 3D spectroscopy is a general term for spectroscopy of an area of the sky and derives its name from its two spatial + one spectral dimensions. There are an increasing number of instruments which use integral field devices to achieve spectroscopy of an area of the sky, either using lens arrays, optical fibres or image slicers, to pack spectra of multiple pixels on the sky (``spaxels'') onto a 2D detector. On account of the large volume of data and the special methods required to reduce and analyse 3D data, there are only a few centres of expertise and these are mostly involved with instrument developments. There is a perceived lack of expertise in 3D spectroscopy spread though the astronomical community and its use in the armoury of the observational astronomer is viewed as being highly specialised. For precisely this reason the Euro3D RTN was proposed to train young researchers in this area and develop user tools to widen the experience with this particular type of data in Europe. The Euro3D RTN is coordinated by Martin M. Roth (Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam) and has been running since July 2002. The first Euro3D science conference was held in Cambridge, UK from 22 to 23 May 2003. The main emphasis of the conference was, in keeping with the RTN, to expose the work of the young post-docs who are funded by the RTN. In addition the team members from the eleven European institutes involved in Euro3D also presented instrumental and observational developments. The conference was organized by Andy Bunker and held at the Institute of Astronomy. There were over thirty participants and 26 talks covered the whole range of application of 3D techniques. The science ranged from Galactic planetary nebulae and globular clusters to kinematics of nearby galaxies out to objects at high redshift. Several talks were devoted to reporting recent observations with newly

  16. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery. PMID:26657435

  17. 3D printing in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  18. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITHOUT TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  19. PLOT3D/AMES, APOLLO UNIX VERSION USING GMR3D (WITH TURB3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P.

    1994-01-01

    PLOT3D is an interactive graphics program designed to help scientists visualize computational fluid dynamics (CFD) grids and solutions. Today, supercomputers and CFD algorithms can provide scientists with simulations of such highly complex phenomena that obtaining an understanding of the simulations has become a major problem. Tools which help the scientist visualize the simulations can be of tremendous aid. PLOT3D/AMES offers more functions and features, and has been adapted for more types of computers than any other CFD graphics program. Version 3.6b+ is supported for five computers and graphic libraries. Using PLOT3D, CFD physicists can view their computational models from any angle, observing the physics of problems and the quality of solutions. As an aid in designing aircraft, for example, PLOT3D's interactive computer graphics can show vortices, temperature, reverse flow, pressure, and dozens of other characteristics of air flow during flight. As critical areas become obvious, they can easily be studied more closely using a finer grid. PLOT3D is part of a computational fluid dynamics software cycle. First, a program such as 3DGRAPE (ARC-12620) helps the scientist generate computational grids to model an object and its surrounding space. Once the grids have been designed and parameters such as the angle of attack, Mach number, and Reynolds number have been specified, a "flow-solver" program such as INS3D (ARC-11794 or COS-10019) solves the system of equations governing fluid flow, usually on a supercomputer. Grids sometimes have as many as two million points, and the "flow-solver" produces a solution file which contains density, x- y- and z-momentum, and stagnation energy for each grid point. With such a solution file and a grid file containing up to 50 grids as input, PLOT3D can calculate and graphically display any one of 74 functions, including shock waves, surface pressure, velocity vectors, and particle traces. PLOT3D's 74 functions are organized into

  20. 3D multiplexed immunoplasmonics microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Éric; Patskovsky, Sergiy; Rioux, David; Meunier, Michel

    2016-07-01

    Selective labelling, identification and spatial distribution of cell surface biomarkers can provide important clinical information, such as distinction between healthy and diseased cells, evolution of a disease and selection of the optimal patient-specific treatment. Immunofluorescence is the gold standard for efficient detection of biomarkers expressed by cells. However, antibodies (Abs) conjugated to fluorescent dyes remain limited by their photobleaching, high sensitivity to the environment, low light intensity, and wide absorption and emission spectra. Immunoplasmonics is a novel microscopy method based on the visualization of Abs-functionalized plasmonic nanoparticles (fNPs) targeting cell surface biomarkers. Tunable fNPs should provide higher multiplexing capacity than immunofluorescence since NPs are photostable over time, strongly scatter light at their plasmon peak wavelengths and can be easily functionalized. In this article, we experimentally demonstrate accurate multiplexed detection based on the immunoplasmonics approach. First, we achieve the selective labelling of three targeted cell surface biomarkers (cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and voltage-gated K+ channel subunit KV1.1) on human cancer CD44+ EGFR+ KV1.1+ MDA-MB-231 cells and reference CD44- EGFR- KV1.1+ 661W cells. The labelling efficiency with three stable specific immunoplasmonics labels (functionalized silver nanospheres (CD44-AgNSs), gold (Au) NSs (EGFR-AuNSs) and Au nanorods (KV1.1-AuNRs)) detected by reflected light microscopy (RLM) is similar to the one with immunofluorescence. Second, we introduce an improved method for 3D localization and spectral identification of fNPs based on fast z-scanning by RLM with three spectral filters corresponding to the plasmon peak wavelengths of the immunoplasmonics labels in the cellular environment (500 nm for 80 nm AgNSs, 580 nm for 100 nm AuNSs and 700 nm for 40 nm × 92 nm AuNRs). Third, the developed

  1. 3D MR imaging in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttman, Michael A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2001-05-01

    A system has been developed to produce live 3D volume renderings from an MR scanner. Whereas real-time 2D MR imaging has been demonstrated by several groups, 3D volumes are currently rendered off-line to gain greater understanding of anatomical structures. For example, surgical planning is sometimes performed by viewing 2D images or 3D renderings from previously acquired image data. A disadvantage of this approach is misregistration which could occur if the anatomy changes due to normal muscle contractions or surgical manipulation. The ability to produce volume renderings in real-time and present them in the magnet room could eliminate this problem, and enable or benefit other types of interventional procedures. The system uses the data stream generated by a fast 2D multi- slice pulse sequence to update a volume rendering immediately after a new slice is available. We demonstrate some basic types of user interaction with the rendering during imaging at a rate of up to 20 frames per second.

  2. Spatially resolved 3D noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefner, David P.; Preece, Bradley L.; Doe, Joshua M.; Burks, Stephen D.

    2016-05-01

    When evaluated with a spatially uniform irradiance, an imaging sensor exhibits both spatial and temporal variations, which can be described as a three-dimensional (3D) random process considered as noise. In the 1990s, NVESD engineers developed an approximation to the 3D power spectral density (PSD) for noise in imaging systems known as 3D noise. In this correspondence, we describe how the confidence intervals for the 3D noise measurement allows for determination of the sampling necessary to reach a desired precision. We then apply that knowledge to create a smaller cube that can be evaluated spatially across the 2D image giving the noise as a function of position. The method presented here allows for both defective pixel identification and implements the finite sampling correction matrix. In support of the reproducible research effort, the Matlab functions associated with this work can be found on the Mathworks file exchange [1].

  3. Autofocus for 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Elkin, Forest

    2008-04-01

    Three dimensional (3D) autofocus remains a significant challenge for the development of practical 3D multipass radar imaging. The current 2D radar autofocus methods are not readily extendable across sensor passes. We propose a general framework that allows a class of data adaptive solutions for 3D auto-focus across passes with minimal constraints on the scene contents. The key enabling assumption is that portions of the scene are sparse in elevation which reduces the number of free variables and results in a system that is simultaneously solved for scatterer heights and autofocus parameters. The proposed method extends 2-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) methods to an arbitrary number of passes allowing the consideration of scattering from multiple height locations. A specific case from the proposed autofocus framework is solved and demonstrates autofocus and coherent multipass 3D estimation across the 8 passes of the "Gotcha Volumetric SAR Data Set" X-Band radar data.

  4. Accepting the T3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, D.O.; Pope, S.C.; DeLapp, J.G.

    1994-10-01

    In April, a 128 PE Cray T3D was installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Advanced Computing Laboratory as part of the DOE`s High-Performance Parallel Processor Program (H4P). In conjunction with CRI, the authors implemented a 30 day acceptance test. The test was constructed in part to help them understand the strengths and weaknesses of the T3D. In this paper, they briefly describe the H4P and its goals. They discuss the design and implementation of the T3D acceptance test and detail issues that arose during the test. They conclude with a set of system requirements that must be addressed as the T3D system evolves.

  5. Strain estimation in 3D by fitting linear and planar data to the March model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulchrone, Kieran F.; Talbot, Christopher J.

    2016-08-01

    The probability density function associated with the March model is derived and used in a maximum likelihood method to estimate the best fit distribution and 3D strain parameters for a given set of linear or planar data. Typically it is assumed that in the initial state (pre-strain) linear or planar data are uniformly distributed on the sphere which means the number of strain parameters estimated needs to be reduced so that the numerical technique succeeds. Essentially this requires that the data are rotated into a suitable reference frame prior to analysis. The method has been applied to a suitable example from the Dalradian of SW Scotland and results obtained are consistent with those from an independent method of strain analysis. Despite March theory having been incorporated deep into the fabric of geological strain analysis, its full potential as a simple direct 3D strain analytical tool has not been achieved. The method developed here may help remedy this situation.

  6. Frame of Reference: Special Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetsch, Lori A.

    2010-01-01

    Rare, distinctive, unique--academic libraries are exploring new ways to describe and define what they've traditionally called special collections: incunabula, manuscripts, rare books, cultural artifacts and more. These valuable, historically important, and often one-of-a-kind artifacts can be a treasure trove for scholars and students. Technology…

  7. Combinatorial 3D Mechanical Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulais, Corentin; Teomy, Eial; de Reus, Koen; Shokef, Yair; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-03-01

    We present a class of elastic structures which exhibit 3D-folding motion. Our structures consist of cubic lattices of anisotropic unit cells that can be tiled in a complex combinatorial fashion. We design and 3d-print this complex ordered mechanism, in which we combine elastic hinges and defects to tailor the mechanics of the material. Finally, we use this large design space to encode smart functionalities such as surface patterning and multistability.

  8. Real-time depth map manipulation for 3D visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ideses, Ianir; Fishbain, Barak; Yaroslavsky, Leonid

    2009-02-01

    One of the key aspects of 3D visualization is computation of depth maps. Depth maps enables synthesis of 3D video from 2D video and use of multi-view displays. Depth maps can be acquired in several ways. One method is to measure the real 3D properties of the scene objects. Other methods rely on using two cameras and computing the correspondence for each pixel. Once a depth map is acquired for every frame, it can be used to construct its artificial stereo pair. There are many known methods for computing the optical flow between adjacent video frames. The drawback of these methods is that they require extensive computation power and are not very well suited to high quality real-time 3D rendering. One efficient method for computing depth maps is extraction of motion vector information from standard video encoders. In this paper we present methods to improve the 3D visualization quality acquired from compression CODECS by spatial/temporal and logical operations and manipulations. We show how an efficient real time implementation of spatial-temporal local order statistics such as median and local adaptive filtering in 3D-DCT domain can substantially improve the quality of depth maps and consequently 3D video while retaining real-time rendering. Real-time performance is achived by utilizing multi-core technology using standard parallelization algorithms and libraries (OpenMP, IPP).

  9. Automatic Reconstruction of Spacecraft 3D Shape from Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poelman, C.; Radtke, R.; Voorhees, H.

    We describe a system that computes the three-dimensional (3D) shape of a spacecraft from a sequence of uncalibrated, two-dimensional images. While the mathematics of multi-view geometry is well understood, building a system that accurately recovers 3D shape from real imagery remains an art. A novel aspect of our approach is the combination of algorithms from computer vision, photogrammetry, and computer graphics. We demonstrate our system by computing spacecraft models from imagery taken by the Air Force Research Laboratory's XSS-10 satellite and DARPA's Orbital Express satellite. Using feature tie points (each identified in two or more images), we compute the relative motion of each frame and the 3D location of each feature using iterative linear factorization followed by non-linear bundle adjustment. The "point cloud" that results from this traditional shape-from-motion approach is typically too sparse to generate a detailed 3D model. Therefore, we use the computed motion solution as input to a volumetric silhouette-carving algorithm, which constructs a solid 3D model based on viewpoint consistency with the image frames. The resulting voxel model is then converted to a facet-based surface representation and is texture-mapped, yielding realistic images from arbitrary viewpoints. We also illustrate other applications of the algorithm, including 3D mensuration and stereoscopic 3D movie generation.

  10. Autonomous Real-Time Interventional Scan Plane Control With a 3-D Shape-Sensing Needle

    PubMed Central

    Plata, Juan Camilo; Holbrook, Andrew B.; Park, Yong-Lae; Pauly, Kim Butts; Daniel, Bruce L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates real-time scan plane control dependent on three-dimensional needle bending, as measured from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible optical strain sensors. A biopsy needle with embedded fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors to measure surface strains is used to estimate its full 3-D shape and control the imaging plane of an MR scanner in real-time, based on the needle’s estimated profile. The needle and scanner coordinate frames are registered to each other via miniature radio-frequency (RF) tracking coils, and the scan planes autonomously track the needle as it is deflected, keeping its tip in view. A 3-D needle annotation is superimposed over MR-images presented in a 3-D environment with the scanner’s frame of reference. Scan planes calculated based on the FBG sensors successfully follow the tip of the needle. Experiments using the FBG sensors and RF coils to track the needle shape and location in real-time had an average root mean square error of 4.2 mm when comparing the estimated shape to the needle profile as seen in high resolution MR images. This positional variance is less than the image artifact caused by the needle in high resolution SPGR (spoiled gradient recalled) images. Optical fiber strain sensors can estimate a needle’s profile in real-time and be used for MRI scan plane control to potentially enable faster and more accurate physician response. PMID:24968093

  11. Understanding Immersivity: Image Generation and Transformation Processes in 3D Immersive Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kozhevnikov, Maria; Dhond, Rupali P.

    2012-01-01

    Most research on three-dimensional (3D) visual-spatial processing has been conducted using traditional non-immersive 2D displays. Here we investigated how individuals generate and transform mental images within 3D immersive (3DI) virtual environments, in which the viewers perceive themselves as being surrounded by a 3D world. In Experiment 1, we compared participants’ performance on the Shepard and Metzler (1971) mental rotation (MR) task across the following three types of visual presentation environments; traditional 2D non-immersive (2DNI), 3D non-immersive (3DNI – anaglyphic glasses), and 3DI (head mounted display with position and head orientation tracking). In Experiment 2, we examined how the use of different backgrounds affected MR processes within the 3DI environment. In Experiment 3, we compared electroencephalogram data recorded while participants were mentally rotating visual-spatial images presented in 3DI vs. 2DNI environments. Overall, the findings of the three experiments suggest that visual-spatial processing is different in immersive and non-immersive environments, and that immersive environments may require different image encoding and transformation strategies than the two other non-immersive environments. Specifically, in a non-immersive environment, participants may utilize a scene-based frame of reference and allocentric encoding whereas immersive environments may encourage the use of a viewer-centered frame of reference and egocentric encoding. These findings also suggest that MR performed in laboratory conditions using a traditional 2D computer screen may not reflect spatial processing as it would occur in the real world. PMID:22908003

  12. CFL3D: Its History and Some Recent Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, C. L.; Biedron, R. T.; Thomas, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    The history of the Computational Fluids Laboratory -3D (CFL3D) Navier-Stokes computer code is discussed and a comprehensive reference list is given. Three recent advanced applications are presented (1) Wing with partial-spanflap, (2) F/A-18 with forebody control strake, and (3) Noise predictions for an advanced ducted propeller turbomachinery flow.

  13. Invertible authentication for 3D meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, Jana; Benedens, Oliver

    2003-06-01

    Digital watermarking has become an accepted technology for enabling multimedia protection schemes. Based on the introduced media independent protocol schemes for invertible data authentication in references 2, 4 and 5 we discuss the design of a new 3D invertible labeling technique to ensure and require high data integrity. We combine digital signature schemes and digital watermarking to provide a public verifiable integrity. Furthermore the protocol steps in the other papers to ensure that the original data can only be reproduced with a secret key is adopted for 3D meshes. The goal is to show how the existing protocol can be used for 3D meshes to provide solutions for authentication watermarking. In our design concept and evaluation we see that due to the nature of 3D meshes the invertible function are different from the image and audio concepts to achieve invertibility to guaranty reversibility of the original. Therefore we introduce a concept for distortion free invertibility and a concept for adjustable minimum distortion invertibility.

  14. Collaborative annotation of 3D crystallographic models.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J; Henderson, M; Khan, I

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the AnnoCryst system-a tool that was designed to enable authenticated collaborators to share online discussions about 3D crystallographic structures through the asynchronous attachment, storage, and retrieval of annotations. Annotations are personal comments, interpretations, questions, assessments, or references that can be attached to files, data, digital objects, or Web pages. The AnnoCryst system enables annotations to be attached to 3D crystallographic models retrieved from either private local repositories (e.g., Fedora) or public online databases (e.g., Protein Data Bank or Inorganic Crystal Structure Database) via a Web browser. The system uses the Jmol plugin for viewing and manipulating the 3D crystal structures but extends Jmol by providing an additional interface through which annotations can be created, attached, stored, searched, browsed, and retrieved. The annotations are stored on a standardized Web annotation server (Annotea), which has been extended to support 3D macromolecular structures. Finally, the system is embedded within a security framework that is capable of authenticating users and restricting access only to trusted colleagues.

  15. LASTRAC.3d: Transition Prediction in 3D Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2004-01-01

    Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) is a general-purpose, physics-based transition prediction code released by NASA for laminar flow control studies and transition research. This paper describes the LASTRAC extension to general three-dimensional (3D) boundary layers such as finite swept wings, cones, or bodies at an angle of attack. The stability problem is formulated by using a body-fitted nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinate system constructed on the body surface. The nonorthogonal coordinate system offers a variety of marching paths and spanwise waveforms. In the extreme case of an infinite swept wing boundary layer, marching with a nonorthogonal coordinate produces identical solutions to those obtained with an orthogonal coordinate system using the earlier release of LASTRAC. Several methods to formulate the 3D parabolized stability equations (PSE) are discussed. A surface-marching procedure akin to that for 3D boundary layer equations may be used to solve the 3D parabolized disturbance equations. On the other hand, the local line-marching PSE method, formulated as an easy extension from its 2D counterpart and capable of handling the spanwise mean flow and disturbance variation, offers an alternative. A linear stability theory or parabolized stability equations based N-factor analysis carried out along the streamline direction with a fixed wavelength and downstream-varying spanwise direction constitutes an efficient engineering approach to study instability wave evolution in a 3D boundary layer. The surface-marching PSE method enables a consistent treatment of the disturbance evolution along both streamwise and spanwise directions but requires more stringent initial conditions. Both PSE methods and the traditional LST approach are implemented in the LASTRAC.3d code. Several test cases for tapered or finite swept wings and cones at an angle of attack are discussed.

  16. From 3D view to 3D print

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  17. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  18. Long-term R and V-band monitoring of some suitable targets for the link between ICRF and the future Gaia celestial reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taris, F.; Andrei, A.; Roland, J.; Klotz, A.; Vachier, F.; Souchay, J.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The Gaia astrometric mission of the European Space Agency was launched on December 2013. It will provide a catalog of 500 000 quasars. Some of these targets will be chosen to build an optical reference system that will be linked to the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF). The astrometric coordinates of these sources will have roughly the same uncertainty at both optical and radio wavelengths, and it is then mandatory to observe a common set of targets to build the link. In the ICRF, some targets have been chosen because of their pointlikeness. They are quoted as defining sources, and they ensure very good uncertainty about their astrometric coordinates. At optical wavelengths, a comparable uncertainty could be achieved for targets that do not exhibit strong astrophysical phenomena, which is a potential source of photocenter flickering. A signature of these phenomena is a magnitude variation at optical wavelengths. Aims: The goal of this work is to present the time series of 14 targets suitable for the link between the ICRF and the future Gaia Celestial Reference Frame. The observations have been done systematically by robotic telescopes in France and Chile once every two nights since 2011 and in two filters. These time series are analyzed to search for periodic or quasi-periodic phenomena that must be taken into account when computing the uncertainty about the astrometric coordinates. Methods: Two independent methods were used in this work to analyze the time series. We used the CLEAN algorithm to compare the frequency obtained to those given by the Lomb-Scargle method. It avoids misinterpreting the frequency peaks given in the periodograms. Results: For the 14 targets we determine some periods with a confidence level above 90% in each case. Some of the periods found in this work were not previously known. For the others, we did a comparative study of the periods previously studied by others and always confirm their values. All the periods given

  19. Remote 3D Medical Consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Krishnan, Srinivas; Söderholm, Hanna M.

    Two-dimensional (2D) video-based telemedical consultation has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years. Two issues that seem to arise in most relevant case studies are the difficulty associated with obtaining the desired 2D camera views, and poor depth perception. To address these problems we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to synthesize a spatially continuous range of dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and events. The 3D views can be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote viewers with fixed displays or mobile devices such as a personal digital assistant (PDA). The viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewer virtual head- or hand-slaved (PDA-based) remote cameras for mono or stereo viewing. We call this idea remote 3D medical consultation (3DMC). In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical consultation; we describe the relevant computer vision/graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present some early experimental results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical consultation could offer benefits over conventional 2D televideo.

  20. Explaining as Mediated Action. An Analysis of Pre-service Teachers' Account of Forces of Inertia in Non-inertial Frames of Reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pereira, Alexsandro Pereira; Lima Junior, Paulo; Rodrigues, Renato Felix

    2016-05-01

    Explaining is one of the most important everyday practices in science education. In this article, we examine how scientific explanations could serve as cultural tools for members of a group of pre-service physics teachers. Specifically, we aim at their use of explanations about forces of inertia in non-inertial frames of reference. A basic assumption of our study is that explanatory tools (e.g., typical explanations learned) shape the ways we think and speak about the world. Drawing on the theory of mediated action, analysis illustrates three major claims on scientific explanations: (1) explaining is an act of actively responding to explanations presented by others (and not only to evidence itself); (2) the actual experience of explaining involves the enactment of power and authority; (3) resistance (not acknowledging an explanation as one's own) might be a constitutive part of learning how to explain (hence, teachers could approach scientific explanation in a less dogmatic way). These assertions expand the possibilities of dialogue between studies of scientific explanations and the social sciences. Implications for science teaching and research in science education are presented.

  1. Mixed quantum/classical theory of rotationally and vibrationally inelastic scattering in space-fixed and body-fixed reference frames

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2013-11-07

    We formulated the mixed quantum/classical theory for rotationally and vibrationally inelastic scattering process in the diatomic molecule + atom system. Two versions of theory are presented, first in the space-fixed and second in the body-fixed reference frame. First version is easy to derive and the resultant equations of motion are transparent, but the state-to-state transition matrix is complex-valued and dense. Such calculations may be computationally demanding for heavier molecules and/or higher temperatures, when the number of accessible channels becomes large. In contrast, the second version of theory requires some tedious derivations and the final equations of motion are rather complicated (not particularly intuitive). However, the state-to-state transitions are driven by real-valued sparse matrixes of much smaller size. Thus, this formulation is the method of choice from the computational point of view, while the space-fixed formulation can serve as a test of the body-fixed equations of motion, and the code. Rigorous numerical tests were carried out for a model system to ensure that all equations, matrixes, and computer codes in both formulations are correct.

  2. The Maintenance Of 3-D Scene Databases Using The Analytical Imagery Matching System (Aims)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovey, Stanford T.

    1987-06-01

    The increased demand for multi-resolution displays of simulated scene data for aircraft training or mission planning has led to a need for digital databases of 3-dimensional topography and geographically positioned objects. This data needs to be at varying resolutions or levels of detail as well as be positionally accurate to satisfy close-up and long distance scene views. The generation and maintenance processes for this type of digital database requires that relative and absolute spatial positions of geographic and cultural features be carefully controlled in order for the scenes to be representative and useful for simulation applications. Autometric, Incorporated has designed a modular Analytical Image Matching System (AIMS) which allows digital 3-D terrain feature data to be derived from cartographic and imagery sources by a combination of automatic and man-machine techniques. This system provides a means for superimposing the scenes of feature information in 3-D over imagery for updating. It also allows for real-time operator interaction between a monoscopic digital imagery display, a digital map display, a stereoscopic digital imagery display and automatically detected feature changes for transferring 3-D data from one coordinate system's frame of reference to another for updating the scene simulation database. It is an advanced, state-of-the-art means for implementing a modular, 3-D scene database maintenance capability, where original digital or converted-to-digital analog source imagery is used as a basic input to perform accurate updating.

  3. 3D-Printed Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Au, Anthony K; Huynh, Wilson; Horowitz, Lisa F; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-14

    The advent of soft lithography allowed for an unprecedented expansion in the field of microfluidics. However, the vast majority of PDMS microfluidic devices are still made with extensive manual labor, are tethered to bulky control systems, and have cumbersome user interfaces, which all render commercialization difficult. On the other hand, 3D printing has begun to embrace the range of sizes and materials that appeal to the developers of microfluidic devices. Prior to fabrication, a design is digitally built as a detailed 3D CAD file. The design can be assembled in modules by remotely collaborating teams, and its mechanical and fluidic behavior can be simulated using finite-element modeling. As structures are created by adding materials without the need for etching or dissolution, processing is environmentally friendly and economically efficient. We predict that in the next few years, 3D printing will replace most PDMS and plastic molding techniques in academia.

  4. 3D measurement using circular gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Kevin

    2013-09-01

    3D measurement using methods of structured light are well known in the industry. Most such systems use some variation of straight lines, either as simple lines or with some form of encoding. This geometry assumes the lines will be projected from one side and viewed from another to generate the profile information. But what about applications where a wide triangulation angle may not be practical, particularly at longer standoff distances. This paper explores the use of circular grating patterns projected from a center point to achieve 3D information. Originally suggested by John Caulfield around 1990, the method had some interesting potential, particularly if combined with alternate means of measurement from traditional triangulation including depth from focus methods. The possible advantages of a central reference point in the projected pattern may offer some different capabilities not as easily attained with a linear grating pattern. This paper will explore the pros and cons of the method and present some examples of possible applications.

  5. 3D Computations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; Faux, D; Goto, D; Nikkel, D

    2004-04-05

    This project consists of two activities. Task A, Simulations and Measurements, combines all the material model development and associated numerical work with the materials-oriented experimental activities. The goal of this effort is to provide an improved understanding of dynamic material properties and to provide accurate numerical representations of those properties for use in analysis codes. Task B, ALE3D Development, involves general development activities in the ALE3D code with the focus of improving simulation capabilities for problems of mutual interest to DoD and DOE. Emphasis is on problems involving multi-phase flow, blast loading of structures and system safety/vulnerability studies.

  6. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3D vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.B.; Gallman, P.G.; Slotwinski, A.R.; Wagner, K.; Weaver, S.; Xu, Jieping

    1996-12-31

    This CLVS will provide a substantial advance in high speed computer vision performance to support robotic Environmental Management (EM) operations. This 3D system employs a compact fiber optic based scanner and operator at a 128 x 128 pixel frame at one frame per second with a range resolution of 1 mm over its 1.5 meter working range. Using acousto-optic deflectors, the scanner is completely randomly addressable. This can provide live 3D monitoring for situations where it is necessary to update once per second. This can be used for decontamination and decommissioning operations in which robotic systems are altering the scene such as in waste removal, surface scarafacing, or equipment disassembly and removal. The fiber- optic coherent laser radar based system is immune to variations in lighting, color, or surface shading, which have plagued the reliability of existing 3D vision systems, while providing substantially superior range resolution.

  7. Multiple 3D medical data watermarking for healthcare data management.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suk-Hwan; Kwon, Ki-Ryong

    2011-12-01

    The rapid development of healthcare information management for 3D digital medical libraries, 3D PACS, and 3D medical diagnosis has addressed the security issues pertaining to medical IT technology. This paper presents multiple watermarking schemes for a healthcare information management system for 3D medical image data for the protection, authentication, indexing, and hiding of diagnosis information. The proposed scheme, which is based on POCS watermarking, embeds a robust watermark for a doctor's digital signature and an information retrieval indexing key to the distribution of vertex curvedness; the scheme also embeds a fragile watermark for diagnosis information and an authentication reference message to the vertex distance difference. The multiple embedding process creates three convex sets for robustness, fragileness, and invisibility and projects the 3D medical image data onto these three convex sets alternately and iteratively. Experimental results confirmed that the proposed scheme has the robustness and fragileness to handle various 3D geometric and mesh modifiers simultaneously.

  8. Development of 3D holographic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, Meriç; Önal Tayyar, Duygu

    2016-03-01

    Here we present the development of a 3D holographic endoscope with an interferometer built around a commercial rigid endoscope. We consider recording the holograms with coherent and incoherent light separately without compromising the white light imaging capacity of the endoscope. In coherent light based recording, reference wave required for the hologram is obtained in two different ways. First, as in the classical holography, splitting the laser beam before the object illumination, and secondly creating the reference beam from the object beam itself. This second method does not require path-length matching between the object wave and the reference wave, and it allows the usage of short coherence length light sources. For incoherent light based holographic recordings various interferometric configurations are considered. Experimental results on both illumination conditions are presented.

  9. 3D Printing: Exploring Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Kyle; Flowers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    As 3D printers become more affordable, schools are using them in increasing numbers. They fit well with the emphasis on product design in technology and engineering education, allowing students to create high-fidelity physical models to see and test different iterations in their product designs. They may also help students to "think in three…

  10. The Longitudinal Interplay of Students' Academic Self-Concepts and Achievements within and across Domains: Replicating and Extending the Reciprocal Internal/External Frame of Reference Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niepel, Christoph; Brunner, Martin; Preckel, Franzis

    2014-01-01

    Students' cognitive and motivational profiles have a large impact on their academic careers. The development of such profiles can partly be explained by the reciprocal internal/external frame of reference model (RI/E model). The RI/E model predicts positive and negative longitudinal effects between academic self-concepts and achievements…

  11. TACO3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E.

    1992-03-04

    TACO3D is a three-dimensional, finite-element program for heat transfer analysis. An extension of the two-dimensional TACO program, it can perform linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady-state problems. The program accepts time-dependent or temperature-dependent material properties, and materials may be isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions and loadings are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additional specialized features treat enclosure radiation, bulk nodes, and master/slave internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance). Data input via a free-field format is provided. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A profile (bandwidth) minimization option is available. The code is limited to implicit time integration for transient solutions. TACO3D has no general mesh generation capability. Rows of evenly-spaced nodes and rows of sequential elements may be generated, but the program relies on separate mesh generators for complex zoning. TACO3D does not have the ability to calculate view factors internally. Graphical representation of data in the form of time history and spatial plots is provided through links to the POSTACO and GRAPE postprocessor codes.

  12. Glnemo2: Interactive Visualization 3D Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Jean-Charles

    2011-10-01

    Glnemo2 is an interactive 3D visualization program developed in C++ using the OpenGL library and Nokia QT 4.X API. It displays in 3D the particles positions of the different components of an nbody snapshot. It quickly gives a lot of information about the data (shape, density area, formation of structures such as spirals, bars, or peanuts). It allows for in/out zooms, rotations, changes of scale, translations, selection of different groups of particles and plots in different blending colors. It can color particles according to their density or temperature, play with the density threshold, trace orbits, display different time steps, take automatic screenshots to make movies, select particles using the mouse, and fly over a simulation using a given camera path. All these features are accessible from a very intuitive graphic user interface. Glnemo2 supports a wide range of input file formats (Nemo, Gadget 1 and 2, phiGrape, Ramses, list of files, realtime gyrfalcON simulation) which are automatically detected at loading time without user intervention. Glnemo2 uses a plugin mechanism to load the data, so that it is easy to add a new file reader. It's powered by a 3D engine which uses the latest OpenGL technology, such as shaders (glsl), vertex buffer object, frame buffer object, and takes in account the power of the graphic card used in order to accelerate the rendering. With a fast GPU, millions of particles can be rendered in real time. Glnemo2 runs on Linux, Windows (using minGW compiler), and MaxOSX, thanks to the QT4API.

  13. Identification and Estimation of Postseismic Deformation: Implications for Plate Motion Models, Models of the Earthquake Cycle, and Terrestrial Reference Frame Definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, S.; Bock, Y.; Moore, A. W.; Argus, D. F.; Fang, P.; Liu, Z.; Haase, J. S.; Su, L.; Owen, S. E.; Goldberg, D.; Squibb, M. B.; Geng, J.

    2015-12-01

    Postseismic deformation indicates a viscoelastic response of the lithosphere. It is critical, then, to identify and estimate the extent of postseismic deformation in both space and time, not only for its inherent information on crustal rheology and earthquake physics, but also since it must considered for plate motion models that are derived geodetically from the "steady-state" interseismic velocities, models of the earthquake cycle that provide interseismic strain accumulation and earthquake probability forecasts, as well as terrestrial reference frame definition that is the basis for space geodetic positioning. As part of the Solid Earth Science ESDR System) SESES project under a NASA MEaSUREs grant, JPL and SIO estimate combined daily position time series for over 1800 GNSS stations, both globally and at plate boundaries, independently using the GIPSY and GAMIT software packages, but with a consistent set of a prior epoch-date coordinates and metadata. The longest time series began in 1992, and many of them contain postseismic signals. For example, about 90 of the global GNSS stations out of more than 400 that define the ITRF have experienced one or more major earthquakes and 36 have had multiple earthquakes; as expected, most plate boundary stations have as well. We quantify the spatial (distance from rupture) and temporal (decay time) extent of postseismic deformation. We examine parametric models (log, exponential) and a physical model (rate- and state-dependent friction) to fit the time series. Using a PCA analysis, we determine whether or not a particular earthquake can be uniformly fit by a single underlying postseismic process - otherwise we fit individual stations. Then we investigate whether the estimated time series velocities can be directly used as input to plate motion models, rather than arbitrarily removing the apparent postseismic portion of a time series and/or eliminating stations closest to earthquake epicenters.

  14. Reference frame access under the effects of great earthquakes: a least squares collocation approach for non-secular post-seismic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, D. D.; Piñón, D. A.; Smalley, R.; Bevis, M.; Cimbaro, S. R.; Lenzano, L. E.; Barón, J.

    2016-03-01

    The 2010, (Mw 8.8) Maule, Chile, earthquake produced large co-seismic displacements and non-secular, post-seismic deformation, within latitudes 28°S-40°S extending from the Pacific to the Atlantic oceans. Although these effects are easily resolvable by fitting geodetic extended trajectory models (ETM) to continuous GPS (CGPS) time series, the co- and post-seismic deformation cannot be determined at locations without CGPS (e.g., on passive geodetic benchmarks). To estimate the trajectories of passive geodetic benchmarks, we used CGPS time series to fit an ETM that includes the secular South American plate motion and plate boundary deformation, the co-seismic discontinuity, and the non-secular, logarithmic post-seismic transient produced by the earthquake in the Posiciones Geodésicas Argentinas 2007 (POSGAR07) reference frame (RF). We then used least squares collocation (LSC) to model both the background secular inter-seismic and the non-secular post-seismic components of the ETM at the locations without CGPS. We tested the LSC modeled trajectories using campaign and CGPS data that was not used to generate the model and found standard deviations (95 % confidence level) for position estimates for the north and east components of 3.8 and 5.5 mm, respectively, indicating that the model predicts the post-seismic deformation field very well. Finally, we added the co-seismic displacement field, estimated using an elastic finite element model. The final, trajectory model allows accessing the POSGAR07 RF using post-Maule earthquake coordinates within 5 cm for ˜ 91 % of the passive test benchmarks.

  15. Fallon FORGE 3D Geologic Model

    DOE Data Explorer

    Doug Blankenship

    2016-03-01

    An x,y,z scattered data file for the 3D geologic model of the Fallon FORGE site. Model created in Earthvision by Dynamic Graphic Inc. The model was constructed with a grid spacing of 100 m. Geologic surfaces were extrapolated from the input data using a minimum tension gridding algorithm. The data file is tabular data in a text file, with lithology data associated with X,Y,Z grid points. All the relevant information is in the file header (the spatial reference, the projection etc.) In addition all the fields in the data file are identified in the header.

  16. Lossless compression for 3D PET

    SciTech Connect

    Macq, B.; Sibomana, M.; Coppens, A.; Bol, A.; Michel, C. ); Baker, K.; Jones, B. )

    1994-12-01

    A new adaptive scheme is proposed for the lossless compression of positron emission tomography (PET) sinogram data. The algorithm uses an adaptive differential pulse code modulator (ADPCM) followed by a universal variable length coder (UVLC). Contrasting with Lempel-Ziv (LZ), which operates on a whole sinogram, UVLC operates very efficiently on short data blocks. This is a major advantage for real-time implementation. The algorithms is adaptive and codes data after some on-line estimations of the statistics inside each block. Its efficiency is tested when coding dynamic and static scans from two PET scanners and reaches asymptotically the entropy limit for long frames. For very short 3D frames, the new algorithm is twice more efficient than LZ. Since an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) implementing a similar UVLC scheme is available today, a similar one should be able to sustain PET data lossless compression and decompression at a rate of 27 MBytes/sec. This algorithm is consequently a good candidate for the next generation of lossless compression engine.

  17. Lossless compression for 3D PET

    SciTech Connect

    Macq, B.; Sibomana, M.; Coppens, A.; Bol, A.; Michel, C. . Telecommunication Lab.); Baker, K.; Jones, B. )

    1994-08-01

    A new adaptive scheme is proposed for the lossless compression of positron emission tomography (PET) sinogram data. The algorithm uses an adaptive differential pulse code modulator (ADPCM) followed by a universal variable length coder (UVLC). Contrasting with Lempel-Ziv (LZ), which operates on a whole sinogram, UVLC operates very efficiently on short data blocks. This is a major advantage for real-time implementation. The algorithm is adaptive and codes data after some on-line estimations of the statistics inside each block. Its efficiency is tested when coding dynamic and static scans from two PET scanners and reaches asymptotically the entropy limit for long frames. For very short 3D frames, the new algorithm is twice more efficient than LZ. Since an ASIC implementing a similar UVLC scheme is available today, a similar one should be able to sustain PET data lossless compression and decompression at a rate of 27 MBytes/sec. This algorithm is consequently a good candidate for the next generation of lossless compression engine.

  18. Forensic 3D scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles Q.; Small, Daniel E.; Peters, Ralph R.; Rigdon, J. B.

    2000-05-01

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a fieldable prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  19. 3D Printable Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-08

    In human being's history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today's personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite's linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C(-1) from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  20. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  1. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  2. 3D light scanning macrography.

    PubMed

    Huber, D; Keller, M; Robert, D

    2001-08-01

    The technique of 3D light scanning macrography permits the non-invasive surface scanning of small specimens at magnifications up to 200x. Obviating both the problem of limited depth of field inherent to conventional close-up macrophotography and the metallic coating required by scanning electron microscopy, 3D light scanning macrography provides three-dimensional digital images of intact specimens without the loss of colour, texture and transparency information. This newly developed technique offers a versatile, portable and cost-efficient method for the non-invasive digital and photographic documentation of small objects. Computer controlled device operation and digital image acquisition facilitate fast and accurate quantitative morphometric investigations, and the technique offers a broad field of research and educational applications in biological, medical and materials sciences. PMID:11489078

  3. 3D microscopy - new powerful tools in geomaterials characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauko Pranjić, Alenka; Mladenovič, Ana; Turk, Janez; Šajna, Aljoša; Čretnik, Janko

    2016-04-01

    Microtomography (microCT) is becoming more and more widely recognized in geological sciences as a powerful tool for the spatial characterization of rock and other geological materials. Together with 3D image analysis and other complementary techniques, it has the characteristics of an innovative and non-destructive 3D microscopical technique. On the other hand its main disadvantages are low availability (only a few geological laboratories are equipped with high resolution tomographs), the relatively high prices of testing connected with the use of an xray source, technical limitations connected to the resolution and imaging of certain materials, as well as timeconsuming and complex 3D image analysis, necessary for quantification of 3D tomographic data sets. In this work three examples are presented of optimal 3D microscopy analysis of geomaterials in construction such as porosity characterization of impregnated sandstone, aerated concrete and marble prone to bowing. Studies include processes of microCT imaging, 3D data analysis and fitting of data with complementary analysis, such as confocal microscopy, mercury porosimetry, gas sorption, optical/fluorescent microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Present work has been done in the frame of national research project 3D and 4D microscopy development of new powerful tools in geosciences (ARRS J1-7148) funded by Slovenian Research Agency.

  4. [Real time 3D echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Shiota, T.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients.

  5. [Real time 3D echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F; Shiota, T; Thomas, J D

    2001-07-01

    Three-dimensional representation of the heart is an old concern. Usually, 3D reconstruction of the cardiac mass is made by successive acquisition of 2D sections, the spatial localisation and orientation of which require complex guiding systems. More recently, the concept of volumetric acquisition has been introduced. A matricial emitter-receiver probe complex with parallel data processing provides instantaneous of a pyramidal 64 degrees x 64 degrees volume. The image is restituted in real time and is composed of 3 planes (planes B and C) which can be displaced in all spatial directions at any time during acquisition. The flexibility of this system of acquisition allows volume and mass measurement with greater accuracy and reproducibility, limiting inter-observer variability. Free navigation of the planes of investigation allows reconstruction for qualitative and quantitative analysis of valvular heart disease and other pathologies. Although real time 3D echocardiography is ready for clinical usage, some improvements are still necessary to improve its conviviality. Then real time 3D echocardiography could be the essential tool for understanding, diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:11494630

  6. The 3D representation of the new transformation from the terrestrial to the celestial system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehant, V.; de Viron, O.; Capitaine, N.

    2006-08-01

    To study the sky from the Earth or to use navigation satellites, we need two reference systems, a celestial reference system, as fixed as possible with respect to the inertial frame, and a terrestrial reference system, rotating with the Earth. Additionally, we need a way to go from one reference system to the other. This transformation involves the Earth rotation rate, the polar motion, and the precession-nutation. This transformation is done using an intermediate system, in which the Earth rotation it-self is corrected for. Previously one used an intermediate system related to the equinox; the new paradigm involved a point, denoted the Celestial Intermediate Origin (CIO), which, due to its kinematical property of "Non Rotating Origin", allows better describing the length-of-day of the Earth. The use or not of the CIO only affects this intermediate frame. The new transformation system involving the CIO is additionally much simpler. Moreover, the use of the CIO allows an elegant separation between the polar motion, the precession nutation and the rotation rate variation. In this presentation we will show 3D representations that explain all this.

  7. DYNA3D. Explicit 3-d Hydrodynamic FEM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.; Englemann, B.E. )

    1993-11-30

    DYNA3D is an explicit, three-dimensional, finite element program for analyzing the large deformation dynamic response of inelastic solids and structures. DYNA3D contains 30 material models and 10 equations of state (EOS) to cover a wide range of material behavior. The material models implemented are: elastic, orthotropic elastic, kinematic/isotropic plasticity, thermoelastoplastic, soil and crushable foam, linear viscoelastic, Blatz-Ko rubber, high explosive burn, hydrodynamic without deviatoric stresses, elastoplastic hydrodynamic, temperature-dependent elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic, isotropic elastoplastic with failure, soil and crushable foam with failure, Johnson/Cook plasticity model, pseudo TENSOR geological model, elastoplastic with fracture, power law isotropic plasticity, strain rate dependent plasticity, rigid, thermal orthotropic, composite damage model, thermal orthotropic with 12 curves, piecewise linear isotropic plasticity, inviscid two invariant geologic cap, orthotropic crushable model, Moonsy-Rivlin rubber, resultant plasticity, closed form update shell plasticity, and Frazer-Nash rubber model. The hydrodynamic material models determine only the deviatoric stresses. Pressure is determined by one of 10 equations of state including linear polynomial, JWL high explosive, Sack Tuesday high explosive, Gruneisen, ratio of polynomials, linear polynomial with energy deposition, ignition and growth of reaction in HE, tabulated compaction, tabulated, and TENSOR pore collapse. DYNA3D generates three binary output databases. One contains information for complete states at infrequent intervals; 50 to 100 states is typical. The second contains information for a subset of nodes and elements at frequent intervals; 1,000 to 10,000 states is typical. The last contains interface data for contact surfaces.

  8. Intensity-based 3D/2D registration for percutaneous intervention of major aorto-pulmonary collateral arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couet, Julien; Rivest-Henault, David; Miro, Joaquim; Lapierre, Chantal; Duong, Luc; Cheriet, Mohamed

    2012-02-01

    Percutaneous cardiac interventions rely mainly on the experience of the cardiologist to safely navigate inside soft tissues vessels under X-ray angiography guidance. Additional navigation guidance tool might contribute to improve reliability and safety of percutaneous procedures. This study focus on major aorta-pulmonary collateral arteries (MAPCAs) which are pediatric structures. We present a fully automatic intensity-based 3D/2D registration method that accurately maps pre-operatively acquired 3D tomographic vascular data of a newborn patient over intra-operatively acquired angiograms. The tomographic dataset 3D pose is evaluated by comparing the angiograms with simulated X-ray projections, computed from the pre-operative dataset with a proposed splatting-based projection technique. The rigid 3D pose is updated via a transformation matrix usually defined in respect of the C-Arm acquisition system reference frame, but it can also be defined in respect of the projection plane local reference frame. The optimization of the transformation is driven by two algorithms. First the hill climbing local search and secondly a proposed variant, the dense hill climbing. The latter makes the search space denser by considering the combinations of the registration parameters instead of neighboring solutions only. Although this study focused on the registration of pediatric structures, the same procedure could be applied for any cardiovascular structures involving CT-scan and X-ray angiography. Our preliminary results are promising that an accurate (3D TRE 0.265 +/- 0.647mm) and robust (99% success rate) bi-planes registration of the aorta and MAPCAs from a initial displacement up to 20mm and 20° can be obtained within a reasonable amount of time (13.7 seconds).

  9. Cross modality registration of video and magnetic tracker data for 3D appearance and structure modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Dusty; Chen, Chao-I.; Wang, Yuan-Fang

    2010-02-01

    The paper reports a fully-automated, cross-modality sensor data registration scheme between video and magnetic tracker data. This registration scheme is intended for use in computerized imaging systems to model the appearance, structure, and dimension of human anatomy in three dimensions (3D) from endoscopic videos, particularly colonoscopic videos, for cancer research and clinical practices. The proposed cross-modality calibration procedure operates this way: Before a colonoscopic procedure, the surgeon inserts a magnetic tracker into the working channel of the endoscope or otherwise fixes the tracker's position on the scope. The surgeon then maneuvers the scope-tracker assembly to view a checkerboard calibration pattern from a few different viewpoints for a few seconds. The calibration procedure is then completed, and the relative pose (translation and rotation) between the reference frames of the magnetic tracker and the scope is determined. During the colonoscopic procedure, the readings from the magnetic tracker are used to automatically deduce the pose (both position and orientation) of the scope's reference frame over time, without complicated image analysis. Knowing the scope movement over time then allows us to infer the 3D appearance and structure of the organs and tissues in the scene. While there are other well-established mechanisms for inferring the movement of the camera (scope) from images, they are often sensitive to mistakes in image analysis, error accumulation, and structure deformation. The proposed method using a magnetic tracker to establish the camera motion parameters thus provides a robust and efficient alternative for 3D model construction. Furthermore, the calibration procedure does not require special training nor use expensive calibration equipment (except for a camera calibration pattern-a checkerboard pattern-that can be printed on any laser or inkjet printer).

  10. Objective and subjective quality assessment of geometry compression of reconstructed 3D humans in a 3D virtual room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekuria, Rufael; Cesar, Pablo; Doumanis, Ioannis; Frisiello, Antonella

    2015-09-01

    Compression of 3D object based video is relevant for 3D Immersive applications. Nevertheless, the perceptual aspects of the degradation introduced by codecs for meshes and point clouds are not well understood. In this paper we evaluate the subjective and objective degradations introduced by such codecs in a state of art 3D immersive virtual room. In the 3D immersive virtual room, users are captured with multiple cameras, and their surfaces are reconstructed as photorealistic colored/textured 3D meshes or point clouds. To test the perceptual effect of compression and transmission, we render degraded versions with different frame rates in different contexts (near/far) in the scene. A quantitative subjective study with 16 users shows that negligible distortion of decoded surfaces compared to the original reconstructions can be achieved in the 3D virtual room. In addition, a qualitative task based analysis in a full prototype field trial shows increased presence, emotion, user and state recognition of the reconstructed 3D Human representation compared to animated computer avatars.

  11. 2D and 3D optical diagnostic techniques applied to Madonna dei Fusi by Leonardo da Vinci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, R.; Gambino, M. C.; Greco, M.; Marras, L.; Materazzi, M.; Pampaloni, E.; Pelagotti, A.; Pezzati, L.; Poggi, P.; Sanapo, C.

    2005-06-01

    3D measurement and modelling have been traditionally applied to statues, buildings, archeological sites or similar large structures, but rarely to paintings. Recently, however, 3D measurements have been performed successfully also on easel paintings, allowing to detect and document the painting's surface. We used 3D models to integrate the results of various 2D imaging techniques on a common reference frame. These applications show how the 3D shape information, complemented with 2D colour maps as well as with other types of sensory data, provide the most interesting information. The 3D data acquisition was carried out by means of two devices: a high-resolution laser micro-profilometer, composed of a commercial distance meter mounted on a scanning device, and a laser-line scanner. The 2D data acquisitions were carried out using a scanning device for simultaneous RGB colour imaging and IR reflectography, and a UV fluorescence multispectral image acquisition system. We present here the results of the techniques described, applied to the analysis of an important painting of the Italian Reinassance: `Madonna dei Fusi', attributed to Leonardo da Vinci.

  12. Social scaling of extrapersonal space: target objects are judged as closer when the reference frame is a human agent with available movement potentialities.

    PubMed

    Fini, C; Brass, M; Committeri, G

    2015-01-01

    Space perception depends on our motion potentialities and our intended actions are affected by space perception. Research on peripersonal space (the space in reaching distance) shows that we perceive an object as being closer when we (Witt, Proffitt, & Epstein, 2005; Witt & Proffitt, 2008) or another actor (Costantini, Ambrosini, Sinigaglia, & Gallese, 2011; Bloesch, Davoli, Roth, Brockmole, & Abrams, 2012) can interact with it. Similarly, an object only triggers specific movements when it is placed in our peripersonal space (Costantini, Ambrosini, Tieri, Sinigaglia, & Committeri, 2010) or in the other's peripersonal space (Costantini, Committeri, & Sinigaglia, 2011; Cardellicchio, Sinigaglia, & Costantini, 2013). Moreover, also the extrapersonal space (the space outside reaching distance) seems to be perceived in relation to our movement capabilities: the more effort it takes to cover a distance, the greater we perceive the distance to be (Proffitt, Stefanucci, Banton, & Epstein, 2003; Sugovic & Witt, 2013). However, not much is known about the influence of the other's movement potentialities on our extrapersonal space perception. Three experiments were carried out investigating the categorization of distance in extrapersonal space using human or non-human allocentric reference frames (RF). Subjects were asked to judge the distance ("Near" or "Far") of a target object (a beach umbrella) placed at progressively increasing or decreasing distances until a change from near to far or vice versa was reported. In the first experiment we found a significant "Near space extension" when the allocentric RF was a human virtual agent instead of a static, inanimate object. In the second experiment we tested whether the "Near space extension" depended on the anatomical structure of the RF or its movement potentialities by adding a wooden dummy. The "Near space extension" was only observed for the human agent but not for the dummy. Finally, to rule out the possibility that the

  13. Eruption Sites of LIPs of the Past 250 My With Respect to the slow/fast D" Boundary in Four Improved Reference Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsvik, T. H.; Smethurst, M. A.; Burke, K.; Steinberger, B.

    2005-05-01

    We have shown (Burke and Torsvik 2004) that nearly all of the Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) erupted on the Earth's surface during the past 250 My rose, at the time of their eruption, from the base of the mantle close to the 1 percent slow S-wave delta V contour of the D" zone. Here we report on the use of (1) Improved plate-circuitry (among PAC-ANT-AUS-MADAGAS-IND-SOAM-AFR) and (2) upgraded paleomagnetic data-sets to confirm and refine our results. In an attempt to establish whether rotation of LIPs to their sites at eruption can be used to learn something about mantle and core behavior over the past 250 My we have performed rotations on assumptions of: (1) a persistent geocentric axial magnetic dipole field, (2) a time-dependent non-dipole (octopole) magnetic field contribution (Torsvik and Van der Voo (2002), (3) a mantle wind contribution to mantle flow (Steinberger et al. 2004) and (4) a revised (new timescale) fixed hot-spot (no mantle wind) reference frame. Our test consisted of estimating how closely radials dropped from rotated LIP sets based on these four assumptions plotted to the 1 percent slow contour derived from seismic tomography. We compared S-wave tomographic models at the CMB and opted to use the SMEAN model (Becker and Boschi 2002) recognizing that other models are similar and that all have similar limitations. The mean deviation of the projected rotated LIPs from the 1 percent slow contour is 6 degrees at the CMB. The four different assumptions yield results between 6.5 and 5.5 degrees which seems unlikely to be a significant difference. Our conclusion is that it is not yet possible to discriminate among the four models of mantle and core behavior using our procedure. Becker, T.W and Boschi, L. 2002: A comparison of tomographic and geodynamic mantle models. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems 3, 2001GC000168. Burke, K. and Torsvik, T.H. 2004: Derivation of large igneous provinces of the past 200 million years from long-term heterogeneities in

  14. Social scaling of extrapersonal space: target objects are judged as closer when the reference frame is a human agent with available movement potentialities.

    PubMed

    Fini, C; Brass, M; Committeri, G

    2015-01-01

    Space perception depends on our motion potentialities and our intended actions are affected by space perception. Research on peripersonal space (the space in reaching distance) shows that we perceive an object as being closer when we (Witt, Proffitt, & Epstein, 2005; Witt & Proffitt, 2008) or another actor (Costantini, Ambrosini, Sinigaglia, & Gallese, 2011; Bloesch, Davoli, Roth, Brockmole, & Abrams, 2012) can interact with it. Similarly, an object only triggers specific movements when it is placed in our peripersonal space (Costantini, Ambrosini, Tieri, Sinigaglia, & Committeri, 2010) or in the other's peripersonal space (Costantini, Committeri, & Sinigaglia, 2011; Cardellicchio, Sinigaglia, & Costantini, 2013). Moreover, also the extrapersonal space (the space outside reaching distance) seems to be perceived in relation to our movement capabilities: the more effort it takes to cover a distance, the greater we perceive the distance to be (Proffitt, Stefanucci, Banton, & Epstein, 2003; Sugovic & Witt, 2013). However, not much is known about the influence of the other's movement potentialities on our extrapersonal space perception. Three experiments were carried out investigating the categorization of distance in extrapersonal space using human or non-human allocentric reference frames (RF). Subjects were asked to judge the distance ("Near" or "Far") of a target object (a beach umbrella) placed at progressively increasing or decreasing distances until a change from near to far or vice versa was reported. In the first experiment we found a significant "Near space extension" when the allocentric RF was a human virtual agent instead of a static, inanimate object. In the second experiment we tested whether the "Near space extension" depended on the anatomical structure of the RF or its movement potentialities by adding a wooden dummy. The "Near space extension" was only observed for the human agent but not for the dummy. Finally, to rule out the possibility that the

  15. Interactive 3D Mars Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The Interactive 3D Mars Visualization system provides high-performance, immersive visualization of satellite and surface vehicle imagery of Mars. The software can be used in mission operations to provide the most accurate position information for the Mars rovers to date. When integrated into the mission data pipeline, this system allows mission planners to view the location of the rover on Mars to 0.01-meter accuracy with respect to satellite imagery, with dynamic updates to incorporate the latest position information. Given this information so early in the planning process, rover drivers are able to plan more accurate drive activities for the rover than ever before, increasing the execution of science activities significantly. Scientifically, this 3D mapping information puts all of the science analyses to date into geologic context on a daily basis instead of weeks or months, as was the norm prior to this contribution. This allows the science planners to judge the efficacy of their previously executed science observations much more efficiently, and achieve greater science return as a result. The Interactive 3D Mars surface view is a Mars terrain browsing software interface that encompasses the entire region of exploration for a Mars surface exploration mission. The view is interactive, allowing the user to pan in any direction by clicking and dragging, or to zoom in or out by scrolling the mouse or touchpad. This set currently includes tools for selecting a point of interest, and a ruler tool for displaying the distance between and positions of two points of interest. The mapping information can be harvested and shared through ubiquitous online mapping tools like Google Mars, NASA WorldWind, and Worldwide Telescope.

  16. 3D Printed Shelby Cobra

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie

    2015-01-09

    ORNL's newly printed 3D Shelby Cobra was showcased at the 2015 NAIAS in Detroit. This "laboratory on wheels" uses the Shelby Cobra design, celebrating the 50th anniversary of this model and honoring the first vehicle to be voted a national monument. The Shelby was printed at the Department of Energy’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at ORNL using the BAAM (Big Area Additive Manufacturing) machine and is intended as a “plug-n-play” laboratory on wheels. The Shelby will allow research and development of integrated components to be tested and enhanced in real time, improving the use of sustainable, digital manufacturing solutions in the automotive industry.

  17. Damage and deterioration monitoring of artwork by data fusion of 3D surface and hyperspectral measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, Roger M.; Caballero, José; Quinzan, Ianisse; Ribes-Gómez, Emilio

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes the processing algorithm methodology and preliminary results from a novel optical-based system for the assessment of chemical and mechanical deterioration of artworks. The FP7 Syddarta Project prototype is composed of two optical channels: 1) a 3D imaging channel which acquires 3D surface data and multiband information in the visible spectral range; 2) an infrared hyperspectral imaging channel in the spectral range 900 to 2500 nm. The processing algorithms developed perform the system calibration, damage detection and chemical deterioration analysis. Both photometric and geometric calibrations have been implemented. The photometric calibration is based on a white reference and intensity map and compensates for variation in light intensities. The geometric calibration is based on planar homographies to determine the interior and exterior orientation of the projector and the two cameras. This is used to map the acquired data of the different sensors into a single reference frame. To acquire 3D data, a set of phase-shifted fringe patterns is projected on the object which are processed by Fourier transform. To identify mechanical deterioration, the acquired 3D cloud of points is meshed and differences in surface normals for a given radius are computed. To analyse the chemical deterioration of the pigments a supervised classification method has been implemented. First of all, spectral data is normalized with the Extended Multiplicative Scatter Correction algorithm. Then, data dimensionality is reduced by applying Principal Component Analysis and classification is done with Support Vector Machine. Results are presented showing the performance of the described algorithms.

  18. Positional Awareness Map 3D (PAM3D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Monica; Allen, Earl L.; Yount, John W.; Norcross, April Louise

    2012-01-01

    The Western Aeronautical Test Range of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Dryden Flight Research Center needed to address the aging software and hardware of its current situational awareness display application, the Global Real-Time Interactive Map (GRIM). GRIM was initially developed in the late 1980s and executes on older PC architectures using a Linux operating system that is no longer supported. Additionally, the software is difficult to maintain due to its complexity and loss of developer knowledge. It was decided that a replacement application must be developed or acquired in the near future. The replacement must provide the functionality of the original system, the ability to monitor test flight vehicles in real-time, and add improvements such as high resolution imagery and true 3-dimensional capability. This paper will discuss the process of determining the best approach to replace GRIM, and the functionality and capabilities of the first release of the Positional Awareness Map 3D.

  19. 3D object hiding using three-dimensional ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Zhibo; Li, Tuo; Pan, An; Wang, Yali; Shi, Yishi

    2016-09-01

    We present a novel technique for 3D object hiding by applying three-dimensional ptychography. Compared with 3D information hiding based on holography, the proposed ptychography-based hiding technique is easier to implement, because the reference beam and high-precision interferometric optical setup are not required. The acquisition of the 3D object and the ptychographic encoding process are performed optically. Owing to the introduction of probe keys, the security of the ptychography-based hiding system is significantly enhanced. A series of experiments and simulations demonstrate the feasibility and imperceptibility of the proposed method.

  20. 3D acoustic atmospheric tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Finn, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing spatially varying 3D atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based. Measurements of the acoustic signature measured onboard a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are compared to ground-based observations of the same signals. The frequency-shifted signal variations are then used to estimate the acoustic propagation delay between the UAV and the ground microphones, which are also affected by atmospheric temperature and wind speed vectors along each sound ray path. The wind and temperature profiles are modelled as the weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions (RBFs), which also allow local meteorological measurements made at the UAV and ground receivers to supplement any acoustic observations. Tomography is used to provide a full 3D reconstruction/visualisation of the observed atmosphere. The technique offers observational mobility under direct user control and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. This paper summarises the tomographic technique and reports on the results of simulations and initial field trials. The technique has practical applications for atmospheric research, sound propagation studies, boundary layer meteorology, air pollution measurements, analysis of wind shear, and wind farm surveys.

  1. Gravitation in 3D Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubenstein, John; Cockream, Kandi

    2009-05-01

    3D spacetime was developed by the IWPD Scale Metrics (SM) team using a coordinate system that translates n dimensions to n-1. 4-vectors are expressed in 3D along with a scaling factor representing time. Time is not orthogonal to the three spatial dimensions, but rather in alignment with an object's axis-of-motion. We have defined this effect as the object's ``orientation'' (X). The SM orientation (X) is equivalent to the orientation of the 4-velocity vector positioned tangent to its worldline, where X-1=θ+1 and θ is the angle of the 4-vector relative to the axis-of -motion. Both 4-vectors and SM appear to represent valid conceptualizations of the relationship between space and time. Why entertain SM? Scale Metrics gravity is quantized and may suggest a path for the full unification of gravitation with quantum theory. SM has been tested against current observation and is in agreement with the age of the universe, suggests a physical relationship between dark energy and dark matter, is in agreement with the accelerating expansion rate of the universe, contributes to the understanding of the fine-structure constant and provides a physical explanation of relativistic effects.

  2. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  3. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  4. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  5. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-01-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C−1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process. PMID:26153673

  6. 3D Printable Graphene Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaojun; Li, Dong; Jiang, Wei; Gu, Zheming; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Zengxing; Sun, Zhengzong

    2015-07-01

    In human being’s history, both the Iron Age and Silicon Age thrived after a matured massive processing technology was developed. Graphene is the most recent superior material which could potentially initialize another new material Age. However, while being exploited to its full extent, conventional processing methods fail to provide a link to today’s personalization tide. New technology should be ushered in. Three-dimensional (3D) printing fills the missing linkage between graphene materials and the digital mainstream. Their alliance could generate additional stream to push the graphene revolution into a new phase. Here we demonstrate for the first time, a graphene composite, with a graphene loading up to 5.6 wt%, can be 3D printable into computer-designed models. The composite’s linear thermal coefficient is below 75 ppm·°C-1 from room temperature to its glass transition temperature (Tg), which is crucial to build minute thermal stress during the printing process.

  7. LOTT RANCH 3D PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Lawrence; Bruce Miller

    2004-09-01

    The Lott Ranch 3D seismic prospect located in Garza County, Texas is a project initiated in September of 1991 by the J.M. Huber Corp., a petroleum exploration and production company. By today's standards the 126 square mile project does not seem monumental, however at the time it was conceived it was the most intensive land 3D project ever attempted. Acquisition began in September of 1991 utilizing GEO-SEISMIC, INC., a seismic data contractor. The field parameters were selected by J.M. Huber, and were of a radical design. The recording instruments used were GeoCor IV amplifiers designed by Geosystems Inc., which record the data in signed bit format. It would not have been practical, if not impossible, to have processed the entire raw volume with the tools available at that time. The end result was a dataset that was thought to have little utility due to difficulties in processing the field data. In 1997, Yates Energy Corp. located in Roswell, New Mexico, formed a partnership to further develop the project. Through discussions and meetings with Pinnacle Seismic, it was determined that the original Lott Ranch 3D volume could be vastly improved upon reprocessing. Pinnacle Seismic had shown the viability of improving field-summed signed bit data on smaller 2D and 3D projects. Yates contracted Pinnacle Seismic Ltd. to perform the reprocessing. This project was initiated with high resolution being a priority. Much of the potential resolution was lost through the initial summing of the field data. Modern computers that are now being utilized have tremendous speed and storage capacities that were cost prohibitive when this data was initially processed. Software updates and capabilities offer a variety of quality control and statics resolution, which are pertinent to the Lott Ranch project. The reprocessing effort was very successful. The resulting processed data-set was then interpreted using modern PC-based interpretation and mapping software. Production data, log data

  8. A dynamic 3D foot reconstruction system.

    PubMed

    Thabet, Ali K; Trucco, Emanuele; Salvi, Joaquim; Wang, Weijie; Abboud, Rami J

    2011-01-01

    Foot problems are varied and range from simple disorders through to complex diseases and joint deformities. Wherever possible, the use of insoles, or orthoses, is preferred over surgery. Current insole design techniques are based on static measurements of the foot, despite the fact that orthoses are prevalently used in dynamic conditions while walking or running. This paper presents the design and implementation of a structured-light prototype system providing dense three dimensional (3D) measurements of the foot in motion, and its use to show that foot measurements in dynamic conditions differ significantly from their static counterparts. The input to the system is a video sequence of a foot during a single step; the output is a 3D reconstruction of the plantar surface of the foot for each frame of the input. Engineering and clinical tests were carried out for the validation of the system. The accuracy of the system was found to be 0.34 mm with planar test objects. In tests with real feet, the system proved repeatable, with reconstruction differences between trials one week apart averaging 2.44 mm (static case) and 2.81 mm (dynamic case). Furthermore, a study was performed to compare the effective length of the foot between static and dynamic reconstructions using the 4D system. Results showed an average increase of 9 mm for the dynamic case. This increase is substantial for orthotics design, cannot be captured by a static system, and its subject-specific measurement is crucial for the design of effective foot orthoses.

  9. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction.

  10. 3D Printing of Graphene Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Zhang, Feng; Medarametla, Sai Pradeep; Li, Hui; Zhou, Chi; Lin, Dong

    2016-04-01

    3D printing of a graphene aerogel with true 3D overhang structures is highlighted. The aerogel is fabricated by combining drop-on-demand 3D printing and freeze casting. The water-based GO ink is ejected and freeze-cast into designed 3D structures. The lightweight (<10 mg cm(-3) ) 3D printed graphene aerogel presents superelastic and high electrical conduction. PMID:26861680

  11. 3D-Printing for Analytical Ultracentrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Abhiksha; Krynitsky, Jonathan; Pohida, Thomas J.; Zhao, Huaying

    2016-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a classical technique of physical biochemistry providing information on size, shape, and interactions of macromolecules from the analysis of their migration in centrifugal fields while free in solution. A key mechanical element in AUC is the centerpiece, a component of the sample cell assembly that is mounted between the optical windows to allow imaging and to seal the sample solution column against high vacuum while exposed to gravitational forces in excess of 300,000 g. For sedimentation velocity it needs to be precisely sector-shaped to allow unimpeded radial macromolecular migration. During the history of AUC a great variety of centerpiece designs have been developed for different types of experiments. Here, we report that centerpieces can now be readily fabricated by 3D printing at low cost, from a variety of materials, and with customized designs. The new centerpieces can exhibit sufficient mechanical stability to withstand the gravitational forces at the highest rotor speeds and be sufficiently precise for sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity experiments. Sedimentation velocity experiments with bovine serum albumin as a reference molecule in 3D printed centerpieces with standard double-sector design result in sedimentation boundaries virtually indistinguishable from those in commercial double-sector epoxy centerpieces, with sedimentation coefficients well within the range of published values. The statistical error of the measurement is slightly above that obtained with commercial epoxy, but still below 1%. Facilitated by modern open-source design and fabrication paradigms, we believe 3D printed centerpieces and AUC accessories can spawn a variety of improvements in AUC experimental design, efficiency and resource allocation. PMID:27525659

  12. 3D-Printing for Analytical Ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Desai, Abhiksha; Krynitsky, Jonathan; Pohida, Thomas J; Zhao, Huaying; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a classical technique of physical biochemistry providing information on size, shape, and interactions of macromolecules from the analysis of their migration in centrifugal fields while free in solution. A key mechanical element in AUC is the centerpiece, a component of the sample cell assembly that is mounted between the optical windows to allow imaging and to seal the sample solution column against high vacuum while exposed to gravitational forces in excess of 300,000 g. For sedimentation velocity it needs to be precisely sector-shaped to allow unimpeded radial macromolecular migration. During the history of AUC a great variety of centerpiece designs have been developed for different types of experiments. Here, we report that centerpieces can now be readily fabricated by 3D printing at low cost, from a variety of materials, and with customized designs. The new centerpieces can exhibit sufficient mechanical stability to withstand the gravitational forces at the highest rotor speeds and be sufficiently precise for sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity experiments. Sedimentation velocity experiments with bovine serum albumin as a reference molecule in 3D printed centerpieces with standard double-sector design result in sedimentation boundaries virtually indistinguishable from those in commercial double-sector epoxy centerpieces, with sedimentation coefficients well within the range of published values. The statistical error of the measurement is slightly above that obtained with commercial epoxy, but still below 1%. Facilitated by modern open-source design and fabrication paradigms, we believe 3D printed centerpieces and AUC accessories can spawn a variety of improvements in AUC experimental design, efficiency and resource allocation.

  13. 3D-Printing for Analytical Ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Desai, Abhiksha; Krynitsky, Jonathan; Pohida, Thomas J; Zhao, Huaying; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a classical technique of physical biochemistry providing information on size, shape, and interactions of macromolecules from the analysis of their migration in centrifugal fields while free in solution. A key mechanical element in AUC is the centerpiece, a component of the sample cell assembly that is mounted between the optical windows to allow imaging and to seal the sample solution column against high vacuum while exposed to gravitational forces in excess of 300,000 g. For sedimentation velocity it needs to be precisely sector-shaped to allow unimpeded radial macromolecular migration. During the history of AUC a great variety of centerpiece designs have been developed for different types of experiments. Here, we report that centerpieces can now be readily fabricated by 3D printing at low cost, from a variety of materials, and with customized designs. The new centerpieces can exhibit sufficient mechanical stability to withstand the gravitational forces at the highest rotor speeds and be sufficiently precise for sedimentation equilibrium and sedimentation velocity experiments. Sedimentation velocity experiments with bovine serum albumin as a reference molecule in 3D printed centerpieces with standard double-sector design result in sedimentation boundaries virtually indistinguishable from those in commercial double-sector epoxy centerpieces, with sedimentation coefficients well within the range of published values. The statistical error of the measurement is slightly above that obtained with commercial epoxy, but still below 1%. Facilitated by modern open-source design and fabrication paradigms, we believe 3D printed centerpieces and AUC accessories can spawn a variety of improvements in AUC experimental design, efficiency and resource allocation. PMID:27525659

  14. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  15. 3D Elastic Wavefield Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, L.; Warner, M.; Stekl, I.; Umpleby, A.; Shah, N.

    2010-12-01

    Wavefield tomography, or waveform inversion, aims to extract the maximum information from seismic data by matching trace by trace the response of the solid earth to seismic waves using numerical modelling tools. Its first formulation dates from the early 80's, when Albert Tarantola developed a solid theoretical basis that is still used today with little change. Due to computational limitations, the application of the method to 3D problems has been unaffordable until a few years ago, and then only under the acoustic approximation. Although acoustic wavefield tomography is widely used, a complete solution of the seismic inversion problem requires that we account properly for the physics of wave propagation, and so must include elastic effects. We have developed a 3D tomographic wavefield inversion code that incorporates the full elastic wave equation. The bottle neck of the different implementations is the forward modelling algorithm that generates the synthetic data to be compared with the field seismograms as well as the backpropagation of the residuals needed to form the direction update of the model parameters. Furthermore, one or two extra modelling runs are needed in order to calculate the step-length. Our approach uses a FD scheme explicit time-stepping by finite differences that are 4th order in space and 2nd order in time, which is a 3D version of the one developed by Jean Virieux in 1986. We chose the time domain because an explicit time scheme is much less demanding in terms of memory than its frequency domain analogue, although the discussion of wich domain is more efficient still remains open. We calculate the parameter gradients for Vp and Vs by correlating the normal and shear stress wavefields respectively. A straightforward application would lead to the storage of the wavefield at all grid points at each time-step. We tackled this problem using two different approaches. The first one makes better use of resources for small models of dimension equal

  16. Conducting Polymer 3D Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Sasso, Luigi; Vazquez, Patricia; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Castillo-León, Jaime; Emnéus, Jenny; Svendsen, Winnie E.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting polymer 3D microelectrodes have been fabricated for possible future neurological applications. A combination of micro-fabrication techniques and chemical polymerization methods has been used to create pillar electrodes in polyaniline and polypyrrole. The thin polymer films obtained showed uniformity and good adhesion to both horizontal and vertical surfaces. Electrodes in combination with metal/conducting polymer materials have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry and the presence of the conducting polymer film has shown to increase the electrochemical activity when compared with electrodes coated with only metal. An electrochemical characterization of gold/polypyrrole electrodes showed exceptional electrochemical behavior and activity. PC12 cells were finally cultured on the investigated materials as a preliminary biocompatibility assessment. These results show that the described electrodes are possibly suitable for future in-vitro neurological measurements. PMID:22163508

  17. ShowMe3D

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from themore » displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.« less

  18. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    wavelengths. Since the amount of the wavelength shift is related to the speed of motion, one can determine how fast the debris are moving in either direction. Because Cas A is the result of an explosion, the stellar debris is expanding radially outwards from the explosion center. Using simple geometry, the scientists were able to construct a 3-D model using all of this information. A program called 3-D Slicer modified for astronomical use by the Astronomical Medicine Project at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. was used to display and manipulate the 3-D model. Commercial software was then used to create the 3-D fly-through.

    The blue filaments defining the blast wave were not mapped using the Doppler effect because they emit a different kind of light synchrotron radiation that does not emit light at discrete wavelengths, but rather in a broad continuum. The blue filaments are only a representation of the actual filaments observed at the blast wave.

    This visualization shows that there are two main components to this supernova remnant: a spherical component in the outer parts of the remnant and a flattened (disk-like) component in the inner region. The spherical component consists of the outer layer of the star that exploded, probably made of helium and carbon. These layers drove a spherical blast wave into the diffuse gas surrounding the star. The flattened component that astronomers were unable to map into 3-D prior to these Spitzer observations consists of the inner layers of the star. It is made from various heavier elements, not all shown in the visualization, such as oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, argon and iron.

    High-velocity plumes, or jets, of this material are shooting out from the explosion in the plane of the disk-like component mentioned above. Plumes of silicon appear in the northeast and southwest, while those of iron are seen in the southeast and north. These jets were already known and Doppler velocity measurements have been made for these

  19. Gis-Based Smart Cartography Using 3d Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinverni, E. S.; Tassetti, A. N.

    2013-08-01

    3D City Models have evolved to be important tools for urban decision processes and information systems, especially in planning, simulation, analysis, documentation and heritage management. On the other hand existing and in use numerical cartography is often not suitable to be used in GIS because not geometrically and topologically correctly structured. The research aim is to 3D structure and organize a numeric cartography for GIS and turn it into CityGML standardized features. The work is framed around a first phase of methodological analysis aimed to underline which existing standard (like ISO and OGC rules) can be used to improve the quality requirement of a cartographic structure. Subsequently, from this technical specifics, it has been investigated the translation in formal contents, using an owner interchange software (SketchUp), to support some guide lines implementations to generate a GIS3D structured in GML3. It has been therefore predisposed a test three-dimensional numerical cartography (scale 1:500, generated from range data captured by 3D laser scanner), tested on its quality according to the previous standard and edited when and where necessary. Cad files and shapefiles are converted into a final 3D model (Google SketchUp model) and then exported into a 3D city model (CityGML LoD1/LoD2). The GIS3D structure has been managed in a GIS environment to run further spatial analysis and energy performance estimate, not achievable in a 2D environment. In particular geometrical building parameters (footprint, volume etc.) are computed and building envelop thermal characteristics are derived from. Lastly, a simulation is carried out to deal with asbestos and home renovating charges and show how the built 3D city model can support municipal managers with risk diagnosis of the present situation and development of strategies for a sustainable redevelop.

  20. An Evaluative Review of Simulated Dynamic Smart 3d Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeijn, H.; Sheth, F.; Pettit, C. J.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) modelling of plants can be an asset for creating agricultural based visualisation products. The continuum of 3D plants models ranges from static to dynamic objects, also known as smart 3D objects. There is an increasing requirement for smarter simulated 3D objects that are attributed mathematically and/or from biological inputs. A systematic approach to plant simulation offers significant advantages to applications in agricultural research, particularly in simulating plant behaviour and the influences of external environmental factors. This approach of 3D plant object visualisation is primarily evident from the visualisation of plants using photographed billboarded images, to more advanced procedural models that come closer to simulating realistic virtual plants. However, few programs model physical reactions of plants to external factors and even fewer are able to grow plants based on mathematical and/or biological parameters. In this paper, we undertake an evaluation of plant-based object simulation programs currently available, with a focus upon the components and techniques involved in producing these objects. Through an analytical review process we consider the strengths and weaknesses of several program packages, the features and use of these programs and the possible opportunities in deploying these for creating smart 3D plant-based objects to support agricultural research and natural resource management. In creating smart 3D objects the model needs to be informed by both plant physiology and phenology. Expert knowledge will frame the parameters and procedures that will attribute the object and allow the simulation of dynamic virtual plants. Ultimately, biologically smart 3D virtual plants that react to changes within an environment could be an effective medium to visually represent landscapes and communicate land management scenarios and practices to planners and decision-makers.